Science.gov

Sample records for subject classification schemes

  1. Cross-ontological analytics for alignment of different classification schemes

    DOEpatents

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M; Baddeley, Robert L

    2010-09-28

    Quantification of the similarity between nodes in multiple electronic classification schemes is provided by automatically identifying relationships and similarities between nodes within and across the electronic classification schemes. Quantifying the similarity between a first node in a first electronic classification scheme and a second node in a second electronic classification scheme involves finding a third node in the first electronic classification scheme, wherein a first product value of an inter-scheme similarity value between the second and third nodes and an intra-scheme similarity value between the first and third nodes is a maximum. A fourth node in the second electronic classification scheme can be found, wherein a second product value of an inter-scheme similarity value between the first and fourth nodes and an intra-scheme similarity value between the second and fourth nodes is a maximum. The maximum between the first and second product values represents a measure of similarity between the first and second nodes.

  2. A Computerized English-Spanish Correlation Index to Five Biomedical Library Classification Schemes Based on MeSH*

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Eugene V.

    1971-01-01

    A computerized English/Spanish correlation index to five biomedical library classification schemes and a computerized English/Spanish, Spanish/English listings of MeSH are described. The index was accomplished by supplying appropriate classification numbers of five classification schemes (National Library of Medicine; Library of Congress; Dewey Decimal; Cunningham; Boston Medical) to MeSH and a Spanish translation of MeSH The data were keypunched, merged on magnetic tape, and sorted in a computer alphabetically by English and Spanish subject headings and sequentially by classification number. Some benefits and uses of the index are: a complete index to classification schemes based on MeSH terms; a tool for conversion of classification numbers when reclassifying collections; a Spanish index and a crude Spanish translation of five classification schemes; a data base for future applications, e.g., automatic classification. Other classification schemes, such as the UDC, and translations of MeSH into other languages can be added. PMID:5172471

  3. Classification schemes for knowledge translation interventions: a practical resource for researchers.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Susan E; Zimmermann, Gabrielle L; Nuspl, Megan; Hanson, Heather M; Albrecht, Lauren; Esmail, Rosmin; Sauro, Khara; Newton, Amanda S; Donald, Maoliosa; Dyson, Michele P; Thomson, Denise; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-12-06

    As implementation science advances, the number of interventions to promote the translation of evidence into healthcare, health systems, or health policy is growing. Accordingly, classification schemes for these knowledge translation (KT) interventions have emerged. A recent scoping review identified 51 classification schemes of KT interventions to integrate evidence into healthcare practice; however, the review did not evaluate the quality of the classification schemes or provide detailed information to assist researchers in selecting a scheme for their context and purpose. This study aimed to further examine and assess the quality of these classification schemes of KT interventions, and provide information to aid researchers when selecting a classification scheme. We abstracted the following information from each of the original 51 classification scheme articles: authors' objectives; purpose of the scheme and field of application; socioecologic level (individual, organizational, community, system); adaptability (broad versus specific); target group (patients, providers, policy-makers), intent (policy, education, practice), and purpose (dissemination versus implementation). Two reviewers independently evaluated the methodological quality of the development of each classification scheme using an adapted version of the AGREE II tool. Based on these assessments, two independent reviewers reached consensus about whether to recommend each scheme for researcher use, or not. Of the 51 original classification schemes, we excluded seven that were not specific classification schemes, not accessible or duplicates. Of the remaining 44 classification schemes, nine were not recommended. Of the 35 recommended classification schemes, ten focused on behaviour change and six focused on population health. Many schemes (n = 29) addressed practice considerations. Fewer schemes addressed educational or policy objectives. Twenty-five classification schemes had broad applicability

  4. Discovery of User-Oriented Class Associations for Enriching Library Classification Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Hsiao-Tieh

    2002-01-01

    Presents a user-based approach to exploring the possibility of adding user-oriented class associations to hierarchical library classification schemes. Classes not grouped in the same subject hierarchies yet relevant to users' knowledge are obtained by analyzing a log book of a university library's circulation records, using collaborative filtering…

  5. A classification scheme for risk assessment methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Stamp, Jason Edwin; Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2004-08-01

    This report presents a classification scheme for risk assessment methods. This scheme, like all classification schemes, provides meaning by imposing a structure that identifies relationships. Our scheme is based on two orthogonal aspects--level of detail, and approach. The resulting structure is shown in Table 1 and is explained in the body of the report. Each cell in the Table represent a different arrangement of strengths and weaknesses. Those arrangements shift gradually as one moves through the table, each cell optimal for a particular situation. The intention of this report is to enable informed use of the methods so that amore » method chosen is optimal for a situation given. This report imposes structure on the set of risk assessment methods in order to reveal their relationships and thus optimize their usage.We present a two-dimensional structure in the form of a matrix, using three abstraction levels for the rows and three approaches for the columns. For each of the nine cells in the matrix we identify the method type by name and example. The matrix helps the user understand: (1) what to expect from a given method, (2) how it relates to other methods, and (3) how best to use it. Each cell in the matrix represent a different arrangement of strengths and weaknesses. Those arrangements shift gradually as one moves through the table, each cell optimal for a particular situation. The intention of this report is to enable informed use of the methods so that a method chosen is optimal for a situation given. The matrix, with type names in the cells, is introduced in Table 2 on page 13 below. Unless otherwise stated we use the word 'method' in this report to refer to a 'risk assessment method', though often times we use the full phrase. The use of the terms 'risk assessment' and 'risk management' are close enough that we do not attempt to distinguish them in this report. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. In Section 2 we provide context for

  6. Enriching User-Oriented Class Associations for Library Classification Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Hsiao-Tieh; Yang, Chyan

    2003-01-01

    Explores the possibility of adding user-oriented class associations to hierarchical library classification schemes. Analyses a log of book circulation records from a university library in Taiwan and shows that classification schemes can be made more adaptable by analyzing circulation patterns of similar users. (Author/LRW)

  7. Evaluation of effectiveness of wavelet based denoising schemes using ANN and SVM for bearing condition classification.

    PubMed

    Vijay, G S; Kumar, H S; Srinivasa Pai, P; Sriram, N S; Rao, Raj B K N

    2012-01-01

    The wavelet based denoising has proven its ability to denoise the bearing vibration signals by improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reducing the root-mean-square error (RMSE). In this paper seven wavelet based denoising schemes have been evaluated based on the performance of the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and the Support Vector Machine (SVM), for the bearing condition classification. The work consists of two parts, the first part in which a synthetic signal simulating the defective bearing vibration signal with Gaussian noise was subjected to these denoising schemes. The best scheme based on the SNR and the RMSE was identified. In the second part, the vibration signals collected from a customized Rolling Element Bearing (REB) test rig for four bearing conditions were subjected to these denoising schemes. Several time and frequency domain features were extracted from the denoised signals, out of which a few sensitive features were selected using the Fisher's Criterion (FC). Extracted features were used to train and test the ANN and the SVM. The best denoising scheme identified, based on the classification performances of the ANN and the SVM, was found to be the same as the one obtained using the synthetic signal.

  8. A Classification Scheme for Smart Manufacturing Systems’ Performance Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y. Tina; Kumaraguru, Senthilkumaran; Jain, Sanjay; Robinson, Stefanie; Helu, Moneer; Hatim, Qais Y.; Rachuri, Sudarsan; Dornfeld, David; Saldana, Christopher J.; Kumara, Soundar

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a classification scheme for performance metrics for smart manufacturing systems. The discussion focuses on three such metrics: agility, asset utilization, and sustainability. For each of these metrics, we discuss classification themes, which we then use to develop a generalized classification scheme. In addition to the themes, we discuss a conceptual model that may form the basis for the information necessary for performance evaluations. Finally, we present future challenges in developing robust, performance-measurement systems for real-time, data-intensive enterprises. PMID:28785744

  9. Proposed new classification scheme for chemical injury to the human eye.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Daniel M; Casterton, Phillip L; Dressler, William E; Edelhauser, Henry F; Kruszewski, Francis H; McCulley, James P; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Osborne, Rosemarie; Rothenstein, Arthur; Stitzel, Katherine A; Thomas, Karluss; Ward, Sherry L

    2006-07-01

    Various ocular alkali burn classification schemes have been published and used to grade human chemical eye injuries for the purpose of identifying treatments and forecasting outcomes. The ILSI chemical eye injury classification scheme was developed for the additional purpose of collecting detailed human eye injury data to provide information on the mechanisms associated with chemical eye injuries. This information will have clinical application, as well as use in the development and validation of new methods to assess ocular toxicity. A panel of ophthalmic researchers proposed the new classification scheme based upon current knowledge of the mechanisms of eye injury, and their collective clinical and research experience. Additional ophthalmologists and researchers were surveyed to critique the scheme. The draft scheme was revised, and the proposed scheme represents the best consensus from at least 23 physicians and scientists. The new scheme classifies chemical eye injury into five categories based on clinical signs, symptoms, and expected outcomes. Diagnostic classification is based primarily on two clinical endpoints: (1) the extent (area) of injury at the limbus, and (2) the degree of injury (area and depth) to the cornea. The new classification scheme provides a uniform system for scoring eye injury across chemical classes, and provides enough detail for the clinician to collect data that will be relevant to identifying the mechanisms of ocular injury.

  10. Subject Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gayle; And Others

    Three newspaper librarians described how they manage the files of newspaper clippings which are a necessary part of their collections. The development of a new subject classification system for the clippings files was outlined. The new subject headings were based on standard subject heading lists and on local need. It was decided to use a computer…

  11. 15 CFR Appendix I to Part 921 - Biogeographic Classification Scheme

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biogeographic Classification Scheme I Appendix I to Part 921 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Part 921—Biogeographic Classification Scheme Acadian 1. Northern of Maine (Eastport to the Sheepscot...

  12. 15 CFR Appendix I to Part 921 - Biogeographic Classification Scheme

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biogeographic Classification Scheme I Appendix I to Part 921 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Part 921—Biogeographic Classification Scheme Acadian 1. Northern of Maine (Eastport to the Sheepscot...

  13. 15 CFR Appendix I to Part 921 - Biogeographic Classification Scheme

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biogeographic Classification Scheme I Appendix I to Part 921 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Part 921—Biogeographic Classification Scheme Acadian 1. Northern of Maine (Eastport to the Sheepscot...

  14. 15 CFR Appendix I to Part 921 - Biogeographic Classification Scheme

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biogeographic Classification Scheme I Appendix I to Part 921 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Part 921—Biogeographic Classification Scheme Acadian 1. Northern of Maine (Eastport to the Sheepscot...

  15. 15 CFR Appendix I to Part 921 - Biogeographic Classification Scheme

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biogeographic Classification Scheme I Appendix I to Part 921 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Part 921—Biogeographic Classification Scheme Acadian 1. Northern of Maine (Eastport to the Sheepscot...

  16. State of the Art in the Cramer Classification Scheme and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at the SOT FDA Colloquium on State of the Art in the Cramer Classification Scheme and Threshold of Toxicological Concern in College Park, MD. Slide presentation at the SOT FDA Colloquium on State of the Art in the Cramer Classification Scheme and Threshold of Toxicological Concern in College Park, MD.

  17. OBJECTIVE METEOROLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME DESIGNED TO ELUCIDATE OZONE'S DEPENDENCE ON METEOROLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper utilizes a two-stage clustering approach as part of an objective classification scheme designed to elucidate 03's dependence on meteorology. hen applied to ten years (1981-1990) of meteorological data for Birmingham, Alabama, the classification scheme identified seven ...

  18. 15 CFR 921.3 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. 921.3 Section 921.3 Commerce and... biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. (a) National Estuarine Research Reserves are... classification scheme based on regional variations in the nation's coastal zone has been developed. The...

  19. 15 CFR 921.3 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. 921.3 Section 921.3 Commerce and... biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. (a) National Estuarine Research Reserves are... classification scheme based on regional variations in the nation's coastal zone has been developed. The...

  20. 15 CFR 921.3 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. 921.3 Section 921.3 Commerce and... biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. (a) National Estuarine Research Reserves are... classification scheme based on regional variations in the nation's coastal zone has been developed. The...

  1. 15 CFR 921.3 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. 921.3 Section 921.3 Commerce and... biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. (a) National Estuarine Research Reserves are... classification scheme based on regional variations in the nation's coastal zone has been developed. The...

  2. 15 CFR 921.3 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. 921.3 Section 921.3 Commerce and... biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. (a) National Estuarine Research Reserves are... classification scheme based on regional variations in the nation's coastal zone has been developed. The...

  3. Towards a Collaborative Intelligent Tutoring System Classification Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsley, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel classification scheme for Collaborative Intelligent Tutoring Systems (CITS), an emergent research field. The three emergent classifications of CITS are unstructured, semi-structured, and fully structured. While all three types of CITS offer opportunities to improve student learning gains, the full extent to which these…

  4. A new classification scheme for periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions - Introduction and key changes from the 1999 classification.

    PubMed

    G Caton, Jack; Armitage, Gary; Berglundh, Tord; Chapple, Iain L C; Jepsen, Søren; S Kornman, Kenneth; L Mealey, Brian; Papapanou, Panos N; Sanz, Mariano; S Tonetti, Maurizio

    2018-06-01

    to align and update the classification scheme to the current understanding of periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions. This introductory overview presents the schematic tables for the new classification of periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions and briefly highlights changes made to the 1999 classification. It cannot present the wealth of information included in the reviews, case definition papers, and consensus reports that has guided the development of the new classification, and reference to the consensus and case definition papers is necessary to provide a thorough understanding of its use for either case management or scientific investigation. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that the reader use this overview as an introduction to these subjects. Accessing this publication online will allow the reader to use the links in this overview and the tables to view the source papers (Table ). © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology and European Federation of Periodontology.

  5. A new classification scheme for periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions - Introduction and key changes from the 1999 classification.

    PubMed

    G Caton, Jack; Armitage, Gary; Berglundh, Tord; Chapple, Iain L C; Jepsen, Søren; S Kornman, Kenneth; L Mealey, Brian; Papapanou, Panos N; Sanz, Mariano; S Tonetti, Maurizio

    2018-06-01

    to align and update the classification scheme to the current understanding of periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions. This introductory overview presents the schematic tables for the new classification of periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions and briefly highlights changes made to the 1999 classification. It cannot present the wealth of information included in the reviews, case definition papers, and consensus reports that has guided the development of the new classification, and reference to the consensus and case definition papers is necessary to provide a thorough understanding of its use for either case management or scientific investigation. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that the reader use this overview as an introduction to these subjects. Accessing this publication online will allow the reader to use the links in this overview and the tables to view the source papers (Table 1). © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology and European Federation of Periodontology.

  6. JOURNAL SCOPE GUIDELINES: Paper classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    This scheme is used to clarify the journal's scope and enable authors and readers to more easily locate the appropriate section for their work. For each of the sections listed in the scope statement we suggest some more detailed subject areas which help define that subject area. These lists are by no means exhaustive and are intended only as a guide to the type of papers we envisage appearing in each section. We acknowledge that no classification scheme can be perfect and that there are some papers which might be placed in more than one section. We are happy to provide further advice on paper classification to authors upon request (please email jphysa@iop.org). 1. Statistical physics numerical and computational methods statistical mechanics, phase transitions and critical phenomena quantum condensed matter theory Bose-Einstein condensation strongly correlated electron systems exactly solvable models in statistical mechanics lattice models, random walks and combinatorics field-theoretical models in statistical mechanics disordered systems, spin glasses and neural networks nonequilibrium systems network theory 2. Chaotic and complex systems nonlinear dynamics and classical chaos fractals and multifractals quantum chaos classical and quantum transport cellular automata granular systems and self-organization pattern formation biophysical models 3. Mathematical physics combinatorics algebraic structures and number theory matrix theory classical and quantum groups, symmetry and representation theory Lie algebras, special functions and orthogonal polynomials ordinary and partial differential equations difference and functional equations integrable systems soliton theory functional analysis and operator theory inverse problems geometry, differential geometry and topology numerical approximation and analysis geometric integration computational methods 4. Quantum mechanics and quantum information theory coherent states eigenvalue problems supersymmetric quantum mechanics

  7. Transporter taxonomy - a comparison of different transport protein classification schemes.

    PubMed

    Viereck, Michael; Gaulton, Anna; Digles, Daniela; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2014-06-01

    Currently, there are more than 800 well characterized human membrane transport proteins (including channels and transporters) and there are estimates that about 10% (approx. 2000) of all human genes are related to transport. Membrane transport proteins are of interest as potential drug targets, for drug delivery, and as a cause of side effects and drug–drug interactions. In light of the development of Open PHACTS, which provides an open pharmacological space, we analyzed selected membrane transport protein classification schemes (Transporter Classification Database, ChEMBL, IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology, and Gene Ontology) for their ability to serve as a basis for pharmacology driven protein classification. A comparison of these membrane transport protein classification schemes by using a set of clinically relevant transporters as use-case reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the different taxonomy approaches.

  8. Monitoring nanotechnology using patent classifications: an overview and comparison of nanotechnology classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgens, Björn; Herrero-Solana, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Patents are an essential information source used to monitor, track, and analyze nanotechnology. When it comes to search nanotechnology-related patents, a keyword search is often incomplete and struggles to cover such an interdisciplinary discipline. Patent classification schemes can reveal far better results since they are assigned by experts who classify the patent documents according to their technology. In this paper, we present the most important classifications to search nanotechnology patents and analyze how nanotechnology is covered in the main patent classification systems used in search systems nowadays: the International Patent Classification (IPC), the United States Patent Classification (USPC), and the Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC). We conclude that nanotechnology has a significantly better patent coverage in the CPC since considerable more nanotechnology documents were retrieved than by using other classifications, and thus, recommend its use for all professionals involved in nanotechnology patent searches.

  9. A Standardised Vocabulary for Identifying Benthic Biota and Substrata from Underwater Imagery: The CATAMI Classification Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Alan; Rees, Tony; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imagery collected by still and video cameras is an increasingly important tool for minimal impact, repeatable observations in the marine environment. Data generated from imagery includes identification, annotation and quantification of biological subjects and environmental features within an image. To be long-lived and useful beyond their project-specific initial purpose, and to maximize their utility across studies and disciplines, marine imagery data should use a standardised vocabulary of defined terms. This would enable the compilation of regional, national and/or global data sets from multiple sources, contributing to broad-scale management studies and development of automated annotation algorithms. The classification scheme developed under the Collaborative and Automated Tools for Analysis of Marine Imagery (CATAMI) project provides such a vocabulary. The CATAMI classification scheme introduces Australian-wide acknowledged, standardised terminology for annotating benthic substrates and biota in marine imagery. It combines coarse-level taxonomy and morphology, and is a flexible, hierarchical classification that bridges the gap between habitat/biotope characterisation and taxonomy, acknowledging limitations when describing biological taxa through imagery. It is fully described, documented, and maintained through curated online databases, and can be applied across benthic image collection methods, annotation platforms and scoring methods. Following release in 2013, the CATAMI classification scheme was taken up by a wide variety of users, including government, academia and industry. This rapid acceptance highlights the scheme’s utility and the potential to facilitate broad-scale multidisciplinary studies of marine ecosystems when applied globally. Here we present the CATAMI classification scheme, describe its conception and features, and discuss its utility and the opportunities as well as challenges arising from its use. PMID:26509918

  10. A classification scheme for edge-localized modes based on their probability distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Shabbir, A., E-mail: aqsa.shabbir@ugent.be; Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, D-85748 Garching; Hornung, G.

    We present here an automated classification scheme which is particularly well suited to scenarios where the parameters have significant uncertainties or are stochastic quantities. To this end, the parameters are modeled with probability distributions in a metric space and classification is conducted using the notion of nearest neighbors. The presented framework is then applied to the classification of type I and type III edge-localized modes (ELMs) from a set of carbon-wall plasmas at JET. This provides a fast, standardized classification of ELM types which is expected to significantly reduce the effort of ELM experts in identifying ELM types. Further, themore » classification scheme is general and can be applied to various other plasma phenomena as well.« less

  11. A Noise-Filtered Under-Sampling Scheme for Imbalanced Classification.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qi; Chen, XiaoShuang; Li, SiSi; Zhou, MengChu

    2017-12-01

    Under-sampling is a popular data preprocessing method in dealing with class imbalance problems, with the purposes of balancing datasets to achieve a high classification rate and avoiding the bias toward majority class examples. It always uses full minority data in a training dataset. However, some noisy minority examples may reduce the performance of classifiers. In this paper, a new under-sampling scheme is proposed by incorporating a noise filter before executing resampling. In order to verify the efficiency, this scheme is implemented based on four popular under-sampling methods, i.e., Undersampling + Adaboost, RUSBoost, UnderBagging, and EasyEnsemble through benchmarks and significance analysis. Furthermore, this paper also summarizes the relationship between algorithm performance and imbalanced ratio. Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme can improve the original undersampling-based methods with significance in terms of three popular metrics for imbalanced classification, i.e., the area under the curve, -measure, and -mean.

  12. A Job Classification Scheme for Health Manpower

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey H.

    1968-01-01

    The Census Bureau's occupational classification scheme and concept of the “health services industry” are inadequate tools for analysis of the changing job structure of health manpower. In an attempt to remedy their inadequacies, a new analytical framework—drawing upon the work of James Scoville on the job content of the U.S. economy—was devised. The first stage in formulating this new framework was to determine which jobs should be considered health jobs. The overall health care job family was designed to encompass jobs in which the primary technical focus or function is oriented toward the provision of health services. There are two dimensions to the job classification scheme presented here. The first describes each job in terms of job content; relative income data and minimum education and training requirements were employed as surrogate measures. By this means, health care jobs were grouped by three levels of job content: high, medium, and low. The other dimension describes each job in terms of its technical focus or function; by this means, health care jobs were grouped into nine job families. PMID:5673666

  13. A scheme for a flexible classification of dietary and health biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Praticò, Giulia; Scalbert, Augustin; Vergères, Guy; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Manach, Claudine; Brennan, Lorraine; Afman, Lydia A; Wishart, David S; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Verhagen, Hans; Feskens, Edith J M; Dragsted, Lars O

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers are an efficient means to examine intakes or exposures and their biological effects and to assess system susceptibility. Aided by novel profiling technologies, the biomarker research field is undergoing rapid development and new putative biomarkers are continuously emerging in the scientific literature. However, the existing concepts for classification of biomarkers in the dietary and health area may be ambiguous, leading to uncertainty about their application. In order to better understand the potential of biomarkers and to communicate their use and application, it is imperative to have a solid scheme for biomarker classification that will provide a well-defined ontology for the field. In this manuscript, we provide an improved scheme for biomarker classification based on their intended use rather than the technology or outcomes (six subclasses are suggested: food compound intake biomarkers (FCIBs), food or food component intake biomarkers (FIBs), dietary pattern biomarkers (DPBs), food compound status biomarkers (FCSBs), effect biomarkers, physiological or health state biomarkers). The application of this scheme is described in detail for the dietary and health area and is compared with previous biomarker classification for this field of research.

  14. Maxillectomy defects: a suggested classification scheme.

    PubMed

    Akinmoladun, V I; Dosumu, O O; Olusanya, A A; Ikusika, O F

    2013-06-01

    The term "maxillectomy" has been used to describe a variety of surgical procedures for a spectrum of diseases involving a diverse anatomical site. Hence, classifications of maxillectomy defects have often made communication difficult. This article highlights this problem, emphasises the need for a uniform system of classification and suggests a classification system which is simple and comprehensive. Articles related to this subject, especially those with specified classifications of maxillary surgical defects were sourced from the internet through Google, Scopus and PubMed using the search terms maxillectomy defects classification. A manual search through available literature was also done. The review of the materials revealed many classifications and modifications of classifications from the descriptive, reconstructive and prosthodontic perspectives. No globally acceptable classification exists among practitioners involved in the management of diseases in the mid-facial region. There were over 14 classifications of maxillary defects found in the English literature. Attempts made to address the inadequacies of previous classifications have tended to result in cumbersome and relatively complex classifications. A single classification that is based on both surgical and prosthetic considerations is most desirable and is hereby proposed.

  15. A Classification Scheme for Glaciological AVA Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, A.; Emir, E.

    2014-12-01

    A classification scheme is proposed for amplitude vs. angle (AVA) responses as an aid to the interpretation of seismic reflectivity in glaciological research campaigns. AVA responses are a powerful tool in characterising the material properties of glacier ice and its substrate. However, before interpreting AVA data, careful true amplitude processing is required to constrain basal reflectivity and compensate amplitude decay mechanisms, including anelastic attenuation and spherical divergence. These fundamental processing steps can be difficult to design in cases of noisy data, e.g. where a target reflection is contaminated by surface wave energy (in the case of shallow glaciers) or by energy reflected from out of the survey plane. AVA methods have equally powerful usage in estimating the fluid fill of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, such applications seldom use true amplitude data and instead consider qualitative AVA responses using a well-defined classification scheme. Such schemes are often defined in terms of the characteristics of best-fit responses to the observed reflectivity, e.g. the intercept (I) and gradient (G) of a linear approximation to the AVA data. The position of the response on a cross-plot of I and G then offers a diagnostic attribute for certain fluid types. We investigate the advantages in glaciology of emulating this practice, and develop a cross-plot based on the 3-term Shuey AVA approximation (using I, G, and a curvature term C). Model AVA curves define a clear lithification trend: AVA responses to stiff (lithified) substrates fall discretely into one quadrant of the cross-plot, with positive I and negative G, whereas those to fluid-rich substrates plot diagonally opposite (in the negative I and positive G quadrant). The remaining quadrants are unoccupied by plausible single-layer responses and may therefore be diagnostic of complex thin-layer reflectivity, and the magnitude and polarity of the C term serves as a further indicator

  16. New Course Design: Classification Schemes and Information Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    2002-01-01

    Describes a course developed at St. John's University (New York) in the Division of Library and Information Science that relates traditional classification schemes to information architecture and Web sites. Highlights include functional aspects of information architecture, that is, the way content is structured; assignments; student reactions; and…

  17. A proposed classification scheme for Ada-based software products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernosek, Gary J.

    1986-01-01

    As the requirements for producing software in the Ada language become a reality for projects such as the Space Station, a great amount of Ada-based program code will begin to emerge. Recognizing the potential for varying levels of quality to result in Ada programs, what is needed is a classification scheme that describes the quality of a software product whose source code exists in Ada form. A 5-level classification scheme is proposed that attempts to decompose this potentially broad spectrum of quality which Ada programs may possess. The number of classes and their corresponding names are not as important as the mere fact that there needs to be some set of criteria from which to evaluate programs existing in Ada. An exact criteria for each class is not presented, nor are any detailed suggestions of how to effectively implement this quality assessment. The idea of Ada-based software classification is introduced and a set of requirements from which to base further research and development is suggested.

  18. Simple adaptive sparse representation based classification schemes for EEG based brain-computer interface applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghak; Lee, Seungchan; Ahn, Minkyu; Cho, Hohyun; Jun, Sung Chan; Lee, Heung-No

    2015-11-01

    One of the main problems related to electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems is the non-stationarity of the underlying EEG signals. This results in the deterioration of the classification performance during experimental sessions. Therefore, adaptive classification techniques are required for EEG based BCI applications. In this paper, we propose simple adaptive sparse representation based classification (SRC) schemes. Supervised and unsupervised dictionary update techniques for new test data and a dictionary modification method by using the incoherence measure of the training data are investigated. The proposed methods are very simple and additional computation for the re-training of the classifier is not needed. The proposed adaptive SRC schemes are evaluated using two BCI experimental datasets. The proposed methods are assessed by comparing classification results with the conventional SRC and other adaptive classification methods. On the basis of the results, we find that the proposed adaptive schemes show relatively improved classification accuracy as compared to conventional methods without requiring additional computation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Classification Scheme for Career Education Resource Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koontz, Ronald G.

    The introductory section of the paper expresses its purpose: to devise a classification scheme for career education resource material, which will be used to develop the USOE Office of Career Education Resource Library and will be disseminated to interested State departments of education and local school districts to assist them in classifying…

  20. FIELD TESTS OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED WATERSHED CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES IN THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmentation with a geographically-based classification scheme for two case studies involving 1) Lake Superior tributaries and 2) watersheds of riverine coastal wetlands...

  1. FIELD TESTS OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED WATERSHED CLASSIFICATION SCHEMED IN THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmentation with a geographically-based classification scheme for two case studies involving 1)Lake Superior tributaries and 2) watersheds of riverine coastal wetlands ...

  2. Developing a contributing factor classification scheme for Rasmussen's AcciMap: Reliability and validity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Goode, N; Salmon, P M; Taylor, N Z; Lenné, M G; Finch, C F

    2017-10-01

    One factor potentially limiting the uptake of Rasmussen's (1997) Accimap method by practitioners is the lack of a contributing factor classification scheme to guide accident analyses. This article evaluates the intra- and inter-rater reliability and criterion-referenced validity of a classification scheme developed to support the use of Accimap by led outdoor activity (LOA) practitioners. The classification scheme has two levels: the system level describes the actors, artefacts and activity context in terms of 14 codes; the descriptor level breaks the system level codes down into 107 specific contributing factors. The study involved 11 LOA practitioners using the scheme on two separate occasions to code a pre-determined list of contributing factors identified from four incident reports. Criterion-referenced validity was assessed by comparing the codes selected by LOA practitioners to those selected by the method creators. Mean intra-rater reliability scores at the system (M = 83.6%) and descriptor (M = 74%) levels were acceptable. Mean inter-rater reliability scores were not consistently acceptable for both coding attempts at the system level (M T1  = 68.8%; M T2  = 73.9%), and were poor at the descriptor level (M T1  = 58.5%; M T2  = 64.1%). Mean criterion referenced validity scores at the system level were acceptable (M T1  = 73.9%; M T2  = 75.3%). However, they were not consistently acceptable at the descriptor level (M T1  = 67.6%; M T2  = 70.8%). Overall, the results indicate that the classification scheme does not currently satisfy reliability and validity requirements, and that further work is required. The implications for the design and development of contributing factors classification schemes are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Classification scheme for phenomenological universalities in growth problems in physics and other sciences.

    PubMed

    Castorina, P; Delsanto, P P; Guiot, C

    2006-05-12

    A classification in universality classes of broad categories of phenomenologies, belonging to physics and other disciplines, may be very useful for a cross fertilization among them and for the purpose of pattern recognition and interpretation of experimental data. We present here a simple scheme for the classification of nonlinear growth problems. The success of the scheme in predicting and characterizing the well known Gompertz, West, and logistic models, suggests to us the study of a hitherto unexplored class of nonlinear growth problems.

  4. NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    This guide provides a simple, effective tool to assist aerospace information analysts and database builders in the high-level subject classification of technical materials. Each of the 76 subject categories comprising the classification scheme is presented with a description of category scope, a listing of subtopics, cross references, and an indication of particular areas of NASA interest. The guide also includes an index of nearly 3,000 specific research topics cross referenced to the subject categories. The portable document format (PDF) version of the guide contains links in the index from each input subject to its corresponding categories. In addition to subject classification, the guide can serve as an aid to searching databases that use the classification scheme, and is also an excellent selection guide for those involved in the acquisition of aerospace literature. The CD-ROM contains both HTML and PDF versions.

  5. Social Constructivism: Botanical Classification Schemes of Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Delena

    The assertion that there is a social component to children's construction of knowledge about natural phenomena is supported by evidence from an examination of children's classification schemes for plants. An ethnographic study was conducted with nine sixth grade children in central Texas. The children classified plants in the outdoors, in a…

  6. Modern radiosurgical and endovascular classification schemes for brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-05-04

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and endovascular techniques are commonly used for treating brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs). They are usually used as ancillary techniques to microsurgery but may also be used as solitary treatment options. Careful patient selection requires a clear estimate of the treatment efficacy and complication rates for the individual patient. As such, classification schemes are an essential part of patient selection paradigm for each treatment modality. While the Spetzler-Martin grading system and its subsequent modifications are commonly used for microsurgical outcome prediction for bAVMs, the same system(s) may not be easily applicable to SRS and endovascular therapy. Several radiosurgical- and endovascular-based grading scales have been proposed for bAVMs. However, a comprehensive review of these systems including a discussion on their relative advantages and disadvantages is missing. This paper is dedicated to modern classification schemes designed for SRS and endovascular techniques.

  7. A new scheme for urban impervious surface classification from SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Yunpeng

    2018-05-01

    Urban impervious surfaces have been recognized as a significant indicator for various environmental and socio-economic studies. There is an increasingly urgent demand for timely and accurate monitoring of the impervious surfaces with satellite technology from local to global scales. In the past decades, optical remote sensing has been widely employed for this task with various techniques. However, there are still a range of challenges, e.g. handling cloud contamination on optical data. Therefore, the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was introduced for the challenging task because it is uniquely all-time- and all-weather-capable. Nevertheless, with an increasing number of SAR data applied, the methodology used for impervious surfaces classification remains unchanged from the methods used for optical datasets. This shortcoming has prevented the community from fully exploring the potential of using SAR data for impervious surfaces classification. We proposed a new scheme that is comparable to the well-known and fundamental Vegetation-Impervious surface-Soil (V-I-S) model for mapping urban impervious surfaces. Three scenes of fully polarimetric Radsarsat-2 data for the cities of Shenzhen, Hong Kong and Macau were employed to test and validate the proposed methodology. Experimental results indicated that the overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient were 96.00% and 0.8808 in Shenzhen, 93.87% and 0.8307 in Hong Kong and 97.48% and 0.9354 in Macau, indicating the applicability and great potential of the new scheme for impervious surfaces classification using polarimetric SAR data. Comparison with the traditional scheme indicated that this new scheme was able to improve the overall accuracy by up to 4.6% and Kappa coefficient by up to 0.18.

  8. Gender classification of running subjects using full-body kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christina M.; Flora, Jeffrey B.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes novel automated gender classification of subjects while engaged in running activity. The machine learning techniques include preprocessing steps using principal component analysis followed by classification with linear discriminant analysis, and nonlinear support vector machines, and decision-stump with AdaBoost. The dataset consists of 49 subjects (25 males, 24 females, 2 trials each) all equipped with approximately 80 retroreflective markers. The trials are reflective of the subject's entire body moving unrestrained through a capture volume at a self-selected running speed, thus producing highly realistic data. The classification accuracy using leave-one-out cross validation for the 49 subjects is improved from 66.33% using linear discriminant analysis to 86.74% using the nonlinear support vector machine. Results are further improved to 87.76% by means of implementing a nonlinear decision stump with AdaBoost classifier. The experimental findings suggest that the linear classification approaches are inadequate in classifying gender for a large dataset with subjects running in a moderately uninhibited environment.

  9. Inter-sectoral costs and benefits of mental health prevention: towards a new classification scheme.

    PubMed

    Drost, Ruben M W A; Paulus, Aggie T G; Ruwaard, Dirk; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2013-12-01

    Many preventive interventions for mental disorders have costs and benefits that spill over to sectors outside the healthcare sector. Little is known about these "inter-sectoral costs and benefits" (ICBs) of prevention. However, to achieve an efficient allocation of scarce resources, insights on ICBs are indispensable. The main aim was to identify the ICBs related to the prevention of mental disorders and provide a sector-specific classification scheme for these ICBs. Using PubMed, a literature search was conducted for ICBs of mental disorders and related (psycho)social effects. A policy perspective was used to build the scheme's structure, which was adapted to the outcomes of the literature search. In order to validate the scheme's international applicability inside and outside the mental health domain, semi-structured interviews were conducted with (inter)national experts in the broad fields of health promotion and disease prevention. The searched-for items appeared in a total of 52 studies. The ICBs found were classified in one of four sectors: "Education", "Labor and Social Security", "Household and Leisure" or "Criminal Justice System". Psycho(social) effects were placed in a separate section under "Individual and Family". Based on interviews, the scheme remained unadjusted, apart from adding a population-based dimension. This is the first study which offers a sector-specific classification of ICBs. Given the explorative nature of the study, no guidelines on sector-specific classification of ICBs were available. Nevertheless, the classification scheme was acknowledged by an international audience and could therefore provide added value to researchers and policymakers in the field of mental health economics and prevention. The identification and classification of ICBs offers decision makers supporting information on how to optimally allocate scarce resources with respect to preventive interventions for mental disorders. By exploring a new area of research, which

  10. The Nutraceutical Bioavailability Classification Scheme: Classifying Nutraceuticals According to Factors Limiting their Oral Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Li, Fang; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of a health-promoting dietary component (nutraceutical) may be limited by various physicochemical and physiological phenomena: liberation from food matrices, solubility in gastrointestinal fluids, interaction with gastrointestinal components, chemical degradation or metabolism, and epithelium cell permeability. Nutraceutical bioavailability can therefore be improved by designing food matrices that control their bioaccessibility (B*), absorption (A*), and transformation (T*) within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This article reviews the major factors influencing the gastrointestinal fate of nutraceuticals, and then uses this information to develop a new scheme to classify the major factors limiting nutraceutical bioavailability: the nutraceutical bioavailability classification scheme (NuBACS). This new scheme is analogous to the biopharmaceutical classification scheme (BCS) used by the pharmaceutical industry to classify drug bioavailability, but it contains additional factors important for understanding nutraceutical bioavailability in foods. The article also highlights potential strategies for increasing the oral bioavailability of nutraceuticals based on their NuBACS designation (B*A*T*).

  11. Validation of a selective ensemble-based classification scheme for myoelectric control using a three-dimensional Fitts' Law test.

    PubMed

    Scheme, Erik J; Englehart, Kevin B

    2013-07-01

    When controlling a powered upper limb prosthesis it is important not only to know how to move the device, but also when not to move. A novel approach to pattern recognition control, using a selective multiclass one-versus-one classification scheme has been shown to be capable of rejecting unintended motions. This method was shown to outperform other popular classification schemes when presented with muscle contractions that did not correspond to desired actions. In this work, a 3-D Fitts' Law test is proposed as a suitable alternative to using virtual limb environments for evaluating real-time myoelectric control performance. The test is used to compare the selective approach to a state-of-the-art linear discriminant analysis classification based scheme. The framework is shown to obey Fitts' Law for both control schemes, producing linear regression fittings with high coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.936). Additional performance metrics focused on quality of control are discussed and incorporated in the evaluation. Using this framework the selective classification based scheme is shown to produce significantly higher efficiency and completion rates, and significantly lower overshoot and stopping distances, with no significant difference in throughput.

  12. Mammogram classification scheme using 2D-discrete wavelet and local binary pattern for detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi Putra, Januar

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new mammogram classification scheme to classify the breast tissues as normal or abnormal. Feature matrix is generated using Local Binary Pattern to all the detailed coefficients from 2D-DWT of the region of interest (ROI) of a mammogram. Feature selection is done by selecting the relevant features that affect the classification. Feature selection is used to reduce the dimensionality of data and features that are not relevant, in this paper the F-test and Ttest will be performed to the results of the feature extraction dataset to reduce and select the relevant feature. The best features are used in a Neural Network classifier for classification. In this research we use MIAS and DDSM database. In addition to the suggested scheme, the competent schemes are also simulated for comparative analysis. It is observed that the proposed scheme has a better say with respect to accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Based on experiments, the performance of the proposed scheme can produce high accuracy that is 92.71%, while the lowest accuracy obtained is 77.08%.

  13. CANDELS Visual Classifications: Scheme, Data Release, and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Mozena, Mark; Kocevski, Dale; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Lotz, Jennifer; Bell, Eric F.; Faber, Sandy; Ferguson, Harry; Koo, David; Bassett, Robert; Bernyk, Maksym; Blancato, Kirsten; Bournaud, Frederic; Cassata, Paolo; Castellano, Marco; Cheung, Edmond; Conselice, Christopher J.; Croton, Darren; Dahlen, Tomas; de Mello, Duilia F.; DeGroot, Laura; Donley, Jennifer; Guedes, Javiera; Grogin, Norman; Hathi, Nimish; Hilton, Matt; Hollon, Brett; Koekemoer, Anton; Liu, Nick; Lucas, Ray A.; Martig, Marie; McGrath, Elizabeth; McPartland, Conor; Mobasher, Bahram; Morlock, Alice; O'Leary, Erin; Peth, Mike; Pforr, Janine; Pillepich, Annalisa; Rosario, David; Soto, Emmaris; Straughn, Amber; Telford, Olivia; Sunnquist, Ben; Trump, Jonathan; Weiner, Benjamin; Wuyts, Stijn; Inami, Hanae; Kassin, Susan; Lani, Caterina; Poole, Gregory B.; Rizer, Zachary

    2015-11-01

    We have undertaken an ambitious program to visually classify all galaxies in the five CANDELS fields down to H < 24.5 involving the dedicated efforts of over 65 individual classifiers. Once completed, we expect to have detailed morphological classifications for over 50,000 galaxies spanning 0 < z < 4 over all the fields, with classifications from 3 to 5 independent classifiers for each galaxy. Here, we present our detailed visual classification scheme, which was designed to cover a wide range of CANDELS science goals. This scheme includes the basic Hubble sequence types, but also includes a detailed look at mergers and interactions, the clumpiness of galaxies, k-corrections, and a variety of other structural properties. In this paper, we focus on the first field to be completed—GOODS-S, which has been classified at various depths. The wide area coverage spanning the full field (wide+deep+ERS) includes 7634 galaxies that have been classified by at least three different people. In the deep area of the field, 2534 galaxies have been classified by at least five different people at three different depths. With this paper, we release to the public all of the visual classifications in GOODS-S along with the Perl/Tk GUI that we developed to classify galaxies. We present our initial results here, including an analysis of our internal consistency and comparisons among multiple classifiers as well as a comparison to the Sérsic index. We find that the level of agreement among classifiers is quite good (>70% across the full magnitude range) and depends on both the galaxy magnitude and the galaxy type, with disks showing the highest level of agreement (>50%) and irregulars the lowest (<10%). A comparison of our classifications with the Sérsic index and rest-frame colors shows a clear separation between disk and spheroid populations. Finally, we explore morphological k-corrections between the V-band and H-band observations and find that a small fraction (84 galaxies in total

  14. Mental Task Classification Scheme Utilizing Correlation Coefficient Extracted from Interchannel Intrinsic Mode Function.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Fattah, Shaikh Anowarul

    2017-01-01

    In view of recent increase of brain computer interface (BCI) based applications, the importance of efficient classification of various mental tasks has increased prodigiously nowadays. In order to obtain effective classification, efficient feature extraction scheme is necessary, for which, in the proposed method, the interchannel relationship among electroencephalogram (EEG) data is utilized. It is expected that the correlation obtained from different combination of channels will be different for different mental tasks, which can be exploited to extract distinctive feature. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique is employed on a test EEG signal obtained from a channel, which provides a number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and correlation coefficient is extracted from interchannel IMF data. Simultaneously, different statistical features are also obtained from each IMF. Finally, the feature matrix is formed utilizing interchannel correlation features and intrachannel statistical features of the selected IMFs of EEG signal. Different kernels of the support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used to carry out the classification task. An EEG dataset containing ten different combinations of five different mental tasks is utilized to demonstrate the classification performance and a very high level of accuracy is achieved by the proposed scheme compared to existing methods.

  15. A Classification Scheme for Adult Education. Education Libraries Bulletin, Supplement Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Monica A., Comp.

    This classification scheme, based on the 'facet formula' theory of Ranganathan, is designed primarily for the library of the National Institute of Adult Education in London, England. Kinds of persons being educated (educands), methods and problems of education, specific countries, specific organizations, and forms in which the information is…

  16. A new Fourier transform based CBIR scheme for mammographic mass classification: a preliminary invariance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Tan, Maxine; Qui, Yuchen; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a new content-based image retrieval (CBIR) scheme that enables to achieve higher reproducibility when it is implemented in an interactive computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system without significantly reducing lesion classification performance. This is a new Fourier transform based CBIR algorithm that determines image similarity of two regions of interest (ROI) based on the difference of average regional image pixel value distribution in two Fourier transform mapped images under comparison. A reference image database involving 227 ROIs depicting the verified soft-tissue breast lesions was used. For each testing ROI, the queried lesion center was systematically shifted from 10 to 50 pixels to simulate inter-user variation of querying suspicious lesion center when using an interactive CAD system. The lesion classification performance and reproducibility as the queried lesion center shift were assessed and compared among the three CBIR schemes based on Fourier transform, mutual information and Pearson correlation. Each CBIR scheme retrieved 10 most similar reference ROIs and computed a likelihood score of the queried ROI depicting a malignant lesion. The experimental results shown that three CBIR schemes yielded very comparable lesion classification performance as measured by the areas under ROC curves with the p-value greater than 0.498. However, the CBIR scheme using Fourier transform yielded the highest invariance to both queried lesion center shift and lesion size change. This study demonstrated the feasibility of improving robustness of the interactive CAD systems by adding a new Fourier transform based image feature to CBIR schemes.

  17. A Deep Learning Scheme for Motor Imagery Classification based on Restricted Boltzmann Machines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Na; Li, Tengfei; Ren, Xiaodong; Miao, Hongyu

    2017-06-01

    Motor imagery classification is an important topic in brain-computer interface (BCI) research that enables the recognition of a subject's intension to, e.g., implement prosthesis control. The brain dynamics of motor imagery are usually measured by electroencephalography (EEG) as nonstationary time series of low signal-to-noise ratio. Although a variety of methods have been previously developed to learn EEG signal features, the deep learning idea has rarely been explored to generate new representation of EEG features and achieve further performance improvement for motor imagery classification. In this study, a novel deep learning scheme based on restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM) is proposed. Specifically, frequency domain representations of EEG signals obtained via fast Fourier transform (FFT) and wavelet package decomposition (WPD) are obtained to train three RBMs. These RBMs are then stacked up with an extra output layer to form a four-layer neural network, which is named the frequential deep belief network (FDBN). The output layer employs the softmax regression to accomplish the classification task. Also, the conjugate gradient method and backpropagation are used to fine tune the FDBN. Extensive and systematic experiments have been performed on public benchmark datasets, and the results show that the performance improvement of FDBN over other selected state-of-the-art methods is statistically significant. Also, several findings that may be of significant interest to the BCI community are presented in this article.

  18. CANDELS Visual Classifications: Scheme, Data Release, and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Mozena, Mark; Kocevski, Dale; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Lotz, Jennifer; Bell, Eric F.; Faber, Sandy; Ferguson, Henry; Koo, David; Bassett, Robert; hide

    2014-01-01

    We have undertaken an ambitious program to visually classify all galaxies in the five CANDELS fields down to H <24.5 involving the dedicated efforts of 65 individual classifiers. Once completed, we expect to have detailed morphological classifications for over 50,000 galaxies spanning 0 < z < 4 over all the fields. Here, we present our detailed visual classification scheme, which was designed to cover a wide range of CANDELS science goals. This scheme includes the basic Hubble sequence types, but also includes a detailed look at mergers and interactions, the clumpiness of galaxies, k-corrections, and a variety of other structural properties. In this paper, we focus on the first field to be completed - GOODS-S, which has been classified at various depths. The wide area coverage spanning the full field (wide+deep+ERS) includes 7634 galaxies that have been classified by at least three different people. In the deep area of the field, 2534 galaxies have been classified by at least five different people at three different depths. With this paper, we release to the public all of the visual classifications in GOODS-S along with the Perl/Tk GUI that we developed to classify galaxies. We present our initial results here, including an analysis of our internal consistency and comparisons among multiple classifiers as well as a comparison to the Sersic index. We find that the level of agreement among classifiers is quite good and depends on both the galaxy magnitude and the galaxy type, with disks showing the highest level of agreement and irregulars the lowest. A comparison of our classifications with the Sersic index and restframe colors shows a clear separation between disk and spheroid populations. Finally, we explore morphological k-corrections between the V-band and H-band observations and find that a small fraction (84 galaxies in total) are classified as being very different between these two bands. These galaxies typically have very clumpy and extended morphology or

  19. Diagnostic classification scheme in Iranian breast cancer patients using a decision tree.

    PubMed

    Malehi, Amal Saki

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine a diagnostic classification scheme using a decision tree based model. The study was conducted as a retrospective case-control study in Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran during 2001 to 2009. Data, including demographic and clinical-pathological characteristics, were uniformly collected from 624 females, 312 of them were referred with positive diagnosis of breast cancer (cases) and 312 healthy women (controls). The decision tree was implemented to develop a diagnostic classification scheme using CART 6.0 Software. The AUC (area under curve), was measured as the overall performance of diagnostic classification of the decision tree. Five variables as main risk factors of breast cancer and six subgroups as high risk were identified. The results indicated that increasing age, low age at menarche, single and divorced statues, irregular menarche pattern and family history of breast cancer are the important diagnostic factors in Iranian breast cancer patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the analysis were 66% and 86.9% respectively. The high AUC (0.82) also showed an excellent classification and diagnostic performance of the model. Decision tree based model appears to be suitable for identifying risk factors and high or low risk subgroups. It can also assists clinicians in making a decision, since it can identify underlying prognostic relationships and understanding the model is very explicit.

  20. Classification of childhood epilepsies in a tertiary pediatric neurology clinic using a customized classification scheme from the international league against epilepsy 2010 report.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Teik-Beng

    2013-01-01

    In its 2010 report, the International League Against Epilepsy Commission on Classification and Terminology had made a number of changes to the organization, terminology, and classification of seizures and epilepsies. This study aims to test the usefulness of this revised classification scheme on children with epilepsies aged between 0 and 18 years old. Of 527 patients, 75.1% only had 1 type of seizure and the commonest was focal seizure (61.9%). A specific electroclinical syndrome diagnosis could be made in 27.5%. Only 2.1% had a distinctive constellation. In this cohort, 46.9% had an underlying structural, metabolic, or genetic etiology. Among the important causes were pre-/perinatal insults, malformation of cortical development, intracranial infections, and neurocutaneous syndromes. However, 23.5% of the patients in our cohort were classified as having "epilepsies of unknown cause." The revised classification scheme is generally useful for pediatric patients. To make it more inclusive and clinically meaningful, some local customizations are required.

  1. DREAM: Classification scheme for dialog acts in clinical research query mediation.

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Julia; Chandar, Praveen; He, Zhe; Cimino, James; Hanauer, David; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Clinical data access involves complex but opaque communication between medical researchers and query analysts. Understanding such communication is indispensable for designing intelligent human-machine dialog systems that automate query formulation. This study investigates email communication and proposes a novel scheme for classifying dialog acts in clinical research query mediation. We analyzed 315 email messages exchanged in the communication for 20 data requests obtained from three institutions. The messages were segmented into 1333 utterance units. Through a rigorous process, we developed a classification scheme and applied it for dialog act annotation of the extracted utterances. Evaluation results with high inter-annotator agreement demonstrate the reliability of this scheme. This dataset is used to contribute preliminary understanding of dialog acts distribution and conversation flow in this dialog space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new classification scheme of European cold-water coral habitats: Implications for ecosystem-based management of the deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. S.; Guillaumont, B.; Tempera, F.; Vertino, A.; Beuck, L.; Ólafsdóttir, S. H.; Smith, C. J.; Fosså, J. H.; van den Beld, I. M. J.; Savini, A.; Rengstorf, A.; Bayle, C.; Bourillet, J.-F.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Grehan, A.

    2017-11-01

    Cold-water corals (CWC) can form complex structures which provide refuge, nursery grounds and physical support for a diversity of other living organisms. However, irrespectively from such ecological significance, CWCs are still vulnerable to human pressures such as fishing, pollution, ocean acidification and global warming Providing coherent and representative conservation of vulnerable marine ecosystems including CWCs is one of the aims of the Marine Protected Areas networks being implemented across European seas and oceans under the EC Habitats Directive, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the OSPAR Convention. In order to adequately represent ecosystem diversity, these initiatives require a standardised habitat classification that organises the variety of biological assemblages and provides consistent and functional criteria to map them across European Seas. One such classification system, EUNIS, enables a broad level classification of the deep sea based on abiotic and geomorphological features. More detailed lower biotope-related levels are currently under-developed, particularly with regards to deep-water habitats (>200 m depth). This paper proposes a hierarchical CWC biotope classification scheme that could be incorporated by existing classification schemes such as EUNIS. The scheme was developed within the EU FP7 project CoralFISH to capture the variability of CWC habitats identified using a wealth of seafloor imagery datasets from across the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean. Depending on the resolution of the imagery being interpreted, this hierarchical scheme allows data to be recorded from broad CWC biotope categories down to detailed taxonomy-based levels, thereby providing a flexible yet valuable information level for management. The CWC biotope classification scheme identifies 81 biotopes and highlights the limitations of the classification framework and guidance provided by EUNIS, the EC Habitats Directive, OSPAR and FAO; which largely

  3. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David A.; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C.; Feldman, Howard H.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A.; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the “A/T/N” system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. “A” refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); “T,” the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and “N,” biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N−, or A+/T−/N−, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme. PMID:27371494

  4. Reconsideration of the scheme of the international classification of functioning, disability and health: incentives from the Netherlands for a global debate.

    PubMed

    Heerkens, Yvonne F; de Weerd, Marjolein; Huber, Machteld; de Brouwer, Carin P M; van der Veen, Sabina; Perenboom, Rom J M; van Gool, Coen H; Ten Napel, Huib; van Bon-Martens, Marja; Stallinga, Hillegonda A; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2018-03-01

    The ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) framework (used worldwide to describe 'functioning' and 'disability'), including the ICF scheme (visualization of functioning as result of interaction with health condition and contextual factors), needs reconsideration. The purpose of this article is to discuss alternative ICF schemes. Reconsideration of ICF via literature review and discussions with 23 Dutch ICF experts. Twenty-six experts were invited to rank the three resulting alternative schemes. The literature review provided five themes: 1) societal developments; 2) health and research influences; 3) conceptualization of health; 4) models/frameworks of health and disability; and 5) ICF-criticism (e.g. position of 'health condition' at the top and role of 'contextual factors'). Experts concluded that the ICF scheme gives the impression that the medical perspective is dominant instead of the biopsychosocial perspective. Three alternative ICF schemes were ranked by 16 (62%) experts, resulting in one preferred scheme. There is a need for a new ICF scheme, better reflecting the ICF framework, for further (inter)national consideration. These Dutch schemes should be reviewed on a global scale, to develop a scheme that is more consistent with current and foreseen developments and changing ideas on health. Implications for Rehabilitation We propose policy makers on community, regional and (inter)national level to consider the use of the alternative schemes of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health within their plans to promote functioning and health of their citizens and researchers and teachers to incorporate the alternative schemes into their research and education to emphasize the biopsychosocial paradigm. We propose to set up an international Delphi procedure involving citizens (including patients), experts in healthcare, occupational care, research, education and policy, and planning to get consensus on

  5. Attribution of local climate zones using a multitemporal land use/land cover classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicki, Andreas; Parlow, Eberhard

    2017-04-01

    Worldwide, the number of people living in an urban environment exceeds the rural population with increasing tendency. Especially in relation to global climate change, cities play a major role considering the impacts of extreme heat waves on the population. For urban planners, it is important to know which types of urban structures are beneficial for a comfortable urban climate and which actions can be taken to improve urban climate conditions. Therefore, it is essential to differ between not only urban and rural environments, but also between different levels of urban densification. To compare these built-up types within different cities worldwide, Stewart and Oke developed the concept of local climate zones (LCZ) defined by morphological characteristics. The original LCZ scheme often has considerable problems when adapted to European cities with historical city centers, including narrow streets and irregular patterns. In this study, a method to bridge the gap between a classical land use/land cover (LULC) classification and the LCZ scheme is presented. Multitemporal Landsat 8 data are used to create a high accuracy LULC map, which is linked to the LCZ by morphological parameters derived from a high-resolution digital surface model and cadastral data. A bijective combination of the different classification schemes could not be achieved completely due to overlapping threshold values and the spatially homogeneous distribution of morphological parameters, but the attribution of LCZ to the LULC classification was successful.

  6. Local Laplacian Coding From Theoretical Analysis of Local Coding Schemes for Locally Linear Classification.

    PubMed

    Pang, Junbiao; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Chunjie; Zhang, Weigang; Huang, Qingming; Yin, Baocai

    2015-12-01

    Local coordinate coding (LCC) is a framework to approximate a Lipschitz smooth function by combining linear functions into a nonlinear one. For locally linear classification, LCC requires a coding scheme that heavily determines the nonlinear approximation ability, posing two main challenges: 1) the locality making faraway anchors have smaller influences on current data and 2) the flexibility balancing well between the reconstruction of current data and the locality. In this paper, we address the problem from the theoretical analysis of the simplest local coding schemes, i.e., local Gaussian coding and local student coding, and propose local Laplacian coding (LPC) to achieve the locality and the flexibility. We apply LPC into locally linear classifiers to solve diverse classification tasks. The comparable or exceeded performances of state-of-the-art methods demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Classification scheme for acid rock drainage detection - the Hamersley Basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Dogramaci, Shawan; McLean, Laura

    2017-04-01

    In arid environment where precipitation and surface water are very limited, groundwater is the most important freshwater resource. For this reasons it is intensively exploited and needs to be managed wisely and protected from pollutants. Acid rock drainage often constitutes a serious risk to groundwater quality, particularly in catchments that are subject to mining, large scale groundwater injection or abstraction. However, assessment of the potential acid rock drainage risk can be challenging, especially in carbonate rich environment, where the decreasing pH that usually accompanies pyrite oxidation, can be masked by the high pH-neutralisation capacity of carbonate minerals. In this study, we analysed 73 surface and groundwater samples from different water bodies and aquifers located in the Hamersley Basin, Western Australia. Although the majority of samples had a neutral pH, there was a large spatial variability in the dissolved sulphate concentrations that ranged from 1 mg/L to 15,000 mg/L. Waters with high dissolved sulphate concentration were found in areas with a high percentage of sulphide minerals (e.g. pyrite) located within the aquifer matrix and were characterised by low δ34SSO4 values (+1.2‰ to +4.6) consistent with signatures of aquifer matrix pyritic rock samples (+1.9‰ to +4.4). It was also found that the SO4 concentrations and acidity levels were not only dependent on δ34SSO4 values and existence of pyrite but also on the presence of carbonate minerals in the aquifer matrix. Based on the results from this study, a classification scheme has been developed for identification of waters impacted by acid rock drainage that also encompasses numerous concomitant geochemical processes that often occur in aqueous systems. The classification uses five proxies: SO4, SO4/Cl, SI of calcite, δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4 to improve assessment of the contribution that oxidation of sulphide minerals has to overall sulphate ion concentrations, regardless of acidity

  8. An Alternative Classification Scheme for Teaching Performance Incentives Using a Factor Analytic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertler, Craig A.

    This study attempted to (1) expand the dichotomous classification scheme typically used by educators and researchers to describe teaching incentives and (2) offer administrators and teachers an alternative framework within which to develop incentive systems. Elementary, middle, and high school teachers in Ohio rated 10 commonly instituted teaching…

  9. Map Classification: A Comparison of Schemes with Special Reference to the Continent of Africa. Occasional Papers, Number 154.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrett, Christopher E.

