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Sample records for subjects requiring lumbar

  1. Neutral lumbar spine sitting posture in pain-free subjects.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Dea, Patrick; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Peter; Clifford, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2010-12-01

    Sitting is a common aggravating factor in low back pain (LBP), and re-education of sitting posture is a common aspect of LBP management. However, there is debate regarding what is an optimal sitting posture. This pilot study had 2 aims; to investigate whether pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral sitting posture (slight lumbar lordosis and relaxed thorax); and to compare perceptions of neutral sitting posture to habitual sitting posture (HSP). The lower lumbar spine HSP of seventeen pain-free subjects was initially recorded. Subjects then assumed their own subjectively perceived ideal posture (SPIP). Finally, 2 testers independently positioned the subjects into a tester perceived neutral posture (TPNP). The inter-tester reliability of positioning in TPNP was very good (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.91, mean difference = 3% of range of motion). A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that HSP was significantly more flexed than both SPIP and TPNP (p <0.05). There was no significant difference between SPIP and TPNP (p > 0.05). HSP was more kyphotic than all other postures. This study suggests that pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral lumbar sitting posture. Further investigation into the role of neutral sitting posture in LBP subjects is warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF SUBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF LUMBAR LORDOSIS IN CONVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Ruhinda, E; Byanyima, R K; Mugerwa, H

    2014-10-01

    Reliability and validity studies of different lumbar curvature analysis and measurement techniques have been documented however there is limited literature on the reliability and validity of subjective visual analysis. Radiological assessment of lumbar lordotic curve aids in early diagnosis of conditions even before neurologic changes set in. To ascertain the level of reliability and validity of subjective assessment of lumbar lordosis in conventional radiography. A blinded, repeated-measures diagnostic test was carried out on lumbar spine x-ray radiographs. Radiology Department at Joint Clinical Research Centre (JCRC), Mengo-Kampala-Uganda. Seventy (70) lateral lumbar x-ray films were used for this study and were obtained from the archive of JCRC radiology department at Butikiro house, Mengo-Kampala. Poor observer agreement, both inter- and intra-observer, with kappa values of 0.16 was found. Inter-observer agreement was poorer than intra-observer agreement. Kappa values significantly rose when the lumbar lordosis was clustered into four categories without grading each abnormality. The results confirm that subjective assessment of lumbar lordosis has low reliability and validity. Film quality has limited influence on the observer reliability. This study further shows that fewer scale categories of lordosis abnormalities produce better observer reliability.

  3. Are lumbar repositioning errors larger among patients with chronic low back pain compared with asymptomatic subjects?

    PubMed

    Asell, Malin; Sjölander, Per; Kerschbaumer, Helmut; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2006-09-01

    To resolve the debate over whether lumbar repositioning acuity is reduced in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) by using a study design and methodology to minimize the effects of potential confounders. A single-blinded, controlled, multigroup comparative study. Vocational rehabilitation center. Ninety-two patients with CLBP, divided into subgroups based on severity of symptoms and diagnostic characteristics. An age- and sex-matched group (n=31) of healthy subjects were the control. Not applicable. We measured repositioning errors (variable, constant) at 3 positions of the lumbar spine. Subjects were guided to a sitting target posture and asked to perform lumbar flexion before reproducing the target posture. Self-assessed pain, self-efficacy, and functional ability were addressed through questionnaires. There were no differences in repositioning errors between the patients with CLBP or the subgroups of patients and the control group. We found only weak correlations between the repositioning errors and the self-reported data on functional disability, self-efficacy, and pain. We suggest that sensorimotor dysfunctions in CLBP should be evaluated with methods other than repositioning tests in order to generate data relevant to the development of rational diagnostic methods and rehabilitation programs.

  4. Skin movement errors in measurement of sagittal lumbar and hip angles in young and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yi-Liang; Tully, Elizabeth A; Galea, Mary P

    2008-02-01

    Errors in measurement of sagittal lumbar and hip angles due to skin movement on the pelvis and/or lateral thigh were measured in young (n = 21, age = 18.6 +/- 2.1 years) and older (n = 23, age = 70.9 +/- 6.4 years) age groups. Skin reference markers were attached over specific landmarks of healthy young and elderly subjects, who were videotaped in three static positions of hip flexion using the 2D PEAK Motus video analysis system. Sagittal lumbar and hip angles were calculated from skin reference markers and manually palpated landmarks. The elderly subjects demonstrated greater errors in lumbar angle due to skin movement on the pelvis only in the maximal hip flexion position. The traditional model (ASIS-PSIS-GT-LFE) underestimated sagittal hip angle and the revised model (ASIS-PSIS-2/3Th-1/4Th) provided more accurate measurement of sagittal hip angle throughout the full available range of hip flexion. Skin movement on the pelvis had a small counterbalancing effect on the larger errors from lateral thigh markers (GT-LFE), thereby decreasing hip angle error.

  5. Fat infiltration in the lumbar multifidus and erector spinae muscles in subjects with sway-back posture.

    PubMed

    Pezolato, Adriano; de Vasconcelos, Everaldo Encide; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2012-11-01

    Decreased activity of the lumbar stabilizer muscles has been identified in individuals with sway-back posture. Disuse can predispose these muscles to atrophy, which is characterized by a reduced cross-sectional area (CSA) and by fat infiltration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of fat infiltration in the lumbar multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles as a sign of the muscle atrophy in individuals with sway-back posture, with and without low back pain. Forty-five sedentary individuals between 16 and 40 years old participated in this study. The sample was divided into three groups: symptomatic sway-back (SSBG) (n = 15), asymptomatic sway-back (ASBG) (n = 15), and control (CG) (n = 15). The individuals were first subjected to photographic analysis to classify their postures and were then referred for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the lumbar spine. The total (TCSA) and functional (FCSA) cross-sectional areas of the lumbar erector spinae together with lumbar multifidus and isolated lumbar multifidus muscles were measured from L1 to S1. The amount of fat infiltration was estimated as the difference between the TCSA and the FCSA. Greater fat deposition was observed in the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar multifidus muscles of the individuals in the sway-back posture groups than in the control group. Pain may have contributed to the difference in the amount of fat observed in the groups with the same postural deviation. Similarly, sway-back posture may have contributed to the tissue substitution relative to the control group independently of low back pain. The results of this study indicate that individuals with sway-back posture may be susceptible to morphological changes in their lumbar erector spinae and lumbar multifidus muscles, both due to the presence of pain and as a consequence of their habitual posture.

  6. Isokinetic muscle strength of the trunk and bilateral knees in young subjects with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Li, Min-Hui; Jiang, Shuu-Hai; Tsai, Kao-Chung

    2005-09-15

    Cross-sectional study comparing normal subjects and patients with lumbar disc herniation. To evaluate trunk and knee muscle strength in patients with L4-L5 and/or L5-S1 disc herniation. Numerous studies have shown that patients with low back pain have weaker trunk muscles. The strength of trunk and knee muscles has not been investigated simultaneously in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Forty-one controls and 2 patients were included. Isokinetic strength of the trunk and bilateral knees was tested on a calibrated isokinetic testing machine (Biodex System 3 Pro) regardless of the laterality of the radiculopathy. The testing was carrying out at two different velocities: 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second. Total trunk strength and knee strength were significantly lower in these patients (4.34 +/- 1.06 and 4.06 +/- 1.16 vs. 6.21 +/- 1.05 and 5.83 +/- 1.09 Nm/kg at 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second, respectively, P < 0.001). In patients with unilateral sciatica, there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in unilateral knee strength between sciatica-involved and -uninvolved limbs (1.89 +/- 0.5, 1.08 +/- 0.45, 1.48 +/- 0.58, 0.93 +/- 0.41 vs. 1.68 +/- 0.45, 0.91 +/- 0.38, 1.41 +/- 0.48, 0.79 +/- 0.39 Nm/kg in sciatica-uninvolved vs. sciatica-involved limbs during extension and flexion at 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second, respectively). Total trunk strength was significantly correlated with total knee strength in both groups. In the patients with lumbar disc herniation, muscle strength of the trunk and knees was decreased to a similar extent. Weaker knee strength was found on either side of the lower extremity in the patients with unilateral sciatica, regardless of its location.

  7. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Ko; Hara, Nobuhiro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kunogi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Atsushi, Seichi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Materials and Methods Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years) for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment. Results In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms) had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50–7.31); absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13–5.65); <1-year duration of illness had an OR of 3.81 (95% CI: 1.46–9.98); and hypertension had an OR of 2.09 (95% CI: 0.92–4.78). Conclusions The predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment in LSS patients were the presence of only radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year. PMID:26863214

  8. Feasibility of Lumbar Puncture in the Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Subjects with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Iragui, María; Santos, Telma; Videla, Sebastián; Fernández, Susana; Benejam, Bessy; Videla, Laura; Alcolea, Daniel; Blennow, Kaj; Blesa, Rafael; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main medical problem in older adults with Down syndrome (DS). Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarkers are limited and the feasibility of lumbar puncture (LP) is controversial in this population. To analyze the frequency of complications after a LP in DS. We collected data from 80 adults with DS that underwent a LP within the Down Alzheimer Barcelona Neuroimaging Initiative. Demographics, cognitive status, headache history, and presence of complications after the LP were recorded in every subject. In 53 of them (active group), this information was collected following a semi-structured and validated protocol that actively looks for complications. Other variables related to the LP procedure were also recorded. A telephone interview to the caregiver was performed 5-7 days after the procedure to ask about complications. Data from 27 subjects (clinical practice group), from whom the presence of complications was obtained in a medical follow-up visit within the three months after the LP, were also included. There were no adverse events in 90% of our participants. The most frequent complication was headache (6.25%); only one subject reported a typical post-lumbar puncture headache with moderate severity that required analgesic treatment. Dizziness (3.75%) and back pain (1.25%) were also reported. All the participants that reported complications belonged to the active group. LP can be safely performed to study CSF biomarkers in DS. The reported complications are qualitatively similar to the general population, but are less frequently reported, even when actively searched for.

  9. Bending stiffness of the lumbar spine subjected to posteroanterior manipulative force.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Y W; Tsung, Bonnie Y S; Tong, Pin; Evans, John

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the bending stiffness of the spine when it is subjected to posteroanterior mobilization force. The lumbar spine was modeled as an initially curved beam column supported over the rib cage and the pelvis. Posteroanterior mobilization was assumed to be three-point bending of the beam. The mobilization force was measured by the mounting of a force plate onto the manipulation couch, where electromagnetic sensors measured the change in spinal curvature. The bending stiffness of the spine was derived from the force and curvature data. The technique developed in this study provided highly repeatable data. The theoretical analysis suggests that the pelvic rotation produced by mobilization may be used clinically to indicate the magnitude of the mobilization force. Future research may employ the present method to determine how back pain may affect the bending stiffness of the spine. The bending stiffness values reported in this study will be valuable to future modeling work.

  10. High acceptability and low morbidity of diagnostic lumbar puncture in elderly subjects of mixed cognitive status.

    PubMed

    Hindley, N J; Jobst, K A; King, E; Barnetson, L; Smith, A; Haigh, A M

    1995-05-01

    A total of 273 participants (186 with clinical dementia; 87 "normal" controls; mean age 72 years) in a prospective, longitudinal, dementia research study, underwent lumbar puncture (LP), where possible, on an annual basis. Reporting of symptoms after all LP's (n = 541) was 21.6%, the predominant complaints being mild localised back-pain (12.8%) and headache (10.7%). All symptoms were self-limiting. Analysis of headaches after all first LP's (n = 273) revealed an incidence of 14.2% with marked differences between subjects under 60 years of age (33%) and those over 60 years (10.1%), between subjects with "minimal" cerebral atrophy (19.5%) and those with "significant" atrophy (5.6%) and, to a lesser extent, between subjects with no or mild cognitive impairment (20.6%) and those with significant impairment (9.5%). Age under 60 years and lack of significant cerebral atrophy were shown to be independent predictors of headache. Acceptability of LP was high as demonstrated by agreement to a second procedure by 92.2% of eligible subjects. Our results show that LP can be successfully incorporated into research with the elderly.

  11. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  12. A finite element study of a lumbar motion segment subjected to pure sagittal plane moments.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Adl, A; Ahmed, A M; Shrivastava, S C

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear finite element program has been developed and applied to the analysis of a three-dimensional model of the lumbar L2-3 motion segment subjected to sagittal plane moments. The analysis accounts for both material and geometric nonlinearities and is based on the Updated Lagrangian approach. The disc nucleus has been considered as an incompressible inviscid fluid and the annulus as a composite of collagenous fibres embedded in a matrix of ground substance. Articulation at the facet joints has been treated as a general moving contact problem and the spinal ligaments have been modelled as a collection of nonlinear axial elements. Effects of the loss of intradiscal pressure in flexion and of facetectomy in extension have been analyzed. Comparison of the predicted gross response characteristics with available measurements indicates satisfactory agreement. In flexion relatively large intradiscal pressures are generated, while in extension negative pressures (i.e. suction) of low magnitude are predicted. The stress distribution results indicate that the load transfer path through the posterior elements of the joint in flexion is different from that in extension. In flexion the ligaments are the means of load transfer, while in extension the load is transmitted through the pedicles, laminae and articular processes. In flexion, the inner annulus fibres at the posterolateral location are subject to maximum tensile strain. It is suggested that large flexion moment in combination with other loads is a likely cause of disc prolapse commonly found at this location of the annulus.

  13. Pain, disability, and diagnostic accuracy of clinical instability and endurance tests in subjects with lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvano; Vanti, Carla; Piccarreta, Raffaella; Monticone, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the relationship between the main clinical tests to detect spinal instability, the perceived pain and disability, and symptomatic spondylolisthesis (SPL) characteristics, (2) to investigate the relationship between endurance and instability tests, and (3) to measure the diagnostic accuracy of these tests in unstable SPL diagnosed against dynamic radiographs. Four instability tests were evaluated on 119 subjects: aberrant movements, active straight leg raising (ASLR), prone instability test, and passive lumbar extension test (PLE); and 2 endurance tests, prone bridge test and supine bridge test (SBT). The results were compared with the numeric rating scale for pain and the Oswestry Disability Index for disability. These tests were used as index tests and compared with dynamic radiographs as reference standard on 64 subjects. A significant relationship between disability and all the clinical tests but ASLR was observed. The relation between tests and pain was weaker, not significant for prone instability test and aberrant movement and critical for ASLR (P = .05). There was a low relationship between endurance tests and instability tests. Only PLE showed a significant association with dynamic radiographs (P = .017). Endurance and instability tests appear to be weakly related to the amount of pain but significantly related to the disability in symptomatic SPL. Of the tests evaluated, PLE exhibited the best ability to predict positive dynamic radiographs. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lumbar spine stability for subjects with and without low back pain during one-leg standing test.

    PubMed

    Sung, Paul S; Yoon, BumChul; Lee, Dongchul C

    2010-07-15

    An experimental design comparing kinematic changes in the lumbar spine axis in subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) while standing on one leg with and without visual feedback. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lumbar stability index, which includes relative holding time (RHT) and relative standstill time (RST), in subjects with and without LBP. Even though a number of studies have evaluated postural adjustments based on kinematic changes in subjects with LBP, lumbar spine stability has not been examined for abnormal postural responses with visual feedback. All participants were asked to maintain the stork test position (standing on one leg with the contra lateral hip flexed 90 degrees) for 25 seconds. The outcome measures included RHT and RST for the axes of the core spine and lumbar spine. Independent t tests were used to compare the differences between groups. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance was used to compare the differences for both axes. The age variable was used as a covariate to control confounding effects for the data analyses. The RHT was longer for the lumbar spine axis in subjects without LBP than those with LBP, especially without visual feedback. There was also significant interaction in RST between subjects with and without LBP (F = 7.18, P = 0.01). For the core axis of the trunk, significant differences existed based on the main effect of side (F = 9.07, P = 0.004), trunk rotation (F = 24.30, P = 0.001), and both of these interactions (F = 8.93, P = 0.004). However, there was a lack of significant interaction with age for the lumbar and core spine axes (F = 0.06, P = 0.81). Although the control group included slightly younger volunteers compared with the LBP group, the stability index of the core spine significantly decreased in RHT and RST, especially when visual feedback was blocked for subjects with LBP. The interaction between visual feedback and trunk rotation indicated that core spine stability is critical in

  15. Goniometer evaluation of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis in subjects during growth age: a validity study.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Aristide R; Ferraro, Claudio; Frizziero, Antonio; Ferraro, Marco; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the validity of a pocket compass needle goniometer (IncliMed®, University of Padua) to measure the thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis in children and adolescent. In a group of 128 adolescent the same clinician (FC) measured the thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis according to the goniometer technique and the Cobb angle on lateral spinal radiographs. The linear regression analysis and the Bland and Altman criteria were used for the data analysis. A strong concordance existed between radiological and goniometer evaluation of the thoracic kyphosis (linear regression coefficient: b=0.897;p=0.000), but poor concordance existed at the lumbar lordosis evaluation (b=0.526;p=0.000); so we introduced a modification of the original traditional Cobb method of measurement with improved the linear regression coefficient (b=0.820,p=0.000). Our results confirm the clinical utility of goniometer assessment for the quantification of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis in children and adolescent.

  16. The Transition from Optional to Required Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Grady, William; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Proposes that the optional subject phenomenon in early child language arises because children have not yet acquired the morphological elements (primarily modal and tense) necessary to distinguish subject-taking verbs (e.g., finite verbs) from their non-subject-taking counterparts (e.g., infinitives). (Author/CB)

  17. [A synovial cyst accompanied by asymptomatic lumbar vertebral fracture requiring differentiation from spinal metastasis].

    PubMed

    Miura, Isamu; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Saito, Taiichi; Shiono, Saori; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-06-01

    We experienced a case with a synovial cyst accompanied by asymptomatic lumbar vertebral fracture that required differentiation from spinal metastasis. An 82-year-old man suffered from right leg and anal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed L5 spondylolysis. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed an intra spinal cyst and acute lumbar vertebral fracture of L5 vertebral body. The surrounding area of the cyst presented contrast enhancement, and the extradural mass compressed the dural sac. Bone scintigraphy with 99m technetium-MDP demonstrated intense uptake on the right first, fourth, fifth, and seventh ribs and L2, L3, and L5 vertebra. The F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) image demonstrated an increased radiotracer uptake in the L5 vertebra(standardized uptake value(SUV) max=3.5). Spinal metastasis was suspected. Because of the cauda equina compression syndrome, it was surgically removed. Intraoperatively, a well-demarcated extradural cyst was found and compressed the dural sac markedly. The cyst capsule was thin and contained clear, thin fluid with no signs of bleeding. The histological diagnosis was a synovial cyst. His neurological symptoms improved after the surgery. The synovial cyst may enlarge after asymptomatic vertebral fractures.

  18. Hamstring muscle length and lumbar lordosis in subjects with different lifestyle and work setting: comparison between individuals with and without chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Shortened hamstring muscle length has been noted in persons with low back pain (LBP). Prolonged sitting postures, such as those adopted during different work settings and sedentary lifestyle has been associated with hamstring shortness and LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of lifestyle and work setting on hamstring length and lumbar lordosis in subjects with and without LBP and to identify the relationship between hamstring muscles length and lumbar lordosis in individuals with different lifestyle and work setting. A total of 508 subjects between the ages of 20 and 65 were selected. Subjects were categorized into two groups of individuals with and without LBP. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about the subjects' lifestyle and work setting. Hamstring muscle length and lumbar lordosis were measured in all subjects. The results showed no significant difference in the number of subjects with different work setting or lifestyle in individuals with and without LBP. Hamstring muscle length or lumbar lordosis was not affected by type of work setting and lifestyle. Our data showed significant difference in hamstring length and no significant difference in lumbar lordosis between subjects with and without LBP in all categories. Lumbar lordosis was not different between individuals with and without hamstring tightness in normal and LBP subjects with different work setting and lifestyle. The findings of this study did not support the assumption that work setting and sedentary lifestyle would lead to hamstring tightness in subjects with LBP. It seems that work setting and lifestyle was not a contributing factor for hamstring tightness in subjects with LBP.

  19. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  20. Decreasing the required lumbar extensor moment induces earlier onset of flexion relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zwambag, Derek P; De Carvalho, Diana E; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-10-01

    Flexion relaxation (FR) is characterized by the lumbar erector spinae (LES) becoming myoelectrically silent near full trunk flexion. This study was designed to: (1) determine if decreasing the lumbar moment during flexion would induce FR to occur earlier; (2) characterize thoracic and abdominal muscle activity during FR. Ten male participants performed four trunk flexion/extension movement conditions; lumbar moment was altered by attaching 0, 5, 10, or 15lb counterweights to the torso. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from eight trunk muscles. Lumbar moment, lumbar flexion and trunk inclination angles were calculated at the critical point of LES inactivation (CPLES). Results demonstrated that counterweights decreased the lumbar moment and lumbar flexion angle at CPLES (p<0.0001 and p=0.0029, respectively); the hypothesis that FR occurs earlier when lumbar moment is reduced was accepted. The counterweights did not alter trunk inclination at CPLES (p=0.1987); this is believed to result from an altered hip to spine flexion ratio when counterweights were attached. Lumbar multifidus demonstrated FR, similar to LES, while thoracic muscles remained active throughout flexion. Abdominal muscles activated at the same instant as CPLES, except in the 15lb condition where abdominal muscles activated before CPLES resulting in a period of increased co-contraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A frontal plane model of the lumbar spine subjected to a follower load: implications for the role of muscles.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, A G; Meade, K P; Lee, B

    2001-06-01

    Compression on the lumbar spine is 1000 N for standing and walking and is higher during lifting. Ex vivo experiments show it buckles under a vertical load of 80-100 N. Conversely, the whole lumbar spine can support physiologic compressive loads without large displacements when the load is applied along a follower path that approximates the tangent to the curve of the lumbar spine. This study utilized a two-dimensional beam-column model of the lumbar spine in the frontal plane under gravitational and active muscle loads to address the following question: Can trunk muscle activation cause the path of the internal force resultant to approximate the tangent to the spinal curve and allow the lumbar spine to support compressive loads of physiologic magnitudes? The study identified muscle activation patterns that maintained the lumbar spine model under compressive follower load, resulting in the minimization of internal shear forces and bending moments simultaneously at all lumbar levels. The internal force resultant was compressive, and the lumbar spine model, loaded in compression along the follower load path, supported compressive loads of physiologic magnitudes with minimal change in curvature in the frontal plane. Trunk muscles may coactivate to generate a follower load path and allow the ligamentous lumbar spine to support physiologic compressive loads.

  2. Interpretation of the subjects' condition requirement: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Shah, Seema; Wendler, David

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Federal regulations allow institutional review boards (IRBs) to approve non-beneficial pediatric research when the risks are a minor increase over minimal, provided that the research is likely to develop generalizable knowledge about the subjects' disorder or condition. This "subjects' condition" requirement is quite controversial; commentators have argued for a variety of interpretations. Despite this considerable disagreement in the literature, there have not been any attempts to apply principles of legal interpretation to determine how the subjects' condition requirement should be understood.

  3. Interrater and intrarater reliability of transverse abdominal and lumbar multifidus muscle thickness in subjects with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Olivera; Djordjevic, Aleksandar; Konstantinovic, Ljubica

    2014-12-01

    Two-group, repeated-measures reliability study. To determine interrater and intrarater reliability of ultrasound measurements of transverse abdominal (TrA) and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle thickness, during rest and contraction, in subjects with low back pain (LBP) and healthy subjects over 3 consecutive days, performed by an experienced and a novice rater. Previous reliability studies of TrA or LM thickness did not simultaneously account for muscle state, rater experience, and multiday assessment in large subject samples. The 2 raters measured TrA and LM thickness on 3 consecutive days in 42 healthy subjects and 56 subjects with LBP, during rest and contraction, and calculated the percent thickness change from rest to contraction. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,k)) and 95% minimal detectable change in thickness were derived for a single measure (day 1) and an average measure (days 1-3). The interrater ICC(2,1) values for single-measure thickness (LBP group, 0.71-0.87; healthy group, 0.94-1.00) were similar to those for average-measure thickness (LBP group, 0.73-0.84; healthy group, 0.93-1.00). Both interrater ICC(2,1) and ICC(2,3) were lower for the relative thickness change (0.61-0.96). Intrarater ICC(2,1) values across 3 consecutive days were high for both raters across the 2 groups (LBP group, 0.95-1.00; healthy group, 0.93-1.00), albeit lower for the relative thickness change (0.79-0.99). The 95% minimal detectable changes were < 0.3 mm for the TrA and < 2 mm for the LM (but, in most cases, less than 10% of average thickness). Both experienced and trained novice raters provided reliable measurements of TrA and LM thickness in participants with LBP and healthy participants, during rest and contraction. One-time measurements were similar to averaged measurements. Small absolute errors were observed. Public trial registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001077752.

  4. In healthy subjects, the sitting position can be used to validate the postural effects induced by wearing a lumbar lordosis brace.

    PubMed

    Mathias, M; Rougier, P R

    2010-10-01

    To assess the validity of the sitting position when testing lumbar braces for the maintenance of lordosis. Twelve young adult subjects participated in the experiment, in which they were seated on force platform. The four experimental conditions (with or without a brace and with or without enforced lordosis) were chosen in order to distinguish between the roles played by lordosis and the brace, respectively. The trajectories of the centre of pressure (CP) were analyzed and compared, in order to assess postural orientation and stabilisation processes. Although no effect was seen in terms of orientation, our data showed that use of a lumbar brace led to a notable reduction in CP displacement along the mediolateral and anteroposterior axes. Lordosis barely affected postural performance and only an increase in the mean CP velocity was observed. Lastly, an analysis of variance failed to reveal an interaction between the "lordosis" and "brace" factors. A lumbar brace (in the absence or presence of lordosis) helps subjects to improve their sitting performance. In contrast to previous studies based on the standing posture, the fact that significant differences were found as a function of brace wear emphasises the discriminant power of the sitting position. This task should therefore be applied more widely in the development of more appropriate, validated equipment for lower back pain sufferers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Complications of rhBMP-2 utilization for posterolateral lumbar fusions requiring reoperation: a single practice, retrospective case series report.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Martin F; Jones, Clifford B; Sietsema, Debra L

    2013-10-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) (INFUSE, Medtronic, Memphis, TN, USA) has been used off-label for posterolateral lumbar fusions for many years. The goal of this study was to evaluate the complications requiring reoperation associated with rhBMP-2 application for posterolateral lumbar fusions. During a 7-year period of time (2002-2009), all patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion using rhBMP-2 (INFUSE) were retrospectively evaluated within a large orthopedic surgery private practice. A total of 1,158 consecutive patients were evaluated with 468 (40.4%) males and 690 (59.6%) females. Complications related to rhBMP were defined as reoperation secondary to symptomatic failed fusion (nonunion), symptomatic seroma formation, symptomatic reformation of foraminal bone, and infection. Inclusion criteria were posterolateral fusion with rhBMP-2 implant and age equal to or older than 18 years. Surgical indications and treatment were performed in accordance with the surgeon's best knowledge, discretion, and experience. Patients consented to lumbar decompression and arthrodesis using rhBMP-2. All patients were educated and informed of the off-label utilization of rhBMP-2. Patient follow-up was performed at regular intervals of 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and later if required or indicated. Average age was 59.2 years, and body mass index was 30.7 kg/m². Numbers of levels fused were 1 (414, 35.8%), 2 (469, 40.5%), 3 (162, 14.0%), 4 (70, 6.0%), 5 (19, 1.6%), 6 (11, 0.9%), 7 (7, 0.6%), 8 (4, 0.3%), and 9 (2, 0.2%). Patients having complications requiring reoperation were 117 of 1,158 (10.1%): symptomatic nonunion requiring redo fusion and instrumentation 41 (3.5%), seroma with acute neural compression 32 (2.8%), excess bone formation with delayed neural compression 4 (0.3%), and infection requiring debridement 26 (2.2%). Nonunion was related to male sex and previous BMP exposure. Seroma formation was significantly higher in

  6. Lumbar puncture requirement in acute hemiparesis: diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis after hemiparesis in a child.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sevim; Cansu, Ali; Kamaşak, Tülay; Eyüboğlu, İlker; Esenülkü, Gülnur; Ökten, Ayşenur

    2014-12-01

    Infections are an important acquired cause of cerebral arteriopathy. Tuberculous (TB) meningitis leading to infectious cerebral vasculopathy is a rare cause of acute hemiparesis. A 14-year-old male patient was examined after acute hemiparesis developing within 1 day. Neurological examination revealed total hemiplegia on the left side. Brain MRI findings showed bilateral focal T2-weighted signal hyperintensity in the subcortical and deep white matter regions. There were also areas of restricted diffusion in the right basal ganglia. Although the father had a history of pulmonary TB, the patient had not been given TB prophylaxis because of PPD negativity. At lumbar puncture, opening cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure was 50 cm/H20, CSF protein 66.9 mg/dL, and glucose 54 mg/dL (concurrent blood glucose 93 mg/dL); 170 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per cubic millimeter were present in CSF. Following tests for TB, treatment was started immediately with four anti-TB drugs. TB PCR of CSF and acid-fast bacteria (AFB) staining in gastric aspirate were positive. At clinical follow-up, the patient was able to walk with support at the end of the first month. Various infectious agents have been reported as causes of cerebral vasculopathy. TB, which affects a significant number of patients worldwide, should be kept in mind in terms of cerebral vascular complications. Lumbar puncture is essential in order to diagnose TB meningitis.

  7. Patients with proximal junctional kyphosis requiring revision surgery have higher postoperative lumbar lordosis and larger sagittal balance corrections.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Jo; Bridwell, Keith H; Lenke, Lawrence G; Park, Moon Soo; Song, Kwang Sup; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Chuntarapas, Tapanut

    2014-04-20

    Case control study. To evaluate risk factors in patients in 3 groups: those without proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) (N), with PJK but not requiring revision (P), and then those with PJK requiring revision surgery (S). It is becoming clear that some patients maintain stable PJK angles, whereas others progress and develop severe PJK necessitating revision surgery. A total of 206 patients at a single institution from 2002 to 2007 with adult scoliosis with 2-year minimum follow-up (average 3.5 yr) were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were age more than 18 years and primary fusions greater than 5 levels from any thoracic upper instrumented vertebra to any lower instrumented vertebrae. Revisions were excluded. Radiographical assessment included Cobb measurements in the coronal/sagittal plane and measurements of the PJK angle at postoperative time points: 1 to 2 months, 2 years, and final follow-up. PJK was defined as an angle greater than 10°. The prevalence of PJK was 34%. The average age in N was 49.9 vs. 51.3 years in P and 60.1 years in S. Sex, body mass index, and smoking status were not significantly different between groups. Fusions extending to the pelvis were 74%, 85%, and 91% of the cases in groups N, P, and S. Instrumentation type was significantly different between groups N and S, with a higher number of upper instrumented vertebra hooks in group N. Radiographical parameters demonstrated a higher postoperative lumbar lordosis and a larger sagittal balance change, with surgery in those with PJK requiring revision surgery. Scoliosis Research Society postoperative pain scores were inferior in group N vs. P and S, and Oswestry Disability Index scores were similar between all groups. Patients with PJK requiring revision were older, had higher postoperative lumbar lordosis, and larger sagittal balance corrections than patients without PJK. Based on these data, it seems as though older patients with large corrections in their lumbar lordosis and sagittal balance

  8. Surgical Treatment of Hip Instability in Patients With Lower Lumbar Level Myelomeningocele: Is Muscle Transfer Required?

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Timur; Gursu, Sarper; Bayhan, İlhan Avni; Sofu, Hakan; Bursali, Aysegul

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of hip instability in patients with lower lumbar level myelomeningocele is clinically challenging. Muscle transfer procedures, release of contractures, and intertrochanteric varus-rotation osteotomies have been described to restore weak or absent abductor strength as well as relocation of the hip. However, controlled trials evaluating hip instability in lower lumbar myelomeningocele are limited in the current literature. The purposes of this study were to compare the (1) radiographic evidence for joint stability; (2) clinical outcomes (including abductor strength, ambulatory ability, and residual use of orthoses); and (3) complications between patients undergoing combined periarticular contracture releases and bony procedures with and without external oblique abdominal muscle transfers. Between 2004 and 2013, 14 pediatric patients (16 hips) were treated for hip instability secondary to myelomeningocele using releases with or without muscle transfer. From those, 13 patients (15 hips) with a mean age of 6 years who had L3 to L5 level involvement were evaluated retrospectively. The patients were separated into two groups. Nine hips (in eight patients) were treated by performing a combination of external oblique abdominal muscle transfer to the greater trochanter, periarticular release of contractures, and bony procedures. These were compared with six hips (five patients) treated by performing a combination of periarticular release of contractures and bony procedures without external oblique abdominal muscle transfer. This study compared the results between two surgeons, one of whom always performed these muscle transfers in this setting and the other who never performed muscle transfer during the study period. The patients were clinically followed up at a mean of 41 months (range, 14-122 months); none of the patients was lost to followup. Radiographic evaluation criteria included Reimer's migration index, acetabular index, femoral neck-shaft angle, pelvic

  9. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  10. Sonoanatomic indices of lumbar facet joints in patients with facetogenic back pain in comparison to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Faiz, Hamid Reza; Baghaee, Ali Reza; Nader, Nader D

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, ultrasound is increasingly used with a great accuracy in performing nerve blocks for facet joint disease. To measure sonoanatomic characteristics for the facet joints of lumbar vertebras in patients with facetogenic pain and healthy volunteers. Cross-sectional, observational study. University-affiliated Specialty Clinic for Pain Management. Twenty patients with facet joint disease (FJD) and 40 healthy volunteers (HVGs) were matched for age and sex, height, and weight. Patients with FJD were referred with complaints of pain in the left lumbar facet joints that twice responded favorably to ultrasound guided medial branch blocks. Medial branch blocks. The interfacet joint distance (IFJD) between the third, the fourth, and the fifth lumbar vertebras and their depth from the level of skin (DFS) were measured bilaterally, using a high-resolution ultrasound in both groups. Thirty-one men and 29 women with average age of 41.5±9.5 years were enrolled. The IFJD for L3-L4 was 31.5±4.0 mm on the left side and 31.8±4.0 mm on the right side. The IFJD for L4-L5 was 31.3±4.4 mm on the left side and 31.5±4.0 mm on the right side. The IFJD was uniformly 2.2 mm shorter in the FJD group than those in the HVG group (P=.021). The measurements of DFS increased in lower vertebras (L3lumbar vertebras are smaller in patients suffering from degenerative FJD compared with HVGs. Degenerative changes of intervertebral discs and partial reduction of space between 2 adjacent vertebras may contribute to this observation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Establishing performance requirements of computer based systems subject to uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.

    1997-02-01

    An organized systems design approach is dictated by the increasing complexity of computer based systems. Computer based systems are unique in many respects but share many of the same problems that have plagued design engineers for decades. The design of complex systems is difficult at best, but as a design becomes intensively dependent on the computer processing of external and internal information, the design process quickly borders chaos. This situation is exacerbated with the requirement that these systems operate with a minimal quantity of information, generally corrupted by noise, regarding the current state of the system. Establishing performance requirements for such systems is particularly difficult. This paper briefly sketches a general systems design approach with emphasis on the design of computer based decision processing systems subject to parameter and environmental variation. The approach will be demonstrated with application to an on-board diagnostic (OBD) system for automotive emissions systems now mandated by the state of California and the Federal Clean Air Act. The emphasis is on an approach for establishing probabilistically based performance requirements for computer based systems.

  12. Effects of Smoking on Subjective and Objective Measures of Pain Intensity, Functional Impairment, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease.

    PubMed

    Joswig, Holger; Stienen, Martin N; Smoll, Nicolas R; Corniola, Marco V; Chau, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2017-03-01

    Numerous studies assessed the effects of smoking on lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD); they focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and yielded conflicting results. In this 2-center study on consecutive patients receiving surgical treatment for lumbar DDD, subjective functional impairment (SFI) in terms of PROMs including visual analog scale back and leg pain, Roland-Morris, Oswestry Disability Index, Euro-Qol-5D, and a Short-Form 12 physical component summary was determined at baseline, 3 days, 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Age- and sex-adjusted T-scores of objective functional impairment (OFI) were determined using the Timed Up and Go test up to 6 weeks postoperatively. The responder status was defined by the minimal clinically important difference. We analyzed 375 patients (n = 96 [25.6%] smokers and n = 279 [74.4%] nonsmokers). SFI on any of the PROMs before treatment was similar in smokers and nonsmokers. Smokers were more likely to have OFI in univariate logistic regression analysis (95% confidence interval 1.31-3.37, P = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, however, this relationship became insignificant (95% confidence interval 0.85-2.38, P = 0.184). The smoking status had no predictive capacity on the 6-week SFI or OFI responder status, and there were no differences in any of the PROMs until the 1-year follow-up. PROMs measuring SFI for pain intensity, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life were similar in smokers and nonsmokers before surgery for lumbar DDD, as well as postoperatively. The smoking status has negligible impact on the Timed Up and Go test, which appears to be a robust assessment tool for OFI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Smoll, Nicolas R; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in pain perception are known to exist; however, the exact pathomechanism remains unclear. This work aims to elucidate sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. In a prospective 2-center study, back and leg pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index and Roland-Morris Disability Index), and HRQoL (EuroQol-5D and Short Form [SF12]) were collected for consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. A healthy cohort of n = 110 subjects served as the control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the association between sex and pain, subjective and OFIs, and HRQoL. The study comprised n = 305 patients (41.6% females). Female patients had more VAS back pain (P = 0.002) and leg pain (P = 0.014). They were more likely to report higher functional impairment in terms of Oswestry Disability Index (P = 0.005). Similarly, HRQoL measured with the EuroQol-5D index (P = 0.012) and SF12 physical composite score (P = 0.005) was lower in female patients. Female patients reported higher VAS back and leg pain, functional impairment, and reduced HRQoL than male patients. However, there were no sex differences with respect to the presence and degree of OFI measured by the TUG test using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values. As such, the TUG may be a good test to overcome sex bias for the clinical assessment of patients with degenerative disc disease.

  14. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed.

  15. The intrinsic stiffness of the in vivo lumbar spine in response to quick releases: implications for reflexive requirements.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; McGill, Stuart M

    2009-10-01

    Torso muscles contribute both intrinsic and reflexive stiffness to the spine; recent modeling studies indicate that intrinsic stiffness alone is sometimes insufficient to maintain stability in dynamic situations. The purpose of this study was to experimentally test this idea by limiting muscular reflexive responses to sudden trunk perturbations. Nine healthy males lay on a near-frictionless apparatus and were subjected to quick trunk releases from the neutral position into flexion or right-side lateral bend. Different magnitudes of moment release were accomplished by having participants contract their musculature to create a range of moment levels. EMG was recorded from 12 torso muscles and three-dimensional lumbar spine rotations were monitored. A second-order linear model of the trunk was employed to estimate trunk stiffness and damping during each quick release. Participants displayed very limited reflex responses to the quick load release paradigms, and consequently underwent substantial trunk displacements (>50% flexion range of motion and >70% lateral bend range of motion in the maximum moment trials). Trunk stiffness increased significantly with significant increases in muscle activation, but was still unable to prevent the largest trunk displacements in the absence of reflexes. Thus, it was concluded that the intrinsic stiffness of the trunk was insufficient to adequately prevent the spine from undergoing potentially harmful rotational displacements. Voluntary muscular responses were more apparent than reflexive responses, but occurred too late and of too low magnitude to sufficiently make up for the limited reflexes.

  16. Repeatability, reproducibility, and validity of a new method for characterizing lumbar support in automotive seating.

    PubMed

    Kolich, Mike

    2009-04-01

    This article describes a new and more repeatable, reproducible, and valid test method for characterizing lumbar support in automotive seating. Lumbar support is important because it affects occupant accommodation and perceptions of seat comfort. Assessing only the lumbar mechanism--particularly in terms of travel--is inadequate because it does not consider the effects of trim and foam. The Society of Automotive Engineers' next-generation H-Point machine and associated loading protocol were used as the basis for the new test. The method was found to satisfy minimum gage repeatability and reproducibility requirements. Validity was demonstrated through a regression model that revealed 93.9% of the variance in subjective ratings of poor uncomfortable lumbar support can be explained by two objective indicators: (1) lumbar support prominence in the full-off position and (2) effective travel. The method can be used to differentiate between seats offering two-way adjustable lumbar support. The best two-way adjustable lumbar seat systems are those that couple little to no lumbar support in the starting or off position (i.e., they are nonintrusive) with a considerable amount of effective or perceptible travel. The automotive industry has long needed a way to address the fact that consumers want more lumbar support than their seats currently supply. This contribution offers a method to objectify an important aspect of automotive seating comfort-namely, lumbar support. This should help human factors professionals produce, but not necessarily guarantee, better consumer ratings.

  17. [THE EFFECT OF THE APPLICATION OF THE KINESIOLOGY TAPING TECHNIQUE FOR MUSCLE RANGE OF MOTION OF THE LUMBAR SPINE, AND THE SUBJECTIVE PERCEPTION OF PAIN INTENSITY IN PATIENTS WITH BACK PAIN].

    PubMed

    Garczyński, Wojciech; Lubkowska, Anna; Dobek, Aleksandra; Andryszczyk, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In an era of ubiquitous computing, a considerable part of the population, regardless of age group, spend more time in a sitting position. Long-term, static loading of the spine increases muscle tension, leading to the occurrence of pain. Physiotherapy is recommended as primary and secondary prevention of spinal pain symptoms. The Kinesiology Taping Method is one of the many special methods of physiotherapy which is used during the episodes of back pain in the lumbosacral region. This method consists in sticking on a special tape, which is made of stretch cotton similar to human skin, using a variety of techniques for patch application. The present study evaluated the effect of the application of the Kinesiology Taping technique for muscle mobility in the lumbar spine and the subjective perception of pain intensity. The study group consisted of 100 patients (89 women and 11 men) who experienced pain in the lumbar spine. To assess the mobility of the lumbar spine the Schober test was used. The subjective sensation of pain was assessed using the VAS (visual analogue scale). Measurements were taken four times: before gluing applications, immediately after taping, 7 days after application of the patch, and immediately after its removal. In response to the use of therapy, an increase of mobility of the lumbar spine in flexion front and back, and reduced pain was shown. Application of the muscle kinesiology taping technique is an effective method in reducing pain and increasing mobility of the lumbar spine.

  18. Inclusion of regional poroelastic material properties better predicts biomechanical behavior of lumbar discs subjected to dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jamie R; Natarajan, Raghu N; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between repetitive lifting and the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure is difficult to study in vivo and in vitro. The aim of this investigation was to develop a three-dimensional poroelastic finite element model of a lumbar motion segment that reflects the biological properties and behaviors of in vivo disc tissues including swelling pressure due to the proteoglycans and strain-dependent permeability and porosity. It was hypothesized that when modeling the annulus, prescribing tissue specific material properties will not be adequate for studying the in vivo loading and unloading behavior of the disc. Rather, regional variations of these properties, which are known to exist within the annulus, must also be included. Finite element predictions were compared to in vivo measurements published by Tyrrell et al. (1985) of percent change in total stature for two loading protocols, short-term creep loading and standing recovery and short-term cyclic loading with standing recovery. The model in which the regional variations of material properties in the annulus had been included provided an overall better prediction of the in vivo behavior as compared to the model in which the annulus properties were assumed to be homogenous. This model will now be used to study the relationship between repetitive lifting and disc degeneration.

  19. 40 CFR 71.3 - Sources subject to permitting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section that are not major sources, affected sources, or solid waste incineration... they are subject to 40 CFR part 60, subpart AAA—-Standards of Performance for New Residential Wood...

  20. 40 CFR 71.3 - Sources subject to permitting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section that are not major sources, affected sources, or solid waste incineration... because they are subject to 40 CFR part 61, subpart M—National Emission Standard for Hazardous...

  1. 40 CFR 71.3 - Sources subject to permitting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section that are not major sources, affected sources, or solid waste incineration... because they are subject to 40 CFR part 61, subpart M—National Emission Standard for Hazardous...

  2. Additional Degree Required? Advanced Subject Knowledge and Academic Librarianship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Since the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) first published its terminal degree statement in 1975, the topic of librarians and advanced subject degrees has been controversial, and research on the topic has remained limited. Based on data gathered from two major online job sites as well as library and information science programs…

  3. Additional Degree Required? Advanced Subject Knowledge and Academic Librarianship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Since the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) first published its terminal degree statement in 1975, the topic of librarians and advanced subject degrees has been controversial, and research on the topic has remained limited. Based on data gathered from two major online job sites as well as library and information science programs…

  4. Bipolar Sealer Device Reduces Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements in Posterior Spinal Fusion for Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuesong; Sun, Gang; Sun, Ruifu; Ba, Chenglei; Gong, Xiaojin; Liu, Weibo; Zhai, Rui

    2016-03-01

    A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study. To determine the efficacy of bipolar sealer device in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusions in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients undergoing primary posterior spinal fusion. It has recently been used successfully in pediatric spine surgery, particularly in idiopathic and neuromuscular deformities. However, there is a dearth of literature on prospective study of the efficacy of bipolar sealer device in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusions in patients undergoing degenerative lumbar scoliosis surgery. A total of 100 consecutive degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients who had undergone primary decompression and posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation between June 2010 and June 2012 were prospectively randomized into 1 of 2 groups according to whether bipolar sealer device for intraoperative/postoperative blood management was used or not. Demographic distribution, perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion rate, the length of stay, and postoperative complications were analyzed. The operation time was significantly shorter in the study group than in the control group, 223.4 versus 248.9 minutes (P=0.026). There was significantly lower intraoperative estimated blood loss in the bipolar sealer group, 407 versus 696 mL (P=0.000). Of the patients with the use of bipolar sealer device, the mean red blood cell transfusion requirement during hospitalization was significantly less than the control group, 0.4 versus 1.1 U/patient (P=0.003). Furthermore, significant difference existed in allogenic blood transfusion rate between the 2 cohorts. Within the study group (with the use of bipolar sealer device), the entire perioperative allogenic blood transfusion rate was 18.0% compared with 40.0% of the control group (P=0.015). There were no complications related directly to the use of the bipolar sealer. Utilization of a bipolar sealer during correction of lumbar degenerative

  5. Interexaminer reliability of the electromagnetic radiation receiver for determining lumbar spinal joint dysfunction in subjects with low back pain

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, H.A.; Jacobson, B.H.; Edwards, S.W.; Heng, B.J.