    This guide to the theory and practice of map classification begins with a discussion of the filing of maps and the function of map classification based on area and theme as illustrated by four maps of Africa. The description of the various classification systems which follows is divided into book schemes with provision for maps (including Dewey…

  10. A comparative agreement evaluation of two subaxial cervical spine injury classification systems: the AOSpine and the Allen and Ferguson schemes.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Campos, Mauricio; Yurac, Ratko; Palma, Joaquin; Mobarec, Sebastian; Prada, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    We performed an agreement study using two subaxial cervical spine classification systems: the AOSpine and the Allen and Ferguson (A&F) classifications. We sought to determine which scheme allows better agreement by different evaluators and by the same evaluator on different occasions. Complete imaging studies of 65 patients with subaxial cervical spine injuries were classified by six evaluators (three spine sub-specialists and three senior orthopaedic surgery residents) using the AOSpine subaxial cervical spine classification system and the A&F scheme. The cases were displayed in a random sequence after a 6-week interval for repeat evaluation. The Kappa coefficient (κ) was used to determine inter- and intra-observer agreement. Inter-observer: considering the main AO injury types, the agreement was substantial for the AOSpine classification [κ = 0.61 (0.57-0.64)]; using AO sub-types, the agreement was moderate [κ = 0.57 (0.54-0.60)]. For the A&F classification, the agreement [κ = 0.46 (0.42-0.49)] was significantly lower than using the AOSpine scheme. Intra-observer: the agreement was substantial considering injury types [κ = 0.68 (0.62-0.74)] and considering sub-types [κ = 0.62 (0.57-0.66)]. Using the A&F classification, the agreement was also substantial [κ = 0.66 (0.61-0.71)]. No significant differences were observed between spine surgeons and orthopaedic residents in the overall inter- and intra-observer agreement, or in the inter- and intra-observer agreement of specific type of injuries. The AOSpine classification (using the four main injury types or at the sub-types level) allows a significantly better agreement than the A&F classification. The A&F scheme does not allow reliable communication between medical professionals.

  11. Classification of basic facilities for high-rise residential: A survey from 100 housing scheme in Kajang area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ani, Adi Irfan Che; Sairi, Ahmad; Tawil, Norngainy Mohd; Wahab, Siti Rashidah Hanum Abd; Razak, Muhd Zulhanif Abd

    2016-08-01

    High demand for housing and limited land in town area has increasing the provision of high-rise residential scheme. This type of housing has different owners but share the same land lot and common facilities. Thus, maintenance works of the buildings and common facilities must be well organized. The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify basic facilities for high-rise residential building hoping to improve the management of the scheme. The method adopted is a survey on 100 high-rise residential schemes that ranged from affordable housing to high cost housing by using a snowball sampling. The scope of this research is within Kajang area, which is rapidly developed with high-rise housing. The objective of the survey is to list out all facilities in every sample of the schemes. The result confirmed that pre-determined 11 classifications hold true and can provide the realistic classification for high-rise residential scheme. This paper proposed for redefinition of facilities provided to create a better management system and give a clear definition on the type of high-rise residential based on its facilities.

  12. Classification and Subject Cataloguing Section. Bibliographic Control Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on classification and subject cataloging which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "PRECIS: Basic Principles, Function, and Use," in which Derek Austin (United Kingdom) describes the automated subject indexing system developed for use in the "British…

  13. Development of a Hazard Classification Scheme for Substances Used in the Fraudulent Adulteration of Foods.

    PubMed

    Everstine, Karen; Abt, Eileen; McColl, Diane; Popping, Bert; Morrison-Rowe, Sara; Lane, Richard W; Scimeca, Joseph; Winter, Carl; Ebert, Andrew; Moore, Jeffrey C; Chin, Henry B

    2018-01-01

    Food fraud, the intentional misrepresentation of the true identity of a food product or ingredient for economic gain, is a threat to consumer confidence and public health and has received increased attention from both regulators and the food industry. Following updates to food safety certification standards and publication of new U.S. regulatory requirements, we undertook a project to (i) develop a scheme to classify food fraud-related adulterants based on their potential health hazard and (ii) apply this scheme to the adulterants in a database of 2,970 food fraud records. The classification scheme was developed by a panel of experts in food safety and toxicology from the food industry, academia, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Categories and subcategories were created through an iterative process of proposal, review, and validation using a subset of substances known to be associated with the fraudulent adulteration of foods. Once developed, the scheme was applied to the adulterants in the database. The resulting scheme included three broad categories: 1, potentially hazardous adulterants; 2, adulterants that are unlikely to be hazardous; and 3, unclassifiable adulterants. Categories 1 and 2 consisted of seven subcategories intended to further define the range of hazard potential for adulterants. Application of the scheme to the 1,294 adulterants in the database resulted in 45% of adulterants classified in category 1 (potentially hazardous). Twenty-seven percent of the 1,294 adulterants had a history of causing consumer illness or death, were associated with safety-related regulatory action, or were classified as allergens. These results reinforce the importance of including a consideration of food fraud-related adulterants in food safety systems. This classification scheme supports food fraud mitigation efforts and hazard identification as required in the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act Preventive Controls Rules.

  14. A new classification scheme for treating blunt aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Benjamin W; Lundgren, Rachel S; Gunn, Martin; Quade, Samantha; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Tran, Nam T; Mokadam, Nahush; Aldea, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous questions about the treatment of blunt aortic injury (BAI), including the management of small intimal tears, what injury characteristics are predictive of death from rupture, and which patients actually need intervention. We used our experience in treating BAI during the past decade to create a classification scheme based on radiographic and clinical data and to provide clear treatment guidelines. The records of patients admitted with BAI from 1999 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a radiographically or operatively confirmed diagnosis (echocardiogram, computed tomography, or angiography) of BAI were included. We created a classification system based on the presence or absence of an aortic external contour abnormality, defined as an alteration in the symmetric, round shape of the aorta: (1) intimal tear (IT)-absence of aortic external contour abnormality and intimal defect and/or thrombus of <10 mm in length or width; (2) large intimal flap (LIF)-absence of aortic external contour abnormality and intimal defect and/or thrombus of ≥10 mm in length or width; (3) pseudoaneurysm-presence of aortic external contour abnormality and contained rupture; (4) rupture-presence of aortic external contour abnormality and free contrast extravasation or hemothorax at thoracotomy. We identified 140 patients with BAI. Most injuries were pseudoaneurysm (71%) at the isthmus (70%), 16.4% had an IT, 5.7% had a LIF, and 6.4% had a rupture. Survival rates by classification were IT, 87%; LIF, 100%; pseudoaneurysm, 76%; and rupture, 11% (one patient). Of the ITs, LIFs, and pseudoaneurysms treated nonoperatively, none worsened, and 65% completely healed. No patient with an IT or LIF died. Most patients with ruptures lost vital signs before presentation or in the emergency department and did not survive. Hypotension before or at hospital presentation and size of the periaortic hematoma at the level of the aortic arch predicted likelihood of death from

  15. Model Validation and Site Characterization for Early Deployment MHK Sites and Establishment of Wave Classification Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcher, Levi F

    Model Validation and Site Characterization for Early Deployment Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Sites and Establishment of Wave Classification Scheme presentation from from Water Power Technologies Office Peer Review, FY14-FY16.

  16. A Classification Scheme for Analyzing Mobile Apps Used to Prevent and Manage Disease in Late Life

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aiguo; Lu, Xin; Chen, Hongtu; Li, Changqun; Levkoff, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Background There are several mobile apps that offer tools for disease prevention and management among older adults, and promote health behaviors that could potentially reduce or delay the onset of disease. A classification scheme that categorizes apps could be useful to both older adult app users and app developers. Objective The objective of our study was to build and evaluate the effectiveness of a classification scheme that classifies mobile apps available for older adults in the “Health & Fitness” category of the iTunes App Store. Methods We constructed a classification scheme for mobile apps according to three dimensions: (1) the Precede-Proceed Model (PPM), which classifies mobile apps in terms of predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors for behavior change; (2) health care process, specifically prevention versus management of disease; and (3) health conditions, including physical health and mental health. Content analysis was conducted by the research team on health and fitness apps designed specifically for older adults, as well as those applicable to older adults, released during the months of June and August 2011 and August 2012. Face validity was assessed by a different group of individuals, who were not related to the study. A reliability analysis was conducted to confirm the accuracy of the coding scheme of the sample apps in this study. Results After applying sample inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 119 apps were included in the study sample, of which 26/119 (21.8%) were released in June 2011, 45/119 (37.8%) in August 2011, and 48/119 (40.3%) in August 2012. Face validity was determined by interviewing 11 people, who agreed that this scheme accurately reflected the nature of this application. The entire study sample was successfully coded, demonstrating satisfactory inter-rater reliability by two independent coders (95.8% initial concordance and 100% concordance after consensus was reached). The apps included in the study sample

  17. The reliability of axis V of the multiaxial classification scheme.

    PubMed

    van Goor-Lambo, G

    1987-07-01

    In a reliability study concerning axis V (abnormal psychosocial situations) of the Multiaxial classification scheme for psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence, it was found that the level of agreement in scoring was adequate for only 2 out of 12 categories. A proposal for a modification of axis V was made, including a differentiation and regrouping of the categories and an adjustment of the descriptions in the glossary. With this modification of axis V another reliability study was carried out, in which the level of agreement in scoring was adequate for 12 out of 16 categories.

  18. Medical X-ray Image Hierarchical Classification Using a Merging and Splitting Scheme in Feature Space.

    PubMed

    Fesharaki, Nooshin Jafari; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2013-07-01

    Due to the daily mass production and the widespread variation of medical X-ray images, it is necessary to classify these for searching and retrieving proposes, especially for content-based medical image retrieval systems. In this paper, a medical X-ray image hierarchical classification structure based on a novel merging and splitting scheme and using shape and texture features is proposed. In the first level of the proposed structure, to improve the classification performance, similar classes with regard to shape contents are grouped based on merging measures and shape features into the general overlapped classes. In the next levels of this structure, the overlapped classes split in smaller classes based on the classification performance of combination of shape and texture features or texture features only. Ultimately, in the last levels, this procedure is also continued forming all the classes, separately. Moreover, to optimize the feature vector in the proposed structure, we use orthogonal forward selection algorithm according to Mahalanobis class separability measure as a feature selection and reduction algorithm. In other words, according to the complexity and inter-class distance of each class, a sub-space of the feature space is selected in each level and then a supervised merging and splitting scheme is applied to form the hierarchical classification. The proposed structure is evaluated on a database consisting of 2158 medical X-ray images of 18 classes (IMAGECLEF 2005 database) and accuracy rate of 93.6% in the last level of the hierarchical structure for an 18-class classification problem is obtained.

  19. A Hybrid Semi-supervised Classification Scheme for Mining Multisource Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2011-01-01

    Supervised learning methods such as Maximum Likelihood (ML) are often used in land cover (thematic) classification of remote sensing imagery. ML classifier relies exclusively on spectral characteristics of thematic classes whose statistical distributions (class conditional probability densities) are often overlapping. The spectral response distributions of thematic classes are dependent on many factors including elevation, soil types, and ecological zones. A second problem with statistical classifiers is the requirement of large number of accurate training samples (10 to 30 |dimensions|), which are often costly and time consuming to acquire over large geographic regions. With the increasing availability of geospatial databases, itmore » is possible to exploit the knowledge derived from these ancillary datasets to improve classification accuracies even when the class distributions are highly overlapping. Likewise newer semi-supervised techniques can be adopted to improve the parameter estimates of statistical model by utilizing a large number of easily available unlabeled training samples. Unfortunately there is no convenient multivariate statistical model that can be employed for mulitsource geospatial databases. In this paper we present a hybrid semi-supervised learning algorithm that effectively exploits freely available unlabeled training samples from multispectral remote sensing images and also incorporates ancillary geospatial databases. We have conducted several experiments on real datasets, and our new hybrid approach shows over 25 to 35% improvement in overall classification accuracy over conventional classification schemes.« less

  20. Development and application of a new comprehensive image-based classification scheme for coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Christopher

    The coastal (terrestrial) and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf show a unique biophysical succession of marine features from a highly urbanized, developed coastal region in the north (i.e. northern Miami-Dade County) to a protective marine sanctuary in the southeast (i.e. Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary). However, the establishment of a standard bio-geomorphological classification scheme for this area of coastal and benthic environments is lacking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis and answer the research question of whether new parameters of integrating geomorphological components with dominant biological covers could be developed and applied across multiple remote sensing platforms for an innovative way to identify, interpret, and classify diverse coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf. An ordered manageable hierarchical classification scheme was developed to incorporate the categories of Physiographic Realm, Morphodynamic Zone, Geoform, Landform, Dominant Surface Sediment, and Dominant Biological Cover. Six different remote sensing platforms (i.e. five multi-spectral satellite image sensors and one high-resolution aerial orthoimagery) were acquired, delineated according to the new classification scheme, and compared to determine optimal formats for classifying the study area. Cognitive digital classification at a nominal scale of 1:6000 proved to be more accurate than autoclassification programs and therefore used to differentiate coastal marine environments based on spectral reflectance characteristics, such as color, tone, saturation, pattern, and texture of the seafloor topology. In addition, attribute tables were created in conjugation with interpretations to quantify and compare the spatial relationships between classificatory units. IKONOS-2 satellite imagery was determined to be the optimal platform for applying the hierarchical classification scheme

  1. A physical classification scheme for blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landt, Hermine; Padovani, Paolo; Perlman, Eric S.; Giommi, Paolo

    2004-06-01

    Blazars are currently separated into BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and flat spectrum radio quasars based on the strength of their emission lines. This is performed rather arbitrarily by defining a diagonal line in the Ca H&K break value-equivalent width plane, following Marchã et al. We readdress this problem and put the classification scheme for blazars on firm physical grounds. We study ~100 blazars and radio galaxies from the Deep X-ray Radio Blazar Survey (DXRBS) and 2-Jy radio survey and find a significant bimodality for the narrow emission line [OIII]λ5007. This suggests the presence of two physically distinct classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). We show that all radio-loud AGN, blazars and radio galaxies, can be effectively separated into weak- and strong-lined sources using the [OIII]λ5007-[OII]λ3727 equivalent width plane. This plane allows one to disentangle orientation effects from intrinsic variations in radio-loud AGN. Based on DXRBS, the strongly beamed sources of the new class of weak-lined radio-loud AGN are made up of BL Lacs at the ~75 per cent level, whereas those of the strong-lined radio-loud AGN include mostly (~97 per cent) quasars.

  2. Diffuse Lung Disease in Biopsied Children 2 to 18 Years of Age. Application of the chILD Classification Scheme.

    PubMed

    Fan, Leland L; Dishop, Megan K; Galambos, Csaba; Askin, Frederic B; White, Frances V; Langston, Claire; Liptzin, Deborah R; Kroehl, Miranda E; Deutsch, Gail H; Young, Lisa R; Kurland, Geoffrey; Hagood, James; Dell, Sharon; Trapnell, Bruce C; Deterding, Robin R

    2015-10-01

    Children's Interstitial and Diffuse Lung Disease (chILD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders that is challenging to categorize. In previous study, a classification scheme was successfully applied to children 0 to 2 years of age who underwent lung biopsies for chILD. This classification scheme has not been evaluated in children 2 to 18 years of age. This multicenter interdisciplinary study sought to describe the spectrum of biopsy-proven chILD in North America and to apply a previously reported classification scheme in children 2 to 18 years of age. Mortality and risk factors for mortality were also assessed. Patients 2 to 18 years of age who underwent lung biopsies for diffuse lung disease from 12 North American institutions were included. Demographic and clinical data were collected and described. The lung biopsies were reviewed by pediatric lung pathologists with expertise in diffuse lung disease and were classified by the chILD classification scheme. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for mortality. A total of 191 cases were included in the final analysis. Number of biopsies varied by center (5-49 biopsies; mean, 15.8) and by age (2-18 yr; mean, 10.6 yr). The most common classification category in this cohort was Disorders of the Immunocompromised Host (40.8%), and the least common was Disorders of Infancy (4.7%). Immunocompromised patients suffered the highest mortality (52.8%). Additional associations with mortality included mechanical ventilation, worse clinical status at time of biopsy, tachypnea, hemoptysis, and crackles. Pulmonary hypertension was found to be a risk factor for mortality but only in the immunocompetent patients. In patients 2 to 18 years of age who underwent lung biopsies for diffuse lung disease, there were far fewer diagnoses prevalent in infancy and more overlap with adult diagnoses. Immunocompromised patients with diffuse lung disease who underwent lung biopsies had less than 50% survival at time of last follow-up.

  3. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. I: Conceptual development.

    PubMed

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    The predominant paradigm for the premarket assessment of genetically modified (GM) foods reflects heightened public concern by focusing on foods modified by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) techniques, while foods modified by other methods of genetic modification are generally not assessed for safety. To determine whether a GM product requires less or more regulatory oversight and testing, we developed and evaluated a risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived GM foods. The results of this research are presented in three papers. This paper describes the conceptual development of the proposed RBCS that focuses on two categories of adverse health effects: (1) toxic and antinutritional effects, and (2) allergenic effects. The factors that may affect the level of potential health risks of GM foods are identified. For each factor identified, criteria for differentiating health risk potential are developed. The extent to which a GM food satisfies applicable criteria for each factor is rated separately. A concern level for each category of health effects is then determined by aggregating the ratings for the factors using predetermined aggregation rules. An overview of the proposed scheme is presented, as well as the application of the scheme to a hypothetical GM food.

  4. Subject-Adaptive Real-Time Sleep Stage Classification Based on Conditional Random Field

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Min, Wanli

    2007-01-01

    Sleep staging is the pattern recognition task of classifying sleep recordings into sleep stages. This task is one of the most important steps in sleep analysis. It is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of various sleep disorders, and also relates closely to brain-machine interfaces. We report an automatic, online sleep stager using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal based on a recently-developed statistical pattern recognition method, conditional random field, and novel potential functions that have explicit physical meanings. Using sleep recordings from human subjects, we show that the average classification accuracy of our sleep stager almost approaches the theoretical limit and is about 8% higher than that of existing systems. Moreover, for a new subject snew with limited training data Dnew, we perform subject adaptation to improve classification accuracy. Our idea is to use the knowledge learned from old subjects to obtain from Dnew a regulated estimate of CRF’s parameters. Using sleep recordings from human subjects, we show that even without any Dnew, our sleep stager can achieve an average classification accuracy of 70% on snew. This accuracy increases with the size of Dnew and eventually becomes close to the theoretical limit. PMID:18693884

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis of focal liver lesions by use of physicians' subjective classification of echogenic patterns in baseline and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Shiraishi, Junji; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Doi, Kunio

    2009-04-01

    To develop a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for classifying focal liver lesions (FLLs) by use of physicians' subjective classification of echogenic patterns of FLLs on baseline and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US). A total of 137 hepatic lesions in 137 patients were evaluated with B-mode and NC100100 (Sonazoid)-enhanced pulse-inversion US; lesions included 74 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) (23: well-differentiated, 36: moderately differentiated, 15: poorly differentiated HCCs), 33 liver metastases, and 30 liver hemangiomas. Three physicians evaluated single images at B-mode and arterial phases with a cine mode. Physicians were asked to classify each lesion into one of eight B-mode and one of eight enhancement patterns, but did not make a diagnosis. To classify five types of FLLs, we employed a decision tree model with four decision nodes and four artificial neural networks (ANNs). The results of the physicians' pattern classifications were used successively for four different ANNs in making decisions at each of the decision nodes in the decision tree model. The classification accuracies for the 137 FLLs were 84.8% for metastasis, 93.3% for hemangioma, and 98.6% for all HCCs. In addition, the classification accuracies for histological differentiation types of HCCs were 65.2% for well-differentiated HCC, 41.7% for moderately differentiated HCC, and 80.0% for poorly differentiated HCC. This CAD scheme has the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy of liver lesions. However, the accuracy in the histologic differential diagnosis of HCC based on baseline and contrast-enhanced US is still limited.

  6. A new classification scheme of plastic wastes based upon recycling labels

    SciTech Connect

    Özkan, Kemal, E-mail: kozkan@ogu.edu.tr; Ergin, Semih, E-mail: sergin@ogu.edu.tr; Işık, Şahin, E-mail: sahini@ogu.edu.tr

    experimental setup with a camera and homogenous backlighting. Due to the giving global solution for a classification problem, Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to achieve the classification task and majority voting technique is used as the decision mechanism. This technique equally weights each classification result and assigns the given plastic object to the class that the most classification results agree on. The proposed classification scheme provides high accuracy rate, and also it is able to run in real-time applications. It can automatically classify the plastic bottle types with approximately 90% recognition accuracy. Besides this, the proposed methodology yields approximately 96% classification rate for the separation of PET or non-PET plastic types. It also gives 92% accuracy for the categorization of non-PET plastic types into HPDE or PP.« less

  7. Fused man-machine classification schemes to enhance diagnosis of breast microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, Ioannis; Sevastianos, Chatzistergos; George, Spyrou; Konstantina, Nikita

    2017-11-01

    Computer aided diagnosis (CAD x ) approaches are developed towards the effective discrimination between benign and malignant clusters of microcalcifications. Different sources of information are exploited, such as features extracted from the image analysis of the region of interest, features related to the location of the cluster inside the breast, age of the patient and descriptors provided by the radiologists while performing their diagnostic task. A series of different CAD x schemes are implemented, each of which uses a different category of features and adopts a variety of machine learning algorithms and alternative image processing techniques. A novel framework is introduced where these independent diagnostic components are properly combined according to features critical to a radiologist in an attempt to identify the most appropriate CAD x schemes for the case under consideration. An open access database (Digital Database of Screening Mammography (DDSM)) has been elaborated to construct a large dataset with cases of varying subtlety, in order to ensure the development of schemes with high generalization ability, as well as extensive evaluation of their performance. The obtained results indicate that the proposed framework succeeds in improving the diagnostic procedure, as the achieved overall classification performance outperforms all the independent single diagnostic components, as well as the radiologists that assessed the same cases, in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve following receiver operating characteristic analysis.

  8. A new classification scheme of plastic wastes based upon recycling labels.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Kemal; Ergin, Semih; Işık, Şahin; Işıklı, Idil

    2015-01-01

    results agree on. The proposed classification scheme provides high accuracy rate, and also it is able to run in real-time applications. It can automatically classify the plastic bottle types with approximately 90% recognition accuracy. Besides this, the proposed methodology yields approximately 96% classification rate for the separation of PET or non-PET plastic types. It also gives 92% accuracy for the categorization of non-PET plastic types into HPDE or PP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Real-Time Subject-Independent Pattern Classification of Overt and Covert Movements from fNIRS Signals

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Mohit; Prasad, Vinod A.; Guan, Cuntai; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2016-01-01

    Recently, studies have reported the use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for developing Brain–Computer Interface (BCI) by applying online pattern classification of brain states from subject-specific fNIRS signals. The purpose of the present study was to develop and test a real-time method for subject-specific and subject-independent classification of multi-channel fNIRS signals using support-vector machines (SVM), so as to determine its feasibility as an online neurofeedback system. Towards this goal, we used left versus right hand movement execution and movement imagery as study paradigms in a series of experiments. In the first two experiments, activations in the motor cortex during movement execution and movement imagery were used to develop subject-dependent models that obtained high classification accuracies thereby indicating the robustness of our classification method. In the third experiment, a generalized classifier-model was developed from the first two experimental data, which was then applied for subject-independent neurofeedback training. Application of this method in new participants showed mean classification accuracy of 63% for movement imagery tasks and 80% for movement execution tasks. These results, and their corresponding offline analysis reported in this study demonstrate that SVM based real-time subject-independent classification of fNIRS signals is feasible. This method has important applications in the field of hemodynamic BCIs, and neuro-rehabilitation where patients can be trained to learn spatio-temporal patterns of healthy brain activity. PMID:27467528

  10. Creating a Canonical Scientific and Technical Information Classification System for NCSTRL+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiffany, Melissa E.; Nelson, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the new subject classification system for the NCSTRL+ project. NCSTRL+ is a canonical digital library (DL) based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL). The current NCSTRL+ classification system uses the NASA Scientific and Technical (STI) subject classifications, which has a bias towards the aerospace, aeronautics, and engineering disciplines. Examination of other scientific and technical information classification systems showed similar discipline-centric weaknesses. Traditional, library-oriented classification systems represented all disciplines, but were too generalized to serve the needs of a scientific and technically oriented digital library. Lack of a suitable existing classification system led to the creation of a lightweight, balanced, general classification system that allows the mapping of more specialized classification schemes into the new framework. We have developed the following classification system to give equal weight to all STI disciplines, while being compact and lightweight.

  11. Applying the Methodology of the Community College Classification Scheme to the Public Master's Colleges and Universities Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkead, J. Clint.; Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    This work brings forward the geographically-based classification scheme for the public Master's Colleges and Universities sector. Using the same methodology developed by Katsinas and Hardy (2005) to classify community colleges, this work classifies Master's Colleges and Universities. This work has four major findings and conclusions. First, a…

  12. A two-tier atmospheric circulation classification scheme for the European-North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guentchev, Galina S.; Winkler, Julie A.

    A two-tier classification of large-scale atmospheric circulation was developed for the European-North-Atlantic domain. The classification was constructed using a combination of principal components and k-means cluster analysis applied to reanalysis fields of mean sea-level pressure for 1951-2004. Separate classifications were developed for the winter, spring, summer, and fall seasons. For each season, the two classification tiers were identified independently, such that the definition of one tier does not depend on the other tier having already been defined. The first tier of the classification is comprised of supertype patterns. These broad-scale circulation classes are useful for generalized analyses such as investigations of the temporal trends in circulation frequency and persistence. The second, more detailed tier consists of circulation types and is useful for numerous applied research questions regarding the relationships between large-scale circulation and local and regional climate. Three to five supertypes and up to 19 circulation types were identified for each season. An intuitive nomenclature scheme based on the physical entities (i.e., anomaly centers) which dominate the specific patterns was used to label each of the supertypes and types. Two example applications illustrate the potential usefulness of a two-tier classification. In the first application, the temporal variability of the supertypes was evaluated. In general, the frequency and persistence of supertypes dominated by anticyclonic circulation increased during the study period, whereas the supertypes dominated by cyclonic features decreased in frequency and persistence. The usefulness of the derived circulation types was exemplified by an analysis of the circulation associated with heat waves and cold spells reported at several cities in Bulgaria. These extreme temperature events were found to occur with a small number of circulation types, a finding that can be helpful in understanding past

  13. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. III: Evaluation using a panel of reference foods.

    PubMed

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents an exploratory evaluation of four functional components of a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods in a concordance study. Two independent raters assigned concern levels to 20 reference GM foods using a rating form based on the proposed RBCS. The four components of evaluation were: (1) degree of concordance, (2) distribution across concern levels, (3) discriminating ability of the scheme, and (4) ease of use. At least one of the 20 reference foods was assigned to each of the possible concern levels, demonstrating the ability of the scheme to identify GM foods of different concern with respect to potential health risk. There was reasonably good concordance between the two raters for the three separate parts of the RBCS. The raters agreed that the criteria in the scheme were sufficiently clear in discriminating reference foods into different concern levels, and that with some experience, the scheme was reasonably easy to use. Specific issues and suggestions for improvements identified in the concordance study are discussed.

  14. Lexicon-enhanced sentiment analysis framework using rule-based classification scheme.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Muhammad Zubair; Khan, Aurangzeb; Ahmad, Shakeel; Qasim, Maria; Khan, Imran Ali

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in social networks and blogs, the social media services are increasingly being used by online communities to share their views and experiences about a particular product, policy and event. Due to economic importance of these reviews, there is growing trend of writing user reviews to promote a product. Nowadays, users prefer online blogs and review sites to purchase products. Therefore, user reviews are considered as an important source of information in Sentiment Analysis (SA) applications for decision making. In this work, we exploit the wealth of user reviews, available through the online forums, to analyze the semantic orientation of words by categorizing them into +ive and -ive classes to identify and classify emoticons, modifiers, general-purpose and domain-specific words expressed in the public's feedback about the products. However, the un-supervised learning approach employed in previous studies is becoming less efficient due to data sparseness, low accuracy due to non-consideration of emoticons, modifiers, and presence of domain specific words, as they may result in inaccurate classification of users' reviews. Lexicon-enhanced sentiment analysis based on Rule-based classification scheme is an alternative approach for improving sentiment classification of users' reviews in online communities. In addition to the sentiment terms used in general purpose sentiment analysis, we integrate emoticons, modifiers and domain specific terms to analyze the reviews posted in online communities. To test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we considered users reviews in three domains. The results obtained from different experiments demonstrate that the proposed method overcomes limitations of previous methods and the performance of the sentiment analysis is improved after considering emoticons, modifiers, negations, and domain specific terms when compared to baseline methods.

  15. A cancelable biometric scheme based on multi-lead ECGs.

    PubMed

    Peng-Tzu Chen; Shun-Chi Wu; Jui-Hsuan Hsieh

    2017-07-01

    Biometric technologies offer great advantages over other recognition methods, but there are concerns that they may compromise the privacy of individuals. In this paper, an electrocardiogram (ECG)-based cancelable biometric scheme is proposed to relieve such concerns. In this scheme, distinct biometric templates for a given beat bundle are constructed via "subspace collapsing." To determine the identity of any unknown beat bundle, the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, incorporating a "suppression and poll" strategy, is adopted. Unlike the existing cancelable biometric schemes, knowledge of the distortion transform is not required for recognition. Experiments with real ECGs from 285 subjects are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme. The best recognition rate of 97.58 % was achieved under the test condition N train = 10 and N test = 10.

  16. Reliability of McConnell's classification of patellar orientation in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Watson, C J; Propps, M; Galt, W; Redding, A; Dobbs, D

    1999-07-01

    Test-retest reliability study with blinded testers. To determine the intratester reliability of the McConnell classification system and to determine whether the intertester reliability of this system would be improved by one-on-one training of the testers, increasing the variability and numbers of subjects, blinding the testers to the absence or presence of patellofemoral pain syndrome, and adhering to the McConnell classification system as it is taught in the "McConnell Patellofemoral Treatment Plan" continuing education course. The McConnell classification system is currently used by physical therapy clinicians to quantify static patellar orientation. The measurements generated from this system purportedly guide the therapist in the application of patellofemoral tape and in assessment of the efficacy of treatment interventions on changing patellar orientation. Fifty-six subjects (age range, 21-65 years) provided a total of 101 knees for assessment. Seventy-six knees did not produce symptoms. A researcher who did not participate in the measuring process determined that 17 subjects had patellofemoral pain syndrome in 25 knees. Two testers concurrently measured static patellar orientation (anterior/posterior and medial/lateral tilt, medial/lateral glide, and patellar rotation) on subjects, using the McConnell classification system. Repeat measures were performed 3-7 days later. A kappa (kappa) statistic was used to assess the degree of agreement within each tester and between testers. The kappa coefficients for intratester reliability varied from -0.06 to 0.35. Intertester reliability ranged from -0.03 to 0.19. The McConnell classification system, in its current form, does not appear to be very reliable. Intratester reliability ranged from poor to fair, and intertester reliability was poor to slight. This system should not be used as a measurement tool or as a basis for treatment decisions.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasscer, R. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system has been designed for earth science libraries. It is a tool for assigning call numbers to earth science and allied pure science materials in order to collect these materials into related subject groups on the library shelves and arrange them alphabetically by author and title. The classification can be used as a retrieval system to access materials through the subject and geographic numbers.The classification scheme has been developed over the years since 1904 to meet the ever-changing needs of increased specialization and the development of new areas of research in the earth sciences. The system contains seven schedules: Subject scheduleGeological survey schedule Earth science periodical scheduleGovernment document periodical scheduleGeneral science periodical schedule Earth science map schedule Geographic schedule Introduction provides detailed instructions on the construction of call numbers for works falling into the framework of the classification schedules.The tables following the introduction can be quickly accessed through the use of the newly expanded subject index.The purpose of this publication is to provide the earth science community with a classification and retrieval system for earth science materials, to offer sufficient explanation of its structure and use, and to enable library staff and clientele to classify or access research materials in a library collection.

  18. Classification scheme for sedimentary and igneous rocks in Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.; Schmidt, M. E.; Fisk, M. R.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. W.; Sautter, V.; Sumner, D.; Williams, A. J.; Clegg, S. M.; Cousin, A.; Gasnault, O.; Gellert, R.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Wiens, R. C.

    2017-03-01

    Rocks analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater include a variety of clastic sedimentary rocks and igneous float rocks transported by fluvial and impact processes. To facilitate the discussion of the range of lithologies, we present in this article a petrological classification framework adapting terrestrial classification schemes to Mars compositions (such as Fe abundances typically higher than for comparable lithologies on Earth), to specific Curiosity observations (such as common alkali-rich rocks), and to the capabilities of the rover instruments. Mineralogy was acquired only locally for a few drilled rocks, and so it does not suffice as a systematic classification tool, in contrast to classical terrestrial rock classification. The core of this classification involves (1) the characterization of rock texture as sedimentary, igneous or undefined according to grain/crystal sizes and shapes using imaging from the ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager (RMI), Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam instruments, and (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers based on the abundances of Fe, Si, alkali, and S determined by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments. The aims are to help understand Gale crater geology by highlighting the various categories of rocks analyzed by the rover. Several implications are proposed from the cross-comparisons of rocks of various texture and composition, for instance between in place outcrops and float rocks. All outcrops analyzed by the rover are sedimentary; no igneous outcrops have been observed. However, some igneous rocks are clasts in conglomerates, suggesting that part of them are derived from the crater rim. The compositions of in-place sedimentary rocks contrast significantly with the compositions of igneous float rocks. While some of the differences between sedimentary rocks and igneous floats may be related to physical sorting and diagenesis of the sediments, some of the sedimentary rocks (e

  19. Classification scheme for sedimentary and igneous rocks in Gale crater, Mars

    DOE PAGES

    Mangold, Nicolas; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Fisk, Martin R.; ...

    2016-11-05

    Rocks analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater include a variety of clastic sedimentary rocks and igneous float rocks transported by fluvial and impact processes. Here, to facilitate the discussion of the range of lithologies, we present in this article a petrological classification framework adapting terrestrial classification schemes to Mars compositions (such as Fe abundances typically higher than for comparable lithologies on Earth), to specific Curiosity observations (such as common alkali-rich rocks), and to the capabilities of the rover instruments. Mineralogy was acquired only locally for a few drilled rocks, and so it does not suffice as a systematicmore » classification tool, in contrast to classical terrestrial rock classification. The core of this classification involves (1) the characterization of rock texture as sedimentary, igneous or undefined according to grain/crystal sizes and shapes using imaging from the ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager (RMI), Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam instruments, and (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers based on the abundances of Fe, Si, alkali, and S determined by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments. The aims are to help understand Gale crater geology by highlighting the various categories of rocks analyzed by the rover. Several implications are proposed from the cross-comparisons of rocks of various texture and composition, for instance between in place outcrops and float rocks. All outcrops analyzed by the rover are sedimentary; no igneous outcrops have been observed. However, some igneous rocks are clasts in conglomerates, suggesting that part of them are derived from the crater rim. The compositions of in-place sedimentary rocks contrast significantly with the compositions of igneous float rocks. While some of the differences between sedimentary rocks and igneous floats may be related to physical sorting and diagenesis of the sediments, some of the sedimentary

  20. Classification scheme for sedimentary and igneous rocks in Gale crater, Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, Nicolas; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Fisk, Martin R.

    Rocks analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater include a variety of clastic sedimentary rocks and igneous float rocks transported by fluvial and impact processes. Here, to facilitate the discussion of the range of lithologies, we present in this article a petrological classification framework adapting terrestrial classification schemes to Mars compositions (such as Fe abundances typically higher than for comparable lithologies on Earth), to specific Curiosity observations (such as common alkali-rich rocks), and to the capabilities of the rover instruments. Mineralogy was acquired only locally for a few drilled rocks, and so it does not suffice as a systematicmore » classification tool, in contrast to classical terrestrial rock classification. The core of this classification involves (1) the characterization of rock texture as sedimentary, igneous or undefined according to grain/crystal sizes and shapes using imaging from the ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager (RMI), Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam instruments, and (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers based on the abundances of Fe, Si, alkali, and S determined by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments. The aims are to help understand Gale crater geology by highlighting the various categories of rocks analyzed by the rover. Several implications are proposed from the cross-comparisons of rocks of various texture and composition, for instance between in place outcrops and float rocks. All outcrops analyzed by the rover are sedimentary; no igneous outcrops have been observed. However, some igneous rocks are clasts in conglomerates, suggesting that part of them are derived from the crater rim. The compositions of in-place sedimentary rocks contrast significantly with the compositions of igneous float rocks. While some of the differences between sedimentary rocks and igneous floats may be related to physical sorting and diagenesis of the sediments, some of the sedimentary

  1. Application of a five-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants lodged on the InSiGHT locus-specific database

    PubMed Central

    Plazzer, John-Paul; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Akagi, Kiwamu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bapat, Bharati; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá, Gabriel; den Dunnen, Johan T.; du Sart, Desiree; Fabre, Aurelie; Farrell, Michael P.; Farrington, Susan M.; Frayling, Ian M.; Frebourg, Thierry; Goldgar, David E.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Kohonen-Corish, Maija; Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt; Leung, Suet Yi; Martins, Alexandra; Moller, Pal; Morak, Monika; Nystrom, Minna; Peltomaki, Paivi; Pineda, Marta; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Scott, Rodney J.; Sijmons, Rolf; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Tops, Carli M.; Weber, Thomas; Wijnen, Juul; Woods, Michael O.; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical classification of sequence variants identified in hereditary disease genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and apply a standardized classification scheme to constitutional variants in the Lynch Syndrome genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Unpublished data submission was encouraged to assist variant classification, and recognized by microattribution. The scheme was refined by multidisciplinary expert committee review of clinical and functional data available for variants, applied to 2,360 sequence alterations, and disseminated online. Assessment using validated criteria altered classifications for 66% of 12,006 database entries. Clinical recommendations based on transparent evaluation are now possible for 1,370 variants not obviously protein-truncating from nomenclature. This large-scale endeavor will facilitate consistent management of suspected Lynch Syndrome families, and demonstrates the value of multidisciplinary collaboration for curation and classification of variants in public locus-specific databases. PMID:24362816

  2. Hydrometeorological application of an extratropical cyclone classification scheme in the southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkbeil, J. C.; Brommer, D. M.; Comstock, I. J.; Loyd, T.

    2012-07-01

    Extratropical cyclones (ETCs) in the southern United States are often overlooked when compared with tropical cyclones in the region and ETCs in the northern United States. Although southern ETCs are significant weather events, there is currently not an operational scheme used for identifying and discussing these nameless storms. In this research, we classified 84 ETCs (1970-2009). We manually identified five distinct formation regions and seven unique ETC types using statistical classification. Statistical classification employed the use of principal components analysis and two methods of cluster analysis. Both manual and statistical storm types generally showed positive (negative) relationships with El Niño (La Niña). Manual storm types displayed precipitation swaths consistent with discrete storm tracks which further legitimizes the existence of multiple modes of southern ETCs. Statistical storm types also displayed unique precipitation intensity swaths, but these swaths were less indicative of track location. It is hoped that by classifying southern ETCs into types, that forecasters, hydrologists, and broadcast meteorologists might be able to better anticipate projected amounts of precipitation at their locations.

  3. Relevance popularity: A term event model based feature selection scheme for text classification.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guozhong; An, Baiguo; Yang, Fengqin; Wang, Han; Zhang, Libiao

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection is a practical approach for improving the performance of text classification methods by optimizing the feature subsets input to classifiers. In traditional feature selection methods such as information gain and chi-square, the number of documents that contain a particular term (i.e. the document frequency) is often used. However, the frequency of a given term appearing in each document has not been fully investigated, even though it is a promising feature to produce accurate classifications. In this paper, we propose a new feature selection scheme based on a term event Multinomial naive Bayes probabilistic model. According to the model assumptions, the matching score function, which is based on the prediction probability ratio, can be factorized. Finally, we derive a feature selection measurement for each term after replacing inner parameters by their estimators. On a benchmark English text datasets (20 Newsgroups) and a Chinese text dataset (MPH-20), our numerical experiment results obtained from using two widely used text classifiers (naive Bayes and support vector machine) demonstrate that our method outperformed the representative feature selection methods.

  4. Application of a 5-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants in the InSiGHT locus-specific database.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Bryony A; Spurdle, Amanda B; Plazzer, John-Paul; Greenblatt, Marc S; Akagi, Kiwamu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bapat, Bharati; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá, Gabriel; den Dunnen, Johan T; du Sart, Desiree; Fabre, Aurelie; Farrell, Michael P; Farrington, Susan M; Frayling, Ian M; Frebourg, Thierry; Goldgar, David E; Heinen, Christopher D; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Kohonen-Corish, Maija; Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt; Leung, Suet Yi; Martins, Alexandra; Moller, Pal; Morak, Monika; Nystrom, Minna; Peltomaki, Paivi; Pineda, Marta; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Scott, Rodney J; Sijmons, Rolf; Tavtigian, Sean V; Tops, Carli M; Weber, Thomas; Wijnen, Juul; Woods, Michael O; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2014-02-01

    The clinical classification of hereditary sequence variants identified in disease-related genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and apply a standardized classification scheme to constitutional variants in the Lynch syndrome-associated genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Unpublished data submission was encouraged to assist in variant classification and was recognized through microattribution. The scheme was refined by multidisciplinary expert committee review of the clinical and functional data available for variants, applied to 2,360 sequence alterations, and disseminated online. Assessment using validated criteria altered classifications for 66% of 12,006 database entries. Clinical recommendations based on transparent evaluation are now possible for 1,370 variants that were not obviously protein truncating from nomenclature. This large-scale endeavor will facilitate the consistent management of families suspected to have Lynch syndrome and demonstrates the value of multidisciplinary collaboration in the curation and classification of variants in public locus-specific databases.

  5. Classification of close binary systems by Svechnikov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryomova, G. N.

    The paper presents the historical overview of classification schemes of eclipsing variable stars with the foreground of advantages of the classification scheme by Svechnikov being widely appreciated for Close Binary Systems due to simplicity of classification criteria and brevity.

  6. Refining Time-Activity Classification of Human Subjects Using the Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Maogui; Li, Wei; Li, Lianfa; Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed spatial location information is important in accurately estimating personal exposure to air pollution. Global Position System (GPS) has been widely used in tracking personal paths and activities. Previous researchers have developed time-activity classification models based on GPS data, most of them were developed for specific regions. An adaptive model for time-location classification can be widely applied to air pollution studies that use GPS to track individual level time-activity patterns. Methods Time-activity data were collected for seven days using GPS loggers and accelerometers from thirteen adult participants from Southern California under free living conditions. We developed an automated model based on random forests to classify major time-activity patterns (i.e. indoor, outdoor-static, outdoor-walking, and in-vehicle travel). Sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the contribution of the accelerometer data and the supplemental spatial data (i.e. roadway and tax parcel data) to the accuracy of time-activity classification. Our model was evaluated using both leave-one-fold-out and leave-one-subject-out methods. Results Maximum speeds in averaging time intervals of 7 and 5 minutes, and distance to primary highways with limited access were found to be the three most important variables in the classification model. Leave-one-fold-out cross-validation showed an overall accuracy of 99.71%. Sensitivities varied from 84.62% (outdoor walking) to 99.90% (indoor). Specificities varied from 96.33% (indoor) to 99.98% (outdoor static). The exclusion of accelerometer and ambient light sensor variables caused a slight loss in sensitivity for outdoor walking, but little loss in overall accuracy. However, leave-one-subject-out cross-validation showed considerable loss in sensitivity for outdoor static and outdoor walking conditions. Conclusions The random forests classification model can achieve high accuracy for the four major time

  7. Refining Time-Activity Classification of Human Subjects Using the Global Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Maogui; Li, Wei; Li, Lianfa; Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Detailed spatial location information is important in accurately estimating personal exposure to air pollution. Global Position System (GPS) has been widely used in tracking personal paths and activities. Previous researchers have developed time-activity classification models based on GPS data, most of them were developed for specific regions. An adaptive model for time-location classification can be widely applied to air pollution studies that use GPS to track individual level time-activity patterns. Time-activity data were collected for seven days using GPS loggers and accelerometers from thirteen adult participants from Southern California under free living conditions. We developed an automated model based on random forests to classify major time-activity patterns (i.e. indoor, outdoor-static, outdoor-walking, and in-vehicle travel). Sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the contribution of the accelerometer data and the supplemental spatial data (i.e. roadway and tax parcel data) to the accuracy of time-activity classification. Our model was evaluated using both leave-one-fold-out and leave-one-subject-out methods. Maximum speeds in averaging time intervals of 7 and 5 minutes, and distance to primary highways with limited access were found to be the three most important variables in the classification model. Leave-one-fold-out cross-validation showed an overall accuracy of 99.71%. Sensitivities varied from 84.62% (outdoor walking) to 99.90% (indoor). Specificities varied from 96.33% (indoor) to 99.98% (outdoor static). The exclusion of accelerometer and ambient light sensor variables caused a slight loss in sensitivity for outdoor walking, but little loss in overall accuracy. However, leave-one-subject-out cross-validation showed considerable loss in sensitivity for outdoor static and outdoor walking conditions. The random forests classification model can achieve high accuracy for the four major time-activity categories. The model also performed well

  8. A proposed radiographic classification scheme for congenital thoracic vertebral malformations in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Guevar, Julien; Stalin, Catherine; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Penderis, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations are common in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds such as French bulldogs, English bulldogs, Boston terriers, and pugs. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether a radiographic classification scheme developed for use in humans would be feasible for use in these dog breeds. Inclusion criteria were hospital admission between September 2009 and April 2013, neurologic examination findings available, diagnostic quality lateral and ventro-dorsal digital radiographs of the thoracic vertebral column, and at least one congenital vertebral malformation. Radiographs were retrieved and interpreted by two observers who were unaware of neurologic status. Vertebral malformations were classified based on a classification scheme modified from a previous human study and a consensus of both observers. Twenty-eight dogs met inclusion criteria (12 with neurologic deficits, 16 with no neurologic deficits). Congenital vertebral malformations affected 85/362 (23.5%) of thoracic vertebrae. Vertebral body formation defects were the most common (butterfly vertebrae 6.6%, ventral wedge-shaped vertebrae 5.5%, dorsal hemivertebrae 0.8%, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae 0.5%). No lateral hemivertebrae or lateral wedge-shaped vertebrae were identified. The T7 vertebra was the most commonly affected (11/28 dogs), followed by T8 (8/28 dogs) and T12 (8/28 dogs). The number and type of vertebral malformations differed between groups (P = 0.01). Based on MRI, dorsal, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae were the cause of spinal cord compression in 5/12 (41.6%) of dogs with neurologic deficits. Findings indicated that a modified human radiographic classification system of vertebral malformations is feasible for use in future studies of brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Tensor-based classification of an auditory mobile BCI without a subject-specific calibration phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Rob; Hunyadi, Borbála; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Objective. One of the major drawbacks in EEG brain-computer interfaces (BCI) is the need for subject-specific training of the classifier. By removing the need for a supervised calibration phase, new users could potentially explore a BCI faster. In this work we aim to remove this subject-specific calibration phase and allow direct classification. Approach. We explore canonical polyadic decompositions and block term decompositions of the EEG. These methods exploit structure in higher dimensional data arrays called tensors. The BCI tensors are constructed by concatenating ERP templates from other subjects to a target and non-target trial and the inherent structure guides a decomposition that allows accurate classification. We illustrate the new method on data from a three-class auditory oddball paradigm. Main results. The presented approach leads to a fast and intuitive classification with accuracies competitive with a supervised and cross-validated LDA approach. Significance. The described methods are a promising new way of classifying BCI data with a forthright link to the original P300 ERP signal over the conventional and widely used supervised approaches.

  10. Tensor-based classification of an auditory mobile BCI without a subject-specific calibration phase.

    PubMed

    Zink, Rob; Hunyadi, Borbála; Huffel, Sabine Van; Vos, Maarten De

    2016-04-01

    One of the major drawbacks in EEG brain-computer interfaces (BCI) is the need for subject-specific training of the classifier. By removing the need for a supervised calibration phase, new users could potentially explore a BCI faster. In this work we aim to remove this subject-specific calibration phase and allow direct classification. We explore canonical polyadic decompositions and block term decompositions of the EEG. These methods exploit structure in higher dimensional data arrays called tensors. The BCI tensors are constructed by concatenating ERP templates from other subjects to a target and non-target trial and the inherent structure guides a decomposition that allows accurate classification. We illustrate the new method on data from a three-class auditory oddball paradigm. The presented approach leads to a fast and intuitive classification with accuracies competitive with a supervised and cross-validated LDA approach. The described methods are a promising new way of classifying BCI data with a forthright link to the original P300 ERP signal over the conventional and widely used supervised approaches.

  11. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O; Vogel, Timothy M; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-08-01

    Correctly identifying nearest "neighbors" of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned with

  12. The Evolution of Complex Microsurgical Midface Reconstruction: A Classification Scheme and Reconstructive Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Alam, Daniel; Ali, Yaseen; Klem, Christopher; Coventry, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Orbito-malar reconstruction after oncological resection represents one of the most challenging facial reconstructive procedures. Until the last few decades, rehabilitation was typically prosthesis based with a limited role for surgery. The advent of microsurgical techniques allowed large-volume tissue reconstitution from a distant donor site, revolutionizing the potential approaches to these defects. The authors report a novel surgery-based algorithm and a classification scheme for complete midface reconstruction with a foundation in the Gillies principles of like-to-like reconstruction and with a significant role of computer-aided virtual planning. With this approach, the authors have been able to achieve significantly better patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Twenty five years of beach monitoring in Hong Kong: A re-examination of the beach water quality classification scheme from a comparative and global perspective.

    PubMed

    Thoe, W; Lee, Olive H K; Leung, K F; Lee, T; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Yang, Ron R; Chui, Samuel H K

    2018-06-01

    Hong Kong's beach water quality classification scheme, used effectively for >25 years in protecting public health, was first established in local epidemiology studies during the late 1980s where Escherichia coli (E. coli) was identified as the most suitable faecal indicator bacteria. To review and further substantiate the scheme's robustness, a performance check was carried out to classify water quality of 37 major local beaches in Hong Kong during four bathing seasons (March-October) from 2010 to 2013. Given the enterococci and E. coli data collected, beach classification by the local scheme was found to be in line with the prominent international benchmarks recommended by the World Health Organization and the European Union. Local bacteriological studies over the last 15 years further confirmed that E. coli is the more suitable faecal indicator bacteria than enterococci in the local context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O.; Vogel, Timothy M.; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Correctly identifying nearest “neighbors” of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned

  15. Using two classification schemes to develop vegetation indices of biological integrity for wetlands in West Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Walter; Rentch, James S; Grafton, William N; Kordek, Walter S; Anderson, James T

    2010-11-01

    Bioassessment methods for wetlands, and other bodies of water, have been developed worldwide to measure and quantify changes in "biological integrity." These assessments are based on a classification system, meant to ensure appropriate comparisons between wetland types. Using a local site-specific disturbance gradient, we built vegetation indices of biological integrity (Veg-IBIs) based on two commonly used wetland classification systems in the USA: One based on vegetative structure and the other based on a wetland's position in a landscape and sources of water. The resulting class-specific Veg-IBIs were comprised of 1-5 metrics that varied in their sensitivity to the disturbance gradient (R2=0.14-0.65). Moreover, the sensitivity to the disturbance gradient increased as metrics from each of the two classification schemes were combined (added). Using this information to monitor natural and created wetlands will help natural resource managers track changes in biological integrity of wetlands in response to anthropogenic disturbance and allows the use of vegetative communities to set ecological performance standards for mitigation banks.

  16. A Classification Methodology and Retrieval Model to Support Software Reuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Dewey Decimal Classification ( DDC 18), an enumerative scheme, occupies 40 pages [Buchanan 19791. Langridge [19731 states that the facets listed in the...sense of historical importance or wide spread use. The schemes are: Dewey Decimal Classification ( DDC ), Universal Decimal Classification (UDC...Classification Systems ..... ..... 2.3.3 Library Classification__- .52 23.3.1 Dewey Decimal Classification -53 2.33.2 Universal Decimal Classification 55 2333

  17. Assessment of skeletal maturity in scoliosis patients to determine clinical management: a new classification scheme using distal radius and ulna radiographs.

    PubMed

    Luk, Keith D K; Saw, Lim Beng; Grozman, Samuel; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Samartzis, Dino

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of skeletal maturity in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is important to guide clinical management. Understanding growth peak and cessation is crucial to determine clinical observational intervals, timing to initiate or end bracing therapy, and when to instrument and fuse. The commonly used clinical or radiologic methods to assess skeletal maturity are still deficient in predicting the growth peak and cessation among adolescents, and bone age is too complicated to apply. To address these concerns, we describe a new distal radius and ulna (DRU) classification scheme to assess skeletal maturity. A prospective study. One hundred fifty young, female AIS patients with hand x-rays and no previous history of spine surgery from a single institute were assessed. Radius and ulna plain radiographs, and various anthropomorphic parameters were assessed. We identified various stages of radius and ulna epiphysis maturity, which were graded as R1-R11 for the radius and U1-U9 for the ulna. The bone age, development of sexual characteristics, standing height, sitting height, arm span, radius length, and tibia length were studied prospectively at each stage of these epiphysis changes. Standing height, sitting height, and arm span growth were at their peak during stages R7 (mean, 11.4 years old) and U5 (mean, 11.0 years old). The long bone growths also demonstrated a common peak at R7 and U5. Cessation of height and arm span growth was noted after stages R10 (mean, 15.6 years old) and U9 (mean, 17.3 years old). The new DRU classification is a practical and easy-to-use scheme that can provide skeletal maturation status. This classification scheme provides close relationship with adolescent growth spurt and cessation of growth. This classification may have a tremendous utility in improving clinical-decision making in the conservative and operative management of scoliosis patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Circulation Type Classifications and their nexus to Van Bebber's storm track Vb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstätter, M.; Chimani, B.

    2012-04-01

    Circulation Type Classifications (CTCs) are tools to identify repetitive and predominantly stationary patterns of the atmospheric circulation over a certain area, with the purpose to enable the recognition of specific characteristics in surface climate variables. On the other hand storm tracks can be used to identify similar types of synoptic events from a non-stationary, kinematic perspective. Such a storm track classification for Europe has been done in the late 19th century by Van Bebber (1882, 1891), from which the famous type Vb and Vc/d remained up to the present day because of to their association with major flooding events like in August 2002 in Europe. In this work a systematic tracking procedure has been developed, to determine storm track types and their characteristics especially for the Eastern Alpine Region in the period 1961-2002, using ERA40 and ERAinterim reanalysis. The focus thereby is on cyclone tracks of type V as suggested by van Bebber and congeneric types. This new catalogue is used as a reference to verify the hypothesis of a certain coherence of storm track Vb with certain circulation types (e.g. Fricke and Kaminski, 2002). Selected objective and subjective classification schemes from the COST733 action (http://cost733.met.no/, Phillip et al. 2010) are used therefore, as well as the manual classification from ZAMG (Lauscher 1972 and 1985), in which storm track Vb has been classified explicitly on a daily base since 1948. The latter scheme should prove itself as a valuable and unique data source in that issue. Results show that not less than 146 storm tracks are identified as Vb between 1961 and 2002, whereas only three events could be found from literature, pointing to big subjectivity and preconception in the issue of Vb storm tracks. The annual number of Vb storm tracks do not show any significant trend over the last 42 years, but large variations from year to year. Circulation type classification CAP27 (Cluster Analysis of Principal

  19. Detection and classification of subject-generated artifacts in EEG signals using autoregressive models.

    PubMed

    Lawhern, Vernon; Hairston, W David; McDowell, Kaleb; Westerfield, Marissa; Robbins, Kay

    2012-07-15

    We examine the problem of accurate detection and classification of artifacts in continuous EEG recordings. Manual identification of artifacts, by means of an expert or panel of experts, can be tedious, time-consuming and infeasible for large datasets. We use autoregressive (AR) models for feature extraction and characterization of EEG signals containing several kinds of subject-generated artifacts. AR model parameters are scale-invariant features that can be used to develop models of artifacts across a population. We use a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to discriminate among artifact conditions using the AR model parameters as features. Results indicate reliable classification among several different artifact conditions across subjects (approximately 94%). These results suggest that AR modeling can be a useful tool for discriminating among artifact signals both within and across individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A new gamma-ray burst classification scheme from GRB 060614.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, N; Norris, J P; Barthelmy, S D; Granot, J; Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Markwardt, C B; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; Nousek, J A; O'Brien, P T; Page, M; Palmer, D M; Parsons, A M; Roming, P W A; Sakamoto, T; Sarazin, C L; Schady, P; Stamatikos, M; Woosley, S E

    2006-12-21

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are known to come in two duration classes, separated at approximately 2 s. Long-duration bursts originate from star-forming regions in galaxies, have accompanying supernovae when these are near enough to observe and are probably caused by massive-star collapsars. Recent observations show that short-duration bursts originate in regions within their host galaxies that have lower star-formation rates, consistent with binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers. Moreover, although their hosts are predominantly nearby galaxies, no supernovae have been so far associated with short-duration GRBs. Here we report that the bright, nearby GRB 060614 does not fit into either class. Its approximately 102-s duration groups it with long-duration GRBs, while its temporal lag and peak luminosity fall entirely within the short-duration GRB subclass. Moreover, very deep optical observations exclude an accompanying supernova, similar to short-duration GRBs. This combination of a long-duration event without an accompanying supernova poses a challenge to both the collapsar and the merging-neutron-star interpretations and opens the door to a new GRB classification scheme that straddles both long- and short-duration bursts.

  1. Automatic breast tissue density estimation scheme in digital mammography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menechelli, Renan C.; Pacheco, Ana Luisa V.; Schiabel, Homero

    2017-03-01

    Cases of breast cancer have increased substantially each year. However, radiologists are subject to subjectivity and failures of interpretation which may affect the final diagnosis in this examination. The high density features in breast tissue are important factors related to these failures. Thus, among many functions some CADx (Computer-Aided Diagnosis) schemes are classifying breasts according to the predominant density. In order to aid in such a procedure, this work attempts to describe automated software for classification and statistical information on the percentage change in breast tissue density, through analysis of sub regions (ROIs) from the whole mammography image. Once the breast is segmented, the image is divided into regions from which texture features are extracted. Then an artificial neural network MLP was used to categorize ROIs. Experienced radiologists have previously determined the ROIs density classification, which was the reference to the software evaluation. From tests results its average accuracy was 88.7% in ROIs classification, and 83.25% in the classification of the whole breast density in the 4 BI-RADS density classes - taking into account a set of 400 images. Furthermore, when considering only a simplified two classes division (high and low densities) the classifier accuracy reached 93.5%, with AUC = 0.95.

  2. A novel fractal image compression scheme with block classification and sorting based on Pearson's correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianji; Zheng, Nanning

    2013-09-01

    Fractal image compression (FIC) is an image coding technology based on the local similarity of image structure. It is widely used in many fields such as image retrieval, image denoising, image authentication, and encryption. FIC, however, suffers from the high computational complexity in encoding. Although many schemes are published to speed up encoding, they do not easily satisfy the encoding time or the reconstructed image quality requirements. In this paper, a new FIC scheme is proposed based on the fact that the affine similarity between two blocks in FIC is equivalent to the absolute value of Pearson's correlation coefficient (APCC) between them. First, all blocks in the range and domain pools are chosen and classified using an APCC-based block classification method to increase the matching probability. Second, by sorting the domain blocks with respect to APCCs between these domain blocks and a preset block in each class, the matching domain block for a range block can be searched in the selected domain set in which these APCCs are closer to APCC between the range block and the preset block. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can significantly speed up the encoding process in FIC while preserving the reconstructed image quality well.