    1990-03-01

    Twenty subjects (6 male, 14 female) with low back pain were examined by two experienced and licensed chiropractic doctors (E1 and E2). Both examiners examined the patients using a Toftness Electromagnetic Radiation Receiver (EMRR) and by manual palpation (MP) of the spinous processes. Interexaminer reliability was calculated at three sites (L3, L4, L5) for the following combinations: (a) E1,MP--E2,MP; (b) E1,EMRR--E2,EMRR; (c) E1,MP--E2,EMRR; and (d) E2,MP--E1,EMRR, and intraexaminer reliability was calculated for the following variables: (e) E1,MP--E1,EMRR; and (f) E2,MP--E2,EMRR. Results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for interexaminer reliability of the stated combinations and at the specific sites were: (a) -0.071, 0.400, 0.200; (b) -0.013, 0.100, -0.120; (c) 0.286, 0.300, 0.200; (d) -0.081, 0.000, 0.048. These results predominantly indicate a poor to fair interexaminer reliability. The results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for intraexaminer reliability of the stated combinations were: (e) 0.111, 0.400, 0.737; (f) 0.000, 0.100, 0.368. These results indicate a poor to fair reliability. It was concluded that in subjects with low back pain the EMRR may not be a reliable indicator of spinal joint dysfunction.

  6. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  10. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.400 Who is subject to the requirements of this...

  11. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.400 Who is subject to the requirements of this...

  12. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.400 Who is subject to the requirements of this...

  13. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational study. Purpose To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. Overview of Literature IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Methods Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. Results For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=–0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=–0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). Conclusions The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain. PMID:27340529

  14. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Nagrale, Sanket; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-06-01

    Observational study. To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=-0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=-0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain.

  15. 29 CFR 453.23 - Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during... STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE BONDING... Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year. Considering the purpose of...

  16. 29 CFR 453.23 - Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during... STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE BONDING... Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year. Considering the purpose of...

  17. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act. 4.117... Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Specific Exclusions § 4.117 Work subject to... work required to be done in accordance with the provision of the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act”...

  18. 46 CFR 535.502 - Agreements subject to the Information Form requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Agreements subject to the Information Form requirements... OF 1984 Information Form Requirements § 535.502 Agreements subject to the Information Form... losses; or (5) The discussion of, or agreement on, any service contract matter; and (c)...

  19. 46 CFR 535.502 - Agreements subject to the Information Form requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Agreements subject to the Information Form requirements... OF 1984 Information Form Requirements § 535.502 Agreements subject to the Information Form... losses; or (5) The discussion of, or agreement on, any service contract matter; and (c)...

  20. 46 CFR 188.05-1 - Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter. 188.05-1 Section 188.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-1 Vessels subject to requirements of...

  1. 21 CFR 830.300 - Devices subject to device identification data submission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Devices subject to device identification data submission requirements. 830.300 Section 830.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Identification Database § 830.300 Devices subject to device identification data submission requirements. (a)...

  2. Lumbar lordosis.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar lordosis is a key postural component that has interested both clinicians and researchers for many years. Despite its wide use in assessing postural abnormalities, there remain many unanswered questions regarding lumbar lordosis measurements. Therefore, in this article we reviewed different factors associated with the lordosis angle based on existing literature and determined normal values of lordosis. We reviewed more than 120 articles that measure and describe the different factors associated with the lumbar lordosis angle. Because of a variety of factors influencing the evaluation of lumbar lordosis such as how to position the patient and the number of vertebrae included in the calculation, we recommend establishing a uniform method of evaluating the lordosis angle. Based on our review, it seems that the optimal position for radiologic measurement of lordosis is standing with arms supported while shoulders are flexed at a 30° angle. There is evidence that many factors, such as age, gender, body mass index, ethnicity, and sport, may affect the lordosis angle, making it difficult to determine uniform normal values. Normal lordosis should be determined based on the specific characteristics of each individual; we therefore presented normal lordosis values for different groups/populations. There is also evidence that the lumbar lordosis angle is positively and significantly associated with spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis. However, no association has been found with other spinal degenerative features. Inconclusive evidence exists for association between lordosis and low back pain. Additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations. The optimal lordotic range remains unknown and may be related to a variety of individual factors such as weight, activity, muscular strength, and flexibility of the spine and lower extremities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of... not include the volume and benzene content of the oxygenate in any compliance calculations or...

  4. 43 CFR 46.100 - Federal action subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... action is subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA if it would cause effects on the human... decision on one or more alternative means of accomplishing that goal; and (2) The effects of the...

  5. 43 CFR 46.100 - Federal action subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... action is subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA if it would cause effects on the human... decision on one or more alternative means of accomplishing that goal; and (2) The effects of the...

  6. 43 CFR 46.100 - Federal action subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... action is subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA if it would cause effects on the human... decision on one or more alternative means of accomplishing that goal; and (2) The effects of the...

  7. 43 CFR 46.100 - Federal action subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... action is subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA if it would cause effects on the human... decision on one or more alternative means of accomplishing that goal; and (2) The effects of the...

  8. 43 CFR 46.100 - Federal action subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... action is subject to the procedural requirements of NEPA if it would cause effects on the human... decision on one or more alternative means of accomplishing that goal; and (2) The effects of the...

  9. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act. 4.117 Section 4.117 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Specific Exclusions § 4.117 Work subject...

  10. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements. 300.184 Section 300.184 Wildlife and Fisheries... Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.184 Species subject to permitting...

  11. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements. 300.184 Section 300.184 Wildlife and Fisheries... Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.184 Species subject to permitting...

  12. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements. 300.184 Section 300.184 Wildlife and Fisheries... Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.184 Species subject to...

  13. 40 CFR 63.11111 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart? 63.11111 Section 63.11111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... airports, and the subsequent transfer of aviation gasoline within the airport, is not subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 63.11111 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart? 63.11111 Section 63.11111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... airports is not subject to this subpart and the aviation gasoline is not included in the...

  15. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  16. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  17. The effect of a lumbar support pillow on lumbar posture and comfort during a prolonged seated task.

    PubMed

    Grondin, Diane E; Triano, John J; Tran, Steve; Soave, David

    2013-07-04

    Several risk factors exist for the development of low back pain, including prolonged sitting and flexed spinal curvature. Several investigators have studied lumbar support devices and spinal curvatures in sitting, however few have investigated a pain population and reported a quantitative measure of comfort. The purpose of the current project was to determine whether a lumbar support pillow, outfitted with a cut-out to accommodate the bulk of posterior pelvic soft tissue volume, is more effective than a standard chair in promoting a neutral spinal posture and improving subjective and objective measures of comfort in healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. Twenty eight male participants with and without a history of low back pain sat in a standard office chair and in a chair with the lumbar support pillow for 30 minutes. Lumbar and thoracolumbar postures were measured through electromagnetic markers. Comfort was determined based on the least squares radius of centre of pressure shifting, measured at the buttock-chair interface as well as reported discomfort through visual analog scales. Chair support effects were assessed through ANOVA methods. The study was approved by the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College research ethics board. There was a main effect of condition on lumbar posture (p = 0.006) and thoracolumbar posture (p = 0.014). In the lumbar region, the support and standard chair differed by 2.88° (95% CI; 1.01-4.75), with the lumbar support being closer to neutral than the standard chair. In the thoracolumbar region, the support and standard chair differed by -2.42° (95% CI; -4.22 to -0.62), with the standard chair being closer to neutral than the support device. The centre of pressure measure was significantly improved with the pillow (p = 0.017), however there were no subjective changes in comfort. A lumbar support pillow with a cut-out for the posterior pelvic tissues improved an objective measure of comfort in healthy

  18. The effect of a lumbar support pillow on lumbar posture and comfort during a prolonged seated task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several risk factors exist for the development of low back pain, including prolonged sitting and flexed spinal curvature. Several investigators have studied lumbar support devices and spinal curvatures in sitting, however few have investigated a pain population and reported a quantitative measure of comfort. The purpose of the current project was to determine whether a lumbar support pillow, outfitted with a cut-out to accommodate the bulk of posterior pelvic soft tissue volume, is more effective than a standard chair in promoting a neutral spinal posture and improving subjective and objective measures of comfort in healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. Methods Twenty eight male participants with and without a history of low back pain sat in a standard office chair and in a chair with the lumbar support pillow for 30 minutes. Lumbar and thoracolumbar postures were measured through electromagnetic markers. Comfort was determined based on the least squares radius of centre of pressure shifting, measured at the buttock-chair interface as well as reported discomfort through visual analog scales. Chair support effects were assessed through ANOVA methods. The study was approved by the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College research ethics board. Results There was a main effect of condition on lumbar posture (p = 0.006) and thoracolumbar posture (p = 0.014). In the lumbar region, the support and standard chair differed by 2.88° (95% CI; 1.01-4.75), with the lumbar support being closer to neutral than the standard chair. In the thoracolumbar region, the support and standard chair differed by -2.42° (95% CI; -4.22 to -0.62), with the standard chair being closer to neutral than the support device. The centre of pressure measure was significantly improved with the pillow (p = 0.017), however there were no subjective changes in comfort. Conclusions A lumbar support pillow with a cut-out for the posterior pelvic tissues improved an

  19. 40 CFR 141.501 - Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and... requirements of subpart T? You are subject to these requirements if your system: (a) Is a public water system; (b) Uses surface water or GWUDI as a source; and (c) Serves fewer than 10,000 persons....

  20. 40 CFR 141.501 - Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and... requirements of subpart T? You are subject to these requirements if your system: (a) Is a public water system; (b) Uses surface water or GWUDI as a source; and (c) Serves fewer than 10,000 persons....

  1. 40 CFR 141.501 - Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and... requirements of subpart T? You are subject to these requirements if your system: (a) Is a public water system; (b) Uses surface water or GWUDI as a source; and (c) Serves fewer than 10,000 persons....

  2. 40 CFR 141.501 - Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and... requirements of subpart T? You are subject to these requirements if your system: (a) Is a public water system; (b) Uses surface water or GWUDI as a source; and (c) Serves fewer than 10,000 persons....

  3. 40 CFR 141.501 - Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and... requirements of subpart T? You are subject to these requirements if your system: (a) Is a public water system; (b) Uses surface water or GWUDI as a source; and (c) Serves fewer than 10,000 persons....

  4. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  5. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  6. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  7. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  8. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  9. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Ding, Zi-hai; Xu, Xin Ming; Xu, Yong-qing

    2011-04-14

    Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D

  10. Outcome of Salvage Lumbar Fusion after Lumbar Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose This study aims to define the role of lumbar fusion for persistent back pains after the lumbar disc replacement. Overview of Literature Little is written about lumbar fusion after optimally placed lumbar arthroplasty in patients with persistent lower back pains. Methods Retrospective review of cases of lumbar artificial disc requiring subsequent fusion because of persistent back pains despite optimally placed artificial discs. Outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Clinical improvements indicated 25% improvement in ODI and VAS values. Results Five patients met the study criteria. The mean baseline ODI for the five patients was 52. The mean baseline VAS scores for back and leg pains were 76 and 26, respectively. All the five patients had optimally placed prosthesis. The indication for surgery was the constant low back pains found in all the patients. Revision surgery involved disc explantation and fusion in two of the patients and posterolateral fusion without removing the prosthesis in three. None of the patients achieved adequate pain control after the revision surgery despite the solid bony fusion documented by postoperative computed tomography. The mean ODI value after the fusion was 55. The mean values for back and leg pains VAS were 72 and 30, respectively. Conclusions Lack of good pain relief after successful lumbar artifical disc replacements may indicate different etiology for the back pains. The spine-treating surgeons should have a high threshold level to perform salvage fusion at that level. PMID:24596600

  11. Muscle fibre size and type distribution in thoracic and lumbar regions of erector spinae in healthy subjects without low back pain: normal values and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    MANNION, A. F.; DUMAS, G. A.; COOPER, R. G.; ESPINOSA, F. J.; FARIS, M. W.; STEVENSON, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the normal muscle fibre size and type distribution of the human erector spinae, both in thoracic and lumbar regions, in a group of 31 young healthy male (n=17) and female (n=14) volunteers. Two percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were obtained under local anaesthesia, from the belly of the left erector spinae, at the levels of the 10th thoracic and 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Samples were prepared for routine histochemistry for the identification of fibre types. Fibre size (cross-sectional area (CSA) and narrow diameter (ND)) was quantified using computerised image analysis. The mean CSA/ND for each fibre type was greater in the thoracic than the lumbar region, but there was no difference between the 2 regions either for percentage type I (i.e. percentage distribution by number), percentage type I area (i.e. relative area of the muscle occupied by type I fibres) or the ratio describing the size of the type I fibre relative to that of the type II. Men had larger fibres than women, for each fibre type and at both sampling sites. In the men, each fibre type was of a similar mean size, whereas in the women the type I fibres were considerably larger than both the type II A and type II B fibres, with no difference between the latter two. In both regions of the erector spinae there was no difference between men and women for the proportion (%) of a given fibre type, but the percentage type I fibre area was significantly higher in the women. The erector spinae display muscle fibre characteristics which are clearly very different from those of other skeletal muscles, and which, with their predominance of relatively large type I (slow twitch) fibres, befit their function as postural muscles. Differences between thoracic and lumbar fascicles of the muscle, and between the muscles of men and women, may reflect adaptive responses to differences in function. In assessing the degree of any pathological change in the muscle of patients with low back pain

  12. Influences of posterior-located center of gravity on lumbar extension strength, balance, and lumbar lordosis in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hun; Park, Jin-Kyu; Jeong, Myeong-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    In patients with chronic low back pain, the center of gravity (COG) is abnormally located posterior to the center in most cases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of posterior-located COG on the functions (lumbar extension strength, and static and dynamic balance) and structure (lumbar lordosis angle and lumbosacral angle) of the lumbar spine. In this study, the COG of chronic low back pain patients who complained of only low back pain were examined using dynamic body balance equipment. A total of 164 subjects participated in the study (74 males and 90 females), and they were divided into two groups of 82 patients each. One group (n=82) consisted of patients whose COG was located at the center (C-COG); the other group (n=82) consisted of patients whose COG was located posterior to the center (P-COG). The following measures assessed the lumber functions and structures of the two groups: lumbar extension strength, moving speed of static and dynamic COGs, movement distance of the static and dynamic COGs, lumbar lordosis angle, and lumbosacral angle. The measured values were analyzed using independent t-tests. The group of patients with P-COG showed more decreases in lumbar extension strength, lumbar lordosis angle, and lumbosacral angle compared to the group of patients with C-COG. Also this group showed increases in moving speed and movement distance of the static COG. However, there were no differences in moving speed and movement distance of the dynamic COG between the two groups. These findings suggest that chronic LBP patients with P-COG have some disadvantages to establish lumbar extension strength and static and dynamic balance, which require specific efforts to maintain a neutral position and to control posture.

  13. Assessment of energy requirement for the retinal arterial network in normal and hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Wood, N B; Witt, N; Hughes, A D; Thom, S A; Xu, X Y

    2012-01-01

    The retinal arterial network structure can be altered by systemic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. In order to compare the energy requirement for maintaining retinal blood flow and vessel wall metabolism between normal and hypertensive subjects, 3D hypothetical models of a representative retinal arterial bifurcation were constructed based on topological features derived from retinal images. Computational analysis of blood flow was performed, which accounted for the non-Newtonian rheological properties of blood and peripheral vessel resistance. The results suggested that the rate of energy required to maintain the blood flow and wall metabolism is much lower for normal subjects than for hypertensives, with the latter requiring 49.2% more energy for an entire retinal arteriolar tree. Among the several morphological factors, length-to-diameter ratio was found to have the most significant influence on the overall energy requirement.

  14. 12 CFR 925.8 - Subject to inspection and regulation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... required by section 4(a)(1)(B) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1424(a)(1)(B)) and § 925.6(a)(2) of this part, if, in... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subject to inspection and regulation requirement. 925.8 Section 925.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN...

  15. Tisseel does not reduce postoperative drainage, length of stay, and transfusion requirements for lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented fusion versus laminectomy alone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Typically, fibrin sealants (FSs) and fibrin glues (FGs) are used to strengthen dural repairs during spinal surgery. In 2014, Epstein demonstrated that one FS/FG, Tisseel (Baxter International Inc., Westlake Village, CA, USA) equalized the average times to drain removal and length of stay (LOS) for patients with versus without excess bleeding (e.g. who did not receive Tisseel) undergoing multilevel laminectomies with 1-2 level noninstrumented fusions (LamF).[6] Methods: Here Tisseel was utilized to promote hemostasis for two populations; 39 patients undergoing average 4.4 level lumbar laminectomies with average 1.3 level noninstrumented fusions (LamF), and 48 patients undergoing average 4.0 level laminectomies alone (Lam). We compared the average operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), postoperative drainage, LOS, and transfusion requirements for the LamF versus Lam groups. Results: The average operative times, EBL, postoperative drainage, LOS, and transfusion requirements were all greater for LamF versus Lam patients; operative times (4.1 vs. 3.0 h), average EBL (192.3 vs. 147.9 cc), drainage (e.g. day 1; 199.6 vs. 167.4 cc; day 2; 172.9 vs. 63.9 cc), average LOS (4.6 vs. 2.5 days), and transfusion requirements (11 LamF patients; 18 Units [U] RBC versus 2 Lam patients; 3 U RBC). Conclusions: Utilizing Tisseel to facilitate hemostasis in LamF versus Lam still resulted in greater operative times, EBL, postoperative average drainage, LOS, and transfusion requirements for patients undergoing the noninstrumented fusions. Although Tisseel decreases back bleeding within the spinal canal, it does not reduce blood loss from LamF decorticated transverse processes. PMID:26005579

  16. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart? 250.400 Section 250.400 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.400 Who is subject to the...

  17. 40 CFR 63.11865 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyvinyl chloride and copolymers production process units (PVCPU) as defined in § 63.12005 that are located... Chloride and Copolymers Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.11865 Am I subject to the requirements in... section 112(c)(7) of the Clean Air Act, or to chemical manufacturing process units, as defined in § 63.101...

  18. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart? 250.400 Section 250.400 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations...

  19. 46 CFR 70.05-3 - Foreign vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... all foreign vessels of the following classifications indicated in column 4 of table 70.05-1(a) that...) Notwithstanding the exceptions noted in paragraph (b) of this section, each foreign vessel must report marine... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foreign vessels subject to the requirements of...

  20. 46 CFR 70.05-3 - Foreign vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... all foreign vessels of the following classifications indicated in column 4 of table 70.05-1(a) that...) Notwithstanding the exceptions noted in paragraph (b) of this section, each foreign vessel must report marine... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foreign vessels subject to the requirements of...

  1. 46 CFR 70.05-3 - Foreign vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... all foreign vessels of the following classifications indicated in column 4 of table 70.05-1(a) that...) Notwithstanding the exceptions noted in paragraph (b) of this section, each foreign vessel must report marine... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foreign vessels subject to the requirements of...

  2. 46 CFR 90.05-1 - Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., valid safety equipment certificate. (2) Any vessel operating exclusively on inland waters which are not...)(1) of this section, each foreign vessel shall report marine casualties occurring while the vessel is... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter....

  3. 22 CFR 97.3 - Requirements subject to verification in an outgoing Convention case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... outgoing Convention case. 97.3 Section 97.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ISSUANCE OF ADOPTION CERTIFICATES AND CUSTODY DECLARATIONS IN HAGUE CONVENTION ADOPTION CASES § 97.3 Requirements subject to verification in an outgoing Convention case. (a) Preparation of...

  4. 22 CFR 97.3 - Requirements subject to verification in an outgoing Convention case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... outgoing Convention case. 97.3 Section 97.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ISSUANCE OF ADOPTION CERTIFICATES AND CUSTODY DECLARATIONS IN HAGUE CONVENTION ADOPTION CASES § 97.3 Requirements subject to verification in an outgoing Convention case. (a) Preparation of...

  5. 46 CFR 188.05-1 - Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter. 188.05-1 Section 188.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC... subchapter. (a) This subchapter is applicable to all U.S.-flag vessels indicated in Column 6 of Table 188.05...

  6. 24 CFR 4.9 - Disclosure requirements for assistance subject to section 102(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure requirements for assistance subject to section 102(b). 4.9 Section 4.9 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD REFORM ACT Accountability in the Provision of HUD...

  7. The Effects of Stretching with Lumbar Traction on VAS and Oswestry Scales of Patients with Lumbar 4–5 Herniated Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hae-sun; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stretching with lumbar traction on VAS and Oswestry scale scores of lumbar 4–5 herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. [Subjects] We recruited 20 lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. [Methods] We performed stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients during 4 weeks. The VAS and Oswestry scales were measured before and 4 weeks after the intervention. [Results] The results showed a significant decrease in VAS scale scores for stretching with lumbar traction in lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients, from 18±1.29 to 2.1±1.35. The Oswestry scale scores also decreased significantly, from 20.35±2.01 to 3.5±2.84, after stretching with lumbar traction. [Conclusion] Thus, we suggest stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. PMID:25140094

  8. 40 CFR 60.5422 - What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5422 What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? (a...

  9. 40 CFR 60.5421 - What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5421 What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? (a...

  10. 40 CFR 60.5422 - What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5422 What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? (a...

  11. 40 CFR 60.5421 - What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5421 What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? (a...

  12. Comparison of electromyographic activities of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during stabilization exercises in prone, quadruped, and sitting positions

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Marie; Jacobs, Dee; Wooten, Mary E.; Edeer, Ayse Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were: 1) describe a hierarchy of electromyographic activity production, using percentage maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during prone, quadruped and sitting exercises; and 2) identify optimal recruitment exercises for both lumbar iliocostalis as a global multi-segmental stabilizer and lumbar multifidus as a segmental stabilizer. [Subjects] Twelve healthy volunteers (six male and six female) aged 24 to 45 participated. [Methods] Surface electromyographic activity data were collected bilaterally from lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during exercises. [Results] Two-way ANOVA showed that prone extension, and prone alternate arm and leg lifting exercises produce a statistically significant difference in percent maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus bilaterally compared to other exercises. Quadruped alternate arm and leg lifting exercises produce greater activity in lumbar multifidus muscle than sitting exercises [Conclusion] Prone exercises generate the greatest electromyographic activity and may be the most effective exercises for strengthening both lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles. Quadruped alternate arm and leg lifting produces electromyographic activity at the recommended percent maximum voluntary contraction for training the lumbar multifidus in its role as a segmental stabilizer and is an effective training exercise for this goal. PMID:27821968

  13. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Sharada; Suresh, H.B.; Anirudh, A.V.; Prakash Rozario, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia, making its diagnosis and management a challenge to the treating surgeon. Presentation may be misleading and diagnosis often missed. An imaging study forms an indispensable aid in the diagnosis and surgery is the only treatment option. Presentation of case A 42 year old male presented with history of pain in lower back of 4 years duration and was being treated symptomatically over 4 years with analgesics and physiotherapy. He had noticed a swelling over the left side of his mid-back and consequently on examination was found to have a primary acquired lumbar hernia arising from the deep superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt. Diagnosis was confirmed by Computed Tomographic imaging. Discussion A lumbar hernia may be primary or secondary with only about 300 cases of primary lumbar hernia reported in literature. Lumbar hernias manifest through two possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall, the superior being more common. Management remains surgical with various techniques emerging over the years. The patient at our center underwent an open sublay mesh repair with excellent outcome. Conclusion A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach. PMID:26812667

  14. Time Required to Rectify Inhaler Errors Among Experienced Subjects With Faulty Technique.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S; Bonavia, Marco; Mastropasqua, Eliuccia; Zanforlin, Alessandro; Lodi, Marco; Martucci, Paola; Scichilone, Nicola; Aliani, Maria; Neri, Margherita; Sestini, Piersante

    2017-04-01

    Regardless of the device used, many patients have difficulty maintaining proper inhaler technique over time. Repeated education from caregivers is required to ensure persistence of correct inhaler technique, but no information is available to evaluate the time required to rectify inhaler errors in experienced users with a baseline faulty technique and whether this time of re-education to restore inhaler mastery can differ between devices. This was a multi-center, single-visit, open-label, cross-sectional study in a large group of 981 adult subjects (mean ± SD age 64 ± 15 y) experienced with inhaler use, mainly suffering from COPD and asthma, who showed faulty inhaler technique at a follow-up visit in chest clinics. These subjects received face-to-face practical education from trained caregivers until proper inhaler use could be demonstrated, and the time of instruction was recorded. The mean times (95% CIs) in minutes of instruction required for rectifying misuse and demonstrating inhaler mastery were 5.0 (3.6-6.4) min for the Diskus (n = 199), 5.3 (3.7-6.8) min for the HandiHaler (n = 219), 8.1 (5.6-10.5) min for the metered-dose inhaler (MDI) (n = 532), and 6.0 (5.0-7.0) min for the Turbuhaler (n = 169). The time to demonstrate good inhaler use for MDIs was higher (P < .05) than for all dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Between the DPIs, only the HandiHaler required more time for achieving mastery than the Diskus (P = .005). The variables associated with increasing time for correcting inhaler errors were an older age (0.05 min/y, 95% CI 0.03-0.07), a lower level of education (0.4 min/schooling level, 95% CI 0.7-0.1), and no reported previous instruction in inhaler use (1.96 min, 95% CI 1.35-2.58). In experienced subjects with baseline faulty inhaler use, the mean time of education required to achieve and demonstrate mastery with DPIs was lower than with MDIs. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  15. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respectively. Both programs were performed 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The degree of functional disability was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, and lumbar lordosis angles were measured by plain radiography. [Results] The Oswestry disability index decreased significantly in the both groups; however, it was significantly lower in the lumbar stabilization exercise group. The lumbar lordosis angle increased significantly in the lumbar stabilization exercise group after treatment and was also significantly greater than that in the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise is more effective than conservative treatment for improving functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles. PMID:26180363

  16. A novel, non-functional, COL1A1 polymorphism is not associated with lumbar disk disease in young male Greek subjects unlike that of the Sp1 site

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Thalia; Tilkeridis, Constantinos; Garantziotis, Stavros; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We recently reported the association of the Sp1 site polymorphism of the COL1A1 gene with lumbar disk disease (LDD). In the present study we searched for a different polymorphism of the COL1A1 gene (which is usually not in linkage disequilibrium with the Sp1 site) in subjects with LDD. DESIGN Blood was collected from 24 Greek army recruits, aged 29±7.6 years, with LDD, and 66 healthy men, aged 26±4.38 years, matched for body mass index (BMI) and age, with normal BMD and with no history of trauma or fractures, who served as controls. DNA was extracted and the COL1A1 gene was sequenced. Of the control subjects, 12 were army recruits and 54 were selected from the general population. RESULTS The four base-pair insertion polymorphism in the COL1A1 gene analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA produces two different fragments (alleles A1 and A2): 14 patients (58.3%) were homozygous for A2A2, versus 35 controls (53%), while 3 patients (12.5%) were A1A1, and 8 of the control subjects (12%) had this genotype. There were no statistically significant differences in the presence of the two alleles of this polymorphism between patients with LDD and control subjects. CONCLUSIONS A four base-pair insertion polymorphism of the COL1A1 gene is not associated with the presence of LDD in young males, unlike the Sp1 site polymorphism of the same gene. These data reinforce the association between LDD and the functional polymorphisms of the Sp1 site by showing that other polymorphic sites of the of the COL1A1 gene in the same population of patients are not linked to the disease. PMID:18694864

  17. Does the Incremental Shuttle Walking Test require maximal effort in healthy subjects of different ages?

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristiane Golias; Mesquita, Rafael; Hayashi, Daniela; Merli, Myriam Fernanda; Vidotto, Laís Silva; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron; Probst, Vanessa S

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate if the Incremental Shuttle Walking Test (ISWT) requires maximal effort in healthy subjects of different ages. Cross-sectional. University-based research laboratory. 331 healthy subjects separated into six groups according to age: G1, 18 to 28 years; G2, 29 to 39 years; G3, 40 to 50 years; G4, 51 to 61 years; G5, 62 to 72 years and; G6, 73 to 83 years. Two ISWTs were performed and participants were permitted to run and to exceed 12 levels during the test, if necessary. Heart rate (HR) and symptoms of dyspnoea and fatigue were recorded before and after the test, and the percentage of age-predicted maximal HR (HRmax) was calculated. Maximal effort was defined as HRmax >90% of age-predicted HRmax. Almost 31% of the subjects exceeded 12 levels in the ISWT. At the end of the test, all groups presented a median [interquartile range] HR greater than 90% of HRmax (G1: 100 [95 to 104]; G2: 100 [96 to 105]; G3: 103 [97 to 108]; G4: 99 [91 to 106]; G5: 96 [87 to 106] and G6: 96 [91 to 109]% HRmax). Regarding symptoms, all groups showed higher values after the test (P<0.05). A multiple logistic regression analysis identified female gender, older age and a lower HR before the test as determinants of not achieving 90% of HRmax at the end of the test. The ISWT requires maximal effort in healthy individuals, but for that it is necessary to extend the test beyond twelve levels. Female gender, older age and lower heart rate before the test are the determinants of not reaching maximal effort. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lumbar lordosis in female collegiate dancers and gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Amanda M; Kenworthy, Kristen L; Cortes, Nelson; Caswell, Shane V

    2014-12-01

    Postural deviations can predispose an individual to increased injury risk. Specifically, lumbar deviations are related to increased low back pain and injury. Dancers and gymnasts are anecdotally suggested to have exaggerated lumbar lordosis and subsequently may be at increased risk of lumbar pathologies. Our objective was to examine lumbar lordosis levels in dancers and gymnasts. We examined lumbar lordosis in 47 healthy collegiate females (17 dancers, 29 gymnasts; mean age 20.2 ± 1.6 yrs) using 2-dimensional sagittal plane photographs and the Watson MacDonncha Posture Analysis instrument. Participants' lordosis levels were cross-tabulated and a Mann-Whitney U-test compared lumbar lordosis between groups (p<0.05). Most participants (89.4%, n=42) exhibited either marked (dancers 50%, n=9; gymnasts 62.1%, n=18; combined 57.4%, n=27) or moderate (dancers 27.8%, n=5; gymnasts 34.5%, n=10; combined 31.9%, n=15) lumbar lordosis deviations. The distribution of lordosis was similar across groups (p=0.22). Most dancers and gymnasts had moderate or marked lumbar lordosis. The extreme ranges of motion required during dancing and gymnastics may contribute to the participants' high lumbar lordosis. Instructors should be aware that there may be links between repetitive hyperextension activities and lumbar lordosis levels in dancers and gymnasts. Thus, they should proactively examine lumbar lordosis in their dancers and gymnasts. How much age of training onset, regimens, survivor bias, or other factors influence lumbar lordosis requires study. Longitudinal studies are also needed to determine if lumbar lordosis levels influence lumbar injury incidence in dancers and gymnasts.

  19. Characteristics of PMHS Lumbar Motion Segments in Lateral Shear.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Srini; Prasad, Priya; Rouhana, Stephen W; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Nolte, Lutz P

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of eighteen lumbar spine motion segments subjected to lateral shear forces under quasi-static (0.5 mm/s) and dynamic (500 mm/s) test conditions. The quasi-static test was also performed on the lumbar spine of a side impact anthropomorphic test device, the EuroSID-2 (ES-2). In the quasi-static tests, the maximum force before disc-endplate separation in the PMHS lumbar motion segments was 1850 +/- 612 N, while the average linear stiffness of PMHS lumbar motion segments was 323 +/- 126 N/mm. There was a statistically significant difference between the quasi-static (1850 +/- 612 N) and dynamic (2616 +/- 1151 N) maximum shear forces. The ES-2 lumbar spine (149 N/mm) was more compliant than the PMHS lumbar segments under the quasi-static test condition.

  20. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph (b... degrees at a force level of not less than 18 pounds and not more than 22 pounds, and straighten upon removal of the force to within 5 degrees of its initial position. (b) Test procedure. (1) The lumbar...

  1. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  2. Subjective global assessment for nutritional assessment of hospitalized patients requiring haemodialysis: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sheau Kang; Loh, Yet Hua; Choong, Hui Lin; Suhail, Sufi M

    2016-11-01

    Evidence has validated that the nutritional status of hospitalized patients on haemodialysis could be compromised because of admission-related and hospital-associated morbidities on the background of their kidney disease. However, nutritional status is not assessed and monitored routinely during the hospitalization period. The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of hospitalized patients requiring haemodialysis with the subjective global assessment (SGA) tool during the hospitalization period. This is a prospective cohort study conducted in an acute tertiary general hospital. Patients aged 21-75 years old, admitted for various illnesses and requiring haemodialysis between November 2011 and May 2012 were enrolled into this study. A trained dietician assessed patients' nutritional status with the SGA tool, which included historical data on weight change, dietary intake, gastrointestinal symptoms, functional capacity, comorbidities and physical examination on subcutaneous fat loss, muscle wasting and presence of oedema and/or ascites. Patients were categorized under three groups: SGA-A (well-nourished), SGA-B (moderately malnourished) and SGA-C (severely malnourished). Eighty patients (mean ± SD age = 59 ± 10 years; 76% Chinese ethnicity) were assessed. Mean ± SD body mass index (BMI) was 25.1 ± 6.1 kg/m(2) . SGA categories were 48% SGA-A, 46% SGA-B, and 6% SGA-C. Mean energy and protein intake (P < 0.001), length of hospitalization stay (P = 0.03) and BMI (P = 0.001) were significantly different across the three categories of nutritional status. More than half of the hospitalized patients requiring haemodialysis were malnourished. It is important to incorporate SGA in the care of hospitalized haemodialysis patients for early detection of malnutrition and for medical nutrition therapy to optimise patients' nutritional status for better outcomes. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Active cervical and lumbar range of motion during performance of activities of daily living in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Cobian, Daniel G; Daehn, Nicole S; Anderson, Paul A; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2013-09-15

    Observational cohort design. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the maximum, cumulative, and average cervical and lumbar spine motion required to perform common activities of daily living (ADLs). Previous studies have measured the maximum cervical and lumbar excursions during ADLs, but none have used a motion capture system to allow for noninvasive continuous motion monitoring. Ten healthy, young adults performed 16 ADLs while 3-dimensional kinematics were recorded. Cervical and lumbar rigid body kinematic models were created and scaled to each subject to calculate angular motion. Cervical and lumbar mean active range of motion (ROM) and total excursion for flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The majority of activities used 20% to 40% of maximum available cervical ROM and 40% to 60% of maximum available lumbar ROM. Activities that required concurrent cervical and lumbar spine motion, such as washing in the shower, picking an object up from the floor, and clearing the table, had the greatest motion totals. These activities typically required rates of excursion greater than 10° per second. This is the first investigation to report cumulative spine motion totals associated with the performance of common ADLs. These results provide a preliminary cervical and lumbar spine motion profile in healthy, young adults. The relationship between traditional end ROM measurements and function is not well defined. In agreement with previous research, this investigation concludes that only a small percentage of available ROM is used in performing most activities. Thus, determining the total wear related to common activities may help us to better understand and address spine-related impairments. N/A.

  4. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... at and just below the waist. A herniated lumbar disc can press on the nerves in the spine and may cause pain, numbness, ... point injections do not help heal a herniated lumbar ... on and irritating the nerves, causing symptoms of pain and weakness. The most ...

  5. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. This narrowing is called “stenosis.” As the lumbar spinal canal narrows, the nerves that go through it are squeezed. This squeezing ... chest). It’s thought that these positions “open” the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, ...

  6. 46 CFR 70.05-1 - United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Fishing vessels not engaged in ocean or coastwise service. Such vessels may carry persons on the... international voyage is subject to the requirements of the International Convention for Safety of Life at...

  7. 40 CFR 63.10446 - Do title V permitting requirements apply to area sources subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to area sources subject to this subpart? You are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71, provided you are not otherwise required by law to obtain a...

  8. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance...

  9. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance...

  10. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance...

  11. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance...

  12. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 541 - Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard A Appendix A to Part 541 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A Appendix A to Part 541—Light Duty Truck Lines Subject...

  14. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 541 - Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements... (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A Appendix A to Part 541—Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 541 - Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements... (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A Appendix A to Part 541—Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 541 - Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard A Appendix A to Part 541 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A Appendix A to Part 541—Light Duty Truck Lines Subject...

  17. The number of subjects per variable required in linear regression analyses.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2015-06-01

    To determine the number of independent variables that can be included in a linear regression model. We used a series of Monte Carlo simulations to examine the impact of the number of subjects per variable (SPV) on the accuracy of estimated regression coefficients and standard errors, on the empirical coverage of estimated confidence intervals, and on the accuracy of the estimated R(2) of the fitted model. A minimum of approximately two SPV tended to result in estimation of regression coefficients with relative bias of less than 10%. Furthermore, with this minimum number of SPV, the standard errors of the regression coefficients were accurately estimated and estimated confidence intervals had approximately the advertised coverage rates. A much higher number of SPV were necessary to minimize bias in estimating the model R(2), although adjusted R(2) estimates behaved well. The bias in estimating the model R(2) statistic was inversely proportional to the magnitude of the proportion of variation explained by the population regression model. Linear regression models require only two SPV for adequate estimation of regression coefficients, standard errors, and confidence intervals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of pelvic diagonal movements and resistance on the lumbar multifidus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Yeop; Hong, Ji-Heon; Yu, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jin Seop

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of pelvic diagonal movements, made with and without resistance, on the thickness of lumbar multifidus muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Participants in this study were healthy subjects who had no musculoskeletal disorders or lumbar-related pain. Participants were positioned on their side and instructed to lie with their hip flexor at 40 degrees. Ultrasonography was used for measurement, and the values of two calculations were averaged. [Results] The thickness of ipsilateral lumbar multifidus muscles showed a significant difference following the exercise of pelvic diagonal movements. The results of anterior elevation movements and posterior depression movements also demonstrated significant difference. There was no significant difference in lumbar multifidus muscles thickness between movements made with and without resistance. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that pelvic diagonal movements can be an effective method to promote muscular activation of the ipsilateral multifidus. Furthermore, researchers have concluded that resistance is not required during pelvic diagonal movements to selectively activate the core muscles. PMID:28356650

  19. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  20. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar spine configuration

    PubMed Central

    Hamoud, K.; May, H.; Hay, O.; Medlej, B.; Masharawi, Y.; Peled, N.; Hershkovitz, I.

    2010-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) becomes a common health problem among the elderly. DLSS is usually caused by degenerative changes in bony and/or soft tissue elements. The poor correlation between radiological manifestations and the clinical picture emphasizes the fact that more studies are required to determine the natural course of this syndrome. Our aim was to reveal the association between lower lumbar spine configuration and DLSS. Two groups were studied: the first included 67 individuals with DLSS (mean age 66 ± 10) and the second 100 individuals (mean age 63.4 ± 13) without DLSS-related symptoms. Both groups underwent CT images (Philips Brilliance 64) and the following measurements were performed: a cross-section area of the dural sac, vertebral body dimensions (height, length and width), AP diameter of the bony spinal canal, lumbar lordosis and sacral slope angles. All measurements were taken at L3 to S1. Vertebral body lengths were significantly greater in the DLSS group at all levels compared to the control, whereas anterior vertebral body heights (L3, L4, L5) and middle vertebral heights (L3, L5) were significantly smaller in the LSS group. Lumbar lordosis, sacral slope and bony spinal canal were significantly smaller in the DLSS compared to the control. We conclude that the size and shape of vertebral bodies and canals significantly differed between the study groups. A tentative model is suggested to explain the association between these characteristics and the development of degenerative spinal stenosis. PMID:20652366

  1. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 544 - Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements Only in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements Only in Designated States B Appendix B to Part 544 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INSURER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Pt. 544, App. B Appendix B to Part 544—Issuers of...

  2. Changes in bending stiffness and lumbar spine range of movement following lumbar mobilization and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Stamos-Papastamos, Nikolaos; Petty, Nicola J; Williams, Jonathan M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lumbar rotational manipulation and lumbar central posteroanterior mobilization on lumbar bending stiffness and flexion and extension range of motion (ROM). A same-subject, repeated-measures, crossover design was used using 32 asymptomatic subjects (16 female and 16 male; mean [SD] age, 25.5 [4.5] years; weight, 65.7 [11.8] kg; and height, 1.70 [0.08] m). Each subject received mobilization or manipulation on 2 different occasions. Bending stiffness was calculated using a 3-point bending model using an electromagnetic tracking device and a force platform; lumbar flexion and extension ROM was measured using an electromagnetic tracking device. All variables were measured pre- and postintervention. Their effect was compared using paired t tests. Manipulation and mobilization did not significantly alter either bending stiffness or lumbar flexion and extension ROM (mobilization: P = .175, P = .613, and P = .535; manipulation: P = .973, P = .323, and P = .439). Bending stiffness changes were not correlated to changes in ROM (Pearson r for stiffness-flexion = -0.102, P = .586; Pearson r for stiffness-extension = 0.014, P = .941). Manipulation and mobilization had no significant effect on bending stiffness or flexion and extension ROM for this group of subjects. Some individual variations in effect were observed. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Carolynne M; Forbes, Raeburn B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture is one of the most commonly performed invasive tests in clinical medicine. Evaluation of an acute headache and investigation of inflammatory or infectious disease of the nervous system are the most common indications. Serious complications are rare, and correct technique will minimise diagnostic error and maximise patient comfort. We review the technique of diagnostic Lumbar Puncture including anatomy, needle selection, needle insertion, measurement of opening pressure, Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) specimen handling and after care. We also make some quality improvement suggestions for those designing services incorporating diagnostic Lumbar Puncture. PMID:25075138

  4. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Species subject to permitting... Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.184 Species subject to permitting... accompanied by the appropriate heading or subheading numbers from the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United...

  5. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Species subject to permitting... Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.184 Species subject to permitting... subpart apply to bluefin tuna products including those identified by the following subheading numbers from...

  6. Lumbar vertebral pedicles: radiologic anatomy and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.P.; Kumar, R.; Kinkhabwala, M.; Wengrover, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    With the advancement of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scanning the spine has added new knowledge to the various conditions affecting the pedicles. We wish to review the entire spectrum of pedicular lesions: the embryology, normal anatomy, normal variants, pitfalls, congenital anomalies, and pathological conditions are discussed. Different imaging modalities involving CT, isotope bone scanning, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used to complement plain films of the lumbar spine. This subject review is an excellent source for future reference to lumbar pedicular lesions. 27 references.

  7. Quantification of lumbar endurance on a backup lumbar extension dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Hager, Staci M; Udermann, Brian E; Reineke, David M; Gibson, Mark H; Mayer, John M; Murray, Steven R

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the reliability of static and dynamic lumbar muscle endurance measurements on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer. Sixteen healthy participants (8 male; 8 female) volunteered for this investigation. Fifty percent of each participant's body weight was calculated to determine the weight load utilized for the static (holding time) and dynamic (repetitions) lumbar extension endurance tests. Four separate tests (2 static, 2 dynamic) were conducted with at least a 24-hour rest period between tests. Test-retest intraclass correlations were shown to be high (static lumbar endurance, ICC = 0.92 (p < 0.0005); dynamic lumbar endurance, ICC = 0.93 (p < 0.0005) for both of the performed tests. Our results demonstrated that static and dynamic lumbar endurance can be assessed reliably on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer. Key PointsReliability studies that test lumbar endurance on machines that effectively stabilize the pelvis and isolate the lumbar extensors are limited.This is the first study to report reliability measures of static and dynamic lumbar endurance on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer.Static and dynamic lumbar endurance on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer, which uses a variety of pelvic stabilization mechanisms, can be reliably assessed in apparently healthy individuals.Future research is necessary to examine the reliability of lumbar extension endurance on the BackUP dynamometer in patient populations and validity in various settings.

  8. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  9. Minimally invasive lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2013-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is a common problem. Nerve root compression can occur at different places along a nerve root's course including in the foramina. Minimal invasive approaches allow easier exposure of the lateral foramina and decompression of the nerve root in the foramina. This video demonstrates a minimally invasive approach to decompress the lumbar nerve root in the foramina with a lateral to medial decompression. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/jqa61HSpzIA.

  10. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security requirements for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.203 Security requirements for patent applications containing...

  11. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Security requirements for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.203 Security requirements for patent applications containing...

  12. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Security requirements for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.203 Security requirements for patent applications containing...

  13. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security requirements for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.203 Security requirements for patent applications containing...

  14. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security requirements for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.203 Security requirements for patent applications containing...

  15. The effects of an 8-week stabilization exercise program on lumbar movement sense in patients with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jean-Alexandre; Preuss, Richard; Henry, Sharon M; Dumas, Jean-Pierre; Larivière, Christian

    2016-01-14

    Lumbar stabilization exercises have gained popularity and credibility in patients with non-acute low back pain. Previous research provides more support to strength/resistance and coordination/stabilisation programs. Some authors also suggest adding strength/resistance training following motor control exercises. However, the effect of such a lumbar stabilization program on lumbar proprioception has never been tested so far. The present study investigated the effects of an 8-week stabilization exercise program on lumbar proprioception in patients with low back pain (LBP) and assessed the 8-week test-retest reliability of lumbar proprioception in control subjects. Lumbar proprioception was measured before and after an 8-week lumbar stabilization exercise program for patients with LBP. Control subjects participated in the same protocol but received no treatment. The lumbar proprioception measure showed moderate reliability. Patients with LBP and control subjects demonstrated no differences in lumbar proprioception at baseline. Participants from both groups showed better proprioception following the 8-week interval, demonstrating the presence of learning between testing days. The improvement of lumbar proprioception seen in both groups was ascribed to motor learning of the test itself. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on lumbar proprioception remains unknown because the LBP group did not show lumbar proprioception impairments.