  3. Update on diabetes classification.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celeste C; Philipson, Louis H

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the difficulties in creating a definitive classification of diabetes mellitus in the absence of a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of the major forms. This brief review shows the evolving nature of the classification of diabetes mellitus. No classification scheme is ideal, and all have some overlap and inconsistencies. The only diabetes in which it is possible to accurately diagnose by DNA sequencing, monogenic diabetes, remains undiagnosed in more than 90% of the individuals who have diabetes caused by one of the known gene mutations. The point of classification, or taxonomy, of disease, should be to give insight into both pathogenesis and treatment. It remains a source of frustration that all schemes of diabetes mellitus continue to fall short of this goal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PET/CT detectability and classification of simulated pulmonary lesions using an SUV correction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Andrew N.; Matthews, Kenneth L., II; Bujenovic, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) together are a powerful diagnostic tool, but imperfect image quality allows false positive and false negative diagnoses to be made by any observer despite experience and training. This work investigates PET acquisition mode, reconstruction method and a standard uptake value (SUV) correction scheme on the classification of lesions as benign or malignant in PET/CT images, in an anthropomorphic phantom. The scheme accounts for partial volume effect (PVE) and PET resolution. The observer draws a region of interest (ROI) around the lesion using the CT dataset. A simulated homogenous PET lesion of the same shape as the drawn ROI is blurred with the point spread function (PSF) of the PET scanner to estimate the PVE, providing a scaling factor to produce a corrected SUV. Computer simulations showed that the accuracy of the corrected PET values depends on variations in the CT-drawn boundary and the position of the lesion with respect to the PET image matrix, especially for smaller lesions. Correction accuracy was affected slightly by mismatch of the simulation PSF and the actual scanner PSF. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study resulted in several observations. Using observer drawn ROIs, scaled tumor-background ratios (TBRs) more accurately represented actual TBRs than unscaled TBRs. For the PET images, 3D OSEM outperformed 2D OSEM, 3D OSEM outperformed 3D FBP, and 2D OSEM outperformed 2D FBP. The correction scheme significantly increased sensitivity and slightly increased accuracy for all acquisition and reconstruction modes at the cost of a small decrease in specificity.

  5. On Classification in the Study of Failure, and a Challenge to Classifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, Kimberly S.

    2003-01-01

    Classification schemes are abundant in the literature of failure. They serve a number of purposes, some more successfully than others. We examine several classification schemes constructed for various purposes relating to failure and its investigation, and discuss their values and limits. The analysis results in a continuum of uses for classification schemes, that suggests that the value of certain properties of these schemes is dependent on the goals a classification is designed to forward. The contrast in the value of different properties for different uses highlights a particular shortcoming: we argue that while humans are good at developing one kind of scheme: dynamic, flexible classifications used for exploratory purposes, we are not so good at developing another: static, rigid classifications used to trap and organize data for specific analytic goals. Our lack of strong foundation in developing valid instantiations of the latter impedes progress toward a number of investigative goals. This shortcoming and its consequences pose a challenge to researchers in the study of failure: to develop new methods for constructing and validating static classification schemes of demonstrable value in promoting the goals of investigations. We note current productive activity in this area, and outline foundations for more.

  6. A soft computing scheme incorporating ANN and MOV energy in fault detection, classification and distance estimation of EHV transmission line with FSC.

    PubMed

    Khadke, Piyush; Patne, Nita; Singh, Arvind; Shinde, Gulab

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a novel and accurate scheme for fault detection, classification and fault distance estimation for a fixed series compensated transmission line is proposed. The proposed scheme is based on artificial neural network (ANN) and metal oxide varistor (MOV) energy, employing Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm. The novelty of this scheme is the use of MOV energy signals of fixed series capacitors (FSC) as input to train the ANN. Such approach has never been used in any earlier fault analysis algorithms in the last few decades. Proposed scheme uses only single end measurement energy signals of MOV in all the 3 phases over one cycle duration from the occurrence of a fault. Thereafter, these MOV energy signals are fed as input to ANN for fault distance estimation. Feasibility and reliability of the proposed scheme have been evaluated for all ten types of fault in test power system model at different fault inception angles over numerous fault locations. Real transmission system parameters of 3-phase 400 kV Wardha-Aurangabad transmission line (400 km) with 40 % FSC at Power Grid Wardha Substation, India is considered for this research. Extensive simulation experiments show that the proposed scheme provides quite accurate results which demonstrate complete protection scheme with high accuracy, simplicity and robustness.

  7. Sensitivity and Specificity of the World Health Organization Dengue Classification Schemes for Severe Dengue Assessment in Children in Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Gleicy A.; Gonin, Michelle Luiza C.; Pone, Sheila M.; Cruz, Oswaldo G.; Nobre, Flávio F.; Brasil, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical definition of severe dengue fever remains a challenge for researchers in hyperendemic areas like Brazil. The ability of the traditional (1997) as well as the revised (2009) World Health Organization (WHO) dengue case classification schemes to detect severe dengue cases was evaluated in 267 children admitted to hospital with laboratory-confirmed dengue. Principal Findings Using the traditional scheme, 28.5% of patients could not be assigned to any category, while the revised scheme categorized all patients. Intensive therapeutic interventions were used as the reference standard to evaluate the ability of both the traditional and revised schemes to detect severe dengue cases. Analyses of the classified cases (n = 183) demonstrated that the revised scheme had better sensitivity (86.8%, P<0.001), while the traditional scheme had better specificity (93.4%, P<0.001) for the detection of severe forms of dengue. Conclusions/Significance This improved sensitivity of the revised scheme allows for better case capture and increased ICU admission, which may aid pediatricians in avoiding deaths due to severe dengue among children, but, in turn, it may also result in the misclassification of the patients' condition as severe, reflected in the observed lower positive predictive value (61.6%, P<0.001) when compared with the traditional scheme (82.6%, P<0.001). The inclusion of unusual dengue manifestations in the revised scheme has not shifted the emphasis from the most important aspects of dengue disease and the major factors contributing to fatality in this study: shock with consequent organ dysfunction. PMID:24777054

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of the World Health Organization dengue classification schemes for severe dengue assessment in children in Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Gleicy A; Gonin, Michelle Luiza C; Pone, Sheila M; Cruz, Oswaldo G; Nobre, Flávio F; Brasil, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    The clinical definition of severe dengue fever remains a challenge for researchers in hyperendemic areas like Brazil. The ability of the traditional (1997) as well as the revised (2009) World Health Organization (WHO) dengue case classification schemes to detect severe dengue cases was evaluated in 267 children admitted to hospital with laboratory-confirmed dengue. Using the traditional scheme, 28.5% of patients could not be assigned to any category, while the revised scheme categorized all patients. Intensive therapeutic interventions were used as the reference standard to evaluate the ability of both the traditional and revised schemes to detect severe dengue cases. Analyses of the classified cases (n = 183) demonstrated that the revised scheme had better sensitivity (86.8%, P<0.001), while the traditional scheme had better specificity (93.4%, P<0.001) for the detection of severe forms of dengue. This improved sensitivity of the revised scheme allows for better case capture and increased ICU admission, which may aid pediatricians in avoiding deaths due to severe dengue among children, but, in turn, it may also result in the misclassification of the patients' condition as severe, reflected in the observed lower positive predictive value (61.6%, P<0.001) when compared with the traditional scheme (82.6%, P<0.001). The inclusion of unusual dengue manifestations in the revised scheme has not shifted the emphasis from the most important aspects of dengue disease and the major factors contributing to fatality in this study: shock with consequent organ dysfunction.

  9. CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO AQUATIC STRESSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many classification schemes have been developed to group ecosystems based on similar characteristics. To date, however, no single scheme has addressed coastal ecosystem responses to multiple stressors. We developed a classification framework for coastal ecosystems to improve the ...

  10. Classification Scheme for Items in CAAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Marion G.

    In planning the development of the system for computer assisted assembly of tests, it was agreed at the outset that one of the basic requirements for the successful initiation of any such system would be the development of a detailed item content classification system. The design of the system for classifying item content is a key element in…

  11. The "chessboard" classification scheme of mineral deposits: Mineralogy and geology from aluminum to zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2010-06-01

    Economic geology is a mixtum compositum of all geoscientific disciplines focused on one goal, finding new mineral depsosits and enhancing their exploitation. The keystones of this mixtum compositum are geology and mineralogy whose studies are centered around the emplacement of the ore body and the development of its minerals and rocks. In the present study, mineralogy and geology act as x- and y-coordinates of a classification chart of mineral resources called the "chessboard" (or "spreadsheet") classification scheme. Magmatic and sedimentary lithologies together with tectonic structures (1 -D/pipes, 2 -D/veins) are plotted along the x-axis in the header of the spreadsheet diagram representing the columns in this chart diagram. 63 commodity groups, encompassing minerals and elements are plotted along the y-axis, forming the lines of the spreadsheet. These commodities are subjected to a tripartite subdivision into ore minerals, industrial minerals/rocks and gemstones/ornamental stones. Further information on the various types of mineral deposits, as to the major ore and gangue minerals, the current models and the mode of formation or when and in which geodynamic setting these deposits mainly formed throughout the geological past may be obtained from the text by simply using the code of each deposit in the chart. This code can be created by combining the commodity (lines) shown by numbers plus lower caps with the host rocks or structure (columns) given by capital letters. Each commodity has a small preface on the mineralogy and chemistry and ends up with an outlook into its final use and the supply situation of the raw material on a global basis, which may be updated by the user through a direct link to databases available on the internet. In this case the study has been linked to the commodity database of the US Geological Survey. The internal subdivision of each commodity section corresponds to the common host rock lithologies (magmatic, sedimentary, and

  12. Relationship between AOD and synoptic circulation over the Eastern Mediterranean: A comparison between subjective and objective classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenheimer, Shalev; Nirel, Ronit; Lensky, Itamar M.; Dayan, Uri

    2018-03-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean (EM) Basin is strongly affected by dust originating from two of the largest world sources: The Sahara Desert and the Arabian Peninsula. Climatologically, the distribution pattern of aerosol optical depth (AOD), as proxy to particulate matter (PM), is known to be correlated with synoptic circulation. The climatological relationship between circulation type classifications (CTCs) and AOD levels over the EM Basin ("synoptic skill") was examined for the years 2000-2014. We compared the association between subjective (expert-based) and objective (fully automated) classifications and AOD using autoregressive models. After seasonal adjustment, the mean values of R2 for the different methods were similar. However, the distinct spatial pattern of the R2 values suggests that subjective classifications perform better in their area of expertise, specifically in the southeast region of the study area, while, objective CTCs had better synoptic skill over the northern part of the EM. This higher synoptic skill of subjective CTCs stem from their ability to identify distinct circulation types (e.g. Sharav lows and winter lows) that are infrequent but are highly correlated with AOD. Notably, a simple CTC based on seasonality rather than meteorological parameters predicted well AOD levels, especially over the south-eastern part of the domain. Synoptic classifications that are area-oriented are likely better predictors of AOD and possibly other environmental variables.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasscer, R. Scott

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey library classification system has been designed for an earth science library. It is a tool for assigning classification numbers to earth science and allied pure science library materials in order to collect these materials into related subject groups on the library shelves and arrange them alphabetically by author and title. It can also be used as a retrieval system to access these materials through the subject and visible geographic classification numbers.The classification scheme has been developed over the years since 1904 to meet the ever-changing needs of increased specialization and new areas of study in the earth sciences.This system contains seven schedules:Subject scheduleGeological survey scheduleEarth science periodical scheduleGovernment documents periodical scheduleGeneral science periodical scheduleEarth science maps scheduleGeographic scheduleA geographic number, from the geographic schedule, is distinguished from other numbers in the system in that it is always enclosed in parentheses; for example, (200) is the geographic number for the United States.The geographic number is used in conjunction with the six other previously listed schedules, and it represents slightly different nuances of meanings, in respect to geographic locale, for each schedule.When used with a subject number, the geographic number indicates the country, state, province, or region in which the research was made. The subject number, 203, geology, when combined with the geographic number, (200), for example 203(200), is the classification number for library materials on the geology of the United States.The geographic number, combined with the capital letter G, for example, G(211), is the classification number for an earth science periodical issued by a geological association or university geology department in the State of Maine.When the letter S is combined with a geographic number, for example, S(276), it represents a general science periodical for a

  14. Individual subject classification for Alzheimer's disease based on incremental learning using a spatial frequency representation of cortical thickness data.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngsang; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Jeong, Yong; Shin, Sung Yong

    2012-02-01

    Patterns of brain atrophy measured by magnetic resonance structural imaging have been utilized as significant biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, brain atrophy is variable across patients and is non-specific for AD in general. Thus, automatic methods for AD classification require a large number of structural data due to complex and variable patterns of brain atrophy. In this paper, we propose an incremental method for AD classification using cortical thickness data. We represent the cortical thickness data of a subject in terms of their spatial frequency components, employing the manifold harmonic transform. The basis functions for this transform are obtained from the eigenfunctions of the Laplace-Beltrami operator, which are dependent only on the geometry of a cortical surface but not on the cortical thickness defined on it. This facilitates individual subject classification based on incremental learning. In general, methods based on region-wise features poorly reflect the detailed spatial variation of cortical thickness, and those based on vertex-wise features are sensitive to noise. Adopting a vertex-wise cortical thickness representation, our method can still achieve robustness to noise by filtering out high frequency components of the cortical thickness data while reflecting their spatial variation. This compromise leads to high accuracy in AD classification. We utilized MR volumes provided by Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to validate the performance of the method. Our method discriminated AD patients from Healthy Control (HC) subjects with 82% sensitivity and 93% specificity. It also discriminated Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients, who converted to AD within 18 months, from non-converted MCI subjects with 63% sensitivity and 76% specificity. Moreover, it showed that the entorhinal cortex was the most discriminative region for classification, which is consistent with previous pathological findings. In

  15. MeMoVolc report on classification and dynamics of volcanic explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadonna, C.; Cioni, R.; Costa, A.; Druitt, T.; Phillips, J.; Pioli, L.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A.; Scollo, S.; Bachmann, O.; Bagheri, G.; Biass, S.; Brogi, F.; Cashman, K.; Dominguez, L.; Dürig, T.; Galland, O.; Giordano, G.; Gudmundsson, M.; Hort, M.; Höskuldsson, A.; Houghton, B.; Komorowski, J. C.; Küppers, U.; Lacanna, G.; Le Pennec, J. L.; Macedonio, G.; Manga, M.; Manzella, I.; Vitturi, M. de'Michieli; Neri, A.; Pistolesi, M.; Polacci, M.; Ripepe, M.; Rossi, E.; Scheu, B.; Sulpizio, R.; Tripoli, B.; Valade, S.; Valentine, G.; Vidal, C.; Wallenstein, N.

    2016-11-01

    Classifications of volcanic eruptions were first introduced in the early twentieth century mostly based on qualitative observations of eruptive activity, and over time, they have gradually been developed to incorporate more quantitative descriptions of the eruptive products from both deposits and observations of active volcanoes. Progress in physical volcanology, and increased capability in monitoring, measuring and modelling of explosive eruptions, has highlighted shortcomings in the way we classify eruptions and triggered a debate around the need for eruption classification and the advantages and disadvantages of existing classification schemes. Here, we (i) review and assess existing classification schemes, focussing on subaerial eruptions; (ii) summarize the fundamental processes that drive and parameters that characterize explosive volcanism; (iii) identify and prioritize the main research that will improve the understanding, characterization and classification of volcanic eruptions and (iv) provide a roadmap for producing a rational and comprehensive classification scheme. In particular, classification schemes need to be objective-driven and simple enough to permit scientific exchange and promote transfer of knowledge beyond the scientific community. Schemes should be comprehensive and encompass a variety of products, eruptive styles and processes, including for example, lava flows, pyroclastic density currents, gas emissions and cinder cone or caldera formation. Open questions, processes and parameters that need to be addressed and better characterized in order to develop more comprehensive classification schemes and to advance our understanding of volcanic eruptions include conduit processes and dynamics, abrupt transitions in eruption regime, unsteadiness, eruption energy and energy balance.

  16. A new classification of glaucomas

    PubMed Central

    Bordeianu, Constantin-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To suggest a new glaucoma classification that is pathogenic, etiologic, and clinical. Methods After discussing the logical pathway used in criteria selection, the paper presents the new classification and compares it with the classification currently in use, that is, the one issued by the European Glaucoma Society in 2008. Results The paper proves that the new classification is clear (being based on a coherent and consistently followed set of criteria), is comprehensive (framing all forms of glaucoma), and helps in understanding the sickness understanding (in that it uses a logical framing system). The great advantage is that it facilitates therapeutic decision making in that it offers direct therapeutic suggestions and avoids errors leading to disasters. Moreover, the scheme remains open to any new development. Conclusion The suggested classification is a pathogenic, etiologic, and clinical classification that fulfills the conditions of an ideal classification. The suggested classification is the first classification in which the main criterion is consistently used for the first 5 to 7 crossings until its differentiation capabilities are exhausted. Then, secondary criteria (etiologic and clinical) pick up the relay until each form finds its logical place in the scheme. In order to avoid unclear aspects, the genetic criterion is no longer used, being replaced by age, one of the clinical criteria. The suggested classification brings only benefits to all categories of ophthalmologists: the beginners will have a tool to better understand the sickness and to ease their decision making, whereas the experienced doctors will have their practice simplified. For all doctors, errors leading to therapeutic disasters will be less likely to happen. Finally, researchers will have the object of their work gathered in the group of glaucoma with unknown or uncertain pathogenesis, whereas the results of their work will easily find a logical place in the scheme, as the

  17. EEG Classification for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Using a Tensor Based Multiclass Multimodal Analysis Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongfei; Li, Jie; Lu, Rongrong; Gu, Rong; Cao, Lei; Gong, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems usually utilize one type of changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations for control, such as event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and P300 evoked potentials. There is a recent trend to detect more than one of these signals in one system to create a hybrid BCI. However, in this case, EEG data were always divided into groups and analyzed by the separate processing procedures. As a result, the interactive effects were ignored when different types of BCI tasks were executed simultaneously. In this work, we propose an improved tensor based multiclass multimodal scheme especially for hybrid BCI, in which EEG signals are denoted as multiway tensors, a nonredundant rank-one tensor decomposition model is proposed to obtain nonredundant tensor components, a weighted fisher criterion is designed to select multimodal discriminative patterns without ignoring the interactive effects, and support vector machine (SVM) is extended to multiclass classification. Experiment results suggest that the proposed scheme can not only identify the different changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations induced by different types of tasks but also capture the interactive effects of simultaneous tasks properly. Therefore, it has great potential use for hybrid BCI. PMID:26880873

  18. EEG Classification for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Using a Tensor Based Multiclass Multimodal Analysis Scheme.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongfei; Li, Jie; Lu, Rongrong; Gu, Rong; Cao, Lei; Gong, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems usually utilize one type of changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations for control, such as event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and P300 evoked potentials. There is a recent trend to detect more than one of these signals in one system to create a hybrid BCI. However, in this case, EEG data were always divided into groups and analyzed by the separate processing procedures. As a result, the interactive effects were ignored when different types of BCI tasks were executed simultaneously. In this work, we propose an improved tensor based multiclass multimodal scheme especially for hybrid BCI, in which EEG signals are denoted as multiway tensors, a nonredundant rank-one tensor decomposition model is proposed to obtain nonredundant tensor components, a weighted fisher criterion is designed to select multimodal discriminative patterns without ignoring the interactive effects, and support vector machine (SVM) is extended to multiclass classification. Experiment results suggest that the proposed scheme can not only identify the different changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations induced by different types of tasks but also capture the interactive effects of simultaneous tasks properly. Therefore, it has great potential use for hybrid BCI.

  19. An arrhythmia classification algorithm using a dedicated wavelet adapted to different subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkwon; Min, Se Dong; Lee, Myoungho

    2011-06-27

    Numerous studies have been conducted regarding a heartbeat classification algorithm over the past several decades. However, many algorithms have also been studied to acquire robust performance, as biosignals have a large amount of variation among individuals. Various methods have been proposed to reduce the differences coming from personal characteristics, but these expand the differences caused by arrhythmia. In this paper, an arrhythmia classification algorithm using a dedicated wavelet adapted to individual subjects is proposed. We reduced the performance variation using dedicated wavelets, as in the ECG morphologies of the subjects. The proposed algorithm utilizes morphological filtering and a continuous wavelet transform with a dedicated wavelet. A principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were utilized to compress the morphological data transformed by the dedicated wavelets. An extreme learning machine was used as a classifier in the proposed algorithm. A performance evaluation was conducted with the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. The results showed a high sensitivity of 97.51%, specificity of 85.07%, accuracy of 97.94%, and a positive predictive value of 97.26%. The proposed algorithm achieves better accuracy than other state-of-the-art algorithms with no intrasubject between the training and evaluation datasets. And it significantly reduces the amount of intervention needed by physicians.

  20. An arrhythmia classification algorithm using a dedicated wavelet adapted to different subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have been conducted regarding a heartbeat classification algorithm over the past several decades. However, many algorithms have also been studied to acquire robust performance, as biosignals have a large amount of variation among individuals. Various methods have been proposed to reduce the differences coming from personal characteristics, but these expand the differences caused by arrhythmia. Methods In this paper, an arrhythmia classification algorithm using a dedicated wavelet adapted to individual subjects is proposed. We reduced the performance variation using dedicated wavelets, as in the ECG morphologies of the subjects. The proposed algorithm utilizes morphological filtering and a continuous wavelet transform with a dedicated wavelet. A principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were utilized to compress the morphological data transformed by the dedicated wavelets. An extreme learning machine was used as a classifier in the proposed algorithm. Results A performance evaluation was conducted with the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. The results showed a high sensitivity of 97.51%, specificity of 85.07%, accuracy of 97.94%, and a positive predictive value of 97.26%. Conclusions The proposed algorithm achieves better accuracy than other state-of-the-art algorithms with no intrasubject between the training and evaluation datasets. And it significantly reduces the amount of intervention needed by physicians. PMID:21707989

  1. "Interactive Classification Technology"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    1999-01-01

    The investigators are upgrading a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the technologies to be used in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project are: a) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate multiple perspectives and a wider range of meaning; b) the development of a sufficient set of operators to enable the interpreter of SL to handle representations of basic cognitive acts; and c) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded. As to particular goals the first-year work plan focused on inferencing and.representation issues, including: 1) the development of higher level cognitive/ classification functions and conceptual models for use in inferencing and decision making; 2) the specification of a more detailed scheme of defaults and the enrichment of SL notation to accommodate the scheme; and 3) the adoption of additional perspectives for inferencing.

  2. An evaluation of several different classification schemes - Their parameters and performance. [maximum likelihood decision for crop identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D.; Fuhs, N.; Hixson, M.

    1979-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to apply and evaluate several of the currently available classification schemes for crop identification. The approaches examined were: (1) a per point Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier, (2) a per point sum of normal densities classifier, (3) a per point linear classifier, (4) a per point Gaussian maximum likelihood decision tree classifier, and (5) a texture sensitive per field Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier. Three agricultural data sets were used in the study: areas from Fayette County, Illinois, and Pottawattamie and Shelby Counties in Iowa. The segments were located in two distinct regions of the Corn Belt to sample variability in soils, climate, and agricultural practices.

  3. Selective classification for improved robustness of myoelectric control under nonideal conditions.

    PubMed

    Scheme, Erik J; Englehart, Kevin B; Hudgins, Bernard S

    2011-06-01

    Recent literature in pattern recognition-based myoelectric control has highlighted a disparity between classification accuracy and the usability of upper limb prostheses. This paper suggests that the conventionally defined classification accuracy may be idealistic and may not reflect true clinical performance. Herein, a novel myoelectric control system based on a selective multiclass one-versus-one classification scheme, capable of rejecting unknown data patterns, is introduced. This scheme is shown to outperform nine other popular classifiers when compared using conventional classification accuracy as well as a form of leave-one-out analysis that may be more representative of real prosthetic use. Additionally, the classification scheme allows for real-time, independent adjustment of individual class-pair boundaries making it flexible and intuitive for clinical use.

  4. Addition of Histology to the Paris Classification of Pediatric Crohn Disease Alters Classification of Disease Location.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Melissa A; Verstraete, Sofia G; Garnett, Elizabeth A; Heyman, Melvin B

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of microscopic findings in the classification of pediatric Crohn disease (CD) by determining whether classification of disease changes significantly with inclusion of histologic findings. Sixty patients were randomly selected from a cohort of patients studied at the Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinic at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Two physicians independently reviewed the electronic health records of the included patients to determine the Paris classification for each patient by adhering to present guidelines and then by including microscopic findings. Macroscopic and combined disease location classifications were discordant in 34 (56.6%), with no statistically significant differences between groups. Interobserver agreement was higher in the combined classification (κ = 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.82) as opposed to when classification was limited to macroscopic findings (κ = 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.40-0.58). When evaluating the proximal upper gastrointestinal tract (Paris L4a), the interobserver agreement was better in macroscopic compared with the combined classification. Disease extent classifications differed significantly when comparing isolated macroscopic findings (Paris classification) with the combined scheme that included microscopy. Further studies are needed to determine which scheme provides more accurate representation of disease extent.

  5. An MBO Scheme for Minimizing the Graph Ohta-Kawasaki Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gennip, Yves

    2018-06-01

    We study a graph-based version of the Ohta-Kawasaki functional, which was originally introduced in a continuum setting to model pattern formation in diblock copolymer melts and has been studied extensively as a paradigmatic example of a variational model for pattern formation. Graph-based problems inspired by partial differential equations (PDEs) and variational methods have been the subject of many recent papers in the mathematical literature, because of their applications in areas such as image processing and data classification. This paper extends the area of PDE inspired graph-based problems to pattern-forming models, while continuing in the tradition of recent papers in the field. We introduce a mass conserving Merriman-Bence-Osher (MBO) scheme for minimizing the graph Ohta-Kawasaki functional with a mass constraint. We present three main results: (1) the Lyapunov functionals associated with this MBO scheme Γ -converge to the Ohta-Kawasaki functional (which includes the standard graph-based MBO scheme and total variation as a special case); (2) there is a class of graphs on which the Ohta-Kawasaki MBO scheme corresponds to a standard MBO scheme on a transformed graph and for which generalized comparison principles hold; (3) this MBO scheme allows for the numerical computation of (approximate) minimizers of the graph Ohta-Kawasaki functional with a mass constraint.

  6. Toward an endovascular internal carotid artery classification system.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M; Becske, T; Riina, H A; Raz, E; Zumofen, D; Jafar, J J; Huang, P P; Nelson, P K

    2014-02-01

    Does the world need another ICA classification scheme? We believe so. The purpose of proposed angiography-driven classification is to optimize description of the carotid artery from the endovascular perspective. A review of existing, predominantly surgically-driven classifications is performed, and a new scheme, based on the study of NYU aneurysm angiographic and cross-sectional databases is proposed. Seven segments - cervical, petrous, cavernous, paraophthlamic, posterior communicating, choroidal, and terminus - are named. This nomenclature recognizes intrinsic uncertainty in precise angiographic and cross-sectional localization of aneurysms adjacent to the dural rings, regarding all lesions distal to the cavernous segment as potentially intradural. Rather than subdividing various transitional, ophthalmic, and hypophyseal aneurysm subtypes, as necessitated by their varied surgical approaches and risks, the proposed classification emphasizes their common endovascular treatment features, while recognizing that many complex, trans-segmental, and fusiform aneurysms not readily classifiable into presently available, saccular aneurysm-driven schemes, are being increasingly addressed by endovascular means. We believe this classification may find utility in standardizing nomenclature for outcome tracking, treatment trials and physician communication.

  7. THE ROLE OF WATERSHED CLASSIFICATION IN DIAGNOSING CAUSES OF BIOLOGICAL IMPAIRMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmention with a gewographically-based classification scheme for two case studies involving 1) Lake Superior tributaries and 2) watersheds of riverine coastal wetlands ...

  8. Classification Scheme for Diverse Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks Encountered by MSL in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Fisk, M.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D. W.; Sumner, D.; Sautter, V.; Williams, A. J.; Gellert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed in a lithologically and geochemically diverse region of Mars. We present a recommended rock classification framework based on terrestrial schemes, and adapted for the imaging and analytical capabilities of MSL as well as for rock types distinctive to Mars (e.g., high Fe sediments). After interpreting rock origin from textures, i.e., sedimentary (clastic, bedded), igneous (porphyritic, glassy), or unknown, the overall classification procedure (Fig 1) involves: (1) the characterization of rock type according to grain size and texture; (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers according to Figs 3 and 4; and if applicable, in depth study of (3) mineralogy and (4) geologic/stratigraphic context. Sedimentary rock types are assigned by measuring grains in the best available resolution image (Table 1) and classifying according to the coarsest resolvable grains as conglomerate/breccia, (coarse, medium, or fine) sandstone, silt-stone, or mudstone. If grains are not resolvable in MAHLI images, grains in the rock are assumed to be silt sized or smaller than surface dust particles. Rocks with low color contrast contrast between grains (e.g., Dismal Lakes, sol 304) are classified according to minimum size of apparent grains from surface roughness or shadows outlining apparent grains. Igneous rocks are described as intrusive or extrusive depending on crystal size and fabric. Igneous textures may be described as granular, porphyritic, phaneritic, aphyric, or glassy depending on crystal size. Further descriptors may include terms such as vesicular or cumulate textures.

  9. Predominant-period site classification for response spectra prediction equations in Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Alessandro, Carola; Bonilla, Luis Fabian; Boore, David M.; Rovelli, Antonio; Scotti, Oona

    2012-01-01

    We propose a site‐classification scheme based on the predominant period of the site, as determined from the average horizontal‐to‐vertical (H/V) spectral ratios of ground motion. Our scheme extends Zhao et al. (2006) classifications by adding two classes, the most important of which is defined by flat H/V ratios with amplitudes less than 2. The proposed classification is investigated by using 5%‐damped response spectra from Italian earthquake records. We select a dataset of 602 three‐component analog and digital recordings from 120 earthquakes recorded at 214 seismic stations within a hypocentral distance of 200 km. Selected events are in the moment‐magnitude range 4.0≤Mw≤6.8 and focal depths from a few kilometers to 46 km. We computed H/V ratios for these data and used them to classify each site into one of six classes. We then investigate the impact of this classification scheme on empirical ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs) by comparing its performance with that of the conventional rock/soil classification. Although the adopted approach results in only a small reduction of the overall standard deviation, the use of H/V spectral ratios in site classification does capture the signature of sites with flat frequency‐response, as well as deep and shallow‐soil profiles, characterized by long‐ and short‐period resonance, respectively; in addition, the classification scheme is relatively quick and inexpensive, which is an advantage over schemes based on measurements of shear‐wave velocity.

  10. Classification for Estuarine Ecosystems: A Review and Comparison of Selected Classification Schemes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine scientists have devoted considerable effort to classifying coastal, estuarine and marine environments and their watersheds, for a variety of purposes. These classifications group systems with similarities – most often in physical and hydrodynamic properties – in order ...

  11. A Computer Oriented Scheme for Coding Chemicals in the Field of Biomedicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobka, Marilyn E.; Subramaniam, J.B.

    The chemical coding scheme of the Medical Coding Scheme (MCS), developed for use in the Comparative Systems Laboratory (CSL), is outlined and evaluated in this report. The chemical coding scheme provides a classification scheme and encoding method for drugs and chemical terms. Using the scheme complicated chemical structures may be expressed…

  12. Classification of ring artifacts for their effective removal using type adaptive correction schemes.

    PubMed

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Kamrul

    2011-06-01

    High resolution tomographic images acquired with a digital X-ray detector are often degraded by the so called ring artifacts. In this paper, a detail analysis including the classification, detection and correction of these ring artifacts is presented. At first, a novel idea for classifying rings into two categories, namely type I and type II rings, is proposed based on their statistical characteristics. The defective detector elements and the dusty scintillator screens result in type I ring and the mis-calibrated detector elements lead to type II ring. Unlike conventional approaches, we emphasize here on the separate detection and correction schemes for each type of rings for their effective removal. For the detection of type I ring, the histogram of the responses of the detector elements is used and a modified fast image inpainting algorithm is adopted to correct the responses of the defective pixels. On the other hand, to detect the type II ring, first a simple filtering scheme is presented based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to smooth the sum curve derived form the type I ring corrected projection data. The difference between the sum curve and its smoothed version is then used to detect their positions. Then, to remove the constant bias suffered by the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements with view angle, an estimated dc shift is subtracted from them. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated using real micro-CT images and is compared with three recently reported algorithms. Simulation results demonstrate superior performance of the proposed technique as compared to the techniques reported in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regional assessment of lake ecological states using Landsat: A classification scheme for alkaline-saline, flamingo lakes in the East African Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebbs, E. J.; Remedios, J. J.; Avery, S. T.; Rowland, C. S.; Harper, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    In situ reflectance measurements and Landsat satellite imagery were combined to develop an optical classification scheme for alkaline-saline lakes in the Eastern Rift Valley. The classification allows the ecological state and consequent value, in this case to Lesser Flamingos, to be determined using Landsat satellite imagery. Lesser Flamingos depend on a network of 15 alkaline-saline lakes in East African Rift Valley, where they feed by filtering cyanobacteria and benthic diatoms from the lakes' waters. The classification developed here was based on a decision tree which used the reflectance in Landsat ETM+ bands 2-4 to assign one of six classes: low phytoplankton biomass; suspended sediment-dominated; microphytobenthos; high cyanobacterial biomass; cyanobacterial scum and bleached cyanobacterial scum. The classification accuracy was 77% when verified against in situ measurements. Classified imagery and timeseries were produced for selected lakes, which show the different ecological behaviours of these complex systems. The results have highlighted the importance to flamingos of the food resources offered by the extremely remote Lake Logipi. This study has demonstrated the potential of high spatial resolution, low spectral resolution sensors for providing ecologically valuable information at a regional scale, for alkaline-saline lakes and similar hypereutrophic inland waters.

  14. Mathematical model of blasting schemes management in mining operations in presence of random disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakova, E. I.; Medvedev, A. N.; Kolomytseva, A. O.; Demina, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of blasting schemes management in presence of random disturbances. Based on the lemmas and theorems proved, a control functional is formulated, which is stable. A universal classification of blasting schemes is developed. The main classification attributes are suggested: the orientation in plan the charging wells rows relatively the block of rocks; the presence of cuts in the blasting schemes; the separation of the wells series onto elements; the sequence of the blasting. The periodic regularity of transition from one Short-delayed scheme of blasting to another is proved.

  15. Cheese Classification, Characterization, and Categorization: A Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Almena-Aliste, Montserrat; Mietton, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Cheese is one of the most fascinating, complex, and diverse foods enjoyed today. Three elements constitute the cheese ecosystem: ripening agents, consisting of enzymes and microorganisms; the composition of the fresh cheese; and the environmental conditions during aging. These factors determine and define not only the sensory quality of the final cheese product but also the vast diversity of cheeses produced worldwide. How we define and categorize cheese is a complicated matter. There are various approaches to cheese classification, and a global approach for classification and characterization is needed. We review current cheese classification schemes and the limitations inherent in each of the schemes described. While some classification schemes are based on microbiological criteria, others rely on descriptions of the technologies used for cheese production. The goal of this review is to present an overview of comprehensive and practical integrative classification models in order to better describe cheese diversity and the fundamental differences within cheeses, as well as to connect fundamental technological, microbiological, chemical, and sensory characteristics to contribute to an overall characterization of the main families of cheese, including the expanding world of American artisanal cheeses.

  16. Activity classification based on inertial and barometric pressure sensors at different anatomical locations.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Torres, A; Leuenberger, K; Gonzenbach, R; Luft, A; Gassert, R

    2014-07-01

    Miniature, wearable sensor modules are a promising technology to monitor activities of daily living (ADL) over extended periods of time. To assure both user compliance and meaningful results, the selection and placement site of sensors requires careful consideration. We investigated these aspects for the classification of 16 ADL in 6 healthy subjects under laboratory conditions using ReSense, our custom-made inertial measurement unit enhanced with a barometric pressure sensor used to capture activity-related altitude changes. Subjects wore a module on each wrist and ankle, and one on the trunk. Activities comprised whole body movements as well as gross and dextrous upper-limb activities. Wrist-module data outperformed the other locations for the three activity groups. Specifically, overall classification accuracy rates of almost 93% and more than 95% were achieved for the repeated holdout and user-specific validation methods, respectively, for all 16 activities. Including the altitude profile resulted in a considerable improvement of up to 20% in the classification accuracy for stair ascent and descent. The gyroscopes provided no useful information for activity classification under this scheme. The proposed sensor setting could allow for robust long-term activity monitoring with high compliance in different patient populations.

  17. Advanced Steel Microstructural Classification by Deep Learning Methods.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Seyed Majid; Britz, Dominik; Engstler, Michael; Fritz, Mario; Mücklich, Frank

    2018-02-01

    The inner structure of a material is called microstructure. It stores the genesis of a material and determines all its physical and chemical properties. While microstructural characterization is widely spread and well known, the microstructural classification is mostly done manually by human experts, which gives rise to uncertainties due to subjectivity. Since the microstructure could be a combination of different phases or constituents with complex substructures its automatic classification is very challenging and only a few prior studies exist. Prior works focused on designed and engineered features by experts and classified microstructures separately from the feature extraction step. Recently, Deep Learning methods have shown strong performance in vision applications by learning the features from data together with the classification step. In this work, we propose a Deep Learning method for microstructural classification in the examples of certain microstructural constituents of low carbon steel. This novel method employs pixel-wise segmentation via Fully Convolutional Neural Network (FCNN) accompanied by a max-voting scheme. Our system achieves 93.94% classification accuracy, drastically outperforming the state-of-the-art method of 48.89% accuracy. Beyond the strong performance of our method, this line of research offers a more robust and first of all objective way for the difficult task of steel quality appreciation.

  18. Polsar Land Cover Classification Based on Hidden Polarimetric Features in Rotation Domain and Svm Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.-S.; Chen, S.-W.; Li, Y.-Z.; Xiao, S.-P.

    2017-09-01

    Land cover classification is an important application for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data utilization. Rollinvariant polarimetric features such as H / Ani / α / Span are commonly adopted in PolSAR land cover classification. However, target orientation diversity effect makes PolSAR images understanding and interpretation difficult. Only using the roll-invariant polarimetric features may introduce ambiguity in the interpretation of targets' scattering mechanisms and limit the followed classification accuracy. To address this problem, this work firstly focuses on hidden polarimetric feature mining in the rotation domain along the radar line of sight using the recently reported uniform polarimetric matrix rotation theory and the visualization and characterization tool of polarimetric coherence pattern. The former rotates the acquired polarimetric matrix along the radar line of sight and fully describes the rotation characteristics of each entry of the matrix. Sets of new polarimetric features are derived to describe the hidden scattering information of the target in the rotation domain. The latter extends the traditional polarimetric coherence at a given rotation angle to the rotation domain for complete interpretation. A visualization and characterization tool is established to derive new polarimetric features for hidden information exploration. Then, a classification scheme is developed combing both the selected new hidden polarimetric features in rotation domain and the commonly used roll-invariant polarimetric features with a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Comparison experiments based on AIRSAR and multi-temporal UAVSAR data demonstrate that compared with the conventional classification scheme which only uses the roll-invariant polarimetric features, the proposed classification scheme achieves both higher classification accuracy and better robustness

  19. Impact of Growth in the Universe of Subjects on Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranganathan, Shiyali Ramamritam

    The development of the removal of rigidity in library classification is traced from the Enumerative Classification of DC (1876) through the Nearly-Faceted Classification of UDC (1896), the rigidly, though fully faceted version of CC (1933), the generalized faceted structure of version 2 of CC (1949), down to the Freely Faceted Classification of…

  20. A Philosophical Approach to Describing Science Content: An Example From Geologic Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Fred N.

    1981-01-01

    Examines how research of philosophers of science may be useful to science education researchers and curriculum developers in the development of descriptions of science content related to classification schemes. Provides examples of concept analysis of two igneous rock classification schemes. (DS)

  1. Classification and reduction of pilot error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. H.; Logan, A. L.; Boley, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    Human error is a primary or contributing factor in about two-thirds of commercial aviation accidents worldwide. With the ultimate goal of reducing pilot error accidents, this contract effort is aimed at understanding the factors underlying error events and reducing the probability of certain types of errors by modifying underlying factors such as flight deck design and procedures. A review of the literature relevant to error classification was conducted. Classification includes categorizing types of errors, the information processing mechanisms and factors underlying them, and identifying factor-mechanism-error relationships. The classification scheme developed by Jens Rasmussen was adopted because it provided a comprehensive yet basic error classification shell or structure that could easily accommodate addition of details on domain-specific factors. For these purposes, factors specific to the aviation environment were incorporated. Hypotheses concerning the relationship of a small number of underlying factors, information processing mechanisms, and error types types identified in the classification scheme were formulated. ASRS data were reviewed and a simulation experiment was performed to evaluate and quantify the hypotheses.

  2. Underwater target classification using wavelet packets and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Azimi-Sadjadi, M R; Yao, D; Huang, Q; Dobeck, G J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a new subband-based classification scheme is developed for classifying underwater mines and mine-like targets from the acoustic backscattered signals. The system consists of a feature extractor using wavelet packets in conjunction with linear predictive coding (LPC), a feature selection scheme, and a backpropagation neural-network classifier. The data set used for this study consists of the backscattered signals from six different objects: two mine-like targets and four nontargets for several aspect angles. Simulation results on ten different noisy realizations and for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 12 dB are presented. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the classifier generated based on these results demonstrated excellent classification performance of the system. The generalization ability of the trained network was demonstrated by computing the error and classification rate statistics on a large data set. A multiaspect fusion scheme was also adopted in order to further improve the classification performance.

  3. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. II: Graded testing.

    PubMed

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a graded approach to the testing of crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods based on concern levels in a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) and currently available testing methods. A graded approach offers the potential for more efficient use of testing resources by focusing less on lower concern GM foods, and more on higher concern foods. In this proposed approach to graded testing, products that are classified as Level I would have met baseline testing requirements that are comparable to what is widely applied to premarket assessment of GM foods at present. In most cases, Level I products would require no further testing, or very limited confirmatory analyses. For products classified as Level II or higher, additional testing would be required, depending on the type of the substance, prior dietary history, estimated exposure level, prior knowledge of toxicity of the substance, and the nature of the concern related to unintended changes in the modified food. Level III testing applies only to the assessment of toxic and antinutritional effects from intended changes and is tailored to the nature of the substance in question. Since appropriate test methods are not currently available for all effects of concern, future research to strengthen the testing of GM foods is discussed.

  4. Clinical presentation and outcome prediction of clinical, serological, and histopathological classification schemes in ANCA-associated vasculitis with renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Sánchez, Bertha M; Mejía-Vilet, Juan M; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Loyola-Rodríguez, Georgina; Uribe-Uribe, Norma O; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Several classification schemes have been developed for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), with actual debate focusing on their clinical and prognostic performance. Sixty-two patients with renal biopsy-proven AAV from a single center in Mexico City diagnosed between 2004 and 2013 were analyzed and classified under clinical (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA], microscopic polyangiitis [MPA], renal limited vasculitis [RLV]), serological (proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [PR3-ANCA], myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [MPO-ANCA], ANCA negative), and histopathological (focal, crescenteric, mixed-type, sclerosing) categories. Clinical presentation parameters were compared at baseline between classification groups, and the predictive value of different classification categories for disease and renal remission, relapse, renal, and patient survival was analyzed. Serological classification predicted relapse rate (PR3-ANCA hazard ratio for relapse 2.93, 1.20-7.17, p = 0.019). There were no differences in disease or renal remission, renal, or patient survival between clinical and serological categories. Histopathological classification predicted response to therapy, with a poorer renal remission rate for sclerosing group and those with less than 25 % normal glomeruli; in addition, it adequately delimited 24-month glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) evolution, but it did not predict renal nor patient survival. On multivariate models, renal replacement therapy (RRT) requirement (HR 8.07, CI 1.75-37.4, p = 0.008) and proteinuria (HR 1.49, CI 1.03-2.14, p = 0.034) at presentation predicted renal survival, while age (HR 1.10, CI 1.01-1.21, p = 0.041) and infective events during the induction phase (HR 4.72, 1.01-22.1, p = 0.049) negatively influenced patient survival. At present, ANCA-based serological classification may predict AAV relapses, but neither clinical nor serological

  5. Automatic classification of protein structures using physicochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Abhilash; Rao, M Divya; Sunderrajan, Shruthi; Pennathur, Gautam

    2014-09-01

    Protein classification is the first step to functional annotation; SCOP and Pfam databases are currently the most relevant protein classification schemes. However, the disproportion in the number of three dimensional (3D) protein structures generated versus their classification into relevant superfamilies/families emphasizes the need for automated classification schemes. Predicting function of novel proteins based on sequence information alone has proven to be a major challenge. The present study focuses on the use of physicochemical parameters in conjunction with machine learning algorithms (Naive Bayes, Decision Trees, Random Forest and Support Vector Machines) to classify proteins into their respective SCOP superfamily/Pfam family, using sequence derived information. Spectrophores™, a 1D descriptor of the 3D molecular field surrounding a structure was used as a benchmark to compare the performance of the physicochemical parameters. The machine learning algorithms were modified to select features based on information gain for each SCOP superfamily/Pfam family. The effect of combining physicochemical parameters and spectrophores on classification accuracy (CA) was studied. Machine learning algorithms trained with the physicochemical parameters consistently classified SCOP superfamilies and Pfam families with a classification accuracy above 90%, while spectrophores performed with a CA of around 85%. Feature selection improved classification accuracy for both physicochemical parameters and spectrophores based machine learning algorithms. Combining both attributes resulted in a marginal loss of performance. Physicochemical parameters were able to classify proteins from both schemes with classification accuracy ranging from 90-96%. These results suggest the usefulness of this method in classifying proteins from amino acid sequences.

  6. Sunspot Pattern Classification using PCA and Neural Networks (Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Thompson, D. E.; Slater, G. L.

    2005-01-01

    The sunspot classification scheme presented in this paper is considered as a 2-D classification problem on archived datasets, and is not a real-time system. As a first step, it mirrors the Zuerich/McIntosh historical classification system and reproduces classification of sunspot patterns based on preprocessing and neural net training datasets. Ultimately, the project intends to move from more rudimentary schemes, to develop spatial-temporal-spectral classes derived by correlating spatial and temporal variations in various wavelengths to the brightness fluctuation spectrum of the sun in those wavelengths. Once the approach is generalized, then the focus will naturally move from a 2-D to an n-D classification, where "n" includes time and frequency. Here, the 2-D perspective refers both to the actual SOH0 Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) images that are processed, but also refers to the fact that a 2-D matrix is created from each image during preprocessing. The 2-D matrix is the result of running Principal Component Analysis (PCA) over the selected dataset images, and the resulting matrices and their eigenvalues are the objects that are stored in a database, classified, and compared. These matrices are indexed according to the standard McIntosh classification scheme.

  7. Classification of Instructional Programs: 2000 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert L.; Hunt, E. Stephen

    This third revision of the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) updates and modifies education program classifications, providing a taxonomic scheme that supports the accurate tracking, assessment, and reporting of field of study and program completions activity. This edition has also been adopted as the standard field of study taxonomy…

  8. Deep-learning-based classification of FDG-PET data for Alzheimer's disease categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shibani; Srivastava, Anant; Mi, Liang; Caselli, Richard J.; Chen, Kewei; Goradia, Dhruman; Reiman, Eric M.; Wang, Yalin

    2017-11-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) measures the decline in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, offering a reliable metabolic biomarker even on presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. PET scans provide functional information that is unique and unavailable using other types of imaging. However, the computational efficacy of FDG-PET data alone, for the classification of various Alzheimers Diagnostic categories, has not been well studied. This motivates us to correctly discriminate various AD Diagnostic categories using FDG-PET data. Deep learning has improved state-of-the-art classification accuracies in the areas of speech, signal, image, video, text mining and recognition. We propose novel methods that involve probabilistic principal component analysis on max-pooled data and mean-pooled data for dimensionality reduction, and multilayer feed forward neural network which performs binary classification. Our experimental dataset consists of baseline data of subjects including 186 cognitively unimpaired (CU) subjects, 336 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects with 158 Late MCI and 178 Early MCI, and 146 AD patients from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. We measured F1-measure, precision, recall, negative and positive predictive values with a 10-fold cross validation scheme. Our results indicate that our designed classifiers achieve competitive results while max pooling achieves better classification performance compared to mean-pooled features. Our deep model based research may advance FDG-PET analysis by demonstrating their potential as an effective imaging biomarker of AD.

  9. Development of a Procurement Task Classification Scheme.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Office of Sci- entific Research, Arlington, Virginia, January 1970. Tornow , Walter W . and Pinto, Patrick R. "The Development of a Man- agerial Job...classification. [Ref. 4:271 -. 20 6 %° w Numerical taxonomy proponents hold [Ref. 4:271, ... that the relationships of contiguity and similarity should be...solving. 22 W i * These primitive categories are based on a sorting of learning pro- cesses into classes that have obvious differences at the

  10. Toward functional classification of neuronal types.

    PubMed

    Sharpee, Tatyana O

    2014-09-17

    How many types of neurons are there in the brain? This basic neuroscience question remains unsettled despite many decades of research. Classification schemes have been proposed based on anatomical, electrophysiological, or molecular properties. However, different schemes do not always agree with each other. This raises the question of whether one can classify neurons based on their function directly. For example, among sensory neurons, can a classification scheme be devised that is based on their role in encoding sensory stimuli? Here, theoretical arguments are outlined for how this can be achieved using information theory by looking at optimal numbers of cell types and paying attention to two key properties: correlations between inputs and noise in neural responses. This theoretical framework could help to map the hierarchical tree relating different neuronal classes within and across species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A New Approach to Develop Computer-aided Diagnosis Scheme of Breast Mass Classification Using Deep Learning Technology

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Wang, Yunzhi; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop and test a deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme of mammograms for classifying between malignant and benign masses. METHODS An image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms was used. After down-sampling each ROI from 512×512 to 64×64 pixel size, we applied an 8 layer deep learning network that involves 3 pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) classifier for feature categorization to process ROIs. The 3 pairs of convolution layers contain 20, 10, and 5 feature maps, respectively. Each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer to improve the feature robustness. The output of the sixth layer is fully connected with a MLP classifier, which is composed of one hidden layer and one logistic regression layer. The network then generates a classification score to predict the likelihood of ROI depicting a malignant mass. A four-fold cross validation method was applied to train and test this deep learning network. RESULTS The results revealed that this CAD scheme yields an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.696±0.044, 0.802±0.037, 0.836±0.036, and 0.822±0.035 for fold 1 to 4 testing datasets, respectively. The overall AUC of the entire dataset is 0.790±0.019. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to classify between malignant and benign breast masses without a lesion segmentation, image feature computation and selection process. PMID:28436410

  12. A new approach to develop computer-aided diagnosis scheme of breast mass classification using deep learning technology.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Wang, Yunzhi; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To develop and test a deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme of mammograms for classifying between malignant and benign masses. An image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms was used. After down-sampling each ROI from 512×512 to 64×64 pixel size, we applied an 8 layer deep learning network that involves 3 pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) classifier for feature categorization to process ROIs. The 3 pairs of convolution layers contain 20, 10, and 5 feature maps, respectively. Each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer to improve the feature robustness. The output of the sixth layer is fully connected with a MLP classifier, which is composed of one hidden layer and one logistic regression layer. The network then generates a classification score to predict the likelihood of ROI depicting a malignant mass. A four-fold cross validation method was applied to train and test this deep learning network. The results revealed that this CAD scheme yields an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.696±0.044, 0.802±0.037, 0.836±0.036, and 0.822±0.035 for fold 1 to 4 testing datasets, respectively. The overall AUC of the entire dataset is 0.790±0.019. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to classify between malignant and benign breast masses without a lesion segmentation, image feature computation and selection process.

  13. Taxonomy and Classification Scheme for Artificial Space Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    filter UVB and spectroscopic measurements) and albedo (including polarimetry ). Earliest classifications of asteroids [17] were based on the filter...similarities of the asteroid colors to K0 to K2V stars. The first more complete asteroid taxonomy was based on a synthesis of polarimetry , radiometry, and

  14. On the integrity of functional brain networks in schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and advanced age: Evidence from connectivity-based single-subject classification.

    PubMed

    Pläschke, Rachel N; Cieslik, Edna C; Müller, Veronika I; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Plachti, Anna; Varikuti, Deepthi P; Goosses, Mareike; Latz, Anne; Caspers, Svenja; Jockwitz, Christiane; Moebus, Susanne; Gruber, Oliver; Eickhoff, Claudia R; Reetz, Kathrin; Heller, Julia; Südmeyer, Martin; Mathys, Christian; Caspers, Julian; Grefkes, Christian; Kalenscher, Tobias; Langner, Robert; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2017-12-01

    Previous whole-brain functional connectivity studies achieved successful classifications of patients and healthy controls but only offered limited specificity as to affected brain systems. Here, we examined whether the connectivity patterns of functional systems affected in schizophrenia (SCZ), Parkinson's disease (PD), or normal aging equally translate into high classification accuracies for these conditions. We compared classification performance between pre-defined networks for each group and, for any given network, between groups. Separate support vector machine classifications of 86 SCZ patients, 80 PD patients, and 95 older adults relative to their matched healthy/young controls, respectively, were performed on functional connectivity in 12 task-based, meta-analytically defined networks using 25 replications of a nested 10-fold cross-validation scheme. Classification performance of the various networks clearly differed between conditions, as those networks that best classified one disease were usually non-informative for the other. For SCZ, but not PD, emotion-processing, empathy, and cognitive action control networks distinguished patients most accurately from controls. For PD, but not SCZ, networks subserving autobiographical or semantic memory, motor execution, and theory-of-mind cognition yielded the best classifications. In contrast, young-old classification was excellent based on all networks and outperformed both clinical classifications. Our pattern-classification approach captured associations between clinical and developmental conditions and functional network integrity with a higher level of specificity than did previous whole-brain analyses. Taken together, our results support resting-state connectivity as a marker of functional dysregulation in specific networks known to be affected by SCZ and PD, while suggesting that aging affects network integrity in a more global way. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5845-5858, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017

  15. A Global Classification System for Catchment Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, R. A.

    2004-05-01

    It is a shocking state of affairs - there is no underpinning scientific taxonomy of catchments. There are widely used global classification systems for climate, river morphology, lakes and wetlands, but for river catchments there exists only a plethora of inconsistent, incomplete regional schemes. By proceeding without a common taxonomy for catchments, freshwater science has missed one of its key developmental stages, and has leapt from definition of phenomena to experiments, theories and models, without the theoretical framework of a classification. I propose the development of a global hierarchical classification system for physical aspects of river catchments, to help underpin physical science in the freshwater environment and provide a solid foundation for classification of river ecosystems. Such a classification scheme can open completely new vistas in hydrology: for example it will be possible to (i) rationally transfer experimental knowledge of hydrological processes between basins anywhere in the world, provided they belong to the same class; (ii) perform meaningful meta-analyses in order to reconcile studies that show inconsistent results (iii) generate new testable hypotheses which involve locations worldwide.

  16. National Library of Medicine Classification: A Scheme for the Shelf Arrangement of Books in a Field of Medicine and Its Related Sciences. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Emilie, Ed.

    Outlined is the National Library of Medicine classification system for medicine and related sciences. In this system each preclinical science, such as human anatomy, biochemistry or pathology, and each medical subject, such as infectious diseases or pediatrics, receives a two-letter classification. Under each of these main headings numbered minor…

  17. Automated classification of bone marrow cells in microscopic images for diagnosis of leukemia: a comparison of two classification schemes with respect to the segmentation quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krappe, Sebastian; Benz, Michaela; Wittenberg, Thomas; Haferlach, Torsten; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2015-03-01

    The morphological analysis of bone marrow smears is fundamental for the diagnosis of leukemia. Currently, the counting and classification of the different types of bone marrow cells is done manually with the use of bright field microscope. This is a time consuming, partly subjective and tedious process. Furthermore, repeated examinations of a slide yield intra- and inter-observer variances. For this reason an automation of morphological bone marrow analysis is pursued. This analysis comprises several steps: image acquisition and smear detection, cell localization and segmentation, feature extraction and cell classification. The automated classification of bone marrow cells is depending on the automated cell segmentation and the choice of adequate features extracted from different parts of the cell. In this work we focus on the evaluation of support vector machines (SVMs) and random forests (RFs) for the differentiation of bone marrow cells in 16 different classes, including immature and abnormal cell classes. Data sets of different segmentation quality are used to test the two approaches. Automated solutions for the morphological analysis for bone marrow smears could use such a classifier to pre-classify bone marrow cells and thereby shortening the examination duration.

  18. Physiotherapy movement based classification approaches to low back pain: comparison of subgroups through review and developer/expert survey.

    PubMed

    Karayannis, Nicholas V; Jull, Gwendolen A; Hodges, Paul W

    2012-02-20

    Several classification schemes, each with its own philosophy and categorizing method, subgroup low back pain (LBP) patients with the intent to guide treatment. Physiotherapy derived schemes usually have a movement impairment focus, but the extent to which other biological, psychological, and social factors of pain are encompassed requires exploration. Furthermore, within the prevailing 'biological' domain, the overlap of subgrouping strategies within the orthopaedic examination remains unexplored. The aim of this study was "to review and clarify through developer/expert survey, the theoretical basis and content of physical movement classification schemes, determine their relative reliability and similarities/differences, and to consider the extent of incorporation of the bio-psycho-social framework within the schemes". A database search for relevant articles related to LBP and subgrouping or classification was conducted. Five dominant movement-based schemes were identified: Mechanical Diagnosis and Treatment (MDT), Treatment Based Classification (TBC), Pathoanatomic Based Classification (PBC), Movement System Impairment Classification (MSI), and O'Sullivan Classification System (OCS) schemes. Data were extracted and a survey sent to the classification scheme developers/experts to clarify operational criteria, reliability, decision-making, and converging/diverging elements between schemes. Survey results were integrated into the review and approval obtained for accuracy. Considerable diversity exists between schemes in how movement informs subgrouping and in the consideration of broader neurosensory, cognitive, emotional, and behavioural dimensions of LBP. Despite differences in assessment philosophy, a common element lies in their objective to identify a movement pattern related to a pain reduction strategy. Two dominant movement paradigms emerge: (i) loading strategies (MDT, TBC, PBC) aimed at eliciting a phenomenon of centralisation of symptoms; and (ii) modified

  19. Classification of proteins: available structural space for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Antonina

    2012-01-01

    The wealth of available protein structural data provides unprecedented opportunity to study and better understand the underlying principles of protein folding and protein structure evolution. A key to achieving this lies in the ability to analyse these data and to organize them in a coherent classification scheme. Over the past years several protein classifications have been developed that aim to group proteins based on their structural relationships. Some of these classification schemes explore the concept of structural neighbourhood (structural continuum), whereas other utilize the notion of protein evolution and thus provide a discrete rather than continuum view of protein structure space. This chapter presents a strategy for classification of proteins with known three-dimensional structure. Steps in the classification process along with basic definitions are introduced. Examples illustrating some fundamental concepts of protein folding and evolution with a special focus on the exceptions to them are presented.

  20. Using Simulations to Investigate the Longitudinal Stability of Alternative Schemes for Classifying and Identifying Children with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatschneider, Christopher; Wagner, Richard K.; Hart, Sara A.; Tighe, Elizabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study employed data simulation techniques to investigate the 1-year stability of alternative classification schemes for identifying children with reading disabilities. Classification schemes investigated include low performance, unexpected low performance, dual-discrepancy, and a rudimentary form of constellation model of reading…

  1. [Evaluation of traditional pathological classification at molecular classification era for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingyan

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological classification is in a pivotal position in both basic research and clinical diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. Currently, there are different classification systems in basic science and clinical application. In medical literatures, different classifications are used including Lauren and WHO systems, which have confused many researchers. Lauren classification has been proposed for half a century, but is still used worldwide. It shows many advantages of simple, easy handling with prognostic significance. The WHO classification scheme is better than Lauren classification in that it is continuously being revised according to the progress of gastric cancer, and is always used in the clinical and pathological diagnosis of common scenarios. Along with the progression of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics researches, molecular classification of gastric cancer becomes the current hot topics. The traditional therapeutic approach based on phenotypic characteristics of gastric cancer will most likely be replaced with a gene variation mode. The gene-targeted therapy against the same molecular variation seems more reasonable than traditional chemical treatment based on the same morphological change.