  16. Lumbar-pelvic coordination in the sitting position.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yamanaka, Masanori; Takeda, Naoki

    2008-08-01

    This study assessed the relationship of each movement direction on the lumbar spine and on the pelvis in regards to lumbar-pelvic coordination in the sitting position. Lumbar and pelvic motions were recorded using a flexible electrogoniometer in 12 healthy subjects during two different tasks in the sitting position. The coordination of the lumbar spine and pelvis was evaluated using the ratio of lumbar and pelvic angles (L/P ratio hereafter) in three motion phases. There were significant differences in the L/P ratio values between during the "forward bending" and "rising from a forward flexed position" phases (P<0.01). The L/P ratio value ( approximately -0.7) was consistent during the movement from an erect to a slumped sitting position as the lumbar spine and pelvis moved in opposing directions. This study shows that lumbar-pelvic coordination occurs in the sitting position. Lumbar-pelvic coordination is confirmed even if the movement tasks are different in the sitting position, and these findings show that aspects of a particular movement are dependent on the given movement task. These findings may provide greater insight into the kinematic changes involved in lumber-pelvic coordination, and help clinicians implement sitting exercises conducive to the independence of the patient.

  17. 21 CFR 1314.115 - Distributions not subject to reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RETAIL SALE OF SCHEDULED LISTED CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Mail-Order Sales § 1314.115 Distributions not subject... individual or residential address in any 30-day period. (2) Distributions by retail distributors that may not... authorized for a retail distributor as specified in § 1300.02(b)(29) of this chapter, except that this...

  18. 46 CFR 90.05-1 - Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subchapter. (a) This subchapter is applicable to all U.S.-flag vessels indicated in Column 4 of Table 90.05-1... subject to the provisions of Subchapter O—Certain Bulk and Dangerous Cargoes 10 Column 1 Column 2 Column 3 Column 4 Column 5 Column 6 Column 7 (1) Motor, all vessels except seagoing motor vessels ≥300 gross tons...

  19. 40 CFR 1060.1 - Which products are subject to this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: (1) Light-duty motor vehicles (see 40 CFR part 86). (2) Heavy-duty motor vehicles and heavy-duty... nonroad engines where such fuel systems are subject to part 86 because they are part of a heavy-duty motor... part 1060 does not apply for fuel lines made wholly of metal. Table 1 to § 1060.1—Part...

  20. 40 CFR 1060.1 - Which products are subject to this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: (1) Light-duty motor vehicles (see 40 CFR part 86). (2) Heavy-duty motor vehicles and heavy-duty... nonroad engines where such fuel systems are subject to part 86 because they are part of a heavy-duty motor... part 1060 does not apply for fuel lines made wholly of metal. Table 1 to § 1060.1—Part...

  1. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 329(b)), this is an exemption for “work”, i.e... remanufacturing of equipment which is so extensive as to be equivalent to manufacturing are subject to the Walsh-Healey Act. Remanufacturing shall be deemed to be manufacturing when the criteria in paragraph (b)(1) or...

  2. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 329(b)), this is an exemption for “work”, i.e... remanufacturing of equipment which is so extensive as to be equivalent to manufacturing are subject to the Walsh-Healey Act. Remanufacturing shall be deemed to be manufacturing when the criteria in paragraph (b)(1) or...

  3. 40 CFR 63.11081 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this subpart? 63.11081 Section 63.11081 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...) The loading of aviation gasoline into storage tanks at airports, and the subsequent transfer of aviation gasoline within the airport, is not subject to this subpart. (e) The loading of gasoline...

  4. The effects of weightbath traction hydrotherapy as a component of complex physical therapy in disorders of the cervical and lumbar spine: a controlled pilot study with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Mihály; Molnár, Levente; Dobai, József; Oláh, Csaba; Fehér, Judit; Bender, Tamás

    2008-06-01

    The therapeutic modalities available for the conservative management of chronic cervical and lumbar pain include underwater traction, the usefulness of which is not universally acknowledged. No reports have been published on clinical trials evaluating underwater traction. This study was intended to ascertain any beneficial impact of weightbath therapy on the clinical parameters and quality of life of patients with cervical/lumbar discopathy. The study population comprised 72 subjects. Two groups of 18 patients each received underwater traction therapy of the cervical or lumbar spine with add-on McKenzie exercises and iontophoresis. The remaining two groups, treated with exercises and iontophoresis, served as controls. VAS and SF36 scores, range of motion were monitored to appraise therapeutic efficacy in cervical discopathy, whereas these parameters were supplemented by the Oswestry index in lumbar discopathy. A MRI scan was done at baseline and after 3 months of follow-up. Underwater cervical or lumbar traction therapy for discopathy achieved significant improvement of all study parameters, which was still evident 3 months later. Among the controls, significant improvement of just a single parameter was seen in patients with lumbar, and of two parameters in those with cervical discopathy. Underwater traction therapy effectively mitigates pain, enhances joint flexibility, and improves the quality of life of patients with cervical or lumbar discopathy. The equipment required to administer weightbath therapy is simple to install and treatment technique is straightforward.

  5. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  6. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  7. 40 CFR 262.203 - How an eligible academic entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart. 262.203 Section 262.203 Protection of... entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart. (a) An eligible academic entity... Identification Form (EPA Form 8700-12), that it is electing to be subject to the requirements of this subpart...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Applicability of This Subpart § 62.15035 Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity?...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Applicability of This Subpart § 62.15035 Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity?...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Applicability of This Subpart § 62.15035 Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity? This...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Applicability of This Subpart § 62.15035 Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity? This...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Applicability of This Subpart § 62.15035 Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity? This...

  13. How does wearing a lumbar orthosis interfere with gait initiation?

    PubMed

    Cusin, Etienne; Do, Manh-C; Rougier, Patrice R

    2017-06-01

    The interaction between medical devices and the human body must be evaluated in standardised laboratory tests. Since wearing a lumbar orthosis is assumed to reduce lower back mobility and reinforce trunk movement control through imposed lordosis, this device is expected to affect gait initiation which requires trunk and pelvic rotations. Thirteen healthy subjects were asked to initiate gait without orthosis (control) and orthosis with or without lordosis constraints. The biomechanical parameters usually reported for gait initiation were studied and no statistically significant effects were found. Indeed, the duration of the anticipation, and execution phases and maximal instantaneous velocity of centre of gravity at the end of the first step were not modified by the experimental conditions. The lack of interference underlines the robustness of the gait initiation parameters, which therefore may lead subjects to adopt adaptive strategies to retain this invariance. Future experiments should be conducted to highlight these strategies. Practitioner Summary: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various lumbar orthosis characteristics on gait initiation organisation. The results, based on a dynamic analysis of balance strategies, showed that the medical device had no repercussions on movement control. Several explanations are proposed, which should be validated by future studies.

  14. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the operating requirements of APPS or Annex VI that are applicable to U.S.-flagged vessels outside of... implemented by APPS, for Party vessels, including U.S.-flagged vessels. Note also that nothing in this part...

  15. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... percentage of total development cost required for modernization). (i) For purposes of this determination, the... unit monthly Section 8 cost. (iv) The cost methodology necessary to conduct the cost comparisons...

  16. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the operating requirements of APPS or Annex VI that are applicable to U.S.-flagged vessels outside of... APPS, for Party vessels, including U.S.-flagged vessels. Note also that nothing in this part limits the...

  17. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the operating requirements of APPS or Annex VI that are applicable to U.S.-flagged vessels outside of... implemented by APPS, for Party vessels, including U.S.-flagged vessels. Note also that nothing in this part...

  18. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the operating requirements of APPS or Annex VI that are applicable to U.S.-flagged vessels outside of... implemented by APPS, for Party vessels, including U.S.-flagged vessels. Note also that nothing in this part...

  19. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the operating requirements of APPS or Annex VI that are applicable to U.S.-flagged vessels outside of... implemented by APPS, for Party vessels, including U.S.-flagged vessels. Note also that nothing in this part...

  20. MR system operator: recommended minimum requirements for performing MRI in human subjects in a research setting.

    PubMed

    Calamante, Fernando; Faulkner, William H; Ittermann, Bernd; Kanal, Emanuel; Kimbrell, Vera; Owman, Titti; Reeder, Scott B; Sawyer, Anne M; Shellock, Frank G; van den Brink, Johan S

    2015-04-01

    This article is intended to provide guidelines for the minimum level of safety and operational knowledge that an MR system operator should exhibit in order to safely perform an MR procedure in a human subject in a research setting. This article represents the position of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) regarding this important topic and was developed by members of this society's MR Safety Committee.

  1. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical treatment. Fracture-dislocations of the thoracic and lumbar spine are caused by very high-energy trauma. They can be extremely unstable injuries that often result in serious spinal cord or nerve damage. These injuries require stabilization through surgery. The ...

  2. Relief of Lumbar Symptoms After Cervical Decompression in Patients with Tandem Spinal Stenosis Presenting with Primarily Lumbar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Felbaum, Daniel R; Stewart, Jeffrey J; Sandhu, Faheem A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tandem cervical and lumbar spinal stenosis (TSS) is classically described as intermittent claudication, gait disturbance, and clinical findings of mixed myelopathy and polyradiculopathy. Rarely, patients can present with TSS manifesting in isolated lumbar pain. Several reports have demonstrated improved lumbar back pain and radiculopathy after decompressive cervical spine procedures. We present six patients with dramatic resolution of lumbar spine related symptoms after decompression of the cervical spinal cord despite presenting solely with lower back complaints. Methods: Clinical records of the senior author (F.A.S.) gathered from April 2006 to March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed identifying six patients presenting solely with lumbar symptoms and diagnosed with TSS based on history and physical examination. Results: Six patients with a mean age of 55 (range 39 to 60) presented with solely lower back symptoms and clinical findings suspicious for TSS. Mean follow-up time for all patients was 12 months (range three to 27 months, median 11.5 months). Three patients underwent a cervical procedure as the principal operation, while the remainder had the lumbar spine decompressed initially. All patients that underwent a cervical procedure initially experienced a dramatic decrease or complete resolution of their preoperative lower back pain and radiculopathy (mean preoperative VAS of 6.7 vs. 3.7 postoperative). The remainder of patients with persistent lumbar symptoms resolved after a subsequent cervical operation. Conclusion: Patients presenting with lumbar symptoms out of proportion to imaging require further investigation. We highlight the resolution of lumbar symptoms after a cervical procedure in a select group of patients presenting with lone lower back complaints. In patients presenting with symptoms disproportionate to lumbar imaging, treatment of cervical pathology may provide robust long-term relief of the initial lumbar-related presentation

  3. Measurement of segmental lumbar spine flexion and extension using ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Chleboun, Gary S; Amway, Matthew J; Hill, Jesse G; Root, Kara J; Murray, Hugh C; Sergeev, Alexander V

    2012-10-01

    Clinical measurement, technical note. To describe a technique to measure interspinous process distance using ultrasound (US) imaging, to assess the reliability of the technique, and to compare the US imaging measurements to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements in 3 different positions of the lumbar spine. Segmental spinal motion has been assessed using various imaging techniques, as well as surgically inserted pins. However, some imaging techniques are costly (MRI) and some require ionizing radiation (radiographs and fluoroscopy), and surgical procedures have limited use because of the invasive nature of the technique. Therefore, it is important to have an easily accessible and inexpensive technique for measuring lumbar segmental motion to more fully understand spine motion in vivo, to evaluate the changes that occur with various interventions, and to be able to accurately relate the changes in symptoms to changes in motion of individual vertebral segments. Six asymptomatic subjects participated. The distance between spinous processes at each lumbar segment (L1-2, L2-3, L3-4, L4-5) was measured digitally using MRI and US imaging. The interspinous distance was measured with subjects supine and the lumbar spine in 3 different positions (resting, lumbar flexion, and lumbar extension) for both MRI and US imaging. The differences in distance from neutral to extension, neutral to flexion, and extension to flexion were calculated. The measurement methods had excellent reliability for US imaging (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC3,3] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval: 0.85, 0.97) and MRI (ICC3,3 = 0.98; 95% confidence interval: 0.95, 0.99). The distance measured was similar between US imaging and MRI (P>.05), except at L3-4 flexion-extension (P = .003). On average, the MRI measurements were 1.3 mm greater than the US imaging measurements. This study describes a new method for the measurement of lumbar spine segmental flexion and extension motion using US

  4. Lumbar Repositioning Accuracy as a Measure of Proprioception in Patients with Back Dysfunction and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A control group cross-sectional design. Purpose To compare the difference in repositioning accuracy, as a measure of lumbar proprioception, between patients with back dysfunction and healthy subjects. Overview of Literature Evidence suggests that spinal stability might be compromised in patients with back dysfunction. Lumbar proprioception in back dysfunction has not, however, been adequately investigated. Methods Forty-five participants, representing three groups, took part in the study. Subjects in group one (n = 15) were healthy subjects. Subjects in group two (n = 15) had a history of non-specific mechanical back dysfunction, while subjects in group three (n = 15) had discogenic back dysfunction. Subjects were required to reproduce a target position of 30° lumbar flexion and the absolute error (AE) was calculated. Results The AEs between target and reproduced positions were calculated. The average repositioning AEs were 2.8, 7.5, and 7.1° for the control, mechanical, and discogenic back dysfunction groups respectively. Analysis of variance revealed significant difference between the three groups (p < 0.0002). The AEs were greater in the two back dysfunction groups compared to the control group. Post-hoc tests revealed significant difference in AEs between the control and mechanical group (p < 0.0003), and discogenic group (p < 0.0001), while there was no significant difference between the mechanical and discogenic back dysfunction groups (p = 0.73). Conclusions Differences in proprioception do exist between subjects with back dysfunction and normal subjects. The proprioceptive deficits do exist regardless of the cause of the back dysfunction, and may represent an important aspect of the patho-physiology of such a condition. PMID:22164313

  5. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control... requirements? If you are a subpart H system serving fewer than 10,000 persons which does not provide...

  6. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control... requirements? If you are a subpart H system serving fewer than 10,000 persons which does not provide...

  7. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements... H system serving fewer than 10,000 people and utilizing conventional filtration or direct...

  8. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements... H system serving fewer than 10,000 people and utilizing conventional filtration or direct...

  9. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control... requirements? If you are a subpart H system serving fewer than 10,000 persons which does not provide...

  10. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control... requirements? If you are a subpart H system serving fewer than 10,000 persons which does not provide...

  11. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements... H system serving fewer than 10,000 people and utilizing conventional filtration or direct...

  12. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements... H system serving fewer than 10,000 people and utilizing conventional filtration or direct...

  13. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements... H system serving fewer than 10,000 people and utilizing conventional filtration or direct...

  14. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control... requirements? If you are a subpart H system serving fewer than 10,000 persons which does not provide...

  15. 46 CFR 24.05-1 - Vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subchapter is applicable to all vessels indicated in column 5 of table 24.05-1(a), and is applicable to all... Column 1 Column 2 Column 3 Column 4 Column 5 Column 6 Column 7 (1) Motor, all vessels except seagoing... by columns 2 and 3. All vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR part 98 All...

  16. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim struggled...

  17. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim struggled...

  18. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim struggled...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11865 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyvinyl chloride and copolymers production process units (PVCPU) as defined in § 63.12005 that are located at, or are part of, a major source of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emissions as defined in § 63.2. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to research and development facilities, as defined in...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11865 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyvinyl chloride and copolymers production process units (PVCPU) as defined in § 63.12005 that are located at, or are part of, a major source of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emissions as defined in § 63.2. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to research and development facilities, as defined in...

  1. Clinical usefulness of assessing lumbar somatosensory evoked potentials in lumbar spinal stenosis. Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Konno, Shunsuke; Miyamoto, Masabumi; Gembun, Yoshikazu; Horiguchi, Gen; Ito, Hiromoto

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of assessing lumbar somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The latencies of lumbar SSEPs were recorded in 40 patients with central LSS, including 16 men and 24 women. The mean age of the patients was 67.3 +/- 7.4 years. The diagnosis was LSS in 23 cases and LSS associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis in 17 cases. The average duration of symptoms was 43.8 +/- 51.2 months. Twenty-two cases had bilateral and 18 cases had unilateral leg symptoms. Thirty-seven cases were associated with neurogenic intermittent claudication and the mean walking distance of patients with this condition was 246.8 +/- 232.7 m. The mean Japanese Orthopedic Association scale score, as well as the visual analog scale (VAS) scores of low-back pain, leg pain, and numbness, were 16.5 +/- 3.5, 6.0 +/- 2.5, 6.9 +/- 2.1, and 7.8 +/- 2.2, respectively. The minimal cross-sectional area of the dural sac on MR imaging was 0.44 +/- 0.21 cm(2). Thirty-nine cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy without lumbar and peripheral neuropathy were chosen as the control group. The latencies of lumbar SSEPs in patients with LSS and in the control group were 23.0 +/- 2.0 ms and 21.6 +/- 1.9 ms, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the LSS and control groups (p < 0.05). The latency of lumbar SSEPs was significant correlated with the VAS score of leg numbness (p < 0.05). The latency of lumbar SSEPs in LSS was clearly delayed when the VAS score of leg numbness was > or = 8 (p < 0.05). Lumbar SSEPs are able to detect neurological deficit in the lumbar area effectively, and they can reflect part of the subjective severity of sensory disturbance (numbness) in LSS. Both lumbar SSEPs and VAS scores of leg numbness may be useful for clinical evaluation in patients with LSS.

  2. Physiological Requirements to Perform the Glittre Activities of Daily Living Test by Subjects With Mild-to-Severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Souza, Gérson F; Moreira, Graciane L; Tufanin, Andréa; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Castro, Antonio A; Jardim, José R; Nascimento, Oliver A

    2017-08-01

    The Glittre activities of daily living (ADL) test is supposed to evaluate the functional capacity of COPD patients. The physiological requirements of the test and the time taken to perform it by COPD patients in different disease stages are not well known. The objective of this work was to compare the metabolic, ventilatory, and cardiac requirements and the time taken to carry out the Glittre ADL test by COPD subjects with mild, moderate, and severe disease. Spirometry, Medical Research Council questionnaire, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and 2 Glittre ADL tests were evaluated in 62 COPD subjects. Oxygen uptake (V̇O2 ), carbon dioxide production, pulmonary ventilation, breathing frequency, heart rate, SpO2 , and dyspnea were analyzed before and at the end of the tests. Maximum voluntary ventilation, Glittre peak V̇O2 /cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) peak V̇O2 , Glittre V̇E/maximum voluntary ventilation, and Glittre peak heart rate/CPET peak heart rate ratios were calculated to analyze their reserves. Subjects carried out the Glittre ADL test with similar absolute metabolic, ventilatory, and cardiac requirements. Ventilatory reserve decreased progressively from mild to severe COPD subjects (P < .001 for Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] 1 vs GOLD 2, P < .001 for GOLD 1 vs GOLD 3, and P < .001 for GOLD 2 vs GOLD 3). Severe subjects with COPD presented a significantly lower metabolic reserve than the mild and moderate subjects (P = .006 and P = .043, respectively) and significantly lower Glittre peak heart rate/CPET peak heart rate than mild subjects (P = .01). Time taken to carry out the Glittre ADL test was similar among the groups (P = .82 for GOLD 1 vs GOLD 2, P = .19 for GOLD 1 vs GOLD 3, and P = .45 for GOLD 2 vs GOLD 3). As the degree of air-flow obstruction progresses, the COPD subjects present significant lower ventilatory reserve to perform the Glittre ADL test. In addition, metabolic and cardiac reserves may

  3. Characteristics of thoracic and lumbar movements during gait in lumbar spinal stenosis patients before and after decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Wataru; Deie, Masataka; Fujita, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Sunagawa, Toru; Asaeda, Makoto; Nakamura, Haruka; Kono, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-12-01

    Although gait analysis has been previously conducted for lumbar spinal stenosis patients, the vertebral segmental movements, such as of the thoracic and lumbar regions, and whether the spinal movement during gait changes after decompression surgery remain unclear. Ten patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and 10 healthy controls participated. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scale. Spinal kinematic data of the participants during gait were acquired using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The trunk (whole spine), thoracic, and lumbar flexion and pelvic tilting values were calculated. Spinal kinematic data and clinical outcomes were collected preoperatively and 1month postoperatively for the patients. Compared to that observed preoperatively, the clinical outcomes significantly improved at 1month postoperatively. In the standing position, the preoperative lumbar extension of the patients was significantly smaller than that of the controls. Moreover, during gait, the lumbar flexion relative to the standing position of the patients was smaller than that of the controls preoperatively, and increased at 1month postoperatively. The sum of the thoracic and lumbar flexion values during gait negatively correlated with the score for leg pain. The epidural pressure of lumbar spinal stenosis patients is known to be higher than that of normal subjects during gait, and to decrease during walking with lumbar flexion. Preoperatively, smaller thoracic and lumbar flexion movements during gait relative to the standing position cannot decrease epidural pressure; as a result, severe leg pain might be induced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Do people with intellectual disability require special human subjects research protections? The interplay of history, ethics, and policy.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris; Brosco, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) have a long history of discrimination and stigmatization, and a more recent history of pride and self-advocacy. The early history suggests that people with ID are a vulnerable population and deserve special research protections as do some other groups; the disability rights movement of the late 20th century aligns people with ID more closely with the principle of autonomy that has guided clinical and research ethics for the last 40 years. In examining the history of people with ID and the prevailing framework of human subjects research protections in the United States, we conclude that people with ID do not require special protection in human subjects research. The protections that have already been put in place for all individuals, if conscientiously and effectively implemented, achieve the right balance between safeguarding the interest of human research subjects and empowering individuals who choose to do so to participate in research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the lumbar spine].

    PubMed

    Albisinni, U; Chianura, G; Merlini, L; Calzolari, S; Othsuka, K; Terayama, K

    1988-05-01

    The ossification of the cervical posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is widely known and studied in Japan where a roentgenological incidence of 2.06% adults affected has been found. Data concerning the ossification of the lumbar posterior longitudinal ligament are few and occasional. An epidemiological survey on lumbar OPLL was performed by the authors in Matsumoto, Japan, on a total of 792 subjects, 554 of whom over the age of 35, by means of X-ray of the lumbar spine. Ossification of the lumbar posterior longitudinal ligament was detected in 23 subjects (2.9%), with no significant difference between males (3.0%) and females (2.8). Lumbar OPLL was absent in the 238 subjects aged less than 34; it was the most prevalent after the age of 45 (5.1% in males and 4.5% in females). The ossification developed in two ways: continuous ossified layer extending over several vertebrae; circumscribed ossification of the ligament corresponding to the level of the intervertebral disk (retrodiscal type). The result of this epidemiological survey showed a roentgenological incidence of lumbar OPLL of the same magnitude than that of cervical OPLL.

  6. Insulin requirement profiles in Japanese hospitalized subjects with type 2 diabetes treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Seiya; Okubo, Mina; Koga, Kotaro; Sekigami, Taiji; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Igata, Motoyuki; Ishii, Norio; Shimakawa, Akiko; Matsumura, Takeshi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishida, Kenro; Araki, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the total daily inulin dose (TDD) and contribution of basal insulin to TDD and to identify the predictive factors for insulin requirement profiles in subjects with type 2 diabetes, we retrospectively examined insulin requirement profiles of 275 hospitalized subjects treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy (BBT) (mean age, 60.1 ± 12.9 years; HbA1c, 10.2 ± 4.5%). Target plasma glucose level was set between 80 and 129 mg/dL before breakfast and between 80 and 179 mg/dL at 2-hour after each meal without causing hypoglycemia. We also analyzed the relationship between the insulin requirement profiles (TDD and basal/total daily insulin ratio [B/TD ratio]) and insulin-associated clinical parameters. The mean TDD was 0.463 ± 0.190 unit/kg/day (range, 0.16-1.13 unit/kg/day). The mean B/TD ratio was 0.300 ± 0.099 (range, 0.091-0.667). A positive correlation of TDD with B/TD ratio was revealed by linear regression analysis (r=0.129, p=0.03). Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified post-breakfast glucose levels before titrating insulin as an independent determinant of the insulin requirement profile [Std β (standard regression coefficient) = 0.228, p<0.01 for TDD, Std β = -0.189, p<0.01 for B/TD ratio]. The TDD was <0.6 unit/kg/day and the B/TD ratio was <0.4 in the majority (70.2%) of subjects in the present study. These findings may have relevance in improving glycemic control and decreasing the risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain in subjects with type 2 diabetes treated with BBT.

  7. Microvesicle phenotypes are associated with transfusion requirements and mortality in subjects with severe injuries

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Holcomb, John B.; Kozar, Rosemary; Cardenas, Jessica C.; Wade, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe injury often results in substantial bleeding and mortality. Injury provokes cellular activation and release of extracellular vesicles. Circulating microvesicles (MVs) are predominantly platelet-derived and highly procoagulant. They support hemostasis and vascular function. The roles of MVs in survival after severe injury are largely unknown. We hypothesized that altered MV phenotypes would be associated with transfusion requirements and poor outcomes. Methods This single-centre study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The study cohort consisted of patients with major trauma requiring blood product transfusion and 26 healthy controls. Plasma samples for MVs were collected upon admission to the emergency department (n=169) and post-resuscitation (n=42), and analysed by flow cytometry for MV counts and cellular origin: platelet (PMV), erythrocyte (RMV), leukocyte (LMV), endothelial (EMV), tissue factor (TFMV), and annexin V (AVMV). Twenty-four hour mortality is the outcome measurement used to classify survivors versus non-survivors. Data were compared over time and analysed with demographic and clinical data. Results The median age was 34 (IQR 23, 51), 72% were male, Injury Severity Score was 29 (IQR 19, 36), and 24 h mortality was 13%. MV levels and phenotypes differed between patients and controls. Elevated admission EMVs were found both in survivors (409/µL) and non-survivors (393/µL) compared to controls (23/µL, p<0.001) and persisted over time. Admission levels of PMV, AVMV, RMV, and TFMV were significantly lower in patients who died compared to survivors, but were not independently associated with the 24 h mortality rate. Patients with low MV levels at admission received the most blood products within the first 24 h. AVMV and PMV levels either increased over time or stabilized in survivors but decreased in non-survivors, resulting in significantly lower levels at intensive care unit admission in non-survivors (1,048 vs. 1

  8. Herniated lumbar disk (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herniated lumbar disk is a condition in which part or all of the soft, gelatinous central portion of an intervertebral disk (the nucleus pulposus) is forced through a weakened part of the disk, resulting in back pain and nerve root irritation.

  9. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Is Hydronephrosis a Complication after Anterior Lumbar Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Ruth M.; Behrbalk, Eyal; Mosharraf, Syed; Müller, Roger M.; Boszczyk, Bronek M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective follow-up design. Objective Ureteral injury is a recognized complication following gynecologic surgery and can result in hydronephrosis. Anterior lumbar surgery includes procedures like anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and total disk replacement (TDR). Anterior approaches to the spine require mobilization of the great vessels and visceral organs. The vascular supply to the ureter arising from the iliac arteries may be compromised during midline retraction of the ureter, which could theoretically lead to ureter ischemia and stricture with subsequent hydronephrosis formation. Methods Potential candidates with previous ALIF or TDR via anterior retroperitoneal access between January 2008 and March 2012 were chosen from those operated on by a single surgeon in a university hospital setting (n = 85). Renal ultrasound evaluation of hydronephrosis was performed on all participants. Simple descriptive and inferential statistics were used to generate results. Results A total of 37 voluntary participants were recruited (23 male, 14 female subjects; average age 51.8 years). The prevalence of hydronephrosis in our population was 0.0% (95% confidence interval 0 to 8.1%). Conclusions Retraction of the ureter across the midline in ALIF and TDR does not result in an increase in hydronephrosis and appears to be a safe surgical technique. PMID:26682096

  11. Lumbar discography: an update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results.

  12. Effects of using the posterior or anterior approaches to the lumbar plexus on the minimum effective anesthetic concentration (MEAC) of mepivacaine required to block the femoral nerve: a prospective, randomized, up-and-down study.

    PubMed

    Cappelleri, Gianluca; Aldegheri, Giorgio; Ruggieri, Francesco; Carnelli, Franco; Fanelli, Andrea; Casati, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate if psoas compartment block requires a larger concentration of mepivacaine to block the femoral nerve than does an anterior 3-in-1 femoral nerve block. Forty eight patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament repair were randomly allocated to receive an anterior 3-in-1 femoral block (femoral group, n = 24) or a posterior psoas compartment block (psoas group, n = 24) with 30 mL of mepivacaine. The concentration of the injected solution was varied for consecutive patients using an up-and-down staircase method (initial concentration: 1%; up-and-down steps: 0.1%). The minimum effective anesthetic concentration of mepivacaine blocking the femoral nerve in 50% of cases (ED(50)) was 1.06% +/- 0.31% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45%-1.68%) in the femoral group and 1.03% +/- 0.21% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.45%) in the psoas group (P = .83). The lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerves were blocked in 4 (16%) and 5 (20%) femoral group patients as compared with 20 (83%) and 19 (80%) psoas group patients (P = .005 and P = .0005, respectively). Intraoperative analgesic supplementation was required by 15 (60%) and 5 (20%) patients in the femoral and psoas groups, respectively (P = .01). Using a posterior psoas compartment approach to the lumbar plexus does not increase the minimum effective anesthetic concentration of mepivacaine required to block the femoral nerve as compared with the anterior 3-in-1 approach, and provides better quality of intraoperative anesthesia due to the more reliable block of the lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerves.

  13. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  14. Postoperative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Cerase, A; Lauro, L; Cianfoni, A; Aulisa, L

    2000-01-01

    The differentiation between normal sequelae and complications of any surgical treatment of the lumbar spine is of the utmost importance. Clinical and radiological diagnosis is often difficult. Certainly the introduction of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has improved and refined the diagnostic possibilities, however not all problems have been resolved. For example, the frequent resort in vertebral surgery to metal implants which may limit or even prevent the interpretation of CT or MR images, should be kept in mind. The main types of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are briefly reviewed, focusing on CT and MRI appearance of normal sequelae of early or late complications and the recurrence of the lesion that necessitated the first procedure.

  15. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  16. Kinematic analysis of dynamic lumbar motion in patients with lumbar segmental instability using digital videofluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maroufi, Nader; Behtash, Hamid; Zekavat, Hajar; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2009-01-01

    The study design is a prospective, case–control. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable measurement technique for the assessment of lumbar spine kinematics using digital video fluoroscopy in a group of patients with low back pain (LBP) and a control group. Lumbar segmental instability (LSI) is one subgroup of nonspecific LBP the diagnosis of which has not been clarified. The diagnosis of LSI has traditionally relied on the use of lateral functional (flexion–extension) radiographs but use of this method has proven unsatisfactory. Fifteen patients with chronic low back pain suspected to have LSI and 15 matched healthy subjects were recruited. Pulsed digital videofluoroscopy was used to investigate kinematics of lumbar motion segments during flexion and extension movements in vivo. Intersegmental linear translation and angular displacement, and pathway of instantaneous center of rotation (PICR) were calculated for each lumbar motion segment. Movement pattern of lumbar spine between two groups and during the full sagittal plane range of motion were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures design. Intersegmental linear translation was significantly higher in patients during both flexion and extension movements at L5–S1 segment (p < 0.05). Arc length of PICR was significantly higher in patients for L1–L2 and L5–S1 motion segments during extension movement (p < 0.05). This study determined some kinematic differences between two groups during the full range of lumbar spine. Devices, such as digital videofluoroscopy can assist in identifying better criteria for diagnosis of LSI in otherwise nonspecific low back pain patients in hope of providing more specific treatment. PMID:19727854

  17. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  18. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Alan

    2002-04-01

    Indication and technique of TLIF procedure are described. TLIF provides for anterior column support and posterior tension band. It is a unilateral approach to the spine, and there is no need to expose or manipulate the dura. It provides the benefits of a 360 degrees fusion without performing an anterior approach. It restores the normal anatomy of the motion segment and maintains normal lumbar lordosis. Patients are mobilized quickly and resume activities early.

  19. Lumbar retrodiscal transforaminal injection.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Joseph F

    2007-05-01

    Spinal injections are commonly used to treat lumbar radiculitis and back pain. Delivery of medication to specific targeted pathology is considered important for a successful therapeutic outcome. A variety of routes of injection have been devised for epidural injection of corticosteroid. The author demonstrates a variation of the transforaminal injection technique. The radiographic spread of contrast is described using a more oblique and ventral caudad approach in the epidural space "retrodiscal." It is suggested that the radiographic findings of this technique for discogenic causes of induced radiculitis and/or back pain may yield more precise targeting of putative pathologic sources of radiculopathy and back pain in selected patients. In patients with disc pathology and radiculitis, the anatomy of the lumbar epidural space is reviewed for its potential effect on the flow of injectate. Contrast spread was documented for lumbar transforaminal injection using a needle placement more oblique and behind the disc rather than in the cranial portion. Comparison is made to a typical contrast spread of an infra-pedicular placed transforaminal injection. Retrodiscal contrast injection results in reliable coverage of the retrodiscal region, the exiting nerve at that foraminal level and the proximal portion of the transiting segmental neural sleeve. The radiographic findings demonstrate a difference between classic infra-pedicular versus retrodiscal transforaminal epidural contrast injection patterns, particularly at relatively low volumes. The clinical advantage of one technique versus the other should be established in randomized prospective studies.

  20. Effects of dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises following lumbar microdiscectomy on pain, mobility and return to work. Randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Demir, S; Dulgeroglu, D; Cakci, A

    2014-12-01

    Various lumbar exercise programs are prescribed for rehabilitation purposes following microdiscectomy applied for the treatment of lumbar disk herniation. The literature contains several studies on this subject. However, there are no studies investigating the effects of supervised dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises on fear and fear/regression attitudes of patients and on their return to work. This study investigates the effects of supervised dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises during postoperative rehabilitation on spinal mobility, pain, functional status, return to work, quality of life, and fear/regression attitude of patients who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy for the first time. The study was conducted at physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics. A randomized clinical trial comparing exercise programs after lumbar microdiscectomy. Forty-four lumbar microdiscectomy patients were randomized into two groups. Each group was assessed in terms of low back pain, leg pain, spinal mobility, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), at the postoperative first, second, and sixth months. Fear/regression beliefs and level of pain were evaluated through the Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire (FABQ). Forty-four patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of 22 subjects, respectively, as a study group with Dynamic Lumbar Stabilization (DLS) exercises and home exercises, and a control group with only home exercises for a period of four weeks. Leg pain decreased more in the study group compared with the control group (P=0.004). Spinal mobility scores demonstrated greater increases in the study group (P<0.001). Statistically greater reductions were observed in the study group regarding ODI and FABQ scores (P<0.017). DLS exercises may be recommended to patients following spinal surgery due to their benefits in reducing pain, increasing spinal mobility, and ensuring faster return to work periods.

  1. 36 CFR 51.78 - Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? 51.78 Section 51.78 Parks... Concession Contract Provisions § 51.78 Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? (a) Concession contracts will provide for payment to the...

  2. 36 CFR 51.78 - Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? 51.78 Section 51.78 Parks... Concession Contract Provisions § 51.78 Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? (a) Concession contracts will provide for payment to the...

  3. 36 CFR 51.78 - Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? 51.78 Section 51.78 Parks... Concession Contract Provisions § 51.78 Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? (a) Concession contracts will provide for payment to the...

  4. Correlation between severity of lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Hong; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a narrowing of the spinal canal that causes mechanical compression of the spinal nerve roots. The compression of these nerve roots can cause leg pain, as well as neurogenic claudication. Lumbar epidural steroid injections have commonly been used in patients with LSS. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between the severity of LSS using a grading system (grade 1 = mild stenosis with separation of all cauda equina; grade 2 = moderate stenosis with some cauda equina aggregated; grade 3 = severe stenosis with none of the cauda equina separated) and the subject's response to computed tomography-guided lumbar epidural steroid injection (CTG-LESI) and to evaluate the short-term effectiveness. Forty-seven consecutive patients with degenerative LSS were enrolled in this prospective study. All subjects underwent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging. Two radiologists independently graded lumbar central canal stenosis based on T2-weighted axial images. All CTG-LESI were performed in the procedure room. Outcome measures were obtained using the 5-point patient's satisfaction scale at 2 and 8 weeks post-treatment. To evaluate the outcome, we divided the patients into two groups according to their response to the treatment. Improvement (including reports of slightly improved, much improved, and no pain) was observed in 37 patients (78.7%) at 2 weeks and 36 patients (77.6%) at 8 weeks after the procedure. There was no statistically significant correlation between pain relief and age. The grade of LSS appears to have no effect on the degree of pain relief associated with CTG-LESI. However, CTG-LESI seems to provide effective short-term pain relief due to LSS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the influence of defined geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilising five parametrised musculoskeletal lumbar spine models for four different postures. The influence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine was studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most influential. These parameters can be easily acquired from X-rays and should be used to morph a musculoskeletal lumbar spine model for subject-specific approaches with respect to bone geometry. Furthermore, the model was very sensitive to uncommon configurations and therefore, it is advised that stiffness properties of discs and ligaments should be individualised.

  6. Posture of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Płszewski, Maciej; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Tarnowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The available literature is lacking in reports on the quantitative analysis of posture in patients with lumbar stenosis. The aim of this study was to analyze body posture in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis. The study involved 100 people: 49 persons with severe lumbar spine stenosis and 51 control subjects without any history of back pain. All participatants were evaluated by a photogrammetric method. Photogrammetric measurements showed statistically significant differences in the shape of the anterior-posterior curvatures of the spine. In the study group thoracic kyphosis was significantly greater (p = 0.043), and the depth of lumbar lordosis was significantly smaller (p = 0.038). The inclination of the thoracolumbar segment was also significantly lower (p = 0.013). 1. Measurements of body posture indicate a deepening of thoracic kyphosis and flattening of lumbar lordosis in lumbar stenosis patients. 2. Flattening of physiological lordosis seems to be caused by enlargment of the space of the spinal canal and dural sac in this position.

  7. Practice-related changes in lumbar loading during rapid voluntary pulls made while standing.

    PubMed

    Chang, A H; Lee, W A; Patton, J L

    2000-12-01

    To determine if five days of practice on a novel dynamic, multi-joint pulling task resulted in lower magnitudes of lumbar loading or a more consistent relationship between pulling force and lumbar loading. A repeated measures design compared how practice influenced the magnitude of lumbar torque and the correlations between lumbar torque and pulling force. Previous studies suggest that practice can decrease the magnitude of lumbar loading on simple manual material handling tasks, but it is unknown whether practice reduces lumbar loading for more complex tasks. Neither is it known whether the consistency of lumbar loading increases with practice. Ten healthy adults practiced impulse-like horizontal pulls to targets equaling 20%, 40% and 80% of their estimated maximal dynamic pulling force over 5 days. Movements were unrestrained, other than keeping the feet flat on the ground. We used a four-segment, sagittal plane inverse dynamics model to compute lumbar, hip, knee, and ankle torques on days 1 and 5 from ground reaction forces and moments, pulling forces, and kinematics. An analysis of variance showed significant practice-related changes in lumbar torque at the time of peak pulling force (lumbar torque(peakPF)). The lumbar torque(peakPF) decreased for the 20% pulls, did not change for the 40% pulls, and increased for the 80% pulls. Two subjects showed a significant decrease in lumbar torque(peakPF) for all three force levels. Coefficients of determination between pulling force and lumbar torque (r(2)(PF,LT): a measure of the consistency of the relationship between these two variables) were significantly higher on day 5 than day 1. Practice on a novel pulling task changed the magnitude of lumbar torques and increased their correlation with pulling force, suggesting that subjects learned strategies that improve motor control of lumbar torques. Relevance The study showed that the magnitude and consistency of lumbar loading changed spontaneously as subjects practiced a

  8. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  9. Effects of lumbar extensor fatigue and surface inclination on postural control during quiet stance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dingding; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2012-11-01

    A number of work environments require workers to perform tasks on inclined surfaces. Such tasks, along with muscle fatigue, can impair postural control and increase falling risks. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of surface inclination angle, standing direction, and lumbar extensor fatigue on postural control during quiet standing. A group of 16 young, healthy participants were tested while standing on inclined surfaces before and after lumbar extensor fatigue (induced by repetitive isotonic exercise). Three inclination angles (0°, 18° and 26°) and three standing directions (uphill, downhill, and lateral facing) were examined. Postural control was assessed using several measures derived from center-of-pressure time series and subjectively perceived stability. Significant main and interactive effects of inclination angle and standing direction were found for all dependent measures. The adverse effects of standing on inclined surfaces were found to differ between the three standing directions. In general, dose-response relationships with inclination angle were evident, particularly in the lateral-facing direction. Fatigue-related effects differed between conditions, suggesting that the adverse effect of lumbar extensor fatigue on postural control depend on inclination angle and standing direction. These findings may facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions for work involving inclined surfaces.

  10. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics.

  11. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized.

  12. The lumbar multifidus muscle and patterns of pain.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Jon; John Harris, A; Mercer, Susan R

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the patterns of pain induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the lumbar multifidus muscle opposite the L5 spinous process in 15 healthy adult volunteers. All subjects experienced local pain while referred pain was reported by 13 subjects in one of two regions of the thigh; anterior (n=5) or posterior (n=8). These results confirm that the multifidus muscle may be a source of local and referred pain. Comparison of these maps with pain maps following stimulation of the L4 medial dorsal rami and L4-5 interspinous ligaments shows that pain arising from the band of multifidus innervated by the L4 dorsal ramus has a segmental distribution. In addition patterns of pain arising from multifidus clearly overlap those reported for other lumbar structures. These findings highlight the difficulty of using pain distribution to accurately identify specific lumbar structures as the source of pain.

  13. Bias in the physical examination of patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background No prior studies have examined systematic bias in the musculoskeletal physical examination. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI) on perceived diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. Methods This was a cross-sectional comparison of the performance characteristics of the physical examination with blinding to MRI results (the 'independent group') with performance in the situation where the physical examination was not blinded to MRI results (the 'non-independent group'). The reference standard was the final diagnostic impression of nerve root impingement by the examining physician. Subjects were recruited from a hospital-based outpatient specialty spine clinic. All adults age 18 and older presenting with lower extremity radiating pain of duration ≤ 12 weeks were evaluated for participation. 154 consecutively recruited subjects with lumbar disk herniation confirmed by lumbar spine MRI were included in this study. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in the independent and non-independent groups for the four components of the radiculopathy examination: 1) provocative testing, 2) motor strength testing, 3) pinprick sensory testing, and 4) deep tendon reflex testing. Results The perceived sensitivity of sensory testing was higher with prior knowledge of MRI results (20% vs. 36%; p = 0.05). Sensitivities and specificities for exam components otherwise showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results may introduce bias into the pinprick sensory testing component of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. No statistically significant effect of bias was seen for other components of the physical examination. The effect of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results should be considered when an isolated

  14. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Conservative management of recurrent lumbar disk herniation with epidural fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Welk, Aaron B.; Werdehausen, Destiny N.; Kettner, Norman W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A retrospective case report of a 24-year-old man with recurrent lumbar disk herniation and epidural fibrosis is presented. Recurrent lumbar disk herniation and epidural fibrosis are common complications following lumbar diskectomy. Clinical Features A 24-year-old patient had a history of lumbar diskectomy and new onset of low back pain and radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed recurrent herniation at L5/S1, left nerve root displacement, and epidural fibrosis. Intervention and Outcomes The patient received a course of chiropractic care including lumbar spinal manipulation and rehabilitation exercises with documented subjective and objective functional and symptomatic improvement. Conclusion This case report describes chiropractic management including spinal manipulative therapy and rehabilitation exercises and subsequent objective and subjective functional and symptomatic improvement. PMID:23843756

  16. Lumbar radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Govind, Jay

    2004-06-01

    Radicular pain is caused by irritation of the sensory root or dorsal root ganglion of a spinal nerve. The irritation causes ectopic nerve impulses perceived as pain in the distribution of the axon. The pathophysiology is more than just mass effect: it is a combination of compression sensitising the nerve root to mechanical stimulation, stretching, and a chemically mediated noncellular inflammatory reaction. This article discusses the clinical features, assessment and management of lumbar radicular pain (LRP). Lumbar radicular pain is sharp, shooting or lancinating, and is typically felt as a narrow band of pain down the length of the leg, both superficially and deep. It may be associated with radiculopathy (objective sensory and/or motor dysfunction as a result of conduction block) and may coexist with spinal or somatic referred pain. In more than 50% of cases, LRP settles with simple analgesics. Significant and lasting pain relief can be achieved with transforaminal epidural steroid injection. Surgery is indicated for those patients with progressive neurological deficits or severe LRP refractory to conservative measures.

  17. Financial incentives for lumbar surgery: a critical analysis of physician reimbursement for decompression and fusion procedures.

    PubMed

    Whang, Peter G; Lim, Moe R; Sasso, Rick C; Skelton, Alta; Brown, Zoe B; Greg Anderson, David; Albert, Todd J; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2008-08-01

    Retrospective case-control study/economic analysis. To determine the treatment times required for isolated lumbar decompressions and for combined decompression and instrumented fusion procedures to compare the relative reimbursements for each type of operation as a function of time expenditure by the surgeon. Under current Medicare fee schedules, the payment for a fusion procedure is higher than of an isolated decompression. It has been recently suggested in the lay press that the greater reimbursement for a lumbar arthrodesis may inappropriately influence the manner in which surgeons elect to treat lumbar degenerative conditions, resulting in what they believe to be a substantial number of unnecessary spinal fusions. A consecutive series of 50 single-level decompression cases performed by single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed and compared with an equivalent cohort of subjects who underwent single-level decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion with autogenous iliac crest bone grafting. The operative reports, office charts, and billing records were reviewed to determine the total clinical time invested by the surgeon and the Medicare reimbursement for each surgery. Relative to the corresponding values of the decompression group, combined decompression and fusion procedures were associated with a longer mean surgical time (134.6 min vs. 47.3 min, P<0.0001), a greater number of postoperative visits (1.0 vs. 3.2, P<0.0001), a higher mean total clinical time expenditure (186.6 min vs. 62.2 min, P<0.0001), and a lower mean dollars received per minute of surgeon time ($12.51 vs. $15.51, P<0.001). These findings challenge the assertion that spine surgeons have an undue financial incentive to recommend a combined decompression and instrumented fusion procedure over an isolated decompression to patients with symptomatic lumbar degeneration, especially when considering the greater time, effort, and risk characteristic of this more complex operation.

  18. Complications and Rates of Subsequent Lumbar Surgery Following Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty and Lumbar Fusion.

    PubMed

    Eliasberg, Claire D; Kelly, Michael P; Ajiboye, Remi M; SooHoo, Nelson F

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective analysis. To examine complications and rates of subsequent surgery following lumbar spinal fusion (LF) and lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) at up to 5-year follow-up. LF is commonly used in the management of degenerative disc disease causing pain refractory to nonoperative management. Lumbar TDA was developed as an alternative to fusion with the theoretical advantage of reducing rates of adjacent segment pathology and reoperation. Most prior reports comparing these 2 interventions have come from industry-sponsored investigational device exemption trials and no large-scale administrative database comparisons exist. The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database was queried for patients aged 18 to 65 years undergoing lumbar TDA and LF for degenerative disc disease from 2004 to 2010. Patient characteristics were collected, and rates of complications and readmission were identified. Rates of repeat lumbar surgery were calculated at 90-day and 1-, 3-, and 5-year follow-up intervals. A total of 52,877 patients met the inclusion criteria (LF = 50,462, TDA = 2415). Wound infections were more common following LF than TDA (1.03% vs. 0.25%, P < 0.001). Rates of subsequent lumbar surgery at 90-day and 1-year follow-up were lower with lumbar TDA than LF (90-day-TDA: 2.94% vs. LF: 4.01%, P = 0.007; 1-yr-TDA: 3.46% vs. LF: 4.78%, P = 0.009). However, there were no differences in rates of subsequent lumbar surgery between the 2 groups at 3-year and 5-year follow-up. Lumbar TDA was associated with fewer early reoperations, though beyond 1 year, rates of reoperation were similar. Lumbar TDA may be associated with fewer acute infections, though this may be approach related and unrelated to the device itself. 3.

  19. Complications and Rates of Subsequent Lumbar Surgery Following Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty and Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Eliasberg, Claire D.; Kelly, Michael P.; Ajiboye, Remi M.; SooHoo, Nelson F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Objectives To examine complications and rates of subsequent surgery following lumbar spinal fusion (LF) and lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) at up to 5 years follow-up. Summary of Background Data LF is commonly used in the management of degenerative disc disease causing pain refractory to nonoperative management. Lumbar TDA was developed as an alternative to fusion with the theoretical advantage of reducing rates of adjacent segment pathology and reoperation. Most prior reports comparing these two interventions have come from industry-sponsored investigational device exemption trials and no large-scale administrative database comparisons exist. Methods The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database was queried for patients aged 18 to 65 years undergoing lumbar TDA and LF for degenerative disc disease from 2004 to 2010. Patient characteristics were collected, and rates of complications and readmission were identified. Rates of repeat lumbar surgery were calculated at 90-day and 1-, 3-, and 5-year follow-up intervals. Results A total of 52,877 patients met the inclusion criteria (LF = 50462, TDA = 2415). Wound infections were more common following LF than TDA (1.03% vs. 0.25%, p<0.001). Rates of subsequent lumbar surgery at 90-day and 1-year follow-up were lower with lumbar TDA than LF (90-day – TDA: 2.94% vs. LF: 4.01%, p=0.007; 1-year – TDA: 3.46% vs. LF: 4.78%, p=0.009). However, there were no differences in rates of subsequent lumbar surgery between the two groups at 3-year and 5-year follow-up. Conclusions Lumbar TDA was associated with fewer early reoperations, though beyond one year, rates of reoperation were similar. Lumbar TDA may be associated with fewer acute infections, though this may be approach-related and unrelated to the device itself. PMID:26751061

  20. [Comparative study on function and surface electromyograpgy in patients of lumbar disc herniation treated with acupunctrue and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Lan; Zhou, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jian; Ruan, Chuan-Liang; Zhang, Yong-Shu; Wang, Ze-Xiong

    2014-04-01

    To compare the differences in the clinical function and lumbar and abdominal myodynamia in patiants of lumbar disc herniation treated with moxibustion at Dazhui (GV 14) and Guanyuan (CV 4) and acupuncture. Forty cases were randomized into a moxibustion group and an acupuncture group, 20 cases in each group. In the moxibustion group, the warm moxibustion was applied alternatively at Dazhui (GV 14) and Guanyuan (CV 4) once every other day, 1 h each time, once every day. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture was applied to the corresponding acupoints based on the affected lumbar vertebras, such as Jiaji (EX-B 2), Shens-hu (BL 23), Dachangshu (BL 25) and Huantiao (GB 30), etc. , once evey day 30 min each time. The treatment for 3 weeks was taken as one session in each group. Totally, one session treatment was required. Surface electromyography (SEMG) of bilateral paraspinal muscle and rectus muscle, and JOA score of low back pain were observed in the two groups. (1) JOA score: the score of subjective symptoms, score of activity of daily living (ADL) and total score were improved obviously as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (P<0.01, P<0.05). The results of subjective symptoms score, score of ADL and total score in the acupuncture group were superior to those in the moxibustion group after treatment (6.95+/-0.94 vs 5.50 +/-0.89,10. 90+/-1.86 vs 8.90+/- 1. 92,22.50 +/- 2.82 vs 19.35 +/- 2. 70, all P<0. 05). (2) SEMG comparison: root-mean-square value (RMS) was all reduced in SEMG of the anteflexion, rear protraction, orthostatism, bilateral bending and neck and leg rear flexion for strengthening lumbar muscle as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (P< 0.05, P<0. 01). RMS of the anteflexion and bilateral bending in the acupunture group were reduced much obviously as compared with the moxibustion group. In terms of sitting position anteflexion, rear protraction, orthostatism, bilateral bending and neck and leg rear flexion for

  1. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS): a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone). Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization and costs to assess cost

  2. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

  3. The effects of modified wall squat exercises on average adults' deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability.

    PubMed

    Cho, Misuk

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bridge exercises applying the abdominal drawing-in method and modified wall squat exercises on deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability. [Subjects] A total of 30 subjects were equally divided into an experimental group and a control group. [Methods] The experimental group completed modified wall squat exercises, and the control group performed bridge exercises. Both did so for 30 minutes three times per week over a six-week period. Both groups' transversus abdominis (Tra), internal oblique (IO), and multifidus muscle thickness were measured using ultrasonography, while their static lumbar stability and dynamic lumbar stability were measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. [Results] A comparison of the pre-intervention and post-intervention measures of the experimental group and the control group was made; the Tra and IO thicknesses were significantly different in both groups. [Conclusion] The modified wall squat exercise and bridge exercise affected the thicknesses of the Tra and the IO muscles. While the bridge exercise requirs space and a mattress to lie on, the modified wall squat exercise can be conveniently performed anytime.

  4. A study on difference and importance of sacral slope and pelvic sacral angle that affect lumbar curvature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoung; Lee, Minsun; Kwon, Byongan

    2014-01-01

    Individual pelvic sacral angle was measured, compared and analyzed for the 6 male and female adults who were diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis, foraminal stenosis and mild spondylolisthesis in accordance with spinal parameters, pelvic parameters and occlusion state of sacroiliac joint presented by the author of this thesis based on the fact that the degree of lumbar excessive lordosis that was one of the causes for lumbar pain was determined by sacral slope. The measured values were compared with the standard values of the average normal range from 20 s to 40 s of normal Koreans stated in the study on the change in lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope in accordance with the age by Oh et al. [5] and sacral slope and pelvic sacral slope of each individual of the subjects for measurement were compared. Comparing the difference between the two tilt angles possessed by an individual is a comparison to determine how much the sacroiliac joint connecting pelvis and sacral vertebrae compensated and corrected the sacral vertebrae slope by pelvic tilt under the condition of synarthrodial joint.Under the condition that the location conforming to the line in which the sagittal line of gravity connects with pelvic ASIS and pubic pubic tuberele is the neutral location of pelvic tilt, sacral slope being greater than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic anterior tilting, whereas sacral slope being smaller than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic posterior tilting. On that account, male B, female A and female C had a pelvic posterior tilting of 16 degrees, 1 degree and 5 degrees respectively, whereas male A, male C and female B had a pelvic anterior tilting of 3 degrees, 9 degrees and 4 degrees respectively. In addition, the 6 patients the values of lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope that were almost twice as much as the normal standard values of Koreans. It is believed that this is because the pelvic sacral slope maintaining an angle that is

  5. Occult lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, A R; Taylor, J C

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients presenting with low back pain, associated with sciatic or femoral neuropathy, were found to have lateral recess stenosis occurring as a result of hypertrophy of the facet joints, with preservation within normal limits of the sagittal AP diameter of the lumbar canal. Pathology was believed to be traumatic in origin, and the variable nature of the adhesions suggested recurrent inflammation; the hypertrophy of the facet joints may have been the result of traumatic inflammatory hyperaemia. Radiological investigations were unhelpful. The diagnosis of the condition was made at the time of surgical exploration by the findings of alteration of the facet joints, adhesions and fixity of the nerve roots, normal sagittal AP diameter of the canal, and absence of other significant lesions. Gratifying results were obtained with decompression by wide laminectomy with excision of overhanging facet joints and release of adhesions. PMID:894321

  6. [Intradural lumbar disk hernia].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Bartolomé, P; Canga, A; Vázquez-Barquero, A; García-Valtuille, R; Abascal, F; Cerezal, L

    2001-04-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rare complication of degenerative disc disease. A correct diagnosis of this process is frequently difficult. If this entity is not preoperatively diagnosed and is omitted at surgery, severe neurologic sequels may be provoked. We report a case of a pathologically proven intradural disc herniation preoperatively diagnosed by MR imaging. Clinically, it was manifested by sudden onset of right leg ciatalgia and progressive right lower extremity weakness. The patient also referred a one-month history of sexual dysfunction. MR imaging revealed interruption of the low signal of the anulus fibrosus and of the posterior longitudinal ligament at L2-L3 level and a voluminous disc fragment migrated in the dural sac that showed rim enhancement with gadolinium.The clinical, neuroradiological, and surgical management of lumbar intradural disc herniation are reviewed.

  7. Lumbar spine postures in marines during simulated operational positions.

    PubMed

    Berry, David B; Rodríguez-Soto, Ana E; Su, Jeannie; Gombatto, Sara P; Shahidi, Bahar; Palombo, Laura; Chung, Christine; Jensen, Andrew; Kelly, Karen R; Ward, Samuel R

    2017-01-04

    Low back pain has a 70% higher prevalence in members of the armed forces than in the general population, possibly due to the loads and positions soldiers experience during training and combat. Although the influence of heavy load carriage on standing lumbar spine posture in this population is known, postures in other operationally relevant positions are unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to characterize the effect of simulated military operational positions under relevant loading conditions on global and local lumbar spine postures in active duty male US Marines. Secondary objectives were to evaluate if intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain affect lumbar spine postures. Magnetic resonance images were acquired on an upright scanner in the following operational positions: Natural standing with no external load, standing with body armor (11.3 kg), sitting with body armor, and prone on elbows with body armor. Custom software was used to measure global lumbar spine posture: Lumbosacral flexion, sacral slope, lordosis, local measures of intervertebral angles, and intervertebral distances. Sitting resulted in decreased lumbar lordosis at all levels of the spine except L1-L2. When subjects were prone on elbows, a significant increase in local lordosis was observed only at L5-S1 compared with all other positions. Marines with disc degeneration (77%) or history of low back pain (72%) had decreased lumbar range of motion and less lumbar extension than healthy Marines. These results indicate that a male Marine's pathology undergoes a stereotypic set of postural changes during functional tasks, which may impair performance. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 9999:XX-XX, 2017.

  8. The relation between the lumbar vertebrae and the spinal nerves for far lateral lumbar spinal approaches.

    PubMed

    Güvençer, Mustafa; Naderi, Sait; Kiray, Amaç; Yilmaz, Hakan Sinan; Tetik, Süleyman

    2008-02-01

    The far lateral approaches to the lumbar spine require accurate knowledge of regional anatomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the course of the lumbar nerve roots and their relation to important bony landmarks. Seven adult male cadavers fixed with formaldehyde were used. Morphometric parameters, including the lumbar nerve root diameters, the angle between the nerve roots and the midline, the transverse process length, the inter-transverse process height and width, and the relation between the nerve roots and the transverse processes of the caudal vertebrae were measured. It was observed that the diameter of the nerve roots, and the angle between the nerve roots and the midline, and the distance between the nerve roots and the lateral edge of the superior articular process increased gradually from L1 to L5. The diameter of the nerve root was 4.9+/-0.5mm for L1 and 7.5+/-1.0mm for L5. The midline nerve root angle was 36.1+/-1.6 degrees mm for L1 and 40.4+/-1.4 degrees mm for L5. The distance between the nerve root and the lateral edge of the superior articular process was 6.5+/-1.0mm for L1 and 11.4+/-1.6mm for L5. The nerve roots crossed the transverse processes of the caudal lumbar vertebrae. The nerve roots of L1 and L2 crossed the transverse processes in their first two quarters, the L3 nerve root crossed the transverse process in its second, third or fourth quarters, and the L4 nerve roots crossed the L5 transverse process in its third and fourth quarter or even external to it. Descending toward the lower lumbar vertebrae, the diameter of the lumbar nerve root increases and the nerve roots exit the intervertebral foramen with a larger angle. The special relation between the nerve roots and the caudal vertebra transverse process should be remembered during far lateral lumbar spine approaches.

  9. Movement of the lumbar spine is critical for maintenance of postural recovery following support surface perturbation.

    PubMed

    Mok, Nicola W; Hodges, Paul W

    2013-11-01

    Repeated measures design. This study examined recovery of postural equilibrium (centre of pressure (COP) excursion, time to recover balance, and the number of postural adjustments) following unexpected support surface perturbation in healthy participants with and without a rigid lumbar corset to reduce lumbar motion. Lumbar spine movement is thought to aid postural stability, especially when a "hip" (lumbopelvic) strategy is required, such as in response to large and fast perturbations. Delayed onset of lumbar spine movement in association with prolonged postural recovery in chronic low back pain implies reduced spinal motion could underpin balance deficits in this group. However, other explanations such as poor proprioception cannot be excluded, and the relationship between lumbar movement and postural stability remains unclear. We hypothesized restricted lumbar spine movement would impair control of postural recovery following support surface perturbation. Participants regained postural stability following unexpected support surface perturbations in different directions (forward and backward), with different amplitudes (small, medium, and large), with and without restriction of spine motion by a hard lumbar corset. Although the latency of the postural adjustment was unaffected by the corset, the quality of postural recovery was compromised (increased COP range, time taken for postural recovery, and number of postural adjustments) during recovery, especially in response to large perturbation. Restriction of lumbar spine movement adversely affects postural recovery. The results suggest movement of the lumbar spine, although small in amplitude, is critical for efficient recovery of standing balance.

  10. Sex determination by discriminant function analysis of lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Churchill, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Sex determination is critical for developing the biological profile of unidentified skeletal remains. When more commonly used elements (os coxa, cranium) for sexing are not available, methods utilizing other skeletal elements are needed. This study aims to assess the degree of sexual dimorphism of the lumbar vertebrae and develop discriminant functions for sex determination from them, using a sample of South African blacks from the Raymond A. Dart Collection (47 males, 51 females). Eleven variables at each lumbar level were subjected to univariate and multivariate discriminant function analyses. Univariate equations produced classification rates ranging from 57.7% to 83.5%, with the highest accuracies associated with dimensions of the vertebral body. Multivariate stepwise analysis generated classification rates ranging from 75.9% to 88.7%. These results are comparable to other methods for sexing the skeleton and indicate that measures of the lumbar vertebrae can be used as an effective tool for sex determination.

  11. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U.

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  12. Risk Assessment of Lumbar Segmental Artery Injury During Lateral Transpsoas Approach in the Patients With Lumbar Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Yamashita, Kazuta; Abe, Mitsunobu; Higashino, Kosaku; Ngamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective study using 27 contrast-enhanced multi-planar computed tomography scans of subjects with lumbar scoliosis. To assess the risk of injury of lumbar segmental arteries during transpsoas approach in patients with lumbar scoliosis. Although lumbar interbody fusion using big intervertebral cage through transpsoas approach has a big advantage to correct coronal and sagittal deformity in patients with spinal deformity, the risk for injury of lumbar segmental artery is always concerned. The abdominal-contrast enhanced multi-planar computed tomography scans of 27 subjects with lumbar scoliosis with over 15° of Cobb angle were retrospectively reviewed. The coronal views through the posterior one third of the intervertebral discs were reviewed. The cranio-caudal intervals of the adjacent segmental arteries at each intervertebral level were measured. The recommended working space for the lateral transpsoas approach using extreme lateral interbody fusion retractor is 24 mm in the cranio-caudal direction. The cutoff value for an intersegmental Cobb angle that would estimate a cranio-caudal interval of less than 24 mm was determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. The average interval between the cranio-caudal lumbar segmental arteries on the concave side was significantly shorter than that on the convex side (29.9 vs. 33.6 mm, P < 0.05). The differences in the intervals between the convex and concave sides were correlated with the corresponding intersegmental Cobb angle (r = 0.65, P < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that cutoff value for the best prediction of an interval less than 24 mm was 14.5°, with a specificity of 94.3% and sensitivity of 71.4%. This study demonstrated that female patients with lumbar scoliosis with an intersegmental Cobb angle higher than 14.5° would be at high risk for potential injury to the lumbar artery during a transpsoas approach for extreme lateral interbody

  13. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis: A retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-07-01

    support, if compared with lumbar internal fixation operation. Radiographic parameters reflect lumber structure changes, which could be observed immediately after surgery in both methods; however, the recoveries on nerve function and pain relief required a longer time, especially after PLIF operation.

  14. 43 CFR 429.4 - What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... August 4, 1939 (43 U.S.C. 389). Payments to equalize land values may still be required and administrative... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part? 429.4 Section 429.4 Public Lands: Interior...

  15. 43 CFR 429.4 - What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... August 4, 1939 (43 U.S.C. 389). Payments to equalize land values may still be required and administrative... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part? 429.4 Section 429.4 Public Lands: Interior...

  16. 43 CFR 429.4 - What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... August 4, 1939 (43 U.S.C. 389). Payments to equalize land values may still be required and administrative... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part? 429.4 Section 429.4 Public Lands: Interior...

  17. 43 CFR 429.4 - What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... August 4, 1939 (43 U.S.C. 389). Payments to equalize land values may still be required and administrative... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part? 429.4 Section 429.4 Public Lands: Interior...

  18. 36 CFR 51.78 - Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? 51.78 Section 51.78 Parks... Concession Contract Provisions § 51.78 Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the... subordinate to the objectives of protecting and preserving park areas and of providing necessary and...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 544 - Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements in Each State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements in Each State in Which They Do Business A Appendix A to Part 544... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INSURER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Pt. 544, App. A Appendix A to...

  20. 40 CFR 63.10446 - Do title V permitting requirements apply to area sources subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hospital Ethylene Oxide Sterilizers Other Requirements and Information § 63.10446 Do title V permitting requirements apply...

  1. Development of a fibre optic goniometer system to measure lumbar and hip movement to detect activities and their lumbar postures.

    PubMed

    Bell, J A; Stigant, M

    2007-01-01

    If sitting postures influence the risk of developing low back pain then it is important that quantification of sedentary work activities and simultaneous measurement of lumbar postural characteristics takes place. The objective of this study was to develop a system for identifying activities and their associated lumbar postures using fibre optic goniometers (FOGs). Five student subjects wore two FOGs attached to the lumbar spine and hip for 8 min while being recorded using a video camera when sitting, standing and walking. Observer Software was used to code the video recording, enabling the sagittal movement characteristics of each FOG to be described for individual activities. Results indicated that each activity produced unique data, and could be independently identified from their motion profiles by three raters (k = 1). The data will be used to develop algorithms to automate the process of activity detection. This system has the potential to measure behaviour in non-clinical settings.

  2. Lumbar corpectomy for correction of degenerative scoliosis from osteoradionecrosis reveals a delayed complication of lumbar myxopapillary ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Lawson, Kevin A; Kent, Sean L; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Dumont, Travis M

    2016-08-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is a known complication following radiation therapy, presenting most commonly in the cervical spine as a delayed consequence of radiation that is often necessary in the management of head and neck cancers. In contrast, osteoradionecrosis has rarely been described in the lumbar spine. Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first reported case of lumbar spine osteoradionecrosis, after adjuvant radiation for a primary spinal cord tumor, leading to progressive degenerative scoliosis which required subsequent operative management. Established guidelines recommend that mature bone can tolerate a dose of up to 6000 cGy without injury. However, once bone has been exposed to radiation over this level progressive soft tissue changes may lead to devascularization, leaving the bone vulnerable to osteonecrosis, specifically when manipulated. Radiation necrosis can be progressive and lead to eventual mechanical instability requiring debridement and surgical fixation. In the setting of the lumbar spine, osseous necrosis can lead to biomechanical instability, deformity, pain, and neurologic deficit.

  3. Contribution of Hamstring Fatigue to Quadriceps Inhibition Following Lumbar Extension Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Fritz, Julie M.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1) and moderate (set 2) fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls. Key Points A neuromuscular relationship between the lumbar paraspinals and quadriceps while performing lumbar extension exercise may be influenced by hamstring muscle fatigue. QI following lumbar extension exercise in persons with a history of LBP group may involve significant contribution from the hamstring muscle group. More hamstring muscle contribution may be a necessary adaptation in the history of LBP group due to weaker and more fatigable lumbar extensors. PMID:24198683

  4. The Changes of Trunk Motion Rhythm and Spinal Loading During Trunk Flexion and Extension Motions Caused by Lumbar Muscle Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that lumbar extensor muscle fatigue could potentially affect lumbar-pelvic rhythm and influence spinal loading during trunk motions. In this study, the effects of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on the normalized lumbar-pelvic rotation rhythm and the associated L5/S1 joint loading during weight lifting and lowering tasks were investigated. Thirteen volunteers performed lifting and lowering of a 20-lbs box both before and after lumbar extensor muscle fatigue, which was generated through a static weight holding task. The normalized lumbar-pelvic motion ratio (L/P ratio) and the external moment on the L5/S1 joint were calculated and compared. Results showed that subjects demonstrated significantly larger normalized L/P ratios during both weight lifting and lowering tasks with the influence of fatigue. In addition, although the spinal loadings remain unchanged at the beginning and ending of both lifting and lowering motions, significantly larger L5/S1 joint moments were observed during both motions after fatigue. Such changes indicate potentially elevated risk of back injury. In a clinical setting, the current results demonstrated that lumbar muscle fatigue could cause transient changes in lumbar-pelvic motion rhythm. Therefore, lumbar muscle fatigue must be avoided when using lumbar-pelvic motion rhythms for patient diagnosis or rehabilitation assessment.

  5. Comparison of chronic low-back pain patients hip range of motion with lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang wk; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare differences in hip range of motion between a lumbar stability group and a lumbar instability group of patients with chronic low-back pain. [Subjects] Sixty-nine patients with chronic low-back pain were divided into two groups: a lumbar stability group (n=39) and a lumbar instability group (n=30). [Methods] The patients were assessed using a goniometer to evaluate the hip range of motion at pre-test. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software for Windows. The experimental data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, repeated one-way ANOVA, and the t-test, and a significance level of 0.05. [Results] The limitation of hip range of motion of the lumbar instability group was significantly greater than that of the lumbar stability group. [Conclusion] The chronic low-back pain patients showed greater limitation of hip range of motion than healthy persons, and among them, those who had lumbar instability showed greater limitation than those with lumbar stability. PMID:25729165

  6. Failure within one year following subtotal lumbar discectomy.

    PubMed

    Wera, Glenn D; Marcus, Randall E; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Bohlman, Henry H

    2008-01-01

    Reherniation within the first year following subtotal lumbar discectomy is a rare but noteworthy event. We performed a retrospective, case-controlled study to evaluate the clinical outcomes after early recurrent lumbar disc reherniation. The records of 1320 patients who had undergone primary subtotal lumbar discectomy were analyzed retrospectively by an independent reviewer. Patients with documented reherniation within twelve months were evaluated with regard to the location of the reherniation, the neurologic status, the rate of reoperation, and the subjective outcome. Patients were evaluated on the basis of a physical examination and a review of medical records. Disc morphology, anular competence, and the presence of free fragments were categorized with use of a modified five-part Carragee classification system. The mean duration of follow-up for this group was 52.6 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed with use of the Oswestry score and the modified criteria of McNab. Twenty-nine historical control patients who had undergone uncomplicated subtotal lumbar discectomy were selected. We identified fourteen recurrent lumbar disc herniations within one year after the index procedure. All fourteen patients had radicular pain and weakness prior to, and complete relief of radiculopathy after, the index procedure. All reherniations occurred at the same level as the index procedure, but eight occurred in a different direction than the original herniation. All patients underwent reexploration and discectomy, and two underwent single-level posterolateral arthrodesis. Two patients underwent a third procedure. The average Oswestry score at the time of the latest follow-up was 6.4 for the recurrent herniation group, compared with 6.9 for the controls. The outcomes according to the modified McNab criteria were not significantly different between the groups, with the numbers available. The mean duration of follow-up after the second discectomy was 52.6 months. The rate of early

  7. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercises and thoracic mobilization and exercises on chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Min-Yeong; Kim, Kyoung; Hur,, Beom-Young; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate whether pain, balance, and stabilization of the lumbar region can be improved through thoracic mobilization in addition to lumbar stabilizaing exercises. [Subjects and Methods] This study recruited 36 subjects with chronic low back pain lasting more than 12 weeks. The subjects recruited for this study participated voluntarily, and provided their signed consent to participation. [Results] Improvement in balance was largest in the lumbar stabilization exercise group, followed by the thoracic mobilization and exercise group, and the traditional physical therapy group, in decreasing order of effect. [Conclusion] In conclusion, lumbar stabilization exercises combined with thoracic mobilization had greater effects on stabilization of the lumbar region pain relief, and improvement of the function of the patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:26834365

  8. Effects of muscle extension strength exercise on trunk muscle strength and stability of patients with lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Taeyoung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide the data for constructing an integrated exercise program to help restore muscle strength and stability through extension strength exercise in adult females with lumbar disc herniation. [Subjects and Methods] An 8-week exercise program for lumbar muscle extension strength and stabilization was performed by 26 females older than 20 with lumbar disc herniation findings. [Results] Significant differences were found in lumbar extension muscle strength at every angle of lumbar flexion after participation in the 8-week stabilization exercise program; but there was no significant difference in the weight distribution index. [Conclusion] An integrated exercise program aiming to strengthen lumbar spine muscles, reduce pain and stabilize the trunk can help to maintain muscle strength and balance. In addition, improvement in extension strength is expected to be helpful in daily life by securing the range of joint motion and improving the strength and stability. PMID:27313342

  9. [Lumbar stabilization exercises].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Ríos, Jorge Rodrigo; Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el ejercicio es la intervención con mayor grado de evidencia de eficacia para el tratamiento del dolor crónico de la espalda baja, con beneficio superior en términos de dolor y funcionalidad, en comparación con cualquiera otra intervención. Existe una amplia variedad de ejercicios diseñados; sin embargo, actualmente los llamados ejercicios de estabilización lumbar adquiririeron una popularidad creciente entre los clínicos que están en contacto con enfermedades de la columna. Sin embargo, existe controversia en cuanto a la prescripción adecuada de los mismos y los múltiples protocolos publicados. Objetivo: analizar la bibliografía científica acerca del uso y prescripción de estos ejercicios para favorecer la mejor toma de decisiones enlos clínicos y diseñar, con base a la evidencia, el programa más adecuado para cada paciente. Conclusión: se encontró que este programa es una herramienta esencial en el tratamiento del dolor de espalda baja, en la etapa terapéutica y en la preventiva.

  10. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  11. Lumbar intrathecal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kershner, David E; Binhammer, Robert T

    2002-03-01

    A meticulous examination was performed on 56 vertebral columns from cadavers between 64 and 89 years of age. Identification of all contents within the dural sac was completed; however, the main focus was the cauda equina and lumbar region. In addition to scope dissection, radiographs and histological preparations were used to identify structures, tissue types, and any possible pathology. Discrete intrathecal ligamentous bands were observed in all cadavers examined. They were found randomly binding the dorsal nerve roots of the cauda equina to the dura. Occasional binding of the ventral nerve roots to the dorsal roots was observed. Histological examination demonstrated a dense collagen ligament varying between 0.13 and 0.35 microm in thickness and from 3 mm to 3.5 cm in length. The average number of ligaments found per cadaver was 18. These ligaments displayed a broad base attachment to the nerve root or dura of approximately 3 mm. Looping of the nerve roots associated with these ligaments was seen in one cadaver with a burst fracture. Electron microscopic studies of these ligaments demonstrated similarities to denticulate ligaments. It is suggested that the intrathecal ligaments represent remnants from fetal development of the denticulate ligaments.

  12. A novel MRI classification system for congenital functional lumbar spinal stenosis predicts the risk for tandem cervical spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Spina Iii, Nicholas T; Lee, Joon Y

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and clinically useful morphological classification system for congenital lumbar spinal stenosis using sagittal MRI, allowing clinicians to recognize patterns of lumbar congenital stenosis quickly and be able to screen these patients for tandem cervical stenosis. Forty-four subjects with an MRI of both the cervical and lumbar spine were included. On the lumbar spine MRI, the sagittal canal morphology was classified as one of three types: Type I normal, Type II partially narrow, Type III globally narrow. For the cervical spine, the Torg-Pavlov ratio on X-ray and the cervical spinal canal width on MRI were measured. Kruskal-Wallis analysis was done to determine if there was a relationship between the sagittal morphology of the lumbar spinal canal and the presence of cervical spinal stenosis. Subjects with a type III globally narrow lumbar spinal canal had a significantly lower cervical Torg-Pavlov ratio and smaller cervical spinal canal width than those with a type I normal lumbar spinal canal. A type III lumbar spinal canal is a globally narrow canal characterized by a lack of spinal fluid around the conus. This was defined as "functional lumbar spinal stenosis" and is associated with an increased incidence of tandem cervical spinal stenosis.

  13. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  14. Results of surgical lysis of lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, H A; Schuman, N

    1979-05-01

    From a series of 681 patients with lumbar disc disease treated between 1966 and 1978, 17 patients required surgical lysis of lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis, 8 having initially been operated upon by another surgeon. All patients had severe pain as a predominant feature, with pain being bilateral in 9 patients. Pain was the only major symptom in 3; the other 14 exhibited varying combinations of progressive neurological dysfunction. Three patients developed late symptoms after trauma, 8 to 21 years after back surgery. At operation, multisegmental arachnoiditis was found in 5 patients and anular or subtotal adhesions were found in 12. Complete lysis could not be obtained in 4 patients. Fourteen patients were treated with steroids at the time of operation. Follow-up after lysis was less than 1 year for 5 patients but averaged 4.8 years for the remaining 12. During the 1st year after operation, 76% experienced improvement in pain (35%, good to excellent), 71% experienced improvement in neurological status. Follow-up after at least 1 year revealed 50% still enjoying pain relief (25%, good to excellent) and 45% experiencing neurological improvement. Pain relief persisted in 4 of 5 patients followed 5 years or more. The etiological role of myelograpy and lumbar disc surgery in arachnoiditis has probably been over-rated. Arachnoiditis may be symptomatic or asymptomatic and may mask other, treatable lumbar lesions. More frequent intradural exploration for discrepancies between operative and myelographic findings might reveal, and benefit, more cases of spontaneous arachnoiditis mimicking lumbar disc disease.

  15. 12 CFR 208.36 - Reporting requirements for State member banks subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recent fiscal year, and no foreign offices, may elect to substitute for the financial statements required... data prepared in accordance with GAAP and disclose any material contingencies, as required by Article...

  16. 12 CFR 208.36 - Reporting requirements for State member banks subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recent fiscal year, and no foreign offices, may elect to substitute for the financial statements required... data prepared in accordance with GAAP and disclose any material contingencies, as required by Article...

  17. Effects of vision and lumbar posture on trunk neuromuscular control.

    PubMed

    Maaswinkel, Erwin; van Drunen, Paul; Veeger, Dirk-Jan H E J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-21

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of vision and lumbar posture on trunk neuromuscular control. Torso perturbations were applied with a pushing device while the subjects were restrained at the pelvis in a kneeling-seated position. Torso kinematics and the muscle activity of the lumbar part of the M. Longissimus were recorded for 14 healthy subjects. Four conditions were included: a flexion, extension and neutral lumbar posture with eyes closed and the neutral posture with eyes open. Frequency response functions of the admittance and reflexes showed that there was no significant difference between the eyes open and eyes closed conditions, thereby confirming that vision does not play a role in the stabilization of the trunk during small-amplitude trunk perturbations. In contrast, manipulating posture did lead to significant differences. In particular, the flexed condition led to a lower admittance and lower reflex contribution compared to the neutral condition. Furthermore, the muscle pre-activation (prior to the onset of the perturbation) was significantly lower in the flexed posture compared to neutral. This confirms that flexing the lumbar spine increases the passive tissue stiffness and decreases the contribution of reflex activity to trunk control.

  18. Evaluation of Lower Limb Motor Function Using Wireless Motion Sensors—A Comparison of Normal Elderly Subjects and those Requiring Support Level 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Numata, Takayuki; Kuwae, Yutaka; Sekine, Masaki; Tsuji, Miwa; Okabe, Ichiro; Hara, Keita; Fujimoto, Toshiro; Tamura, Toshiyo

    This study quantitatively compared lower limb motility of normal subjects and those requiring support level 1 (support_1). We developed a wireless inertia sensor with an embedded tri-axial accelerometer and angular velocity sensor. Six normal elderly subjects and ten elderly subjects who were classified as support_1 by the Japanese care insurance system participated in the study. We attached the wireless motion sensors to the center of the lower back and both thighs in the subjects. Subjects were then asked to walk 10 m and perform a stepping exercise. For the evaluation, the cadence, pitch angle, and pitch angular velocity of the thigh auto-correlation function and root mean square (RMS) on the lower back were calculated. The autocorrelation coefficient function for the support_1 subjects was smaller than in the normal subjects, while the RMS was larger in support_1. These differences indicated that the gait and balance abilities of the support_1 subjects were poorer than those of the normal subjects. This suggests that our wireless motion sensor is useful for assessing the motility of the lower limbs while walking and climbing steps.

  19. A Biomechanical Stability Study of Extraforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion on the Cadaveric Lumbar Spine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song; Yan, Meijun; Han, Yingchao; Xia, Dongdong; Sun, Guixin; Li, Lijun; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an effective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease. However, this fusion technique requires resection of inferior facet joint to provide access for superior facet joint resection, which results in reduced lumbar spinal stability and unnecessary trauma. We have previously developed extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) that can avoid back muscle injury with direct nerve root decompression. This study aims to show that ELIF enhances lumbar spinal stability in comparison to TLIF by comparing lumbar spinal stability of L4–L5 range of motion (ROM) on 12 cadaveric spine specimens after performing TLIF or ELIF. Methods 12 cadaveric spine specimens were randomly divided and treated in accordance with the different internal fixations, including ELIF with a unilateral pedicle screw (ELIF+UPS), TLIF with a unilateral pedicle screw (TLIF+UPS), TLIF with a bilateral pedicle screw (TLIF+BPS), ELIF with a unilateral pedicle screw and translaminar facet screw (ELIF+UPS+TLFS) and ELIF with a bilateral pedicle screw (ELIF+BPS). The treatment groups were exposed to a 400-N load and 6 N·m movement force to calculate the angular displacement of L4-L5 during anterior flexion, posterior extension, lateral flexion and rotation operation conditions. Results The ROM in ELIF+UPS group was smaller than that of TLIF+UPS group under all operating conditions, with the significant differences in left lateral flexion and right rotation by 36.15% and 25.97% respectively. The ROM in ELIF+UPS group was higher than that in TLIF+BPS group. The ROM in the ELIF+UPS+TLFS group was much smaller than that in the ELIF+UPS group, but was not significantly different than that in the TLIF+BPS group. Conclusions Despite that TLIF+BPS has great stability, which can be comparable by that of ELIF+UPS. Additionally, ELIF stability can be further improved by using translaminar facet screws without causing more tissue damage to patient. PMID

  20. Occupational risk factors for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation; a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Siol, T; Henkel, N; Fuchs, C; Schug, H; Leheta, F; Marquardt, G; Schmitt, E; Ulrich, P T; Beck, W; Missalla, A; Elsner, G

    2003-11-01

    Previous studies mostly did not separate between symptomatic disc herniation combined with osteochondrosis/spondylosis of the lumbar spine and symptomatic disc herniation in radiographically normal intervertebral spaces. This may at least in part explain the differences in the observed risk patterns. To investigate the possible aetiological relevance of physical and psychosocial workload to lumbar disc herniation with and without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. A total of 267 cases with acute lumbar disc herniation (in two practices and four clinics) and 197 control subjects were studied. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview and analysed using logistic regression to control for age, region, nationality, and diseases affecting the lumbar spine. Cases without knowledge about osteochondrosis/spondylosis (n=42) were excluded from analysis. Risk factors were examined separately for those cases with (n=131) and without (n=94) radiographically diagnosed concomitant osteochondrosis or spondylosis. There was a statistically significant positive association between extreme forward bending and lumbar disc herniation with, as well as without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. There was a statistically significant relation between cumulative exposure to weight lifting or carrying and lumbar disc herniation with, but not without, concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Cases with disc herniation reported time pressure at work as well as psychic strain through contact with clients more frequently than control subjects. Further larger studies are needed to verify the concept of distinct aetiologies of lumbar disc herniation in relatively younger persons with otherwise normal discs and of disc herniation in relatively older persons with structurally damaged discs.

  1. The association of spinal osteoarthritis with lumbar lordosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Careful review of published evidence has led to the postulate that the degree of lumbar lordosis may possibly influence the development and progression of spinal osteoarthritis, just as misalignment does in other joints. Spinal degeneration can ensue from the asymmetrical distribution of loads. The resultant lesions lead to a domino- like breakdown of the normal morphology, degenerative instability and deviation from the correct configuration. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a relationship exists between the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine, as it is expressed by lordosis, and the presence of radiographic osteoarthritis. Methods 112 female subjects, aged 40-72 years, were examined in the Outpatients Department of the Orthopedics' Clinic, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete. Lumbar radiographs were examined on two separate occasions, independently, by two of the authors for the presence of osteoarthritis. Lordosis was measured from the top of L1 to the bottom of L5 as well as from the top of L1 to the top of S1. Furthermore, the angle between the bottom of L5 to the top of S1was also measured. Results and discussion 49 women were diagnosed with radiographic osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine, while 63 women had no evidence of osteoarthritis and served as controls. The two groups were matched for age and body build, as it is expressed by BMI. No statistically significant differences were found in the lordotic angles between the two groups Conclusions There is no difference in lordosis between those affected with lumbar spine osteoarthritis and those who are disease free. It appears that osteoarthritis is not associated with the degree of lumbar lordosis. PMID:20044932

  2. The association of spinal osteoarthritis with lumbar lordosis.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Michael; Papadokostakis, Georgios; Kampanis, Nikos; Sapkas, Georgios; Papadakis, Stamatios A; Katonis, Pavlos

    2010-01-02

    Careful review of published evidence has led to the postulate that the degree of lumbar lordosis may possibly influence the development and progression of spinal osteoarthritis, just as misalignment does in other joints. Spinal degeneration can ensue from the asymmetrical distribution of loads. The resultant lesions lead to a domino- like breakdown of the normal morphology, degenerative instability and deviation from the correct configuration. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a relationship exists between the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine, as it is expressed by lordosis, and the presence of radiographic osteoarthritis. 112 female subjects, aged 40-72 years, were examined in the Outpatients Department of the Orthopedics' Clinic, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete. Lumbar radiographs were examined on two separate occasions, independently, by two of the authors for the presence of osteoarthritis. Lordosis was measured from the top of L1 to the bottom of L5 as well as from the top of L1 to the top of S1. Furthermore, the angle between the bottom of L5 to the top of S1 was also measured. 49 women were diagnosed with radiographic osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine, while 63 women had no evidence of osteoarthritis and served as controls. The two groups were matched for age and body build, as it is expressed by BMI. No statistically significant differences were found in the lordotic angles between the two groups There is no difference in lordosis between those affected with lumbar spine osteoarthritis and those who are disease free. It appears that osteoarthritis is not associated with the degree of lumbar lordosis.

  3. Noncompliance with Human Subjects' Protection Requirements as a Reason for Retracting Papers: Survey of Retraction Notices on Medical Papers Published from 1981 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yusuke; Muto, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Though protection of human research subjects is universally recognized as a critical requirement for the ethical conduct of research, few studies have examined retractions of medical articles through apparent noncompliance with that requirement. From our survey of 99 retracted papers published from 1981 to 2011, we found that the basis for those decisions was poorly explained in retraction notices and that most of the articles continued to be cited. In retraction notices, the current manner of explaining failure to protect human subjects is misleading and confusing.

  4. A minimally invasive technique for percutaneous lumbar facet augmentation: Technical description of a novel device

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary A.; Armin, Sean; Raphael, Dan; Khoo, Larry T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We describe a new posterior dynamic stabilizing system that can be used to augment the mechanics of the degenerating lumbar segment. The mechanism of this system differs from other previously described surgical techniques that have been designed to augment lumbar biomechanics. The implant and technique we describe is an extension-limiting one, and it is designed to support and cushion the facet complex. Furthermore, it is inserted through an entirely percutaneous technique. The purpose of this technical note is to demonstrate a novel posterior surgical approach for the treatment of lumbar degenerative. Methods: This report describes a novel, percutaneously placed, posterior dynamic stabilization system as an alternative option to treat lumbar degenerative disk disease with and without lumbar spinal stenosis. The system does not require a midline soft-tissue dissection, nor subperiosteal dissection, and is a truly minimally invasive means for posterior augmentation of the functional facet complex. This system can be implanted as a stand-alone procedure or in conjunction with decompression procedures. Results: One-year clinical results in nine individual patients, all treated for degenerative disease of the lower lumbar spine, are presented. Conclusions: This novel technique allows for percutaneous posterior dynamic stabilization of the lumbar facet complex. The use of this procedure may allow a less invasive alternative to traditional approaches to the lumbar spine as well as an alternative to other newly developed posterior dynamic stabilization systems. PMID:22145084

  5. Caudal lumbar vertebral fractures in California Quarter Horse and Thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Collar, E M; Zavodovskaya, R; Spriet, M; Hitchens, P L; Wisner, T; Uzal, F A; Stover, S M

    2015-09-01

    To gain insight into the pathophysiology of equine lumbar vertebral fractures in racehorses. To characterise equine lumbar vertebral fractures in California racehorses. Retrospective case series and prospective case-control study. Racehorse post mortem reports and jockey injury reports were retrospectively reviewed. Vertebral specimens from 6 racehorses affected with lumbar vertebral fractures and 4 control racehorses subjected to euthanasia for nonspinal fracture were assessed using visual, radiographic, computed tomography and histological examinations. Lumbar vertebral fractures occurred in 38 Quarter Horse and 29 Thoroughbred racehorses over a 22 year period, primarily involving the 5th and/or 6th lumbar vertebrae (L5-L6; 87% of Quarter Horses and 48% of Thoroughbreds). Lumbar vertebral fractures were the third most common musculoskeletal cause of death in Quarter Horses and frequently involved a jockey injury. Lumbar vertebral specimens contained anatomical variations in the number of vertebrae, dorsal spinous processes and intertransverse articulations. Lumbar vertebral fractures examined in 6 racehorse specimens (5 Quarter Horses and one Thoroughbred) coursed obliquely in a cranioventral to caudodorsal direction across the adjacent L5-L6 vertebral endplates and intervertebral disc, although one case involved only one endplate. All cases had evidence of abnormalities on the ventral aspect of the vertebral bodies consistent with pre-existing, maladaptive pathology. Lumbar vertebral fractures occur in racehorses with pre-existing pathology at the L5-L6 vertebral junction that is likely predisposes horses to catastrophic fracture. Knowledge of these findings should encourage assessment of the lumbar vertebrae, therefore increasing detection of mild vertebral injuries and preventing catastrophic racehorse and associated jockey injuries. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  6. The effect of on-body lift assistive device on the lumbar 3D dynamic moments and EMG during asymmetric freestyle lifting.