  2. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor.

    PubMed

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y C

    2016-11-29

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k -nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  3. Comparing ecoregional classifications for natural areas management in the Klamath Region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarr, Daniel A.; Duff, Andrew; Dinger, Eric C.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Wing, Michael; Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Alexander, John D.

    2015-01-01

    We compared three existing ecoregional classification schemes (Bailey, Omernik, and World Wildlife Fund) with two derived schemes (Omernik Revised and Climate Zones) to explore their effectiveness in explaining species distributions and to better understand natural resource geography in the Klamath Region, USA. We analyzed presence/absence data derived from digital distribution maps for trees, amphibians, large mammals, small mammals, migrant birds, and resident birds using three statistical analyses of classification accuracy (Analysis of Similarity, Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates, and Classification Strength). The classifications were roughly comparable in classification accuracy, with Omernik Revised showing the best overall performance. Trees showed the strongest fidelity to the classifications, and large mammals showed the weakest fidelity. We discuss the implications for regional biogeography and describe how intermediate resolution ecoregional classifications may be appropriate for use as natural areas management domains.

  4. Optimal two-phase sampling design for comparing accuracies of two binary classification rules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiping; Hui, Siu L; Grannis, Shaun

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, we consider the design for comparing the performance of two binary classification rules, for example, two record linkage algorithms or two screening tests. Statistical methods are well developed for comparing these accuracy measures when the gold standard is available for every unit in the sample, or in a two-phase study when the gold standard is ascertained only in the second phase in a subsample using a fixed sampling scheme. However, these methods do not attempt to optimize the sampling scheme to minimize the variance of the estimators of interest. In comparing the performance of two classification rules, the parameters of primary interest are the difference in sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values. We derived the analytic variance formulas for these parameter estimates and used them to obtain the optimal sampling design. The efficiency of the optimal sampling design is evaluated through an empirical investigation that compares the optimal sampling with simple random sampling and with proportional allocation. Results of the empirical study show that the optimal sampling design is similar for estimating the difference in sensitivities and in specificities, and both achieve a substantial amount of variance reduction with an over-sample of subjects with discordant results and under-sample of subjects with concordant results. A heuristic rule is recommended when there is no prior knowledge of individual sensitivities and specificities, or the prevalence of the true positive findings in the study population. The optimal sampling is applied to a real-world example in record linkage to evaluate the difference in classification accuracy of two matching algorithms. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Differentiation chronic post traumatic stress disorder patients from healthy subjects using objective and subjective sleep-related parameters.

    PubMed

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Jamalabadi, Hamidreza; Abedini, Mina; Ghadami, Mohammad R; Sepehry, Amir A; Knight, David C; Khazaie, Habibolah

    2017-05-22

    Sleep disturbance is common in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, prior work has demonstrated that there are inconsistencies between subjective and objective assessments of sleep disturbance in PTSD. Therefore, we investigated whether subjective or objective sleep assessment has greater clinical utility to differentiate PTSD patients from healthy subjects. Further, we evaluated whether the combination of subjective and objective methods improves the accuracy of classification into patient versus healthy groups, which has important diagnostic implications. We recruited 32 chronic war-induced PTSD patients and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects to participate in this study. Subjective (i.e. from three self-reported sleep questionnaires) and objective sleep-related data (i.e. from actigraphy scores) were collected from each participant. Subjective, objective, and combined (subjective and objective) sleep data were then analyzed using support vector machine classification. The classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for subjective variables were 89.2%, 89.3%, and 89%, respectively. The classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for objective variables were 65%, 62.3%, and 67.8%, respectively. The classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for the aggregate variables (combination of subjective and objective variables) were 91.6%, 93.0%, and 90.3%, respectively. Our findings indicate that classification accuracy using subjective measurements is superior to objective measurements and the combination of both assessments appears to improve the classification accuracy for differentiating PTSD patients from healthy individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ecosystem classifications based on summer and winter conditions.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Margaret E; Nelson, Trisalyn A; Wulder, Michael A; Hobart, George W; Coops, Nicholas C; Farmer, Carson J Q

    2013-04-01

    Ecosystem classifications map an area into relatively homogenous units for environmental research, monitoring, and management. However, their effectiveness is rarely tested. Here, three classifications are (1) defined and characterized for Canada along summertime productivity (moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation) and wintertime snow conditions (special sensor microwave/imager snow water equivalent), independently and in combination, and (2) comparatively evaluated to determine the ability of each classification to represent the spatial and environmental patterns of alternative schemes, including the Canadian ecozone framework. All classifications depicted similar patterns across Canada, but detailed class distributions differed. Class spatial characteristics varied with environmental conditions within classifications, but were comparable between classifications. There was moderate correspondence between classifications. The strongest association was between productivity classes and ecozones. The classification along both productivity and snow balanced these two sets of variables, yielding intermediate levels of association in all pairwise comparisons. Despite relatively low spatial agreement between classifications, they successfully captured patterns of the environmental conditions underlying alternate schemes (e.g., snow classes explained variation in productivity and vice versa). The performance of ecosystem classifications and the relevance of their input variables depend on the environmental patterns and processes used for applications and evaluation. Productivity or snow regimes, as constructed here, may be desirable when summarizing patterns controlled by summer- or wintertime conditions, respectively, or of climate change responses. General purpose ecosystem classifications should include both sets of drivers. Classifications should be carefully, quantitatively, and comparatively evaluated

  7. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Aarsvold, John N.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Votaw, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with [11C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR

  8. Differences exist across insurance schemes in China post-consolidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Yinjun; Yi, Danhui; Wang, Xiaojun; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Yu; Liu, Xinchun; Ma, Shuangge

    2017-01-01

    In China, the basic insurance system consists of three schemes: the UEBMI (Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance), URBMI (Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance), and NCMS (New Cooperative Medical Scheme), across which significant differences have been observed. Since 2009, the central government has been experimenting with consolidating these schemes in selected areas. This study examines whether differences still exist across schemes after the consolidation. A survey was conducted in the city of Suzhou, collecting data on subjects 45 years old and above with at least one inpatient or outpatient treatment during a period of twelve months. Analysis on 583 subjects was performed comparing subjects' characteristics across insurance schemes. A resampling-based method was applied to compute the predicted gross medical cost, OOP (out-of-pocket) cost, and insurance reimbursement rate. Subjects under different insurance schemes differ in multiple aspects. For inpatient treatments, subjects under the URBMI have the highest observed and predicted gross and OOP costs, while those under the UEBMI have the lowest. For outpatient treatments, subjects under the UEBMI and URBMI have comparable costs, while those under the NCMS have much lower costs. Subjects under the NCMS also have a much lower reimbursement rate. Differences still exist across schemes in medical costs and insurance reimbursement rate post-consolidation. Further investigations are needed to identify the causes, and interventions are needed to eliminate such differences.

  9. A cautionary note on the use of the Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) in classification designs with and without within-subject factors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bruce A.; Avivi-Reich, Meital; Mozuraitis, Mindaugas

    2015-01-01

    A number of statistical textbooks recommend using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to control for the effects of extraneous factors that might influence the dependent measure of interest. However, it is not generally recognized that serious problems of interpretation can arise when the design contains comparisons of participants sampled from different populations (classification designs). Designs that include a comparison of younger and older adults, or a comparison of musicians and non-musicians are examples of classification designs. In such cases, estimates of differences among groups can be contaminated by differences in the covariate population means across groups. A second problem of interpretation will arise if the experimenter fails to center the covariate measures (subtracting the mean covariate score from each covariate score) whenever the design contains within-subject factors. Unless the covariate measures on the participants are centered, estimates of within-subject factors are distorted, and significant increases in Type I error rates, and/or losses in power can occur when evaluating the effects of within-subject factors. This paper: (1) alerts potential users of ANCOVA of the need to center the covariate measures when the design contains within-subject factors, and (2) indicates how they can avoid biases when one cannot assume that the expected value of the covariate measure is the same for all of the groups in a classification design. PMID:25954230

  10. Computer classification of remotely sensed multispectral image data by extraction and classification of homogeneous objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettig, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A method of classification of digitized multispectral images is developed and experimentally evaluated on actual earth resources data collected by aircraft and satellite. The method is designed to exploit the characteristic dependence between adjacent states of nature that is neglected by the more conventional simple-symmetric decision rule. Thus contextual information is incorporated into the classification scheme. The principle reason for doing this is to improve the accuracy of the classification. For general types of dependence this would generally require more computation per resolution element than the simple-symmetric classifier. But when the dependence occurs in the form of redundance, the elements can be classified collectively, in groups, therby reducing the number of classifications required.

  11. Esophageal motor disorders in subjects with incidentally discovered Chagas disease: a study using high-resolution manometry and the Chicago classification.

    PubMed

    Remes-Troche, J M; Torres-Aguilera, M; Antonio-Cruz, K A; Vazquez-Jimenez, G; De-La-Cruz-Patiño, E

    2014-08-01

    In patients with chronic indeterminate Chagas disease, conventional manometry has shown that 25-48% had esophageal motor disorders. Recently, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) has revolutionized the assessment of esophageal motor function. In this study, we performed esophageal HRM in a group of subjects with incidentally positive serological findings for Trypanosoma cruzi. In this prospective observational study, we evaluated subjects who had positive serological tests for Chagas disease detected during a screening evaluation for blood donation. All subjects underwent symptomatic evaluation and esophageal HRM with a 36 solid-state catheter. Esophageal abnormalities were classified using the Chicago classification. Forty-two healthy subjects (38 males) aged 18-61 years (mean age, 40.7 years) were included. When specific symptoms questionnaire was applied, 14 (33%) subjects had esophageal symptoms. Esophageal high-resolution manometry revealed that 28 (66%) of the subjects had an esophageal motility disorder according to the Chicago classification. Most common findings were hypocontractile disorders in 18 subjects (43%) and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction in 6 (15%). Esophageal high-resolution manometry reveals that up to two thirds of the subjects with an incidental diagnosis of Chagas disease have esophageal abnormalities. This technology increases the detection and allows a more complete assessment of esophageal motor function in subjects infected with T. cruzi even in the early stages of the disease. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Gender classification under extended operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Howard N.; Rizki, Mateen

    2014-06-01

    Gender classification is a critical component of a robust image security system. Many techniques exist to perform gender classification using facial features. In contrast, this paper explores gender classification using body features extracted from clothed subjects. Several of the most effective types of features for gender classification identified in literature were implemented and applied to the newly developed Seasonal Weather And Gender (SWAG) dataset. SWAG contains video clips of approximately 2000 samples of human subjects captured over a period of several months. The subjects are wearing casual business attire and outer garments appropriate for the specific weather conditions observed in the Midwest. The results from a series of experiments are presented that compare the classification accuracy of systems that incorporate various types and combinations of features applied to multiple looks at subjects at different image resolutions to determine a baseline performance for gender classification.

  13. Do thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries classification systems exhibit lower inter- and intra-observer agreement than other fractures classifications?: A comparison using fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur as contrast model.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Klaber, Ianiv; Carmona, Maximiliano; Palma, Joaquin; Campos, Mauricio; Yurac, Ratko

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated that the complex patterns of spinal injuries have prevented adequate agreement using thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries (TLSI) classifications; however, limb fracture classifications have also shown variable agreements. This study compared agreement using two TLSI classifications with agreement using two classifications of fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur (FTAPF). Six evaluators classified the radiographs and computed tomography scans of 70 patients with acute TLSI using the Denis and the new AO Spine thoraco-lumbar injury classifications. Additionally, six evaluators classified the radiographs of 70 patients with FTAPF using the Tronzo and the AO schemes. Six weeks later, all cases were presented in a random sequence for repeat assessment. The Kappa coefficient (κ) was used to determine agreement. Inter-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine classification, the mean κ was 0.62 (0.57-0.66) considering fracture types, and 0.55 (0.52-0.57) considering sub-types; using the Denis classification, κ was 0.62 (0.59-0.65). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.58 (0.54-0.63) considering fracture types and 0.31 (0.28-0.33) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.54 (0.50-0.57). Intra-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine scheme, the mean κ was 0.77 (0.72-0.83) considering fracture types, and 0.71 (0.67-0.76) considering sub-types; for the Denis classification, κ was 0.76 (0.71-0.81). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.75 (0.69-0.81) considering fracture types and 0.45 (0.39-0.51) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.64 (0.58-0.70). Using the main types of AO classifications, inter- and intra-observer agreement of TLSI were comparable to agreement evaluating FTAPF; including sub-types, inter- and intra-observer agreement evaluating TLSI were significantly better than assessing FTAPF. Inter- and intra-observer agreements using the Denis

  14. TFM classification and staging of oral submucous fibrosis: A new proposal.

    PubMed

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Thomas, Deepak; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Hunasgi, Santosh; Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Hale, Beverley; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Rahimi, Siavash; Merkx, Matthias A W; Brennan, Peter A

    2018-04-01

    We have evaluated the rationale of existing grading and staging schemes of oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) based on how they are categorized. A novel classification and staging scheme is proposed. A total of 300 OSMF patients were evaluated for agreement between functional, clinical, and histopathological staging. Bilateral biopsies were assessed in 25 patients to evaluate for any differences in histopathological staging of OSMF in the same mouth. Extent of clinician agreement for categorized staging data was evaluated using Cohen's weighted kappa analysis. Cross-tabulation was performed on categorical grading data to understand the intercorrelation, and the unweighted kappa analysis was used to assess the bilateral grade agreement. Probabilities of less than 0.05 were considered significant. Data were analyzed using SPSS Statistics (version 25.0, IBM, USA). A low agreement was found between all the stages depicting the independent nature of trismus, clinical features, and histopathological components (K = 0.312, 0.167, 0.152) in OSMF. Following analysis, a three-component classification scheme (TFM classification) was developed that describes the severity of each independently, grouping them using a novel three-tier staging scheme as a guide to the treatment plan. The proposed classification and staging could be useful for effective communication, categorization, and for recording data and prognosis, and for guiding treatment plans. Furthermore, the classification considers OSMF malignant transformation in detail. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Differences exist across insurance schemes in China post-consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Danhui; Wang, Xiaojun; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Yu; Liu, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Background In China, the basic insurance system consists of three schemes: the UEBMI (Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance), URBMI (Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance), and NCMS (New Cooperative Medical Scheme), across which significant differences have been observed. Since 2009, the central government has been experimenting with consolidating these schemes in selected areas. This study examines whether differences still exist across schemes after the consolidation. Methods A survey was conducted in the city of Suzhou, collecting data on subjects 45 years old and above with at least one inpatient or outpatient treatment during a period of twelve months. Analysis on 583 subjects was performed comparing subjects’ characteristics across insurance schemes. A resampling-based method was applied to compute the predicted gross medical cost, OOP (out-of-pocket) cost, and insurance reimbursement rate. Results Subjects under different insurance schemes differ in multiple aspects. For inpatient treatments, subjects under the URBMI have the highest observed and predicted gross and OOP costs, while those under the UEBMI have the lowest. For outpatient treatments, subjects under the UEBMI and URBMI have comparable costs, while those under the NCMS have much lower costs. Subjects under the NCMS also have a much lower reimbursement rate. Conclusions Differences still exist across schemes in medical costs and insurance reimbursement rate post-consolidation. Further investigations are needed to identify the causes, and interventions are needed to eliminate such differences. PMID:29125837

  16. Alzheimer Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Automatic Classification Based on Cortical Atrophy for Single-Subject Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Möller, Christiane; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Versteeg, Adriaan; Tijms, Betty; de Munck, Jan C; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Swieten, John; Dopper, Elise; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Wink, Alle Meije

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of an image-based classifier to distinguish between Alzheimer disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in individual patients by using gray matter (GM) density maps computed from standard T1-weighted structural images obtained with multiple imagers and with independent training and prediction data. Materials and Methods The local institutional review board approved the study. Eighty-four patients with AD, 51 patients with bvFTD, and 94 control subjects were divided into independent training (n = 115) and prediction (n = 114) sets with identical diagnosis and imager type distributions. Training of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier used diagnostic status and GM density maps and produced voxelwise discrimination maps. Discriminant function analysis was used to estimate suitability of the extracted weights for single-subject classification in the prediction set. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated for image-based classifiers and neuropsychological z scores. Results Training accuracy of the SVM was 85% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 72% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 79% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD (P ≤ .029). Single-subject diagnosis in the prediction set when using the discrimination maps yielded accuracies of 88% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 85% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 82% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD, with a good to excellent AUC (range, 0.81-0.95; P ≤ .001). Machine learning-based categorization of AD versus bvFTD based on GM density maps outperforms classification based on neuropsychological test results. Conclusion The SVM can be used in single-subject discrimination and can help the clinician arrive at a diagnosis. The SVM can be used to distinguish disease-specific GM patterns in patients with AD

  17. The classification of phobic disorders.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, D V; Sheehan, K H

    The history of classification of phobic disorders is reviewed. Problems in the ability of current classification schemes to predict, control and describe the relationship between the symptoms and other phenomena are outlined. A new classification of phobic disorders is proposed based on the presence or absence of an endogenous anxiety syndrome with the phobias. The two categories of phobic disorder have a different clinical presentation and course, a different mean age of onset, distribution of age of onset, sex distribution, response to treatment modalities, GSR testing and habituation response. Empirical evidence supporting this proposal is cited. This classification has heuristic merit in guiding research efforts and discussions and in directing the clinician to a simple and practical solution of his patient's phobic disorder.

  18. The impact of catchment source group classification on the accuracy of sediment fingerprinting outputs.

    PubMed

    Pulley, Simon; Foster, Ian; Collins, Adrian L

    2017-06-01

    The objective classification of sediment source groups is at present an under-investigated aspect of source tracing studies, which has the potential to statistically improve discrimination between sediment sources and reduce uncertainty. This paper investigates this potential using three different source group classification schemes. The first classification scheme was simple surface and subsurface groupings (Scheme 1). The tracer signatures were then used in a two-step cluster analysis to identify the sediment source groupings naturally defined by the tracer signatures (Scheme 2). The cluster source groups were then modified by splitting each one into a surface and subsurface component to suit catchment management goals (Scheme 3). The schemes were tested using artificial mixtures of sediment source samples. Controlled corruptions were made to some of the mixtures to mimic the potential causes of tracer non-conservatism present when using tracers in natural fluvial environments. It was determined how accurately the known proportions of sediment sources in the mixtures were identified after unmixing modelling using the three classification schemes. The cluster analysis derived source groups (2) significantly increased tracer variability ratios (inter-/intra-source group variability) (up to 2122%, median 194%) compared to the surface and subsurface groupings (1). As a result, the composition of the artificial mixtures was identified an average of 9.8% more accurately on the 0-100% contribution scale. It was found that the cluster groups could be reclassified into a surface and subsurface component (3) with no significant increase in composite uncertainty (a 0.1% increase over Scheme 2). The far smaller effects of simulated tracer non-conservatism for the cluster analysis based schemes (2 and 3) was primarily attributed to the increased inter-group variability producing a far larger sediment source signal that the non-conservatism noise (1). Modified cluster analysis

  19. New KF-PP-SVM classification method for EEG in brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Banghua; Han, Zhijun; Zan, Peng; Wang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Classification methods are a crucial direction in the current study of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). To improve the classification accuracy for electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, a novel KF-PP-SVM (kernel fisher, posterior probability, and support vector machine) classification method is developed. Its detailed process entails the use of common spatial patterns to obtain features, based on which the within-class scatter is calculated. Then the scatter is added into the kernel function of a radial basis function to construct a new kernel function. This new kernel is integrated into the SVM to obtain a new classification model. Finally, the output of SVM is calculated based on posterior probability and the final recognition result is obtained. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed KF-PP-SVM method, EEG data collected from laboratory are processed with four different classification schemes (KF-PP-SVM, KF-SVM, PP-SVM, and SVM). The results showed that the overall average improvements arising from the use of the KF-PP-SVM scheme as opposed to KF-SVM, PP-SVM and SVM schemes are 2.49%, 5.83 % and 6.49 % respectively.

  20. Optical tomographic detection of rheumatoid arthritis with computer-aided classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    A recent research study has shown that combining multiple parameters, drawn from optical tomographic images, leads to better classification results to identifying human finger joints that are affected or not affected by rheumatic arthritis RA. Building up on the research findings of the previous study, this article presents an advanced computer-aided classification approach for interpreting optical image data to detect RA in finger joints. Additional data are used including, for example, maximum and minimum values of the absorption coefficient as well as their ratios and image variances. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index and area under the curve AUC. Results were compared to different benchmarks ("gold standard"): magnet resonance, ultrasound and clinical evaluation. Maximum accuracies (AUC=0.88) were reached when combining minimum/maximum-ratios and image variances and using ultrasound as gold standard.

  1. Maximum-likelihood curve-fitting scheme for experiments with pulsed lasers subject to intensity fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Metz, Thomas; Walewski, Joachim; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2003-03-20

    Evaluation schemes, e.g., least-squares fitting, are not generally applicable to any types of experiments. If the evaluation schemes were not derived from a measurement model that properly described the experiment to be evaluated, poorer precision or accuracy than attainable from the measured data could result. We outline ways in which statistical data evaluation schemes should be derived for all types of experiment, and we demonstrate them for laser-spectroscopic experiments, in which pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the laser power cause correlated variations of laser intensity and generated signal intensity. The method of maximum likelihood is demonstrated in the derivation of an appropriate fitting scheme for this type of experiment. Statistical data evaluation contains the following steps. First, one has to provide a measurement model that considers statistical variation of all enclosed variables. Second, an evaluation scheme applicable to this particular model has to be derived or provided. Third, the scheme has to be characterized in terms of accuracy and precision. A criterion for accepting an evaluation scheme is that it have accuracy and precision as close as possible to the theoretical limit. The fitting scheme derived for experiments with pulsed lasers is compared to well-established schemes in terms of fitting power and rational functions. The precision is found to be as much as three timesbetter than for simple least-squares fitting. Our scheme also suppresses the bias on the estimated model parameters that other methods may exhibit if they are applied in an uncritical fashion. We focus on experiments in nonlinear spectroscopy, but the fitting scheme derived is applicable in many scientific disciplines.

  2. Change classification in SAR time series: a functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten; Hinz, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Change detection represents a broad field of research in SAR remote sensing, consisting of many different approaches. Besides the simple recognition of change areas, the analysis of type, category or class of the change areas is at least as important for creating a comprehensive result. Conventional strategies for change classification are based on supervised or unsupervised landuse / landcover classifications. The main drawback of such approaches is that the quality of the classification result directly depends on the selection of training and reference data. Additionally, supervised processing methods require an experienced operator who capably selects the training samples. This training step is not necessary when using unsupervised strategies, but nevertheless meaningful reference data must be available for identifying the resulting classes. Consequently, an experienced operator is indispensable. In this study, an innovative concept for the classification of changes in SAR time series data is proposed. Regarding the drawbacks of traditional strategies given above, it copes without using any training data. Moreover, the method can be applied by an operator, who does not have detailed knowledge about the available scenery yet. This knowledge is provided by the algorithm. The final step of the procedure, which main aspect is given by the iterative optimization of an initial class scheme with respect to the categorized change objects, is represented by the classification of these objects to the finally resulting classes. This assignment step is subject of this paper.

  3. Carnegie's New Community Engagement Classification: Affirming Higher Education's Role in Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Amy

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (CFAT) stirred the higher education world with the announcement of a new classification for institutions that engage with community. The classification, community engagement, is the first in a set of planned classification schemes resulting from the foundation's reexamination of the…

  4. Si-29 NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked quartz from Meteor Crater, Arizona: Correlation to Kieffer's classification scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Cygan, R. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have applied solid state Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to five naturally-shocked Coconino Sandstone samples from Meteor Crater, Arizona, with the goal of examining possible correlations between NMR spectral characteristics and shock level. This work follows our observation of a strong correlation between the width of a Si-29 resonance and peak shock pressure for experimentally shocked quartz powders. The peak width increase is due to the shock-induced formation of amorphous silica, which increases as a function of shock pressure over the range that we studied (7.5 to 22 GPa). The Coconino Sandstone spectra are in excellent agreement with the classification scheme of Kieffer in terms of presence and approximate abundances of quartz, coesite, stishovite, and glass. We also observe a new resonance in two moderately shocked samples that we have tentatively identified with silicon in tetrahedra with one hydroxyl group in a densified form of amorphous silica.

  5. A novel encoding scheme for effective biometric discretization: Linearly Separable Subcode.

    PubMed

    Lim, Meng-Hui; Teoh, Andrew Beng Jin

    2013-02-01

    Separability in a code is crucial in guaranteeing a decent Hamming-distance separation among the codewords. In multibit biometric discretization where a code is used for quantization-intervals labeling, separability is necessary for preserving distance dissimilarity when feature components are mapped from a discrete space to a Hamming space. In this paper, we examine separability of Binary Reflected Gray Code (BRGC) encoding and reveal its inadequacy in tackling interclass variation during the discrete-to-binary mapping, leading to a tradeoff between classification performance and entropy of binary output. To overcome this drawback, we put forward two encoding schemes exhibiting full-ideal and near-ideal separability capabilities, known as Linearly Separable Subcode (LSSC) and Partially Linearly Separable Subcode (PLSSC), respectively. These encoding schemes convert the conventional entropy-performance tradeoff into an entropy-redundancy tradeoff in the increase of code length. Extensive experimental results vindicate the superiority of our schemes over the existing encoding schemes in discretization performance. This opens up possibilities of achieving much greater classification performance with high output entropy.

  6. SWIFT Detects a remarkable Gamma-ray Burst, GRB 060514, that introduces a New Classification Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Norris, J. P.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Granot, J.; Kaneko, Y.; Kouveliotou, C.; Markwardt, C. B.; Meszaros, P.; hide

    2007-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GFU3s) are known to come in two duration classes, separated at approx.2 s. Long bursts originate from star forming regions in galaxies, have accompanying supernovae (SNe) when near enough to observe and are likely caused by massive-star collapsars. Recent observations show that short bursts originate in regions within their host galaxies with lower star formation rates, consistent with binary neutron star (NS) or NS - black hole (BH) mergers. Moreover, although their hosts are predominantly nearby galaxies, no SNe have been so far associated with short GRBs. We report here on the bright, nearby GRB 060614 that does not fit in either class. Its approx.102 s duration groups it with long GRBs, while its temporal lag and peak luminosity fall entirely within the short GRB subclass. Moreover, very deep optical observations exclude an accompanying supernova, similar to short GRBs. This combination of a long duration event without accompanying SN poses a challenge to both a collapsar and merging NS interpretation and opens the door on a new GRB classification scheme that straddles both long and short bursts.

  7. Heuristic pattern correction scheme using adaptively trained generalized regression neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hoya, T; Chambers, J A

    2001-01-01

    In many pattern classification problems, an intelligent neural system is required which can learn the newly encountered but misclassified patterns incrementally, while keeping a good classification performance over the past patterns stored in the network. In the paper, an heuristic pattern correction scheme is proposed using adaptively trained generalized regression neural networks (GRNNs). The scheme is based upon both network growing and dual-stage shrinking mechanisms. In the network growing phase, a subset of the misclassified patterns in each incoming data set is iteratively added into the network until all the patterns in the incoming data set are classified correctly. Then, the redundancy in the growing phase is removed in the dual-stage network shrinking. Both long- and short-term memory models are considered in the network shrinking, which are motivated from biological study of the brain. The learning capability of the proposed scheme is investigated through extensive simulation studies.

  8. A fast and efficient segmentation scheme for cell microscopic image.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, G; Charrier, C; Lezoray, O; Meurie, C; Cardot, H

    2007-04-27

    Microscopic cellular image segmentation schemes must be efficient for reliable analysis and fast to process huge quantity of images. Recent studies have focused on improving segmentation quality. Several segmentation schemes have good quality but processing time is too expensive to deal with a great number of images per day. For segmentation schemes based on pixel classification, the classifier design is crucial since it is the one which requires most of the processing time necessary to segment an image. The main contribution of this work is focused on how to reduce the complexity of decision functions produced by support vector machines (SVM) while preserving recognition rate. Vector quantization is used in order to reduce the inherent redundancy present in huge pixel databases (i.e. images with expert pixel segmentation). Hybrid color space design is also used in order to improve data set size reduction rate and recognition rate. A new decision function quality criterion is defined to select good trade-off between recognition rate and processing time of pixel decision function. The first results of this study show that fast and efficient pixel classification with SVM is possible. Moreover posterior class pixel probability estimation is easy to compute with Platt method. Then a new segmentation scheme using probabilistic pixel classification has been developed. This one has several free parameters and an automatic selection must dealt with, but criteria for evaluate segmentation quality are not well adapted for cell segmentation, especially when comparison with expert pixel segmentation must be achieved. Another important contribution in this paper is the definition of a new quality criterion for evaluation of cell segmentation. The results presented here show that the selection of free parameters of the segmentation scheme by optimisation of the new quality cell segmentation criterion produces efficient cell segmentation.

  9. Divorcing Strain Classification from Species Names.

    PubMed

    Baltrus, David A

    2016-06-01

    Confusion about strain classification and nomenclature permeates modern microbiology. Although taxonomists have traditionally acted as gatekeepers of order, the numbers of, and speed at which, new strains are identified has outpaced the opportunity for professional classification for many lineages. Furthermore, the growth of bioinformatics and database-fueled investigations have placed metadata curation in the hands of researchers with little taxonomic experience. Here I describe practical challenges facing modern microbial taxonomy, provide an overview of complexities of classification for environmentally ubiquitous taxa like Pseudomonas syringae, and emphasize that classification can be independent of nomenclature. A move toward implementation of relational classification schemes based on inherent properties of whole genomes could provide sorely needed continuity in how strains are referenced across manuscripts and data sets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Models of Marine Fish Biodiversity: Assessing Predictors from Three Habitat Classification Schemes.

    PubMed

    Yates, Katherine L; Mellin, Camille; Caley, M Julian; Radford, Ben T; Meeuwig, Jessica J

    2016-01-01

    Prioritising biodiversity conservation requires knowledge of where biodiversity occurs. Such knowledge, however, is often lacking. New technologies for collecting biological and physical data coupled with advances in modelling techniques could help address these gaps and facilitate improved management outcomes. Here we examined the utility of environmental data, obtained using different methods, for developing models of both uni- and multivariate biodiversity metrics. We tested which biodiversity metrics could be predicted best and evaluated the performance of predictor variables generated from three types of habitat data: acoustic multibeam sonar imagery, predicted habitat classification, and direct observer habitat classification. We used boosted regression trees (BRT) to model metrics of fish species richness, abundance and biomass, and multivariate regression trees (MRT) to model biomass and abundance of fish functional groups. We compared model performance using different sets of predictors and estimated the relative influence of individual predictors. Models of total species richness and total abundance performed best; those developed for endemic species performed worst. Abundance models performed substantially better than corresponding biomass models. In general, BRT and MRTs developed using predicted habitat classifications performed less well than those using multibeam data. The most influential individual predictor was the abiotic categorical variable from direct observer habitat classification and models that incorporated predictors from direct observer habitat classification consistently outperformed those that did not. Our results show that while remotely sensed data can offer considerable utility for predictive modelling, the addition of direct observer habitat classification data can substantially improve model performance. Thus it appears that there are aspects of marine habitats that are important for modelling metrics of fish biodiversity that are

  11. Models of Marine Fish Biodiversity: Assessing Predictors from Three Habitat Classification Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Katherine L.; Mellin, Camille; Caley, M. Julian; Radford, Ben T.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.

    2016-01-01

    Prioritising biodiversity conservation requires knowledge of where biodiversity occurs. Such knowledge, however, is often lacking. New technologies for collecting biological and physical data coupled with advances in modelling techniques could help address these gaps and facilitate improved management outcomes. Here we examined the utility of environmental data, obtained using different methods, for developing models of both uni- and multivariate biodiversity metrics. We tested which biodiversity metrics could be predicted best and evaluated the performance of predictor variables generated from three types of habitat data: acoustic multibeam sonar imagery, predicted habitat classification, and direct observer habitat classification. We used boosted regression trees (BRT) to model metrics of fish species richness, abundance and biomass, and multivariate regression trees (MRT) to model biomass and abundance of fish functional groups. We compared model performance using different sets of predictors and estimated the relative influence of individual predictors. Models of total species richness and total abundance performed best; those developed for endemic species performed worst. Abundance models performed substantially better than corresponding biomass models. In general, BRT and MRTs developed using predicted habitat classifications performed less well than those using multibeam data. The most influential individual predictor was the abiotic categorical variable from direct observer habitat classification and models that incorporated predictors from direct observer habitat classification consistently outperformed those that did not. Our results show that while remotely sensed data can offer considerable utility for predictive modelling, the addition of direct observer habitat classification data can substantially improve model performance. Thus it appears that there are aspects of marine habitats that are important for modelling metrics of fish biodiversity that are

  12. Unsupervised classification of earth resources data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, M. Y.; Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Cummings, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    A new clustering technique is presented. It consists of two parts: (a) a sequential statistical clustering which is essentially a sequential variance analysis and (b) a generalized K-means clustering. In this composite clustering technique, the output of (a) is a set of initial clusters which are input to (b) for further improvement by an iterative scheme. This unsupervised composite technique was employed for automatic classification of two sets of remote multispectral earth resource observations. The classification accuracy by the unsupervised technique is found to be comparable to that by existing supervised maximum liklihood classification technique.

  13. Real-time classification of auditory sentences using evoked cortical activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, David A.; Leonard, Matthew K.; Chang, Edward F.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Recent research has characterized the anatomical and functional basis of speech perception in the human auditory cortex. These advances have made it possible to decode speech information from activity in brain regions like the superior temporal gyrus, but no published work has demonstrated this ability in real-time, which is necessary for neuroprosthetic brain-computer interfaces. Approach. Here, we introduce a real-time neural speech recognition (rtNSR) software package, which was used to classify spoken input from high-resolution electrocorticography signals in real-time. We tested the system with two human subjects implanted with electrode arrays over the lateral brain surface. Subjects listened to multiple repetitions of ten sentences, and rtNSR classified what was heard in real-time from neural activity patterns using direct sentence-level and HMM-based phoneme-level classification schemes. Main results. We observed single-trial sentence classification accuracies of 90% or higher for each subject with less than 7 minutes of training data, demonstrating the ability of rtNSR to use cortical recordings to perform accurate real-time speech decoding in a limited vocabulary setting. Significance. Further development and testing of the package with different speech paradigms could influence the design of future speech neuroprosthetic applications.

  14. Classification of cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G.

    1985-01-01

    A great diversity of methods and mechanisms were devised to effect cryogenic refrigeration. The basic parameters and considerations affecting the selection of a particular system are reviewed. A classification scheme for mechanical cryocoolers is presented. An important distinguishing feature is the incorporation or not of a regenerative heat exchanger, of valves, and of the method for achieving a pressure variation.

  15. THE WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR COMPARATIVE WATERSHED FRAMEWORK: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stratified random selection of watersheds allowed us to compare geographically-independent classification schemes based on watershed storage (wetland + lake area/watershed area) and forest fragmentation with a geographically-based classification scheme within the Northern Lakes a...

  16. The classification of anxiety and hysterical states. Part I. Historical review and empirical delineation.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, D V; Sheehan, K H

    1982-08-01

    The history of the classification of anxiety, hysterical, and hypochondriacal disorders is reviewed. Problems in the ability of current classification schemes to predict, control, and describe the relationship between the symptoms and other phenomena are outlined. Existing classification schemes failed the first test of a good classification model--that of providing categories that are mutually exclusive. The independence of these diagnostic categories from each other does not appear to hold up on empirical testing. In the absence of inherently mutually exclusive categories, further empirical investigation of these classes is obstructed since statistically valid analysis of the nominal data and any useful multivariate analysis would be difficult if not impossible. It is concluded that the existing classifications are unsatisfactory and require some fundamental reconceptualization.

  17. Classification of instability after reverse shoulder arthroplasty guides surgical management and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Abdelfattah, Adham; Otto, Randall J; Simon, Peter; Christmas, Kaitlyn N; Tanner, Gregory; LaMartina, Joey; Levy, Jonathan C; Cuff, Derek J; Mighell, Mark A; Frankle, Mark A

    2018-04-01

    Revision of unstable reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) remains a significant challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of a new treatment-guiding classification for instability after RSA, to describe the clinical outcomes of patients stabilized operatively, and to identify those with higher risk of recurrence. All patients undergoing revision for instability after RSA were identified at our institution. Demographic, clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative data were collected. A classification was developed using all identified causes of instability after RSA and allocating them to 1 of 3 defined treatment-guiding categories. Eight surgeons reviewed all data and applied the classification scheme to each case. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability was used to evaluate the classification scheme. Preoperative clinical outcomes were compared with final follow-up in stabilized shoulders. Forty-three revision cases in 34 patients met the inclusion for study. Five patients remained unstable after revision. Persistent instability most commonly occurred in persistent deltoid dysfunction and postoperative acromial fractures but also in 1 case of soft tissue impingement. Twenty-one patients remained stable at minimum 2 years of follow-up and had significant improvement of clinical outcome scores and range of motion. Reliability of the classification scheme showed substantial and almost perfect interobserver and intraobserver agreement among all the participants (κ = 0.699 and κ = 0.851, respectively). Instability after RSA can be successfully treated with revision surgery using the reliable treatment-guiding classification scheme presented herein. However, more understanding is needed for patients with greater risk of recurrent instability after revision surgery. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Classification of Hysteria and Related Disorders: Historical and Phenomenological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    North, Carol S.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the history of the conceptualization of dissociative, conversion, and somatoform syndromes in relation to one another, chronicles efforts to classify these and other phenomenologically-related psychopathology in the American diagnostic system for mental disorders, and traces the subsequent divergence in opinions of dissenting sectors on classification of these disorders. This article then considers the extensive phenomenological overlap across these disorders in empirical research, and from this foundation presents a new model for the conceptualization of these disorders. The classification of disorders formerly known as hysteria and phenomenologically-related syndromes has long been contentious and unsettled. Examination of the long history of the conceptual difficulties, which remain inherent in existing classification schemes for these disorders, can help to address the continuing controversy. This review clarifies the need for a major conceptual revision of the current classification of these disorders. A new phenomenologically-based classification scheme for these disorders is proposed that is more compatible with the agnostic and atheoretical approach to diagnosis of mental disorders used by the current classification system. PMID:26561836

  19. The search for structure - Object classification in large data sets. [for astronomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Research concerning object classifications schemes are reviewed, focusing on large data sets. Classification techniques are discussed, including syntactic, decision theoretic methods, fuzzy techniques, and stochastic and fuzzy grammars. Consideration is given to the automation of MK classification (Morgan and Keenan, 1973) and other problems associated with the classification of spectra. In addition, the classification of galaxies is examined, including the problems of systematic errors, blended objects, galaxy types, and galaxy clusters.

  20. Classification of diffuse lung diseases: why and how.

    PubMed

    Hansell, David M

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of complex lung diseases, notably the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and small airways diseases, owes as much to repeated attempts over the years to classify them as to any single conceptual breakthrough. One of the many benefits of a successful classification scheme is that it allows workers, within and between disciplines, to be clear that they are discussing the same disease. This may be of particular importance in the recruitment of individuals for a clinical trial that requires a standardized and homogeneous study population. Different specialties require fundamentally different things from a classification: for epidemiologic studies, a classification that requires categorization of individuals according to histopathologic pattern is not usually practicable. Conversely, a scheme that simply divides diffuse parenchymal disease into inflammatory and noninflammatory categories is unlikely to further the understanding about the pathogenesis of disease. Thus, for some disease groupings, for example, pulmonary vasculopathies, there may be several appropriate classifications, each with its merits and demerits. There has been an interesting shift in the past few years, from the accepted primacy of histopathology as the sole basis on which the classification of parenchymal lung disease has rested, to new ways of considering how these entities relate to each other. Some inventive thinking has resulted in new classifications that undoubtedly benefit patients and clinicians in their endeavor to improve management and outcome. The challenge of understanding the logic behind current classifications and their shortcomings are explored in various examples of lung diseases.

  1. A scheme for the classification of explosions in the chemical process industry.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Tasneem; Pasman, H J; Abbasi, S A

    2010-02-15

    All process industry accidents fall under three broad categories-fire, explosion, and toxic release. Of these fire is the most common, followed by explosions. Within these broad categories occur a large number of sub-categories, each depicting a specific sub-type of a fire/explosion/toxic release. But whereas clear and self-consistent sub-classifications exist for fires and toxic releases, the situation is not as clear vis a vis explosions. In this paper the inconsistencies and/or shortcomings associated with the classification of different types of explosions, which are seen even in otherwise highly authentic and useful reference books on process safety, are reviewed. In its context a new classification is attempted which may, hopefully, provide a frame-of-reference for the future.

  2. Classification and Lateralization of Temporal Lobe Epilepsies with and without Hippocampal Atrophy Based on Whole-Brain Automatic MRI Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Keihaninejad, Shiva; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Gousias, Ioannis S.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Duncan, John S.; Aljabar, Paul; Rueckert, Daniel; Hammers, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Brain images contain information suitable for automatically sorting subjects into categories such as healthy controls and patients. We sought to identify morphometric criteria for distinguishing controls (n = 28) from patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), 60 with and 20 without hippocampal atrophy (TLE-HA and TLE-N, respectively), and for determining the presumed side of seizure onset. The framework employs multi-atlas segmentation to estimate the volumes of 83 brain structures. A kernel-based separability criterion was then used to identify structures whose volumes discriminate between the groups. Next, we applied support vector machines (SVM) to the selected set for classification on the basis of volumes. We also computed pairwise similarities between all subjects and used spectral analysis to convert these into per-subject features. SVM was again applied to these feature data. After training on a subgroup, all TLE-HA patients were correctly distinguished from controls, achieving an accuracy of 96 ± 2% in both classification schemes. For TLE-N patients, the accuracy was 86 ± 2% based on structural volumes and 91 ± 3% using spectral analysis. Structures discriminating between patients and controls were mainly localized ipsilaterally to the presumed seizure focus. For the TLE-HA group, they were mainly in the temporal lobe; for the TLE-N group they included orbitofrontal regions, as well as the ipsilateral substantia nigra. Correct lateralization of the presumed seizure onset zone was achieved using hippocampi and parahippocampal gyri in all TLE-HA patients using either classification scheme; in the TLE-N patients, lateralization was accurate based on structural volumes in 86 ± 4%, and in 94 ± 4% with the spectral analysis approach. Unilateral TLE has imaging features that can be identified automatically, even when they are invisible to human experts. Such morphometric image features may serve as classification and lateralization criteria

  3. Revisiting the taxonomical classification of Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2): still a real challenge.

    PubMed

    Franzo, Giovanni; Cortey, Martí; Olvera, Alex; Novosel, Dinko; Castro, Alessandra Marnie Martins Gomes De; Biagini, Philippe; Segalés, Joaquim; Drigo, Michele

    2015-08-28

    PCV2 has emerged as one of the most devastating viral infections of swine farming, causing a relevant economic impact due to direct losses and control strategies expenses. Epidemiological and experimental studies have evidenced that genetic diversity is potentially affecting the virulence of PVC2. The growing number of PCV2 complete genomes and partial sequences available at GenBank questioned the accepted PCV2 classification. Nine hundred seventy five PCV2 complete genomes and 1,270 ORF2 sequences available from GenBank were subjected to recombination, PASC and phylogenetic analyses and results were used for comparison with previous classification scheme. The outcome of these analyses favors the recognition of four genotypes on the basis of ORF2 sequences, namely PCV2a, PCV2b, PCV2c and PCV2d-mPCV2b. To deal with the difficulty of founding an unambiguous classification and accounting the impossibility to define a p-distance cut-off, a set of reference sequences that could be used in further phylogenetic studies for PCV2 genotyping was established. Being aware that extensive phylogenetic analyses are time-consuming and often impracticable during routine diagnostic activity, ORF2 nucleotide positions adequately conserved in the reference sequences were identified and reported to allow a quick genotype differentiation. Globally, the present work provides an updated scenario of PCV2 genotypes distribution and, based on the limits of the previous classification criteria, proposes new rapid and effective schemes for differentiating the four defined PCV2 genotypes.

  4. Dewey Decimal Classification Online Project: Evaluation of a Library Schedule and Index Integrated into the Subject Searching Capabilities of an Online Catalog. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen; Demeyer, Anh N.

    In this research project, subject terms from the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) Schedules and Relative Index were incorporated into an online catalog as searcher's tools for subject access, browsing, and display. Four features of the DDC were employed to help searchers browse for and match their own subject terms with the online catalog's…

  5. Classification enhancement for post-stroke dementia using fuzzy neighborhood preserving analysis with QR-decomposition.

    PubMed

    Al-Qazzaz, Noor Kamal; Ali, Sawal; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Escudero, Javier

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to discriminate the electroencephalogram (EEG) of 5 patients with vascular dementia (VaD), 15 patients with stroke-related mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 15 control normal subjects during a working memory (WM) task. We used independent component analysis (ICA) and wavelet transform (WT) as a hybrid preprocessing approach for EEG artifact removal. Three different features were extracted from the cleaned EEG signals: spectral entropy (SpecEn), permutation entropy (PerEn) and Tsallis entropy (TsEn). Two classification schemes were applied - support vector machine (SVM) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN) - with fuzzy neighborhood preserving analysis with QR-decomposition (FNPAQR) as a dimensionality reduction technique. The FNPAQR dimensionality reduction technique increased the SVM classification accuracy from 82.22% to 90.37% and from 82.6% to 86.67% for kNN. These results suggest that FNPAQR consistently improves the discrimination of VaD, MCI patients and control normal subjects and it could be a useful feature selection to help the identification of patients with VaD and MCI.

  6. Crisis in Cataloging Revisited: The Year's Work in Subject Analysis, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, James Bradford

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the 1990 literature that concerns subject analysis. Issues addressed include subject cataloging, including Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH); classification, including Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), Library of Congress Classification, and classification in online systems; subject access, including the online use of…

  7. Centrifuge: rapid and sensitive classification of metagenomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Breitwieser, Florian P.

    2016-01-01

    Centrifuge is a novel microbial classification engine that enables rapid, accurate, and sensitive labeling of reads and quantification of species on desktop computers. The system uses an indexing scheme based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) and the Ferragina-Manzini (FM) index, optimized specifically for the metagenomic classification problem. Centrifuge requires a relatively small index (4.2 GB for 4078 bacterial and 200 archaeal genomes) and classifies sequences at very high speed, allowing it to process the millions of reads from a typical high-throughput DNA sequencing run within a few minutes. Together, these advances enable timely and accurate analysis of large metagenomics data sets on conventional desktop computers. Because of its space-optimized indexing schemes, Centrifuge also makes it possible to index the entire NCBI nonredundant nucleotide sequence database (a total of 109 billion bases) with an index size of 69 GB, in contrast to k-mer-based indexing schemes, which require far more extensive space. PMID:27852649

  8. Dewey Decimal Classification for U. S. Conn: An Advantage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Kate

    This paper examines the use of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system at the U. S. Conn Library at Wayne State College (WSC) in Nebraska. Several developments in the last 20 years which have eliminated the trend toward reclassification of academic library collections from DDC to the Library of Congress (LC) classification scheme are…

  9. A new local-global approach for classification.

    PubMed

    Peres, R T; Pedreira, C E

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new local-global pattern classification scheme that combines supervised and unsupervised approaches, taking advantage of both, local and global environments. We understand as global methods the ones concerned with the aim of constructing a model for the whole problem space using the totality of the available observations. Local methods focus into sub regions of the space, possibly using an appropriately selected subset of the sample. In the proposed method, the sample is first divided in local cells by using a Vector Quantization unsupervised algorithm, the LBG (Linde-Buzo-Gray). In a second stage, the generated assemblage of much easier problems is locally solved with a scheme inspired by Bayes' rule. Four classification methods were implemented for comparison purposes with the proposed scheme: Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ); Feedforward Neural Networks; Support Vector Machine (SVM) and k-Nearest Neighbors. These four methods and the proposed scheme were implemented in eleven datasets, two controlled experiments, plus nine public available datasets from the UCI repository. The proposed method has shown a quite competitive performance when compared to these classical and largely used classifiers. Our method is simple concerning understanding and implementation and is based on very intuitive concepts. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Detailed Quantitative Classifications of Galaxy Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Preethi

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes responsible for the growth of galaxies is one of the key challenges in extragalactic astronomy. The assembly history of a galaxy is imprinted in a galaxy’s detailed morphology. The bulge-to-total ratio of galaxies, the presence or absence of bars, rings, spiral arms, tidal tails etc, all have implications for the past merger, star formation, and feedback history of a galaxy. However, current quantitative galaxy classification schemes are only useful for broad binning. They cannot classify or exploit the wide variety of galaxy structures seen in nature. Therefore, comparisons of observations with theoretical predictions of secular structure formation have only been conducted on small samples of visually classified galaxies. However large samples are needed to disentangle the complex physical processes of galaxy formation. With the advent of large surveys, like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and WFIRST, the problem of statistics will be resolved. However, the need for a robust quantitative classification scheme will still remain. Here I will present early results on promising machine learning algorithms that are providing detailed classifications, identifying bars, rings, multi-armed spiral galaxies, and Hubble type.

  11. Comparison of Classification Methods for P300 Brain-Computer Interface on Disabled Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Manyakov, Nikolay V.; Chumerin, Nikolay; Combaz, Adrien; Van Hulle, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on tests with a mind typing paradigm based on a P300 brain-computer interface (BCI) on a group of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients, suffering from motor and speech disabilities. We investigate the achieved typing accuracy given the individual patient's disorder, and how it correlates with the type of classifier used. We considered 7 types of classifiers, linear as well as nonlinear ones, and found that, overall, one type of linear classifier yielded a higher classification accuracy. In addition to the selection of the classifier, we also suggest and discuss a number of recommendations to be considered when building a P300-based typing system for disabled subjects. PMID:21941530

  12. Bayesian hierarchical modeling for subject-level response classification in peptide microarray immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Imholte, Gregory; Gottardo, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    Summary The peptide microarray immunoassay simultaneously screens sample serum against thousands of peptides, determining the presence of antibodies bound to array probes. Peptide microarrays tiling immunogenic regions of pathogens (e.g. envelope proteins of a virus) are an important high throughput tool for querying and mapping antibody binding. Because of the assay’s many steps, from probe synthesis to incubation, peptide microarray data can be noisy with extreme outliers. In addition, subjects may produce different antibody profiles in response to an identical vaccine stimulus or infection, due to variability among subjects’ immune systems. We present a robust Bayesian hierarchical model for peptide microarray experiments, pepBayes, to estimate the probability of antibody response for each subject/peptide combination. Heavy-tailed error distributions accommodate outliers and extreme responses, and tailored random effect terms automatically incorporate technical effects prevalent in the assay. We apply our model to two vaccine trial datasets to demonstrate model performance. Our approach enjoys high sensitivity and specificity when detecting vaccine induced antibody responses. A simulation study shows an adaptive thresholding classification method has appropriate false discovery rate control with high sensitivity, and receiver operating characteristics generated on vaccine trial data suggest that pepBayes clearly separates responses from non-responses. PMID:27061097

  13. Classification in Astronomy: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric

    2012-03-01

    used today with many refinements by Gerard de Vaucouleurs and others. Supernovae, nearly all of which are found in external galaxies, have a complicated classification scheme:Type I with subtypes Ia, Ib, Ic, Ib/c pec and Type II with subtypes IIb, IIL, IIP, and IIn (Turatto 2003). The classification is based on elemental abundances in optical spectra and on optical light curve shapes. Tadhunter (2009) presents a three-dimensional classification of active galactic nuclei involving radio power, emission line width, and nuclear luminosity. These taxonomies have played enormously important roles in the development of astronomy, yet all were developed using heuristic methods. Many are based on qualitative and subjective assessments of spatial, temporal, or spectral properties. A qualitative, morphological approach to astronomical studies was explicitly promoted by Zwicky (1957). Other classifications are based on quantitative criteria, but these criteria were developed by subjective examination of training datasets. For example, starburst galaxies are discriminated from narrow-line Seyfert galaxies by a curved line in a diagramof the ratios of four emission lines (Veilleux and Osterbrock 1987). Class II young stellar objects have been defined by a rectangular region in a mid-infrared color-color diagram (Allen et al. 2004). Short and hard gamma-ray bursts are discriminated by a dip in the distribution of burst durations (Kouveliotou et al. 2000). In no case was a statistical or algorithmic procedure used to define the classes.

  14. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a joint ESA/JAXA mission planned to be launched in 2018. The multi-sensor platform carries a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral-resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). Three out of the four instruments (ATLID, MSI, and BBR) will be able to sense the global aerosol distribution and contribute to the overarching EarthCARE goals of sensor synergy and radiation closure with respect to aerosols. The high-spectral-resolution lidar ATLID obtains profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, and linear depolarization ratio as well as the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 355 nm. MSI provides AOT at 670 nm (over land and ocean) and 865 nm (over ocean). Next to these primary observables the aerosol type is one of the required products to be derived from both lidar stand-alone and ATLID-MSI synergistic retrievals. ATLID measurements of the aerosol intensive properties (lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) and ATLID-MSI observations of the spectral AOT will provide the basic input for aerosol-type determination. Aerosol typing is needed for the quantification of anthropogenic versus natural aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the investigation of aerosol-cloud interaction, assimilation purposes, and the validation of atmospheric transport models which carry components like dust, sea salt, smoke and pollution. Furthermore, aerosol classification is a prerequisite for the estimation of direct aerosol radiative forcing and radiative closure studies. With an appropriate underlying microphysical particle description, the categorization of aerosol observations into predefined aerosol types allows us to infer information needed for the calculation of shortwave radiative effects, such as mean particle size, single-scattering albedo, and spectral conversion factors. In order to ensure

  15. Evaluation of several schemes for classification of remotely sensed data: Their parameters and performance. [Foster County, North Dakota; Grant County, Kansas; Iroquois County, Illinois, Tippecanoe County, Indiana; and Pottawattamie and Shelby Counties, Iowa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D.; Fuhs, N.; Hixson, M.; Akiyama, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Data sets for corn, soybeans, winter wheat, and spring wheat were used to evaluate the following schemes for crop identification: (1) per point Gaussian maximum classifier; (2) per point sum of normal densities classifiers; (3) per point linear classifier; (4) per point Gaussian maximum likelihood decision tree classifiers; and (5) texture sensitive per field Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier. Test site location and classifier both had significant effects on classification accuracy of small grains; classifiers did not differ significantly in overall accuracy, with the majority of the difference among classifiers being attributed to training method rather than to the classification algorithm applied. The complexity of use and computer costs for the classifiers varied significantly. A linear classification rule which assigns each pixel to the class whose mean is closest in Euclidean distance was the easiest for the analyst and cost the least per classification.

  16. FORUM: A Suggestion for an Improved Vegetation Scheme for Local and Global Mapping and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    ADAMS

    1999-01-01

    / Understanding of global ecological problems is at least partly dependent on clear assessments of vegetation change, and such assessment is always dependent on the use of a vegetation classification scheme. Use of satellite remotely sensed data is the only practical means of carrying out any global-scale vegetation mapping exercise, but if the resulting maps are to be useful to most ecologists and conservationists, they must be closely tied to clearly defined features of vegetation on the ground. Furthermore, much of the mapping that does take place involves more local-scale description of field sites; for purposes of cost and practicality, such studies usually do not involve remote sensing using satellites. There is a need for a single scheme that integrates the smallest to the largest scale in a way that is meaningful to most environmental scientists. Existing schemes are unsatisfactory for this task; they are ambiguous, unnecessarily complex, and their categories do not correspond to common-sense definitions. In response to these problems, a simple structural-physiognomically based scheme with 23 fundamental categories is proposed here for mapping and monitoring on any scale, from local to global. The fundamental categories each subdivide into more specific structural categories for more detailed mapping, but all the categories can be used throughout the world and at any scale, allowing intercomparison between regions. The next stage in the process will be to obtain the views of as many people working in as many different fields as possible, to see whether the proposed scheme suits their needs and how it should be modified. With a few modifications, such a scheme could easily be appended to an existing land cover classification scheme, such as the FAO system, greatly increasing the usefulness and accessability of the results of the landcover classification. KEY WORDS: Vegetation scheme; Mapping; Monitoring; Land cover

  17. Improved opponent color local binary patterns: an effective local image descriptor for color texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Francesco; Bello-Cerezo, Raquel; Napoletano, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Texture classification plays a major role in many computer vision applications. Local binary patterns (LBP) encoding schemes have largely been proven to be very effective for this task. Improved LBP (ILBP) are conceptually simple, easy to implement, and highly effective LBP variants based on a point-to-average thresholding scheme instead of a point-to-point one. We propose the use of this encoding scheme for extracting intra- and interchannel features for color texture classification. We experimentally evaluated the resulting improved opponent color LBP alone and in concatenation with the ILBP of the local color contrast map on a set of image classification tasks over 9 datasets of generic color textures and 11 datasets of biomedical textures. The proposed approach outperformed other grayscale and color LBP variants in nearly all the datasets considered and proved competitive even against image features from last generation convolutional neural networks, particularly for the classification of biomedical images.

  18. SOM Classification of Martian TES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, R. C.; Roush, T. L.

    2002-01-01

    A classification scheme based on unsupervised self-organizing maps (SOM) is described. Results from its application to the ASU mineral spectral database are presented. Applications to the Martian Thermal Emission Spectrometer data are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Classification of extraterrestrial civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tong B.; Chang, Grace

    1991-06-01

    A scheme of classification of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) communities based on the scope of energy accessible to the civilization in question is proposed as an alternative to the Kardeshev (1964) scheme that includes three types of civilization, as determined by their levels of energy expenditure. The proposed scheme includes six classes: (1) a civilization that runs essentially on energy exerted by individual beings or by domesticated lower life forms, (2) harnessing of natural sources on planetary surface with artificial constructions, like water wheels and wind sails, (3) energy from fossils and fissionable isotopes, mined beneath the planet surface, (4) exploitation of nuclear fusion on a large scale, whether on the planet, in space, or from primary solar energy, (5) extensive use of antimatter for energy storage, and (6) energy from spacetime, perhaps via the action of naked singularities.