    PubMed

    Abdoli-E, Mohammad; Stevenson, Joan M

    2008-03-01

    A new on-body personal lift assistive device was developed to reduce force requirements of back muscles during lifting and static holding tasks. Nine male subjects participated in the study. Twelve Fastrak sensors were used to record positions and rotations of the segments. Trunk muscles were normalized to maximum and integrated electromyographic amplitudes of the left and right thoracic erector spinae, lumbar erector spinae, external obliques, and rectus abdominalis were compared in asymmetrical lifting for three different loads (5 kg, 15 kg, 25 kg) using free style under two conditions: with and without a lift assistive device. The assistive device significantly reduced the required muscular effort of the lumbar and thoracic erector spinae (P=0.001) with no significant differences in the level of abdominal muscular activity. Average integrated electromyography amplitudes were reduced across all subjects by 23.9% for lumbar erector spinae, 24.4% for thoracic erector spinae, and 34.9% for the contralateral external oblique muscles. The assistive device had its greatest impact on smaller moments with 30% reduction in lateral bending, and 24% reduction in rotational moments, with only 19.5% a reduction in larger flexion-extension moments. To investigate whether the lift assistive device affected lifting kinematics, the device tensions were zeroed mathematically. No kinematic differences in lifting technique would explain this magnitude of moment reduction. The on-body assistive device reduced the required muscular effort of the lumbar and thoracic erector spinae without adversely affecting the level of abdominal muscle activity. These reductions were mirrored by similar 3D moment reductions.

  7. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Table 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table 20...

  8. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Table 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table 20...

  9. Lumbar and sacral radiofrequency neurotomy.

    PubMed

    Mazin, David A; Sullivan, Joseph P

    2010-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy is an interventional procedure used to alleviate certain types of low back pain. RF energy is used to thermally coagulate the specific nerves that transmit pain signals. Recent evidence has shown that this procedure demonstrates significant efficacy in relieving low back pain in lumbar zygapophysial joints, and research is ongoing to determine if pain relief for the sacroiliac joint is also possible. This article provides an evidence-based background for performing RF neurotomy, discusses the relevant anatomy, and highlights the indications and technique for lumbar and sacral RF neurotomy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sunset dates of chemicals subject to final TSCA section 4: test requirements and related section 12(b) actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This table lists all chemical substances and mixtures that are and/or have been the subject of final TSCA Section 4 test rules and/or TSCA Section 4 enforceable consent agreements/orders (ECAs) issued under the TSCA Existing Chemicals Testing Program.

  11. 40 CFR 721.160 - Notification requirements for new chemical substances subject to section 5(e) orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chemical substances subject to section 5(e) orders. 721.160 Section 721.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Expedited Process for Issuing Significant New Use Rules for Selected Chemical Substances...

  12. 40 CFR 721.160 - Notification requirements for new chemical substances subject to section 5(e) orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical substances subject to section 5(e) orders. 721.160 Section 721.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Expedited Process for Issuing Significant New Use Rules for Selected Chemical Substances...

  13. 43 CFR 429.3 - What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What types of uses are subject to the... LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability § 429.3 What types of uses... organized sporting events; (d) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses; (e) Infrastructure, such...

  14. 43 CFR 429.3 - What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What types of uses are subject to the... LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability § 429.3 What types of uses... organized sporting events; (d) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses; (e) Infrastructure, such...

  15. 43 CFR 429.3 - What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What types of uses are subject to the... LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability § 429.3 What types of uses... organized sporting events; (d) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses; (e) Infrastructure, such...

  16. 43 CFR 429.3 - What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What types of uses are subject to the... LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability § 429.3 What types of uses... organized sporting events; (d) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses; (e) Infrastructure, such...

  17. 43 CFR 429.3 - What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true What types of uses are subject to the... LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability § 429.3 What types of uses... organized sporting events; (d) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses; (e) Infrastructure, such...

  18. Spinal Anesthesia in Elderly Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Noah L; Edwards, Charles C; Brown, Charles H; Ledford, Emily C; Dean, Clayton L; Lin, Charles; Edwards, Charles C

    2017-03-01

    Spinal anesthesia is increasingly viewed as a reasonable alternative to general anesthesia for lumbar spine surgery. However, the results of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spine decompression and combined decompression and fusion procedures are limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to report a single institution's experience using spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. A retrospective review was conducted using a prospectively collected database of consecutive lumbar spine surgeries performed under spinal anesthesia in patients 70 years or older at a single center between December 2013 and October 2015. A total of 56 patients were included in the study; 27 patients (48%) underwent lumbar decompression and 29 patients (52%) underwent combined decompression and fusion procedures. Mean operative time was 101 minutes (range, 30-210 minutes), and mean operative blood loss was 187 mL (range, 20-700 mL). Mean maximum inpatient postoperative visual analog scale score was 6.2 (range, 1-10). Nausea occurred in 21% (12 of 56) of the patients. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days (range, 1-6 days). No mortality, stroke, permanent loss of function, or pulmonary embolism occurred. None of the cases required conversion to general anesthesia. All of the patients were ambulatory on either the day of the surgery or the next morning. These results demonstrate that spinal anesthesia is a viable method of anesthesia for patients 70 years and older undergoing lumbar spine surgery. They also demonstrate the safety of this method for patients older than 84 years and for surgeries lasting up to 3½ hours. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e317-e322.].

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahesha, Kanthila

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who were treated with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy from May 2012 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and at yearly interval thereafter. The outcome was assessed using modified Macnab's criteria, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index. Results: The mean followup period was 2 years (range 18 months - 3 years). Transforaminal approach was used in 84 patients, interlaminar approach in seven patients, and combined approach in nine patients. An excellent outcome was noted in ninety patients, good outcome in six patients, fair result in two patients, and poor result in two patients. Minor complications were seen in three patients, and two patients had recurrent disc prolapse. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar disc prolapse. It has the advantage that it can be performed on a day care basis under local anesthesia with shorter length of hospitalization and early return to work thus improving the quality of life earlier. The low complication rate makes it the future of disc surgery. Transforaminal approach alone is sufficient in majority of cases, although 16% of cases required either percutaneous interlaminar approach or combined approach. The procedure definitely has a learning curve, but it is acceptable with adequate preparations. PMID:28216749

  20. Electromyographic Changes in Trunk Muscles During Graded Lumbar Stabilization Exercises.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Reen; Park, Dae Kwon; Lee, Seok Tae; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar stabilization exercises are effective for the treatment of patients with low back pain. However, personalized exercise programs are required to facilitate more efficient treatment, as each individual exhibits the different characteristics of the trunk muscles and pain. To determine the effects of graded lumbar stabilization exercises on the trunk muscles in healthy individuals, using surface electromyography. A cross-sectional prospective study. Outpatient pain clinic. Ten healthy male participants without low back pain were recruited on a volunteer basis. Four common lumbar stabilization exercises were selected, including the curl up, dead bug, Superman, and bird dog exercises. Each exercise was divided into 5 intensity levels, with participants performing all exercises at each intensity level, to a total of 20 exercises. Electromyographic changes in the trunk muscles according to intensity level were analyzed. Using superficial electromyography, the peak amplitude and area under the curve for each of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique abdominis (EO), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles were measured. In general, as the level of intensity increased, the activity of the related lumbar stabilizing muscles also increased significantly (P < .05). Specifically, the peak amplitudes of the RA (P = .008) and EO (P < .001) were increased during the curl up exercise, whereas the peak amplitudes of the MF (P < .001) and ES (P = .002) were increased during the bird dog exercise. The prolonged exercise duration of the Superman exercise increased the mean area under the curve of MF, ES, and RA (P < .001). Using a graded exercise program, an appropriate level of exercise intensity can be prescribed and modulated according to patient tolerance and physical ability. Therefore, a graded lumbar stabilization exercise program may represent an effective way to strengthen the lumbar stabilizing muscles in patients with low back pain. Copyright © 2016

  1. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  2. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  3. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  4. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  5. Effect of extensor muscle activation on the response to lumbar posteroanterior forces.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Esler, M A; Mildren, J; Herbert, R

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the responses of normal subjects to the application of cyclical lumbar posteroanterior forces which simulated a manipulative therapy technique known as mobilization. The specific aim was to determine whether increases in spinal extensor muscle activity could modify the stiffness of lumbar posteroanterior movements. The lumbar posteroanterior stiffness was measured in eleven asymptomatic subjects in the prone position, both in the relaxed condition and during maximal voluntary isometric muscle contractions. The electromyographic activity of lumbar extensor muscles was measured in the relaxed and maximal contraction conditions during the application of mobilization. The posteroanterior stiffness was found to be significantly greater during maximum activation of the extensor muscles. The results indicate that muscle activity can significantly alter lumbar posteroanterior stiffness. Clinicians often apply posteroanterior forces over a spinous process of a vertebra to assess the resistance to movement. Information about the degree and nature of perceived resistance to posteroanterior movement is used to help make a diagnosis and select treatment techniques. This study has shown that increased activity of the spinal extensor muscles can increase the stiffness of lumbar posteroanterior movements, compared with the case where the subject is relaxed. When interpreting the posteroanterior responses of patients, clinicians should be aware that spinal extensor mucle activity can influence resistance to posteroanterior movement.

  6. Positive medium-term influence of multimodal pain management on socioeconomic factors and health care utilization in patients with lumbar radiculopathy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, Achim; Loher, Martin; Boluki, Daniel; Grifka, Joachim; Völlner, Florian; Renkawitz, Tobias; Maderbacher, Günther; Götz, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Background Multimodal pain management (MPM) represents a central approach to avoiding surgery in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Independent of the type of health system, cost effectiveness and socioeconomic factors are becoming increasingly important. This study investigated the medium-term influence of conservative MPM on health care utilization and socioeconomic factors. Methods This study compared subjective, objective, and socioeconomic factors of 60 patients after inpatient MPM because of lumbar radiculopathy, before and 1 year ± 2 weeks after treatment. Results Over the course of the 1-year follow-up, one-third of the patients had not required any conservative treatment in comparison to 100% of patients before MPM therapy. The number of patients requiring analgesics could be significantly reduced from 26 to 12, and the number of patients who did not require any analgesics had increased from 14 to 32. After 1 year, the number of patients who had to regularly contact a physician because of low back pain (once per month for 6 months) had been reduced from 58 to 27. Conclusion MPM is an effective approach to treating lumbar radiculopathy and reducing its negative influence on socioeconomic factors. Therapeutic benefits also include a decrease in health care utilization. Therefore, health care providers should place the mid-term success for patients and socioeconomic factors before the short-term costs of therapy. PMID:28243143

  7. Magnetic resonance myelography in early postoperative lumbar discectomy: An efficient and cost effective modality

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pankaj R; Dave, Bharat R; Deliwala, Ujjval H; Krishnan, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) after lumbar discectomy is all too often an unrewarding challenge. A constellation of findings are inevitable, and determining their significance is often difficult. MRM is a noninvasive technique that can provide anatomical information about the subarachnoid space. Until now, there is no study reported in literature showing any clinico-radiological correlation of post operative MRM. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of MRM for the demonstration of decompression in operated discectomy patients and its correlation with subjective and objective outcome (pain and SLR) in immediate postoperative period. Materials and Methods: Fifty three patients of single level lumbar disc herniation (LDH) justifying the inclusion criteria were operated for discectomy. All patients underwent MRM on second/third postoperative day. The pain relief and straight leg raise sign improvement was correlated with the postoperative MRM images to group the patients into: A- Subjective Pain relief, SLR improved and MRM image showing myelo regression; B- Subjective Pain relief, SLR improved and MRM image showing no myelo regression; C- No Subjective Pain relief, no SLR improved and MRM image showing myelo regression and; D- No Subjective Pain relief, no SLR improved and MRM image showing no myelo regression. Results: The result showed that Group A had 46 while Group B, C and Group D had 4, 2 and one patients respectively. Clinico-radiological correlation (Clinically diagnosed patient and findings with MRM correlation) was present in 47 patients (88.68%) which includes both A and D groups. The MRM specificity and sensitivity were 92% and 33.33% respectively. Conclusion: MRM is a non-invasive, efficient and reliable tool in confirming postoperative decompression in lumbar discectomy patients, especially when economic factors are to be considered and the required expertise to reliably read a complex

  8. Lumbar Extension during Stoop Lifting is Delayed by the Load and Hamstring Tightness

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Risa; Yokoyama, Ginga; Kawabata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tomotaka

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between lumbar pelvic rhythm and the physical characteristics of stoop lifting. [Subjects and Methods] Participants performed a stoop lifting task under two conditions: with and without load. We assessed the lumbar kyphosis and sacral inclination angles using the SpinalMouse® system, as well as hamstring flexibility. During stoop lifting, surface electromyograms and the lumbar and sacral motions were recorded using a multi-channel telemetry system and flexible electrogoniometers. [Results] In the initial phase of lifting, lumbar extension was delayed by load; the delay showed a negative correlation with sacral inclination angle at trunk flexion, whereas a positive correlation was observed with electromyogram activity of the lumbar multifidus. Additionally, a positive correlation was observed between sacral inclination angle and hip flexion range of motion during the straight leg raise test. [Conclusion] We found that a disorder of the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be caused by both load and hamstring tightness. In the initial phase of stoop lifting, delayed lumbar extension is likely to lead to an increase in spinal instability and stress on the posterior ligamentous system. This mechanism shows that stoop lifting of a load may be harmful to the lower back of people with hamstring tightness. PMID:24567676

  9. Spine Posture and Discomfort During Prolonged Simulated Driving With Self-Selected Lumbar Support Prominence.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, Diana E; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-09-01

    We examined magnitude preference, subjective discomfort, and spine posture during prolonged simulated driving with a self-selected amount of lumbar support. The general use of lumbar supports has been associated with decreased reports of low-back pain during driving exposures; however, minimal data exist regarding occupant magnitude preference. Participants chose between five discrete levels of lumbar support (0-4 cm). Time-varying postural and discomfort responses were then monitored throughout 2 hr of simulated driving. There were no significant effects of gender or time on posture. Women preferred larger amounts of support than men (3.25 cm ± 0.71 and 2.56 cm ± 0.88, respectively, p = .048). All participants exhibited significant increases (p = .003) in pelvic discomfort throughout the 2-hr trial regardless of the level of support chosen. Discomfort related to various aspects of the lumbar support increased significantly over time. Retrospectively, no participants desired a setting beyond 4 cm, and the majority of respondents indicate had they been able to change their initial selection, they would choose a setting between 2 and 3 cm. The results suggest that occupants would prefer increasing the excursion capability of automobile lumbar supports beyond 2 cm. Excursion capability and adjustability of automobile lumbar supports are important features to better meet end-user preference and to reducing lumbar flexion in sitting. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  10. Reposition sense of lumbar curvature with flexed and asymmetric lifting postures.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sara E; Granata, Kevin P

    2003-03-01

    Reposition sense of lumbar curvature was assessed as a function of trunk flexion, trunk asymmetry, and target lumbar curvature using a repeated-measures design and an active-active proprioception paradigm. The objectives of the research were to measure the ability of the subjects to sense and control the lumbar curvature in different lifting postures and to see if error in the lumbar curvature would increase in high-risk postures. The risk of low back disorders (LBDs) is related to trunk posture, with greater risk reported in flexed and asymmetric trunk positions. Spinal posture, including trunk position and lumbar lordosis, influences spinal stability. Hence, the ability to accurately sense and control spinal curvature may be an important factor in the control of LBD risk. Eleven subjects were trained to assume specified lumbar curvatures using visual feedback. The ability of the subjects to reproduce this curvature without feedback was then assessed. This procedure was repeated for different trunk postures, including flexion and asymmetry, and with different target lumbar curvatures. These measurements demonstrated reposition error was increased in flexed trunk positions but was unchanged with trunk asymmetry. This increase in reposition error with flexion was diminished when the target posture and lumbar curvature were highly flexed and kyphotic. This research suggests that it may be difficult to control spinal curvature in flexed positions, leading to an increased risk of injury. For jobs in which flexed working postures are unavoidable, therefore, it is important to minimize potentially unstable events such as slipping or shifting loads to avoid injury.

  11. Electrophysiological effects of lumbar dorsal root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Myklebust, J B; Maiman, D J; Larson, S J; Sances, A

    1984-06-01

    Electrical stimulation was applied to the L-5 and L-6 dorsal root ganglia of 14 monkeys with concurrent monitoring of cortical and intralaminar thalamic evoked potentials. Both responses were decreased by root stimulation, although cortical suppression required current levels 50 to 100% higher. The evoked potentials remained suppressed for periods of up to 60 minutes after 10- to 15-minute stimulation of the lumbar root electrodes. There was no increase in the duration of transmission block with longer stimulation periods. These results and available clinical data suggest that a local conduction block may be responsible for the pain relief produced by peripheral electrical stimulation. Further studies to identify more precisely the neural systems affected are required.

  12. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-04

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  13. Endoscopic lateral transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Bergey, Darren L; Villavicencio, Alan T; Goldstein, Theodore; Regan, John J

    2004-08-01

    A description of a novel surgical approach to the lumbar spine and a prospective evaluation of the early surgical outcomes. Describe the early postoperative results and the operative technique of a new, minimally invasive transpsoas approach for anterior fusion of the lumbar spine that minimizes the risk to large vessels and other critical structures. Standard anterior endoscopic approaches to the lumbar spine require mobilization of the great vessels and sympathetic plexus. Vascular injury and retrograde ejaculation are complications clearly associated with this approach. A retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine may reduce these risks. From 1996 to 2002, 21 patients (13 females, 8 males; mean age 50.0 years) underwent an endoscopic, retroperitoneal transpsoas approach for exposure of the lumbar spine. Surgical indications included discogenic pain in 14 patients, spinal instability at a level adjacent to a previous fusion in 3 patients, and progressive degenerative scoliosis in 4 patients. Data were reviewed to document the early postoperative results for this procedure. Illustrations were created to clearly describe this approach. Average operative time for the single level cases was 149 minutes (range 120-170 minutes); blood loss was 150 cc (range 50-650); postoperative hospital stay was 4.1 days. At long-term follow-up, visual analogue scale scores had decreased an average of 5.9. Mean follow-up was 3.1 years (range 2 months-6.0 years). Six patients (30%) experienced paresthesias in the groin/thigh region. Five of these same patients also complained of groin/thigh pain (27%). Two patients had symptoms that lasted longer than 1 month. One patient was converted to a mini-open lateral approach. There were no vascular injuries. Early results show the endoscopic lateral transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine to be a safe, minimally invasive method for anterior fusion of the first through the fourth lumbar vertebrae. Although there is a risk of

  14. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term.

  15. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  16. North Carolina's Implementation of Visibility Impact Assessment Requirements for New Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications Subject to Clean Air Act Prevention of Significant Deterioration Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. 46 CFR 42.03-5 - U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements of this subchapter. (a) Vessels engaged in foreign voyages or international voyages other than solely Great Lakes voyages. (1) All U.S. flag vessels which engage in foreign voyages or international...: (i) Ships of war; (ii) New vessels of less than 79 feet in length; (iii) Existing vessels of...

  18. The effects of transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the activation of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Jin Hyun; Jung, Gil Su; Baek, Seung Ok; Jones, Rodney; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effectiveness of three different neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocols for the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with LDK were recruited. Three stimulation protocols were investigated: stimulation of the abdominal muscles (protocol A); stimulation of the lumbar muscles (protocol B); and simultaneous stimulation of the abdominal and lumbar muscles (protocol A+B). Images of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI), transversus abdominis (TrA), and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles were captured by real-time ultrasound imaging (RUSI). [Results] The thickness of LM was significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for all three protocols. Thicknesses of the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for protocols A and A+B. Thickness increases in LM were significantly greater during protocols B and A+B, but not during protocol A. Thickness increases in the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during protocols A and A+B, but not during protocol B. [Conclusion] NMES can significantly activate the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with LDK. Protocol A+B of NMES is recommended to aid postural correction and low back pain (LBP) in patients with LDK. PMID:27064323

  19. Spinal sagittal balance and spinopelvic parameters in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis; a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Haghnegahdar, Ali; Rezaee, Hamid; Sharifi Rad, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the spinal sagittal balance and the spinopelvic parameters in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and healthy controls in Iranian population. We performed a case-control study in which 48 patients with lumbar spine stenosis and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects with back pain were eligible for participation. We used INFINITT picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) of the Chamran Hospital for selecting the patients for the study group. The sagittal balance, pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and sacral slope were measured in all the patients and controls using thoracolumbosacral radiographies in the standing position. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding the baseline characteristics. The prevalence of sagittal imbalance was significantly higher in the patients with lumbar spine stenosis in comparison with the controls (31.2% vs. 14.8%; P<0.001). The sacral slope was significantly lower in patients with lumbar canal stenosis than the healthy controls (31.39°±11.2 vs. 43.7°±8.4; P<0.001). The lumbar lordosis was significantly lower in patients with lumbar canal stenosis than the controls (31.27°±12.4 vs. 45.8°±10.7; P < 0.001). The pelvic incidence was not significantly different between the 2 groups (50.16°±11.9 vs. 52°±9.6; P=0.342). The degenerative lumbar canal stenosis is associated with increased sagittal imbalance and decreased lumbar lordosis and sacral slope in a sample of the Iranian adult population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Differences in lumbar and pelvic angles and gluteal pressure in different sitting postures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Su; An, Duk-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of erect sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting, and erect posture with cross-legged sitting on the lumbar and pelvic angles, and gluteal pressure. [Subjects] For the experiments, 17 healthy women were recruited. [Methods] All subjects were asked to perform three sitting postures: erect sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting, and erect posture with cross-legged sitting. Lumbar and pelvic angles were measured using a three-dimensional motion-capture system, and gluteal pressure was measured using a pressure mat. [Results] Compared to erector sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater lumbar flexion, posterior pelvic tilt, and left pelvic tilt. Compared to erect sitting, erect posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater lumbar flexion and posterior pelvic tilt. Compared to erect posture with cross-legged sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater lumbar flexion and posterior pelvic tilt. Compared to erect sitting and erect posture with cross-legged sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater left gluteal pressure; there was no significant difference in right gluteal pressure. [Conclusion] An erect posture can reduce changes in lumbar and pelvic angles, and gluteal pressure compared to a slouched posture during cross-legged sitting.

  1. Epidural steroid injection for lumbar disc herniation in NFL athletes.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Richman, Daniel; Drakos, Mark; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie; Cammisa, Frank; Warren, Russell F

    2012-02-01

    To our knowledge, there is no published information on the efficacy of epidural steroid injections for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation in an athletic population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of epidural corticosteroid injection for treatment of lumbar disc herniation in a group of National Football League (NFL) players. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all NFL players who underwent an epidural steroid injection at our institution for incapacitating pain secondary to an acute lumbar disc herniation (confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging) from 2003 to 2010. Our primary outcome was success of the injection, defined as return to play. The secondary outcome of the study was to evaluate risk factors for failure of this treatment approach. Seventeen players had a total of 37 injections for 27 distinct lumbar disc herniation episodes from 2003 to 2010. The success rate of returning an athlete to play for a given episode of disc herniation was 89% (24 of 27 episodes) with an average loss of 2.8 practices (range = 0-12) and 0.6 games (range = 0-2) after the injection. Four players required a repeat injection for the same episode. Three of these four players ultimately failed conservative management and required surgical intervention. Risk factors for failing injection therapy included sequestration of the disc herniation on magnetic resonance imaging (P = 0.01) and weakness on physical examination (P = 0.002). There were no complications reported. In this highly selective group of professional athletes, our results suggest that epidural steroid injections are a safe and effective therapeutic option in the treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

  2. EPA's Conclusion that WEPCO's Proposed Renovations to its Port Washington Power Plant Would be Subject to NSPS and PSD Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. Impact of lumbar spine posture on thoracic spine motion and muscle activation patterns.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Brian C; Drake, Janessa D M

    2014-10-01

    Complex motion during standing is typical in daily living and requires movement of both the thoracic and lumbar spine; however, the effects of lumbar spine posture on thoracic spine motion patterns remain unclear. Thirteen males moved to six positions involving different lumbar (neutral and flexed) and thoracic (flexed and twisted) posture combinations. The thoracic spine was partitioned into three segments and the range of motion from each posture was calculated. Electromyographical data were collected from eight muscles bilaterally. Results showed that with a flexed lumbar spine, the lower-thoracic region had 14.83 ° and 15.6 1 ° more flexion than the upper- and mid-thoracic regions, respectively. A flexed lumbar spine significantly reduced the mid-thoracic axial twist angle by 5.21 ° compared to maximum twist in the mid-thoracic region. Functional differences emerged across muscles, as low back musculature was greatest in maintaining flexed lumbar postures, while thoracic erector spinae and abdominals showed bilateral differences with greater activations to the ipsilateral side. Combined postures have been previously identified as potential injury modulators and bilateral muscle patterns can have an effect on loading pathways. Overall, changes in thoracic motion were modified by lumbar spine posture, highlighting the importance of considering a multi-segmented approach when analyzing trunk motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional lumbar spine vertebral motion during running using indwelling bone pins.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, Bruce A; Rozumalski, Adam; Swanson, Andrew N; Wervey, Roy; Dykes, Daryll C; Novacheck, Tom F; Schwartz, Michael H

    2014-12-15

    Eight healthy volunteers participated in this observational study. Quantify 3-dimensional motions of the lumbar vertebrae during running via direct in vivo measurement and compare these motions to walking data from the same technique and running data from a skin-mounted technique. Lumbar spine motions in running are only reported in 1 series of articles using a skin-mounted technique subject to overestimation and only instrumented a single vertebra. Reflective marker triads were attached to Kirschner wires inserted into the spinous processes of L1-S1. Anatomic registration between each vertebra and attached triad was achieved using spinal computed tomographic scans. Skin-mounted trunk markers were used to assess thoracic motions. Subjects ran several times in a calibrated volume at self-selected speed while 3-dimensional motion data were collected. Lumbar spine flexion and pelvic rotation patterns in running were reversed compared with walking. Increased lumbar spine motions during running occurred at the most inferior segments. Thoracic spine, lumbar spine and pelvis exhibited significantly greater range of sagittal plane motion with running. The pelvis had significantly greater range of frontal plane motion, and the thoracic spine had significantly greater range of transverse plane motion with running. Skin-mounted studies reported as much as 4 times the motion range determined by the indwelling bone pin techniques, indicating that the skin motion relative to the underlying bone during running was greater than the motion of the underlying vertebrae. The lumbar spine acts as a distinct functional segment in the spine during running, chiefly contributing lateral flexion to balance the relative motions between the trunk and pelvis. The lumbar spine is also shown to oppose thoracic spine sagittal flexion. While the lumbar spine chiefly contributes to frontal plane motion, the thoracic spine contributes the majority of the transverse plane motion. N/A.

  5. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  6. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Ossification of the Yellow Ligament in the Lumbar Spine: First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tetsuya; Funayama, Toru; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Keita; Miura, Kousei; Nagashima, Katsuya; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    When ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) occurs in the lumbar spine and extends to the lateral wall of the spinal canal, facetectomy is required to remove all of the ossified lesion and achieve decompression. Subsequent posterior fixation with interbody fusion will then be necessary to prevent postoperative progression of the ossification and intervertebral instability. The technique of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) has recently been introduced. Using this procedure, surgeons can avoid excess blood loss from the extradural venous plexus and detachment of the ossified lesion and the ventral dura mater is avoidable. We present a 55-year-old male patient with OYL at L3/4 and anterior spondylolisthesis of L4 vertebra, with concomitant ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, who presented with a severe gait disturbance. He underwent a 2-stage operation without complications: LLIF for L3/4 and L4/5 was performed at the initial surgery, and posterior decompression fixation using pedicle screws from L3 to L5 was performed at the second surgery. His postoperative progress was favorable, and his interbody fusion was deemed successful. Here, we present the first reported case of LLIF for OYL of the lumbar spine. This procedure can be a good option for OYL of the lumbar spine. PMID:28352485

  7. The effect of kinesio taping in forward bending of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping(®) technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping(®) influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility.

  8. Conservative treatments for lumbar radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Gregory; Nissen, Michael J; Genevay, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar radicular pain is a frequent medical pathology and represents a significant burden on society. The diagnosis of sciatica is largely clinical, in the setting of a combination of radicular pain and neurologic deficits (motor, reflexes, and/or sensation) or a positive straight leg raise test. Imaging is generally not necessary for sciatica, except in the presence of warning signs or in the setting of persisting or worsening pain. The recommended first-line treatment has not yet been clearly established. The choice of a conservative treatment approach combined with simple analgesics in the initial stages seems to be reasonable. A detailed discussion with the patient is important to explain the fact that surgery may only be necessary in the event of pain persisting in excess of 3 months or because of the development or worsening of a neurologic deficit. More high quality studies are clearly required to assist the medical practitioner in knowing how best to treat this group of patients.

  9. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41° ± 4), H. erectus (45°) and fossil H. sapiens (54° ± 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51° ± 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29° ± 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22° ± 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans.

  10. [Regional anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy].

    PubMed

    Dagher, Christine; Naccache, Nicole; Narchi, Patrick; Hage, Paul; Antakly, Marie-Claire

    2002-01-01

    Lumbar microdiscectomy surgery is already performed under spinal anesthesia (SA) in many institutions. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of analgesia and recovery after SA when compared to general anesthesia (GA) after lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Following light sedation, SA is performed with the patient in the left lateral decubitus position, one to two levels above the herniated disc level. Isobaric 0.5% bupivacaine 3-3.5 ml was injected intrathecally followed by wound infiltration with 15 ml of bupivacaine with 1/200 000 epinephrine prior to surgical incision. Despite randomization, we found significantly more females in the GA group. Pain scores at 4 and 8 h postoperatively were lower in SA group as well as total analgesic consumption during the first 24 h. Postoperative recovery including time to drinking, eating and walking were more rapid after SA when compared to GA. During the postoperative period, the incidence of urinary retention was comparable between groups but the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly higher in the GA group. Moreover, the overall patient's and surgeon's satisfaction were significantly better in the SA group. SA associated to wound infiltration using bupivacaine is an interesting alternative to general anesthesia for outpatient lumbar microdiscectomy surgery.

  11. The effect of backpacks on the lumbar spine in children: a standing magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Neuschwander, Timothy B; Cutrone, John; Macias, Brandon R; Cutrone, Samantha; Murthy, Gita; Chambers, Henry; Hargens, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    This study is a repeated measures design to measure the lumbar spine response to typical school backpack loads in healthy children. The lumbar spine in this setting was measured for the first time by an upright magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The purpose of this study is to measure the lumbar spine response to typical school backpack loads in healthy children. We hypothesize that backpack loads significantly increase disc compression and lumbar curvature. Children commonly carry school backpacks of 10% to 22% bodyweight. Despite growing concern among parents about safety, there are no imaging studies which describe the effect of backpack loads on the spine in children. Three boys and 5 girls, age 11 +/- 2 years (mean +/- SD) underwent T2 weighted sagittal and coronal MRI scans of the lumbar spine while standing. Scans were repeated with 4, 8, and 12 kg backpack loads, which represented approximately 10%, 20%, and 30% body weight for our sample. Main outcome measures were disc compression, defined as post- minus preloading disc height, and lumbar asymmetry, defined as the coronal Cobb angle between the superior endplates of S1 and L1. Increasing backpack loads significantly compressed lumbar disc heights measured in the midline sagittal plane (P < 0.05, repeated-measures analysis of variance [ANOVA]). Lumbar asymmetry was: 2.23 degrees +/- 1.07 degrees standing, 5.46 degrees +/- 2.50 degrees with 4 kg, 9.18 degrees +/- 2.25 degrees with 8 kg, and 5.68 degrees +/- 1.76 degrees with 12 kg (mean +/- SE). Backpack loads significantly increased lumbar asymmetry (P < 0.03, one-way ANOVA). Four of the 8 subjects had Cobb angles greater than 10 degrees during 8-kg backpack loads. Using a visual-analogue scale to rate their pain (0-no pain, 10-worst pain imaginable), subjects reported significant increases in back pain associated with backpack loads of 4, 8, and 12 kg (P < 0.001, 1-way ANOVA). Backpack loads are responsible for a significant amount of back pain in

  12. [Case-control study of the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation in 5 northern provinces of China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng-ming; Ling, Ming; Chang, Yan-hai; Liu, Zong-zhi; Xu, Hong-hai; Gong, Li-qun; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yin-gang

    2010-11-01

    To explore the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation in the 5 northern provinces of China. A total of 2010 patients with established diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation by CT and/or MRI and 2170 control subjects without a history of low back pain or sciatica were randomly selected from the community population and hospitalized patients. The family history of lumbar disc herniation, occupations, smoking status, and occupational psychosocial factors were investigated. The positivity of family history of lumbar disc herniation was the highest risk factor (OR=3.551) followed by lumbar load (OR=2.132) and hard work (OR=1.763). Physical exercises (OR=0.435) were significantly related with the disease, and the OR of the type of bed was 0.364. A family history of lumbar disc herniation, lumbar load and hard work are the major risk factors for lumbar disc herniation, and physical exercises and sleeping not in soft bed might be a protective factor against the disease.

  13. Results of lumbar spondylodeses using different bone grafting materials after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

    PubMed

    vonderHoeh, Nicolas Heinz; Voelker, Anna; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2017-05-25

    Can a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HA) and autologous bone from decompression sites produce similar results when used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)? In the current literature, autologous iliac crest bone grafts (ICBGs) have been reported the gold standard for this procedure. Indeed, to date, no clinical data have confirmed that a mixture of equal volumes of HA and local autologous bone produce similar results in term of fusion as the same volume of autologous ICBG alone. Study design/setting This study was approved by the local ethics committee and completed in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded manner. The results of lumbar fusion using TLIF and different bone grafting materials were compared. Patient sample The patient sample included patients with spinal lumbar degenerative disease. Outcome measures The clinical outcome was determined using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The radiological outcomes and fusion rates were determined with radiographs evaluated using the McAfee criteria and computed tomography (CT) data evaluated by the Williams criteria. Three blinded investigators (one radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons) assessed the data. The secondary variables included donor site morbidity. Methods The patients were admitted to our department for orthopedic surgery with degenerative lumbar pathologies (L2-S1) that required stabilization in one or two segments using a TLIF procedure. The patients were 18-80 years old. Only those patients who had degenerative lumbar pathologies and agreed to be educated about the study were included. The patients were divided into the following two randomized groups: group A: TLIF procedure using autologous ICBGs alone; and group B: TLIF procedure using local bone from decompression site mixed with hydroxyapatite. Each group received equal graft volumes. The mixture in group B consisted of equal volumes of local autograft (5 cc) and synthetic

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis of lumbar stenosis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koompairojn, Soontharee; Hua, Kathleen; Hua, Kien A.; Srisomboon, Jintavaree

    2010-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are indispensable tools for patients' healthcare in modern medicine. Nevertheless, the only fully automatic CAD system available for lumbar stenosis today is for X-ray images. Its performance is limited due to the limitations intrinsic to X-ray images. In this paper, we present a system for magnetic resonance images. It employs a machine learning classification technique to automatically recognize lumbar spine components. Features can then be extracted from these spinal components. Finally, diagnosis is done by applying a Multilayer Perceptron. This classification framework can learn the features of different spinal conditions from the training images. The trained Perceptron can then be applied to diagnose new cases for various spinal conditions. Our experimental studies based on 62 subjects indicate that the proposed system is reliable and significantly better than our older system for X-ray images.

  15. [Influence of the weather on the course of lumbar syndromes].

    PubMed

    Machalek, A; Tilscher, H; Friedrich, M; Polt, E

    1980-01-01

    Sensation of pain during lumbar syndromes is correlated with weather situations, the definition of which takes into consideration traditional as well as new methods of weather classification. To this end, it was necessary to develop an algesia index for the purpose of defining the subjective pain sensation by classifying it in different groups enabling the application of medico-meteorological statistics. The medical data were correlated with the following meteorological arametes: Weather-phase scheme according to Brezowsky-Ungeheuer; temperature-humidity environment; weather situations for Central Europe; synoptic index cycle; advention of temperature in medium altitudes of the atmosphere; vorticity for cyclogenesis. The following results were obtained: Pain sensation in the lumbar area shows a significant dependence on weather situations. Althoguh singular meteorological parameters are not important, the human body is affected primarily by the sum total of all weather elements.

  16. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  17. Countermeasures against lumbar spine deconditioning in prolonged bed rest: resistive exercise with and without whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Gast, Ulf; Richardson, Carolyn A; Hides, Julie A; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of short-duration, high-load resistive exercise, with and without whole body vibration on lumbar muscle size, intervertebral disk and spinal morphology changes, and low back pain (LBP) incidence during prolonged bed rest, 24 subjects underwent 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest and performed either resistive vibration exercise (n = 7), resistive exercise only (n = 8), or no exercise (n = 9; 2nd Berlin Bed-Rest Study). Discal and spinal shape was measured from sagittal plane magnetic resonance images. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum, and psoas were measured on para-axial magnetic resonance images. LBP incidence was assessed with questionnaires at regular intervals. The countermeasures reduced CSA loss in the multifidus, lumbar erector spinae and quadratus lumborum muscles, with greater increases in psoas muscle CSA seen in the countermeasure groups (P ≤ 0.004). There was little statistical evidence for an additional effect of whole body vibration above resistive exercise alone on these muscle changes. Exercise subjects reported LBP more frequently in the first week of bed rest, but this was only significant in resistive exercise only (P = 0.011 vs. control, resistive vibration exercise vs. control: P = 0.56). No effect of the countermeasures on changes in spinal morphology was seen (P ≥ 0.22). The results suggest that high-load resistive exercise, with or without whole body vibration, performed 3 days/wk can reduce lumbar muscle atrophy, but further countermeasure optimization is required.

  18. Ankle restrictive firefighting boots alter the lumbar biomechanics during landing tasks.

    PubMed

    Vu, Vy; Walker, Anthony; Ball, Nick; Spratford, Wayne

    2017-11-01

    Firefighters incur high incidences of lower back and body injuries. Firefighting boots, with specific design requirements, have been shown to reduce ankle range of motion. This reduction has been associated with impaired force dissipation and lower body kinematic alterations. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between firefighting boots, lumbar biomechanics and load carriage during landing. Our data indicates that when wearing firefighting boots, lumbar forces increased and kinematics changed in frontal and transverse planes. These changes may be occurring due to the restrictive shaft of the firefighting boot reducing ankle range of motion. Comparisons between unloaded and loaded conditions also showed increased changes in lumbar biomechanics, independent of footwear worn. Therefore, wearing firefighting boots, in addition to operational loading, may be placing firefighters at greater risk of lumbar injuries. Future research investigating firefighting boots and additional load carriage on lower body biomechanics during landing is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inter and intra-rater reliability of mobile device goniometer in measuring lumbar flexion range of motion.

    PubMed

    Bedekar, Nilima; Suryawanshi, Mayuri; Rairikar, Savita; Sancheti, Parag; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of range of motion (ROM) is integral part of assessment of musculoskeletal system. This is required in health fitness and pathological conditions; also it is used as an objective outcome measure. Several methods are described to check spinal flexion range of motion. Different methods for measuring spine ranges have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, a new device was introduced in this study using the method of dual inclinometer to measure lumbar spine flexion range of motion (ROM). To determine Intra and Inter-rater reliability of mobile device goniometer in measuring lumbar flexion range of motion. iPod mobile device with goniometer software was used. The part being measure i.e the back of the subject was suitably exposed. Subject was standing with feet shoulder width apart. Spinous process of second sacral vertebra S2 and T12 were located, these were used as the reference points and readings were taken. Three readings were taken for each: inter-rater reliability as well as the intra-rater reliability. Sufficient rest was given between each flexion movement. Intra-rater reliability using ICC was r=0.920 and inter-rater r=0.812 at CI 95%. Validity r=0.95. Mobile device goniometer has high intra-rater reliability. The inter-rater reliability was moderate. This device can be used to assess range of motion of spine flexion, representing uni-planar movement.

  20. Minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation and lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Xu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhang, Bi; Lin, Qiuyan; He, Mingchang

    2013-08-01

    Minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases has won the support of many surgeons. However, few data are available regarding clinical research on unilateral pedicle screw fixation associated with minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of lumbar spinal diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes in a selected series of patients with lumbar degenerative diseases treated with minimally invasive unilateral vs classic bilateral pedicle screw fixation and lumbar interbody fusion. Patients in the unilateral group (n=43) underwent minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation with the Quadrant system (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee). The bilateral group (n=42) underwent bilateral instrumentation via the classic approach. Visual analog scale pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index scores, fusion rate, operative time, blood loss, and complications were analyzed. Mean operative time was 75 minutes in the unilateral group and 95 minutes in the bilateral group. Mean blood loss was 220 mL in the unilateral group and 450 mL in the bilateral group. Mean postoperative visual analog scale pain score was 3.10±0.16 in the unilateral group and 3.30±1.10 in the bilateral group. Mean postoperative Oswestry Disability Index score was 15.67±2.3 in the unilateral group and 14.93±2.6 in the bilateral group. Successful fusion was achieved in 92.34% of patients in the unilateral group and 93.56% of patients in the bilateral group. Minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation is an effective and reliable option for the surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. It causes less blood loss, requires less operative time, and has a fusion rate comparable with that of conventional bilateral fixation. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Electrical stimulation threshold in chronically compressed lumbar nerve roots: Observational study.

    PubMed

    Plata-Bello, Julio; Pérez-Lorensu, Pedro Javier; Brage, Liberto; Hernández-Hernández, Vanessa; Dóniz, Ayoze; Roldán-Delgado, Héctor; Febles, Pablo; García-Conde, Mario; Pérez-Orribo, Luis; García-Marín, Víctor

    2015-12-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) is a common practice in spinal surgery, mostly during pedicle screw placement. However, there is not enough information about the factors that can interfere with IONM data. One of these factors may be existing damage of the nerve root whose function must be preserved. The main purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of chronic compression in lumbar nerve roots in terms of stimulation thresholds during direct nerve stimulation. Direct electrical stimulation was performed in 201 lumbar nerve roots during lumbar spinal procedures under general anaesthesia in 80 patients with different lumbar spinal pathologies. Clinical and radiological data were reviewed in order to establish the presence of chronic compression. Chronically compressed nerve roots showed a higher stimulation threshold than non compressed nerve roots (11.93 mA vs. 4.33 mA). This difference was confirmed with intra-subject comparison (paired sample t test, p=0.012). No other clinical factors were associated with this higher stimulation threshold in lumbar nerve roots. A higher stimulation threshold is present in compressed lumbar nerve roots than non compressed roots. This needs to be taken into consideration during pedicle screw placement, where intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is being used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Physiological Loading on the Lumbar Spine of National Level Athletes in Different Sports.

    PubMed

    Rozan, Mansoorehossadat; Rouhollahi, Vahid; Rastogi, Amit; Dureha, Dilip Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The lumbar spine is subjected to considerable stress during many athletic efforts. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of physiological loading on the lumbar spine in national male players of different games, which may be predictive of the future development of low back pain and injury symptoms. Thirty-four national players (12 cricket players, 12 field hockey players, and 10 basketball players) underwent magnetic resonance imaging, and selected geometric variables including intervertebral disc angles, the Farfan ratio, the lumbar body index, the compression deformity ratio, the biconcave deformity ratio and the anterior wedge deformity ratio were measured using KINOVEA-0.8.15 software and syngo fast view software and calculated using specific formulas. The results indicated a significant difference in the intervertebral disc angle between the three groups at the L2/3, L3/4 and L4/5 levels. In relation to the lumbar vertebral body shape and size, significant differences were found in the lumbar index at the L2 level, in the biconcave deformity at the L1 and L2 levels and in relation to the anterior wedge deformity at L2 between the three selected groups. Our data suggest that the different physiological loadings in the selected sports play an important role in the development of degenerative changes of the lumbar spine, which may be considered a risk factor for future injury and/or low back pain in each specific sport because of the unique demands of each discipline.

  3. Perioperative and short-term advantages of mini-open approach for lumbar spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vela, J.; Joven-Aliaga, E.; Herrera, A.; Vicente, J.; Suñén, E.; Loste, A.; Tabuenca, A.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported a vascular and neurologic damage of the lumbar muscles produced in the classic posterior approach for lumbar spinal fusions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a better clinical and functional outcome in the postoperative and short term in patients undergoing minimal invasive surgery (“mini-open”) for this lumbar spinal arthrodesis. We designed a prospective study with a 30 individuals cohort randomized in two groups, depending on the approach performed to get a instrumented lumbar circumferential arthrodesis: “classic posterior” (CL group) or “mini-open” approach (MO group). Several clinical and functional parameters were assessed, including blood loss, postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and daily life activities during hospital stay and at the 3-month follow-up. Patients of the “mini-open approach” group had a significant lower blood loss and hospital stay during admission. They also had significant lower analgesic requirements and faster recovery of daily life activities (specially moderate efforts) when compared to the patients of the “classic posterior approach” group. No significant differences were found between two groups in surgery timing, X-rays exposure or sciatic postoperative pain. This study, inline with previous investigations, reinforces the concept of minimizing the muscular lumbar damage with a mini-open approach for a faster and better recovery of patients’ disability in the short term. Further investigations are necessary to confirm these findings in the long term, and to verify the achievement of a stable lumbar spinal fusion. PMID:19399538

  4. Relationship of body composition, knee extensor strength, and standing balance to lumbar bone mineral density in postmenopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsub; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate correlations between lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) and general characteristics of postmenopausal females, including body composition, knee extensor strength, standing balance, and femur BMD. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 postmenopausal females (55.6 ± 4.6 years) who were caregivers or guardians of patients in the K hospital were included in the study. The weight, height, body composition, left and right knee extensor strength, standing balance, femur BMD, and lumbar BMD measurements of the subjects were obtained. [Results] The effect of measurement variables on lumbar BMD was examined. Increases in age and menopausal duration were observed to significantly increase lumbar BMD, whereas an increase in height was found to significantly decrease lumbar BMD. An increase in soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, fat-free mass, and femur BMD was also associated with significantly decreased lumbar BMD. [Conclusion] Age, menopausal duration, soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, and fat-free mass were factors that decreased lumbar BMD in menopausal females. This study is expected to provide basic knowledge for osteoporosis prevention and treatment programs for postmenopausal females. PMID:27512276

  5. Differences in end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending between low back pain subgroups and genders.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Shannon L; Johnson, Molly B; Zou, Dequan; Van Dillen, Linda R

    2012-04-01

    Patterns of lumbar posture and motion are associated with low back pain (LBP). Research suggests LBP subgroups demonstrate different patterns during common tasks. This study assessed differences in end-range lumbar flexion during two tasks between two LBP subgroups classified according to the Movement System Impairment model. Additionally, the impact of gender differences on subgroup differences was assessed. Kinematic data were collected. Subjects in the Rotation (Rot) and Rotation with Extension (RotExt) LBP subgroups were asked to sit slumped and bend forward from standing. Lumbar end-range flexion was calculated. Subjects reported symptom behaviour during each test. Compared to the RotExt subgroup, the Rot subgroup demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and a trend towards greater end-range lumbar flexion with forward bending. Compared to females, males demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending. A greater proportion of people in the Rot subgroup reported symptoms with each test compared to the RotExt subgroup. Males and females were equally likely to report symptoms with each test. Gender differences were not responsible for LBP subgroup differences. Subgrouping people with LBP provides insight into differences in lumbar motion within the LBP population. Results suggesting potential consistent differences across flexion-related tasks support the presence of stereotypical movement patterns that are related to LBP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Foot Hyperpronation on Lumbar Lordosis and Thoracic Kyphosis in Standing Position Using 3-Dimensional Ultrasound-Based Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Farokhmanesh, Khatere; Shirzadian, Toraj; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Shahri, Mina Neyakan

    2014-01-01

    Based on clinical observations, foot hyperpronation is very common. Excessive pronation (hyperpronation) can cause malalignment of the lower extremities. This most often leads to functional and structural deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foot hyperpronation on lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis. Thirty five healthy subjects (age range, 18030 years) were asked to stand on 4 positions including a flat surface (normal position) and on wedges angled at 10, 15, and 20 degrees. Sampling was done using simple random sampling. Measurements were made by a motion analysis system. For data analysis, the SPSS software (ver. 18) using paired t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. The eversion created by the wedges caused a significant increase in lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis. The most significant change occurred between two consecutive positions of flat surface and the first wedge. The t-test for repeated measures showed a high correlation between each two consecutive positions. The results showed that with increased bilateral foot pronation, lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis increased as well. In fact, each of these results is a compensation phenomenon. Further studies are required to determine long-term results of excessive foot pronation and its probable effect on damage progression. PMID:25169004

  7. Effect of foot hyperpronation on lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis in standing position using 3-dimensional ultrasound-based motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Farokhmanesh, Khatere; Shirzadian, Toraj; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Shahri, Mina Neyakan

    2014-06-17

    Based on clinical observations, foot hyperpronation is very common. Excessive pronation (hyperpronation) can cause malalignment of the lower extremities. This most often leads to functional and structural deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foot hyperpronation on lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis. Thirty five healthy subjects (age range, 18030 years) were asked to stand on 4 positions including a flat surface (normal position) and on wedges angled at 10, 15, and 20 degrees. Sampling was done using simple random sampling. Measurements were made by a motion analysis system. For data analysis, the SPSS software (ver. 18) using paired t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. The eversion created by the wedges caused a significant increase in lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis. The most significant change occurred between two consecutive positions of flat surface and the first wedge. The t-test for repeated measures showed a high correlation between each two consecutive positions. The results showed that with increased bilateral foot pronation, lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis increased as well. In fact, each of these results is a compensation phenomenon. Further studies are required to determine long-term results of excessive foot pronation and its probable effect on damage progression.

  8. Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Jose F.; Ramos, Ana; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature. PMID:20174835

  9. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Etiologic and pathologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Quiles, M; Marchisello, P J; Tsairis, P

    1978-03-01

    The etiologic factors and pathologic findings in 38 patients with lumbar arachnoiditis are presented. Lumbar spine surgery and the injection of contrast materials prior to the diagnosis of this condition are considered the most important factors in its genesis. In this series, there was microscopic evidence of arachnoiditis ossificans in 3 patients and arachnoiditis calcificans in 1 patient.

  10. [Lumbar pain in old age].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, H

    1996-10-22

    In advanced age, lumbar pain is less frequently caused by occupational stress and psychosomatic factors. Unstable segments and spondylo-arthrotic degeneration can lead to muscular strain whenever insufficient secondary stability and missing muscular equilibrium are involved. In the differential diagnosis one must distinguish between osteoporosis and spinal stenosis, which increases in frequency with age. Pain due to internal or gynecological problems must be excluded. From the therapeutic point of view, patients should be instructed in ergonomics and the simple application of physiotherapeutic procedures, e.g. heat and cold. Analgetics become increasingly important with age, consequently resulting in reduced use of antirheumatics. There exists enough evidence to show that muscular training of the lumbar muscles play an important role in the secondary prevention of lumbar pain in elderly people as well. Essentially, it can be stated that physical age is not directly related to possible ailment. The change of occupational obligations, with possibilities to adapt to personal stress levels, as well as the positive attitude towards everyday life in retirement have a major influence in accepting and handling ability of problems, concerning pain. In the department of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Rheumatology of the Clinic Wilhelm Schulthess it was found that among 7806 patients with lower back pain (1990-1995) 43.3% involved the ages of 40 to 60 and 31.3% the ages of 60 to 80. More distinctly than in younger patients, older aged patients tend to show a marked discrepancy between radiological findings and effective pain. Lower back pains of elderly patients are of a different nature from those found in younger or middle-aged people. Ischialgia due to the protrusion of an intervertebral disk or an acute lumbovertebral syndrome caused by muscular instability are found much less frequently.

  11. Lumbar intraspinal extradural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Min; Rhee, Woo Tack; Choi, Soo Jung; Eom, Dae Woon

    2009-07-01

    The lumbar intraspinal epidural ganglion cyst has been a rare cause of the low back pain or leg pain. Ganglion cysts and synovial cysts compose the juxtafacet cysts. Extensive studies have been performed about the synovial cysts, however, very little has been known about the ganglion cyst. Current report is about two ganglion cysts associated with implicative findings in young male patients. We discuss about the underlying pathology of the ganglion cyst based on intraoperative evidences, associated disc herniation at the same location or severe degeneration of the ligament flavum that the cyst originated from in young patients.

  12. Correlations between Transversus Abdominis Thickness, Lumbar Stability, and Balance of Female University Students

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wontae

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to analyze the correlations of the thicknesses of the transversus abdominis muscle (Tra) and the internal obliquus abdominis muscle (Io) with static lumbar stability (SLS), dynamic lumbar stability (DLS), and balance. [Subjects] The subjects of the present study were 40 female university students who had no physical defects or pain. [Methods] The thicknesses of Tra and Io muscles were measured using an ultrasonic imaging diagnostic unit. SLS and DLS were measured using a Pressure Biofeedback Unit (PBU), and Weight Distribution Indexes (WDI) and stability scores (SS) were measured using a balance measuring unit. [Results] As the thickness of the Tra increased, SLS, DLS, WDI, and SS improved. As SLS improved, DLS and WDI were also improved. [Conclusion] To improve lumbar stability and balance, training is needed in order to increase the muscle mass of the transversus abdominis muscle. PMID:24259828

  13. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  14. Comparison of lumbar spine stabilization exercise versus general exercise in young male patients with lumbar disc herniation after 1 year of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chaoqun; Ren, Jixin; Zhang, Jianzheng; Wang, Chongwei; Liu, Zhi; Li, Fang; Sun, Tiansheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The safest and most effective conservative treatment for patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has not been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lumbar spine stabilization exercise (LSSE) and general exercise (GE) on pain intensity and functional capacity in young male patients with LDH. Methods: Sixty-three young male adults aged 20 to 29 years with the diagnosis of LDH were enrolled and divided into an LSSE group (n=30) and a GE group (n=33). Patients in both groups received low-power laser (LPL) therapy during the first week of the onset of LDH. Patients in the GE group underwent a GE program. Patients in the LSSE group followed an LSSE program for 3 months. All of the patients were subjected to pain intensity and functional capacity evaluations four times: at pre-and post-LPL therapy, and at 3 months and 1 year post-exercise. Pain intensity of the lower back and legs was evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS), and functional capacity was evaluated with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Both groups showed a significant reduction in VAS and ODI scores at 3 and 12 months post-exercise compared with before treatment (P<0.001). The LSSE group showed a significant reduction in the average score of the VAS for low back pain (P=0.012) and the ODI (P=0.003) at 12 months post-exercise compared with the GE group. Conclusions: LSSE and GE are considered as effective interventions for young male patients with LDH. Moreover, LSSE is more effective than GE, and physical therapy, such as LPL, is required during acute LDH. PMID:26309670

  15. Occupational risk factors for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Siol, T; Henkel, N; Fuchs, C; Schug, H; Leheta, F; Marquardt, G; Schmitt, E; Ulrich, P; Beck, W; Missalla, A; Elsner, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Previous studies mostly did not separate between symptomatic disc herniation combined with osteochondrosis/spondylosis of the lumbar spine and symptomatic disc herniation in radiographically normal intervertebral spaces. This may at least in part explain the differences in the observed risk patterns. Aims: To investigate the possible aetiological relevance of physical and psychosocial workload to lumbar disc herniation with and without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Methods: A total of 267 cases with acute lumbar disc herniation (in two practices and four clinics) and 197 control subjects were studied. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview and analysed using logistic regression to control for age, region, nationality, and diseases affecting the lumbar spine. Cases without knowledge about osteochondrosis/spondylosis (n=42) were excluded from analysis. Risk factors were examined separately for those cases with (n=131) and without (n=94) radiographically diagnosed concomitant osteochondrosis or spondylosis. Results: There was a statistically significant positive association between extreme forward bending and lumbar disc herniation with, as well as without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. There was a statistically significant relation between cumulative exposure to weight lifting or carrying and lumbar disc herniation with, but not without, concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Cases with disc herniation reported time pressure at work as well as psychic strain through contact with clients more frequently than control subjects. Conclusions: Further larger studies are needed to verify the concept of distinct aetiologies of lumbar disc herniation in relatively younger persons with otherwise normal discs and of disc herniation in relatively older persons with structurally damaged discs. PMID:14573712

  16. Responses to lumbar magnetic stimulation in newborns with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, Niels; Pasman, Jaco W; Roeleveld, Nel; Rotteveel, Jan J; Mullaart, Reinier A

    2006-02-01

    Searching for a tool to quantify motor impairment in spina bifida, transcranial and lumbar magnetic stimulation were applied in affected newborn infants. Lumbar magnetic stimulation resulted in motor evoked potentials in both the quadriceps muscle and the tibialis anterior muscle in most (11/13) subjects. However, transcranial magnetic stimulation did not lead to any response at all. A strong left-to-right correlation existed for amplitude and for latency. Lumbar magnetic stimulation proved to be applicable in newborn infants with spina bifida. Although current concepts regarding spina bifida suppose lower motor neuron dysfunction, the results of this study suggest that lower motor neuron integrity is at least partly preserved after birth. Transcranial magnetic stimulation does not lead to responses in healthy newborn infants because of insufficient synaptogenesis, myelinogenesis, and axon thickness. Therefore, conclusions on upper motor neuron function in spina bifida cannot be drawn. To what extent the method used here can achieve the aim of quantifying motor impairment is a matter of further study.

  17. Spondylodiscitis Occurring after Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Mehmet Zafer

    2013-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis is a rare disease which is generally seen after long-term epidural catheterization. However, spondylidiscitis developing after diagnostic lumbar puncture is very rare. Early diagnosis has a crucial role in the management of the disease and inclines the morbidity rates. However, the diagnosis is often delayed due to the rarity and insidious onset of the disease usually presenting with low back pain which has a high frequency in the society. If it is diagnosed early before development of an abscess requiring surgery or neurological deficit, it responds to antimicrobial therapy quite well. We report 66-year-old male case of spondylodiscitis developing after diagnostic lumbar puncture. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy. After antimicrobial therapy, findings of spondylodiscitis were completely resolved and no recurrence was seen in the period of 9-month followup. PMID:23476837

  18. Neuromuscular disorders associated with static lumbar flexion: a feline model.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M; Zhou, B; Baratta, R V; Zhu, M; Lu, Y

    2002-04-01

    Static flexion of the lumbar spine with constant load applied to the viscoelastic structures for 20 minutes and for 50 minutes resulted in development of spasms and inhibition in the multifidus muscles (e.g., deep erector spinae) and in creep of the supraspinous ligament in the feline model. The development of spasms and inhibition was not dependent on load magnitude. It is suggested that occupational and sports activities which require prolonged static lumbar flexion within the physiological range can cause a "sprain"-like injury to the ligaments, which in turn reflexively induce spasms and inhibition in some erector spinae muscles. Such disorder may take a long time to recover, in the order of days to weeks, depending on the level of creep developed in the tissues.

  19. Surgical options for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Gustavo C; Ferreira, Paulo H; Yoo, Rafael Ij; Harris, Ian A; Pinheiro, Marina B; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Maher, Christopher G; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2016-11-01

    , operation time, length of hospital stay, reoperation rates, and costs. We grouped trials according to the types of surgical interventions being compared and categorised follow-up times as short-term when less than 12 months and long-term when 12 months or more. Pain and disability scores were converted to a common 0 to 100 scale. We calculated mean differences for continuous outcomes and relative risks for dichotomous outcomes. We pooled data using the random-effects model in Review Manager 5.3, and used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the evidence. We included a total of 24 randomised controlled trials (reported in 39 published research articles or abstracts) in this review. The trials included 2352 participants with lumbar spinal stenosis with symptoms of neurogenic claudication. None of the included trials compared surgery with no treatment, placebo or sham surgery. Therefore, all included studies compared two or more surgical techniques. We judged all trials to be at high risk of bias for the blinding of care provider domain, and most of the trials failed to adequately conceal the randomisation process, blind the participants or use intention-to-treat analysis. Five trials compared the effects of fusion in addition to decompression surgery. Our results showed no significant differences in pain relief at long-term (mean difference (MD) -0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) -7.32 to 6.74). Similarly, we found no between-group differences in disability reduction in the long-term (MD 3.26, 95% CI -6.12 to 12.63). Participants who received decompression alone had significantly less perioperative blood loss (MD -0.52 L, 95% CI -0.70 L to -0.34 L) and required shorter operations (MD -107.94 minutes, 95% CI -161.65 minutes to -54.23 minutes) compared with those treated with decompression plus fusion, though we found no difference in the number of reoperations (risk ratio (RR) 1.25, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.92). Another three trials investigated the effects of interspinous

  20. The effect of massage on localized lumbar muscle fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tim Hideaki; Leisman, Gerry; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nishijo, Kazushi

    2002-01-01

    Background There is not enough evidence to support the efficacy of massage for muscle fatigue despite wide utilization of the modality in various clinical settings. This study investigated the influence of massage application on localized back muscle fatigue. Methods Twenty-nine healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (massage and rest conditions). On each test day, subjects were asked to lie in the prone position on a treatment table and perform sustained back extension for 90 seconds. Subjects then either received massage on the lumbar region or rested for a 5 minute duration, then repeated the back extension movement. The median frequency (MDF), mean power frequency (MNF), and root mean square (RMS) amplitude of electromyographic signals during the 90 second sustained lumbar muscle contraction were analyzed. The subjective feeling of fatigue was then evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results MDF and MNF significantly declined with time under all conditions. There was no significant difference in MDF, MNF or RMS value change between before and after massage, or between rest and massage conditions. There was a significant increase in fatigue VAS at the end of the 2nd back extension with rest condition. There was a significant difference in fatigue VAS change between massage and rest condition. Conclusions A significant difference was observed between massage and rest condition on VAS for muscle fatigue. On EMG analysis, there were no significant differences to conclude that massage stimulation influenced the myoelectrical muscle fatigue, which is associated with metabolic and electrical changes. PMID:12377105

  1. Effects of aquatic backward locomotion exercise and progressive resistance exercise on lumbar extension strength in patients who have undergone lumbar diskectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Sin; Park, Jaebum; Shim, Jae Kun

    2010-02-01

    To compare the effects of aquatic backward locomotion exercise and progressive resistance exercise with a machine on lumbar extension strength in patients who have undergone diskectomy for a lumbar disk herniation. Prospective comparative study. Department of Kinesiology at a state university. Male patients (N=30) with disk herniation at spinal levels L3 to S1 completed this study as subjects. After the diskectomy for a lumbar disk herniation, all patients had 6 weeks of rest time. At the end of the rest period, the aquatic backward locomotion exercise and progressive resistance exercise groups, respectively, started first 6 weeks of underwater training and lumbar extension training twice per week. After completion of the first 6-week training, subjects participated in a second 6-week training. After the whole 12-week training, subjects had no training for 6 weeks (detraining) and a follow-up 6-week training (retraining). The control (CON) group did not undergo any training. For each test, maximum voluntary isometric lumbar extension strength was measured in 7 trunk positions (72 degrees , 60 degrees , 48 degrees , 36 degrees , 24 degrees , 12 degrees , and 0 degrees of the trunk angle). The progressive resistance exercise and aquatic backward locomotion exercise groups showed increases in lumbar extension strength after the first 6-week training, although they were not statistically different from the CON group. After a second 6-week training, the progressive resistance exercise and aquatic backward locomotion exercise groups showed statistically significant increases in their strength levels as compared with the CON group. After the detraining period, the strength levels of the progressive resistance exercise and aquatic backward locomotion exercise groups did not statistically differ from the CON group. After the retraining period, the progressive resistance exercise and aquatic backward locomotion exercise groups showed increases in their strength levels, which

  2. Lift performance and lumbar loading in standing and seated lifts.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Kane J; Carstairs, Greg L; Ham, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of posture on lifting performance. Twenty-three male soldiers lifted a loaded box onto a platform in standing and seated postures to determine their maximum lift capacity and maximum acceptable lift. Lift performance, trunk kinematics, lumbar loads, anthropometric and strength data were recorded. There was a significant main effect for lift effort but not for posture or the interaction. Effect sizes showed that lumbar compression forces did not differ between postures at lift initiation (Standing 5566.2 ± 627.8 N; Seated 5584.0 ± 16.0) but were higher in the standing posture (4045.7 ± 408.3 N) when compared with the seated posture (3655.8 ± 225.7 N) at lift completion. Anterior shear forces were higher in the standing posture at both lift initiation (Standing 519.4 ± 104.4 N; Seated 224.2 ± 9.4 N) and completion (Standing 183.3 ± 62.5 N; Seated 71.0 ± 24.2 N) and may have been a result of increased trunk flexion and a larger horizontal distance of the mass from the L5-S1 joint. Practitioner Summary: Differences between lift performance and lumbar forces in standing and seated lifts are unclear. Using a with-in subjects repeated measures design, we found no difference in lifted mass or lumbar compression force at lift initiation between standing and seated lifts.

  3. Oblique Intrathecal Injection in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Gordon A E; Yavin, Daniel; Dhaliwal, Perry; Whittaker, Tara; Krupa, JoyAnne; Du Plessis, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Intrathecal morphine (ITM) is an efficacious method of providing postoperative analgesia and reducing pain associated complications. Despite adoption in many surgical fields, ITM has yet to become a standard of care in lumbar spine surgery. Spine surgeons' reticence to make use of the technique may in part be attributed to concerns of precipitating a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Herein we describe a method for oblique intrathecal injection during lumbar spine surgery to minimize risk of CSF leak. The dural sac is penetrated obliquely at a 30° angle to offset dural and arachnoid puncture sites. Oblique injection in instances of limited dural exposure is made possible by introducing a 60° bend to a standard 30-gauge needle. The technique was applied for injection of ITM or placebo in 104 cases of lumbar surgery in the setting of a randomized controlled trial. Injection was not performed in two cases (2/104, 1.9%) following preinjection dural tear. In the remaining 102 cases no instances of postoperative CSF leakage attributable to oblique intrathecal injection occurred. Three cases (3/102, 2.9%) of transient CSF leakage were observed immediately following intrathecal injection with no associated sequelae or requirement for postsurgical intervention. In two cases, the observed leak was repaired by sealing with fibrin glue, whereas in a single case the leak was self-limited requiring no intervention. Oblique dural puncture was not associated with increased incidence of postoperative CSF leakage. This safe and reliable method of delivery of ITM should therefore be routinely considered in lumbar spine surgery.

  4. Effect of cryotherapy on the lumbar spine in elderly men with back pain.

    PubMed

    Giemza, Czesław; Matczak-Giemza, Magdalena; Ostrowska, Bożena; Bieć, Ewa; Doliński, Mirosław

    2014-09-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is a procedure which is more and more often successfully applied in medicine. Used in physiotherapy programs improves the efficiency of physiotherapeutic exercises applied in different aliments. The aim of the research was to determine the influence of WBC treatment on the improvement of spine activity in elderly men. The evaluation was based on subjects suffering from chronic lower back pain. The research was conducted on 96 male in the age of 65-75 years suffering from chronic pain in the lumbar spine, lasting >3 months. All the subjects performed physical exercises at a gym. Half of the examined patients performed only physical exercises while the second half of the group participated in WBC before performing the same exercises. The research evaluated the mobility of lumbar spine at all movement planes and examined the values of active potentials of erector spinae in the lumbar part of the spine. The group of men who participated in WBC showed significantly lower values of active potentials of erector spinae muscles in the lumbar part of the spine and a significant increase in the range of the lumbar spine mobility, in comparison to the group which did not use WBC.

  5. Trabecular mineral contents of lumbar vertebra in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Okumura, H; Yamamuro, T

    1990-01-01

    The trabecular mineral contents (TMCs) of the third lumbar vertebra in normal subjects and patients with spinal osteoporosis and with femoral neck fracture were measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) using a reference phantom. The present paper describes these results. The TMCs in patients with spinal osteoporosis and with femoral neck fracture were significantly lower than those in normal subjects. When evaluated in terms of the ratio to the mean trabecular mineral content (mTMC) in normal subjects of the same decade groups, it was assumed that there should be a threshold value of vertebral compression fracture, and that value was approximately 50% of the mTMC in normal subjects. A correlation was noted between the data of the QCT method and those of the microdensitometric method in the groups with vertebral compression fracture and with femoral neck fracture, but not in the group without vertebral fracture.

  6. Transpedicular endoscopic surgery for lumbar spinal synovial cyst—report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Krzok, Guntram; Wagner, Ralf; Iprenburg, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar facet cysts are a benign, degenerative, and fairly uncommon cause for lumbar radiculopathy. The standard surgical treatment for lumbar facet cysts often requires a laminectomy and medial facetectomy which can further destabilize a pathological motion segment. The authors present here a novel technique for transpedicular endoscopic access to the pathology that obviates the need to violate the lamina or facet. Methods Two patient cases are described where the lumbar 4–5 facet cysts arise medial to the pedicle. Percutaneous access to the cysts was established by drilling through the adjacent pedicle creating a 7-mm corridor to establish access for the endoscopic tubular retractor and the working channel endoscope. Straight and bendable forceps were used to remove the cysts under direct visualization. Results Following surgery, the patients’ symptoms showed immediate regression with complete relief of one patient’s foot drop by 6 months. Conclusions Transpedicular endoscopic access is described as novel minimally invasive surgical option in the awake patient for lumbar facet cysts adjacent to the Lumbar 4 or 5 pedicle. PMID:28097248

  7. Lumbar foraminal stenosis, the hidden stenosis including at L5/S1.

    PubMed

    Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhide; Eguchi, Yawara; Kubota, Go; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In patients with lower back and leg pain, lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS) is one of the most important pathologies, especially for predominant radicular symptoms. LFS pathology can develop as a result of progressing spinal degeneration and is characterized by exacerbation with foraminal narrowing caused by lumbar extension (Kemp's sign). However, there is a lack of critical clinical findings for LFS pathology. Therefore, patients with robust and persistent leg pain, which is exacerbated by lumbar extension, should be suspected of LFS. Radiological diagnosis is performed using multiple radiological modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, including plain examination and novel protocols such as diffusion tensor imaging, as well as dynamic X-ray, and computed tomography. Electrophysiological testing can also aid diagnosis. Treatment options include both conservative and surgical approaches. Conservative treatment includes medication, rehabilitation, and spinal nerve block. Surgery should be considered when the pathology is refractory to conservative treatment and requires direct decompression of the exiting nerve root, including the dorsal root ganglia. In cases with decreased intervertebral height and/or instability, fusion surgery should also be considered. Recent advancements in minimally invasive lumbar lateral interbody fusion procedures enable effective and less invasive foraminal enlargement compared with traditional fusion surgeries such as transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. The lumbosacral junction can cause L5 radiculopathy with greater incidence than other lumbar levels as a result of anatomical and epidemiological factors, which should be better addressed when treating clinical lower back pain.

  8. Lumbar Mechanics in Tennis Groundstrokes: Differences in Elite Adolescent Players With and Without Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Amity; Straker, Leon; Whiteside, David; O'Sullivan, Peter; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2016-02-01

    Adolescent tennis players are at risk for low back pain (LBP). Recent research has demonstrated a potential mechanical etiology during serves; however, groundstrokes have also been suggested to load this region. Therefore, this study compared lumbar mechanics between players with and without a history of LBP during open and square stance tennis forehands and backhands. Nineteen elite, adolescent, male tennis players participated, 7 with a history of recurrent disabling LBP and 12 without. Differences in three-dimensional lumbar kinetics and kinematics were compared between pain/no pain groups and groundstrokes using linear mixed models (P < .01). There were no significant differences between pain/no pain groups. Relative to a right-handed player, groundstroke comparisons revealed that forehands had greater racquet velocity, greater lumbar right lateral flexion force, as well as upper lumbar extension/rightward rotation and lower lumbar right rotation/lateral flexion movements that were closer to or further beyond end of range than backhands. Backhands required upper lumbar leftward rotation that was beyond end range, while forehands did not. Given that players typically rotated near to their end of range during the backswing of both forehands and backhands, independent of pain, groundstrokes may contribute to the cumulative strain linked to LBP in tennis players.

  9. Paradoxical herniation after decompressive craniectomy provoked by lumbar puncture or ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Creutzfeldt, Claire J; Vilela, Marcelo D; Longstreth, William T

    2015-11-01

    Two patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy after head trauma deteriorated secondary to paradoxical herniation, one after lumbar puncture and the other after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. They motivated the authors to investigate further provoked paradoxical herniation. The authors reviewed the records of 205 patients who were treated at a single hospital with decompressive craniectomy for head trauma to identify those who had had lumbar puncture performed or a ventriculoperitoneal shunt placed after craniectomy but before cranioplasty. Among the patients who met these criteria, those with provoked paradoxical herniation were identified. The authors also sought to identify similar cases from the literature. Exact binomials were used to calculate 95% CIs. None of 26 patients who underwent a lumbar puncture within 1 month of craniectomy deteriorated, whereas 2 of 10 who underwent a lumbar puncture 1 month afterward did so (20% [95% CI 2.4%-55.6%]). Similarly, after ventriculoperitoneal shunting, 3 of 10 patients deteriorated (30% [95% CI 6.7%-65.2%]). Timing of the procedure and the appearance of the skin flap were important factors in deterioration after lumbar puncture but not after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. A review of the literature identified 15 additional patients with paradoxical herniation provoked by lumbar puncture and 7 by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Lumbar puncture and ventriculoperitoneal shunting carry substantial risk when performed in a patient after decompressive craniectomy and before cranioplasty. When the condition that prompts decompression (such as brain swelling associated with stroke or trauma) requires time to resolve, risk is associated with lumbar puncture performed ≥ 1 month after decompressive craniectomy.

  10. The effect of prior lumbar surgeries on the flexion relaxation phenomenon and its responsiveness to rehabilitative treatment.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Brede, Emily; Gatchel, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal pretreatment flexion-relaxation in chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients has been shown to improve with functional restoration rehabilitation. Little is known about the effects of prior lumbar surgeries on flexion-relaxation and its responsiveness to treatment. To quantify the effect of prior lumbar surgeries on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon and its responsiveness to rehabilitative treatment. A prospective cohort study of chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients, including those with and without prior lumbar spinal surgeries. A sample of 126 chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients with prior work-related injuries entered an interdisciplinary functional restoration program and agreed to enroll in this study. Fifty-seven patients had undergone surgical decompression or discectomy (n=32) or lumbar fusion (n=25), and the rest had no history of prior injury-related spine surgery (n=69). At post-treatment, 116 patients were reevaluated, including those with prior decompressions or discectomies (n=30), lumbar fusions (n=21), and no surgery (n=65). A comparison group of 30 pain-free control subjects was tested with an identical assessment protocol, and compared with post-rehabilitation outcomes. Mean surface electromyography (SEMG) at maximum voluntary flexion; subject achievement of flexion-relaxation (SEMG≤3.5 μV); gross lumbar, true lumbar, and pelvic flexion ROM; and a pain visual analog scale self-report during forward bending task. Identical measures were obtained at pretreatment and post-treatment. Patients entered an interdisciplinary functional restoration program, including a quantitatively directed, medically supervised exercise process and a multimodal psychosocial disability management component. The functional restoration program was accompanied by a SEMG-assisted stretching training program, designed to teach relaxation of the lumbar musculature during end-range flexion

  11. Outcomes After Lumbar Disc Herniation in the National Basketball Association

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Shobhit V.; Kester, Benjamin S.; Hsu, Wellington K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Professional basketball players are at risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), yet the evidence guiding treatment after operative or nonoperative management of this condition in the National Basketball Association (NBA) is limited. Hypothesis: NBA players with LDH will have different performance outcomes based on treatment type. Study Design: Case-control study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Athletes in the NBA with an LDH were identified through team injury reports, transaction records, and public sports archives. A 1:2 case-control study was performed in which LDH players and players without LDH were matched for player variables. Statistical analysis was employed to compare pre- and postindex season performance (games played and player efficiency rating [PER]) and career longevity between test subjects and controls in the operatively treated (OT) and nonoperatively treated (NOT) cohorts. Results: A total of 61 NBA players with LDH were included, of whom 34 underwent discectomy and 27 were managed nonoperatively. Return-to-play (RTP) rates did not differ between NOT and OT players (77.8% vs 79.4%). When compared with controls, OT players played significantly fewer games and had a lower PER than controls during the first postoperative season, but no difference was seen 2 and 3 years after surgery, with no difference in postoperative career length. In contrast, no difference in games played or PER was seen between NOT players and controls, although NOT players played significantly fewer postindex seasons. Conclusion: NBA players have a high RTP rate regardless of type of treatment for LDH; however, postindex performance differs between surgically and nonoperatively managed patients when compared with players without an LDH. However, further studies with a larger sample size are required for more definitive recommendations. Clinical Relevance: There is a high RTP rate after LDH in the NBA, although postindex performance may differ based on operative

  12. Outcomes After Lumbar Disc Herniation in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Shobhit V; Kester, Benjamin S; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-01-01

    Professional basketball players are at risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), yet the evidence guiding treatment after operative or nonoperative management of this condition in the National Basketball Association (NBA) is limited. NBA players with LDH will have different performance outcomes based on treatment type. Case-control study. Level 4. Athletes in the NBA with an LDH were identified through team injury reports, transaction records, and public sports archives. A 1:2 case-control study was performed in which LDH players and players without LDH were matched for player variables. Statistical analysis was employed to compare pre- and postindex season performance (games played and player efficiency rating [PER]) and career longevity between test subjects and controls in the operatively treated (OT) and nonoperatively treated (NOT) cohorts. A total of 61 NBA players with LDH were included, of whom 34 underwent discectomy and 27 were managed nonoperatively. Return-to-play (RTP) rates did not differ between NOT and OT players (77.8% vs. 79.4%). When compared with controls, OT players played significantly fewer games and had a lower PER than controls during the first postoperative season, but no difference was seen 2 and 3 years after surgery, with no difference in postoperative career length. In contrast, no difference in games played or PER was seen between NOT players and controls, although NOT players played significantly fewer postindex seasons. NBA players have a high RTP rate regardless of type of treatment for LDH; however, postindex performance differs between surgically and nonoperatively managed patients when compared with players without an LDH. However, further studies with a larger sample size are required for more definitive recommendations. There is a high RTP rate after LDH in the NBA, although postindex performance may differ based on operative versus nonoperative treatment. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Minimally invasive percutaneous posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Larry T; Palmer, Sylvain; Laich, Daniel T; Fessler, Richard G

    2002-11-01

    The wide exposure required for a standard posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can cause unnecessary trauma to the lumbar musculoligamentous complex. By combining existing microendoscopic, percutaneous instrumentation and interbody technologies, a novel, minimally invasive, percutaneous PLIF technique was developed to minimize such iatrogenic tissue injury (MIP-PLIF). The MIP-PLIF technique was validated in three cadaveric torsos with six motion segments decompressed and fused. Preoperative variables measured from imaging included interpedicular distance, pedicular height and width, interspinous distance, lordosis, intervertebral height, Cobb angle, and foraminal height and volume. Using the METRx and MD spinal access systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN), bilateral laminotomies were performed using a hybrid of microsurgical and microendoscopic techniques. The intervertebral disc spaces were then distracted and prepared with the Tangent (Medtronic Sofamor Danek) interbody instruments. Either a 10 or 12 by 22 mm interbody graft was then placed. Using the Sextant (Medtronic Sofamor Danek) system, percutaneous pedicle screw-rod fixation of the motion segment was completed. We then applied MIP-PLIF in three patients. For segments with preoperative intervertebral/foraminal height loss, MIP-PLIF was effective in restoring both heights in all cases. The amount of improvement (9.7 to 38% disc height increase; 7.7 to 29.9% foraminal height increase) varied directly with the size of the graft used and the original degree of disc and foraminal height loss. Segmental lordosis improved by 29% on average. Graft and screw placement was accurate in the cadavers, except for a single Grade 1 screw violation of one pedicle. The average operative time was 3.5 hours per level. In our three clinical cases, the MIP-PLIF procedure required a mean of 5.4 hours, estimated blood loss was 185 ml, and inpatient stay was 2.8 days, with no intravenous narcotic use after 2 days in

  14. Degenerative disease in lumbar spine of military parachuting instructors.

    PubMed

    Bar-Dayan, Y; Weisbort, M; Bar-Dayan, Y; Velan, G J; Ravid, M; Hendel, D; Shemer, J

    2003-12-01

    Parachuting, be it static line or skydiving, places enormous stresses on the human spine. It is, therefore, important to determine the prevalence and severity of degenerative changes in the lumbar spine of subjects who practice this sport activity. Seventy four parachuting instructors, mean age 33 years and with an average of 410 static line and skydiving jumps, were included in the study. Past radiographs were examined and compared to current anterolateral and lateral views of the lumbar spine, in order to determine the prevalence of degenerative changes and document possible progression. Doubtful radiographic changes in the lumbar spine were identified in 47.4 percent of the parachuting instructors, mild degeneration in 9.6 percent, moderate degenerative disease in 10.9 percent and severe radiographic changes in 5.5 percent. Schmorll nodes were found in 8.1 percent of the subjects. Traction spurs--osteophytes were identified in 6.8 percent. The degenerative changes correlated with age and the number of jumps. Spondylolysis of L5-S1 and L3-L4 segments were observed in 12.2 and 1.4 percent respectively. Progressive spondylolisthesis was found in 2 subjects. No correlation was found between the severity of radiographic changes and either the prevalence and the severity of low back pain. The present findings provide a rational for considering repeated sheer stress as an etiology of degenerative changes in the spinal cord, and as a possible contributing factor to the pathogenesis of spondylolysis. Further study has to be done comparing parachuting instructors to a non-parachuting group, or equivalent physically active individuals, in order to assess the effect of sport-background on the development of degenerative changes.

  15. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch results in increased segmental joint loads in the unfused and fused lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Senteler, Marco; Weisse, Bernhard; Snedeker, Jess G; Rothenfluh, Dominique A

    2014-07-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) has been reported to occur in up to 27 % of lumbar fusion patients. A previous study identified patients at risk according to the difference of pelvic incidence and lordosis. Patients with a difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis >15° have been found to have a 20 times higher risk for ASD. Therefore, it was the aim of the present study to investigate forces acting on the adjacent segment in relation to pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis (PILL) mismatch as a measure of spino-pelvic alignment using rigid body modeling to decipher the underlying forces as potential contributors to degeneration of the adjacent segment. Sagittal configurations of 81 subjects were reconstructed in a musculoskeletal simulation environment. Lumbar spine height was normalized, and body and segmental mass properties were kept constant throughout the population to isolate the effect of sagittal alignment. A uniform forward/backward flexion movement (0°-30°-0°) was simulated for all subjects. Intervertebral joint loads at lumbar level L3-L4 and L4-L5 were determined before and after simulated fusion. In the unfused state, an approximately linear relationship between sagittal alignment and intervertebral loads could be established (shear: 0° flexion r = 0.36, p < 0.001, 30° flexion r = 0.48, p < 0.001; compression: 0° flexion r = 0.29, p < 0.01, 30° flexion r = 0.40, p < 0.001). Additionally, shear changes during the transition from upright to 30° flexed posture were on average 32 % higher at level L3-L4 and 14 % higher at level L4-L5 in alignments that were clinically observed to be prone to ASD. Simulated fusion affected shear forces at the level L3-L4 by 15 % (L4-L5 fusion) and 23 % (L4-S1 fusion) more for alignments at risk for ASD. Higher adjacent segment shear forces in alignments at risk for ASD already prior to fusion provide a mechanistic explanation for the clinically observed correlation between PILL mismatch and rate

  16. [Influence of testing position on lumbar isokinetic measurements].

    PubMed

    Cohen, P; Chantraine, A; Gobelet, C; Ziltener, J L

    2002-01-01

    The studies carried out on the lumbar spine, using an isokinetic type machine, showed the importance of the extensor muscles and the force they develop, compared with the flexor muscles. Both the sitting and standing positions were used without determining the better position. MAIN OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To determine how the patients position influenced the performance of the muscles. We also studied a new parameter : the angle to maximal peak torque (APT). 17 healthy subjects and 19 suffering from low back pain were chosen. We perform the test in both positions for each subject. We compare in each group the peak torque of the extensor and flexor muscles on both positions and the angle of this torque. Low back pain subjects flexor/extensor ratio were 1.71 sitting and 1.56 standing. Healthy subjects showed normal ratio of 0.69 and 0.84. The position of the subject has no influence on the results in the low back pain subjects, and the sitting position is preferred. The angle of development of the maximal peak torque in both groups of muscles was very interesting, especially in the subjects suffering from low back pain and shines a new light on the different functions of the muscles of the low back pain suffering subjects and the healthy subjects. This angle (APT) is inversed in low back pain subjects who develop more torque for the extensors in extension of the spine.

  17. Lumbar interspinous bursitis in active polymyalgia rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Barozzi, Libero; Boiardi, Luigi; Pipitone, Nicolò; Bajocchi, Gian Luigi; Macchioni, Pier Luigi; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Pazzola, Giulia; Valentino, Massimo; De Luca, Carlo; Hunder, Gene G

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inflammatory involvement of lumbar interspinous bursae in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten consecutive, untreated new patients with PMR and pain in the shoulder and pelvic girdles were investigated. Seven patients with spondyloarthritis (4 with psoriatic spondyloarthrits, one with entheropatic spondyloarthritis, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis) as well as 2 patients with spinal osteoarthritis and 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with lumbar pain served as controls. MRI of lumbar spine was performed in all PMR patients and controls. Nine patients (5 PMR patients and 4 controls) also had MRI of the thoracic spine. MRI evidence of interspinous lumbar bursitis was found in 9/10 patients with PMR and in 5/11 controls. A moderate to marked (grade ≥2 on a semiquantitative 0-3 scale) lumbar bursitis occurred significantly more frequently in patients with PMR than in control patients (60% vs. 9%, p=0.020). In most of the patients and controls lumbar bursitis was found at the L3-L5 interspaces. Only 2 patients had bursitis at a different level (one patient had widespread lumbar bursitis, and one control at L2-L4). No interspinous bursitis was demonstrated by MRI of the thoracic spine in patients and controls. Inflammation of lumbar bursae may be responsible for the low back pain reported by patients with PMR. The prominent inflammatory involvement of bursae including those of the lumbar spine supports the hypothesis that PMR may be a disorder affecting predominantly extra-articular synovial structures.

  18. Quadriceps Inhibition After Repetitive Lumbar Extension Exercise in Persons With a History of Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M; Fritz, Julie M; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Saliba, Ethan N; Gansneder, Bruce M; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2006-01-01

    Context: A neuromuscular relationship exists between the lumbar extensor and quadriceps muscles during fatiguing exercise. However, this relationship may be different for persons with low back pain (LBP). Objective: To compare quadriceps inhibition after isometric, fatiguing lumbar extension exercise between persons with a history of LBP and control subjects. Design: A 2 × 3 factorial, repeated-measures, time-series design with independent variables of group (persons with a history of LBP, controls) and time (baseline, postexercise set 1, postexercise set 2). Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five subjects with a history of LBP were matched by sex, height, and mass to 25 healthy control subjects. Intervention(s): Electromyography median frequency indexed lumbar paraspinal muscular fatigue while subjects performed 2 sets of isometric lumbar extension exercise. Subjects exercised until a 15% downward shift in median frequency for the first set and a 25% shift for the second set were demonstrated. Main Outcome Measure(s): Knee extension force was measured while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction. During this maximal effort, a percutaneous electric stimulus was applied to the quadriceps, causing a transient, supramaximal increase in force output. We used the ratio between the 2 forces to estimate quadriceps inhibition. Quadriceps electromyographic activity was recorded during the maximal contractions to compare median frequencies over time. Results: Both groups exhibited significantly increased quadriceps inhibition after the first (12.6% ± 10.0%, P < .001) and second (15.2% ± 9.7%, P < .001) exercise sets compared with baseline (9.6% ± 9.3%). However, quadriceps inhibition was not different between groups. Conclusions: Persons with a history of LBP do not appear to be any more or less vulnerable to quadriceps inhibition after fatiguing lumbar extension exercise. PMID:17043693

  19. The effects of deep abdominal muscle strengthening exercises on respiratory function and lumbar stability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunyoung; Lee, Hanyong

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of deep abdominal muscle strengthening exercises on respiratory function and lumbar stability. [Subjects] From among 120 male and female students, 22 whose thoraxes opened no more than 5 cm during inspiration and expiration and whose forced expiratory flow rates were around 300 m/L were recruited. The subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group of eleven, who performed deep abdominal muscle strengthening exercises, and a control group of eleven, who received no particular intervention. [Methods] The subjects were instructed to perform normal breathing in the hook-lying position. They were then directed to hold their breath for ten seconds at the end of inspiration. Ten repetitions of this breathing comprised a set of respiratory training, and a total of five sets were performed by the subjects. [Results] Deep abdominal muscle training was effective at enhancing respiratory function and lumbar stabilization. [Conclusion] The clinical application of deep abdominal muscle strengthening exercises along with lumbar stabilization exercises should be effective for lower back pain patients in need of lumbar stabilization.

  20. The influence of initial resting posture on range of motion of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Coates, J E; McGregor, A H; Beith, I D; Hughes, S P

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of initial resting posture on range of motion of the lumbar spine in 18 normal subjects. Subjects resting posture and active range of motion was measured using the CA-6000 Spinal Motion Analyser (OSI, USA) in five test positions, namely in flat standing and with a variety of heel raises. Analysis showed that there was no significant correlation between subject's normal resting posture and active range of motion. However, when subjects resting posture was artificially altered with heel raises, significant effects on the active range of motion were demonstrated. Increasing heel height significantly influenced resting posture in the sagittal plane only. As heel height increased, the lumbar lordosis decreased and a significant reduction in the range of lumbar spine flexion (P<0.001) was observed. Simulating pelvic asymmetry influenced resting posture in the frontal plane and significant effects on the range of lateral flexion (P<0.05) were observed. These results have important clinical implications in terms of using range of motion of the lumbar spine as an examination tool and suggest that studies using range of motion as an outcome measure should consider initial resting posture. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  1. Lumbar Disc Herniation Presented with Contralateral Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pius; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to unravel the putative mechanism underlying the neurologic deficits contralateral to the side with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and to elucidate the treatment for this condition. Methods From January 2009 to June 2015, 8 patients with LDH with predominantly contralateral neurologic deficits underwent surgical treatment on the side with LDH with or without decompressing the symptomatic side. A retrospective review of charts and radiological records of these 8 patients was performed. The putative mechanisms underlying the associated contralateral neurological deficits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and the adequate surgical approach are discussed here. Results MRI revealed a similar laterally skewed paramedian disc herniation, with the apex deviated from the symptomatic side rather than directly compressing the nerve root; this condition may generate a contralateral traction force. EMG revealed radiculopathies in both sides of 6 patients and in the herniated side of 2 patients. Based on EMG findings and the existence of suspicious lateral recess stenosis of the symptomatic side, 6 patients underwent bilateral decompression of nerve roots and 2 were subjected to a microscopic discectomy to treat the asymptomatic disc herniation. No specific conditions such as venous congestion, nerve root anomaly or epidural lipomatosis were observed, which may be considered the putative pathomechanism causing the contralateral neurological deficits. The symptoms resolved significantly after surgery. Conclusion The traction force generated on the contralateral side and lateral recess stenosis, rather than direct compression, may cause the contralateral neurologic deficits observed in LDH. PMID:28264243

  2. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Alpoim, Bruno; Rodrigues, Elisa; Félix, António; Silva, Luís; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation. PMID:26229836

  3. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  4. Predictors of Reoperation after Microdecompression in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hee-Jong; Lee, Gwang-Soo; Heo, June-Young; Chang, Jae-Chil

    2016-01-01

    Objective The risk factors of reoperation after microdecompression (MD) for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) are unclear. In this study, we presented the outcomes of MD for degenerative LSS and investigated the risk factors associated with reoperation. Methods A retrospective review was conducted using the clinical records and radiographs of patients with LSS who underwent MD. For clinical evaluation, we used the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system for low back pain, body mass index, and Charlson comorbidity index. For radiological evaluation, disc height, facet angle, and sagittal rotation angle were measured in operated segments. Also the Modic change and Pfirrmann grade for degeneration in the endplate and disc were scored. Results Forty-three patients aged 69±9 years at index surgery were followed for 48±25 months. The average preoperative JOA score was 6.9±1.6 points. The score improved to 9.1±2.1 points at the latest follow-up (p<0.001). Seven patients (16.3%) underwent reoperation. Clinical and radiological factors except operation level and Pfirrmann grade showed a p-value >0.1. Patients with Pfirrmann grade IV and lower lumbar segment had a 29.1% rate of reoperation (p=0.001), whereas patients without these factors had a 0% rate of reoperation. Conclusion Moderate disk degeneration (Pfirrmann IV) in lower lumbar segments is a risk factor of disk herniation or foraminal stenosis requiring reoperation after MD in LSS. PMID:28127375

  5. Postural strategy changes with fatigue of the lumbar extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin L; Madigan, Michael L; Davidson, Bradley S; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of lumbar extensor fatigue on postural strategy in response to a balance perturbation. Anteriorly-directed force perturbations were applied to the upper back with a padded pendulum and attempted to challenge the postural control system without eliciting a stepping response. In three separate sessions, subjects were perturbed both before and after a fatiguing protocol that induced lumbar extensor fatigue to one of three different fatigue levels. Postural strategy was quantified using center of pressure position along with joint angles and joint torques for the ankle, knee, hip, and "low back" joints. Results showed both proactive and reactive changes in postural strategy. Proactive changes involved a slight anterior lean prior to the perturbation, and reactive changes were consistent with a shift toward more of a hip strategy with fatigue. In addition, results suggested that subjects classified as moving mostly at the hip prior to fatigue were more affected by fatigue compared to subjects classified as moving roughly equal amounts at the ankle and hip prior to fatigue. Increasing fatigue level exaggerated some, but not all, of the changes in postural strategy with fatigue. These findings illustrate that neuromuscular fatigue can influence postural strategy in response to a balance perturbation.