  20. A computerized scheme for lung nodule detection in multiprojection chest radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Li Qiang; Boyce, Sarah J.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Our previous study indicated that multiprojection chest radiography could significantly improve radiologists' performance for lung nodule detection in clinical practice. In this study, the authors further verify that multiprojection chest radiography can greatly improve the performance of a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme. Methods: Our database consisted of 59 subjects, including 43 subjects with 45 nodules and 16 subjects without nodules. The 45 nodules included 7 real and 38 simulated ones. The authors developed a conventional CAD scheme and a new fusion CAD scheme to detect lung nodules. The conventional CAD scheme consisted of four steps for (1) identification ofmore » initial nodule candidates inside lungs, (2) nodule candidate segmentation based on dynamic programming, (3) extraction of 33 features from nodule candidates, and (4) false positive reduction using a piecewise linear classifier. The conventional CAD scheme processed each of the three projection images of a subject independently and discarded the correlation information between the three images. The fusion CAD scheme included the four steps in the conventional CAD scheme and two additional steps for (5) registration of all candidates in the three images of a subject, and (6) integration of correlation information between the registered candidates in the three images. The integration step retained all candidates detected at least twice in the three images of a subject and removed those detected only once in the three images as false positives. A leave-one-subject-out testing method was used for evaluation of the performance levels of the two CAD schemes. Results: At the sensitivities of 70%, 65%, and 60%, our conventional CAD scheme reported 14.7, 11.3, and 8.6 false positives per image, respectively, whereas our fusion CAD scheme reported 3.9, 1.9, and 1.2 false positives per image, and 5.5, 2.8, and 1.7 false positives per patient, respectively. The low performance of the

  1. Etiological classification of ischemic stroke in young patients: a comparative study of TOAST, CCS, and ASCO.

    PubMed

    Gökçal, Elif; Niftaliyev, Elvin; Asil, Talip

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of stroke subtypes is important for making treatment decisions and prognostic evaluations. The TOAST classification system is most commonly used, but the CCS and ASCO classification systems might be more useful to identify stroke etiologies in young patients whose strokes have a wide range of different causes. In this manuscript, we aim to compare the differences in subtype classification between TOAST, CCS, and ASCO in young stroke patients. The TOAST, CCS, and ASCO classification schemes were applied to 151 patients with ischemic stroke aged 18-49 years old and the proportion of subtypes classified by each scheme was compared. For comparison, determined etiologies were defined as cases with evident and probable subtypes when using the CCS scheme and cases with grade 1 and 2 subtypes but no other grade 1 subtype when using the ASCO scheme. The McNemar test with Bonferroni correction was used to assess significance. By TOAST, 41.1% of patients' stroke etiology was classified as undetermined etiology, 19.2% as cardioembolic, 13.2% as large artery atherosclerosis, 11.3% as small vessel occlusion, and 15.2% as other causes. Compared with TOAST, both CCS and ASCO assigned fewer patients to the undetermined etiology group (30.5% p < 0.001 and 26.5% p < 0.001, respectively) and assigned more patients to the small vessel occlusion category (19.9%, p < 0.001, and 21.9%, p < 0.001, respectively). Additionally, both schemes assigned more patients to the large artery atherosclerosis group (15.9 and 16.6%, respectively). The proportion of patients assigned to either the cardioembolic or the other causes etiology did not differ significantly between the three schemes. Application of the CCS and ASCO classification schemes in young stroke patients seems feasible, and using both schemes may result in fewer patients being classified as undetermined etiology. New studies with more patients and a prospective design are needed to explore this topic further.

  2. TFOS DEWS II Definition and Classification Report.

    PubMed

    Craig, Jennifer P; Nichols, Kelly K; Akpek, Esen K; Caffery, Barbara; Dua, Harminder S; Joo, Choun-Ki; Liu, Zuguo; Nelson, J Daniel; Nichols, Jason J; Tsubota, Kazuo; Stapleton, Fiona

    2017-07-01

    The goals of the TFOS DEWS II Definition and Classification Subcommittee were to create an evidence-based definition and a contemporary classification system for dry eye disease (DED). The new definition recognizes the multifactorial nature of dry eye as a disease where loss of homeostasis of the tear film is the central pathophysiological concept. Ocular symptoms, as a broader term that encompasses reports of discomfort or visual disturbance, feature in the definition and the key etiologies of tear film instability, hyperosmolarity, and ocular surface inflammation and damage were determined to be important for inclusion in the definition. In the light of new data, neurosensory abnormalities were also included in the definition for the first time. In the classification of DED, recent evidence supports a scheme based on the pathophysiology where aqueous deficient and evaporative dry eye exist as a continuum, such that elements of each are considered in diagnosis and management. Central to the scheme is a positive diagnosis of DED with signs and symptoms, and this is directed towards management to restore homeostasis. The scheme also allows consideration of various related manifestations, such as non-obvious disease involving ocular surface signs without related symptoms, including neurotrophic conditions where dysfunctional sensation exists, and cases where symptoms exist without demonstrable ocular surface signs, including neuropathic pain. This approach is not intended to override clinical assessment and judgment but should prove helpful in guiding clinical management and research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A combined reconstruction-classification method for diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, P; Prince, S J D; Arridge, S

    2009-11-07

    We present a combined classification and reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography (DOT). DOT is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, some regularization is needed. We present a mixture of Gaussians prior, which regularizes the DOT reconstruction step. During each iteration, the parameters of a mixture model are estimated. These associate each reconstructed pixel with one of several classes based on the current estimate of the optical parameters. This classification is exploited to form a new prior distribution to regularize the reconstruction step and update the optical parameters. The algorithm can be described as an iteration between an optimization scheme with zeroth-order variable mean and variance Tikhonov regularization and an expectation-maximization scheme for estimation of the model parameters. We describe the algorithm in a general Bayesian framework. Results from simulated test cases and phantom measurements show that the algorithm enhances the contrast of the reconstructed images with good spatial accuracy. The probabilistic classifications of each image contain only a few misclassified pixels.

  4. Discriminative Hierarchical K-Means Tree for Large-Scale Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhi; Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, Yingli

    2015-09-01

    A key challenge in large-scale image classification is how to achieve efficiency in terms of both computation and memory without compromising classification accuracy. The learning-based classifiers achieve the state-of-the-art accuracies, but have been criticized for the computational complexity that grows linearly with the number of classes. The nonparametric nearest neighbor (NN)-based classifiers naturally handle large numbers of categories, but incur prohibitively expensive computation and memory costs. In this brief, we present a novel classification scheme, i.e., discriminative hierarchical K-means tree (D-HKTree), which combines the advantages of both learning-based and NN-based classifiers. The complexity of the D-HKTree only grows sublinearly with the number of categories, which is much better than the recent hierarchical support vector machines-based methods. The memory requirement is the order of magnitude less than the recent Naïve Bayesian NN-based approaches. The proposed D-HKTree classification scheme is evaluated on several challenging benchmark databases and achieves the state-of-the-art accuracies, while with significantly lower computation cost and memory requirement.

  5. Comparing the performance of flat and hierarchical Habitat/Land-Cover classification models in a NATURA 2000 site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavish, Yoni; O'Connell, Jerome; Marsh, Charles J.; Tarantino, Cristina; Blonda, Palma; Tomaselli, Valeria; Kunin, William E.

    2018-02-01

    The increasing need for high quality Habitat/Land-Cover (H/LC) maps has triggered considerable research into novel machine-learning based classification models. In many cases, H/LC classes follow pre-defined hierarchical classification schemes (e.g., CORINE), in which fine H/LC categories are thematically nested within more general categories. However, none of the existing machine-learning algorithms account for this pre-defined hierarchical structure. Here we introduce a novel Random Forest (RF) based application of hierarchical classification, which fits a separate local classification model in every branching point of the thematic tree, and then integrates all the different local models to a single global prediction. We applied the hierarchal RF approach in a NATURA 2000 site in Italy, using two land-cover (CORINE, FAO-LCCS) and one habitat classification scheme (EUNIS) that differ from one another in the shape of the class hierarchy. For all 3 classification schemes, both the hierarchical model and a flat model alternative provided accurate predictions, with kappa values mostly above 0.9 (despite using only 2.2-3.2% of the study area as training cells). The flat approach slightly outperformed the hierarchical models when the hierarchy was relatively simple, while the hierarchical model worked better under more complex thematic hierarchies. Most misclassifications came from habitat pairs that are thematically distant yet spectrally similar. In 2 out of 3 classification schemes, the additional constraints of the hierarchical model resulted with fewer such serious misclassifications relative to the flat model. The hierarchical model also provided valuable information on variable importance which can shed light into "black-box" based machine learning algorithms like RF. We suggest various ways by which hierarchical classification models can increase the accuracy and interpretability of H/LC classification maps.

  6. An analysis of the synoptic and climatological applicability of circulation type classifications for Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Ciaran; Fealy, Rowan

    2013-04-01

    Circulation type classifications (CTCs) compiled as part of the COST733 Action, entitled 'Harmonisation and Application of Weather Type Classifications for European Regions', are examined for their synoptic and climatological applicability to Ireland based on their ability to characterise surface temperature and precipitation. In all 16 different objective classification schemes, representative of four different methodological approaches to circulation typing (optimization algorithms, threshold based methods, eigenvector techniques and leader algorithms) are considered. Several statistical metrics which variously quantify the ability of CTCs to discretize daily data into well-defined homogeneous groups are used to evaluate and compare different approaches to synoptic typing. The records from 14 meteorological stations located across the island of Ireland are used in the study. The results indicate that while it was not possible to identify a single optimum classification or approach to circulation typing - conditional on the location and surface variables considered - a number of general assertions regarding the performance of different schemes can be made. The findings for surface temperature indicate that that those classifications based on predefined thresholds (e.g. Litynski, GrossWetterTypes and original Lamb Weather Type) perform well, as do the Kruizinga and Lund classification schemes. Similarly for precipitation predefined type classifications return high skill scores, as do those classifications derived using some optimization procedure (e.g. SANDRA, Self Organizing Maps and K-Means clustering). For both temperature and precipitation the results generally indicate that the classifications perform best for the winter season - reflecting the closer coupling between large-scale circulation and surface conditions during this period. In contrast to the findings for temperature, spatial patterns in the performance of classifications were more evident for

  7. Classification of Palmprint Using Principal Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Munaga V. N. K.; Kumar, M. K. Pramod; Sharma, Kuldeep

    In this paper, a new classification scheme for palmprint is proposed. Palmprint is one of the reliable physiological characteristics that can be used to authenticate an individual. Palmprint classification provides an important indexing mechanism in a very large palmprint database. Here, the palmprint database is initially categorized into two groups, right hand group and left hand group. Then, each group is further classified based on the distance traveled by principal line i.e. Heart Line During pre processing, a rectangular Region of Interest (ROI) in which only heart line is present, is extracted. Further, ROI is divided into 6 regions and depending upon the regions in which the heart line traverses the palmprint is classified accordingly. Consequently, our scheme allows 64 categories for each group forming a total number of 128 possible categories. The technique proposed in this paper includes only 15 such categories and it classifies not more than 20.96% of the images into a single category.

  8. Centrifuge: rapid and sensitive classification of metagenomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Song, Li; Breitwieser, Florian P; Salzberg, Steven L

    2016-12-01

    Centrifuge is a novel microbial classification engine that enables rapid, accurate, and sensitive labeling of reads and quantification of species on desktop computers. The system uses an indexing scheme based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) and the Ferragina-Manzini (FM) index, optimized specifically for the metagenomic classification problem. Centrifuge requires a relatively small index (4.2 GB for 4078 bacterial and 200 archaeal genomes) and classifies sequences at very high speed, allowing it to process the millions of reads from a typical high-throughput DNA sequencing run within a few minutes. Together, these advances enable timely and accurate analysis of large metagenomics data sets on conventional desktop computers. Because of its space-optimized indexing schemes, Centrifuge also makes it possible to index the entire NCBI nonredundant nucleotide sequence database (a total of 109 billion bases) with an index size of 69 GB, in contrast to k-mer-based indexing schemes, which require far more extensive space. © 2016 Kim et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. A classification of open Gaussian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmer, Daniel; Brown, Eric; Kempf, Achim; Mann, Robert B.; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2018-06-01

    We introduce a classification scheme for the generators of bosonic open Gaussian dynamics, providing instructive diagrams description for each type of dynamics. Using this classification, we discuss the consequences of imposing complete positivity on Gaussian dynamics. In particular, we show that non-symplectic operations must be active to allow for complete positivity. In addition, non-symplectic operations can, in fact, conserve the volume of phase space only if the restriction of complete positivity is lifted. We then discuss the implications for the relationship between information and energy flows in open quantum mechanics.

  10. Solar wind classification from a machine learning perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich-Meisner, V.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2017-12-01

    It is a very well known fact that the ubiquitous solar wind comes in at least two varieties, the slow solar wind and the coronal hole wind. The simplified view of two solar wind types has been frequently challenged. Existing solar wind categorization schemes rely mainly on different combinations of the solar wind proton speed, the O and C charge state ratios, the Alfvén speed, the expected proton temperature and the specific proton entropy. In available solar wind classification schemes, solar wind from stream interaction regimes is often considered either as coronal hole wind or slow solar wind, although their plasma properties are different compared to "pure" coronal hole or slow solar wind. As shown in Neugebauer et al. (2016), even if only two solar wind types are assumed, available solar wind categorization schemes differ considerably for intermediate solar wind speeds. Thus, the decision boundary between the coronal hole and the slow solar wind is so far not well defined.In this situation, a machine learning approach to solar wind classification can provide an additional perspective.We apply a well-known machine learning method, k-means, to the task of solar wind classification in order to answer the following questions: (1) How many solar wind types can reliably be identified in our data set comprised of ten years of solar wind observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)? (2) Which combinations of solar wind parameters are particularly useful for solar wind classification?Potential subtypes of slow solar wind are of particular interest because they can provide hints of respective different source regions or release mechanisms of slow solar wind.

  11. Creating a classification of image types in the medical literature for visual categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Henning; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer

    2012-02-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) from specialized collections has often been proposed for use in such areas as diagnostic aid, clinical decision support, and teaching. The visual retrieval from broad image collections such as teaching files, the medical literature or web images, by contrast, has not yet reached a high maturity level compared to textual information retrieval. Visual image classification into a relatively small number of classes (20-100) on the other hand, has shown to deliver good results in several benchmarks. It is, however, currently underused as a basic technology for retrieval tasks, for example, to limit the search space. Most classification schemes for medical images are focused on specific areas and consider mainly the medical image types (modalities), imaged anatomy, and view, and merge them into a single descriptor or classification hierarchy. Furthermore, they often ignore other important image types such as biological images, statistical figures, flowcharts, and diagrams that frequently occur in the biomedical literature. Most of the current classifications have also been created for radiology images, which are not the only types to be taken into account. With Open Access becoming increasingly widespread particularly in medicine, images from the biomedical literature are more easily available for use. Visual information from these images and knowledge that an image is of a specific type or medical modality could enrich retrieval. This enrichment is hampered by the lack of a commonly agreed image classification scheme. This paper presents a hierarchy for classification of biomedical illustrations with the goal of using it for visual classification and thus as a basis for retrieval. The proposed hierarchy is based on relevant parts of existing terminologies, such as the IRMA-code (Image Retrieval in Medical Applications), ad hoc classifications and hierarchies used in imageCLEF (Image retrieval task at the Cross-Language Evaluation

  12. An improved fault detection classification and location scheme based on wavelet transform and artificial neural network for six phase transmission line using single end data only.

    PubMed

    Koley, Ebha; Verma, Khushaboo; Ghosh, Subhojit

    2015-01-01

    Restrictions on right of way and increasing power demand has boosted development of six phase transmission. It offers a viable alternative for transmitting more power, without major modification in existing structure of three phase double circuit transmission system. Inspite of the advantages, low acceptance of six phase system is attributed to the unavailability of a proper protection scheme. The complexity arising from large number of possible faults in six phase lines makes the protection quite challenging. The proposed work presents a hybrid wavelet transform and modular artificial neural network based fault detector, classifier and locator for six phase lines using single end data only. The standard deviation of the approximate coefficients of voltage and current signals obtained using discrete wavelet transform are applied as input to the modular artificial neural network for fault classification and location. The proposed scheme has been tested for all 120 types of shunt faults with variation in location, fault resistance, fault inception angles. The variation in power system parameters viz. short circuit capacity of the source and its X/R ratio, voltage, frequency and CT saturation has also been investigated. The result confirms the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed protection scheme which makes it ideal for real time implementation.

  13. An unsupervised classification technique for multispectral remote sensing data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, M. Y.; Cummings, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a two-part clustering technique consisting of (a) a sequential statistical clustering, which is essentially a sequential variance analysis, and (b) a generalized K-means clustering. In this composite clustering technique, the output of (a) is a set of initial clusters which are input to (b) for further improvement by an iterative scheme. This unsupervised composite technique was employed for automatic classification of two sets of remote multispectral earth resource observations. The classification accuracy by the unsupervised technique is found to be comparable to that by traditional supervised maximum-likelihood classification techniques.

  14. COMPARISON OF GEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES FOR MID-ATLANTIC STREAM FISH ASSEMBLAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the influence of geographic factors in structuring fish assemblages is crucial to developing a comprehensive assessment of stream conditions. We compared the classification strengths (CS) of geographic groups (ecoregions and catchments), stream order, and groups bas...

  15. Classification and global distribution of ocean precipitation types based on satellite passive microwave signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Nitin

    The main objectives of this thesis are to develop a robust statistical method for the classification of ocean precipitation based on physical properties to which the SSM/I is sensitive and to examine how these properties vary globally and seasonally. A two step approach is adopted for the classification of oceanic precipitation classes from multispectral SSM/I data: (1)we subjectively define precipitation classes using a priori information about the precipitating system and its possible distinct signature on SSM/I data such as scattering by ice particles aloft in the precipitating cloud, emission by liquid rain water below freezing level, the difference of polarization at 19 GHz-an indirect measure of optical depth, etc.; (2)we then develop an objective classification scheme which is found to reproduce the subjective classification with high accuracy. This hybrid strategy allows us to use the characteristics of the data to define and encode classes and helps retain the physical interpretation of classes. The classification methods based on k-nearest neighbor and neural network are developed to objectively classify six precipitation classes. It is found that the classification method based neural network yields high accuracy for all precipitation classes. An inversion method based on minimum variance approach was used to retrieve gross microphysical properties of these precipitation classes such as column integrated liquid water path, column integrated ice water path, and column integrated min water path. This classification method is then applied to 2 years (1991-92) of SSM/I data to examine and document the seasonal and global distribution of precipitation frequency corresponding to each of these objectively defined six classes. The characteristics of the distribution are found to be consistent with assumptions used in defining these six precipitation classes and also with well known climatological patterns of precipitation regions. The seasonal and global

  16. An enhanced forest classification scheme for modeling vegetation-climate interactions based on national forest inventory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majasalmi, Titta; Eisner, Stephanie; Astrup, Rasmus; Fridman, Jonas; Bright, Ryan M.

    2018-01-01

    Forest management affects the distribution of tree species and the age class of a forest, shaping its overall structure and functioning and in turn the surface-atmosphere exchanges of mass, energy, and momentum. In order to attribute climate effects to anthropogenic activities like forest management, good accounts of forest structure are necessary. Here, using Fennoscandia as a case study, we make use of Fennoscandic National Forest Inventory (NFI) data to systematically classify forest cover into groups of similar aboveground forest structure. An enhanced forest classification scheme and related lookup table (LUT) of key forest structural attributes (i.e., maximum growing season leaf area index (LAImax), basal-area-weighted mean tree height, tree crown length, and total stem volume) was developed, and the classification was applied for multisource NFI (MS-NFI) maps from Norway, Sweden, and Finland. To provide a complete surface representation, our product was integrated with the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative Land Cover (ESA CCI LC) map of present day land cover (v.2.0.7). Comparison of the ESA LC and our enhanced LC products (https://doi.org/10.21350/7zZEy5w3) showed that forest extent notably (κ = 0.55, accuracy 0.64) differed between the two products. To demonstrate the potential of our enhanced LC product to improve the description of the maximum growing season LAI (LAImax) of managed forests in Fennoscandia, we compared our LAImax map with reference LAImax maps created using the ESA LC product (and related cross-walking table) and PFT-dependent LAImax values used in three leading land models. Comparison of the LAImax maps showed that our product provides a spatially more realistic description of LAImax in managed Fennoscandian forests compared to reference maps. This study presents an approach to account for the transient nature of forest structural attributes due to human

  17. Chicago classification criteria of esophageal motility disorders defined in high resolution esophageal pressure topography.

    PubMed

    Bredenoord, A J; Fox, M; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E; Schwizer, W; Smout, A J P M

    2012-03-01

    The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been an evolutionary process, molded first by published evidence pertinent to the clinical interpretation of high resolution manometry (HRM) studies and secondarily by group experience when suitable evidence is lacking. This publication summarizes the state of our knowledge as of the most recent meeting of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group in Ascona, Switzerland in April 2011. The prior iteration of the Chicago Classification was updated through a process of literature analysis and discussion. The major changes in this document from the prior iteration are largely attributable to research studies published since the prior iteration, in many cases research conducted in response to prior deliberations of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group. The classification now includes criteria for subtyping achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, motility disorders not observed in normal subjects (Distal esophageal spasm, Hypercontractile esophagus, and Absent peristalsis), and statistically defined peristaltic abnormalities (Weak peristalsis, Frequent failed peristalsis, Rapid contractions with normal latency, and Hypertensive peristalsis). The Chicago Classification is an algorithmic scheme for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders from clinical EPT studies. Moving forward, we anticipate continuing this process with increased emphasis placed on natural history studies and outcome data based on the classification. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Video Games: Instructional Potential and Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawrocki, Leon H.; Winner, Janet L.

    1983-01-01

    Intended to provide a framework and impetus for future investigations of video games, this paper summarizes activities investigating the instructional use of such games, observations by the authors, and a proposed classification scheme and a paradigm to assist in the preliminary selection of instructional video games. Nine references are listed.…

  19. Ototoxicity (cochleotoxicity) classifications: A review.

    PubMed

    Crundwell, Gemma; Gomersall, Phil; Baguley, David M

    2016-01-01

    Drug-mediated ototoxicity, specifically cochleotoxicity, is a concern for patients receiving medications for the treatment of serious illness. A number of classification schemes exist, most of which are based on pure-tone audiometry, in order to assist non-audiological/non-otological specialists in the identification and monitoring of iatrogenic hearing loss. This review identifies the primary classification systems used in cochleototoxicity monitoring. By bringing together classifications published in discipline-specific literature, the paper aims to increase awareness of their relative strengths and limitations in the assessment and monitoring of ototoxic hearing loss and to indicate how future classification systems may improve upon the status-quo. Literature review. PubMed identified 4878 articles containing the search term ototox*. A systematic search identified 13 key classification systems. Cochleotoxicity classification systems can be divided into those which focus on hearing change from a baseline audiogram and those that focus on the functional impact of the hearing loss. Common weaknesses of these grading scales included a lack of sensitivity to small adverse changes in hearing thresholds, a lack of high-frequency audiometry (>8 kHz), and lack of indication of which changes are likely to be clinically significant for communication and quality of life.

  20. Diagnosis and Classification of 17 Diseases from 1404 Subjects via Pattern Analysis of Exhaled Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report on an artificially intelligent nanoarray based on molecularly modified gold nanoparticles and a random network of single-walled carbon nanotubes for noninvasive diagnosis and classification of a number of diseases from exhaled breath. The performance of this artificially intelligent nanoarray was clinically assessed on breath samples collected from 1404 subjects having one of 17 different disease conditions included in the study or having no evidence of any disease (healthy controls). Blind experiments showed that 86% accuracy could be achieved with the artificially intelligent nanoarray, allowing both detection and discrimination between the different disease conditions examined. Analysis of the artificially intelligent nanoarray also showed that each disease has its own unique breathprint, and that the presence of one disease would not screen out others. Cluster analysis showed a reasonable classification power of diseases from the same categories. The effect of confounding clinical and environmental factors on the performance of the nanoarray did not significantly alter the obtained results. The diagnosis and classification power of the nanoarray was also validated by an independent analytical technique, i.e., gas chromatography linked with mass spectrometry. This analysis found that 13 exhaled chemical species, called volatile organic compounds, are associated with certain diseases, and the composition of this assembly of volatile organic compounds differs from one disease to another. Overall, these findings could contribute to one of the most important criteria for successful health intervention in the modern era, viz. easy-to-use, inexpensive (affordable), and miniaturized tools that could also be used for personalized screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of a number of diseases, which can clearly be extended by further development. PMID:28000444

  1. Automated source classification of new transient sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, M.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Wilms, J.; DeLuca, A.

    2017-10-01

    The EXTraS project harvests the hitherto unexplored temporal domain information buried in the serendipitous data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard the ESA XMM-Newton mission since its launch. This includes a search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis, and a search and characterization of variability in hundreds of thousands of sources. We present an automated classification scheme for new transient sources in the EXTraS project. The method is as follows: source classification features of a training sample are used to train machine learning algorithms (performed in R; randomForest (Breiman, 2001) in supervised mode) which are then tested on a sample of known source classes and used for classification.

  2. Approach for a Clinically Useful Comprehensive Classification of Vascular and Neural Aspects of Diabetic Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abramoff, Michael D.; Fort, Patrice E.; Han, Ian C.; Jayasundera, K. Thiran; Sohn, Elliott H.; Gardner, Thomas W.

    2018-01-01

    The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and other standardized classification schemes have laid a foundation for tremendous advances in the understanding and management of diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, technological advances in optics and image analysis, especially optical coherence tomography (OCT), OCT angiography (OCTa), and ultra-widefield imaging, as well as new discoveries in diabetic retinal neuropathy (DRN), are exposing the limitations of ETDRS and other classification systems to completely characterize retinal changes in diabetes, which we term diabetic retinal disease (DRD). While it may be most straightforward to add axes to existing classification schemes, as diabetic macular edema (DME) was added as an axis to earlier DR classifications, doing so may make these classifications increasingly complicated and thus clinically intractable. Therefore, we propose future research efforts to develop a new, comprehensive, and clinically useful classification system that will identify multimodal biomarkers to reflect the complex pathophysiology of DRD and accelerate the development of therapies to prevent vision-threatening DRD. PMID:29372250

  3. Approach for a Clinically Useful Comprehensive Classification of Vascular and Neural Aspects of Diabetic Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Abramoff, Michael D; Fort, Patrice E; Han, Ian C; Jayasundera, K Thiran; Sohn, Elliott H; Gardner, Thomas W

    2018-01-01

    The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and other standardized classification schemes have laid a foundation for tremendous advances in the understanding and management of diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, technological advances in optics and image analysis, especially optical coherence tomography (OCT), OCT angiography (OCTa), and ultra-widefield imaging, as well as new discoveries in diabetic retinal neuropathy (DRN), are exposing the limitations of ETDRS and other classification systems to completely characterize retinal changes in diabetes, which we term diabetic retinal disease (DRD). While it may be most straightforward to add axes to existing classification schemes, as diabetic macular edema (DME) was added as an axis to earlier DR classifications, doing so may make these classifications increasingly complicated and thus clinically intractable. Therefore, we propose future research efforts to develop a new, comprehensive, and clinically useful classification system that will identify multimodal biomarkers to reflect the complex pathophysiology of DRD and accelerate the development of therapies to prevent vision-threatening DRD.

  4. Branch classification: A new mechanism for improving branch predictor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.Y.; Hao, E.; Patt, Y.

    There is wide agreement that one of the most significant impediments to the performance of current and future pipelined superscalar processors is the presence of conditional branches in the instruction stream. Speculative execution is one solution to the branch problem, but speculative work is discarded if a branch is mispredicted. For it to be effective, speculative work is discarded if a branch is mispredicted. For it to be effective, speculative execution requires a very accurate branch predictor; 95% accuracy is not good enough. This paper proposes branch classification, a methodology for building more accurate branch predictors. Branch classification allows anmore » individual branch instruction to be associated with the branch predictor best suited to predict its direction. Using this approach, a hybrid branch predictor can be constructed such that each component branch predictor predicts those branches for which it is best suited. To demonstrate the usefulness of branch classification, an example classification scheme is given and a new hybrid predictor is built based on this scheme which achieves a higher prediction accuracy than any branch predictor previously reported in the literature.« less

  5. ERTS-1 data applications to Minnesota forest land use classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizer, J. E. (Principal Investigator); Eller, R. G.; Meyer, M. P.; Ulliman, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Color-combined ERTS-1 MSS spectral slices were analyzed to determine the maximum (repeatable) level of meaningful forest resource classification data visually attainable by skilled forest photointerpreters for the following purposes: (1) periodic updating of the Minnesota Land Management Information System (MLMIS) statewide computerized land use data bank, and (2) to provide first-stage forest resources survey data for large area forest land management planning. Controlled tests were made of two forest classification schemes by experienced professional foresters with special photointerpretation training and experience. The test results indicate it is possible to discriminate the MLMIS forest class from the MLMIS nonforest classes, but that it is not possible, under average circumstances, to further stratify the forest classification into species components with any degree of reliability with ERTS-1 imagery. An ongoing test of the resulting classification scheme involves the interpretation, and mapping, of the south half of Itasca County, Minnesota, with ERTS-1 imagery. This map is undergoing field checking by on the ground field cooperators, whose evaluation will be completed in the fall of 1973.

  6. High-order asynchrony-tolerant finite difference schemes for partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditya, Konduri; Donzis, Diego A.

    2017-12-01

    Synchronizations of processing elements (PEs) in massively parallel simulations, which arise due to communication or load imbalances between PEs, significantly affect the scalability of scientific applications. We have recently proposed a method based on finite-difference schemes to solve partial differential equations in an asynchronous fashion - synchronization between PEs is relaxed at a mathematical level. While standard schemes can maintain their stability in the presence of asynchrony, their accuracy is drastically affected. In this work, we present a general methodology to derive asynchrony-tolerant (AT) finite difference schemes of arbitrary order of accuracy, which can maintain their accuracy when synchronizations are relaxed. We show that there are several choices available in selecting a stencil to derive these schemes and discuss their effect on numerical and computational performance. We provide a simple classification of schemes based on the stencil and derive schemes that are representative of different classes. Their numerical error is rigorously analyzed within a statistical framework to obtain the overall accuracy of the solution. Results from numerical experiments are used to validate the performance of the schemes.

  7. Adaptive video-based vehicle classification technique for monitoring traffic.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-08-01

    This report presents a methodology for extracting two vehicle features, vehicle length and number of axles in order : to classify the vehicles from video, based on Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)s recommended vehicle : classification scheme....

  8. A color-coded vision scheme for robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kelley Tina

    1991-01-01

    Most vision systems for robotic applications rely entirely on the extraction of information from gray-level images. Humans, however, regularly depend on color to discriminate between objects. Therefore, the inclusion of color in a robot vision system seems a natural extension of the existing gray-level capabilities. A method for robot object recognition using a color-coding classification scheme is discussed. The scheme is based on an algebraic system in which a two-dimensional color image is represented as a polynomial of two variables. The system is then used to find the color contour of objects. In a controlled environment, such as that of the in-orbit space station, a particular class of objects can thus be quickly recognized by its color.

  9. Multi-dimensional classification of GABAergic interneurons with Bayesian network-modeled label uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Interneuron classification is an important and long-debated topic in neuroscience. A recent study provided a data set of digitally reconstructed interneurons classified by 42 leading neuroscientists according to a pragmatic classification scheme composed of five categorical variables, namely, of the interneuron type and four features of axonal morphology. From this data set we now learned a model which can classify interneurons, on the basis of their axonal morphometric parameters, into these five descriptive variables simultaneously. Because of differences in opinion among the neuroscientists, especially regarding neuronal type, for many interneurons we lacked a unique, agreed-upon classification, which we could use to guide model learning. Instead, we guided model learning with a probability distribution over the neuronal type and the axonal features, obtained, for each interneuron, from the neuroscientists' classification choices. We conveniently encoded such probability distributions with Bayesian networks, calling them label Bayesian networks (LBNs), and developed a method to predict them. This method predicts an LBN by forming a probabilistic consensus among the LBNs of the interneurons most similar to the one being classified. We used 18 axonal morphometric parameters as predictor variables, 13 of which we introduce in this paper as quantitative counterparts to the categorical axonal features. We were able to accurately predict interneuronal LBNs. Furthermore, when extracting crisp (i.e., non-probabilistic) predictions from the predicted LBNs, our method outperformed related work on interneuron classification. Our results indicate that our method is adequate for multi-dimensional classification of interneurons with probabilistic labels. Moreover, the introduced morphometric parameters are good predictors of interneuron type and the four features of axonal morphology and thus may serve as objective counterparts to the subjective, categorical axonal features.

  10. ABCD classification system: a novel classification for subaxial cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Mootaz

    2014-04-20

    The classification system was derived through a retrospective analysis of 73 consecutive cases of subaxial cervical spine injury as well as thorough literature review. To define a new classification system for subaxial cervical spine injuries. There exist several methods to classify subaxial cervical spine injuries but no single system has emerged as clearly superior to the others. On the basis of a 2-column anatomical model, the first part of the proposed classification is an anatomical description of the injury. It delivers the information whether the injury is bony, ligamentous, or a combined one. The first 4 alphabetical letters have been used for simplicity. Each column is represented by an alphabetical letter from A to D. Each letter has a radiological meaning (A = Absent injury, B = Bony lesion, C = Combined bony and ligamentous, D = Disc or ligamentous injury).The second part of the classification is represented by 3 modifiers. These are the neurological status of the patient (N), the degree of spinal canal stenosis (S), and the degree of instability (I). For simplicity, each modifier was graded in an ascending pattern of severity from zero to 2. The last part is optional and denotes which radiological examination has been used to define the injury type. The new ABCD classification was applicable for all patients. The most common type was anterior ligamentous and posterior combined injury "DC" (37.9%), followed by "DD" injury in 12% of the cases. Through this work a new classification for cervical spine injuries is proposed. The aim is to establish criteria for a common language in description of cervical injuries aiming for simplification, especially for junior residents. Each letter and each sign has a meaning to deliver the largest amount of information. Both the radiological as well as the clinical data are represented in this scheme. However, further evaluation of this classification is needed. 3.

  11. Cross-mapping the ICNP with NANDA, HHCC, Omaha System and NIC for unified nursing language system development. International Classification for Nursing Practice. International Council of Nurses. North American Nursing Diagnosis Association. Home Health Care Classification. Nursing Interventions Classification.

    PubMed

    Hyun, S; Park, H A

    2002-06-01

    Nursing language plays an important role in describing and defining nursing phenomena and nursing actions. There are numerous vocabularies describing nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes in nursing. However, the lack of a standardized unified nursing language is considered a problem for further development of the discipline of nursing. In an effort to unify the nursing languages, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) has proposed the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) as a unified nursing language system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inclusiveness and expressiveness of the ICNP terms by cross-mapping them with the existing nursing terminologies, specifically the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy I, the Omaha System, the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) and the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Nine hundred and seventy-four terms from these four classifications were cross-mapped with the ICNP terms. This was performed in accordance with the Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Diagnosis and Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Intervention, which were suggested by the ICNP development team. An expert group verified the results. The ICNP Phenomena Classification described 87.5% of the NANDA diagnoses, 89.7% of the HHCC diagnoses and 72.7% of the Omaha System problem classification scheme. The ICNP Action Classification described 79.4% of the NIC interventions, 80.6% of the HHCC interventions and 71.4% of the Omaha System intervention scheme. The results of this study suggest that the ICNP has a sound starting structure for a unified nursing language system and can be used to describe most of the existing terminologies. Recommendations for the addition of terms to the ICNP are provided.

  12. Classification of topological phonons in linear mechanical metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Süsstrunk, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Topological phononic crystals, alike their electronic counterparts, are characterized by a bulk–edge correspondence where the interior of a material dictates the existence of stable surface or boundary modes. In the mechanical setup, such surface modes can be used for various applications such as wave guiding, vibration isolation, or the design of static properties such as stable floppy modes where parts of a system move freely. Here, we provide a classification scheme of topological phonons based on local symmetries. We import and adapt the classification of noninteracting electron systems and embed it into the mechanical setup. Moreover, we provide an extensive set of examples that illustrate our scheme and can be used to generate models in unexplored symmetry classes. Our work unifies the vast recent literature on topological phonons and paves the way to future applications of topological surface modes in mechanical metamaterials. PMID:27482105

  13. Classification of document page images based on visual similarity of layout structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Christian K.; Doermann, David S.

    1999-12-01

    Searching for documents by their type or genre is a natural way to enhance the effectiveness of document retrieval. The layout of a document contains a significant amount of information that can be used to classify a document's type in the absence of domain specific models. A document type or genre can be defined by the user based primarily on layout structure. Our classification approach is based on 'visual similarity' of the layout structure by building a supervised classifier, given examples of the class. We use image features, such as the percentages of tex and non-text (graphics, image, table, and ruling) content regions, column structures, variations in the point size of fonts, the density of content area, and various statistics on features of connected components which can be derived from class samples without class knowledge. In order to obtain class labels for training samples, we conducted a user relevance test where subjects ranked UW-I document images with respect to the 12 representative images. We implemented our classification scheme using the OC1, a decision tree classifier, and report our findings.

  14. Estimating persistence of brominated and chlorinated organic pollutants in air, water, soil, and sediments with the QSPR-based classification scheme.

    PubMed

    Puzyn, T; Haranczyk, M; Suzuki, N; Sakurai, T

    2011-02-01

    We have estimated degradation half-lives of both brominated and chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs and PCDDs), furans (PBDFs and PCDFs), biphenyls (PBBs and PCBs), naphthalenes (PBNs and PCNs), diphenyl ethers (PBDEs and PCDEs) as well as selected unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air, surface water, surface soil, and sediments (in total of 1,431 compounds in four compartments). Next, we compared the persistence between chloro- (relatively well-studied) and bromo- (less studied) analogs. The predictions have been performed based on the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) scheme with use of k-nearest neighbors (kNN) classifier and the semi-quantitative system of persistence classes. The classification models utilized principal components derived from the principal component analysis of a set of 24 constitutional and quantum mechanical descriptors as input variables. Accuracies of classification (based on an external validation) were 86, 85, 87, and 75% for air, surface water, surface soil, and sediments, respectively. The persistence of all chlorinated species increased with increasing halogenation degree. In the case of brominated organic pollutants (Br-OPs), the trend was the same for air and sediments. However, we noticed that the opposite trend for persistence in surface water and soil. The results suggest that, due to high photoreactivity of C-Br chemical bonds, photolytic processes occurring in surface water and soil are able to play significant role in transforming and removing Br-OPs from these compartments. This contribution is the first attempt of classifying together Br-OPs and Cl-OPs according to their persistence, in particular, environmental compartments.

  15. Full-motion video analysis for improved gender classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, Jeffrey B.; Lochtefeld, Darrell F.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2014-06-01

    The ability of computer systems to perform gender classification using the dynamic motion of the human subject has important applications in medicine, human factors, and human-computer interface systems. Previous works in motion analysis have used data from sensors (including gyroscopes, accelerometers, and force plates), radar signatures, and video. However, full-motion video, motion capture, range data provides a higher resolution time and spatial dataset for the analysis of dynamic motion. Works using motion capture data have been limited by small datasets in a controlled environment. In this paper, we explore machine learning techniques to a new dataset that has a larger number of subjects. Additionally, these subjects move unrestricted through a capture volume, representing a more realistic, less controlled environment. We conclude that existing linear classification methods are insufficient for the gender classification for larger dataset captured in relatively uncontrolled environment. A method based on a nonlinear support vector machine classifier is proposed to obtain gender classification for the larger dataset. In experimental testing with a dataset consisting of 98 trials (49 subjects, 2 trials per subject), classification rates using leave-one-out cross-validation are improved from 73% using linear discriminant analysis to 88% using the nonlinear support vector machine classifier.

  16. Etiologic classification of TIA and minor stroke by A-S-C-O and causative classification system as compared to TOAST reduces the proportion of patients categorized as cause undetermined.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jamsheed A; Abuzinadah, Ahmad R; Imoukhuede, Oje; Bernbaum, Manya L; Modi, Jayesh; Demchuk, Andrew M; Coutts, Shelagh B

    2014-01-01

    The assortment of patients based on the underlying pathophysiology is central to preventing recurrent stroke after a transient ischemic attack and minor stroke (TIA-MS). The causative classification of stroke (CCS) and the A-S-C-O (A for atherosclerosis, S for small vessel disease, C for Cardiac source, O for other cause) classification schemes have recently been developed. These systems have not been specifically applied to the TIA-MS population. We hypothesized that both CCS and A-S-C-O would increase the proportion of patients with a definitive etiologic mechanism for TIA-MS as compared with TOAST. Patients were analyzed from the CATCH study. A single-stroke physician assigned all patients to an etiologic subtype using published algorithms for TOAST, CCS and ASCO. We compared the proportions in the various categories for each classification scheme and then the association with stroke progression or recurrence was assessed. TOAST, CCS and A-S-C-O classification schemes were applied in 469 TIA-MS patients. When compared to TOAST both CCS (58.0 vs. 65.3%; p < 0.0001) and ASCO grade 1 or 2 (37.5 vs. 65.3%; p < 0.0001) assigned fewer patients as cause undetermined. CCS had increased assignment of cardioembolism (+3.8%, p = 0.0001) as compared with TOAST. ASCO grade 1 or 2 had increased assignment of cardioembolism (+8.5%, p < 0.0001), large artery atherosclerosis (+14.9%, p < 0.0001) and small artery occlusion (+4.3%, p < 0.0001) as compared with TOAST. Compared with CCS, using ASCO resulted in a 20.5% absolute reduction in patients assigned to the 'cause undetermined' category (p < 0.0001). Patients who had multiple high-risk etiologies either by CCS or ASCO classification or an ASCO undetermined classification had a higher chance of having a recurrent event. Both CCS and ASCO schemes reduce the proportion of TIA and minor stroke patients classified as 'cause undetermined.' ASCO resulted in the fewest patients classified as cause undetermined. Stroke recurrence

  17. Stygoregions – a promising approach to a bioregional classification of groundwater systems

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Heide; Griebler, Christian; Berkhoff, Sven; Matzke, Dirk; Fuchs, Andreas; Hahn, Hans Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Linked to diverse biological processes, groundwater ecosystems deliver essential services to mankind, the most important of which is the provision of drinking water. In contrast to surface waters, ecological aspects of groundwater systems are ignored by the current European Union and national legislation. Groundwater management and protection measures refer exclusively to its good physicochemical and quantitative status. Current initiatives in developing ecologically sound integrative assessment schemes by taking groundwater fauna into account depend on the initial classification of subsurface bioregions. In a large scale survey, the regional and biogeographical distribution patterns of groundwater dwelling invertebrates were examined for many parts of Germany. Following an exploratory approach, our results underline that the distribution patterns of invertebrates in groundwater are not in accordance with any existing bioregional classification system established for surface habitats. In consequence, we propose to develope a new classification scheme for groundwater ecosystems based on stygoregions. PMID:22993698

  18. A prototype of mammography CADx scheme integrated to imaging quality evaluation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiabel, Homero; Matheus, Bruno R. N.; Angelo, Michele F.; Patrocínio, Ana Claudia; Ventura, Liliane

    2011-03-01

    As all women over the age of 40 are recommended to perform mammographic exams every two years, the demands on radiologists to evaluate mammographic images in short periods of time has increased considerably. As a tool to improve quality and accelerate analysis CADe/Dx (computer-aided detection/diagnosis) schemes have been investigated, but very few complete CADe/Dx schemes have been developed and most are restricted to detection and not diagnosis. The existent ones usually are associated to specific mammographic equipment (usually DR), which makes them very expensive. So this paper describes a prototype of a complete mammography CADx scheme developed by our research group integrated to an imaging quality evaluation process. The basic structure consists of pre-processing modules based on image acquisition and digitization procedures (FFDM, CR or film + scanner), a segmentation tool to detect clustered microcalcifications and suspect masses and a classification scheme, which evaluates as the presence of microcalcifications clusters as well as possible malignant masses based on their contour. The aim is to provide enough information not only on the detected structures but also a pre-report with a BI-RADS classification. At this time the system is still lacking an interface integrating all the modules. Despite this, it is functional as a prototype for clinical practice testing, with results comparable to others reported in literature.

  19. Applying graphics user interface ot group technology classification and coding at the Boeing aerospace company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, P. H.; Jacobson, H.

    1984-10-01

    The thrust of 'group technology' is toward the exploitation of similarities in component design and manufacturing process plans to achieve assembly line flow cost efficiencies for small batch production. The systematic method devised for the identification of similarities in component geometry and processing steps is a coding and classification scheme implemented by interactive CAD/CAM systems. This coding and classification scheme has led to significant increases in computer processing power, allowing rapid searches and retrievals on the basis of a 30-digit code together with user-friendly computer graphics.

  20. Efficient Fingercode Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-Wei; Law, Kwok-Yan; Gollmann, Dieter; Chung, Siu-Leung; Li, Jian-Bin; Sun, Jia-Guang

    In this paper, we present an efficient fingerprint classification algorithm which is an essential component in many critical security application systems e. g. systems in the e-government and e-finance domains. Fingerprint identification is one of the most important security requirements in homeland security systems such as personnel screening and anti-money laundering. The problem of fingerprint identification involves searching (matching) the fingerprint of a person against each of the fingerprints of all registered persons. To enhance performance and reliability, a common approach is to reduce the search space by firstly classifying the fingerprints and then performing the search in the respective class. Jain et al. proposed a fingerprint classification algorithm based on a two-stage classifier, which uses a K-nearest neighbor classifier in its first stage. The fingerprint classification algorithm is based on the fingercode representation which is an encoding of fingerprints that has been demonstrated to be an effective fingerprint biometric scheme because of its ability to capture both local and global details in a fingerprint image. We enhance this approach by improving the efficiency of the K-nearest neighbor classifier for fingercode-based fingerprint classification. Our research firstly investigates the various fast search algorithms in vector quantization (VQ) and the potential application in fingerprint classification, and then proposes two efficient algorithms based on the pyramid-based search algorithms in VQ. Experimental results on DB1 of FVC 2004 demonstrate that our algorithms can outperform the full search algorithm and the original pyramid-based search algorithms in terms of computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy.

  1. Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders Defined in High Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT)†

    PubMed Central

    Bredenoord, Albert J; Fox, Mark; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E; Schwizer, Werner; Smout, AJPM; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Cook, Ian J; Gyawali, Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F; Zerbib, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been, and will continue to be, an evolutionary process, molded first by published evidence pertinent to the clinical interpretation of high resolution manometry (HRM) studies and secondarily by group experience when suitable evidence is lacking. Methods This publication summarizes the state of our knowledge as of the most recent meeting of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group in Ascona, Switzerland in April 2011. The prior iteration of the Chicago Classification was updated through a process of literature analysis and discussion. Key Results The major changes in this document from the prior iteration are largely attributable to research studies published since the prior iteration, in many cases research conducted in response to prior deliberations of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group. The classification now includes criteria for subtyping achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, motility disorders not observed in normal subjects (Distal esophageal spasm, Hypercontractile esophagus, and Absent peristalsis), and statistically defined peristaltic abnormalities (Weak peristalsis, Frequent failed peristalsis, Rapid contractions with normal latency, and Hypertensive peristalsis). Conclusions & Inferences The Chicago Classification is an algorithmic scheme for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders from clinical EPT studies. Moving forward, we anticipate continuing this process with increased emphasis placed on natural history studies and outcome data based on the classification. PMID:22248109

  2. Ice/water Classification of Sentinel-1 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosov, Anton; Zakhvatkina, Natalia; Muckenhuber, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Sea Ice monitoring and classification relies heavily on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. These sensors record data either only at horizontal polarization (RADARSAT-1) or vertically polarized (ERS-1 and ERS-2) or at dual polarization (Radarsat-2, Sentinel-1). Many algorithms have been developed to discriminate sea ice types and open water using single polarization images. Ice type classification, however, is still ambiguous in some cases. Sea ice classification in single polarization SAR images has been attempted using various methods since the beginning of the ERS programme. The robust classification using only SAR images that can provide useful results under varying sea ice types and open water tend to be not generally applicable in operational regime. The new generation SAR satellites have capability to deliver images in several polarizations. This gives improved possibility to develop sea ice classification algorithms. In this study we use data from Sentinel-1 at dual-polarization, i.e. HH (horizontally transmitted and horizontally received) and HV (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). This mode assembles wide SAR image from several narrower SAR beams, resulting to an image of 500 x 500 km with 50 m resolution. A non-linear scheme for classification of Sentinel-1 data has been developed. The processing allows to identify three classes: ice, calm water and rough water at 1 km spatial resolution. The raw sigma0 data in HH and HV polarization are first corrected for thermal and random noise by extracting the background thermal noise level and smoothing the image with several filters. At the next step texture characteristics are computed in a moving window using a Gray Level Co-occurence Matrix (GLCM). A neural network is applied at the last step for processing array of the most informative texture characteristics and ice/water classification. The main results are: * the most informative texture characteristics to be used for sea ice classification

  3. Critical Evaluation of Headache Classifications

    PubMed Central

    ÖZGE, Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Transforming a subjective sense like headache into an objective state and establishing a common language for this complaint which can be both a symptom and a disease all by itself have kept the investigators busy for years. Each recommendation proposed has brought along a set of patients who do not meet the criteria. While almost the most ideal and most comprehensive classification studies continued at this point, this time criticisims about withdrawing from daily practice came to the fore. In this article, the classification adventure of scientists who work in the area of headache will be summarized. More specifically, 2 classifications made by the International Headache Society (IHS) and the point reached in relation with the 3rd classification which is still being worked on will be discussed together with headache subtypes. It has been presented with the wish and belief that it will contribute to the readers and young investigators who are interested in this subject. PMID:28360577

  4. Critical Evaluation of Headache Classifications.

    PubMed

    Özge, Aynur

    2013-08-01

    Transforming a subjective sense like headache into an objective state and establishing a common language for this complaint which can be both a symptom and a disease all by itself have kept the investigators busy for years. Each recommendation proposed has brought along a set of patients who do not meet the criteria. While almost the most ideal and most comprehensive classification studies continued at this point, this time criticisims about withdrawing from daily practice came to the fore. In this article, the classification adventure of scientists who work in the area of headache will be summarized. More specifically, 2 classifications made by the International Headache Society (IHS) and the point reached in relation with the 3rd classification which is still being worked on will be discussed together with headache subtypes. It has been presented with the wish and belief that it will contribute to the readers and young investigators who are interested in this subject.

  5. A fuzzy integral method based on the ensemble of neural networks to analyze fMRI data for cognitive state classification across multiple subjects.

    PubMed

    Cacha, L A; Parida, S; Dehuri, S; Cho, S-B; Poznanski, R R

    2016-12-01

    The huge number of voxels in fMRI over time poses a major challenge to for effective analysis. Fast, accurate, and reliable classifiers are required for estimating the decoding accuracy of brain activities. Although machine-learning classifiers seem promising, individual classifiers have their own limitations. To address this limitation, the present paper proposes a method based on the ensemble of neural networks to analyze fMRI data for cognitive state classification for application across multiple subjects. Similarly, the fuzzy integral (FI) approach has been employed as an efficient tool for combining different classifiers. The FI approach led to the development of a classifiers ensemble technique that performs better than any of the single classifier by reducing the misclassification, the bias, and the variance. The proposed method successfully classified the different cognitive states for multiple subjects with high accuracy of classification. Comparison of the performance improvement, while applying ensemble neural networks method, vs. that of the individual neural network strongly points toward the usefulness of the proposed method.

  6. Development and evaluation of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for lung nodule detection in chest radiographs by means of two-stage nodule enhancement with support vector classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Sheng; Suzuki, Kenji; MacMahon, Heber

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) scheme for nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) with a high sensitivity and a low false-positive (FP) rate. Methods: The authors developed a CADe scheme consisting of five major steps, which were developed for improving the overall performance of CADe schemes. First, to segment the lung fields accurately, the authors developed a multisegment active shape model. Then, a two-stage nodule-enhancement technique was developed for improving the conspicuity of nodules. Initial nodule candidates were detected and segmented by using the clustering watershed algorithm. Thirty-one shape-, gray-level-, surface-, and gradient-based features were extracted from each segmentedmore » candidate for determining the feature space, including one of the new features based on the Canny edge detector to eliminate a major FP source caused by rib crossings. Finally, a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) with a Gaussian kernel was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. Results: To evaluate and compare the scheme to other published CADe schemes, the authors used a publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs. The CADe scheme based on the SVM classifier achieved sensitivities of 78.6% (110/140) and 71.4% (100/140) with averages of 5.0 (1165/233) FPs/image and 2.0 (466/233) FPs/image, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the CADe scheme based on a linear discriminant analysis classifier had a sensitivity of 60.7% (85/140) at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. For nodules classified as ''very subtle'' and ''extremely subtle,'' a sensitivity of 57.1% (24/42) was achieved at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. When the authors used a database developed at the University of Chicago, the sensitivities was 83.3% (40/48) and 77.1% (37/48) at an FP rate of 5.0 (240/48) FPs/image and 2.0 (96/48) FPs /image, respectively. Conclusions: These results compare favorably to those

  7. Classification of product inspection items using nonlinear features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Casasent, David P.; Lee, H.-W.

    1998-03-01

    Automated processing and classification of real-time x-ray images of randomly oriented touching pistachio nuts is discussed. The ultimate objective is the development of a system for automated non-invasive detection of defective product items on a conveyor belt. This approach involves two main steps: preprocessing and classification. Preprocessing locates individual items and segments ones that touch using a modified watershed algorithm. The second stage involves extraction of features that allow discrimination between damaged and clean items (pistachio nuts). This feature extraction and classification stage is the new aspect of this paper. We use a new nonlinear feature extraction scheme called the maximum representation and discriminating feature (MRDF) extraction method to compute nonlinear features that are used as inputs to a classifier. The MRDF is shown to provide better classification and a better ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve than other methods.

  8. Automated structural classification of lipids by machine learning.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ryan; Miller, Ryan H; Miller, Ryan D; Porter, Michael; Dalgleish, James; Prince, John T

    2015-03-01

    Modern lipidomics is largely dependent upon structural ontologies because of the great diversity exhibited in the lipidome, but no automated lipid classification exists to facilitate this partitioning. The size of the putative lipidome far exceeds the number currently classified, despite a decade of work. Automated classification would benefit ongoing classification efforts by decreasing the time needed and increasing the accuracy of classification while providing classifications for mass spectral identification algorithms. We introduce a tool that automates classification into the LIPID MAPS ontology of known lipids with >95% accuracy and novel lipids with 63% accuracy. The classification is based upon simple chemical characteristics and modern machine learning algorithms. The decision trees produced are intelligible and can be used to clarify implicit assumptions about the current LIPID MAPS classification scheme. These characteristics and decision trees are made available to facilitate alternative implementations. We also discovered many hundreds of lipids that are currently misclassified in the LIPID MAPS database, strongly underscoring the need for automated classification. Source code and chemical characteristic lists as SMARTS search strings are available under an open-source license at https://www.github.com/princelab/lipid_classifier. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Single-trial EEG RSVP classification using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamwell, Jared; Lee, Hyungtae; Kwon, Heesung; Marathe, Amar R.; Lawhern, Vernon; Nothwang, William

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) have been explored as a means to return function to paralyzed or otherwise debilitated individuals. An emerging use for BCIs is in human-autonomy sensor fusion where physiological data from healthy subjects is combined with machine-generated information to enhance the capabilities of artificial systems. While human-autonomy fusion of physiological data and computer vision have been shown to improve classification during visual search tasks, to date these approaches have relied on separately trained classification models for each modality. We aim to improve human-autonomy classification performance by developing a single framework that builds codependent models of human electroencephalograph (EEG) and image data to generate fused target estimates. As a first step, we developed a novel convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture and applied it to EEG recordings of subjects classifying target and non-target image presentations during a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) image triage task. The low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of EEG inherently limits the accuracy of single-trial classification and when combined with the high dimensionality of EEG recordings, extremely large training sets are needed to prevent overfitting and achieve accurate classification from raw EEG data. This paper explores a new deep CNN architecture for generalized multi-class, single-trial EEG classification across subjects. We compare classification performance from the generalized CNN architecture trained across all subjects to the individualized XDAWN, HDCA, and CSP neural classifiers which are trained and tested on single subjects. Preliminary results show that our CNN meets and slightly exceeds the performance of the other classifiers despite being trained across subjects.

  10. Generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary HR InSAR image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    Land cover classification of remote sensing imagery is an important topic of research. For example, different applications require precise and fast information about the land cover of the imaged scenery (e.g., disaster management and change detection). Focusing on high resolution (HR) spaceborne remote sensing imagery, the user has the choice between passive and active sensor systems. Passive systems, such as multispectral sensors, have the disadvantage of being dependent from weather influences (fog, dust, clouds, etc.) and time of day, since they work in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, active systems like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provide improved capabilities. As an interactive method analyzing HR InSAR image pairs, the CovAmCohTM method was introduced in former studies. CovAmCoh represents the joint analysis of locality (coefficient of variation - Cov), backscatter (amplitude - Am) and temporal stability (coherence - Coh). It delivers information on physical backscatter characteristics of imaged scene objects or structures and provides the opportunity to detect different classes of land cover (e.g., urban, rural, infrastructure and activity areas). As example, railway tracks are easily distinguishable from other infrastructure due to their characteristic bluish coloring caused by the gravel between the sleepers. In consequence, imaged objects or structures have a characteristic appearance in CovAmCoh images which allows the development of classification rules. In this paper, a generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary InSAR image pairs using the CovAmCoh method is proposed. This scheme bases on analyzing the information content of typical CovAmCoh imagery using the semisupervised k-means clustering. It is shown that eight classes model the main local information content of CovAmCoh images sufficiently and can be used as basis for a classification scheme.

  11. Unsupervised classification of remote multispectral sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, M. Y.

    1972-01-01

    The new unsupervised classification technique for classifying multispectral remote sensing data which can be either from the multispectral scanner or digitized color-separation aerial photographs consists of two parts: (a) a sequential statistical clustering which is a one-pass sequential variance analysis and (b) a generalized K-means clustering. In this composite clustering technique, the output of (a) is a set of initial clusters which are input to (b) for further improvement by an iterative scheme. Applications of the technique using an IBM-7094 computer on multispectral data sets over Purdue's Flight Line C-1 and the Yellowstone National Park test site have been accomplished. Comparisons between the classification maps by the unsupervised technique and the supervised maximum liklihood technique indicate that the classification accuracies are in agreement.

  12. Changing Patient Classification System for Hospital Reimbursement in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Methods Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). Results The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians’ knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Conclusion Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care. PMID:20564769

  13. Changing patient classification system for hospital reimbursement in Romania.

    PubMed

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians' knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case-mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case-mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care.

  14. An evaluation of supervised classifiers for indirectly detecting salt-affected areas at irrigation scheme level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Sybrand Jacobus; van Niekerk, Adriaan

    2016-07-01

    Soil salinity often leads to reduced crop yield and quality and can render soils barren. Irrigated areas are particularly at risk due to intensive cultivation and secondary salinization caused by waterlogging. Regular monitoring of salt accumulation in irrigation schemes is needed to keep its negative effects under control. The dynamic spatial and temporal characteristics of remote sensing can provide a cost-effective solution for monitoring salt accumulation at irrigation scheme level. This study evaluated a range of pan-fused SPOT-5 derived features (spectral bands, vegetation indices, image textures and image transformations) for classifying salt-affected areas in two distinctly different irrigation schemes in South Africa, namely Vaalharts and Breede River. The relationship between the input features and electro conductivity measurements were investigated using regression modelling (stepwise linear regression, partial least squares regression, curve fit regression modelling) and supervised classification (maximum likelihood, nearest neighbour, decision tree analysis, support vector machine and random forests). Classification and regression trees and random forest were used to select the most important features for differentiating salt-affected and unaffected areas. The results showed that the regression analyses produced weak models (<0.4 R squared). Better results were achieved using the supervised classifiers, but the algorithms tend to over-estimate salt-affected areas. A key finding was that none of the feature sets or classification algorithms stood out as being superior for monitoring salt accumulation at irrigation scheme level. This was attributed to the large variations in the spectral responses of different crops types at different growing stages, coupled with their individual tolerances to saline conditions.