  6. [Microsurgery in lumbar disk operations. Possibilities, methods and results].

    PubMed

    Schwetlick, G

    1998-07-01

    The frequency of lumbar disc hemiation amounts to 5.1% with the male and 3.7% with the female population. Because of the often long-time pain-conditional impairment of the patients as well as the varied therapy-possibilities, the treatment of the ruptured lumbar intervertebral disc represents a special challenge. The indication to the operation for the lumbar disk-herniation results from the malfunctions of the nerve roots, the pains, as well as the temporal course of the symptoms. New and important developments have given the introduction of micro-surgical operation-techniques into the orthopedics. This development has led to it that many orthopedists and neurosurgeons the micro-surgical operation-technique prefers. Important for the micro-surgical lumbar discectomy is the operation-microscope, a good preoperative diagnostics as well as a particular micro-surgical operation-instrument. Through the different enlargement-possibilities of the operation-microscope, all anatomical structures can increase and are done visibly for the surgeon as well as the assistant. Intraoperative injuries of the dura as well as the spinal-nerves are certainly avoided hereby. The micro-surgical discectomie requires no longer time like the conventional operation of the disk. The postoperative stay in the hospital as well as the time of the work-incompetence is reduced. Postoperative inflammations of the disk-area as well as renewed operations are rarer with the microchirurgischen technique. If an operation is necessary, so this should not be out-hesitated too long in order to avoid bed results.

  7. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1978-03-01

    Late sequelae (adhesive arachnoiditis) have been reported following myelography with the oily contrast medium (Pantopaque) and with the ionic water-soluble contrast media methiodal sodium (Abrodil, Conturex, Kontrast U) meglumine iothalamate (Conray Meglumine) and meglumine iocarmate (Bis-Conray, Dimer-X). Adhesive arachnoiditis has not yet been reported after the use of the nonionic water-soluble contrast medium metrizamide (Amipaque). Thus, this is considered the contrast medium of choice for lumbar myelography. Using the recommended dose of 10 ml with an iodine concentration of 170 mg/ml for this examination, adhesive arachnoiditis is unlikely to occur. Increased osmolality of spinal fluid after injection of contrast medium is related to increased frequency of arachnoiditis.

  8. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. Methods This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3−L4, L4−L5 or L5−S1 were enrolled. Results The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3−L4, L4−L5, and L5−S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5−22). Conclusions It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery. PMID:28119770

  9. Optical, spectroscopic, and Doppler evaluation of "normal" and "abnormal" reflexology areas in lumbar vertebral pathology: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Krishna; Elanchezhiyan, D; Maran, V B; Das, Raunak Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Singh, S P; Murali Krishna, C; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2012-01-01

    Scientific validation of reflexology requires an in-depth and noninvasive evaluation of "reflexology/reflex areas" in health and disease. The present paper reports the differential properties of "normal" and "abnormal" reflexology areas related to the lumbar vertebrae in a subject suffering from low back pain. The pathology is supported by radiological evidence. The reflexology target regions were clinically assessed with respect to colour and tenderness in response to finger pressure. Grey scale luminosity and pain intensity, as assessed by visual analogue scale scores, differentiated "normal" from "abnormal" skin. Skin swept source-optical coherence tomography recorded their structural differences. Infrared thermography revealed temperature variations. A laser Doppler study using a combined microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen monitoring system indicated alterations in blood flow and oxygen perfusion. Raman spectroscopy showed differences in chemical signatures between these areas. The present findings may indicate a potential correlation between the reflexology areas and subsurface pathological changes, showing an association with the healthy or unhealthy status of the lumbar vertebrae.

  10. Low-dose computed tomography of the lumbar spine: a phantom study on imaging parameters and image quality.

    PubMed

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Mats; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Håkan

    2014-09-01

    Lumbar spine radiography has limited diagnostic value but low radiation dose compared with computed tomography (CT). The average effective radiation dose from lumbar spine radiography is about 1.1 mSv. Low-dose lumbar spine CT may be an alternative to increase the diagnostic value at low radiation dose, around 1 mSv. To determine the optimal settings for low-dose lumbar spine CT simultaneously aiming for the highest diagnostic image quality possible. An ovine lower thoracic and lumbar spine phantom, with all soft tissues around the vertebrae preserved except the skin, was placed in a 20 L plastic container filled with water. The phantom was scanned repeatedly with various technical settings; different tube potential, reference mAs, and with different convolution filters. Five radiologists evaluated the image quality according to a modification of the European guidelines for multislice computed tomography (MSCT) quality criteria for lumbar spine CT 2004. In a visual comparison the different scans were also ranked subjectively according to perceived image quality. Image noise and contrast were measured. A tube potential of 120 kV with reference mAs 30 and medium or medium smooth convolution filter gave the best image quality at a sub-millisievert dose level, i.e. with an effective dose comparable to that from lumbar spine radiography. Low-dose lumbar spine CT thus opens a possibility to substitute lumbar spine radiography with CT without obvious increase in radiation dose. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment while waiting for the results of the culture. Risks A lumbar puncture is considered a safe procedure with minimal risks. Most of the time, there are no complications. In some instances, a ...

  12. In vivo Loads in the Lumbar L3-4 Disc during a Weight Lifting Extension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge of in vivo human lumbar loading is critical for understanding the lumbar function and for improving surgical treatments of lumbar pathology. Although numerous experimental measurements and computational simulations have been reported, non-invasive determination of in vivo spinal disc loads is still a challenge in biomedical engineering. The object of the study is to investigate the in vivo human lumbar disc loads using a subject-specific and kinematic driven finite element approach. Methods Three dimensional (3D) lumbar spine models of three living subjects were created using MR images. A 3D finite element model of the L3-4 disc, including the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, was built for each subject. The endplate kinematics of the L3-4 segment of each subject during a dynamic weight lifting extension was determined using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. The endplate kinematics was used as displacement boundary conditions of the subject specific finite element model of the L3-4 disc to calculate the in-vivo disc forces and moments during the weight lifting activity. Findings During the weight lifting extension, the L3-4 disc experienced maximum shear load of about 230 N or 0.34 bodyweight at the flexion position and maximum compressive load of 1500 N or 2.28 bodyweight at the upright position. The disc experienced a primary flexion-extension moment during the motion which reached a maximum of 4.2 Nm at upright position with stretched arms holding the weight. Interpretation This study provided quantitative data on in vivo disc loading that could help understand intrinsic biomechanics of the spine and improve surgical treatment of pathological discs using fusion or arthroplasty techniques. PMID:24345591

  13. Athletic performance outcomes following lumbar discectomy in professional basketball players.

    PubMed

    Anakwenze, Okechukwu A; Namdari, Surena; Auerbach, Joshua D; Baldwin, Keith; Weidner, Zachary D; Lonner, Baron S; Huffman, G R; Sennett, Brian J

    2010-04-01

    Retrospective case-control study. To quantify the athletic performance profiles after lumbar discectomy (LD) in a cohort of National Basketball Association (NBA) players in comparison with a control group of matched NBA players who did not undergo LD during the same study period. LD provides symptomatic relief and improved functional outcomes in the majority of patients as assessed by validated measures such as Oswestry Disability Index, Visual Analog Scale, and Short Form-36 (SF-36). Among professional athletes, however, the goal of lumbar HNP treated by discectomy is not only to improve functional status but also, ultimately, to return the player to preinjury athletic performance levels. No study to date has compared the athletic performance profiles before and after discectomy in professional athletes. An analysis of NBA games summaries, weekly injury reports, player profiles, and press releases was performed to identify 24 NBA players who underwent LD for symptomatic lumbar HNP between 1991 and 2007. A 1:2 case: control study was performed using players without history of lumbar HNP who were matched for age, position, experience, and body mass index as control subjects (n = 48). Paired t tests were conducted on the following parameters: games played, minutes per game, points per 40 minutes, rebounds per 40 minutes, assists per 40 minutes, steals per 40 minutes, blocks per 40 minutes, and shooting percentage. For each athletic performance outcome, between-group comparisons evaluating preindex to postindex season performance were done (index season = season of surgery). In the LD group, 18 of 24 players (75%) returned to play again in the NBA, compared with 42 of 48 players (88%, P = 0.31) in the control group. One year after surgery, between-group comparisons revealed statistically significant increase in blocked shots per 40 minutes in the LD (0.18) versus control group (-0.33; P = 0.008) and a smaller decrease in rebounds per 40 minutes in the LD (-0

  14. [Disc alterations of lumbar spine on magnetic resonance images in asymptomatic workers].

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Moreno, Rocío; Lezama-Suárez, Gabriel; Gómez-Jiménez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    to determine abnormal findings of the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance images in asymptomatic subjects. prospective, transverse and descriptive study, in workers of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social without low back pain; they were invited to be observed with magnetic resonance images of lumbar spine. A total of 105 cases was interpreted by a radiologist, who did not know the patients' clinical conditions. 107 lumbar spine alterations studies were mixed in order to not influence in the results, and they were not included in the statistic analysis. 55 % of the cases had discal alterations, 38 % presented bulging disk and 17 % presented protrusion. Other alterations were Schmorl's nodule, osteocondrosis, espondilolistesis, and annular tears. bulging disk and discal protrusion frequency have high prevalence in magnetic resonance images in healthy individuals, so its presence in symptomatic patients is not necessarily cause of low back pain.

  15. Surgical decompression for lumbar stenosis in pediatric achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Baca, Kirsten E; Abdullah, Madeel A; Ting, Beverlie L; Schkrohowsky, Joshua G; Hoernschemeyer, Daniel G; Carson, Benjamin S; Ain, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common complication of achondroplasia. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated a greater than 2-year outcome after surgical intervention for spinal stenosis in such children or compared decompression with and without instrumentation in relation to revision surgery. Our purpose was to assess the efficacy of lumbar decompression and instrumentation for symptomatic stenosis in children with achondroplasia. We retrospectively reviewed our institution's database to identify children (< or =18 y old) with achondroplasia undergoing initial spinal decompression for lumbar stenosis from 1995 through 2003. We identified 18 such patients and reviewed their medical records for demographic data, presenting signs and symptoms, and treatment and outcome data. Mean follow-up was 72.0+/-27.6 months. We determined each patient's symptom score (SS) based on presence of leg weakness, numbness, or pain; abnormal reflexes; incontinence; and walking intolerance (unable to walk > or =5 blocks). Each finding was scored 1 point (6 points maximum). Nine patients requiring revision surgery were assigned a revision postoperative SS. All patients were contacted at the end of data collection and assigned a final follow-up SS. Baseline SS values were compared with postoperative, revision postoperative, and final follow-up scores using a paired t test (alpha=0.05). The mean preoperative and final SS values were significantly different: 4.0+/-0.9 (most common symptoms, leg weakness and incontinence) and 1.6+/-1.7 (most common symptom, leg weakness), respectively. Nine patients underwent decompression with instrumentation initially; 9 did not; 7 of the latter required instrumentation during revision; and 2 of the former also required revision. Those without initial instrumentation were 3.5 times more likely (odds ratio=12.3) to require revision. Surgical decompression with instrumentation significantly reduced the symptoms of lumbar stenosis and the likelihood of revision

  16. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  17. Factors that influence recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Yaman, M E; Kazancı, A; Yaman, N D; Baş, F; Ayberk, G

    2017-06-01

    The most common cause of poor outcome following lumbar disc surgery is recurrent herniation. Recurrence has been noted in 5% to 15% of patients with surgically treated primary lumbar disc herniation. There have been many studies designed to determine the risk factors for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. In this study, we retrospectively analysed the influence of disc degeneration, endplate changes, surgical technique, and patient's clinical characteristics on recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients who underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and who were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. All these operations were performed between August 2004 and September 2009 at the Neurosurgery Department of Ataturk Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. During the study period, 126 patients were reviewed, with 101 patients underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and 25 patients were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation. Preoperative higher intervertebral disc height (P<0.001) and higher body mass index (P=0.042) might be risk factors for recurrence. Modic endplate changes were statistically significantly greater in the recurrent group than in the non-recurrent group (P=0.032). Our study suggests that patients who had recurrent lumbar disc herniation had preoperative higher disc height and higher body mass index. Modic endplate changes had a higher tendency for recurrence of lumbar disc herniation. Well-planned and well-conducted large-scale prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm this and enable convenient treatment modalities to prevent recurrent disc pathology.

  18. Triggered EMG Potentials in Determining Neuroanatomical Safe Zone for Transpsoas Lumbar Approach: Are They Reliable?

    PubMed

    Sarwahi, Vishal; Pawar, Abhijit; Sugarman, Etan; Legatt, Alan D; Dworkin, Aviva; Thornhill, Beverly; Lo, Yungtai; Wendolowski, Stephen F; Gecelter, Rachel C; Moguilevitch, Marina

    2016-06-01

    In vivo analysis in swine model. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of triggered EMG (t-EMG) and its reliability in lateral lumbar interbody fusions surgery. We also aim to document changes in psoas muscle produced during the approach. Lateral lumbar interbody fusions is preferred over direct anterior approach because of lower complications, blood loss, and shorter recovery time. Threshold-EMGs are utilized for real-time feedback about nerve location; however, neurological deficits are widely reported, and are unique to this approach. Multiple factors have been hypothesized including neuropraxia from retractors and compression from psoas hematoma/edema. The variable reports of neurological complication even with t-EMGs indicate the need to study them further. Eight swines underwent left-sided retroperitoneal approach. The nerve on the surface of the psoas was identified and threshold-EMGs were obtained utilizing a ball-tip, and needle probe. First EMG and threshold responses required to elicit 20-μV responses were recorded for 2 mm incremental distances up to 10 mm. In the second part, a K-wire was inserted into the mid-lumbar disc space, and a tubular retractor docked and dilated adequately. Postmortem CT scans were carried out to evaluate changes in psoas muscle. A t-EMG stimulus threshold of <5 mA indicates a higher probability that the probe is close to or on the nerve, but this was not proportional to the distance suggesting limitations for nerve mapping. Negative predictive value of t-EMGs is 76.5% with the ball-tipped probe and 80% with the needle probe for t-EMG ≥10 mA and indicates that even with higher thresholds, the nerve may be much closer than anticipated. Postoperative hematoma was not seen on CT scans. Threshold measurements are unreliable in estimating distance from the nerve in an individual subject and higher values do not always correspond to a 'safe zone." 5.

  19. The High Prevalence of Symptomatic Degenerative Lumbar Osteoarthritis in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yajun; Xiao, Bin; Han, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    years. Lumbar osteoarthritis is epidemic in Beijing and will become a more severe problem in aging society. Different populations have different features that require targeted interventions. Level of Evidence: 2 PMID:24825154

  20. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of human lumbar nerves.

    PubMed

    Kraan, G A; Delwel, E J; Hoogland, P V J M; van der Veen, M R; Wuisman, P I J M; Stoeckart, R; Kleinrensink, G J; Snijders, C J

    2005-03-15

    An anatomic study of the extraforaminal attachments of the lumbar spinal nerves was performed using human lumbar spinal columns. To identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each lumbar level that attach lumbar spinal nerves to structures at the level of the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms to protect the spinal nerve against traction have been described. All these structures involved are located in the spinal canal, proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Five embalmed human lumbar spines (T12-S1) were used. Bilaterally, the extraforaminal region was dissected to describe and measure anatomic structures and their relationships. Histology was performed with staining on the sites of attachment and along the ligament. The levels T12-L2 show bilaterally 2 ligaments, a superior extraforaminal ligament and an inferior extraforaminal ligament. The superior extraforaminal ligament emerges from the joint capsule of the facet joints and inserts in both, the intervertebral disc and the ventral crista of the intervertebral foramen, passing the spinal nerve laterally. In one specimen on level L2-L3, the superior extraforaminal ligament is not attached to the spinal nerve. The inferior extraforaminal ligament emerges from the intervertebral disc, passing the nerve medially and attaching the spinal nerve. At the levels L2-L5, the inferior extraforaminal ligaments are only attached to the intervertebral disc, not to the joint capsule. Histologically, the ligaments consisted of mainly collagenous structures. Ligamentous connections exist between lumbar extraforaminal spinal nerves and nearby structures.

  1. Scoliosis secondary to lumbar osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiping; Niu, Xingbang; Wang, Biao; He, Simin; Hao, Dingjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Lumbar osteoid osteoma has a low incidence, which could easily lead to scoliosis. Patient concerns: Scoliosis secondary to lumbar osteoid osteoma could be easily misdiagnosed when patients do not complain of obvious symptoms. Diagnoses: We reported a case of a 9-year-old boy with back deformity that was firstly diagnosed with scoliosis at the local hospital. After prescribed with orthosis, the patient experienced aggravating pain that could not be relieved with painkillers. After he admitted to our hospital for further medical advice, he was prescribed to complete radiological examinations. Considering his radiological examination results and his medical history, correct diagnosis of lumbar osteoid osteoma was made. Interventions: Surgical intervention of posterior lesion resection was conducted after diagnosis. Intra-operative frozen pathology indicated features of osteoid osteoma. As the lesion involved inferior articular process of L5, which could cause lumbar instability after lesion resection, internal fixation was conducted at L4-S1 segment, and posterolateral bone fusion was also conducted at L5-S1 segment. Outcomes: Three months after operation, the patient showed marked improvement of scoliosis deformity and great relief of lumbar pain. Lessons subsections: Although spine osteoid osteoma is clinically rare, it shall not be overlooked when young patients present with scoliosis first. Radiological results including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging shall be taken carefully as reference when making diagnosis. Surgical intervention of lesion resection could well improve scoliosis and relieve lumbar pain. PMID:27893671

  2. The lumbar sympathetic. Anatomy and surgical implications.

    PubMed

    Simeone, F A

    1977-01-01

    The ganglionated lumbar sympathetic chains lie on the lateral aspects of the bodies of the lumbar vertebrae and not more laterally as in the thorax where the chain lies in relation to the heads and necks of the ribs. Lumbar ganglia vary in number. They are best numbered according to the spinal nerve to which the particular ganglion sends its postganglionic fibers, but, at operation, the surgeon is unable to obtain this kind of information. It is customary to mark the extent of resection by the application of a dura clip to the proximal and distal ends of the trunk. Roentgenographic visualization later can approximate the level of resection in relation to the vertebrae. Anomalies can lead to unsuccessful denervation of the lower extremities. These include extraganglionic connecting sympathetic nerve trunks, intermediate ganglia, and cross-over fibers connecting the right and left lumbar sympathetic trunks usually at the level of the fourth and fifth lumbar segments, but anatomically sometimes as high as the third and second. Specific complications of lumbar sympathectomy include failure of adequate denervation, brief paralytic ileus, hyperidrosis in parts of the body which remain normally innervated, sexual dysfunction, and post-sympathectomy neuralgia.

  3. Position sense in the lumbar spine with torso flexion and loading.

    PubMed

    Gade, Venkata K; Wilson, Sara E

    2007-05-01

    Proprioception plays an important role in appropriate sensation of spine position, movement, and stability. Previous research has demonstrated that position sense error in the lumbar spine is increased in flexed postures. This study investigated the change in position sense as a function of altered trunk flexion and moment loading independently. Reposition sense of lumbar angle in 17 subjects was assessed. Subjects were trained to assume specified lumbar angles using visual feedback. The ability of the subjects to reproduce this curvature without feedback was then assessed. This procedure was repeated for different torso flexion and moment loading conditions. These measurements demonstrated that position sense error increased significantly with the trunk flexion (40%, p < .05) but did not increase with moment load (p = .13). This increased error with flexion suggests a loss in the ability to appropriately sense and therefore control lumbar posture in flexed tasks. This loss in proprioceptive sense could lead to more variable lifting coordination and a loss in dynamic stability that could increase low back injury risk. This research suggests that it is advisable to avoid work in flexed postures.

  4. Lumbar spine kinematics during walking in people with and people without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gombatto, Sara P; Brock, Tricia; DeLork, Anthony; Jones, Glynis; Madden, Erin; Rinere, Chelsea

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a problem that can contribute to functional limitations and disability. Understanding kinematics during walking can provide a basis for examination and treatment in people with LBP. Prior research related to kinematics during walking is conflicting. However, investigators have not considered regional differences in lumbar spine kinematics or movement-based LBP subgroups. In the current study, three-dimensional kinematics of the upper and lower lumbar regions were examined in people with and without LBP. A clinical examination then was conducted to assign people with LBP to a movement-based subgroup and differences in kinematics among subgroups were examined. All subjects displayed significantly more upper than lower lumbar movement in the axial and coronal planes (P<.01). People with LBP displayed significantly less overall lumbar rotation than controls (P<.05). There were no significant group differences in sagittal plane kinematics (P>.05). Walking was limited by or provocative of pain in <25% of subjects with LBP. There were predictable differences in kinematics among some movement-based LBP subgroups that approached statistical significance (P=.09-.11). Walking was provocative of LBP in few subjects, and differences between people with and without LBP and among LBP subgroups were minimal. Limitations include that attempts to standardize gait speed may have minimized observed effects, and there was limited power to detect movement-based LBP subgroup differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. New Predictive Index for Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration Associated With Aging.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kazushi; Kita, Teruo; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Kanematsu, Fumiaki; Yasunami, Toshiya; Sakanaka, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional imaging study of paraspinal muscle degeneration using a new index for easy evaluation. To examine the natural progression of age-related changes in the lumbar paraspinal muscles and to verify the validity of our new index for evaluating paraspinal muscle degenerationSUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Measurement of paraspinal muscle morphology is an effective method for reflecting atrophy and fat infiltration, but it is complicated to perform. Therefore, we focused on the groove between lumbar paraspinal muscles as a simple index for evaluating paraspinal muscle degeneration. A total of 160 subjects aged 10 to 88 years (10 male and 10 female subjects in each decade) with lumbar lordosis of more than 20° were included. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure lumbar lordosis, while axial T2-weighted MRI was used to measure cross-sectional area (CSA) and fat infiltration rate of the paraspinal muscles at the intervertebral disc level from L1 to L5. To quantify the depth of the groove between the paraspinal muscles, our own image index (lumbar indentation value (LIV): equal to the length of the bulge of the muscle to the attachment of the spinous process), also was measured. We then determined the correlation between LIV and paraspinal muscle degeneration. There were no significant differences in BMI and lumbar lordosis between age groups. CSA of the paraspinal muscles tended to decrease with age, and fat infiltration rate increased with age. There was a negative correlation between CSA and fat infiltration rate at all levels (r = -0.474 to -0.634). LIV decreased significantly with age and strongly correlated with CSA at all levels (r = 0.709-0.789). Our new index is a simple and effective parameter for evaluating paraspinal muscle degeneration associated with aging. 4.

  6. Examination of Learning Trajectories for Simulated Lumbar Puncture Training Using Hand Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Caitlin T; Davison, Colleen; Ungi, Tamas; Holden, Matthew; Fichtinger, Gabor; McGraw, Robert

    2015-10-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted using hand motion analysis (HMA) to assess the acquisition and retention of technical proficiency among first-year medical students learning the lumbar puncture (LP) skill in a simulated setting. Twenty-five subjects attended three or four simulation sessions at 6-week intervals. The initial session consisted of an introduction to the procedure and a baseline HMA assessment. This was followed by a session involving deliberate practice and evaluation using HMA. Subject HMA metrics were followed over time and compared to performance benchmarks to determine the volume of practice required to achieve and maintain technical proficiency in the simulated setting. Performance benchmarks were derived from the assessment of experts using HMA. Subject baseline metrics were significantly different from expert (p < 0.01). At the outset of session 2, none of the subjects achieved the performance benchmarks. At the outset of sessions 3 and 4, 40 and 60% of subjects, respectively, demonstrated retention of technical proficiency. However, there was evidence of significant skill erosion between sessions (p < 0.01). The mean number of practice attempts required to achieve technical proficiency declined between sessions. Regression analysis indicated that there was a significant training effect for all students (overall negative slopes) over time. When examining the group as a whole, the speed at which students reached the expert benchmark was not significantly associated with number of practices in the first three sessions, although for some individuals these factors did appear associated. A total of 76% of subjects retained technical proficiency by session 4 and required a mean of 14 practices (range = 5 to 19). These results show that the majority of students require three to four sessions of deliberate practice to achieve a sustainable level of proficiency in the LP procedure. There is considerable variation in learning progression and

  7. Prevalence of Lumbar Disc Herniation in Adolescent Males in Seoul, Korea: Prevalence of Adolescent LDH in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Keun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Lee, Myoung Seok; Park, Hyung-chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2011-01-01

    Objective The authors surveyed the prevalence and the clinical character of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in Korean male adolescents, and the usefulness of current conscription criteria. Methods The data of 39,673 nineteen-year-old males that underwent a conscription examination at the Seoul Regional Korean Military Manpower Administration (MMA) from October 2010 to May 2011 were investigated. For those diagnosed as having lumbar disc herniation, prevalences, subject characteristics, herniation severities, levels of herniation, and modified Korean Oswestry low back pain disability scores by MMA physical grade were evaluated. The analysis was performed using medical certificates, medical records, medical images, and electromyographic and radiologic findings. Results The prevalence of adolescent LDH was 0.60%(237 of the 39,673 study subjects), and the prevalence of serious adolescent LDH with thecal sac compression or significant discogenic spinal stenosis was 0.28%(110 of the 39,673 study subjects). Of the 237 adolescent LDH cases, 105 (44.3%) were of single level LDH and 132 (55.7%) were of multiple level LDH, and the L4-5 level was the most severely and frequently affected. Oswestry back pain disability scores increased with herniation severity (p<0.01), and were well correlated with MMA grade. Conclusions In this large cohort of 19-year-old Korean males, the prevalence of adolescent LDH was 0.60% and the prevalence of serious adolescent LDH, which requires management, was relatively high at 0.28%. MMA physical grade was confirmed to be a useful measure of the disability caused by LDH. PMID:26064143

  8. Lumbar microdiscectomy in pediatric patients: a large single-institution series.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kevin S; Dunn, Ian; Gunnarsson, Thorsteinn; Proctor, Mark R

    2010-02-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a rare but significant cause of pain and disability in the pediatric population. Lumbar microdiscectomy, although routinely performed in adults, has not been described in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to determine the surgical results of lumbar microdiscectomy in the pediatric population by analyzing the experiences at Children's Hospital Boston over the past decade. A series of 87 consecutive cases of lumbar microdiscectomy performed by the senior author (M.R.P.) from 1999 to 2008 were reviewed. Presenting symptoms, physical examination findings, and preoperative MR imaging findings were obtained from medical records. Immediate operative results were assessed including operative duration, blood loss, length of stay, and complications, along with long-term outcome and need for repeat surgery. This series represents the first surgical series of pediatric microdiscectomies. The mean patient age was 16.6 years (range 12-18 years) and 60% were female. The preoperative physical examination results were notable for motor deficits in 26% of patients, sensory changes in 41%, loss of deep tendon reflex in 22%, and a positive straight leg raise in 95%. Conservative management was the first line of treatment in all patients and the mean duration of symptoms until surgical treatment was 12.2 months. The mean operative time was 110 minutes and the mean postoperative length of stay was 1.3 days. Complications were rare: postoperative infection occurred in 1%, postoperative CSF leak in 1%, and new postoperative neurological deficits in 1%. Only 6% of patients needed repeat lumbar surgery and 1 patient ultimately required lumbar fusion. The treatment of pediatric lumbar disc herniation with microdiscectomy is a safe procedure with low operative complications. Nuances of the presentation, treatment options, and surgery in the pediatric population are discussed.

  9. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Plus Lumbar Mini-Open Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyon Su; Kim, Hak Sun; Ankur, Nanda; Kho, Phillip Anthony; Kim, Sung Jun; Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Jin Oh; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study are to describe the outcome of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated with Video Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) plus supplementary minimal incision in the lumbar region for thoracic and lumbar deformity correction and fusion. Materials and Methods This is a case series of 13 patients treated with VATS plus lumbar mini-open surgery for AIS. A total of 13 patients requiring fusions of both the thoracic and lumbar regions were included in this study: 5 of these patients were classified as Lenke type 1A and 8 as Lenke type 5C. Fusion was performed using VATS up to T12 or L1 vertebral level. Lower levels were accessed via a small mini-incision in the lumbar area to gain access to the lumbar spine via the retroperitoneal space. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Results The average number of fused vertebrae was 7.1 levels. A significant correction in the Cobb angle was obtained at the final follow-up (p = 0.001). The instrumented segmental angle in the sagittal plane was relatively well-maintained following surgery, albeit with a slight increase. Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) scores were noted have significantly improved at the final follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusion Indications for the use of VATS may be extended from patients with localized thoracic scoliosis to those with thoracolumbar scoliosis. By utilizing a supplementary minimal incision in the lumbar region, a satisfactory deformity correction may be accomplished with minimal post-operative scarring. PMID:21155045

  10. Rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Ostelo, R W; de Vet, H C; Waddell, G; Kerckhoffs, M R; Leffers, P; van Tulder, M W

    2002-01-01

    Although several rehabilitation programs, physical fitness programs or protocols regarding instruction for patients to return to work after lumbar disc surgery have been suggested, little is known about the efficacy and effectiveness of these treatments. There are still persistent fears of causing re-injury, re-herniation, or instability. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of active treatments that are used in the rehabilitation after first-time lumbar disc surgery. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Psyclit databases up to April 2000 and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register 2001, Issue 3. Both randomized and non-randomized controlled trials on any type of active rehabilitation program after first-time disc surgery were included. Two independent reviewers performed the inclusion of studies and two other reviewers independently performed the methodological quality assessment. A rating system that consists of four levels of scientific evidence summarizes the results. Thirteen studies were included, six of which were of high quality. There is no strong evidence for the effectiveness for any treatment starting immediately post-surgery, mainly because of lack of (good quality) studies. For treatments that start four to six weeks post-surgery there is strong evidence (level 1) that intensive exercise programs are more effective on functional status and faster return to work (short-term follow-up) as compared to mild exercise programs and there is strong evidence (level 1) that on long term follow up there is no difference between intensive exercise programs and mild exercise programs with regard to overall improvement. For all other primary outcome measures for the comparison between intensive and mild exercise programs there is conflicting evidence (level 3) with regard to long-term follow-up. Furthermore, there is no strong evidence for the effectiveness of supervised training as compared to home exercises. There was also no

  11. In vivo loads in the lumbar L3-4 disc during a weight lifting extension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobai; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of in vivo human lumbar loading is critical for understanding the lumbar function and for improving surgical treatments of lumbar pathology. Although numerous experimental measurements and computational simulations have been reported, non-invasive determination of in vivo spinal disc loads is still a challenge in biomedical engineering. The object of the study is to investigate the in vivo human lumbar disc loads using a subject-specific and kinematic driven finite element approach. Three dimensional lumbar spine models of three living subjects were created using MR images. Finite element model of the L3-4 disc was built for each subject. The endplate kinematics of the L3-4 segment of each subject during a dynamic weight lifting extension was determined using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. The endplate kinematics was used as displacement boundary conditions to calculate the in-vivo disc forces and moments during the weight lifting activity. During the weight lifting extension, the L3-4 disc experienced maximum shear load of about 230 N or 0.34 bodyweight at the flexion position and maximum compressive load of 1500 N or 2.28 bodyweight at the upright position. The disc experienced a primary flexion-extension moment during the motion which reached a maximum of 4.2 Nm at upright position with stretched arms holding the weight. This study provided quantitative data on in vivo disc loading that could help understand intrinsic biomechanics of the spine and improve surgical treatment of pathological discs using fusion or arthroplasty techniques. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Greater Resting Lumbar Extensor Myofascial Stiffness in Younger Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Than Age-Comparable Healthy Volunteers Quantified by Myotonometry.

    PubMed

    Andonian, Brian J; Masi, Alfonse T; Aldag, Jean C; Barry, Alexander J; Coates, Brandon A; Emrich, Katherine; Henderson, Jacqueline; Kelly, Joseph; Nair, Kalyani

    2015-11-01

    To quantify resting lumbar erector myofascial stiffness in younger patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and age-comparable healthy control subjects using a handheld mechanical impulse-based myotonometric device. A case-control study of 24 patients with AS and 24 age-comparable healthy control subjects. University physical therapy department. Patients with AS (men: n=19; women: n=5; total: N=24) and healthy volunteers (men: n=19; women: n=5; total: N=24) without low back pain (age range, 18-46y). Not applicable. Lumbar myofascial stiffness. At the initial measurements, median stiffness (Nm) of the averaged right- and left-sided values was greater (P=.021) in 24 patients with AS than 24 control subjects (268.9 vs 238.9, respectively). Repeated measurements after a 10-minute prone resting period were also greater (P=.007) in patients with AS than control subjects (281.0 vs 241.4, respectively). The 48 averaged right- and left-sided values from baseline and 10-minute measurements were compared in each subject group. The patients with AS more frequently (P=.012) had stiffness values >250 Nm (35 [72.9%] vs 22 [45.8%] in control subjects). Lumbar myofascial stiffness was greater in 24 patients with AS than in the control subjects. A hypothesized biomechanical concept of increased resting lumbar myofascial stiffness in AS may be supported by this preliminary controlled study. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The outcome of lumbar discectomy in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Shapiro, M S; Hatch, J D; Knight, J; Dorey, F J; Delamarter, R B

    1999-03-15

    An outcomes assessment of 14 elite college athletes who had undergone lumbar disc surgery was performed using the SF-36, a validated questionnaire that assesses quality of life. To determine the outcomes and results of lumbar disc surgery in an elite group of athletes and compare the results with those in the general population and in age-matched control subjects. Lumbar disc surgery is reported to be a highly successful procedure with excellent results. The outcome in elite athletes has not been assessed and compared with population norms and age-matched control subjects. Fourteen athletes from schools in the National Collegiate Athletic Association with a mean age of 20.7, underwent lumbar discectomy for radiculopathy refractory to conservative treatment. Ten had a single-level microdiscectomy, three a two-level microdiscectomy, and one a percutaneous discectomy. Patients were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 3.1 years, underwent a detailed clinical evaluation, and filled out the SF-36 questionnaire. All 14 patients had improvement of pain with elimination of the radicular component, took less medication than before surgery, and returned to recreational sports. Nine patients, all with a single level microdiscectomy, returned to varsity sports. Five athletes prematurely retired from competitive sports because of continued symptoms. Three of the athletes who retired underwent two-level procedures, and one had a percutaneous discectomy. SF-36 scores for bodily pain, physical role, and social and mental health roles were significantly lower in those athletes who retired. Patient scores were also compared with those in a group of noninjured age-and sport-matched college athletes. There were no differences between injured and noninjured athletes, but both groups had scores significantly lower than normal values in an age-matched group for bodily pain, physical role, general health, and social function. All patients were satisfied with their surgeries, were greatly

  14. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  15. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2015-09-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus.

  16. Management of severe pain due to lumbar disk protrusion.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Liam

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disk protrusion can cause excruciating pain in severe cases, which can be exacerbated by activity such as sitting down and straining at stool. Acute sciatica due to disk rupture will improve within 1 to 3 months. The efficacy of drugs used for the management of sciatica in primary care is unclear. Severe cases can require opioid analgesia, however people taking opioids for pain relief frequently present with opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. The use of transforaminal steroid injections is a controversial issue and repeat steroid injections should be considered in light of the risk-benefit profile of the individual patient.

  17. Three-dimensional lumbar spine postures measured by magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cargill, Sara C; Pearcy, Mark; Barry, Mark Darrell

    2007-05-15

    Investigation of method. This study presents a novel method of accurately determining relative bone position in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Biomechanical modeling of the human body requires measurement of the relative positions of skeletal elements. Spinal orientation is particularly difficult to measure due to small joint movements, relative inaccessibility of the bones to direct measurement, and joint complexity. A process incorporating both positional and conventional MRI was used to measure the skeletal positions of the lumbar spine and pelvis. The method uses higher quality conventional MRI to determine bone geometries and then registers these with lower resolution, positional MRI images of various postures to determine the relative locations of the bones. Flexion/extension, lateral bend, and axial twist rotations were measured for each joint. The results indicate good intrameasurer reliability, with a maximum rotational difference for all vertebral registrations of less than 1 degrees and a maximum translational difference of less than 3 mm. While there did not appear to be significant patterns between the 2 Subjects, there were trends within each Subject as well as identifiable postural characteristics. Although processing times are currently lengthy, the data collected are 3-dimensional, and represent the anatomy and movement of a specific individual.

  18. Shaping the Output of Lumbar Flexor Motoneurons by Sacral Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, Meir; Anglister, Lili; Lev-Tov, Aharon

    2017-02-01

    The ability to improve motor function in spinal cord injury patients by reactivating spinal central pattern generators (CPGs) requires the elucidation of neurons and pathways involved in activation and modulation of spinal networks in accessible experimental models. Previously we reported on adrenoceptor-dependent sacral control of lumbar flexor motoneuron firing in newborn rats. The current work focuses on clarification of the circuitry and connectivity involved in this unique modulation and its potential use. Using surgical manipulations of the spinal gray and white matter, electrophysiological recordings, and confocal microscopy mapping, we found that methoxamine (METH) activation of sacral networks within the ventral aspect of S2 segments was sufficient to produce alternating rhythmic bursting (0.15-1 Hz) in lumbar flexor motoneurons. This lumbar rhythm depended on continuity of the ventral funiculus (VF) along the S2-L2 segments. Interrupting the VF abolished the rhythm and replaced it by slow unstable bursting. Calcium imaging of S1-S2 neurons, back-labeled via the VF, revealed that ∼40% responded to METH, mostly by rhythmic firing. All uncrossed projecting METH responders and ∼70% of crossed projecting METH responders fired with the concurrent ipsilateral motor output, while the rest (∼30%) fired with the contralateral motor output. We suggest that METH-activated sacral CPGs excite ventral clusters of sacral VF neurons to deliver the ascending drive required for direct rhythmic activation of lumbar flexor motoneurons. The capacity of noradrenergic-activated sacral CPGs to modulate the activity of lumbar networks via sacral VF neurons provides a novel way to recruit rostral lumbar motoneurons and modulate the output required to execute various motor behaviors.

  19. Lumbar motion trends and correlation with low back pain. Part I. A roentgenological evaluation of coupled lumbar motion in lateral bending.

    PubMed

    Haas, M; Nyiendo, J; Peterson, C; Thiel, H; Sellers, T; Dal Mas, E; Kirton, C; Cassidy, D

    1992-01-01

    A radiographic study was undertaken to describe the relationship between coupled lumbar motion in lateral bending and the presence of low back pain symptomatology, evaluate trends of coupled motion and determine if these trends were attributable to chance confluence of independent motions. Survey. Chiropractic college student health center and private chiropractic clinic. 249 subjects: 114 with low back pain, 29 asymptomatic with no history and 106 asymptomatic with history. Of these, 194 were freshman volunteers and 55 were new private clinic low back pain patients. None. Lumbar segmental coupled motion categories according to the scheme of Cassidy and Grice, as well as a modified scheme. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant relationship (p = .01) between coupled lumbar motion and low back pain. When viewed intersegmentally, approximately half of all lumbar motion was type II; symmetric motion was rare and attributable to chance confluence of individual segmental motion. This study suggests that back pain is not an indication for the routine use of lateral bending films for the identification of abnormal coupled motion. Furthermore, each segmental categorization appears to be independent of contralateral categorization as well as motion at all other segmental levels. It is also suggested that type II motion cannot be ruled out as a normal variant. Finally, the ubiquity of coupled motion asymmetry suggests that symmetry must be reevaluated as a criterion for normal spinal function.

  20. Lumbar degenerative kyphosis: radiologic analysis and classifications.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jee-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Min, Jun-Hong; Han, Kyoung-Mi

    2007-11-15

    Retrospective study of a consecutive patient series. To review the radiographic classification of patients with sagittal imbalance due to lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) and to determine correlation between thoracic and lumbar curve. Lumbar degenerative kyphosis is one of the common spinal deformities in Asian countries, especially Korea and Japan. However, there have been few studies regarding the classification and treatment of this disease. Seventy-eight patients with LDK were analyzed and classified according to the standing lateral whole spine findings. Total lumbar lordosis (L1-S1), thoracic kyphosis (T5-T12), sacral slope, thoracolumbar angle (T11-L1), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA) were measured on the lateral view of the whole spine. Spinal curve deformities were classified into 2 groups according to the thoracolumbar (T-L) junction angle: flat or lordotic angle (Group 1; N = 53) and kyphotic angle (Group 2; N = 25). In Group 1, significant correlations between the thoracic and lumbar curves (r = 0.772, P < 0.0001), and between the lumbar curve and sacral slope (r = 0.785, P < 0.0001) were observed. By this result, Group 1 was classified as sagittal thoracic compensated group. In contrast, In Group 2, no correlation was found between the thoracic and lumbar curves in the decompensated group (r = 0.179, P = 0.391), but we found a significant correlation between lordosis and sacral slope (r = 0.442, P = 0.027). By this result, Group 2 was classified as sagittal thoracic decompensated group. There was significant difference in SVA between 2 groups (P = 0.020). The angle of the thoracolumbar junction is an important parameter in determining whether a sagittal thoracic compensatory mechanism exists in LDK. We assumed that existence of a compensatory mechanism in the proximal spine is central to the determination of the fusion levels in the treatment of LDK.

  1. Lumbar posture and muscular activity while sitting during office work.

    PubMed

    Mörl, Falk; Bradl, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Field study, cross-sectional study to measure the posture and sEMG of the lumbar spine during office work for a better understanding of the lumbar spine within such conditions. There is high incidence of low back pain in office workers. Currently there is little information about lumbar posture and the activity of lumbar muscles during extended office work. Thirteen volunteers were examined for around 2h of their normal office work. Typical tasks were documented and synchronised to a portable long term measuring device for sEMG and posture examination. The correlation of lumbar spine posture and sEMG was tested statistically. The majority of time spent in office work was sedentary (82%). Only 5% of the measured time was undertaken in erect body position (standing or walking). The sEMG of the lumbar muscles under investigation was task dependent. A strong relation to lumbar spine posture was found within each task. The more the lumbar spine was flexed, the less there was activation of lumbar muscles (P < .01). Periods of very low or no activation of lumbar muscles accounted for about 30% of relaxed sitting postures. Because of very low activation of lumbar muscles while sitting, the load is transmitted by passive structures like ligaments and intervertebral discs. Due to the viscoelasticity of passive structures and low activation of lumbar muscles, the lumbar spine may incline into de-conditioning. This may be a reason for low back pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathoanatomical characteristics of clinical lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tomkins-Lane, Christy C; Battié, Michele C; Hu, Richard; Macedo, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    There is no clear picture of pathoanatomy in clinically diagnosed LSS. Findings in the literature regarding imaging in LSS are heterogeneous. Characterize the pathoanatomy of LSS, as reported in the radiology reports, for a large community-based sample of patients with the clinical diagnosis of LSS. Retrospective review of clinical radiology reports. The sample comprised patients 40 years of age or older, with clinically diagnosed LSS. Radiology reports for lumbar MRI were obtained and data were extracted pertaining to the type and location of LSS. 173 subjects with a mean age of 66.2 ± 11.7 years were included (61% women). 68.2% had mixed stenosis, 19.1% had central stenosis only, and 12.7% had lateral stenosis only. By level, the most prevalent findings were at L4/5 (93%), L3/4 (66%) and L5/S1 (49%). This pattern was different in those with lateral stenosis only, where the proportion of findings at L5/S1 was higher than at L3/4. 156 subjects (90.2%) had findings of at least moderate severity. Considering moderate-severe findings only, 31% had mixed stenosis and 40.0% had multi-level findings (90.5% at adjacent segments). When mild findings were included for subjects with at least one moderate-severe finding the rate of mixed stenosis increased to 59%, and multi-level stenosis to 68.6%. The most common multi-level combinations were L3/4 and L4/5 for two-level stenosis and L2/3 through L4/5 for three-level. Results of this study confirm a number of pathoanatomical patterns in people diagnosed with LSS, including a high proportion of stenosis at L4/5, followed by L3/4 and L5/S1. Results also suggest a high prevalence of multi-level stenosis at adjacent segments. The prevalence of mixed stenosis varied from 31% to 68.2%; inclusion of mild findings resulted in a higher rate of both mixed and multi-level stenosis, compared to analysis of moderate-severe findings only. These results may guide future studies on LSS pathophysiology, by focusing attention toward the most

  3. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR.