  15. Automated Decision Tree Classification of Corneal Shape

    PubMed Central

    Twa, Michael D.; Parthasarathy, Srinivasan; Roberts, Cynthia; Mahmoud, Ashraf M.; Raasch, Thomas W.; Bullimore, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The volume and complexity of data produced during videokeratography examinations present a challenge of interpretation. As a consequence, results are often analyzed qualitatively by subjective pattern recognition or reduced to comparisons of summary indices. We describe the application of decision tree induction, an automated machine learning classification method, to discriminate between normal and keratoconic corneal shapes in an objective and quantitative way. We then compared this method with other known classification methods. Methods The corneal surface was modeled with a seventh-order Zernike polynomial for 132 normal eyes of 92 subjects and 112 eyes of 71 subjects diagnosed with keratoconus. A decision tree classifier was induced using the C4.5 algorithm, and its classification performance was compared with the modified Rabinowitz–McDonnell index, Schwiegerling’s Z3 index (Z3), Keratoconus Prediction Index (KPI), KISA%, and Cone Location and Magnitude Index using recommended classification thresholds for each method. We also evaluated the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve for each classification method. Results Our decision tree classifier performed equal to or better than the other classifiers tested: accuracy was 92% and the area under the ROC curve was 0.97. Our decision tree classifier reduced the information needed to distinguish between normal and keratoconus eyes using four of 36 Zernike polynomial coefficients. The four surface features selected as classification attributes by the decision tree method were inferior elevation, greater sagittal depth, oblique toricity, and trefoil. Conclusions Automated decision tree classification of corneal shape through Zernike polynomials is an accurate quantitative method of classification that is interpretable and can be generated from any instrument platform capable of raw elevation data output. This method of pattern classification is extendable to other classification

  16. A Three-Phase Decision Model of Computer-Aided Coding for the Iranian Classification of Health Interventions (IRCHI)

    PubMed Central

    Azadmanjir, Zahra; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mokhtaran, Mehrshad; Kameli, Mohammad Esmail

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Accurate coded data in the healthcare are critical. Computer-Assisted Coding (CAC) is an effective tool to improve clinical coding in particular when a new classification will be developed and implemented. But determine the appropriate method for development need to consider the specifications of existing CAC systems, requirements for each type, our infrastructure and also, the classification scheme. Aim: The aim of the study was the development of a decision model for determining accurate code of each medical intervention in Iranian Classification of Health Interventions (IRCHI) that can be implemented as a suitable CAC system. Methods: first, a sample of existing CAC systems was reviewed. Then feasibility of each one of CAC types was examined with regard to their prerequisites for their implementation. The next step, proper model was proposed according to the structure of the classification scheme and was implemented as an interactive system. Results: There is a significant relationship between the level of assistance of a CAC system and integration of it with electronic medical documents. Implementation of fully automated CAC systems is impossible due to immature development of electronic medical record and problems in using language for medical documenting. So, a model was proposed to develop semi-automated CAC system based on hierarchical relationships between entities in the classification scheme and also the logic of decision making to specify the characters of code step by step through a web-based interactive user interface for CAC. It was composed of three phases to select Target, Action and Means respectively for an intervention. Conclusion: The proposed model was suitable the current status of clinical documentation and coding in Iran and also, the structure of new classification scheme. Our results show it was practical. However, the model needs to be evaluated in the next stage of the research. PMID:28883671

  17. A Three-Phase Decision Model of Computer-Aided Coding for the Iranian Classification of Health Interventions (IRCHI).

    PubMed

    Azadmanjir, Zahra; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mokhtaran, Mehrshad; Kameli, Mohammad Esmail

    2017-06-01

    Accurate coded data in the healthcare are critical. Computer-Assisted Coding (CAC) is an effective tool to improve clinical coding in particular when a new classification will be developed and implemented. But determine the appropriate method for development need to consider the specifications of existing CAC systems, requirements for each type, our infrastructure and also, the classification scheme. The aim of the study was the development of a decision model for determining accurate code of each medical intervention in Iranian Classification of Health Interventions (IRCHI) that can be implemented as a suitable CAC system. first, a sample of existing CAC systems was reviewed. Then feasibility of each one of CAC types was examined with regard to their prerequisites for their implementation. The next step, proper model was proposed according to the structure of the classification scheme and was implemented as an interactive system. There is a significant relationship between the level of assistance of a CAC system and integration of it with electronic medical documents. Implementation of fully automated CAC systems is impossible due to immature development of electronic medical record and problems in using language for medical documenting. So, a model was proposed to develop semi-automated CAC system based on hierarchical relationships between entities in the classification scheme and also the logic of decision making to specify the characters of code step by step through a web-based interactive user interface for CAC. It was composed of three phases to select Target, Action and Means respectively for an intervention. The proposed model was suitable the current status of clinical documentation and coding in Iran and also, the structure of new classification scheme. Our results show it was practical. However, the model needs to be evaluated in the next stage of the research.

  18. Analysis of a Bibliographic Database Enhanced with a Library Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabenstott, Karen Markey; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes a project that examined the effects of incorporating subject terms from the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) into a bibliographic database. It is concluded that the incorporation of DDC and possibly other library classifications into online catalogs can enhance subject access and provide additional subject searching strategies. (11…

  19. Prediction of cause of death from forensic autopsy reports using text classification techniques: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Shuib, Liyana; Raj, Ram Gopal; Rajandram, Retnagowri; Shaikh, Khairunisa

    2018-07-01

    Automatic text classification techniques are useful for classifying plaintext medical documents. This study aims to automatically predict the cause of death from free text forensic autopsy reports by comparing various schemes for feature extraction, term weighing or feature value representation, text classification, and feature reduction. For experiments, the autopsy reports belonging to eight different causes of death were collected, preprocessed and converted into 43 master feature vectors using various schemes for feature extraction, representation, and reduction. The six different text classification techniques were applied on these 43 master feature vectors to construct a classification model that can predict the cause of death. Finally, classification model performance was evaluated using four performance measures i.e. overall accuracy, macro precision, macro-F-measure, and macro recall. From experiments, it was found that that unigram features obtained the highest performance compared to bigram, trigram, and hybrid-gram features. Furthermore, in feature representation schemes, term frequency, and term frequency with inverse document frequency obtained similar and better results when compared with binary frequency, and normalized term frequency with inverse document frequency. Furthermore, the chi-square feature reduction approach outperformed Pearson correlation, and information gain approaches. Finally, in text classification algorithms, support vector machine classifier outperforms random forest, Naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbor, decision tree, and ensemble-voted classifier. Our results and comparisons hold practical importance and serve as references for future works. Moreover, the comparison outputs will act as state-of-art techniques to compare future proposals with existing automated text classification techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. Semi-Automated Classification of Seafloor Data Collected on the Delmarva Inner Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, E. M.; Pendleton, E. A.; Brothers, L. L.; Mahmud, A.; Thieler, E. R.

    2017-12-01

    We tested automated classification methods on acoustic bathymetry and backscatter data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on the Delmarva inner continental shelf to efficiently and objectively identify sediment texture and geomorphology. Automated classification techniques are generally less subjective and take significantly less time than manual classification methods. We used a semi-automated process combining unsupervised and supervised classification techniques to characterize seafloor based on bathymetric slope and relative backscatter intensity. Statistical comparison of our automated classification results with those of a manual classification conducted on a subset of the acoustic imagery indicates that our automated method was highly accurate (95% total accuracy and 93% Kappa). Our methods resolve sediment ridges, zones of flat seafloor and areas of high and low backscatter. We compared our classification scheme with mean grain size statistics of samples collected in the study area and found that strong correlations between backscatter intensity and sediment texture exist. High backscatter zones are associated with the presence of gravel and shells mixed with sand, and low backscatter areas are primarily clean sand or sand mixed with mud. Slope classes further elucidate textural and geomorphologic differences in the seafloor, such that steep slopes (>0.35°) with high backscatter are most often associated with the updrift side of sand ridges and bedforms, whereas low slope with high backscatter correspond to coarse lag or shell deposits. Low backscatter and high slopes are most often found on the downdrift side of ridges and bedforms, and low backscatter and low slopes identify swale areas and sand sheets. We found that poor acoustic data quality was the most significant cause of inaccurate classification results, which required additional user input to mitigate. Our method worked well

  1. Hydrological Climate Classification: Can We Improve on Köppen-Geiger?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoben, W.; Woods, R. A.; Freer, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Classification is essential in the study of complex natural systems, yet hydrology so far has no formal way to structure the climate forcing which underlies hydrologic response. Various climate classification systems can be borrowed from other disciplines but these are based on different organizing principles than a hydrological classification might use. From gridded global data we calculate a gridded aridity index, an aridity seasonality index and a rain-vs-snow index, which we use to cluster global locations into climate groups. We then define the membership degree of nearly 1100 catchments to each of our climate groups based on each catchment's climate and investigate the extent to which streamflow responses within each climate group are similar. We compare this climate classification approach with the often-used Köppen-Geiger classification, using statistical tests based on streamflow signature values. We find that three climate indices are sufficient to distinguish 18 different climate types world-wide. Climates tend to change gradually in space and catchments can thus belong to multiple climate groups, albeit with different degrees of membership. Streamflow responses within a climate group tend to be similar, regardless of the catchments' geographical proximity. A Wilcoxon two-sample test based on streamflow signature values for each climate group shows that the new classification can distinguish different flow regimes using this classification scheme. The Köppen-Geiger approach uses 29 climate classes but is less able to differentiate streamflow regimes. Climate forcing exerts a strong control on typical hydrologic response and both change gradually in space. This makes arbitrary hard boundaries in any classification scheme difficult to defend. Any hydrological classification should thus acknowledge these gradual changes in forcing. Catchment characteristics (soil or vegetation type, land use, etc) can vary more quickly in space than climate does, which

  2. Overview of classification systems in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Rulon L; Jazaeri, Omid; Yi, J; Smith, M; Gupta, Rajan

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), secondary to atherosclerotic disease, is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. While PAD is common, it is estimated that the majority of patients with PAD are undiagnosed and undertreated. The challenge to the treatment of PAD is to accurately diagnose the symptoms and determine treatment for each patient. The varied presentations of peripheral vascular disease have led to numerous classification schemes throughout the literature. Consistent grading of patients leads to both objective criteria for treating patients and a baseline for clinical follow-up. Reproducible classification systems are also important in clinical trials and when comparing medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment paradigms. This article reviews the various classification systems for PAD and advantages to each system.

  3. Preprocessing and meta-classification for brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Paul S; de Sa, Virginia R

    2007-03-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a system which allows direct translation of brain states into actions, bypassing the usual muscular pathways. A BCI system works by extracting user brain signals, applying machine learning algorithms to classify the user's brain state, and performing a computer-controlled action. Our goal is to improve brain state classification. Perhaps the most obvious way to improve classification performance is the selection of an advanced learning algorithm. However, it is now well known in the BCI community that careful selection of preprocessing steps is crucial to the success of any classification scheme. Furthermore, recent work indicates that combining the output of multiple classifiers (meta-classification) leads to improved classification rates relative to single classifiers (Dornhege et al., 2004). In this paper, we develop an automated approach which systematically analyzes the relative contributions of different preprocessing and meta-classification approaches. We apply this procedure to three data sets drawn from BCI Competition 2003 (Blankertz et al., 2004) and BCI Competition III (Blankertz et al., 2006), each of which exhibit very different characteristics. Our final classification results compare favorably with those from past BCI competitions. Additionally, we analyze the relative contributions of individual preprocessing and meta-classification choices and discuss which types of BCI data benefit most from specific algorithms.

  4. A subject-independent pattern-based Brain-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andreas M.; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Rana, Mohit; Pasqualotto, Emanuele; Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Kai-Keng; Tejos, Cristián; Zamorano, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco; Birbaumer, Niels; Ruiz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    While earlier Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) studies have mostly focused on modulating specific brain regions or signals, new developments in pattern classification of brain states are enabling real-time decoding and modulation of an entire functional network. The present study proposes a new method for real-time pattern classification and neurofeedback of brain states from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. It involves the creation of a fused classification model based on the method of Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs) from data of several healthy individuals. The subject-independent model is then used to classify EEG data in real-time and provide feedback to new individuals. In a series of offline experiments involving training and testing of the classifier with individual data from 27 healthy subjects, a mean classification accuracy of 75.30% was achieved, demonstrating that the classification system at hand can reliably decode two types of imagery used in our experiments, i.e., happy emotional imagery and motor imagery. In a subsequent experiment it is shown that the classifier can be used to provide neurofeedback to new subjects, and that these subjects learn to “match” their brain pattern to that of the fused classification model in a few days of neurofeedback training. This finding can have important implications for future studies on neurofeedback and its clinical applications on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26539089

  5. Subject-specific and pose-oriented facial features for face recognition across poses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping-Han; Hsu, Gee-Sern; Wang, Yun-Wen; Hung, Yi-Ping

    2012-10-01

    Most face recognition scenarios assume that frontal faces or mug shots are available for enrollment to the database, faces of other poses are collected in the probe set. Given a face from the probe set, one needs to determine whether a match in the database exists. This is under the assumption that in forensic applications, most suspects have their mug shots available in the database, and face recognition aims at recognizing the suspects when their faces of various poses are captured by a surveillance camera. This paper considers a different scenario: given a face with multiple poses available, which may or may not include a mug shot, develop a method to recognize the face with poses different from those captured. That is, given two disjoint sets of poses of a face, one for enrollment and the other for recognition, this paper reports a method best for handling such cases. The proposed method includes feature extraction and classification. For feature extraction, we first cluster the poses of each subject's face in the enrollment set into a few pose classes and then decompose the appearance of the face in each pose class using Embedded Hidden Markov Model, which allows us to define a set of subject-specific and pose-priented (SSPO) facial components for each subject. For classification, an Adaboost weighting scheme is used to fuse the component classifiers with SSPO component features. The proposed method is proven to outperform other approaches, including a component-based classifier with local facial features cropped manually, in an extensive performance evaluation study.

  6. Exploring the impact of wavelet-based denoising in the classification of remote sensing hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada-Barriuso, Pablo; Heras, Dora B.; Argüello, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    The classification of remote sensing hyperspectral images for land cover applications is a very intensive topic. In the case of supervised classification, Support Vector Machines (SVMs) play a dominant role. Recently, the Extreme Learning Machine algorithm (ELM) has been extensively used. The classification scheme previously published by the authors, and called WT-EMP, introduces spatial information in the classification process by means of an Extended Morphological Profile (EMP) that is created from features extracted by wavelets. In addition, the hyperspectral image is denoised in the 2-D spatial domain, also using wavelets and it is joined to the EMP via a stacked vector. In this paper, the scheme is improved achieving two goals. The first one is to reduce the classification time while preserving the accuracy of the classification by using ELM instead of SVM. The second one is to improve the accuracy results by performing not only a 2-D denoising for every spectral band, but also a previous additional 1-D spectral signature denoising applied to each pixel vector of the image. For each denoising the image is transformed by applying a 1-D or 2-D wavelet transform, and then a NeighShrink thresholding is applied. Improvements in terms of classification accuracy are obtained, especially for images with close regions in the classification reference map, because in these cases the accuracy of the classification in the edges between classes is more relevant.

  7. Boosted classification trees result in minor to modest improvement in the accuracy in classifying cardiovascular outcomes compared to conventional classification trees

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Peter C; Lee, Douglas S

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Classification trees are increasingly being used to classifying patients according to the presence or absence of a disease or health outcome. A limitation of classification trees is their limited predictive accuracy. In the data-mining and machine learning literature, boosting has been developed to improve classification. Boosting with classification trees iteratively grows classification trees in a sequence of reweighted datasets. In a given iteration, subjects that were misclassified in the previous iteration are weighted more highly than subjects that were correctly classified. Classifications from each of the classification trees in the sequence are combined through a weighted majority vote to produce a final classification. The authors' objective was to examine whether boosting improved the accuracy of classification trees for predicting outcomes in cardiovascular patients. Methods: We examined the utility of boosting classification trees for classifying 30-day mortality outcomes in patients hospitalized with either acute myocardial infarction or congestive heart failure. Results: Improvements in the misclassification rate using boosted classification trees were at best minor compared to when conventional classification trees were used. Minor to modest improvements to sensitivity were observed, with only a negligible reduction in specificity. For predicting cardiovascular mortality, boosted classification trees had high specificity, but low sensitivity. Conclusions: Gains in predictive accuracy for predicting cardiovascular outcomes were less impressive than gains in performance observed in the data mining literature. PMID:22254181

  8. Consensus Classification Using Non-Optimized Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Brownfield, Brett; Lemos, Tony; Kalivas, John H

    2018-04-03

    Classifying samples into categories is a common problem in analytical chemistry and other fields. Classification is usually based on only one method, but numerous classifiers are available with some being complex, such as neural networks, and others are simple, such as k nearest neighbors. Regardless, most classification schemes require optimization of one or more tuning parameters for best classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. A process not requiring exact selection of tuning parameter values would be useful. To improve classification, several ensemble approaches have been used in past work to combine classification results from multiple optimized single classifiers. The collection of classifications for a particular sample are then combined by a fusion process such as majority vote to form the final classification. Presented in this Article is a method to classify a sample by combining multiple classification methods without specifically classifying the sample by each method, that is, the classification methods are not optimized. The approach is demonstrated on three analytical data sets. The first is a beer authentication set with samples measured on five instruments, allowing fusion of multiple instruments by three ways. The second data set is composed of textile samples from three classes based on Raman spectra. This data set is used to demonstrate the ability to classify simultaneously with different data preprocessing strategies, thereby reducing the need to determine the ideal preprocessing method, a common prerequisite for accurate classification. The third data set contains three wine cultivars for three classes measured at 13 unique chemical and physical variables. In all cases, fusion of nonoptimized classifiers improves classification. Also presented are atypical uses of Procrustes analysis and extended inverted signal correction (EISC) for distinguishing sample similarities to respective classes.

  9. Classification-Based Spatial Error Concealment for Visual Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Zheng, Yefeng; Wu, Min

    2006-12-01

    In an error-prone transmission environment, error concealment is an effective technique to reconstruct the damaged visual content. Due to large variations of image characteristics, different concealment approaches are necessary to accommodate the different nature of the lost image content. In this paper, we address this issue and propose using classification to integrate the state-of-the-art error concealment techniques. The proposed approach takes advantage of multiple concealment algorithms and adaptively selects the suitable algorithm for each damaged image area. With growing awareness that the design of sender and receiver systems should be jointly considered for efficient and reliable multimedia communications, we proposed a set of classification-based block concealment schemes, including receiver-side classification, sender-side attachment, and sender-side embedding. Our experimental results provide extensive performance comparisons and demonstrate that the proposed classification-based error concealment approaches outperform the conventional approaches.

  10. Chondrule formation, metamorphism, brecciation, an important new primary chondrule group, and the classification of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Shaoxiong, Huang; Benoit, Paul H.

    1995-01-01

    The recently proposed compositional classification scheme for meteoritic chondrules divides the chondrules into groups depending on the composition of their two major phases, olivine (or pyroxene) and the mesostasis, both of which are genetically important. The scheme is here applied to discussions of three topics: the petrographic classification of Roosevelt County 075 (the least-metamorphosed H chondrite known), brecciation (an extremely important and ubiquitous process probably experienced by greater than 40% of all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites), and the group A5 chondrules in the least metamorphosed ordinary chondrites which have many similarities to chondrules in the highly metamorphosed 'equilibrated' chondrites. Since composition provides insights into both primary formation properties of the chondruies and the effects of metamorphism on the entire assemblage it is possible to determine the petrographic type of RC075 as 3.1 with unique certainty. Similarly, the near scheme can be applied to individual chondrules without knowledge of the petrographic type of the host chondrite, which makes it especially suitable for studying breccias. Finally, the new scheme has revealed the existence of chondrules not identified by previous techniques and which appear to be extremely important. Like group A1 and A2 chondrules (but unlike group B1 chondrules) the primitive group A5 chondruies did not supercool during formation, but unlike group A1 and A2 chondrules (and like group B1 chondrules) they did not suffer volatile loss and reduction during formation. It is concluded that the compositional classification scheme provides important new insights into the formation and history of chondrules and chondrites which would be overlooked by previous schemes.

  11. Distinguishing medication-free subjects with unipolar disorder from subjects with bipolar disorder: state matters.

    PubMed

    Rive, Maria M; Redlich, Ronny; Schmaal, Lianne; Marquand, André F; Dannlowski, Udo; Grotegerd, Dominik; Veltman, Dick J; Schene, Aart H; Ruhé, Henricus G

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have indicated that pattern recognition techniques of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data for individual classification may be valuable for distinguishing between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). Importantly, medication may have affected previous classification results as subjects with MDD and BD use different classes of medication. Furthermore, almost all studies have investigated only depressed subjects. Therefore, we focused on medication-free subjects. We additionally investigated whether classification would be mood state independent by including depressed and remitted subjects alike. We applied Gaussian process classifiers to investigate the discriminatory power of structural MRI (gray matter volumes of emotion regulation areas) and resting-state fMRI (resting-state networks implicated in mood disorders: default mode network [DMN], salience network [SN], and lateralized frontoparietal networks [FPNs]) in depressed (n=42) and remitted (n=49) medication-free subjects with MDD and BD. Depressed subjects with MDD and BD could be classified based on the gray matter volumes of emotion regulation areas as well as DMN functional connectivity with 69.1% prediction accuracy. Prediction accuracy using the FPNs and SN did not exceed chance level. It was not possible to discriminate between remitted subjects with MDD and BD. For the first time, we showed that medication-free subjects with MDD and BD can be differentiated based on structural MRI as well as resting-state functional connectivity. Importantly, the results indicated that research concerning diagnostic neuroimaging tools distinguishing between MDD and BD should consider mood state as only depressed subjects with MDD and BD could be correctly classified. Future studies, in larger samples are needed to investigate whether the results can be generalized to medication-naïve or first-episode subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  12. Evaluation of the Melanocytic Pathology Assessment Tool and Hierarchy for Diagnosis (MPATH-Dx) classification scheme for diagnosis of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms: Results from the International Melanoma Pathology Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lott, Jason P; Elmore, Joann G; Zhao, Ge A; Knezevich, Stevan R; Frederick, Paul D; Reisch, Lisa M; Chu, Emily Y; Cook, Martin G; Duncan, Lyn M; Elenitsas, Rosalie; Gerami, Pedram; Landman, Gilles; Lowe, Lori; Messina, Jane L; Mihm, Martin C; van den Oord, Joost J; Rabkin, Michael S; Schmidt, Birgitta; Shea, Christopher R; Yun, Sook Jung; Xu, George X; Piepkorn, Michael W; Elder, David E; Barnhill, Raymond L

    2016-08-01

    Pathologists use diverse terminology when interpreting melanocytic neoplasms, potentially compromising quality of care. We sought to evaluate the Melanocytic Pathology Assessment Tool and Hierarchy for Diagnosis (MPATH-Dx) scheme, a 5-category classification system for melanocytic lesions. Participants (n = 16) of the 2013 International Melanoma Pathology Study Group Workshop provided independent case-level diagnoses and treatment suggestions for 48 melanocytic lesions. Individual diagnoses (including, when necessary, least and most severe diagnoses) were mapped to corresponding MPATH-Dx classes. Interrater agreement and correlation between MPATH-Dx categorization and treatment suggestions were evaluated. Most participants were board-certified dermatopathologists (n = 15), age 50 years or older (n = 12), male (n = 9), based in the United States (n = 11), and primary academic faculty (n = 14). Overall, participants generated 634 case-level diagnoses with treatment suggestions. Mean weighted kappa coefficients for diagnostic agreement after MPATH-Dx mapping (assuming least and most severe diagnoses, when necessary) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.68-0.71) and 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.71-0.73), respectively, whereas correlation between MPATH-Dx categorization and treatment suggestions was 0.91. This was a small sample size of experienced pathologists in a testing situation. Varying diagnostic nomenclature can be classified into a concise hierarchy using the MPATH-Dx scheme. Further research is needed to determine whether this classification system can facilitate diagnostic concordance in general pathology practice and improve patient care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Snyder-Dolan classification scheme to the selection of "orthogonal" columns for fast screening of illicit drugs and impurity profiling of pharmaceuticals--I. Isocratic elution.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenzhe; Zhang, Yu; Carr, Peter W; Rutan, Sarah C; Dumarey, Melanie; Schellinger, Adam P; Pritts, Wayne

    2009-09-18

    Fourteen judiciously selected reversed phase columns were tested with 18 cationic drug solutes under the isocratic elution conditions advised in the Snyder-Dolan (S-D) hydrophobic subtraction method of column classification. The standard errors (S.E.) of the least squares regressions of logk' vs. logk'(REF) were obtained for a given column against a reference column and used to compare and classify columns based on their selectivity. The results are consistent with those obtained with a study of the 16 test solutes recommended by Snyder and Dolan. To the extent these drugs are representative, these results show that the S-D classification scheme is also generally applicable to pharmaceuticals under isocratic conditions. That is, those columns judged to be similar based on the 16 S-D solutes were similar based on the 18 drugs; furthermore those columns judged to have significantly different selectivities based on the 16 S-D probes appeared to be quite different for the drugs as well. Given that the S-D method has been used to classify more than 400 different types of reversed phases the extension to cationic drugs is a significant finding.

  14. Gemstones and geosciences in space and time. Digital maps to the "Chessboard classification scheme of mineral deposits"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.; Weber, Berthold

    2013-12-01

    The gemstones, covering the spectrum from jeweler's to showcase quality, have been presented in a tripartite subdivision, by country, geology and geomorphology realized in 99 digital maps with more than 2600 mineralized sites. The various maps were designed based on the "Chessboard classification scheme of mineral deposits" proposed by Dill (2010a, 2010b) to reveal the interrelations between gemstone deposits and mineral deposits of other commodities and direct our thoughts to potential new target areas for exploration. A number of 33 categories were used for these digital maps: chromium, nickel, titanium, iron, manganese, copper, tin-tungsten, beryllium, lithium, zinc, calcium, boron, fluorine, strontium, phosphorus, zirconium, silica, feldspar, feldspathoids, zeolite, amphibole (tiger's eye), olivine, pyroxenoid, garnet, epidote, sillimanite-andalusite, corundum-spinel - diaspore, diamond, vermiculite-pagodite, prehnite, sepiolite, jet, and amber. Besides the political base map (gems by country) the mineral deposit is drawn on a geological map, illustrating the main lithologies, stratigraphic units and tectonic structure to unravel the evolution of primary gemstone deposits in time and space. The geomorphological map is to show the control of climate and subaerial and submarine hydrography on the deposition of secondary gemstone deposits. The digital maps are designed so as to be plotted as a paper version of different scale and to upgrade them for an interactive use and link them to gemological databases.

  15. Modern classification and outcome predictors of surgery in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-02-23

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVM) are challenging lesions. Part of this challenge stems from the infinite diversity of these lesions regarding shape, location, anatomy, and physiology. This diversity has called on a variety of treatment modalities for these lesions, of which microsurgical resection prevails as the mainstay of treatment. As such, outcome prediction and managing strategy mainly rely on unraveling the nature of these complex tangles and ways each lesion responds to various therapeutic modalities. This strategy needs the ability to decipher each lesion through accurate and efficient categorization. Therefore, classification schemes are essential parts of treatment planning and outcome prediction. This article summarizes different surgical classification schemes and outcome predictors proposed for bAVMs.

  16. Log-ratio transformed major element based multidimensional classification for altered High-Mg igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Rivera-Gómez, M. Abdelaly; Díaz-González, Lorena; Quiroz-Ruiz, Alfredo

    2016-12-01

    A new multidimensional classification scheme consistent with the chemical classification of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) is proposed for the nomenclature of High-Mg altered rocks. Our procedure is based on an extensive database of major element (SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3t, MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5) compositions of a total of 33,868 (920 High-Mg and 32,948 "Common") relatively fresh igneous rock samples. The database consisting of these multinormally distributed samples in terms of their isometric log-ratios was used to propose a set of 11 discriminant functions and 6 diagrams to facilitate High-Mg rock classification. The multinormality required by linear discriminant and canonical analysis was ascertained by a new computer program DOMuDaF. One multidimensional function can distinguish the High-Mg and Common igneous rocks with high percent success values of about 86.4% and 98.9%, respectively. Similarly, from 10 discriminant functions the High-Mg rocks can also be classified as one of the four rock types (komatiite, meimechite, picrite, and boninite), with high success values of about 88%-100%. Satisfactory functioning of this new classification scheme was confirmed by seven independent tests. Five further case studies involving application to highly altered rocks illustrate the usefulness of our proposal. A computer program HMgClaMSys was written to efficiently apply the proposed classification scheme, which will be available for online processing of igneous rock compositional data. Monte Carlo simulation modeling and mass-balance computations confirmed the robustness of our classification with respect to analytical errors and postemplacement compositional changes.

  17. Gaining qualitative insight into the subjective experiences of adherers to an exercise referral scheme: A thematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Eynon, Michael John; O'Donnell, Christopher; Williams, Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Nine adults who had completed an exercise referral scheme participated in a semi-structured interview to uncover the key psychological factors associated with adherence to the scheme. Through thematic analysis, an exercise identity emerged to be a major factor associated with adherence to the scheme, which was formed of a number of underpinning constructs including changes in self-esteem, changes in self-efficacy and changes in self-regulatory strategies. Also, an additional theme of transitions in motivation to exercise was identified, showing participants' motivation to alter from extrinsic to intrinsic reasons to exercise during the scheme.

  18. Classification Based on Hierarchical Linear Models: The Need for Incorporation of Social Contexts in Classification Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Brandon K.; Wang, Qui

    2009-01-01

    Many areas in educational and psychological research involve the use of classification statistical analysis. For example, school districts might be interested in attaining variables that provide optimal prediction of school dropouts. In psychology, a researcher might be interested in the classification of a subject into a particular psychological…

  19. Conspicuity assessment of selected propeller and tail rotor paint schemes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1978-08-01

    An investigation was conducted to rank the conspicuity of three paint schemes for airplane propellers and two schemes tail rotor blades previously recommended by the U.S. military and British Civil Aviation Authority. Thirty volunteer subjects with n...

  20. [The establishment, development and application of classification approach of freshwater phytoplankton based on the functional group: a review].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Zhu, Jin-Yong; Lu, Kai-Hong; Wan, Li; Mao, Xiao-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Appropriate schemes for classification of freshwater phytoplankton are prerequisites and important tools for revealing phytoplanktonic succession and studying freshwater ecosystems. An alternative approach, functional group of freshwater phytoplankton, has been proposed and developed due to the deficiencies of Linnaean and molecular identification in ecological applications. The functional group of phytoplankton is a classification scheme based on autoecology. In this study, the theoretical basis and classification criterion of functional group (FG), morpho-functional group (MFG) and morphology-based functional group (MBFG) were summarized, as well as their merits and demerits. FG was considered as the optimal classification approach for the aquatic ecology research and aquatic environment evaluation. The application status of FG was introduced, with the evaluation standards and problems of two approaches to assess water quality on the basis of FG, index methods of Q and QR, being briefly discussed.

  1. Interactive Classification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    2000-01-01

    The investigators upgraded a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the more effective use of the technologies in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project were: 1) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate a wider range of meaning; 2) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded; and 3) the development of an interpreter for SL that would handle representations of some basic cognitive acts and perspectives.

  2. Lagrangian methods of cosmic web classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. D.; Faltenbacher, A.; Johnson, M. S. T.

    2016-05-01

    The cosmic web defines the large-scale distribution of matter we see in the Universe today. Classifying the cosmic web into voids, sheets, filaments and nodes allows one to explore structure formation and the role environmental factors have on halo and galaxy properties. While existing studies of cosmic web classification concentrate on grid-based methods, this work explores a Lagrangian approach where the V-web algorithm proposed by Hoffman et al. is implemented with techniques borrowed from smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Lagrangian approach allows one to classify individual objects (e.g. particles or haloes) based on properties of their nearest neighbours in an adaptive manner. It can be applied directly to a halo sample which dramatically reduces computational cost and potentially allows an application of this classification scheme to observed galaxy samples. Finally, the Lagrangian nature admits a straightforward inclusion of the Hubble flow negating the necessity of a visually defined threshold value which is commonly employed by grid-based classification methods.

  3. Biometric Authentication for Gender Classification Techniques: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathivanan, P.; Poornima, K.

    2017-12-01

    One of the challenging biometric authentication applications is gender identification and age classification, which captures gait from far distance and analyze physical information of the subject such as gender, race and emotional state of the subject. It is found that most of the gender identification techniques have focused only with frontal pose of different human subject, image size and type of database used in the process. The study also classifies different feature extraction process such as, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Local Directional Pattern (LDP) that are used to extract the authentication features of a person. This paper aims to analyze different gender classification techniques that help in evaluating strength and weakness of existing gender identification algorithm. Therefore, it helps in developing a novel gender classification algorithm with less computation cost and more accuracy. In this paper, an overview and classification of different gender identification techniques are first presented and it is compared with other existing human identification system by means of their performance.

  4. Sequenced subjective accents for brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlek, R. J.; Schaefer, R. S.; Gielen, C. C. A. M.; Farquhar, J. D. R.; Desain, P.

    2011-06-01

    Subjective accenting is a cognitive process in which identical auditory pulses at an isochronous rate turn into the percept of an accenting pattern. This process can be voluntarily controlled, making it a candidate for communication from human user to machine in a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. In this study we investigated whether subjective accenting is a feasible paradigm for BCI and how its time-structured nature can be exploited for optimal decoding from non-invasive EEG data. Ten subjects perceived and imagined different metric patterns (two-, three- and four-beat) superimposed on a steady metronome. With an offline classification paradigm, we classified imagined accented from non-accented beats on a single trial (0.5 s) level with an average accuracy of 60.4% over all subjects. We show that decoding of imagined accents is also possible with a classifier trained on perception data. Cyclic patterns of accents and non-accents were successfully decoded with a sequence classification algorithm. Classification performances were compared by means of bit rate. Performance in the best scenario translates into an average bit rate of 4.4 bits min-1 over subjects, which makes subjective accenting a promising paradigm for an online auditory BCI.

  5. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis of microarray breast cancer classification under feature variability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Large discrepancies in signature composition and outcome concordance have been observed between different microarray breast cancer expression profiling studies. This is often ascribed to differences in array platform as well as biological variability. We conjecture that other reasons for the observed discrepancies are the measurement error associated with each feature and the choice of preprocessing method. Microarray data are known to be subject to technical variation and the confidence intervals around individual point estimates of expression levels can be wide. Furthermore, the estimated expression values also vary depending on the selected preprocessing scheme. In microarray breast cancer classification studies, however, these two forms of feature variability are almost always ignored and hence their exact role is unclear. Results We have performed a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of microarray breast cancer classification under the two types of feature variability mentioned above. We used data from six state of the art preprocessing methods, using a compendium consisting of eight diferent datasets, involving 1131 hybridizations, containing data from both one and two-color array technology. For a wide range of classifiers, we performed a joint study on performance, concordance and stability. In the stability analysis we explicitly tested classifiers for their noise tolerance by using perturbed expression profiles that are based on uncertainty information directly related to the preprocessing methods. Our results indicate that signature composition is strongly influenced by feature variability, even if the array platform and the stratification of patient samples are identical. In addition, we show that there is often a high level of discordance between individual class assignments for signatures constructed on data coming from different preprocessing schemes, even if the actual signature composition is identical. Conclusion Feature variability can

  6. Automatic liver volume segmentation and fibrosis classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Evgeny; Klang, Eyal; Amitai, Michal; Greenspan, Hayit

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we present an automatic method for liver segmentation and fibrosis classification in liver computed-tomography (CT) portal phase scans. The input is a full abdomen CT scan with an unknown number of slices, and the output is a liver volume segmentation mask and a fibrosis grade. A multi-stage analysis scheme is applied to each scan, including: volume segmentation, texture features extraction and SVM based classification. Data contains portal phase CT examinations from 80 patients, taken with different scanners. Each examination has a matching Fibroscan grade. The dataset was subdivided into two groups: first group contains healthy cases and mild fibrosis, second group contains moderate fibrosis, severe fibrosis and cirrhosis. Using our automated algorithm, we achieved an average dice index of 0.93 ± 0.05 for segmentation and a sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.81for classification. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first end to end automatic framework for liver fibrosis classification; an approach that, once validated, can have a great potential value in the clinic.

  7. Age-related differences in the neural basis of the subjective vividness of memories: Evidence from multivoxel pattern classification

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marcia K.; Kuhl, Brice A.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Ankudowich, Elizabeth; Durbin, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Although older adults often show reduced episodic memory accuracy, their ratings of the subjective vividness of their memories often equal or even exceed those of young adults. Such findings suggest that young and older adults may differentially access and/or weight different kinds of information in making vividness judgments. We examined this idea using multivoxel pattern classification of fMRI data to measure category representations while participants saw and remembered pictures of objects and scenes. Consistent with our hypothesis, there were age-related differences in how category representations related to the subjective sense of vividness. During remembering, older adults’ vividness ratings were more related, relative to young adults’, to category representations in prefrontal cortex. In contrast, young adults’ vividness ratings were more related, relative to older adults, to category representations in parietal cortex. In addition, category representations were more correlated among posterior regions in young than older adults, whereas correlations between PFC and posterior regions did not differ between the two groups. Together, these results are consistent with the idea that young and older adults differentially weight different types of information in assessing subjective vividness of their memories. PMID:25855004

  8. Application of Snyder-Dolan Classification Scheme to the Selection of “Orthogonal” Columns for Fast Screening for Illicit Drugs and Impurity Profiling of Pharmaceuticals - I. Isocratic Elution

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wenzhe; Zhang, Yu; Carr, Peter W.; Rutan, Sarah C.; Dumarey, Melanie; Schellinger, Adam P.; Pritts, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen judiciously selected reversed-phase columns were tested with 18 cationic drug solutes under the isocratic elution conditions advised in the Snyder-Dolan (S-D) hydrophobic subtraction method of column classification. The standard errors (S.E.) of the least squares regressions of log k′ vs. log k′REF were obtained for a given column against a reference column and used to compare and classify columns based on their selectivity. The results are consistent with those obtained with a study of the 16 test solutes recommended by Snyder and Dolan. To the extent that these drugs are representative these results show that the S-D classification scheme is also generally applicable to pharmaceuticals under isocratic conditions. That is, those columns judged to be similar based on the S-D 16 solutes were similar based on the 18 drugs; furthermore those columns judged to have significantly different selectivities based on the 16 S-D probes appeared to be quite different for the drugs as well. Given that the S-D method has been used to classify more than 400 different types of reversed phases the extension to cationic drugs is a significant finding. PMID:19698948

  9. Consensus embedding: theory, algorithms and application to segmentation and classification of biomedical data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dimensionality reduction (DR) enables the construction of a lower dimensional space (embedding) from a higher dimensional feature space while preserving object-class discriminability. However several popular DR approaches suffer from sensitivity to choice of parameters and/or presence of noise in the data. In this paper, we present a novel DR technique known as consensus embedding that aims to overcome these problems by generating and combining multiple low-dimensional embeddings, hence exploiting the variance among them in a manner similar to ensemble classifier schemes such as Bagging. We demonstrate theoretical properties of consensus embedding which show that it will result in a single stable embedding solution that preserves information more accurately as compared to any individual embedding (generated via DR schemes such as Principal Component Analysis, Graph Embedding, or Locally Linear Embedding). Intelligent sub-sampling (via mean-shift) and code parallelization are utilized to provide for an efficient implementation of the scheme. Results Applications of consensus embedding are shown in the context of classification and clustering as applied to: (1) image partitioning of white matter and gray matter on 10 different synthetic brain MRI images corrupted with 18 different combinations of noise and bias field inhomogeneity, (2) classification of 4 high-dimensional gene-expression datasets, (3) cancer detection (at a pixel-level) on 16 image slices obtained from 2 different high-resolution prostate MRI datasets. In over 200 different experiments concerning classification and segmentation of biomedical data, consensus embedding was found to consistently outperform both linear and non-linear DR methods within all applications considered. Conclusions We have presented a novel framework termed consensus embedding which leverages ensemble classification theory within dimensionality reduction, allowing for application to a wide range of high

  10. 5 CFR 511.702 - Agency or Office classification appeal decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency or Office classification appeal... REGULATIONS CLASSIFICATION UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Effective Dates of Position Classification Actions or Decisions § 511.702 Agency or Office classification appeal decisions. (a) Subject to § 511.703, the...

  11. 5 CFR 511.702 - Agency or Office classification appeal decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency or Office classification appeal... REGULATIONS CLASSIFICATION UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Effective Dates of Position Classification Actions or Decisions § 511.702 Agency or Office classification appeal decisions. (a) Subject to § 511.703, the...

  12. Classifying Human Activity Patterns from Smartphone Collected GPS data: a Fuzzy Classification and Aggregation Approach.

    PubMed

    Wan, Neng; Lin, Ge

    2016-12-01

    Smartphones have emerged as a promising type of equipment for monitoring human activities in environmental health studies. However, degraded location accuracy and inconsistency of smartphone-measured GPS data have limited its effectiveness for classifying human activity patterns. This study proposes a fuzzy classification scheme for differentiating human activity patterns from smartphone-collected GPS data. Specifically, a fuzzy logic reasoning was adopted to overcome the influence of location uncertainty by estimating the probability of different activity types for single GPS points. Based on that approach, a segment aggregation method was developed to infer activity patterns, while adjusting for uncertainties of point attributes. Validations of the proposed methods were carried out based on a convenient sample of three subjects with different types of smartphones. The results indicate desirable accuracy (e.g., up to 96% in activity identification) with use of this method. Two examples were provided in the appendix to illustrate how the proposed methods could be applied in environmental health studies. Researchers could tailor this scheme to fit a variety of research topics.

  13. Objectification of Orthodontic Treatment Needs: Does the Classification of Malocclusions or a History of Orthodontic Treatment Matter?

    PubMed

    Kozanecka, Anna; Sarul, Michał; Kawala, Beata; Antoszewska-Smith, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic classifications make it possible to give an accurate diagnosis but do not indicate an objective orthodontic treatment need. In order to evaluate the need for treatment, it is necessary to use such indicators as the IOTN. The aim of the study was to find (i) relationships between individual diagnosis and objective recommendations for treatment and (ii) an answer to the question whether and which occlusal anomalies play an important role in the objectification of treatment needs. Two hundred three 18-year-old adolescents (104 girls, 99 boys) were examined. In order to recognize occlusal anomalies, the classifications proposed by Orlik-Grzybowska and Ackerman-Proffit were used. The occlusal anomalies were divided into three categories: belonging to both classifications, typical of OrlikGrzybowska classification and typical of Ackerman-Proffit classification. In order to determine the objective need for orthodontic treatment, the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the IOTN was used. The occurrence of the following malocclusions covered by both classifications, namely abnormal overjet, crossbite and Angle's class, had a statistically significant (p < 0.05) impact on an increase of treatment needs in the subjects (DHC > 3). As for the classification by Orlik-Grzybowska, dental malpositions and canine class significantly affected the need for orthodontic treatment, while in the case of the Ackerman-Proffit scheme, it was asymmetry and crowding. There was no statistically significant correlation between past orthodontic treatment and current orthodontic treatment need. IOTN may be affected by a greater number of occlusal anomalies than it was assumed. Orthodontic treatment received in the past slightly reduces the need for treatment in 18-year-olds.

  14. A Stereo Music Preprocessing Scheme for Cochlear Implant Users.

    PubMed

    Buyens, Wim; van Dijk, Bas; Wouters, Jan; Moonen, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Listening to music is still one of the more challenging aspects of using a cochlear implant (CI) for most users. Simple musical structures, a clear rhythm/beat, and lyrics that are easy to follow are among the top factors contributing to music appreciation for CI users. Modifying the audio mix of complex music potentially improves music enjoyment in CI users. A stereo music preprocessing scheme is described in which vocals, drums, and bass are emphasized based on the representation of the harmonic and the percussive components in the input spectrogram, combined with the spatial allocation of instruments in typical stereo recordings. The scheme is assessed with postlingually deafened CI subjects (N = 7) using pop/rock music excerpts with different complexity levels. The scheme is capable of modifying relative instrument level settings, with the aim of improving music appreciation in CI users, and allows individual preference adjustments. The assessment with CI subjects confirms the preference for more emphasis on vocals, drums, and bass as offered by the preprocessing scheme, especially for songs with higher complexity. The stereo music preprocessing scheme has the potential to improve music enjoyment in CI users by modifying the audio mix in widespread (stereo) music recordings. Since music enjoyment in CI users is generally poor, this scheme can assist the music listening experience of CI users as a training or rehabilitation tool.

  15. Computer-aided Classification of Mammographic Masses Using Visually Sensitive Image Features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Zarafshani, Ali; Qiu, Yuchen; Qian, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme that computes visually sensitive image features routinely used by radiologists to develop a machine learning classifier and distinguish between the malignant and benign breast masses detected from digital mammograms. Methods An image dataset including 301 breast masses was retrospectively selected. From each segmented mass region, we computed image features that mimic five categories of visually sensitive features routinely used by radiologists in reading mammograms. We then selected five optimal features in the five feature categories and applied logistic regression models for classification. A new CAD interface was also designed to show lesion segmentation, computed feature values and classification score. Results Areas under ROC curves (AUC) were 0.786±0.026 and 0.758±0.027 when to classify mass regions depicting on two view images, respectively. By fusing classification scores computed from two regions, AUC increased to 0.806±0.025. Conclusion This study demonstrated a new approach to develop CAD scheme based on 5 visually sensitive image features. Combining with a “visual aid” interface, CAD results may be much more easily explainable to the observers and increase their confidence to consider CAD generated classification results than using other conventional CAD approaches, which involve many complicated and visually insensitive texture features. PMID:27911353

  16. Towards biological plausibility of electronic noses: A spiking neural network based approach for tea odour classification.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sankho Turjo; Bhondekar, Amol P; Macaš, Martin; Kumar, Ritesh; Kaur, Rishemjit; Sharma, Anupma; Gulati, Ashu; Kumar, Amod

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a novel encoding scheme for neuronal code generation for odour recognition using an electronic nose (EN). This scheme is based on channel encoding using multiple Gaussian receptive fields superimposed over the temporal EN responses. The encoded data is further applied to a spiking neural network (SNN) for pattern classification. Two forms of SNN, a back-propagation based SpikeProp and a dynamic evolving SNN are used to learn the encoded responses. The effects of information encoding on the performance of SNNs have been investigated. Statistical tests have been performed to determine the contribution of the SNN and the encoding scheme to overall odour discrimination. The approach has been implemented in odour classification of orthodox black tea (Kangra-Himachal Pradesh Region) thereby demonstrating a biomimetic approach for EN data analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stokes space modulation format classification based on non-iterative clustering algorithm for coherent optical receivers.

    PubMed

    Mai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jie; Wu, Xiong; Zhang, Qun; Guo, Changjian; Yang, Yanfu; Li, Zhaohui

    2017-02-06

    A Stokes-space modulation format classification (MFC) technique is proposed for coherent optical receivers by using a non-iterative clustering algorithm. In the clustering algorithm, two simple parameters are calculated to help find the density peaks of the data points in Stokes space and no iteration is required. Correct MFC can be realized in numerical simulations among PM-QPSK, PM-8QAM, PM-16QAM, PM-32QAM and PM-64QAM signals within practical optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) ranges. The performance of the proposed MFC algorithm is also compared with those of other schemes based on clustering algorithms. The simulation results show that good classification performance can be achieved using the proposed MFC scheme with moderate time complexity. Proof-of-concept experiments are finally implemented to demonstrate MFC among PM-QPSK/16QAM/64QAM signals, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed MFC scheme.

  18. A learning scheme for reach to grasp movements: on EMG-based interfaces using task specific motion decoding models.

    PubMed

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J; Manolakos, Elias S

    2013-09-01

    A learning scheme based on random forests is used to discriminate between different reach to grasp movements in 3-D space, based on the myoelectric activity of human muscles of the upper-arm and the forearm. Task specificity for motion decoding is introduced in two different levels: Subspace to move toward and object to be grasped. The discrimination between the different reach to grasp strategies is accomplished with machine learning techniques for classification. The classification decision is then used in order to trigger an EMG-based task-specific motion decoding model. Task specific models manage to outperform "general" models providing better estimation accuracy. Thus, the proposed scheme takes advantage of a framework incorporating both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously in order to split the task space. The proposed learning scheme can be easily used to a series of EMG-based interfaces that must operate in real time, providing data-driven capabilities for multiclass problems, that occur in everyday life complex environments.

  19. Alternative ways of representing Zapotec and Cuicatec folk classification of birds: a multidimensional model and its implications for culturally-informed conservation in Oaxaca, México.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Salinas, Graciela; Ellen, Roy F; Valiñas-Coalla, Leopoldo; Caballero, Javier; Argueta-Villamar, Arturo

    2013-12-09

    We report on a comparative ethno-ornithological study of Zapotec and Cuicatec communities in Northern Oaxaca, Mexico that provided a challenge to some existing descriptions of folk classification. Our default model was the taxonomic system of ranks developed by Brent Berlin. Fieldwork was conducted in the Zapotec village of San Miguel Tiltepec and in the Cuicatec village of San Juan Teponaxtla, using a combination of ethnographic interviews and pile-sorting tests. Post-fieldwork, Principal Component Analysis using NTSYSpc V. 2.11f was applied to obtain pattern variation for the answers from different participants. Using language and pile-sorting data analysed through Principal Component Analysis, we show how both Zapotec and Cuicatec subjects place a particular emphasis on an intermediate level of classification.These categories group birds with non-birds using ecological and behavioral criteria, and violate a strict distinction between symbolic and mundane (or ‘natural’), and between ‘general-purpose’ and ‘single-purpose’ schemes. We suggest that shared classificatory knowledge embodying everyday schemes for apprehending the world of birds might be better reflected in a multidimensional model that would also provide a more realistic basis for developing culturally-informed conservation strategies.

  20. Applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to segment and quantify visceral and subcutaneous fat areas from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal obesity is strongly associated with a number of diseases and accurately assessment of subtypes of adipose tissue volume plays a significant role in predicting disease risk, diagnosis and prognosis. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning models to automatically segment subcutaneous fat areas (SFA) and visceral (VFA) fat areas depicting on CT images. A dataset involving CT images from 40 patients were retrospectively collected and equally divided into two independent groups (i.e. training and testing group). The new CAD scheme consisted of two sequential convolutional neural networks (CNNs) namely, Selection-CNN and Segmentation-CNN. Selection-CNN was trained using 2,240 CT slices to automatically select CT slices belonging to abdomen areas and SegmentationCNN was trained using 84,000 fat-pixel patches to classify fat-pixels as belonging to SFA or VFA. Then, data from the testing group was used to evaluate the performance of the optimized CAD scheme. Comparing to manually labelled results, the classification accuracy of CT slices selection generated by Selection-CNN yielded 95.8%, while the accuracy of fat pixel segmentation using Segmentation-CNN yielded 96.8%. Therefore, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using deep learning based CAD scheme to recognize human abdominal section from CT scans and segment SFA and VFA from CT slices with high agreement compared with subjective segmentation results.

  1. Support vector machine and principal component analysis for microarray data classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Widi; Adiwijaya

    2018-03-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide although a significant proportion of it can be cured if it is detected early. In recent decades, technology called microarray takes an important role in the diagnosis of cancer. By using data mining technique, microarray data classification can be performed to improve the accuracy of cancer diagnosis compared to traditional techniques. The characteristic of microarray data is small sample but it has huge dimension. Since that, there is a challenge for researcher to provide solutions for microarray data classification with high performance in both accuracy and running time. This research proposed the usage of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as a dimension reduction method along with Support Vector Method (SVM) optimized by kernel functions as a classifier for microarray data classification. The proposed scheme was applied on seven data sets using 5-fold cross validation and then evaluation and analysis conducted on term of both accuracy and running time. The result showed that the scheme can obtained 100% accuracy for Ovarian and Lung Cancer data when Linear and Cubic kernel functions are used. In term of running time, PCA greatly reduced the running time for every data sets.

  2. sdg boson model in the SU(3) scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Yoshimi

    1985-02-01

    Basic properties of the interacting boson model with s-, d- and g-bosons are investigated in rotational nuclei. An SU(3)-seniority scheme is found for the classification of physically important states according to a group reduction chain U(15) ⊃ SU(3). The capability of describing rotational bands increases enormously in comparison with the ordinary sd interacting boson model. The sdg boson model is shown to be able to describe the so-called anharmonicity effect recently observed in the 168Er nucleus.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of the GEMS soil organic carbon model to land cover land use classification uncertainties under different climate scenarios in Senegal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieye, A.M.; Roy, David P.; Hanan, N.P.; Liu, S.; Hansen, M.; Toure, A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit land cover land use (LCLU) change information is needed to drive biogeochemical models that simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. Such information is increasingly being mapped using remotely sensed satellite data with classification schemes and uncertainties constrained by the sensing system, classification algorithms and land cover schemes. In this study, automated LCLU classification of multi-temporal Landsat satellite data were used to assess the sensitivity of SOC modeled by the Global Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). The GEMS was run for an area of 1560 km2 in Senegal under three climate change scenarios with LCLU maps generated using different Landsat classification approaches. This research provides a method to estimate the variability of SOC, specifically the SOC uncertainty due to satellite classification errors, which we show is dependent not only on the LCLU classification errors but also on where the LCLU classes occur relative to the other GEMS model inputs.

  4. Cooperative Learning for Distributed In-Network Traffic Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, S. B.; Loo, H. R.; Ismail, I.; Andromeda, T.; Marsono, M. N.

    2017-04-01

    Inspired by the concept of autonomic distributed/decentralized network management schemes, we consider the issue of information exchange among distributed network nodes to network performance and promote scalability for in-network monitoring. In this paper, we propose a cooperative learning algorithm for propagation and synchronization of network information among autonomic distributed network nodes for online traffic classification. The results show that network nodes with sharing capability perform better with a higher average accuracy of 89.21% (sharing data) and 88.37% (sharing clusters) compared to 88.06% for nodes without cooperative learning capability. The overall performance indicates that cooperative learning is promising for distributed in-network traffic classification.

  5. REGIONAL-SCALE WIND FIELD CLASSIFICATION EMPLOYING CLUSTER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L G; Glaser, R E; Chin, H S

    2004-06-17

    The classification of time-varying multivariate regional-scale wind fields at a specific location can assist event planning as well as consequence and risk analysis. Further, wind field classification involves data transformation and inference techniques that effectively characterize stochastic wind field variation. Such a classification scheme is potentially useful for addressing overall atmospheric transport uncertainty and meteorological parameter sensitivity issues. Different methods to classify wind fields over a location include the principal component analysis of wind data (e.g., Hardy and Walton, 1978) and the use of cluster analysis for wind data (e.g., Green et al., 1992; Kaufmann and Weber, 1996). The goalmore » of this study is to use a clustering method to classify the winds of a gridded data set, i.e, from meteorological simulations generated by a forecast model.« less

  6. Rank preserving sparse learning for Kinect based scene classification.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dapeng; Jin, Lianwen; Yang, Zhao; Li, Xuelong

    2013-10-01

    With the rapid development of the RGB-D sensors and the promptly growing population of the low-cost Microsoft Kinect sensor, scene classification, which is a hard, yet important, problem in computer vision, has gained a resurgence of interest recently. That is because the depth of information provided by the Kinect sensor opens an effective and innovative way for scene classification. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for scene classification, which applies locality-constrained linear coding (LLC) to local SIFT features for representing the RGB-D samples and classifies scenes through the cooperation between a new rank preserving sparse learning (RPSL) based dimension reduction and a simple classification method. RPSL considers four aspects: 1) it preserves the rank order information of the within-class samples in a local patch; 2) it maximizes the margin between the between-class samples on the local patch; 3) the L1-norm penalty is introduced to obtain the parsimony property; and 4) it models the classification error minimization by utilizing the least-squares error minimization. Experiments are conducted on the NYU Depth V1 dataset and demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of RPSL for scene classification.

  7. Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of synthetic meshes biopsied from their abdominal wall repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. Methods Biopsies of the synthetic meshes were obtained from the abdominal wall repair sites of 51 patients during a subsequent abdominal re-exploration. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics (cell infiltration, cell types, extracellular matrix deposition, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and neovascularization) and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were also stained with Sirius Red and Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a threshold p value of ≤0.200. Results The model selection process for the extracellular matrix score yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation, and mesh classification (c-statistic = 0.842). For CR score, the model selection process yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2 = 0.464). The model selection process for the collagen III area yielded a model with two variables: subject body mass index at time of mesh explantation and pack-year history (r2 = 0.244). Conclusion Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict degree of remodeling for synthetic meshes used to reinforce abdominal wall repair sites. These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances for which non

  8. Significance of clustering and classification applications in digital and physical libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Ioannis; Koulouris, Alexandros; Zervos, Spiros; Dendrinos, Markos; Giannakopoulos, Georgios

    2015-02-01

    Applications of clustering and classification techniques can be proved very significant in both digital and physical (paper-based) libraries. The most essential application, document classification and clustering, is crucial for the content that is produced and maintained in digital libraries, repositories, databases, social media, blogs etc., based on various tags and ontology elements, transcending the traditional library-oriented classification schemes. Other applications with very useful and beneficial role in the new digital library environment involve document routing, summarization and query expansion. Paper-based libraries can benefit as well since classification combined with advanced material characterization techniques such as FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) can be vital for the study and prevention of material deterioration. An improved two-level self-organizing clustering architecture is proposed in order to enhance the discrimination capacity of the learning space, prior to classification, yielding promising results when applied to the above mentioned library tasks.

  9. Refining Landsat classification results using digital terrain data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wayne A.; Shasby, Mark

    1982-01-01

     Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation systems (EROS) Data Center have recently completed two land-cover mapping projects in which digital terrain data were used to refine Landsat classification results. Digital ter rain data were incorporated into the Landsat classification process using two different procedures that required developing decision criteria either subjectively or quantitatively. The subjective procedure was used in a vegetation mapping project in Arizona, and the quantitative procedure was used in a forest-fuels mapping project in Montana. By incorporating digital terrain data into the Landsat classification process, more spatially accurate landcover maps were produced for both projects.

  10. Cooling schemes for two-component fermions in layered optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Shimpei; Danshita, Ippei

    2017-12-01

    Recently, a cooling scheme for ultracold atoms in a bilayer optical lattice has been proposed (A. Kantian et al., arXiv:1609.03579). In their scheme, the energy offset between the two layers is increased dynamically such that the entropy of one layer is transferred to the other layer. Using the full-Hilbert-space approach, we compute cooling dynamics subjected to the scheme in order to show that their scheme fails to cool down two-component fermions. We develop an alternative cooling scheme for two-component fermions, in which the spin-exchange interaction of one layer is significantly reduced. Using both full-Hilbert-space and matrix-product-state approaches, we find that our scheme can decrease the temperature of the other layer by roughly half.

  11. USCS and the USDA Soil Classification System: Development of a Mapping Scheme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    important to human daily living. A variety of disciplines (geology, agriculture, engineering, etc.) require a sys- tematic categorization of soil, detailing...it is often important to also con- sider parameters that indicate soil strength. Two important properties used for engineering-related problems are...that many textural clas- sification systems were developed to meet specifics needs. In agriculture, textural classification is used to determine crop

  12. U.S. Geological Survey ArcMap Sediment Classification tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ArcMap Sediment Classification tool is a custom toolbar that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) ArcGIS 9.2 Desktop application to aid in the analysis of seabed sediment classification. The tool uses as input either a point data layer with field attributes containing percentage of gravel, sand, silt, and clay or four raster data layers representing a percentage of sediment (0-100%) for the various sediment grain size analysis: sand, gravel, silt and clay. This tool is designed to analyze the percent of sediment at a given location and classify the sediments according to either the Folk (1954, 1974) or Shepard (1954) as modified by Schlee(1973) classification schemes. The sediment analysis tool is based upon the USGS SEDCLASS program (Poppe, et al. 2004).

  13. Exploiting unsupervised and supervised classification for segmentation of the pathological lung in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korfiatis, P.; Kalogeropoulou, C.; Daoussis, D.; Petsas, T.; Adonopoulos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    Delineation of lung fields in presence of diffuse lung diseases (DLPDs), such as interstitial pneumonias (IP), challenges segmentation algorithms. To deal with IP patterns affecting the lung border an automated image texture classification scheme is proposed. The proposed segmentation scheme is based on supervised texture classification between lung tissue (normal and abnormal) and surrounding tissue (pleura and thoracic wall) in the lung border region. This region is coarsely defined around an initial estimate of lung border, provided by means of Markov Radom Field modeling and morphological operations. Subsequently, a support vector machine classifier was trained to distinguish between the above two classes of tissue, using textural feature of gray scale and wavelet domains. 17 patients diagnosed with IP, secondary to connective tissue diseases were examined. Segmentation performance in terms of overlap was 0.924±0.021, and for shape differentiation mean, rms and maximum distance were 1.663±0.816, 2.334±1.574 and 8.0515±6.549 mm, respectively. An accurate, automated scheme is proposed for segmenting abnormal lung fields in HRC affected by IP

  14. Evaluation of host and viral factors associated with severe dengue based on the 2009 WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Aguilar, Jorge O; Monroy-Martínez, Verónica; Díaz, Daniel; Barrios-Palacios, Jacqueline; Ramos, Celso; Ulloa-García, Armando; García-Pillado, Janet; Ruiz-Ordaz, Blanca H

    2014-12-11

    Dengue fever (DF) is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease affecting humans. The World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a revised classification in 2009 to enable the more effective identification of cases of severe dengue (SD). This was designed primarily as a clinical tool, but it also enables cases of SD to be differentiated into three specific subcategories (severe vascular leakage, severe bleeding, and severe organ dysfunction). However, no study has addressed whether this classification has advantage in estimating factors associated with the progression of disease severity or dengue pathogenesis. We evaluate in a dengue outbreak associated risk factors that could contribute to the development of SD according to the 2009 WHO classification. A prospective cross-sectional study was performed during an epidemic of dengue in 2009 in Chiapas, Mexico. Data were analyzed for host and viral factors associated with dengue cases, using the 1997 and 2009 WHO classifications. The cost-benefit ratio (CBR) was also estimated. The sensitivity in the 1997 WHO classification for determining SD was 75%, and the specificity was 97.7%. For the 2009 scheme, these were 100% and 81.1%, respectively. The 2009 classification showed a higher benefit (537%) with a lower cost (10.2%) than the 1997 WHO scheme. A secondary antibody response was strongly associated with SD. Early viral load was higher in cases of SD than in those with DF. Logistic regression analysis identified predictive SD factors (secondary infection, disease phase, viral load) within the 2009 classification. However, within the 1997 scheme it was not possible to differentiate risk factors between DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. The critical clinical stage for determining SD progression was the transition from fever to defervescence in which plasma leakage can occur. The clinical phenotype of SD is influenced by the host (secondary response) and viral factors (viral load). The 2009

  15. Texture as a basis for acoustic classification of substrate in the nearshore region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, A.; Wattrus, N. J.

    2016-12-01

    Segmentation and classification of substrate type from two locations in Lake Superior, are predicted using multivariate statistical processing of textural measures derived from shallow-water, high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data. During a multibeam sonar survey, both bathymetric and backscatter data are collected. It is well documented that the statistical characteristic of a sonar backscatter mosaic is dependent on substrate type. While classifying the bottom-type on the basis on backscatter alone can accurately predict and map bottom-type, it lacks the ability to resolve and capture fine textural details, an important factor in many habitat mapping studies. Statistical processing can capture the pertinent details about the bottom-type that are rich in textural information. Further multivariate statistical processing can then isolate characteristic features, and provide the basis for an accurate classification scheme. Preliminary results from an analysis of bathymetric data and ground-truth samples collected from the Amnicon River, Superior, Wisconsin, and the Lester River, Duluth, Minnesota, demonstrate the ability to process and develop a novel classification scheme of the bottom type in two geomorphologically distinct areas.

  16. Classifier fusion for VoIP attacks classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Jakub; Rezac, Filip

    2017-05-01

    SIP is one of the most successful protocols in the field of IP telephony communication. It establishes and manages VoIP calls. As the number of SIP implementation rises, we can expect a higher number of attacks on the communication system in the near future. This work aims at malicious SIP traffic classification. A number of various machine learning algorithms have been developed for attack classification. The paper presents a comparison of current research and the use of classifier fusion method leading to a potential decrease in classification error rate. Use of classifier combination makes a more robust solution without difficulties that may affect single algorithms. Different voting schemes, combination rules, and classifiers are discussed to improve the overall performance. All classifiers have been trained on real malicious traffic. The concept of traffic monitoring depends on the network of honeypot nodes. These honeypots run in several networks spread in different locations. Separation of honeypots allows us to gain an independent and trustworthy attack information.

  17. Multisource Data Classification Using A Hybrid Semi-supervised Learning Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Shekhar, Shashi

    2009-01-01

    In many practical situations thematic classes can not be discriminated by spectral measurements alone. Often one needs additional features such as population density, road density, wetlands, elevation, soil types, etc. which are discrete attributes. On the other hand remote sensing image features are continuous attributes. Finding a suitable statistical model and estimation of parameters is a challenging task in multisource (e.g., discrete and continuous attributes) data classification. In this paper we present a semi-supervised learning method by assuming that the samples were generated by a mixture model, where each component could be either a continuous or discrete distribution. Overall classificationmore » accuracy of the proposed method is improved by 12% in our initial experiments.« less

  18. The EpiOcular™ Eye Irritation Test is the Method of Choice for the In Vitro Eye Irritation Testing of Agrochemical Formulations: Correlation Analysis of EpiOcular Eye Irritation Test and BCOP Test Data According to the UN GHS, US EPA and Brazil ANVISA Classification Schemes.

    PubMed

    Kolle, Susanne N; Rey Moreno, Maria Cecilia; Mayer, Winfried; van Cott, Andrew; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) test is commonly used for the identification of severe ocular irritants (GHS Category 1), but it is not recommended for the identification of ocular irritants (GHS Category 2). The incorporation of human reconstructed tissue model-based tests into a tiered test strategy to identify ocular non-irritants and replace the Draize rabbit eye irritation test has been suggested (OECD TG 405). The value of the EpiOcular™ Eye Irritation Test (EIT) for the prediction of ocular non-irritants (GHS No Category) has been demonstrated, and an OECD Test Guideline (TG) was drafted in 2014. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the BCOP test, in conjunction with corneal histopathology (as suggested for the evaluation of the depth of the injury( and/or the EpiOcular-EIT, could be used to predict the eye irritation potential of agrochemical formulations according to the UN GHS, US EPA and Brazil ANVISA classification schemes. We have assessed opacity, permeability and histopathology in the BCOP assay, and relative tissue viability in the EpiOcular-EIT, for 97 agrochemical formulations with available in vivo eye irritation data. By using the OECD TG 437 protocol for liquids, the BCOP test did not result in sufficient correct predictions of severe ocular irritants for any of the three classification schemes. The lack of sensitivity could be improved somewhat by the inclusion of corneal histopathology, but the relative viability in the EpiOcular-EIT clearly outperformed the BCOP test for all three classification schemes. The predictive capacity of the EpiOcular-EIT for ocular non-irritants (UN GHS No Category) for the 97 agrochemical formulations tested (91% sensitivity, 72% specificity and 82% accuracy for UN GHS classification) was comparable to that obtained in the formal validation exercise underlying the OECD draft TG. We therefore conclude that the EpiOcular-EIT is currently the best in vitro method for the prediction

  19. Classification of infectious bursal disease virus into genogroups.

    PubMed

    Michel, Linda O; Jackwood, Daral J

    2017-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes infectious bursal disease (IBD), an immunosuppressive disease of poultry. The current classification scheme of IBDV is confusing because it is based on antigenic types (variant and classical) as well as pathotypes. Many of the amino acid changes differentiating these various classifications are found in a hypervariable region of the capsid protein VP2 (hvVP2), the major host protective antigen. Data from this study were used to propose a new classification scheme for IBDV based solely on genogroups identified from phylogenetic analysis of the hvVP2 of strains worldwide. Seven major genogroups were identified, some of which are geographically restricted and others that have global dispersion, such as genogroup 1. Genogroup 2 viruses are predominately distributed in North America, while genogroup 3 viruses are most often identified on other continents. Additionally, we have identified a population of genogroup 3 vvIBDV isolates that have an amino acid change from alanine to threonine at position 222 while maintaining other residues conserved in this genogroup (I242, I256 and I294). A222T is an important mutation because amino acid 222 is located in the first of four surface loops of hvVP2. A similar shift from proline to threonine at 222 is believed to play a role in the significant antigenic change of the genogroup 2 IBDV strains, suggesting that antigenic drift may be occurring in genogroup 3, possibly in response to antigenic pressure from vaccination.

  20. [New International Classification of Chronic Pancreatitis (M-ANNHEIM multifactor classification system, 2007): principles, merits, and demerits].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2008-01-01

    The new International Classification of Chronic Pancreatitis (designated as M-ANNHEIM) proposed by a group of German specialists in late 2007 is reviewed. All its sections are subjected to analysis (risk group categories, clinical stages and phases, variants of clinical course, diagnostic criteria for "established" and "suspected" pancreatitis, instrumental methods and functional tests used in the diagnosis, evaluation of the severity of the disease using a scoring system, stages of elimination of pain syndrome). The new classification is compared with the earlier classification proposed by the author. Its merits and demerits are discussed.

  1. Single-accelerometer-based daily physical activity classification.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi; Yin, Bin; Aarts, Ronald M

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a single tri-axial accelerometer placed on the waist was used to record the acceleration data for human physical activity classification. The data collection involved 24 subjects performing daily real-life activities in a naturalistic environment without researchers' intervention. For the purpose of assessing customers' daily energy expenditure, walking, running, cycling, driving, and sports were chosen as target activities for classification. This study compared a Bayesian classification with that of a Decision Tree based approach. A Bayes classifier has the advantage to be more extensible, requiring little effort in classifier retraining and software update upon further expansion or modification of the target activities. Principal components analysis was applied to remove the correlation among features and to reduce the feature vector dimension. Experiments using leave-one-subject-out and 10-fold cross validation protocols revealed a classification accuracy of approximately 80%, which was comparable with that obtained by a Decision Tree classifier.

  2. Extending a field-based Sonoran desert vegetation classification to a regional scale using optical and microwave satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, Scott Marshall

    2000-10-01

    Vegetation mapping in and regions facilitates ecological studies, land management, and provides a record to which future land changes can be compared. Accurate and representative mapping of desert vegetation requires a sound field sampling program and a methodology to transform the data collected into a representative classification system. Time and cost constraints require that a remote sensing approach be used if such a classification system is to be applied on a regional scale. However, desert vegetation may be sparse and thus difficult to sense at typical satellite resolutions, especially given the problem of soil reflectance. This study was designed to address these concerns by conducting vegetation mapping research using field and satellite data from the US Army Yuma Proving Ground (USYPG) in Southwest Arizona. Line and belt transect data from the Army's Land Condition Trend Analysis (LCTA) Program were transformed into relative cover and relative density classification schemes using cluster analysis. Ordination analysis of the same data produced two and three-dimensional graphs on which the homogeneity of each vegetation class could be examined. It was found that the use of correspondence analysis (CA), detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) ordination methods was superior to the use of any single ordination method for helping to clarify between-class and within-class relationships in vegetation composition. Analysis of these between-class and within-class relationships were of key importance in examining how well relative cover and relative density schemes characterize the USYPG vegetation. Using these two classification schemes as reference data, maximum likelihood and artificial neural net classifications were then performed on a coregistered dataset consisting of a summer Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image, one spring and one summer ERS-1 microwave image, and elevation, slope, and aspect layers

  3. An efficient scheme for automatic web pages categorization using the support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, with an evolution of the Internet and related technologies, the number of the Internet users grows exponentially. These users demand access to relevant web pages from the Internet within fraction of seconds. To achieve this goal, there is a requirement of an efficient categorization of web page contents. Manual categorization of these billions of web pages to achieve high accuracy is a challenging task. Most of the existing techniques reported in the literature are semi-automatic. Using these techniques, higher level of accuracy cannot be achieved. To achieve these goals, this paper proposes an automatic web pages categorization into the domain category. The proposed scheme is based on the identification of specific and relevant features of the web pages. In the proposed scheme, first extraction and evaluation of features are done followed by filtering the feature set for categorization of domain web pages. A feature extraction tool based on the HTML document object model of the web page is developed in the proposed scheme. Feature extraction and weight assignment are based on the collection of domain-specific keyword list developed by considering various domain pages. Moreover, the keyword list is reduced on the basis of ids of keywords in keyword list. Also, stemming of keywords and tag text is done to achieve a higher accuracy. An extensive feature set is generated to develop a robust classification technique. The proposed scheme was evaluated using a machine learning method in combination with feature extraction and statistical analysis using support vector machine kernel as the classification tool. The results obtained confirm the effectiveness of the proposed scheme in terms of its accuracy in different categories of web pages.

  4. Does ASA classification impact success rates of endovascular aneurysm repairs?

    PubMed

    Conners, Michael S; Tonnessen, Britt H; Sternbergh, W Charles; Carter, Glen; Yoselevitz, Moises; Money, Samuel R

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical success, clinical success, postoperative complication rate, need for a secondary procedure, and mortality rate with endovascular aneurysm repair (EAR), based on the physical status classification scheme advocated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). At a single institution 167 patients underwent attempted EAR. Query of a prospectively maintained database supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records was used to gather statistics pertaining to patient demographics and outcome. In patients selected for EAR on the basis of acceptable anatomy, technical and clinical success rates were not significantly different among the different ASA classifications. Importantly, postoperative complication and 30-day mortality rates do not appear to significantly differ among the different ASA classifications in this patient population.

  5. Contemplating case mix: A primer on case mix classification and management.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andrew P; Poss, Jeffery W; McKillop, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Case mix classifications are the frameworks that underlie many healthcare funding schemes, including the so-called activity-based funding. Now more than ever, Canadian healthcare administrators are evaluating case mix-based funding and deciphering how they will influence their organization. Case mix is a topic fraught with technical jargon and largely relegated to government agencies or private industries. This article provides an abridged review of case mix classification as well as its implications for management in healthcare. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  6. Family Traits of Galaxies: From the Tuning Fork to a Physical Classification in a Multi-Wavelength Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; D'Onofrio, Mauro; Zaggia, Simone; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Laurikainen, Eija; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Gallart, Carme; Fraix-Burnet, Didier

    At the time of the Great Debate nebulæ where recognized to have different morphologies and first classifications, sometimes only descriptive, have been attempted. A review of these early classification systems are well documented by the Allan Sandage's review in 2005 (Sandage 2005). This review emphasized the debt, in term of continuity of forms of spiral galaxies, due by the Hubble's classification scheme to the Reynold's systems proposed in 1920 (Reynolds, 1920).

  7. Bayes classification of interferometric TOPSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, T. R.; Rodriguez, E.; Houshmand, B.; Carande, R.

    1995-01-01

    We report the Bayes classification of terrain types at different sites using airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) data. A Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier was applied on multidimensional observations derived from the SAR intensity, the terrain elevation model, and the magnitude of the interferometric correlation. Training sets for forested, urban, agricultural, or bare areas were obtained either by selecting samples with known ground truth, or by k-means clustering of random sets of samples uniformly distributed across all sites, and subsequent assignments of these clusters using ground truth. The accuracy of the classifier was used to optimize the discriminating efficiency of the set of features that was chosen. The most important features include the SAR intensity, a canopy penetration depth model, and the terrain slope. We demonstrate the classifier's performance across sites using a unique set of training classes for the four main terrain categories. The scenes examined include San Francisco (CA) (predominantly urban and water), Mount Adams (WA) (forested with clear cuts), Pasadena (CA) (urban with mountains), and Antioch Hills (CA) (water, swamps, fields). Issues related to the effects of image calibration and the robustness of the classification to calibration errors are explored. The relative performance of single polarization Interferometric data classification is contrasted against classification schemes based on polarimetric SAR data.

  8. Generalized Rainich conditions, generalized stress-energy conditions, and the Hawking-Ellis classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín–Moruno, Prado; Visser, Matt

    2017-11-01

    The (generalized) Rainich conditions are algebraic conditions which are polynomial in the (mixed-component) stress-energy tensor. As such they are logically distinct from the usual classical energy conditions (NEC, WEC, SEC, DEC), and logically distinct from the usual Hawking-Ellis (Segré-Plebański) classification of stress-energy tensors (type I, type II, type III, type IV). There will of course be significant inter-connections between these classification schemes, which we explore in the current article. Overall, we shall argue that it is best to view the (generalized) Rainich conditions as a refinement of the classical energy conditions and the usual Hawking-Ellis classification.

  9. Iris Image Classification Based on Hierarchical Visual Codebook.

    PubMed

    Zhenan Sun; Hui Zhang; Tieniu Tan; Jianyu Wang

    2014-06-01

    Iris recognition as a reliable method for personal identification has been well-studied with the objective to assign the class label of each iris image to a unique subject. In contrast, iris image classification aims to classify an iris image to an application specific category, e.g., iris liveness detection (classification of genuine and fake iris images), race classification (e.g., classification of iris images of Asian and non-Asian subjects), coarse-to-fine iris identification (classification of all iris images in the central database into multiple categories). This paper proposes a general framework for iris image classification based on texture analysis. A novel texture pattern representation method called Hierarchical Visual Codebook (HVC) is proposed to encode the texture primitives of iris images. The proposed HVC method is an integration of two existing Bag-of-Words models, namely Vocabulary Tree (VT), and Locality-constrained Linear Coding (LLC). The HVC adopts a coarse-to-fine visual coding strategy and takes advantages of both VT and LLC for accurate and sparse representation of iris texture. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed iris image classification method achieves state-of-the-art performance for iris liveness detection, race classification, and coarse-to-fine iris identification. A comprehensive fake iris image database simulating four types of iris spoof attacks is developed as the benchmark for research of iris liveness detection.

  10. Multiple Sparse Representations Classification

    PubMed Central

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan S.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Sparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small patch surrounding it. Using these patches, a dictionary is trained for each class in a supervised fashion. Commonly, redundant/overcomplete dictionaries are trained and image patches are sparsely represented by a linear combination of only a few of the dictionary elements. Given a set of trained dictionaries, a new patch is sparse coded using each of them, and subsequently assigned to the class whose dictionary yields the minimum residual energy. We propose a generalization of this scheme. The method, which we call multiple sparse representations classification (mSRC), is based on the observation that an overcomplete, class specific dictionary is capable of generating multiple accurate and independent estimates of a patch belonging to the class. So instead of finding a single sparse representation of a patch for each dictionary, we find multiple, and the corresponding residual energies provides an enhanced statistic which is used to improve classification. We demonstrate the efficacy of mSRC for three example applications: pixelwise classification of texture images, lumen segmentation in carotid artery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bifurcation point detection in carotid artery MRI. We compare our method with conventional SRC, K-nearest neighbor, and support vector machine classifiers. The results show that mSRC outperforms SRC and the other reference methods. In addition, we present an extensive evaluation of the effect of the main mSRC parameters: patch size, dictionary size, and

  11. Hyperspectral Image Classification via Multitask Joint Sparse Representation and Stepwise MRF Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Lin, Jianzhe; Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Hyperspectral image (HSI) classification is a crucial issue in remote sensing. Accurate classification benefits a large number of applications such as land use analysis and marine resource utilization. But high data correlation brings difficulty to reliable classification, especially for HSI with abundant spectral information. Furthermore, the traditional methods often fail to well consider the spatial coherency of HSI that also limits the classification performance. To address these inherent obstacles, a novel spectral-spatial classification scheme is proposed in this paper. The proposed method mainly focuses on multitask joint sparse representation (MJSR) and a stepwise Markov random filed framework, which are claimed to be two main contributions in this procedure. First, the MJSR not only reduces the spectral redundancy, but also retains necessary correlation in spectral field during classification. Second, the stepwise optimization further explores the spatial correlation that significantly enhances the classification accuracy and robustness. As far as several universal quality evaluation indexes are concerned, the experimental results on Indian Pines and Pavia University demonstrate the superiority of our method compared with the state-of-the-art competitors.

  12. A Critical Review of Mode of Action (MOA) Assignment Classifications for Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are various structure-based classification schemes to categorize chemicals based on mode of action (MOA) which have been applied for both eco and human health toxicology. With increasing calls to assess thousands of chemicals, some of which have little available informatio...

  13. A new stylolite classification scheme to estimate compaction and local permeability variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Rood, M. P.; Beaudoin, N.; Chung, P.; Bons, P. D.; Gomez-Rivas, E.

    2016-12-01

    We modeled the geometrical roughening of bedding-parallel, mainly layer-dominated stylolites in order to understand their structural evolution, to present an advanced classification of stylolite shapes and to relate this classification to chemical compaction and permeability variations at stylolites. Stylolites are rough dissolution seams that develop in sedimentary basins during chemical compaction. In the Zechstein 2 carbonate units, an important lean gas reservoir in the southern Permian Zechstein basin in Germany, stylolites influence local fluid flow, mineral replacement reactions and hence the permeability of the reservoir. Our simulations demonstrate that layer-dominated stylolites can grow in three distinct stages: an initial slow nucleation phase, a fast layer-pinning phase and a final freezing phase if the layer is completely dissolved during growth. Dissolution of the pinning layer and thus destruction of the stylolite's compaction tracking capabilities is a function of the background noise in the rock and the dissolution rate of the layer itself. Low background noise needs a slower dissolving layer for pinning to be successful but produces flatter teeth than higher background noise. We present an advanced classification based on our simulations and separate stylolites into four classes: (1) rectangular layer type, (2) seismogram pinning type, (3) suture/sharp peak type and (4) simple wave-like type. Rectangular layer type stylolites are the most appropriate for chemical compaction estimates because they grow linearly and record most of the actual compaction (up to 40 mm in the Zechstein example). Seismogram pinning type stylolites also provide good tracking capabilities, with the largest teeth tracking most of the compaction. Suture/sharp peak type stylolites grow in a non-linear fashion and thus do not record most of the actual compaction. However, when a non-linear growth law is used, the compaction estimates are similar to those making use of the

  14. The Ecohydrological Context of Drought and Classification of Plant Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Ackerly, D.; Dawson, T. E.; Manzoni, S.; Skelton, R. P.; Vico, G.; Thompson, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Many recent studies on drought-induced vegetation mortality have explored how plant functional traits, and classifications of such traits along axes of, e.g., isohydry - anisohydry, might contribute to predicting drought survival and recovery. As these studies proliferate, concerns are growing about the consistency and predictive value of such classifications. Here, we outline the basis for a systematic classification of drought strategies that accounts for both environmental conditions and functional traits. We (1) identify drawbacks of exiting isohydricity and trait-based metrics, (2) identify major axes of trait and environmental variation that determine drought mortality pathways (hydraulic failure and carbon starvation) using non-dimensional trait groups, and (3) demonstrate that these trait groupings predict physiological drought outcomes using both measured and synthetic data. In doing so we untangle some confounding effects of environment and trait variations that undermine current classification schemes, outline a pathway to progress towards a general classification of drought vulnerability, and advocate for more careful treatment of the environmental conditions within which plant drought responses occur.

  15. A neural network for noise correlation classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paitz, Patrick; Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    We present an artificial neural network (ANN) for the classification of ambient seismic noise correlations into two categories, suitable and unsuitable for noise tomography. By using only a small manually classified data subset for network training, the ANN allows us to classify large data volumes with low human effort and to encode the valuable subjective experience of data analysts that cannot be captured by a deterministic algorithm. Based on a new feature extraction procedure that exploits the wavelet-like nature of seismic time-series, we efficiently reduce the dimensionality of noise correlation data, still keeping relevant features needed for automated classification. Using global- and regional-scale data sets, we show that classification errors of 20 per cent or less can be achieved when the network training is performed with as little as 3.5 per cent and 16 per cent of the data sets, respectively. Furthermore, the ANN trained on the regional data can be applied to the global data, and vice versa, without a significant increase of the classification error. An experiment where four students manually classified the data, revealed that the classification error they would assign to each other is substantially larger than the classification error of the ANN (>35 per cent). This indicates that reproducibility would be hampered more by human subjectivity than by imperfections of the ANN.

  16. Hamate-pisiform coalition: morphology, clinical significance, and a simplified classification scheme for carpal coalition.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Scott E

    2011-03-01

    Hamate-pisiform coalition is characterized by the abnormal union of the pisiform bone and hamulus of the hamate. Because most reported cases are isolated, and literature on the subject is sparse, relatively little is known about this condition and its clinical significance. The purpose of this report is to discuss the occurrence, morphology, and frequency of hamate-pisiform coalition identified in a skeletal sample of native South Africans, and to conduct a metaanalysis of all known cases in order to clarify the sex distribution, laterality, form, and clinical significance of this condition. Five new cases (three male, two female) of hamate-pisiform coalition were identified in 527 native South Africans. Results indicate that hamate-pisiform coalition is infrequent (0.76%) but may be more likely encountered in individuals of African ancestry. Morphologically, non-osseous examples ranged in appearance from minor expressions involving pitting of an expanded hamulus base, to a variably pitted articulation between an elongated pisiform and hamulus. Osseous union between the two bones tends to extend beyond the hamulus base to adjacent areas of the hamate. Cases involving osseous union appear predisposed to fracture while ulnar neuropathy is significantly more frequent in individuals exhibiting non-osseous coalition. As both non-osseous and osseous cases can have clinical significance, awareness of the variable manifestations of this condition is necessary for hand specialists. A simplified classification system is suggested to more consistently characterize carpal coalitions. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Evaluating multimedia chemical persistence: Classification and regression tree analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.H.; McKone, T.E.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    2000-04-01

    For the thousands of chemicals continuously released into the environment, it is desirable to make prospective assessments of those likely to be persistent. Widely distributed persistent chemicals are impossible to remove from the environment and remediation by natural processes may take decades, which is problematic if adverse health or ecological effects are discovered after prolonged release into the environment. A tiered approach using a classification scheme and a multimedia model for determining persistence is presented. Using specific criteria for persistence, a classification tree is developed to classify a chemical as persistent or nonpersistent based on the chemical properties. In thismore » approach, the classification is derived from the results of a standardized unit world multimedia model. Thus, the classifications are more robust for multimedia pollutants than classifications using a single medium half-life. The method can be readily implemented and provides insight without requiring extensive and often unavailable data. This method can be used to classify chemicals when only a few properties are known and can be used to direct further data collection. Case studies are presented to demonstrate the advantages of the approach.« less

  18. Automating document classification for the Immune Epitope Database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Morgan, Alexander A; Zhang, Qing; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2007-01-01

    Background The Immune Epitope Database contains information on immune epitopes curated manually from the scientific literature. Like similar projects in other knowledge domains, significant effort is spent on identifying which articles are relevant for this purpose. Results We here report our experience in automating this process using Naïve Bayes classifiers trained on 20,910 abstracts classified by domain experts. Improvements on the basic classifier performance were made by a) utilizing information stored in PubMed beyond the abstract itself b) applying standard feature selection criteria and c) extracting domain specific feature patterns that e.g. identify peptides sequences. We have implemented the classifier into the curation process determining if abstracts are clearly relevant, clearly irrelevant, or if no certain classification can be made, in which case the abstracts are manually classified. Testing this classification scheme on an independent dataset, we achieve 95% sensitivity and specificity in the 51.1% of abstracts that were automatically classified. Conclusion By implementing text classification, we have sped up the reference selection process without sacrificing sensitivity or specificity of the human expert classification. This study provides both practical recommendations for users of text classification tools, as well as a large dataset which can serve as a benchmark for tool developers. PMID:17655769

  19. Gender classification from video under challenging operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Schrock, Olga; Dong, Guozhu

    2014-06-01

    The literature is abundant with papers on gender classification research. However the majority of such research is based on the assumption that there is enough resolution so that the subject's face can be resolved. Hence the majority of the research is actually in the face recognition and facial feature area. A gap exists for gender classification under challenging operating conditions—different seasonal conditions, different clothing, etc.—and when the subject's face cannot be resolved due to lack of resolution. The Seasonal Weather and Gender (SWAG) Database is a novel database that contains subjects walking through a scene under operating conditions that span a calendar year. This paper exploits a subset of that database—the SWAG One dataset—using data mining techniques, traditional classifiers (ex. Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine, etc.) and traditional (canny edge detection, etc.) and non-traditional (height/width ratios, etc.) feature extractors to achieve high correct gender classification rates (greater than 85%). Another novelty includes exploiting frame differentials.

  20. A comprehensive catalogue and classification of human thermal climate indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, C. R.; Grigorieva, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The very large number of human thermal climate indices that have been proposed over the past 100 years or so is a manifestation of the perceived importance within the scientific community of the thermal environment and the desire to quantify it. Schemes used differ in approach according to the number of variables taken into account, the rationale employed, the relative sophistication of the underlying body-atmosphere heat exchange theory and the particular design for application. They also vary considerably in type and quality, as well as in several other aspects. Reviews appear in the literature, but they cover a limited number of indices. A project that produces a comprehensive documentation, classification and overall evaluation of the full range of existing human thermal climate indices has never been attempted. This paper deals with documentation and classification. A subsequent report will focus on evaluation. Here a comprehensive register of 162 thermal indices is assembled and a sorting scheme devised that groups them according to eight primary classification classes. It is the first stage in a project to organise and evaluate the full range of all human thermal climate indices. The work, when completed, will make it easier for users to reflect on the merits of all available thermal indices. It will be simpler to locate and compare indices and decide which is most appropriate for a particular application or investigation.

  1. A comprehensive catalogue and classification of human thermal climate indices.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, C R; Grigorieva, E A

    2015-01-01

    The very large number of human thermal climate indices that have been proposed over the past 100 years or so is a manifestation of the perceived importance within the scientific community of the thermal environment and the desire to quantify it. Schemes used differ in approach according to the number of variables taken into account, the rationale employed, the relative sophistication of the underlying body-atmosphere heat exchange theory and the particular design for application. They also vary considerably in type and quality, as well as in several other aspects. Reviews appear in the literature, but they cover a limited number of indices. A project that produces a comprehensive documentation, classification and overall evaluation of the full range of existing human thermal climate indices has never been attempted. This paper deals with documentation and classification. A subsequent report will focus on evaluation. Here a comprehensive register of 162 thermal indices is assembled and a sorting scheme devised that groups them according to eight primary classification classes. It is the first stage in a project to organise and evaluate the full range of all human thermal climate indices. The work, when completed, will make it easier for users to reflect on the merits of all available thermal indices. It will be simpler to locate and compare indices and decide which is most appropriate for a particular application or investigation.

  2. Automated Classification of Thermal Infrared Spectra Using Self-organizing Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Hogan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Existing and planned space missions to a variety of planetary and satellite surfaces produce an ever increasing volume of spectral data. Understanding the scientific informational content in this large data volume is a daunting task. Fortunately various statistical approaches are available to assess such data sets. Here we discuss an automated classification scheme based on Kohonen Self-organizing maps (SOM) we have developed. The SUM process produces an output layer were spectra having similar properties lie in close proximity to each other. One major effort is partitioning this output layer into appropriate regions. This is prefonned by defining dosed regions based upon the strength of the boundaries between adjacent cells in the SOM output layer. We use the Davies-Bouldin index as a measure of the inter-class similarities and intra-class dissimilarities that determines the optimum partition of the output layer, and hence number of SOM clusters. This allows us to identify the natural number of clusters formed from the spectral data. Mineral spectral libraries prepared at Arizona State University (ASU) and John Hopkins University (JHU) are used to test and evaluate the classification scheme. We label the library sample spectra in a hierarchical scheme with class, subclass, and mineral group names. We use a portion of the spectra to train the SOM, i.e. produce the output layer, while the remaining spectra are used to test the SOM. The test spectra are presented to the SOM output layer and assigned membership to the appropriate cluster. We then evaluate these assignments to assess the scientific meaning and accuracy of the derived SOM classes as they relate to the labels. We demonstrate that unsupervised classification by SOMs can be a useful component in autonomous systems designed to identify mineral species from reflectance and emissivity spectra in the therrnal IR.

  3. Multidimensional classification of magma types for altered igneous rocks and application to their tectonomagmatic discrimination and igneous provenance of siliciclastic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Rivera-Gómez, M. Abdelaly; Díaz-González, Lorena; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Amezcua-Valdez, Alejandra; Rosales-Rivera, Mauricio; Verma, Sanjeet K.; Quiroz-Ruiz, Alfredo; Armstrong-Altrin, John S.

    2017-05-01

    A new multidimensional scheme consistent with the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) is proposed for the classification of igneous rocks in terms of four magma types: ultrabasic, basic, intermediate, and acid. Our procedure is based on an extensive database of major element composition of a total of 33,868 relatively fresh rock samples having a multinormal distribution (initial database with 37,215 samples). Multinormally distributed database in terms of log-ratios of samples was ascertained by a new computer program DOMuDaF, in which the discordancy test was applied at the 99.9% confidence level. Isometric log-ratio (ilr) transformation was used to provide overall percent correct classification of 88.7%, 75.8%, 88.0%, and 80.9% for ultrabasic, basic, intermediate, and acid rocks, respectively. Given the known mathematical and uncertainty propagation properties, this transformation could be adopted for routine applications. The incorrect classification was mainly for the "neighbour" magma types, e.g., basic for ultrabasic and vice versa. Some of these misclassifications do not have any effect on multidimensional tectonic discrimination. For an efficient application of this multidimensional scheme, a new computer program MagClaMSys_ilr (MagClaMSys-Magma Classification Major-element based System) was written, which is available for on-line processing on http://tlaloc.ier.unam.mx/index.html. This classification scheme was tested from newly compiled data for relatively fresh Neogene igneous rocks and was found to be consistent with the conventional IUGS procedure. The new scheme was successfully applied to inter-laboratory data for three geochemical reference materials (basalts JB-1 and JB-1a, and andesite JA-3) from Japan and showed that the inferred magma types are consistent with the rock name (basic for basalts JB-1 and JB-1a and intermediate for andesite JA-3). The scheme was also successfully applied to five case studies of older Archaean to

  4. Mode of Action (MOA) Assignment Classifications for Ecotoxicology: Evaluation of Available Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are various structure-based classification schemes to categorize chemicals based on mode of action (MOA) which have been applied for both eco and human toxicology. With increasing calls to assess 1000s of chemicals, some of which have little available information other tha...

  5. A pilot evaluation of two G-seat cueing schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison was made of two contrasting G-seat cueing schemes. The G-seat, an aircraft simulation subsystem, creates aircraft acceleration cues via seat contour changes. Of the two cueing schemes tested, one was designed to create skin pressure cues and the other was designed to create body position cues. Each cueing scheme was tested and evaluated subjectively by five pilots regarding its ability to cue the appropriate accelerations in each of four simple maneuvers: a pullout, a pushover, an S-turn maneuver, and a thrusting maneuver. A divergence of pilot opinion occurred, revealing that the perception and acceptance of G-seat stimuli is a highly individualistic phenomena. The creation of one acceptable G-seat cueing scheme was, therefore, deemed to be quite difficult.

  6. Semi-supervised classification tool for DubaiSat-2 multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mansoori, Saeed

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses a semi-supervised classification tool based on a pixel-based approach of the multi-spectral satellite imagery. There are not many studies demonstrating such algorithm for the multispectral images, especially when the image consists of 4 bands (Red, Green, Blue and Near Infrared) as in DubaiSat-2 satellite images. The proposed approach utilizes both unsupervised and supervised classification schemes sequentially to identify four classes in the image, namely, water bodies, vegetation, land (developed and undeveloped areas) and paved areas (i.e. roads). The unsupervised classification concept is applied to identify two classes; water bodies and vegetation, based on a well-known index that uses the distinct wavelengths of visible and near-infrared sunlight that is absorbed and reflected by the plants to identify the classes; this index parameter is called "Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)". Afterward, the supervised classification is performed by selecting training homogenous samples for roads and land areas. Here, a precise selection of training samples plays a vital role in the classification accuracy. Post classification is finally performed to enhance the classification accuracy, where the classified image is sieved, clumped and filtered before producing final output. Overall, the supervised classification approach produced higher accuracy than the unsupervised method. This paper shows some current preliminary research results which point out the effectiveness of the proposed technique in a virtual perspective.

  7. A Novel, Simplified Scheme for Plastics Identification: "JCE" Classroom Activity 104

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary E.; Walker, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In this Activity, students identify samples of seven types of recyclable plastic by using a flowchart scheme. The flowchart procedure includes making density comparisons of the plastic samples in water and alcohol and observing physical changes of plastic samples subjected to boiling water temperatures and exposure to acetone. This scheme is…

  8. Alternative ways of representing Zapotec and Cuicatec folk classification of birds: a multidimensional model and its implications for culturally-informed conservation in Oaxaca, México

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report on a comparative ethno-ornithological study of Zapotec and Cuicatec communities in Northern Oaxaca, Mexico that provided a challenge to some existing descriptions of folk classification. Our default model was the taxonomic system of ranks developed by Brent Berlin. Methods Fieldwork was conducted in the Zapotec village of San Miguel Tiltepec and in the Cuicatec village of San Juan Teponaxtla, using a combination of ethnographic interviews and pile-sorting tests. Post-fieldwork, Principal Component Analysis using NTSYSpc V. 2.11f was applied to obtain pattern variation for the answers from different participants. Results and conclusion Using language and pile-sorting data analysed through Principal Component Analysis, we show how both Zapotec and Cuicatec subjects place a particular emphasis on an intermediate level of classification. These categories group birds with non-birds using ecological and behavioral criteria, and violate a strict distinction between symbolic and mundane (or ‘natural’), and between ‘general-purpose’ and ‘single-purpose’ schemes. We suggest that shared classificatory knowledge embodying everyday schemes for apprehending the world of birds might be better reflected in a multidimensional model that would also provide a more realistic basis for developing culturally-informed conservation strategies. PMID:24321280

  9. An on-line BCI for control of hand grasp sequence and holding using adaptive probabilistic neural network.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Mehrnaz Kh; Erfanian, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for on-line controlling the sequence of hand grasping and holding in a virtual reality environment. The goal of this research is to develop an interaction technique that will allow the BCI to be effective in real-world scenarios for hand grasp control. Moreover, for consistency of man-machine interface, it is desirable the intended movement to be what the subject imagines. For this purpose, we developed an on-line BCI which was based on the classification of EEG associated with imagination of the movement of hand grasping and resting state. A classifier based on probabilistic neural network (PNN) was introduced for classifying the EEG. The PNN is a feedforward neural network that realizes the Bayes decision discriminant function by estimating probability density function using mixtures of Gaussian kernels. Two types of classification schemes were considered here for on-line hand control: adaptive and static. In contrast to static classification, the adaptive classifier was continuously updated on-line during recording. The experimental evaluation on six subjects on different days demonstrated that by using the static scheme, a classification accuracy as high as the rate obtained by the adaptive scheme can be achieved. At the best case, an average classification accuracy of 93.0% and 85.8% was obtained using adaptive and static scheme, respectively. The results obtained from more than 1500 trials on six subjects showed that interactive virtual reality environment can be used as an effective tool for subject training in BCI.

  10. Classification of change detection and change blindness from near-infrared spectroscopy signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Katura, Takusige

    2011-08-01

    Using a machine-learning classification algorithm applied to near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals, we classify a success (change detection) or a failure (change blindness) in detecting visual changes for a change-detection task. Five subjects perform a change-detection task, and their brain activities are continuously monitored. A support-vector-machine algorithm is applied to classify the change-detection and change-blindness trials, and correct classification probability of 70-90% is obtained for four subjects. Two types of temporal shapes in classification probabilities are found: one exhibiting a maximum value after the task is completed (postdictive type), and another exhibiting a maximum value during the task (predictive type). As for the postdictive type, the classification probability begins to increase immediately after the task completion and reaches its maximum in about the time scale of neuronal hemodynamic response, reflecting a subjective report of change detection. As for the predictive type, the classification probability shows an increase at the task initiation and is maximal while subjects are performing the task, predicting the task performance in detecting a change. We conclude that decoding change detection and change blindness from NIRS signal is possible and argue some future applications toward brain-machine interfaces.

  11. Railroad Classification Yard Technology Manual: Volume II : Yard Computer Systems

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-08-01

    This volume (Volume II) of the Railroad Classification Yard Technology Manual documents the railroad classification yard computer systems methodology. The subjects covered are: functional description of process control and inventory computer systems,...

  12. Semantic Shot Classification in Sports Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ling-Yu; Xu, Min; Tian, Qi

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a unified framework for semantic shot classification in sports videos. Unlike previous approaches, which focus on clustering by aggregating shots with similar low-level features, the proposed scheme makes use of domain knowledge of a specific sport to perform a top-down video shot classification, including identification of video shot classes for each sport, and supervised learning and classification of the given sports video with low-level and middle-level features extracted from the sports video. It is observed that for each sport we can predefine a small number of semantic shot classes, about 5~10, which covers 90~95% of sports broadcasting video. With the supervised learning method, we can map the low-level features to middle-level semantic video shot attributes such as dominant object motion (a player), camera motion patterns, and court shape, etc. On the basis of the appropriate fusion of those middle-level shot classes, we classify video shots into the predefined video shot classes, each of which has a clear semantic meaning. The proposed method has been tested over 4 types of sports videos: tennis, basketball, volleyball and soccer. Good classification accuracy of 85~95% has been achieved. With correctly classified sports video shots, further structural and temporal analysis, such as event detection, video skimming, table of content, etc, will be greatly facilitated.

  13. Natural image classification driven by human brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dai; Peng, Hanyang; Wang, Jinqiao; Tang, Ming; Xue, Rong; Zuo, Zhentao

    2016-03-01

    Natural image classification has been a hot topic in computer vision and pattern recognition research field. Since the performance of an image classification system can be improved by feature selection, many image feature selection methods have been developed. However, the existing supervised feature selection methods are typically driven by the class label information that are identical for different samples from the same class, ignoring with-in class image variability and therefore degrading the feature selection performance. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method, driven by human brain activity signals collected using fMRI technique when human subjects were viewing natural images of different categories. The fMRI signals associated with subjects viewing different images encode the human perception of natural images, and therefore may capture image variability within- and cross- categories. We then select image features with the guidance of fMRI signals from brain regions with active response to image viewing. Particularly, bag of words features based on GIST descriptor are extracted from natural images for classification, and a sparse regression base feature selection method is adapted to select image features that can best predict fMRI signals. Finally, a classification model is built on the select image features to classify images without fMRI signals. The validation experiments for classifying images from 4 categories of two subjects have demonstrated that our method could achieve much better classification performance than the classifiers built on image feature selected by traditional feature selection methods.

  14. Wing Classification in the Virtual Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William H.

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is a Web site that hosts a database of documents organized to allow teams of scientists and engineers to store and maintain documents. A number of other workgroup-related capabilities are provided. My tasks as a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellow included developing a scheme for classifying the workgroups using the VRC using the various Divisions within NASA Enterprises. To this end I developed a plan to use several CGI Perl scripts to gather classification information from the leaders of the workgroups, and to display all the workgroups within a specified classification. I designed, implemented, and partially tested scripts which can be used to do the classification. I was also asked to consider directions for future development of the VRC. I think that the VRC can use XML to advantage. XML is a markup language with designer tags that can be used to build meaning into documents. An investigation as to how CORBA, an object-oriented object request broker included with JDK 1.2, might be used also seems justified.

  15. Surveillance system and method having an operating mode partitioned fault classification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, Randall L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A system and method which partitions a parameter estimation model, a fault detection model, and a fault classification model for a process surveillance scheme into two or more coordinated submodels together providing improved diagnostic decision making for at least one determined operating mode of an asset.

  16. Structure D'Ensemble, Multiple Classification, Multiple Seriation and Amount of Irrelevant Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamel, B. Remmo; Van Der Veer, M. A. A.

    1972-01-01

    A significant positive correlation between multiple classification was found, in testing 65 children aged 6 to 8 years, at the stage of concrete operations. This is interpreted as support for the existence of a structure d'ensemble of operational schemes in the period of concrete operations. (Authors)

  17. Cellular automata rule characterization and classification using texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicao, Jeaneth; Ribas, Lucas C.; Scabini, Leonardo F. S.; Bruno, Odermir M.

    2018-05-01

    The cellular automata (CA) spatio-temporal patterns have attracted the attention from many researchers since it can provide emergent behavior resulting from the dynamics of each individual cell. In this manuscript, we propose an approach of texture image analysis to characterize and classify CA rules. The proposed method converts the CA spatio-temporal patterns into a gray-scale image. The gray-scale is obtained by creating a binary number based on the 8-connected neighborhood of each dot of the CA spatio-temporal pattern. We demonstrate that this technique enhances the CA rule characterization and allow to use different texture image analysis algorithms. Thus, various texture descriptors were evaluated in a supervised training approach aiming to characterize the CA's global evolution. Our results show the efficiency of the proposed method for the classification of the elementary CA (ECAs), reaching a maximum of 99.57% of accuracy rate according to the Li-Packard scheme (6 classes) and 94.36% for the classification of the 88 rules scheme. Moreover, within the image analysis context, we found a better performance of the method by means of a transformation of the binary states to a gray-scale.

  18. JPEG XS call for proposals subjective evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, David; Bruylants, Tim; Willème, Alexandre; Ebrahimi, Touradj; Schelkens, Peter; Macq, Benoit

    2017-09-01

    In March 2016 the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), formally known as ISO/IEC SC29 WG1, issued a call for proposals soliciting compression technologies for a low-latency, lightweight and visually transparent video compression scheme. Within the JPEG family of standards, this scheme was denominated JPEG XS. The subjective evaluation of visually lossless compressed video sequences at high resolutions and bit depths poses particular challenges. This paper describes the adopted procedures, the subjective evaluation setup, the evaluation process and summarizes the obtained results which were achieved in the context of the JPEG XS standardization process.

  19. Using dual classifications in the development of avian wetland indices of biological integrity for wetlands in West Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Walter; Anderson, James T; Kordek, Walter S

    2010-05-01

    Considerable resources are being used to develop and implement bioassessment methods for wetlands to ensure that "biological integrity" is maintained under the United States Clean Water Act. Previous research has demonstrated that avian composition is susceptible to human impairments at multiple spatial scales. Using a site-specific disturbance gradient, we built avian wetland indices of biological integrity (AW-IBI) specific to two wetland classification schemes, one based on vegetative structure and the other based on the wetland's position in the landscape and sources of water. The resulting class-specific AW-IBI was comprised of one to four metrics that varied in their sensitivity to the disturbance gradient. Some of these metrics were specific to only one of the classification schemes, whereas others could discriminate varying levels of disturbance regardless of classification scheme. Overall, all of the derived biological indices specific to the vegetative structure-based classes of wetlands had a significant relation with the disturbance gradient; however, the biological index derived for floodplain wetlands exhibited a more consistent response to a local disturbance gradient. We suspect that the consistency of this response is due to the inherent nature of the connectivity of available habitat in floodplain wetlands.

  20. 32 CFR 2001.14 - Classification challenges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... any more specific than to question why information is or is not classified, or is classified at a... a classification challenge to information that has been the subject of a challenge within the past two years, or that is the subject of pending litigation, the agency is not required to process the...

  1. DTI measurements for Alzheimer’s classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggipinto, Tommaso; Bellotti, Roberto; Amoroso, Nicola; Diacono, Domenico; Donvito, Giacinto; Lella, Eufemia; Monaco, Alfonso; Antonella Scelsi, Marzia; Tangaro, Sabina; Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, Alzheimer's.

    2017-03-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a promising imaging technique that provides insight into white matter microstructure integrity and it has greatly helped identifying white matter regions affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in its early stages. DTI can therefore be a valuable source of information when designing machine-learning strategies to discriminate between healthy control (HC) subjects, AD patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Nonetheless, several studies have reported so far conflicting results, especially because of the adoption of biased feature selection strategies. In this paper we firstly analyzed DTI scans of 150 subjects from the Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI) database. We measured a significant effect of the feature selection bias on the classification performance (p-value  <  0.01), leading to overoptimistic results (10% up to 30% relative increase in AUC). We observed that this effect is manifest regardless of the choice of diffusion index, specifically fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. Secondly, we performed a test on an independent mixed cohort consisting of 119 ADNI scans; thus, we evaluated the informative content provided by DTI measurements for AD classification. Classification performances and biological insight, concerning brain regions related to the disease, provided by cross-validation analysis were both confirmed on the independent test.

  2. Comparing Features for Classification of MEG Responses to Motor Imagery.

    PubMed

    Halme, Hanna-Leena; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) with real-time neurofeedback could be a viable approach, e.g., in rehabilitation of cerebral stroke. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) noninvasively measures electric brain activity at high temporal resolution and is well-suited for recording oscillatory brain signals. MI is known to modulate 10- and 20-Hz oscillations in the somatomotor system. In order to provide accurate feedback to the subject, the most relevant MI-related features should be extracted from MEG data. In this study, we evaluated several MEG signal features for discriminating between left- and right-hand MI and between MI and rest. MEG was measured from nine healthy participants imagining either left- or right-hand finger tapping according to visual cues. Data preprocessing, feature extraction and classification were performed offline. The evaluated MI-related features were power spectral density (PSD), Morlet wavelets, short-time Fourier transform (STFT), common spatial patterns (CSP), filter-bank common spatial patterns (FBCSP), spatio-spectral decomposition (SSD), and combined SSD+CSP, CSP+PSD, CSP+Morlet, and CSP+STFT. We also compared four classifiers applied to single trials using 5-fold cross-validation for evaluating the classification accuracy and its possible dependence on the classification algorithm. In addition, we estimated the inter-session left-vs-right accuracy for each subject. The SSD+CSP combination yielded the best accuracy in both left-vs-right (mean 73.7%) and MI-vs-rest (mean 81.3%) classification. CSP+Morlet yielded the best mean accuracy in inter-session left-vs-right classification (mean 69.1%). There were large inter-subject differences in classification accuracy, and the level of the 20-Hz suppression correlated significantly with the subjective MI-vs-rest accuracy. Selection of the classification algorithm had only a minor effect on the results. We obtained good accuracy in sensor-level decoding of MI from single-trial MEG data. Feature extraction

  3. Comparing Features for Classification of MEG Responses to Motor Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Halme, Hanna-Leena; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Background Motor imagery (MI) with real-time neurofeedback could be a viable approach, e.g., in rehabilitation of cerebral stroke. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) noninvasively measures electric brain activity at high temporal resolution and is well-suited for recording oscillatory brain signals. MI is known to modulate 10- and 20-Hz oscillations in the somatomotor system. In order to provide accurate feedback to the subject, the most relevant MI-related features should be extracted from MEG data. In this study, we evaluated several MEG signal features for discriminating between left- and right-hand MI and between MI and rest. Methods MEG was measured from nine healthy participants imagining either left- or right-hand finger tapping according to visual cues. Data preprocessing, feature extraction and classification were performed offline. The evaluated MI-related features were power spectral density (PSD), Morlet wavelets, short-time Fourier transform (STFT), common spatial patterns (CSP), filter-bank common spatial patterns (FBCSP), spatio—spectral decomposition (SSD), and combined SSD+CSP, CSP+PSD, CSP+Morlet, and CSP+STFT. We also compared four classifiers applied to single trials using 5-fold cross-validation for evaluating the classification accuracy and its possible dependence on the classification algorithm. In addition, we estimated the inter-session left-vs-right accuracy for each subject. Results The SSD+CSP combination yielded the best accuracy in both left-vs-right (mean 73.7%) and MI-vs-rest (mean 81.3%) classification. CSP+Morlet yielded the best mean accuracy in inter-session left-vs-right classification (mean 69.1%). There were large inter-subject differences in classification accuracy, and the level of the 20-Hz suppression correlated significantly with the subjective MI-vs-rest accuracy. Selection of the classification algorithm had only a minor effect on the results. Conclusions We obtained good accuracy in sensor-level decoding of MI from single

  4. Stretchy binary classification.

    PubMed

    Toh, Kar-Ann; Lin, Zhiping; Sun, Lei; Li, Zhengguo

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we introduce an analytic formulation for compressive binary classification. The formulation seeks to solve the least ℓ p -norm of the parameter vector subject to a classification error constraint. An analytic and stretchable estimation is conjectured where the estimation can be viewed as an extension of the pseudoinverse with left and right constructions. Our variance analysis indicates that the estimation based on the left pseudoinverse is unbiased and the estimation based on the right pseudoinverse is biased. Sparseness can be obtained for the biased estimation under certain mild conditions. The proposed estimation is investigated numerically using both synthetic and real-world data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Adam Walsh Act: An Examination of Sex Offender Risk Classification Systems.

    PubMed

    Zgoba, Kristen M; Miner, Michael; Levenson, Jill; Knight, Raymond; Letourneau, Elizabeth; Thornton, David

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the Adam Walsh Act (AWA) classification tiers with actuarial risk assessment instruments and existing state classification schemes in their respective abilities to identify sex offenders at high risk to re-offend. Data from 1,789 adult sex offenders released from prison in four states were collected (Minnesota, New Jersey, Florida, and South Carolina). On average, the sexual recidivism rate was approximately 5% at 5 years and 10% at 10 years. AWA Tier 2 offenders had higher Static-99R scores and higher recidivism rates than Tier 3 offenders, and in Florida, these inverse correlations were statistically significant. Actuarial measures and existing state tier systems, in contrast, did a better job of identifying high-risk offenders and recidivists. As well, we examined the distribution of risk assessment scores within and across tier categories, finding that a majority of sex offenders fall into AWA Tier 3, but more than half score low or moderately low on the Static-99R. The results indicate that the AWA sex offender classification scheme is a poor indicator of relative risk and is likely to result in a system that is less effective in protecting the public than those currently implemented in the states studied. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Diversity and classification of mycorrhizal associations.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, Mark

    2004-08-01

    Most mycorrhizas are 'balanced' mutualistic associations in which the fungus and plant exchange commodities required for their growth and survival. Myco-heterotrophic plants have 'exploitative' mycorrhizas where transfer processes apparently benefit only plants. Exploitative associations are symbiotic (in the broad sense), but are not mutualistic. A new definition of mycorrhizas that encompasses all types of these associations while excluding other plant-fungus interactions is provided. This definition recognises the importance of nutrient transfer at an interface resulting from synchronised plant-fungus development. The diversity of interactions between mycorrhizal fungi and plants is considered. Mycorrhizal fungi also function as endophytes, necrotrophs and antagonists of host or non-host plants, with roles that vary during the lifespan of their associations. It is recommended that mycorrhizal associations are defined and classified primarily by anatomical criteria regulated by the host plant. A revised classification scheme for types and categories of mycorrhizal associations defined by these criteria is proposed. The main categories of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal associations (VAM) are 'linear' or 'coiling', and of ectomycorrhizal associations (ECM) are 'epidermal' or 'cortical'. Subcategories of coiling VAM and epidermal ECM occur in certain host plants. Fungus-controlled features result in 'morphotypes' within categories of VAM and ECM. Arbutoid and monotropoid associations should be considered subcategories of epidermal ECM and ectendomycorrhizas should be relegated to an ECM morphotype. Both arbuscules and vesicles define mycorrhizas formed by glomeromycotan fungi. A new classification scheme for categories, subcategories and morphotypes of mycorrhizal associations is provided.

  7. Synthesis and size classification of metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, Takashi; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Sato, Yoshinori; Tamura, Kazuchika; Aiba, Setsuya; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are considered for biomedical applications, such as the medium in magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and for the purification or classification of DNA or virus. The performance of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical application such as hyperthermia depends very much on the magnetic properties, size and size distribution. We briefly described the basic idea behind their use in drug delivery, magnetic separation and hyperthermia and discussed the prerequisite properties magnetic particles for biomedical applications. Finally reported the synthesis and classification scheme to prepare magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with narrow size distribution for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

  8. Malware distributed collection and pre-classification system using honeypot technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégio, André R. A.; Oliveira, Isabela L.; Santos, Rafael D. C.; Cansian, Adriano M.; de Geus, Paulo L.

    2009-04-01

    Malware has become a major threat in the last years due to the ease of spread through the Internet. Malware detection has become difficult with the use of compression, polymorphic methods and techniques to detect and disable security software. Those and other obfuscation techniques pose a problem for detection and classification schemes that analyze malware behavior. In this paper we propose a distributed architecture to improve malware collection using different honeypot technologies to increase the variety of malware collected. We also present a daemon tool developed to grab malware distributed through spam and a pre-classification technique that uses antivirus technology to separate malware in generic classes.

  9. Predicting Prodromal Alzheimer's Disease in Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Machine Learning Classification of Multimodal Multicenter Diffusion-Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Dyrba, Martin; Barkhof, Frederik; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Filippi, Massimo; Hausner, Lucrezia; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Kirste, Thomas; Teipel, Stefan J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients show early changes in white matter (WM) structural integrity. We studied the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in assessing WM alterations in the predementia stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We applied a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to DTI and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging data from 35 amyloid-β42 negative MCI subjects (MCI-Aβ42-), 35 positive MCI subjects (MCI-Aβ42+), and 25 healthy controls (HC) retrieved from the European DTI Study on Dementia. The SVM was applied to DTI-derived fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity (MD), and mode of anisotropy (MO) maps. For comparison, we studied classification based on gray matter (GM) and WM volume. We obtained accuracies of up to 68% for MO and 63% for GM volume when it came to distinguishing between MCI-Aβ42- and MCI-Aβ42+. When it came to separating MCI-Aβ42+ from HC we achieved an accuracy of up to 77% for MD and a significantly lower accuracy of 68% for GM volume. The accuracy of multimodal classification was not higher than the accuracy of the best single modality. Our results suggest that DTI data provide better prediction accuracy than GM volume in predementia AD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  10. Transfer Kernel Common Spatial Patterns for Motor Imagery Brain-Computer Interface Classification

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Mengxi; Liu, Shucong; Zhang, Pengju

    2018-01-01

    Motor-imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) commonly use the common spatial pattern (CSP) as preprocessing step before classification. The CSP method is a supervised algorithm. Therefore a lot of time-consuming training data is needed to build the model. To address this issue, one promising approach is transfer learning, which generalizes a learning model can extract discriminative information from other subjects for target classification task. To this end, we propose a transfer kernel CSP (TKCSP) approach to learn a domain-invariant kernel by directly matching distributions of source subjects and target subjects. The dataset IVa of BCI Competition III is used to demonstrate the validity by our proposed methods. In the experiment, we compare the classification performance of the TKCSP against CSP, CSP for subject-to-subject transfer (CSP SJ-to-SJ), regularizing CSP (RCSP), stationary subspace CSP (ssCSP), multitask CSP (mtCSP), and the combined mtCSP and ssCSP (ss + mtCSP) method. The results indicate that the superior mean classification performance of TKCSP can achieve 81.14%, especially in case of source subjects with fewer number of training samples. Comprehensive experimental evidence on the dataset verifies the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed TKCSP approach over several state-of-the-art methods. PMID:29743934

  11. Transfer Kernel Common Spatial Patterns for Motor Imagery Brain-Computer Interface Classification.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mengxi; Zheng, Dezhi; Liu, Shucong; Zhang, Pengju

    2018-01-01

    Motor-imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) commonly use the common spatial pattern (CSP) as preprocessing step before classification. The CSP method is a supervised algorithm. Therefore a lot of time-consuming training data is needed to build the model. To address this issue, one promising approach is transfer learning, which generalizes a learning model can extract discriminative information from other subjects for target classification task. To this end, we propose a transfer kernel CSP (TKCSP) approach to learn a domain-invariant kernel by directly matching distributions of source subjects and target subjects. The dataset IVa of BCI Competition III is used to demonstrate the validity by our proposed methods. In the experiment, we compare the classification performance of the TKCSP against CSP, CSP for subject-to-subject transfer (CSP SJ-to-SJ), regularizing CSP (RCSP), stationary subspace CSP (ssCSP), multitask CSP (mtCSP), and the combined mtCSP and ssCSP (ss + mtCSP) method. The results indicate that the superior mean classification performance of TKCSP can achieve 81.14%, especially in case of source subjects with fewer number of training samples. Comprehensive experimental evidence on the dataset verifies the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed TKCSP approach over several state-of-the-art methods.

  12. A classification scheme for alternative oxidases reveals the taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the enzyme in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Costa, José Hélio; McDonald, Allison E; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Fernandes de Melo, Dirce

    2014-11-01

    A classification scheme based on protein phylogenies and sequence harmony method was used to clarify the taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the alternative oxidase (AOX) in angiosperms. A large data set analyses showed that AOX1 and AOX2 subfamilies were distributed into 4 phylogenetic clades: AOX1a-c/1e, AOX1d, AOX2a-c and AOX2d. High diversity in AOX family compositions was found. While the AOX2 subfamily was not detected in monocots, the AOX1 subfamily has expanded (AOX1a-e) in the large majority of these plants. In addition, Poales AOX1b and 1d were orthologous to eudicots AOX1d and then renamed as AOX1d1 and 1d2. AOX1 or AOX2 losses were detected in some eudicot plants. Several AOX2 duplications (AOX2a-c) were identified in eudicot species, mainly in the asterids. The AOX2b originally identified in eudicots in the Fabales order (soybean, cowpea) was divergent from AOX2a-c showing some specific amino acids with AOX1d and then it was renamed as AOX2d. AOX1d and AOX2d seem to be stress-responsive, facultative and mutually exclusive among species suggesting a complementary role with an AOX1(a) in stress conditions. Based on the data collected, we present a model for the evolutionary history of AOX in angiosperms and highlight specific areas where further research would be most beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Kernel-based Joint Feature Selection and Max-Margin Classification for Early Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, Ehsan; Wu, Guorong; Saghafi, Behrouz; An, Le; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection methods usually select the most compact and relevant set of features based on their contribution to a linear regression model. Thus, these features might not be the best for a non-linear classifier. This is especially crucial for the tasks, in which the performance is heavily dependent on the feature selection techniques, like the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which progresses slowly while affects the quality of life dramatically. In this paper, we use the data acquired from multi-modal neuroimaging data to diagnose PD by investigating the brain regions, known to be affected at the early stages. We propose a joint kernel-based feature selection and classification framework. Unlike conventional feature selection techniques that select features based on their performance in the original input feature space, we select features that best benefit the classification scheme in the kernel space. We further propose kernel functions, specifically designed for our non-negative feature types. We use MRI and SPECT data of 538 subjects from the PPMI database, and obtain a diagnosis accuracy of 97.5%, which outperforms all baseline and state-of-the-art methods.

  14. Kernel-based Joint Feature Selection and Max-Margin Classification for Early Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adeli, Ehsan; Wu, Guorong; Saghafi, Behrouz; An, Le; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection methods usually select the most compact and relevant set of features based on their contribution to a linear regression model. Thus, these features might not be the best for a non-linear classifier. This is especially crucial for the tasks, in which the performance is heavily dependent on the feature selection techniques, like the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which progresses slowly while affects the quality of life dramatically. In this paper, we use the data acquired from multi-modal neuroimaging data to diagnose PD by investigating the brain regions, known to be affected at the early stages. We propose a joint kernel-based feature selection and classification framework. Unlike conventional feature selection techniques that select features based on their performance in the original input feature space, we select features that best benefit the classification scheme in the kernel space. We further propose kernel functions, specifically designed for our non-negative feature types. We use MRI and SPECT data of 538 subjects from the PPMI database, and obtain a diagnosis accuracy of 97.5%, which outperforms all baseline and state-of-the-art methods. PMID:28120883

  15. A user-driven treadmill control scheme for simulating overground locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghyun; Stanley, Christopher J; Curatalo, Lindsey A; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Treadmill-based locomotor training should simulate overground walking as closely as possible for optimal skill transfer. The constant speed of a standard treadmill encourages automaticity rather than engagement and fails to simulate the variable speeds encountered during real-world walking. To address this limitation, this paper proposes a user-driven treadmill velocity control scheme that allows the user to experience natural fluctuations in walking velocity with minimal unwanted inertial force due to acceleration/deceleration of the treadmill belt. A smart estimation limiter in the scheme effectively attenuates the inertial force during velocity changes. The proposed scheme requires measurement of pelvic and swing foot motions, and is developed for a treadmill of typical belt length (1.5 m). The proposed scheme is quantitatively evaluated here with four healthy subjects by comparing it with the most advanced control scheme identified in the literature.

  16. Cell dynamic morphology classification using deep convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Pang, Fengqian; Shi, Yonggang; Liu, Zhiwen

    2018-05-15

    Cell morphology is often used as a proxy measurement of cell status to understand cell physiology. Hence, interpretation of cell dynamic morphology is a meaningful task in biomedical research. Inspired by the recent success of deep learning, we here explore the application of convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to cell dynamic morphology classification. An innovative strategy for the implementation of CNNs is introduced in this study. Mouse lymphocytes were collected to observe the dynamic morphology, and two datasets were thus set up to investigate the performances of CNNs. Considering the installation of deep learning, the classification problem was simplified from video data to image data, and was then solved by CNNs in a self-taught manner with the generated image data. CNNs were separately performed in three installation scenarios and compared with existing methods. Experimental results demonstrated the potential of CNNs in cell dynamic morphology classification, and validated the effectiveness of the proposed strategy. CNNs were successfully applied to the classification problem, and outperformed the existing methods in the classification accuracy. For the installation of CNNs, transfer learning was proved to be a promising scheme. © 2018 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2018 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Bibliographic Control Division. Section: Classification and Indexing. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on classification and indexing presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Profile on Chinese Cataloguing and Subject Cataloguing" (Yan Lizhong, China); (2) "The Trend of Classification in Japan" (Hiroshi Ishiyama, Japan); (3) "Classification in Online…

  18. Infant Mortality: Development of a Proposed Update to the Dollfus Classification of Infant Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Dove, Melanie S.; Minnal, Archana; Damesyn, Mark; Curtis, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying infant deaths with common underlying causes and potential intervention points is critical to infant mortality surveillance and the development of prevention strategies. We constructed an International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10) parallel to the Dollfus cause-of-death classification scheme first published in 1990, which organized infant deaths by etiology and their amenability to prevention efforts. Methods Infant death records for 1996, dual-coded to the ICD Ninth Revision (ICD-9) and ICD-10, were obtained from the CDC public-use multiple-cause-of-death file on comparability between ICD-9 and ICD-10. We used the underlying cause of death to group 27,821 infant deaths into the nine categories of the ICD-9-based update to Dollfus' original coding scheme, published by Sowards in 1999. Comparability ratios were computed to measure concordance between ICD versions. Results The Dollfus classification system updated with ICD-10 codes had limited agreement with the 1999 modified classification system. Although prematurity, congenital malformations, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, and obstetric conditions were the first through fourth most common causes of infant death under both systems, most comparability ratios were significantly different from one system to the other. Conclusion The Dollfus classification system can be adapted for use with ICD-10 codes to create a comprehensive, etiology-based profile of infant deaths. The potential benefits of using Dollfus logic to guide perinatal mortality reduction strategies, particularly to maternal and child health programs and other initiatives focused on improving infant health, warrant further examination of this method's use in perinatal mortality surveillance. PMID:26556935

  19. Predicted singers' vocal fold lengths and voice classification-a study of x-ray morphological measures.

    PubMed

    Roers, Friederike; Mürbe, Dirk; Sundberg, Johan

    2009-07-01

    Students admitted to the solo singing education at the University of Music Dresden, Germany have been submitted to a detailed physical examination of a variety of factors with relevance to voice function since 1959. In the years 1959-1991, this scheme of examinations included X-ray profiles of the singers' vocal tracts. This material of 132 X-rays of voice professionals was used to investigate different laryngeal morphological measures and their relation to vocal fold length. Further, the study aimed to investigate if there are consistent anatomical differences between singers of different voice classifications. The study design used was a retrospective analysis. Vocal fold length could be measured in 29 of these singer subjects directly. These data showed a strong correlation with the anterior-posterior diameter of the subglottis and the trachea as well as with the distance from the anterior contour of the thyroid cartilage to the anterior contour of the spine. These relations were used in an attempt to predict the 132 singers' vocal fold lengths. The results revealed a clear covariation between predicted vocal fold length and voice classification. Anterior-posterior subglottic-tracheal diameter yielded mean vocal fold lengths of 14.9, 16.0, 16.6, 18.4, 19.5, and 20.9mm for sopranos, mezzo-sopranos, altos, tenors, baritones, and basses, respectively. The data support the assumption that there are consistent anatomical laryngeal differences between singers of different voice classifications, which are of relevance to pitch range and timbre of the voice.

  20. Diagnostic discrepancies in retinopathy of prematurity classification

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. Peter; Ryan, Michael C.; Lore, Emily; Tian, Peng; Ostmo, Susan; Jonas, Karyn; Chan, R.V. Paul; Chiang, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the most common areas for discrepancy in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) classification between experts. Design Prospective cohort study. Subjects, Participants, and/or Controls 281 infants were identified as part of a multi-center, prospective, ROP cohort study from 7 participating centers. Each site had participating ophthalmologists who provided the clinical classification after routine examination using binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO), and obtained wide-angle retinal images, which were independently classified by two study experts. Methods Wide-angle retinal images (RetCam; Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA) were obtained from study subjects, and two experts evaluated each image using a secure web-based module. Image-based classifications for zone, stage, plus disease, overall disease category (no ROP, mild ROP, Type II or pre-plus, and Type I) were compared between the two experts, and to the clinical classification obtained by BIO. Main Outcome Measures Inter-expert image-based agreement and image-based vs. ophthalmoscopic diagnostic agreement using absolute agreement and weighted kappa statistic. Results 1553 study eye examinations from 281 infants were included in the study. Experts disagreed on the stage classification in 620/1553 (40%) of comparisons, plus disease classification (including pre-plus) in 287/1553 (18%), zone in 117/1553 (8%), and overall ROP category in 618/1553 (40%). However, agreement for presence vs. absence of type 1 disease was >95%. There were no differences between image-based and clinical classification except for zone III disease. Conclusions The most common area of discrepancy in ROP classification is stage, although inter-expert agreement for clinically-significant disease such as presence vs. absence of type 1 and type 2 disease is high. There were no differences between image-based grading and the clinical exam in the ability to detect clinically-significant disease. This study provides

  1. Classification and overview of research in real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Purnendu; Gorinsky, Sergey V.; Laplante, Phillip A.; Stoyenko, Alexander D.; Marlowe, Thomas J.

    1996-10-01

    Real-time imaging has application in areas such as multimedia, virtual reality, medical imaging, and remote sensing and control. Recently, the imaging community has witnessed a tremendous growth in research and new ideas in these areas. To lend structure to this growth, we outline a classification scheme and provide an overview of current research in real-time imaging. For convenience, we have categorized references by research area and application.

  2. Nationwide classification of forest types of India using remote sensing and GIS.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C Sudhakar; Jha, C S; Diwakar, P G; Dadhwal, V K

    2015-12-01

    India, a mega-diverse country, possesses a wide range of climate and vegetation types along with a varied topography. The present study has classified forest types of India based on multi-season IRS Resourcesat-2 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data. The study has characterized 29 land use/land cover classes including 14 forest types and seven scrub types. Hybrid classification approach has been used for the classification of forest types. The classification of vegetation has been carried out based on the ecological rule bases followed by Champion and Seth's (1968) scheme of forest types in India. The present classification scheme has been compared with the available global and national level land cover products. The natural vegetation cover was estimated to be 29.36% of total geographical area of India. The predominant forest types of India are tropical dry deciduous and tropical moist deciduous. Of the total forest cover, tropical dry deciduous forests occupy an area of 2,17,713 km(2) (34.80%) followed by 2,07,649 km(2) (33.19%) under tropical moist deciduous forests, 48,295 km(2) (7.72%) under tropical semi-evergreen forests and 47,192 km(2) (7.54%) under tropical wet evergreen forests. The study has brought out a comprehensive vegetation cover and forest type maps based on inputs critical in defining the various categories of vegetation and forest types. This spatially explicit database will be highly useful for the studies related to changes in various forest types, carbon stocks, climate-vegetation modeling and biogeochemical cycles.

  3. A Descriptive Genetic Classification for Glaciovolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.; Russell, K.; Porritt, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    We review the recently published descriptive genetic classification for glaciovolcanoes (Russell et al., Quat Sci Rv, 2014). The new classification uses 'tuya' as a root word for all glaciovolcanic edifices, and with modifiers that make the classification descriptive (e.g., andesitic, lava-dominated, flat topped tuya). Although tuyas can range in composition from basaltic to rhyolitic, many of the characteristics diagnostic of glaciovolcanic environments are largely independent of lava composition (e.g., edifice morphology, columnar jointing patterns, glass distributions, pyroclast shapes). Tuya subtypes are first classified on the basis of variations in edifice-scale morphologies (e.g., conical tuya) then, on the proportions of the essential lithofacies (e.g., tephra-dominated conical tuya), and lastly on magma composition (e.g., basaltic, tephra-dominated, conical tuya). The lithofacies associations within tuyas broadly record the interplay between magmatic and glaciohydraulic conditions extent during the active phases of the eruption, including the dominant style of eruption (e.g., explosive vs. effusive). We present nine distinct, endmember models for glaciovolcanic edifices that simultaneously record changes in eruption conditions (explosive, transitional, effusive) for different general glaciohydraulic conditions (closed/sealed, leaky/partly sealed, open/well-drained). To date we have identified potential examples for 7 of the 9 models. Use of a simplified, descriptive classification scheme for glaciovolcanoes will facilitate communications amongst volcanologists and planetary scientists and the use of tuyas for recovering critical paleo-environmental information, particularly the local glaciohydraulics extent during eruptions.

  4. The Importance of Temporal and Spatial Vegetation Structure Information in Biotope Mapping Schemes: A Case Study in Helsingborg, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tian; Qiu, Ling; Hammer, Mårten; Gunnarsson, Allan

    2012-02-01

    Temporal and spatial vegetation structure has impact on biodiversity qualities. Yet, current schemes of biotope mapping do only to a limited extend incorporate these factors in the mapping. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of a modified biotope mapping scheme that includes temporal and spatial vegetation structure. A refined scheme was developed based on a biotope classification, and applied to a green structure system in Helsingborg city in southern Sweden. It includes four parameters of vegetation structure: continuity of forest cover, age of dominant trees, horizontal structure, and vertical structure. The major green structure sites were determined by interpretation of panchromatic aerial photographs assisted with a field survey. A set of biotope maps was constructed on the basis of each level of modified classification. An evaluation of the scheme included two aspects in particular: comparison of species richness between long-continuity and short-continuity forests based on identification of woodland continuity using ancient woodland indicators (AWI) species and related historical documents, and spatial distribution of animals in the green space in relation to vegetation structure. The results indicate that (1) the relationship between forest continuity: according to verification of historical documents, the richness of AWI species was higher in long-continuity forests; Simpson's diversity was significantly different between long- and short-continuity forests; the total species richness and Shannon's diversity were much higher in long-continuity forests shown a very significant difference. (2) The spatial vegetation structure and age of stands influence the richness and abundance of the avian fauna and rabbits, and distance to the nearest tree and shrub was a strong determinant of presence for these animal groups. It is concluded that continuity of forest cover, age of dominant trees, horizontal and vertical structures of vegetation

  5. Using reconstructed IVUS images for coronary plaque classification.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Karla L; Barajas, Joel; Pujol, Oriol; Rodriguez, Oriol; Radeva, Petia

    2007-01-01

    Coronary plaque rupture is one of the principal causes of sudden death in western societies. Reliable diagnostic of the different plaque types are of great interest for the medical community the predicting their evolution and applying an effective treatment. To achieve this, a tissue classification must be performed. Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) represents a technique to explore the vessel walls and to observe its histological properties. In this paper, a method to reconstruct IVUS images from the raw Radio Frequency (RF) data coming from ultrasound catheter is proposed. This framework offers a normalization scheme to compare accurately different patient studies. The automatic tissue classification is based on texture analysis and Adapting Boosting (Adaboost) learning technique combined with Error Correcting Output Codes (ECOC). In this study, 9 in-vivo cases are reconstructed with 7 different parameter set. This method improves the classification rate based on images, yielding a 91% of well-detected tissue using the best parameter set. It also reduces the inter-patient variability compared with the analysis of DICOM images, which are obtained from the commercial equipment.

  6. Automated classification of Acid Rock Drainage potential from Corescan drill core imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cracknell, M. J.; Jackson, L.; Parbhakar-Fox, A.; Savinova, K.

    2017-12-01

    Classification of the acid forming potential of waste rock is important for managing environmental hazards associated with mining operations. Current methods for the classification of acid rock drainage (ARD) potential usually involve labour intensive and subjective assessment of drill core and/or hand specimens. Manual methods are subject to operator bias, human error and the amount of material that can be assessed within a given time frame is limited. The automated classification of ARD potential documented here is based on the ARD Index developed by Parbhakar-Fox et al. (2011). This ARD Index involves the combination of five indicators: A - sulphide content; B - sulphide alteration; C - sulphide morphology; D - primary neutraliser content; and E - sulphide mineral association. Several components of the ARD Index require accurate identification of sulphide minerals. This is achieved by classifying Corescan Red-Green-Blue true colour images into the presence or absence of sulphide minerals using supervised classification. Subsequently, sulphide classification images are processed and combined with Corescan SWIR-based mineral classifications to obtain information on sulphide content, indices representing sulphide textures (disseminated versus massive and degree of veining), and spatially associated minerals. This information is combined to calculate ARD Index indicator values that feed into the classification of ARD potential. Automated ARD potential classifications of drill core samples associated with a porphyry Cu-Au deposit are compared to manually derived classifications and those obtained by standard static geochemical testing and X-ray diffractometry analyses. Results indicate a high degree of similarity between automated and manual ARD potential classifications. Major differences between approaches are observed in sulphide and neutraliser mineral percentages, likely due to the subjective nature of manual estimates of mineral content. The automated approach

  7. Evaluating Support for the Current Classification of Eukaryotic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Barbero, Erika; Lasser, Elyse; Dunthorn, Micah; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Patterson, David J; Katz, Laura A

    2006-01-01

    Perspectives on the classification of eukaryotic diversity have changed rapidly in recent years, as the four eukaryotic groups within the five-kingdom classification—plants, animals, fungi, and protists—have been transformed through numerous permutations into the current system of six “supergroups.” The intent of the supergroup classification system is to unite microbial and macroscopic eukaryotes based on phylogenetic inference. This supergroup approach is increasing in popularity in the literature and is appearing in introductory biology textbooks. We evaluate the stability and support for the current six-supergroup classification of eukaryotes based on molecular genealogies. We assess three aspects of each supergroup: (1) the stability of its taxonomy, (2) the support for monophyly (single evolutionary origin) in molecular analyses targeting a supergroup, and (3) the support for monophyly when a supergroup is included as an out-group in phylogenetic studies targeting other taxa. Our analysis demonstrates that supergroup taxonomies are unstable and that support for groups varies tremendously, indicating that the current classification scheme of eukaryotes is likely premature. We highlight several trends contributing to the instability and discuss the requirements for establishing robust clades within the eukaryotic tree of life. PMID:17194223

  8. Automatic detection and classification of artifacts in single-channel EEG.

    PubMed

    Olund, Thomas; Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels W; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory EEG monitoring can provide medical doctors important diagnostic information, without hospitalizing the patient. These recordings are however more exposed to noise and artifacts compared to clinically recorded EEG. An automatic artifact detection and classification algorithm for single-channel EEG is proposed to help identifying these artifacts. Features are extracted from the EEG signal and wavelet subbands. Subsequently a selection algorithm is applied in order to identify the best discriminating features. A non-linear support vector machine is used to discriminate among different artifact classes using the selected features. Single-channel (Fp1-F7) EEG recordings are obtained from experiments with 12 healthy subjects performing artifact inducing movements. The dataset was used to construct and validate the model. Both subject-specific and generic implementation, are investigated. The detection algorithm yield an average sensitivity and specificity above 95% for both the subject-specific and generic models. The classification algorithm show a mean accuracy of 78 and 64% for the subject-specific and generic model, respectively. The classification model was additionally validated on a reference dataset with similar results.

  9. Developing a visual moraine classification scheme to support investigations into the Holocene glacier chronology of the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufung, Eva; Winkler, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    investigation on basis of a specifically developed visual classification scheme for specific regional moraine types. Our classification also takes the recently controversial discussion on the influence of major mass movement events (like rock avalanches) on glacier behavior into account by highlighting those moraines that may be influences/created by such events and require special attention. When completed, this study eventually may be a useful tool for an improved selection of future study sites by including such purpose-oriented geomorphological criteria.

  10. Classification of forest land attributes using multi-source remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippuri, Inka; Suvanto, Aki; Maltamo, Matti; Korhonen, Kari T.; Pitkänen, Juho; Packalen, Petteri

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to (1) examine the classification of forest land using airborne laser scanning (ALS) data, satellite images and sample plots of the Finnish National Forest Inventory (NFI) as training data and to (2) identify best performing metrics for classifying forest land attributes. Six different schemes of forest land classification were studied: land use/land cover (LU/LC) classification using both national classes and FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) classes, main type, site type, peat land type and drainage status. Special interest was to test different ALS-based surface metrics in classification of forest land attributes. Field data consisted of 828 NFI plots collected in 2008-2012 in southern Finland and remotely sensed data was from summer 2010. Multinomial logistic regression was used as the classification method. Classification of LU/LC classes were highly accurate (kappa-values 0.90 and 0.91) but also the classification of site type, peat land type and drainage status succeeded moderately well (kappa-values 0.51, 0.69 and 0.52). ALS-based surface metrics were found to be the most important predictor variables in classification of LU/LC class, main type and drainage status. In best classification models of forest site types both spectral metrics from satellite data and point cloud metrics from ALS were used. In turn, in the classification of peat land types ALS point cloud metrics played the most important role. Results indicated that the prediction of site type and forest land category could be incorporated into stand level forest management inventory system in Finland.

  11. Energy-efficiency based classification of the manufacturing workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frumuşanu, G.; Afteni, C.; Badea, N.; Epureanu, A.

    2017-08-01

    EU Directive 92/75/EC established for the first time an energy consumption labelling scheme, further implemented by several other directives. As consequence, nowadays many products (e.g. home appliances, tyres, light bulbs, houses) have an EU Energy Label when offered for sale or rent. Several energy consumption models of manufacturing equipments have been also developed. This paper proposes an energy efficiency - based classification of the manufacturing workstation, aiming to characterize its energetic behaviour. The concept of energy efficiency of the manufacturing workstation is defined. On this base, a classification methodology has been developed. It refers to specific criteria and their evaluation modalities, together to the definition & delimitation of energy efficiency classes. The energy class position is defined after the amount of energy needed by the workstation in the middle point of its operating domain, while its extension is determined by the value of the first coefficient from the Taylor series that approximates the dependence between the energy consume and the chosen parameter of the working regime. The main domain of interest for this classification looks to be the optimization of the manufacturing activities planning and programming. A case-study regarding an actual lathe classification from energy efficiency point of view, based on two different approaches (analytical and numerical) is also included.

  12. Classification of burn wounds using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acha, Begona; Serrano, Carmen; Palencia, Sergio; Murillo, Juan Jose

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve a previous method developed by the authors for the classification of burn wounds into their depths. The inputs of the system are color and texture information, as these are the characteristics observed by physicians in order to give a diagnosis. Our previous work consisted in segmenting the burn wound from the rest of the image and classifying the burn into its depth. In this paper we focus on the classification problem only. We already proposed to use a Fuzzy-ARTMAP neural network (NN). However, we may take advantage of new powerful classification tools such as Support Vector Machines (SVM). We apply the five-folded cross validation scheme to divide the database into training and validating sets. Then, we apply a feature selection method for each classifier, which will give us the set of features that yields the smallest classification error for each classifier. Features used to classify are first-order statistical parameters extracted from the L*, u* and v* color components of the image. The feature selection algorithms used are the Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) and the Sequential Backward Selection (SBS) methods. As data of the problem faced here are not linearly separable, the SVM was trained using some different kernels. The validating process shows that the SVM method, when using a Gaussian kernel of variance 1, outperforms classification results obtained with the rest of the classifiers, yielding an error classification rate of 0.7% whereas the Fuzzy-ARTMAP NN attained 1.6 %.

  13. Determining the saliency of feature measurements obtained from images of sedimentary organic matter for use in its classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Andrew F.; Harris, Anthony J.; Ware, J. Andrew; Jarvis, Paul S.

    2006-11-01

    The classification of sedimentary organic matter (OM) images can be improved by determining the saliency of image analysis (IA) features measured from them. Knowing the saliency of IA feature measurements means that only the most significant discriminating features need be used in the classification process. This is an important consideration for classification techniques such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), where too many features can lead to the 'curse of dimensionality'. The classification scheme adopted in this work is a hybrid of morphologically and texturally descriptive features from previous manual classification schemes. Some of these descriptive features are assigned to IA features, along with several others built into the IA software (Halcon) to ensure that a valid cross-section is available. After an image is captured and segmented, a total of 194 features are measured for each particle. To reduce this number to a more manageable magnitude, the SPSS AnswerTree Exhaustive CHAID (χ 2 automatic interaction detector) classification tree algorithm is used to establish each measurement's saliency as a classification discriminator. In the case of continuous data as used here, the F-test is used as opposed to the published algorithm. The F-test checks various statistical hypotheses about the variance of groups of IA feature measurements obtained from the particles to be classified. The aim is to reduce the number of features required to perform the classification without reducing its accuracy. In the best-case scenario, 194 inputs are reduced to 8, with a subsequent multi-layer back-propagation ANN recognition rate of 98.65%. This paper demonstrates the ability of the algorithm to reduce noise, help overcome the curse of dimensionality, and facilitate an understanding of the saliency of IA features as discriminators for sedimentary OM classification.

  14. A neural network approach to cloud classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Weger, Ronald C.; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that, using high-spatial-resolution data, very high cloud classification accuracies can be obtained with a neural network approach. A texture-based neural network classifier using only single-channel visible Landsat MSS imagery achieves an overall cloud identification accuracy of 93 percent. Cirrus can be distinguished from boundary layer cloudiness with an accuracy of 96 percent, without the use of an infrared channel. Stratocumulus is retrieved with an accuracy of 92 percent, cumulus at 90 percent. The use of the neural network does not improve cirrus classification accuracy. Rather, its main effect is in the improved separation between stratocumulus and cumulus cloudiness. While most cloud classification algorithms rely on linear parametric schemes, the present study is based on a nonlinear, nonparametric four-layer neural network approach. A three-layer neural network architecture, the nonparametric K-nearest neighbor approach, and the linear stepwise discriminant analysis procedure are compared. A significant finding is that significantly higher accuracies are attained with the nonparametric approaches using only 20 percent of the database as training data, compared to 67 percent of the database in the linear approach.

  15. Texture classification of lung computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheng, Hang See; Shamsuddin, Siti M.

    2013-03-01

    Current development of algorithms in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme is growing rapidly to assist the radiologist in medical image interpretation. Texture analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is one of important preliminary stage in the computerized detection system and classification for lung cancer. Among different types of images features analysis, Haralick texture with variety of statistical measures has been used widely in image texture description. The extraction of texture feature values is essential to be used by a CAD especially in classification of the normal and abnormal tissue on the cross sectional CT images. This paper aims to compare experimental results using texture extraction and different machine leaning methods in the classification normal and abnormal tissues through lung CT images. The machine learning methods involve in this assessment are Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS), Naive Bayes, Decision Tree (J48) and Backpropagation Neural Network. AIRS is found to provide high accuracy (99.2%) and sensitivity (98.0%) in the assessment. For experiments and testing purpose, publicly available datasets in the Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) are used as study cases.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis system: a Bayesian hybrid classification method.

    PubMed

    Calle-Alonso, F; Pérez, C J; Arias-Nicolás, J P; Martín, J

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to classify multi-class biomedical objects is presented. The method is based on a hybrid approach which combines pairwise comparison, Bayesian regression and the k-nearest neighbor technique. It can be applied in a fully automatic way or in a relevance feedback framework. In the latter case, the information obtained from both an expert and the automatic classification is iteratively used to improve the results until a certain accuracy level is achieved, then, the learning process is finished and new classifications can be automatically performed. The method has been applied in two biomedical contexts by following the same cross-validation schemes as in the original studies. The first one refers to cancer diagnosis, leading to an accuracy of 77.35% versus 66.37%, originally obtained. The second one considers the diagnosis of pathologies of the vertebral column. The original method achieves accuracies ranging from 76.5% to 96.7%, and from 82.3% to 97.1% in two different cross-validation schemes. Even with no supervision, the proposed method reaches 96.71% and 97.32% in these two cases. By using a supervised framework the achieved accuracy is 97.74%. Furthermore, all abnormal cases were correctly classified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decomposition and extraction: a new framework for visual classification.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Chen, Qiang; Sun, Lin; Dai, Bin; Yan, Shuicheng

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel framework for visual classification based on hierarchical image decomposition and hybrid midlevel feature extraction. Unlike most midlevel feature learning methods, which focus on the process of coding or pooling, we emphasize that the mechanism of image composition also strongly influences the feature extraction. To effectively explore the image content for the feature extraction, we model a multiplicity feature representation mechanism through meaningful hierarchical image decomposition followed by a fusion step. In particularly, we first propose a new hierarchical image decomposition approach in which each image is decomposed into a series of hierarchical semantical components, i.e, the structure and texture images. Then, different feature extraction schemes can be adopted to match the decomposed structure and texture processes in a dissociative manner. Here, two schemes are explored to produce property related feature representations. One is based on a single-stage network over hand-crafted features and the other is based on a multistage network, which can learn features from raw pixels automatically. Finally, those multiple midlevel features are incorporated by solving a multiple kernel learning task. Extensive experiments are conducted on several challenging data sets for visual classification, and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. ADHD classification using bag of words approach on network features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmaz, Berkan; Dey, Soumyabrata; Rao, A. Ravishankar; Shah, Mubarak

    2012-02-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is receiving lots of attention nowadays mainly because it is one of the common brain disorders among children and not much information is known about the cause of this disorder. In this study, we propose to use a novel approach for automatic classification of ADHD conditioned subjects and control subjects using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data of resting state brains. For this purpose, we compute the correlation between every possible voxel pairs within a subject and over the time frame of the experimental protocol. A network of voxels is constructed by representing a high correlation value between any two voxels as an edge. A Bag-of-Words (BoW) approach is used to represent each subject as a histogram of network features; such as the number of degrees per voxel. The classification is done using a Support Vector Machine (SVM). We also investigate the use of raw intensity values in the time series for each voxel. Here, every subject is represented as a combined histogram of network and raw intensity features. Experimental results verified that the classification accuracy improves when the combined histogram is used. We tested our approach on a highly challenging dataset released by NITRC for ADHD-200 competition and obtained promising results. The dataset not only has a large size but also includes subjects from different demography and edge groups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to propose BoW approach in any functional brain disorder classification and we believe that this approach will be useful in analysis of many brain related conditions.

  19. Integrating human and machine intelligence in galaxy morphology classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Melanie R.; Scarlata, Claudia; Fortson, Lucy F.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, B. D.; Galloway, Melanie A.; Willett, Kyle W.; Dickinson, Hugh; Masters, Karen L.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wright, Darryl

    2018-06-01

    Quantifying galaxy morphology is a challenging yet scientifically rewarding task. As the scale of data continues to increase with upcoming surveys, traditional classification methods will struggle to handle the load. We present a solution through an integration of visual and automated classifications, preserving the best features of both human and machine. We demonstrate the effectiveness of such a system through a re-analysis of visual galaxy morphology classifications collected during the Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2) project. We reprocess the top-level question of the GZ2 decision tree with a Bayesian classification aggregation algorithm dubbed SWAP, originally developed for the Space Warps gravitational lens project. Through a simple binary classification scheme, we increase the classification rate nearly 5-fold classifying 226 124 galaxies in 92 d of GZ2 project time while reproducing labels derived from GZ2 classification data with 95.7 per cent accuracy. We next combine this with a Random Forest machine learning algorithm that learns on a suite of non-parametric morphology indicators widely used for automated morphologies. We develop a decision engine that delegates tasks between human and machine and demonstrate that the combined system provides at least a factor of 8 increase in the classification rate, classifying 210 803 galaxies in just 32 d of GZ2 project time with 93.1 per cent accuracy. As the Random Forest algorithm requires a minimal amount of computational cost, this result has important implications for galaxy morphology identification tasks in the era of Euclid and other large-scale surveys.

  20. The Anatomy of a Mathematical Proof: Implications for Analyses with Toulmin's Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    A model solution to a proof question on an examination is explored and subjected to a detailed analysis in terms of Toulmin's scheme of argumentation. In doing so, the ways in which the scheme has been variously used in the mathematics education and philosophical literature are contrasted. The analysis raises a number of issues concerning the…

  1. Classification Behavior in Children Thirty-Six Months of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimada, Shoko; Sano, Ryogoro

    The purposes of this study were to examine the development of classification ability in 36 month olds and to clarify the positive relationship between classification ability and general cognitive development. Subjects, 16 Japanese children (8 males, 8 females), were individually tested by the use of 12 colored pictures of animals and vehicles.…

  2. Comparison of subjective and fully automated methods for measuring mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Moshina, Nataliia; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Waade, Gunvor G; Ursin, Giske; Hofvind, Solveig

    2018-02-01

    Background Breast radiologists of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program subjectively classified mammographic density using a three-point scale between 1996 and 2012 and changed into the fourth edition of the BI-RADS classification since 2013. In 2015, an automated volumetric breast density assessment software was installed at two screening units. Purpose To compare volumetric breast density measurements from the automated method with two subjective methods: the three-point scale and the BI-RADS density classification. Material and Methods Information on subjective and automated density assessment was obtained from screening examinations of 3635 women recalled for further assessment due to positive screening mammography between 2007 and 2015. The score of the three-point scale (I = fatty; II = medium dense; III = dense) was available for 2310 women. The BI-RADS density score was provided for 1325 women. Mean volumetric breast density was estimated for each category of the subjective classifications. The automated software assigned volumetric breast density to four categories. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was assessed using weighted kappa (k w ). Results Mean volumetric breast density was 4.5%, 7.5%, and 13.4% for categories I, II, and III of the three-point scale, respectively, and 4.4%, 7.5%, 9.9%, and 13.9% for the BI-RADS density categories, respectively ( P for trend < 0.001 for both subjective classifications). The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was k w  = 0.5 (95% CI = 0.47-0.53; P < 0.001). Conclusion Mean values of volumetric breast density increased with increasing density category of the subjective classifications. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was moderate.

  3. Fabric wrinkle characterization and classification using modified wavelet coefficients and optimized support-vector-machine classifier

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents a novel wrinkle evaluation method that uses modified wavelet coefficients and an optimized support-vector-machine (SVM) classification scheme to characterize and classify wrinkle appearance of fabric. Fabric images were decomposed with the wavelet transform (WT), and five parame...

  4. Site classification of Indian strong motion network using response spectra ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sumer; Kumar, Vikas; Choudhury, Pallabee; Yadav, R. B. S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, we tried to classify the Indian strong motion sites spread all over Himalaya and adjoining region, located on varied geological formations, based on response spectral ratio. A total of 90 sites were classified based on 395 strong motion records from 94 earthquakes recorded at these sites. The magnitude of these earthquakes are between 2.3 and 7.7 and the hypocentral distance for most of the cases is less than 50 km. The predominant period obtained from response spectral ratios is used to classify these sites. It was found that the shape and predominant peaks of the spectra at these sites match with those in Japan, Italy, Iran, and at some of the sites in Europe and the same classification scheme can be applied to Indian strong motion network. We found that the earlier schemes based on description of near-surface geology, geomorphology, and topography were not able to capture the effect of sediment thickness. The sites are classified into seven classes (CL-I to CL-VII) with varying predominant periods and ranges as proposed by Alessandro et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 102:680-695 2012). The effect of magnitudes and hypocentral distances on the shape and predominant peaks were also studied and found to be very small. The classification scheme is robust and cost-effective and can be used in region-specific attenuation relationships for accounting local site effect.

  5. Using methods from the data mining and machine learning literature for disease classification and prediction: A case study examining classification of heart failure sub-types

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Peter C.; Tu, Jack V.; Ho, Jennifer E.; Levy, Daniel; Lee, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Physicians classify patients into those with or without a specific disease. Furthermore, there is often interest in classifying patients according to disease etiology or subtype. Classification trees are frequently used to classify patients according to the presence or absence of a disease. However, classification trees can suffer from limited accuracy. In the data-mining and machine learning literature, alternate classification schemes have been developed. These include bootstrap aggregation (bagging), boosting, random forests, and support vector machines. Study design and Setting We compared the performance of these classification methods with those of conventional classification trees to classify patients with heart failure according to the following sub-types: heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) vs. heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). We also compared the ability of these methods to predict the probability of the presence of HFPEF with that of conventional logistic regression. Results We found that modern, flexible tree-based methods from the data mining literature offer substantial improvement in prediction and classification of heart failure sub-type compared to conventional classification and regression trees. However, conventional logistic regression had superior performance for predicting the probability of the presence of HFPEF compared to the methods proposed in the data mining literature. Conclusion The use of tree-based methods offers superior performance over conventional classification and regression trees for predicting and classifying heart failure subtypes in a population-based sample of patients from Ontario. However, these methods do not offer substantial improvements over logistic regression for predicting the presence of HFPEF. PMID:23384592

  6. Validity and reliability of the Paprosky acetabular defect classification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Raymond; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Sullivan, Thomas; Costi, Kerry; Howie, Donald W; Solomon, Lucian B

    2013-07-01

    The Paprosky acetabular defect classification is widely used but has not been appropriately validated. Reliability of the Paprosky system has not been evaluated in combination with standardized techniques of measurement and scoring. This study evaluated the reliability, teachability, and validity of the Paprosky acetabular defect classification. Preoperative radiographs from a random sample of 83 patients undergoing 85 acetabular revisions were classified by four observers, and their classifications were compared with quantitative intraoperative measurements. Teachability of the classification scheme was tested by dividing the four observers into two groups. The observers in Group 1 underwent three teaching sessions; those in Group 2 underwent one session and the influence of teaching on the accuracy of their classifications was ascertained. Radiographic evaluation showed statistically significant relationships with intraoperative measurements of anterior, medial, and superior acetabular defect sizes. Interobserver reliability improved substantially after teaching and did not improve without it. The weighted kappa coefficient went from 0.56 at Occasion 1 to 0.79 after three teaching sessions in Group 1 observers, and from 0.49 to 0.65 after one teaching session in Group 2 observers. The Paprosky system is valid and shows good reliability when combined with standardized definitions of radiographic landmarks and a structured analysis. Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. Geometric Structure-Preserving Discretization Schemes for Nonlinear Elasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-13

    conditions. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS geometric theory for nonlinear elasticity, discrete exterior calculus 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION...associated Laplacian. We use the general theory for approximation of Hilbert complexes and the finite element exterior calculus and introduce some stable mixed

  8. A classification of errors in lay comprehension of medical documents.

    PubMed

    Keselman, Alla; Smith, Catherine Arnott

    2012-12-01

    Emphasis on participatory medicine requires that patients and consumers participate in tasks traditionally reserved for healthcare providers. This includes reading and comprehending medical documents, often but not necessarily in the context of interacting with Personal Health Records (PHRs). Research suggests that while giving patients access to medical documents has many benefits (e.g., improved patient-provider communication), lay people often have difficulty understanding medical information. Informatics can address the problem by developing tools that support comprehension; this requires in-depth understanding of the nature and causes of errors that lay people make when comprehending clinical documents. The objective of this study was to develop a classification scheme of comprehension errors, based on lay individuals' retellings of two documents containing clinical text: a description of a clinical trial and a typical office visit note. While not comprehensive, the scheme can serve as a foundation of further development of a taxonomy of patients' comprehension errors. Eighty participants, all healthy volunteers, read and retold two medical documents. A data-driven content analysis procedure was used to extract and classify retelling errors. The resulting hierarchical classification scheme contains nine categories and 23 subcategories. The most common error made by the participants involved incorrectly recalling brand names of medications. Other common errors included misunderstanding clinical concepts, misreporting the objective of a clinical research study and physician's findings during a patient's visit, and confusing and misspelling clinical terms. A combination of informatics support and health education is likely to improve the accuracy of lay comprehension of medical documents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Cardiac arrhythmia beat classification using DOST and PSO tuned SVM.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sandeep; Ray, Kailash Chandra; Shankar, Om

    2016-11-01

    The increase in the number of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has gained significant attention from the study of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. These ECG signals are studied by the experienced cardiologist for accurate and proper diagnosis, but it becomes difficult and time-consuming for long-term recordings. Various signal processing techniques are studied to analyze the ECG signal, but they bear limitations due to the non-stationary behavior of ECG signals. Hence, this study aims to improve the classification accuracy rate and provide an automated diagnostic solution for the detection of cardiac arrhythmias. The proposed methodology consists of four stages, i.e. filtering, R-peak detection, feature extraction and classification stages. In this study, Wavelet based approach is used to filter the raw ECG signal, whereas Pan-Tompkins algorithm is used for detecting the R-peak inside the ECG signal. In the feature extraction stage, discrete orthogonal Stockwell transform (DOST) approach is presented for an efficient time-frequency representation (i.e. morphological descriptors) of a time domain signal and retains the absolute phase information to distinguish the various non-stationary behavior ECG signals. Moreover, these morphological descriptors are further reduced in lower dimensional space by using principal component analysis and combined with the dynamic features (i.e based on RR-interval of the ECG signals) of the input signal. This combination of two different kinds of descriptors represents each feature set of an input signal that is utilized for classification into subsequent categories by employing PSO tuned support vector machines (SVM). The proposed methodology is validated on the baseline MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and evaluated under two assessment schemes, yielding an improved overall accuracy of 99.18% for sixteen classes in the category-based and 89.10% for five classes (mapped according to AAMI standard) in the patient

  10. Some sequential, distribution-free pattern classification procedures with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poage, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some sequential, distribution-free pattern classification techniques are presented. The decision problem to which the proposed classification methods are applied is that of discriminating between two kinds of electroencephalogram responses recorded from a human subject: spontaneous EEG and EEG driven by a stroboscopic light stimulus at the alpha frequency. The classification procedures proposed make use of the theory of order statistics. Estimates of the probabilities of misclassification are given. The procedures were tested on Gaussian samples and the EEG responses.

  11. Training echo state networks for rotation-invariant bone marrow cell classification.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Philipp; Burgsteiner, Harald; Asslaber, Martin; Ahammer, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    The main principle of diagnostic pathology is the reliable interpretation of individual cells in context of the tissue architecture. Especially a confident examination of bone marrow specimen is dependent on a valid classification of myeloid cells. In this work, we propose a novel rotation-invariant learning scheme for multi-class echo state networks (ESNs), which achieves very high performance in automated bone marrow cell classification. Based on representing static images as temporal sequence of rotations, we show how ESNs robustly recognize cells of arbitrary rotations by taking advantage of their short-term memory capacity. The performance of our approach is compared to a classification random forest that learns rotation-invariance in a conventional way by exhaustively training on multiple rotations of individual samples. The methods were evaluated on a human bone marrow image database consisting of granulopoietic and erythropoietic cells in different maturation stages. Our ESN approach to cell classification does not rely on segmentation of cells or manual feature extraction and can therefore directly be applied to image data.

  12. An Unequal Secure Encryption Scheme for H.264/AVC Video Compression Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yibo; Wang, Jidong; Ikenaga, Takeshi; Tsunoo, Yukiyasu; Goto, Satoshi

    H.264/AVC is the newest video coding standard. There are many new features in it which can be easily used for video encryption. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to do video encryption for H.264/AVC video compression standard. We define Unequal Secure Encryption (USE) as an approach that applies different encryption schemes (with different security strength) to different parts of compressed video data. This USE scheme includes two parts: video data classification and unequal secure video data encryption. Firstly, we classify the video data into two partitions: Important data partition and unimportant data partition. Important data partition has small size with high secure protection, while unimportant data partition has large size with low secure protection. Secondly, we use AES as a block cipher to encrypt the important data partition and use LEX as a stream cipher to encrypt the unimportant data partition. AES is the most widely used symmetric cryptography which can ensure high security. LEX is a new stream cipher which is based on AES and its computational cost is much lower than AES. In this way, our scheme can achieve both high security and low computational cost. Besides the USE scheme, we propose a low cost design of hybrid AES/LEX encryption module. Our experimental results show that the computational cost of the USE scheme is low (about 25% of naive encryption at Level 0 with VEA used). The hardware cost for hybrid AES/LEX module is 4678 Gates and the AES encryption throughput is about 50Mbps.

  13. Meal box schemes a convenient way to avoid convenience food? Uses and understandings of meal box schemes among Danish consumers.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Frej Daniel; Halkier, Bente

    2017-07-01

    The term convenience food is subject to diversification, lack of clarity and moral ambiguity. In this paper we address these issues and critically discuss convenience food by using empirical findings from a Danish study that deals with practitioners' uses of meal box schemes. The methodological design consists of thirteen individual interviews, four focus groups and some observations of cooking practices. We combine the empirical findings with a particular definition of convenience food by Brunner et al. (2010) and selected practice theoretical concepts. This particular combination enables us to categorize meal box schemes as a new form of convenience food called convenient food. In addition, results suggest that meal box schemes reduce leftovers from dinner. Meal boxes also influence dinner related activities such as planning ahead in time and grocery shopping, which require less physical and mental effort. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An evaluation of sampling and full enumeration strategies for Fisher Jenks classification in big data settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rey, Sergio J.; Stephens, Philip A.; Laura, Jason R.

    2017-01-01

    Large data contexts present a number of challenges to optimal choropleth map classifiers. Application of optimal classifiers to a sample of the attribute space is one proposed solution. The properties of alternative sampling-based classification methods are examined through a series of Monte Carlo simulations. The impacts of spatial autocorrelation, number of desired classes, and form of sampling are shown to have significant impacts on the accuracy of map classifications. Tradeoffs between improved speed of the sampling approaches and loss of accuracy are also considered. The results suggest the possibility of guiding the choice of classification scheme as a function of the properties of large data sets.

  15. International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) Three Stage Classification System: 1973; Part 2 - Definitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The seven levels of education, as classified numerically by International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED), are defined along with courses, programs, and fields of education listed under each level. Also contained is an alphabetical subject index indicating appropriate code numbers. For related documents see TM003535 and TM003536. (RC)

  16. Revealing how different spinors can be: The Lounesto spinor classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff da Silva, J. M.; Cavalcanti, R. T.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to give a coordinate-based introduction to the so-called Lounesto spinorial classification scheme. Among other results, it has evinced classes of spinors which fail to satisfy Dirac equation. The underlying idea and the central aspects of such spinorial categorization are introduced in an argumentative basis, after which we delve into a commented account on recent results obtained from (and within) this branch of research.

  17. A novel transferable individual tree crown delineation model based on Fishing Net Dragging and boundary classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Im, Jungho; Quackenbush, Lindi J.

    2015-12-01

    This study provides a novel approach to individual tree crown delineation (ITCD) using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in dense natural forests using two main steps: crown boundary refinement based on a proposed Fishing Net Dragging (FiND) method, and segment merging based on boundary classification. FiND starts with approximate tree crown boundaries derived using a traditional watershed method with Gaussian filtering and refines these boundaries using an algorithm that mimics how a fisherman drags a fishing net. Random forest machine learning is then used to classify boundary segments into two classes: boundaries between trees and boundaries between branches that belong to a single tree. Three groups of LiDAR-derived features-two from the pseudo waveform generated along with crown boundaries and one from a canopy height model (CHM)-were used in the classification. The proposed ITCD approach was tested using LiDAR data collected over a mountainous region in the Adirondack Park, NY, USA. Overall accuracy of boundary classification was 82.4%. Features derived from the CHM were generally more important in the classification than the features extracted from the pseudo waveform. A comprehensive accuracy assessment scheme for ITCD was also introduced by considering both area of crown overlap and crown centroids. Accuracy assessment using this new scheme shows the proposed ITCD achieved 74% and 78% as overall accuracy, respectively, for deciduous and mixed forest.

  18. Global hierarchical classification of deepwater and wetland environments from remote sensing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluet-Chouinard, E.; Lehner, B.; Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; McIntyre, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    Global surface water maps have improved in spatial and temporal resolutions through various remote sensing methods: open water extents with compiled Landsat archives and inundation with topographically downscaled multi-sensor retrievals. These time-series capture variations through time of open water and inundation without discriminating between hydrographic features (e.g. lakes, reservoirs, river channels and wetland types) as other databases have done as static representation. Available data sources present the opportunity to generate a comprehensive map and typology of aquatic environments (deepwater and wetlands) that improves on earlier digitized inventories and maps. The challenge of classifying surface waters globally is to distinguishing wetland types with meaningful characteristics or proxies (hydrology, water chemistry, soils, vegetation) while accommodating limitations of remote sensing data. We present a new wetland classification scheme designed for global application and produce a map of aquatic ecosystem types globally using state-of-the-art remote sensing products. Our classification scheme combines open water extent and expands it with downscaled multi-sensor inundation data to capture the maximal vegetated wetland extent. The hierarchical structure of the classification is modified from the Cowardin Systems (1979) developed for the USA. The first level classification is based on a combination of landscape positions and water source (e.g. lacustrine, riverine, palustrine, coastal and artificial) while the second level represents the hydrologic regime (e.g. perennial, seasonal, intermittent and waterlogged). Class-specific descriptors can further detail the wetland types with soils and vegetation cover. Our globally consistent nomenclature and top-down mapping allows for direct comparison across biogeographic regions, to upscale biogeochemical fluxes as well as other landscape level functions.

  19. Common occupational classification system - revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover inmore » sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.« less

  20. A classification scheme for turbulent flows based on their joint velocity-intermittency structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keylock, C. J.; Nishimura, K.; Peinke, J.

    2011-12-01

    Kolmogorov's classic theory for turbulence assumed an independence between velocity increments and the value for the velocity itself. However, this assumption is questionable, particularly in complex geophysical flows. Here we propose a framework for studying velocity-intermittency coupling that is similar in essence to the popular quadrant analysis method for studying near-wall flows. However, we study the dominant (longitudinal) velocity component along with a measure of the roughness of the signal, given mathematically by its series of Hölder exponents. Thus, we permit a possible dependence between velocity and intermittency. We compare boundary layer data obtained in a wind tunnel to turbulent jets and wake flows. These flow classes all have distinct velocity-intermittency characteristics, which cause them to be readily distinguished using our technique. Our method is much simpler and quicker to apply than approaches that condition the velocity increment statistics at some scale, r, on the increment statistics at a neighbouring, larger spatial scale, r+Δ, and the velocity itself. Classification of environmental flows is then possible based on their similarities to the idealised flow classes and we demonstrate this using laboratory data for flow in a parallel-channel confluence where the region of flow recirculation in the lee of the step is discriminated as a flow class distinct from boundary layer, jet and wake flows. Hence, using our method, it is possible to assign a flow classification to complex geophysical, turbulent flows depending upon which idealised flow class they most resemble.

  1. A Study of Hierarchical Classification in Concrete and Formal Thought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowell, Walter E.

    This researcher investigated the relationship of hierarchical classification processes in subjects categorized as to developmental level as defined by Piaget's theory, and explored the validity of the hierarchical model and test used in the study. A hierarchical classification test and a battery of four Piaget-type tasks were administered…

  2. Threshold of toxicological concern values for non-genotoxic effects in industrial chemicals: re-evaluation of the Cramer classification.

    PubMed

    Kalkhof, H; Herzler, M; Stahlmann, R; Gundert-Remy, U

    2012-01-01

    The TTC concept employs available data from animal testing to derive a distribution of NOAELs. Taking a probabilistic view, the 5th percentile of the distribution is taken as a threshold value for toxicity. In this paper, we use 824 NOAELs from repeated dose toxicity studies of industrial chemicals to re-evaluate the currently employed TTC values, which have been derived for substances grouped according to the Cramer scheme (Cramer et al. in Food Cosm Toxicol 16:255-276, 1978) by Munro et al. (Food Chem Toxicol 34:829-867, 1996) and refined by Kroes and Kozianowski (Toxicol Lett 127:43-46, 2002), Kroes et al. 2000. In our data set, consisting of 756 NOAELs from 28-day repeated dose testing and 57 NOAELs from 90-days repeated dose testing, the experimental NOAEL had to be extrapolated to chronic TTC using regulatory accepted extrapolation factors. The TTC values derived from our data set were higher than the currently used TTC values confirming the safety of the latter. We analysed the prediction of the Cramer classification by comparing the classification by this tool with the guidance values for classification according to the Globally Harmonised System of classification and labelling of the United Nations (GHS). Nearly 90% of the chemicals were in Cramer class 3 and assumed as highly toxic compared to 22% according to the GHS. The Cramer classification does underestimate the toxicity of chemicals only in 4.6% of the cases. Hence, from a regulatory perspective, the Cramer classification scheme might be applied as it overestimates hazard of a chemical.

  3. Instrument classification in polyphonic music based on timbre analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong

    2001-07-01

    While most previous work on musical instrument recognition is focused on the classification of single notes in monophonic music, a scheme is proposed in this paper for the distinction of instruments in continuous music pieces which may contain one or more kinds of instruments. Highlights of the system include music segmentation into notes, harmonic partial estimation in polyphonic sound, note feature calculation and normalization, note classification using a set of neural networks, and music piece categorization with fuzzy logic principles. Example outputs of the system are `the music piece is 100% guitar (with 90% likelihood)' and `the music piece is 60% violin and 40% piano, thus a violin/piano duet'. The system has been tested with twelve kinds of musical instruments, and very promising experimental results have been obtained. An accuracy of about 80% is achieved, and the number can be raised to 90% if misindexings within the same instrument family are tolerated (e.g. cello, viola and violin). A demonstration system for musical instrument classification and music timbre retrieval is also presented.

  4. Former Spencer Artillery Range, Tennessee Classification Demonstration Open Field and Dynamic Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    DEMONSTRATION REPORT Former Spencer Artillery Range, Tennessee Classification Demonstration Open Field and Dynamic Areas ESTCP...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17...2016 Technical Report N/A Former Spencer Artillery Range, Tennessee Classification Demonstration Open Field and Dynamic Areas Richard MacNeil, USA

  5. Construction of an Yucatec Maya soil classification and comparison with the WRB framework.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Francisco; Zinck, J Alfred

    2010-02-13

    Mayas living in southeast Mexico have used soils for millennia and provide thus a good example for understanding soil-culture relationships and for exploring the ways indigenous people name and classify the soils of their territory. This paper shows an attempt to organize the Maya soil knowledge into a soil classification scheme and compares the latter with the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB). Several participative soil surveys were carried out in the period 2000-2009 with the help of bilingual Maya-Spanish-speaking farmers. A multilingual soil database was built with 315 soil profile descriptions. On the basis of the diagnostic soil properties and the soil nomenclature used by Maya farmers, a soil classification scheme with a hierarchic, dichotomous and open structure was constructed, organized in groups and qualifiers in a fashion similar to that of the WRB system. Maya soil properties were used at the same categorical levels as similar diagnostic properties are used in the WRB system. The Maya soil classification (MSC) is a natural system based on key properties, such as relief position, rock types, size and quantity of stones, color of topsoil and subsoil, depth, water dynamics, and plant-supporting processes. The MSC addresses the soil properties of surficial and subsurficial horizons, and uses plant communities as qualifier in some cases. The MSC is more accurate than the WRB for classifying Leptosols.

  6. A Hybrid Classification System for Heart Disease Diagnosis Based on the RFRS Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoli; Su, Qiang; Zhang, Mo; Zhu, Yanhong; Wang, Qiugen; Wang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the most common diseases in the world. The objective of this study is to aid the diagnosis of heart disease using a hybrid classification system based on the ReliefF and Rough Set (RFRS) method. The proposed system contains two subsystems: the RFRS feature selection system and a classification system with an ensemble classifier. The first system includes three stages: (i) data discretization, (ii) feature extraction using the ReliefF algorithm, and (iii) feature reduction using the heuristic Rough Set reduction algorithm that we developed. In the second system, an ensemble classifier is proposed based on the C4.5 classifier. The Statlog (Heart) dataset, obtained from the UCI database, was used for experiments. A maximum classification accuracy of 92.59% was achieved according to a jackknife cross-validation scheme. The results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed system is superior to the performances of previously reported classification techniques.

  7. Summary measures of agreement and association between many raters' ordinal classifications.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Aya A; Freer, Phoebe E; Nelson, Kerrie P

    2017-10-01

    Interpretation of screening tests such as mammograms usually require a radiologist's subjective visual assessment of images, often resulting in substantial discrepancies between radiologists' classifications of subjects' test results. In clinical screening studies to assess the strength of agreement between experts, multiple raters are often recruited to assess subjects' test results using an ordinal classification scale. However, using traditional measures of agreement in some studies is challenging because of the presence of many raters, the use of an ordinal classification scale, and unbalanced data. We assess and compare the performances of existing measures of agreement and association as well as a newly developed model-based measure of agreement to three large-scale clinical screening studies involving many raters' ordinal classifications. We also conduct a simulation study to demonstrate the key properties of the summary measures. The assessment of agreement and association varied according to the choice of summary measure. Some measures were influenced by the underlying prevalence of disease and raters' marginal distributions and/or were limited in use to balanced data sets where every rater classifies every subject. Our simulation study indicated that popular measures of agreement and association are prone to underlying disease prevalence. Model-based measures provide a flexible approach for calculating agreement and association and are robust to missing and unbalanced data as well as the underlying disease prevalence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deep learning for EEG-Based preference classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Jason; Hou, Chew Lin; Mountstephens, James

    2017-10-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based emotion classification is rapidly becoming one of the most intensely studied areas of brain-computer interfacing (BCI). The ability to passively identify yet accurately correlate brainwaves with our immediate emotions opens up truly meaningful and previously unattainable human-computer interactions such as in forensic neuroscience, rehabilitative medicine, affective entertainment and neuro-marketing. One particularly useful yet rarely explored areas of EEG-based emotion classification is preference recognition [1], which is simply the detection of like versus dislike. Within the limited investigations into preference classification, all reported studies were based on musically-induced stimuli except for a single study which used 2D images. The main objective of this study is to apply deep learning, which has been shown to produce state-of-the-art results in diverse hard problems such as in computer vision, natural language processing and audio recognition, to 3D object preference classification over a larger group of test subjects. A cohort of 16 users was shown 60 bracelet-like objects as rotating visual stimuli on a computer display while their preferences and EEGs were recorded. After training a variety of machine learning approaches which included deep neural networks, we then attempted to classify the users' preferences for the 3D visual stimuli based on their EEGs. Here, we show that that deep learning outperforms a variety of other machine learning classifiers for this EEG-based preference classification task particularly in a highly challenging dataset with large inter- and intra-subject variability.