  4. Spinal needle force monitoring during lumbar puncture using fiber Bragg grating force device.

    PubMed

    Ambastha, Shikha; Umesh, Sharath; Dabir, Sundaresh; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2016-11-01

    A technique for real-time dynamic monitoring of force experienced by a spinal needle during lumbar puncture using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor is presented. The proposed FBG force device (FBGFD) evaluates the compressive force on the spinal needle during lumbar puncture, particularly avoiding the bending effect on the needle. The working principle of the FBGFD is based on transduction of force experienced by the spinal needle into strain variations monitored by the FBG sensor. FBGFD facilitates external mounting of a spinal needle for its smooth insertion during lumbar puncture without any intervention. The developed FBGFD assists study and analysis of the force required for the spinal needle to penetrate various tissue layers from skin to the epidural space; this force is indicative of the varied resistance offered by different tissue layers for the spinal needle traversal. Calibration of FBGFD is performed on a micro-universal testing machine for 0 to 20 N range with an obtained resolution of 0.021 N. The experimental trials using spinal needles mounted on FBGFD are carried out on a human cadaver specimen with punctures made in the lumbar region from different directions. Distinct forces are recorded when the needle encounters skin, muscle tissue, and a bone in its traversing path. Real-time spinal needle force monitoring using FBGFD may reduce potentially serious complications during the lumbar puncture, such as overpuncturing of tissue regions, by impeding the spinal needle insertion at epidural space.

  5. Spinal needle force monitoring during lumbar puncture using fiber Bragg grating force device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambastha, Shikha; Umesh, Sharath; Dabir, Sundaresh; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2016-11-01

    A technique for real-time dynamic monitoring of force experienced by a spinal needle during lumbar puncture using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor is presented. The proposed FBG force device (FBGFD) evaluates the compressive force on the spinal needle during lumbar puncture, particularly avoiding the bending effect on the needle. The working principle of the FBGFD is based on transduction of force experienced by the spinal needle into strain variations monitored by the FBG sensor. FBGFD facilitates external mounting of a spinal needle for its smooth insertion during lumbar puncture without any intervention. The developed FBGFD assists study and analysis of the force required for the spinal needle to penetrate various tissue layers from skin to the epidural space; this force is indicative of the varied resistance offered by different tissue layers for the spinal needle traversal. Calibration of FBGFD is performed on a micro-universal testing machine for 0 to 20 N range with an obtained resolution of 0.021 N. The experimental trials using spinal needles mounted on FBGFD are carried out on a human cadaver specimen with punctures made in the lumbar region from different directions. Distinct forces are recorded when the needle encounters skin, muscle tissue, and a bone in its traversing path. Real-time spinal needle force monitoring using FBGFD may reduce potentially serious complications during the lumbar puncture, such as overpuncturing of tissue regions, by impeding the spinal needle insertion at epidural space.

  6. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Norden, Diana M.; Faw, Timothy D.; Deibert, Rochelle; S.Wohleb, Eric; Sheridan, John F.; P.Godbout, Jonathan; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24 hours and 7 days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24 hours after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7 days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  7. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christopher N; Norden, Diana M; Faw, Timothy D; Deibert, Rochelle; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Basso, D Michele

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24h and 7days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24h after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9.

  8. Full-endoscopic interlaminar removal of chronic lumbar epidural hematoma after spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yen-Po; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Lin, Ping-Yi; Huang, Abel Po-Hao; Cheng, Chun-Yuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Chien-Min; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spinal manipulation is widely used for low back pain treatments. Complications associated with spinal manipulation are seen. Lumbar epidural hematoma (EDH) is one of the complications reported in the literature. If lumbar chronic EDH symptoms are present, which are similar to those of a herniated nucleus pulposus, surgery may be considered if medical treatment fails. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy utilizing an interlaminar approach can be successfully applied to those with herniated nucleus pulposus. We use the same technique to remove the lumbar chronic EDH, which is the first documented report in the related literature. Methods: We present a case with chronic lumbar EDH associated with spinal manipulation. Neurologic deficits were noted on physical examination. We arranged for a full-endoscopic interlaminar approach to remove the hematoma for the patient with the rigid endoscopy (Vertebris system; Richard Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany). Results: After surgery, the patient's radiculopathy immediately began to disappear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up 10 days after the surgery revealed no residual hematoma. No complications were noted during the outpatient department follow up. Conclusions: Lumbar EDH is a possible complication of spinal manipulation. Patient experiencing rapidly progressive neurologic deficit require early surgical evacuation, while conservative treatment may only be applied to those with mild symptoms. A percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar approach may be a viable alternative for the treatment of those with chronic EDH with progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:24872917

  9. Ten-Step Minimally Invasive Spine Lumbar Decompression and Dural Repair Through Tubular Retractors.

    PubMed

    Boukebir, Mohamed Abdelatif; Berlin, Connor David; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Heiland, Tim; Schöller, Karsten; Rawanduzy, Cameron; Kirnaz, Sertaç; Jada, Ajit; Härtl, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery utilizing tubular retractors has become an increasingly popular approach for decompression in the lumbar spine. However, a better understanding of appropriate indications, efficacious surgical techniques, limitations, and complication management is required to effectively teach the procedure and to facilitate the learning curve. To describe our experience and recommendations regarding tubular surgery for lumbar disc herniations, foraminal compression with unilateral radiculopathy, lumbar spinal stenosis, synovial cysts, and dural repair. We reviewed our experience between 2008 and 2014 to develop a step-by-step description of the surgical techniques and complication management, including dural repair through tubes, for the 4 lumbar pathologies of highest frequency. We provide additional supplementary videos for dural tear repair, laminotomy for bilateral decompression, and synovial cyst resection. Our overview and complementary materials document the key technical details to maximize the success of the 4 MIS surgical techniques. The review of our experience in 331 patients reveals technical feasibility as well as satisfying clinical results, with no postoperative complications associated with cerebrospinal fluid leaks, 1 infection, and 17 instances (5.1%) of delayed fusion. MIS surgery through tubular retractors is a safe and effective alternative to traditional open or microsurgical techniques for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Adherence to strict microsurgical techniques will allow the surgeon to effectively address bilateral pathology while preserving stability and minimizing complications.

  10. Automatic lumbar vertebrae detection based on feature fusion deep learning for partial occluded C-arm X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Yinlong; An, Haibo; Tan, Jindong; Yang Li; Wei Liang; Yinlong Zhang; Haibo An; Jindong Tan; Li, Yang; Liang, Wei; Tan, Jindong; Zhang, Yinlong; An, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    Automatic and accurate lumbar vertebrae detection is an essential step of image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery (IG-MISS). However, traditional methods still require human intervention due to the similarity of vertebrae, abnormal pathological conditions and uncertain imaging angle. In this paper, we present a novel convolutional neural network (CNN) model to automatically detect lumbar vertebrae for C-arm X-ray images. Training data is augmented by DRR and automatic segmentation of ROI is able to reduce the computational complexity. Furthermore, a feature fusion deep learning (FFDL) model is introduced to combine two types of features of lumbar vertebrae X-ray images, which uses sobel kernel and Gabor kernel to obtain the contour and texture of lumbar vertebrae, respectively. Comprehensive qualitative and quantitative experiments demonstrate that our proposed model performs more accurate in abnormal cases with pathologies and surgical implants in multi-angle views.

  11. Targeted Intraspinal Radiofrequency Ablation for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert E; Granville, Michelle; Hatgis DO, Jesse

    2017-03-10

    and clinical symptoms. Follow-up of the patients up to 30 months shows that the effect of RF heat on the soft tissue is long lasting. In our long-term follow-up of greater than six months, 58% of RF treated patients had lasting relief of clinical symptoms, back pain, and claudication with increased spinal movement. This reduction in pain and improvement in motion allows patients to continue more aggressive physical therapy and muscle strengthening that secondarily can improve their symptoms. Post-procedure follow-up MRI scans in multiple patients have shown a clear reduction in soft tissue lesion size. Long-term follow-up demonstrated that 58% of patients treated with RF targeted ablation have not required further intervention and 22% went on to other surgical treatments for lumbar spinal stenosis. By reducing the soft tissue component of the stenosis with RF ablation and creating relatively more epidural space, targeted intraspinal RF may be a possible minimally invasive, percutaneous non-surgical alternative to treatment in a number of patients where soft tissue lumbar stenosis is the main cause of patients' symptoms. This technique offers a simple and safe additional method to relieve symptoms of lumbar stenosis and possibly compression within the neural foramina, especially in the elderly.

  12. Targeted Intraspinal Radiofrequency Ablation for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Robert E; Hatgis, DO, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    with patients' improvement in pain and clinical symptoms. Follow-up of the patients up to 30 months shows that the effect of RF heat on the soft tissue is long lasting. Results In our long-term follow-up of greater than six months, 58% of RF treated patients had lasting relief of clinical symptoms, back pain, and claudication with increased spinal movement. This reduction in pain and improvement in motion allows patients to continue more aggressive physical therapy and muscle strengthening that secondarily can improve their symptoms. Post-procedure follow-up MRI scans in multiple patients have shown a clear reduction in soft tissue lesion size. Long-term follow-up demonstrated that 58% of patients treated with RF targeted ablation have not required further intervention and 22% went on to other surgical treatments for lumbar spinal stenosis. Conclusion By reducing the soft tissue component of the stenosis with RF ablation and creating relatively more epidural space, targeted intraspinal RF may be a possible minimally invasive, percutaneous non-surgical alternative to treatment in a number of patients where soft tissue lumbar stenosis is the main cause of patients' symptoms. This technique offers a simple and safe additional method to relieve symptoms of lumbar stenosis and possibly compression within the neural foramina, especially in the elderly. PMID:28413736

  13. Workers' Compensation, Return to Work, and Lumbar Fusion for Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar fusion for spondylolisthesis is associated with consistent outcomes in the general population. However, workers' compensation is a risk factor for worse outcomes. Few studies have evaluated prognostic factors within this clinically distinct population. The goal of this study was to identify prognostic factors for return to work among patients with workers' compensation claims after fusion for spondylolisthesis. The authors used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, and Current Procedural Terminology codes to identify 686 subjects from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation who underwent fusion for spondylolisthesis from 1993 to 2013. Positive return to work status was recorded in patients who returned to work within 2 years of fusion and remained working for longer than 6 months. The criteria for return to work were met by 29.9% (n=205) of subjects. The authors used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify prognostic factors for return to work. Negative preoperative prognostic factors for postoperative return to work included: out of work for longer than 1 year before fusion (P<.001; odds ratio [OR], 0.16); depression (P=.007; OR<0.01); long-term opioid analgesic use (P=.006; OR, 0.41); lumbar stenosis (P=.043; OR, 0.55); and legal representation (P=.042; OR, 0.63). Return to work rates associated with these factors were 9.7%, 0.0%, 10.0%, 29.2%, and 25.0%, respectively. If these subjects were excluded, the return to work rate increased to 60.4%. The 70.1% (n=481) of subjects who did not return to work had markedly worse outcomes, shown by higher medical costs, chronic opioid dependence, and higher rates of failed back syndrome, total disability, and additional surgery. Psychiatric comorbidity increased after fusion but was much higher in those who did not return to work. Future studies are needed to identify how to better facilitate return to work among similar patients with workers' compensation claims. Copyright 2016

  14. Automatic lumbar spine measurement in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zheng, Dong; Liao, Shu; Peng, Zhigang; Yan, Ruyi; Liu, Junhua; Dong, Zhongxing; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Zhan, Yiqiang; Fei, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Accurate lumbar spine measurement in CT images provides an essential way for quantitative spinal diseases analysis such as spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. In today's clinical workflow, the measurements are manually performed by radiologists and surgeons, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Therefore, automatic and accurate lumbar spine measurement algorithm becomes highly desirable. In this study, we propose a method to automatically calculate five different lumbar spine measurements in CT images. There are three main stages of the proposed method: First, a learning based spine labeling method, which integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information, is used to detect lumbar and sacrum vertebrae in CT images. Then, a multiatlases based image segmentation method is used to segment each lumbar vertebra and the sacrum based on the detection result. Finally, measurements are derived from the segmentation result of each vertebra. Our method has been evaluated on 138 spinal CT scans to automatically calculate five widely used clinical spine measurements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve more than 90% success rates across all the measurements. Our method also significantly improves the measurement efficiency compared to manual measurements. Besides benefiting the routine clinical diagnosis of spinal diseases, our method also enables the large scale data analytics for scientific and clinical researches.

  15. Strength gains through lumbar lordosis restoration

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test the hypothesis that restoring the lumbar lordosis will increase a patient's voluntary muscular strength and decrease back pain symptoms. Clinical Features A patient was diagnosed with mechanical low back pain. The initial radiographic study revealed a loss of the lumbar lordosis. The patient determined his maximum bench press prior to the treatment program. The treatment outcome was based upon post-intervention radiographs, a Borg pain scale, and the patient's post-intervention maximum bench press. Intervention and Outcome The treatment program consisted of warm-up exercises, spinal manipulation, rehabilitative exercises, neuromuscular re-education, and prescribed home care. The treatment period consisted of 12 visits in the first 4 weeks, followed by once weekly for another 12 weeks, for a total of 24 visits in 4 months. In the first month, the Borg scale decreased from 5/10 to 0/10, and after 4 months the lumbar lordosis was increased from 2° to 31°. The sacral base angle (Ferguson's angle) increased from 18° to 31°. The patient's maximum bench press also increased from 245 pounds to 305 pounds. Conclusion Restoration of the lumbar lordosis appears to have a positive effect on muscular strength. This study supports the previous premise that a lumbar lordosis provides an inherent mechanical advantage for strength and stability. PMID:19674610

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... If You Have Questions en español Resonancia magnética: columna lumbar What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Cervical Spine Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  17. Influence of Physiological Loading on the Lumbar Spine of National Level Athletes in Different Sports

    PubMed Central

    Rouhollahi, Vahid; Rastogi, Amit; Dureha, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The lumbar spine is subjected to considerable stress during many athletic efforts. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of physiological loading on the lumbar spine in national male players of different games, which may be predictive of the future development of low back pain and injury symptoms. Thirty-four national players (12 cricket players, 12 field hockey players, and 10 basketball players) underwent magnetic resonance imaging, and selected geometric variables including intervertebral disc angles, the Farfan ratio, the lumbar body index, the compression deformity ratio, the biconcave deformity ratio and the anterior wedge deformity ratio were measured using KINOVEA-0.8.15 software and syngo fast view software and calculated using specific formulas. The results indicated a significant difference in the intervertebral disc angle between the three groups at the L2/3, L3/4 and L4/5 levels. In relation to the lumbar vertebral body shape and size, significant differences were found in the lumbar index at the L2 level, in the biconcave deformity at the L1 and L2 levels and in relation to the anterior wedge deformity at L2 between the three selected groups. Our data suggest that the different physiological loadings in the selected sports play an important role in the development of degenerative changes of the lumbar spine, which may be considered a risk factor for future injury and/or low back pain in each specific sport because of the unique demands of each discipline. PMID:28149348

  18. Clinical and surgical outcomes after lumbar laminectomy: An analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and surgical outcomes following lumbar laminectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time, bilateral, 1-3 level laminectomies for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients with discectomy, complete facetectomy, and fusion were excluded. Results: Five hundred patients were followed for an average of 46.79 months. Following lumbar laminectomy, patients experienced statistically significant improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, weakness, and sensory deficits. The rate of intraoperative durotomy was 10.00%; however, 1.60% experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. The risk of experiencing at least one postoperative complication with a lumbar laminectomy was 5.60%. Seventy-two patients (14.40%) required reoperations for progression of degenerative disease over a mean of 3.40 years. The most common symptoms prior to reoperation included back pain (54.17%), radiculopathy (47.22%), weakness (18.06%), sensory deficit (15.28%), and neurogenic claudication (19.44%). The relative risk of reoperation for patients with postoperative back pain was 6.14 times higher than those without postoperative back pain (P < 0.001). Of the 72 patients undergoing reoperations, 55.56% underwent decompression alone, while 44.44% underwent decompression and posterolateral fusions. When considering all-time reoperations, the lifetime risk of requiring a fusion after a lumbar laminectomy based on this study (average follow-up of 46.79 months) was 8.0%. Conclusion: Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory deficit following lumbar laminectomy. Incidental durotomy rate was 10.00%. Following a first-time laminectomy, the reoperation rate was 14.4% over a mean of 3.40 years. PMID:26005583

  19. Effect of Lumbar Progressive Resistance Exercise on Lumbar Muscular Strength and Core Muscular Endurance in Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Mayer, John M; Childs, John D; Neilson, Brett D; Chen, Henian; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Quillen, William S

    2016-11-01

    Low back pain is common, costly, and disabling for active duty military personnel and veterans. The evidence is unclear on which management approaches are most effective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar extensor high-intensity progressive resistance exercise (HIPRE) training versus control on improving lumbar extension muscular strength and core muscular endurance in soldiers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with active duty U.S. Army Soldiers (n = 582) in combat medic training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Soldiers were randomized by platoon to receive the experimental intervention (lumbar extensor HIPRE training, n = 298) or control intervention (core stabilization exercise training, n = 284) at one set, one time per week, for 11 weeks. Lumbar extension muscular strength and core muscular endurance were assessed before and after the intervention period. At 11-week follow-up, lumbar extension muscular strength was 9.7% greater (p = 0.001) for HIPRE compared with control. No improvements in core muscular endurance were observed for HIPRE or control. Lumbar extensor HIPRE training is effective to improve isometric lumbar extension muscular strength in U.S. Army Soldiers. Research is needed to explore the clinical relevance of these gains. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. The lumbar lordosis below Harrington instrumentation for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Swank, S M; Mauri, T M; Brown, J C

    1990-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluates lumbar lordosis in 43 patients before and after Harrington instrumentation into the lumbar spine. The authors measured overall lumbar lordosis, lordosis of unfused lumbar levels, and sagittal vertical axis. Lordosis decreased progressively in lower levels of fusion. The increase in lordosis below the fusion did not compensate for the overall loss of lordosis. The sagittal vertical axis moved forward, producing a subtle, asymptomatic form of flat back syndrome.

  1. Imaging of current spinal hardware: lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ha, Alice S; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this article are to review the indications for and the materials and designs of hardware more commonly used in the lumbar spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to show examples of hardware complications. Stabilization and fusion of the lumbar spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and newer types of material incorporation are increasingly more common in contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of this spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of fundamental hardware design, physiologic objectives, normal postoperative imaging appearances, and unique complications. Radiologists may have little training and experience with the new and modified types of hardware used in the lumbar spine.

  2. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  3. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    PubMed

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  4. Concomitant cervical and lumbar intradural intramedullary lipoma.

    PubMed

    Muthusubramanian, Vikram; Pande, Anil; Vasudevan, Madhabushi Chakravarthy; Ramamurthi, Ravi

    2008-03-01

    Lipomas of the spinal cord are often a component of spinal dysraphic states. Nondysraphic intramedullary spinal cord lipomas are rare, and concomitant isolated cervical and lumbar intradural intramedullary lipomata are very rare. One patient with concomitant isolated nondysraphic cervical and lumbar spinal cord lipomata has been reported and management options discussed. A young girl presented with insidious-onset diffuse neck pain and early myelopathic signs. Conventional radiographs were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the whole neuraxis revealed concomitant cervical and lumbar intradural intramedullary lipoma. Subtotal resection of the lesion was performed at both levels, after which the patient improved symptomatically and was ambulant independently. Concomitant intradural lipomas at 2 different locations unassociated with a dysraphic state is very rare. Magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression study is the investigation of choice. Adequate decompression with subtotal removal is the treatment of choice.

  5. A Foundation for Systems Anthropometry: Lumbar/Pelvic Kinematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Roentgenographic Measurement of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Height ." Spine , 6(2):154:158. Andriacchi, T., Schultz, A... measured , enabling coupled motion (Wite and Panjabi, 1978), for example, in lateral bending of the lumbar spine , to be investigated. Two different...to seated position. They describe measured positions of the lumbar spine , sacrum, and inncminate with anatomical landmarks important to

  6. [Lumbar disc protrusion in childhood. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Lins, E; Basedow, H

    1976-02-01

    This is a case of lumbar disc protrusion in a 14 year old girl, with typical symptomatology. Special attention should be called to the rarity of this case. The clinical and myelographic diagnosis showed a lumbar herniation L 4/L5. Treatment was performed by lumbar hemilaminectomie. The post operative controll showed remission of the clinical findings.

  7. Temperature change in lumbar periarticular tissue with continuous ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Morrisette, David C; Brown, Debora; Saladin, Michael E

    2004-12-01

    Counterbalanced, within-subjects experimental design. To determine the effect of continuous 1-MHz ultrasound, given at 1.5 W/cm2 and 2.0 W/cm2 for 10 minutes, on tissue temperature in the region of the L4-L5 zygapophyseal joint. Ultrasound is a modality commonly used for the treatment of lower back pain syndromes. Randomized controlled trials supporting the clinical effectiveness for ultrasound in the treatment of any type of lower back condition are lacking. While one purported purpose of ultrasound is the deep-heating effect, it has not been demonstrated that ultrasound can heat tissues in the area of the lumbar zygapophyseal joints, and the specific parameters needed for a heating effect have not been investigated. To aid in the design of the ultrasound intervention for future randomized controlled trials, it would be beneficial to have insight into the thermal effects of ultrasound on tissues of the lumbar spine and the parameters needed to produce a thermal effect. The present study examined the heating effect of ultrasound on periarticular tissue in the lumbar spine. Continuous, 1-MHz ultrasound at intensities of 1.5 W/cm2 and 2.0 W/cm2 was applied for 10 minutes to the lower back of 6 healthy individuals without lower back pain, while temperature measurements were taken with a hypodermic thermocouple implanted next to the L4-L5 zygapophyseal joint. ANOVA models were used for statistical analysis. Statistical analysis confirmed that the 2.0-W/cm2 ultrasound application produced (a) a more rapid increase in temperature over time, (b) a greater overall level of heating, and (c) significantly greater heating 6 minutes after the beginning of ultrasound administration. The mean terminal temperatures (at 10 minutes) obtained during the 1.5-W/cm2 and 2.0-W/cm2 ultrasound applications were 38.1 degrees C and 39.3 degrees C, respectively. Continuous 1-MHz ultrasound given at either 1.5-W/cm2 or 2.0-W/cm2 intensity has the capability of heating lumbar periarticular

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Mini Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Ehab M.; Elmorsy, Haitham M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mini-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (Mini-TLIF) and other minimally invasive approaches introduced for the purpose of treating lumbar degenerative disc disease and instability are achieving high success and safety rates as the conventional approaches. Moreover, it has less soft tissue damage, minimal blood loss, and less hospital stay. Methods A prospective study was conducted from 2012 to 2014 on 28 patients who were subjected to Mini-open TLIF combined with transpedicular screw fixation for spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease. Two paramedian approaches were done, 4 cm for each, to insert the pedicular screws, along with inserting unilateral TLIF cage with autologous bone graft. Decompression was done either unilateral or bilateral according to the patient side of radiculopathy. Sixteen patients (57.2%) were diagnosed with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 7 patients (25%) were diagnosed with isthmic type spondylolisthesis, and 5 patients (17.8%) were diagnosed with degenerative disc disease, 2 of them(7.1%) had previous operations at the same level. Twenty patients (71.4%) were operated at the L4/5 level, and 8 patients (28.6%) at the L5/S1 level. Results All patients were able to ambulate the next day of surgery. The mean estimated blood loss was 251.79mL. The average hospital stay was 4.14 days. The average follow-up was 9 months. The mean visual analog scale was 1.86 at discharge, 1.68 after 3 months, and 1.38 after 6 months. After 6 months of the operation, MacNab's criteria were good in 23 patients and excellent in 5 patients. We had one case with transient weakness, 2 cases of screw malposition without clinical manifestations, and one case of infection. Conclusion Mini-TLIF approach is an efficient and safe approach for treating instability and degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. The clinical outcome is encouraging and it may be an operation of choice for lumbar spinal fusion in selected patients. PMID:28127376

  9. Quantitative Data-driven Utilization of Hematologic Labs Following Lumbar Fusion.

    PubMed

    Yew, Andrew Y; Hoffman, Haydn; Li, Charles; McBride, Duncan Q; Holly, Langston T; Lu, Daniel C

    2015-05-01

    Retrospective case series. Large national inpatient databases estimate that approximately 200,000 lumbar fusions are performed annually in the United States alone. It is common for surgeons to routinely order postoperative hematologic studies to rule out postoperative anemia despite a paucity of data to support routine laboratory utilization. To describe quantitative criteria to guide postoperative utilization of hematologic laboratory assessments. A retrospective analysis of 490 consecutive lumbar fusion procedures performed at a single institution by 3 spine surgeons was performed. Inclusion criteria included instrumented and noninstrumented lumbar fusions performed for any etiology. Data were acquired on preoperative and postoperative hematocrit, platelets, and international normalized ratio as well as age, sex, number of levels undergoing operation, indication for surgery, and intraoperative blood loss. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine correlation to postoperative transfusion requirement. A total of 490 patients undergoing lumbar fusion were identified. Twenty-five patients (5.1%) required postoperative transfusion. No patients required readmission for anemia or transfusion. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that reduced preoperative hematocrit and increased intraoperative blood loss were independent predictors of postoperative transfusion requirement. Intraoperative blood loss >1000 mL had an odds ratio of 8.9 (P=0.013), and preoperative hematocrit <35 had an odds ratio of 4.37 (P=0.008) of requiring a postoperative transfusion. Routine postoperative hematologic studies are not necessary in many patients. High intraoperative blood loss and low preoperative hematocrit were independent predictors of postoperative blood transfusion. Our results describe quantitative preoperative and intraoperative criteria to guide data-driven utilization of postoperative hematologic studies following lumbar fusion.

  10. Motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic region improve respiratory function in obese men. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bezzoli, Emanuela; Andreotti, Dianne; Pianta, Lucia; Mascheroni, Martina; Piccinno, Lorena; Puricelli, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Salvadori, Alberto; Codecasa, Franco; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2016-11-10

    Obese subjects have decreased pulmonary function. The hypothesis of our study was that poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic musculature secondary to obesity may hinder the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. The aim of the paper was to evaluate whether specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature were able to improve respiratory function. Twenty obese male patients underwent a rehabilitation program including adapted physical activity and respiratory physiotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned to a Specific Motor Control Exercise Group (SG) and a Control Group (CG). SG followed a protocol according to the SMARTERehab concept aimed at improving posture, intra-abdominal pressure, rib cage mobility, and perception of correct muscle activation. CG performed an exercise training protocol to improve aerobic capacity and muscle strength. After intervention, both groups showed similar changes in body weight, fat, and fat-free mass. Respiratory function indexes improved in SG due to improved proprioception and coordination of the deep lumbar-pelvic muscles. Our study provides preliminary evidence that breathing, postural control, and spinal stability are intertwined. Positive respiratory effects in obese men can be obtained by prescribing specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic muscles. Implications for rehabilitation Obese subjects present with decreased pulmonary function and postural changes. Poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic muscles affects posture and the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. Specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature can improve respiratory function. Breathing and postural control are intertwined: positive respiratory effects can be obtained by enhancing motor control of the lumbar-pelvic muscles.

  11. Correlation between Radiologic Sign of Lumbar Lordosis and Functional Status in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Alireza; Farahangiz, Siamak; Pakniat Jahromi, Bita; Setayeshpour, Nazanin; Nasseri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A cross-sectional study. Purpose To describe the correlation between lumbar lordosis angle and functional status of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP). Overview of Literature There are different and conflicting opinions regarding the relationship between the degree of lumbar lordosis and functional status of patients with low back pain. Nonetheless, the severity of lordosis is still one of the routine physical exams considered in rehabilitation clinics. Methods The degree of lumbar lordosis of 150 patients with CMLBP was measured by means of Cobb's method using sagittal standing spinal radiographs. Subjects with probable secondary causes of low back pain (trauma, congenital anomaly, spinal infection, rheumatologic problems and history of spinal surgery) were excluded. Besides recording demographic data, their score of functional disability was estimated using Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, one of the most useful and reliable questionnaires. Comparison between these data was made regarding different age and gender groups. Results In this study, 119 subjects were female and 31 male, with an age range of 19-85 years. The average degree of lumbar lordosis was 44.69±11.43 and that of Oswestry disability index (ODI) 30.52%. Although we found a significant direct relationship between age and degree of lumbar lordosis (Pearson's correlation coefficient, p=0.016, r=0.197), while insignificant correlation was seen between the degree of lumbar lordosis and ODI (p=0.129). Conclusions There was no significant correlation between the degree of lumbar lordosis and the score of functional disability with regards to different age groups and gender. PMID:25346808

  12. Lumbar microendoscopic discectomy: surgical technique and nuances.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed A; Nasim, Khurram; Najibullah, Mostafa

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar microendoscopic discectomy (MED) is a minimally invasive transmuscular approach that combines standard lumbar microsurgical techniques with endoscopy. MED advantages include reduced tissue trauma, direct visualization of the nerve root and disc disease, and allowing bony decompression in cases with spinal or lateral recess stenosis. Operative charts and videos of patients undergoing MED were retrieved from our database and reviewed. A description of the surgical technique was then formulated. The surgical technique of MED is described and is essentially similar to conventional microdiscectomy. Some modifications are, however, necessary owing to the difference between microscopic and endoscopic views.

  13. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  14. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  15. Mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Ricks, Christian; Tempel, Zachary; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-07-01

    In deformity surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion provides excellent biomechanical support, creates a broad surface area for arthrodesis, and induces lordosis in the lower lumbar spine. Preoperative MRI, plain radiographs, and, when available, CT scan should be carefully assessed for sacral slope as it relates to pubic symphysis, position of the great vessels (especially at L4/5), disc space height, or contraindication to an anterior approach. This video demonstrates the steps in an anterior surgical procedure with minimal open exposure. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/r3bC4_vu1hQ .

  16. Iatrogenic lumbar meningocoele: report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Italo; Hodges, Thomas O.

    1970-01-01

    We have reported three cases of iatrogenic lumbar meningocoeles after surgery for herniated lumbar intervertebral discs. We reject the term spurious, pseudo, or false as given by earlier writers. We feel that, in reality, these sacs are true meningocoeles, with complete arachnoidal lining and freely communicating with the intraspinal subarachnoid space. We have also given a brief outline of the clinical features, elucidated the mechanisms operative in the production of symptoms, and suggested the cardinal features of radiographic diagnosis. Prevention is, of course, the best way to avoid this complication. If a dural tear does occur, every effort should be made to suture it in a watertight manner. Images PMID:4918460

  17. Does pregnancy increase the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Arakawa, M

    2004-04-01

    Pregnancy has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of nerves to local anesthetics and to decrease anesthetic requirements during regional anesthesia. In this study, whether pregnancy increased the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia was evaluated. Two populations (14 pregnant and 14 non-pregnant women) undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia were studied and received 17 mL of 2% lidocaine-epinephrine (1: 200,000). The pain threshold response after repeated electrical stimulation was used to assess sensory blockade at the L2, S1 and S3 dermatomes. Motor blockade was evaluated using the Bromage score. Demographic data except for weight were comparable between the two groups. There was a significant difference in cephalad spread of anesthesia between the groups. No significant differences in pain threshold or onset of sensory blockade at the L2, S1 or S3 segments were found between the groups. The pain thresholds at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly lower than that at L2 within each group. The mean onset times at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly longer than that at L2 within each group. No differences in Bromage score were found between the groups. In pregnant women, cephalad spread of epidural anesthesia was facilitated but latency of blockade, density and motor blockade were not. It takes over 25 min to achieve satisfactory blockade at sacral segments. Those who perform lumbar epidural anesthesia alone for cesarean section should consider the use of additives (e.g. fentanyl, bicarbonate) to enhance the block, or a greater volume of local anesthetic.

  18. Lower extremity joint kinetics and lumbar curvature during squat and stoop lifting.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Youngho

    2009-02-02

    In this study, kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity joint and the lumbar lordosis during two different symmetrical lifting techniques(squat and stoop) were examined using the three-dimensional motion analysis. Twenty-six young male volunteers were selected for the subjects in this study. While they lifted boxes weighing 5, 10 and 15 kg by both squat and stoop lifting techniques, their motions were captured and analyzed using the 3D motion analysis system which was synchronized with two forceplates and the electromyographic system. Joint kinematics was determined by the forty-three reflective markers which were attached on the anatomical locations based on the VICON Plug-in-Gait marker placement protocol. Joint kinetics was analyzed by using the inverse dynamics. Paired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the differences of variables between two techniques, and among three different weights. Correlation coefficient was calculated to explain the role of lower limb joint motion in relation to the lumbar lordosis. There were not significant differences in maximum lumbar joint moments between two techniques. The hip and ankle contributed the most part of the support moment during squat lifting, and the knee flexion moment played an important role in stoop lifting. The hip, ankle and lumbar joints generated power and only the knee joint absorbed power in the squat lifting. The knee and ankle joints absorbed power, the hip and lumbar joints generated power in the stoop lifting. The bi-articular antagonist muscles' co-contraction around the knee joint during the squat lifting and the eccentric co-contraction of the gastrocnemius and the biceps femoris were found important for maintaining the straight leg during the stoop lifting. At the time of lordotic curvature appearance in the squat lifting, there were significant correlations in all three lower extremity joint moments with the lumbar joint. Differently, only the hip moment had significant

  19. Lower extremity joint kinetics and lumbar curvature during squat and stoop lifting

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Youngho

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity joint and the lumbar lordosis during two different symmetrical lifting techniques(squat and stoop) were examined using the three-dimensional motion analysis. Methods Twenty-six young male volunteers were selected for the subjects in this study. While they lifted boxes weighing 5, 10 and 15 kg by both squat and stoop lifting techniques, their motions were captured and analyzed using the 3D motion analysis system which was synchronized with two forceplates and the electromyographic system. Joint kinematics was determined by the forty-three reflective markers which were attached on the anatomical locations based on the VICON Plug-in-Gait marker placement protocol. Joint kinetics was analyzed by using the inverse dynamics. Paired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the differences of variables between two techniques, and among three different weights. Correlation coefficient was calculated to explain the role of lower limb joint motion in relation to the lumbar lordosis. Results There were not significant differences in maximum lumbar joint moments between two techniques. The hip and ankle contributed the most part of the support moment during squat lifting, and the knee flexion moment played an important role in stoop lifting. The hip, ankle and lumbar joints generated power and only the knee joint absorbed power in the squat lifting. The knee and ankle joints absorbed power, the hip and lumbar joints generated power in the stoop lifting. The bi-articular antagonist muscles' co-contraction around the knee joint during the squat lifting and the eccentric co-contraction of the gastrocnemius and the biceps femoris were found important for maintaining the straight leg during the stoop lifting. At the time of lordotic curvature appearance in the squat lifting, there were significant correlations in all three lower extremity joint moments with the lumbar joint. Differently, only the hip

  20. Patient misconceptions concerning lumbar spondylosis diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Franz, Eric W; Bentley, J Nicole; Yee, Patricia P S; Chang, Kate W C; Kendall-Thomas, Jennifer; Park, Paul; Yang, Lynda J S

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Patient outcome measures are becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of health care quality and physician performance. Of the many novel measures currently being explored, patient satisfaction and other subjective measures of patient experience are among the most heavily weighted. However, these subjective measures are strongly influenced by a number of factors, including patient demographics, level of understanding of the disorder and its treatment, and patient expectations. In the present study, patients referred to a neurosurgery clinic for degenerative spinal disorders were surveyed to determine their understanding of lumbar spondylosis diagnosis and treatment. METHODS A multiple-choice, 6-question survey was distributed to all patients referred to a general neurosurgical spine clinic at a tertiary care center over a period of 11 months as a quality improvement initiative to assist the provider with individualized patient counseling. The survey consisted of questions designed to assess patient understanding of the role of radiological imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of low-back and leg pain, and patient perception of the indications for surgical compared with conservative management. Demographic data were also collected. RESULTS A total of 121 surveys were included in the analysis. More than 50% of the patients indicated that they would undergo spine surgery based on abnormalities found on MRI, even without symptoms; more than 40% of patients indicated the same for plain radiographs. Similarly, a large proportion of patients (33%) believed that back surgery was more effective than physical therapy in the treatment of back pain without leg pain. Nearly one-fifth of the survey group (17%) also believed that back injections were riskier than back surgery. There were no significant differences in survey responses among patients with a previous history of spine surgery compared with those without previous spine surgery. CONCLUSIONS These

  1. Differences in early sagittal plane alignment between thoracic and lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Schlösser, Tom P C; Shah, Suken A; Reichard, Samantha J; Rogers, Kenneth; Vincken, Koen L; Castelein, René M

    2014-02-01

    It has previously been shown that rotational stability of spinal segments is reduced by posteriorly directed shear loads that are the result of gravity and muscle tone. Posterior shear loads act on those segments of the spine that are posteriorly inclined, as determined by each individual's inherited sagittal spinal profile. Accordingly, it can be inferred that certain sagittal spinal profiles are more prone to develop a rotational deformity that may lead to idiopathic scoliosis; and lumbar scoliosis, on one end of the spectrum, develops from a different sagittal spinal profile than thoracic scoliosis on the other end. To examine the role of sagittal spinopelvic alignment in the etiopathogenesis of different types of idiopathic scoliosis. Multicenter retrospective analysis of lateral radiographs of patients with small thoracic and lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliotic curves. We included 192 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with either a thoracic (n=128) or lumbar (n=64) structural curve with a Cobb angle of less than 20° were studied. Children with other spinal pathology or with more severe idiopathic scoliosis were excluded, because this disturbs their original sagittal profile. Subjects who underwent scoliosis screening and had a normal spine were included in the control cohort (n=95). Thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, T9 sagittal offset, C7 and T4 sagittal plumb lines, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope, as well as parameters describing orientation in space of each individual vertebra between C7 and L5 and length of the posteriorly inclined segment. On standardized lateral radiographs of the spine, a systematic, semi-automatic measurement of the different sagittal spinopelvic parameters was performed for each subject using in-house developed computer software. Early thoracic scoliosis showed a significantly different sagittal plane from lumbar scoliosis. Furthermore, both scoliotic curve patterns were different from controls, but in a

  2. Effects of 12-week core stabilization exercise on the Cobb angle and lumbar muscle strength of adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2017-01-01

    To identify the effects of core stabilization exercise on the Cobb angle and lumbar muscle strength of adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Subjects in the present study consisted of primary school students who were confirmed to have scoliosis on radiologic examination performed during their visit to the National Fitness Center in Seoul, Korea. Depending on whether they participated in a 12-week core stabilization exercise program, subjects were divided into the exercise (n=14, age 12.71±0.72 years) or control (n=15, age 12.80±0.86 years) group. The exercise group participated in three sessions of core stabilization exercise per week for 12 weeks. The Cobb angle, flexibility, and lumbar muscle strength tests were performed before and after core stabilization exercise. Repeated-measure two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the treatment effects between the exercise and control groups. There was no significant difference in thoracic Cobb angle between the groups. The exercise group had a significant decrease in the lumbar Cobb angle after exercise compared to before exercise (P<0.001). The exercise group also had a significant increase in lumbar flexor and extensor muscles strength after exercise compared to before exercise (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). Core stabilization exercise can be an effective therapeutic exercise to decrease the Cobb angle and improve lumbar muscle strength in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:28503541

  3. Effects of 12-week core stabilization exercise on the Cobb angle and lumbar muscle strength of adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2017-04-01

    To identify the effects of core stabilization exercise on the Cobb angle and lumbar muscle strength of adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Subjects in the present study consisted of primary school students who were confirmed to have scoliosis on radiologic examination performed during their visit to the National Fitness Center in Seoul, Korea. Depending on whether they participated in a 12-week core stabilization exercise program, subjects were divided into the exercise (n=14, age 12.71±0.72 years) or control (n=15, age 12.80±0.86 years) group. The exercise group participated in three sessions of core stabilization exercise per week for 12 weeks. The Cobb angle, flexibility, and lumbar muscle strength tests were performed before and after core stabilization exercise. Repeated-measure two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the treatment effects between the exercise and control groups. There was no significant difference in thoracic Cobb angle between the groups. The exercise group had a significant decrease in the lumbar Cobb angle after exercise compared to before exercise (P<0.001). The exercise group also had a significant increase in lumbar flexor and extensor muscles strength after exercise compared to before exercise (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). Core stabilization exercise can be an effective therapeutic exercise to decrease the Cobb angle and improve lumbar muscle strength in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis.

  4. Fluoroscopy-Guided Lumbar Drainage of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Patients in Whom a Blind Beside Approach Is Difficult

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Choong Guen; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kang, Heung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rates of technical success, clinical success, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and informed consent was waived. Ninety-six procedures on 60 consecutive patients performed July 2008 to December 2013 were evaluated. The patients were referred for the fluoroscopy-guided procedure due to failed attempts at a bedside approach, a history of lumbar surgery, difficulty cooperating, or obesity. Fluoroscopy-guided lumbar drainage procedures were performed in the lateral decubitus position with a midline puncture of L3/4 in the interspinous space. The catheter tip was positioned at the T12/L1 level, and the catheter was visualized on contrast agent-aided fluoroscopy. A standard angiography system with a rotatable C-arm was used. The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study. Results The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively. The mean hospital stay for an external lumbar drain was 4.84 days. Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal. Conclusion Fluoroscopy-guided external lumbar drainage is a technically reliable procedure in difficult patients with failed attempts at a bedside procedure, history of lumbar surgery, difficulties in cooperation, or obesity. PMID:26175586

  5. Conflicting calculations of pelvic incidence and pelvic tilt secondary to transitional lumbosacral anatomy (lumbarization of S-1): case report.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Charles H; Glassman, Steven D; Gum, Jeffrey L; Carreon, Leah Y

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in the understanding of adult spinal deformity have led to a greater awareness of the role of the pelvis in maintaining sagittal balance and alignment. Pelvic incidence has emerged as a key radiographic measure and should closely match lumbar lordosis. As proper measurement of the pelvic incidence requires accurate identification of the S-1 endplate, lumbosacral transitional anatomy may lead to errors. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how lumbosacral transitional anatomy may lead to errors in the measurement of pelvic parameters. The current case highlights one of the potential complications that can be avoided with awareness. The authors report the case of a 61-year-old man who had undergone prior lumbar surgeries and then presented with symptomatic lumbar stenosis and sagittal malalignment. Radiographs showed a lumbarized S-1. Prior numbering of the segments in previous surgical and radiology reports led to a pelvic incidence calculation of 61°. Corrected numbering of the segments using the lumbarized S-1 endplate led to a pelvic incidence calculation of 48°. Without recognition of the lumbosacral anatomy, overcorrection of the lumbar lordosis might have led to negative sagittal balance and the propensity to develop proximal junction failure. This case illustrates that improper identification of lumbosacral transitional anatomy may lead to errors that could affect clinical outcome. Awareness of this potential error may help improve patient outcomes.

  6. Comparison of three aids for teaching lumbar surgical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Mitchell, P

    2013-08-01

    Reduced surgeons' training time has resulted in a need to increase the speed of learning. Currently, anatomy education involves traditional (textbooks, physical models, cadaveric dissection/prosection) and recent (electronic) techniques. As yet there are no available data comparing their performance. The performance of three anatomical training aids at teaching the surgical anatomy of the lumbar spinal was compared. The aids used were paper-based images, a three-dimensional plastic model and a semitransparent computer model. Fifty one study subjects were recruited from a population of junior doctors, nurses, medical and nursing students. Three study groups were created which differed in the order of presenting the aids. For each subject, spinal anatomy was revised by the investigator, teaching them the anatomy using each aid. They were specifically taught the locations of the intervertebral disc, pedicles and nerve roots in the lateral recesses. They then drew these structures on a response sheet (three response sheets per subject). The computer model was the best at allowing subjects accurately to determine structure location followed by the paper-based images, the plastic model was the worst. Accuracy improved with successive models used but this trend was not significant. Subjects were not versed in spinal anatomy beforehand, so meaningful baseline measures were not available. The educational performance of surgical anatomical training aids can be measured and compared. A computer generated 3 dimensional model gave the best results with paper-based images second and the plastic model third.

  7. Apparent diffusion coefficient maps in the assessment of surgical patients with lumbar spine degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Andrey A.; Patel, Arpan A.; Miller, Eric J.; Bohl, Michael A.; Stepanov, Ivan A.; Bardonova, Liudmila A.; Kerimbaev, Talgat; Asantsev, Anton O.; Giers, Morgan B.; Preul, Mark C.; Byvaltsev, Vadim A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for the assessment of patients with advanced degenerative lumbar spine disease and describe characteristic features of ADC maps in various degenerative lumbar spinal conditions. Methods T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion weighted (DWI) MR images of 100 consecutive patients admitted to the spinal surgery service were assessed. ADC maps were generated from DWI images using Osyrix software. The ADC values and characteristic ADC maps were assessed in the regions of interest over the different pathological entities of the lumbar spine. Results The study included 452 lumbar vertebral segments available for analysis of ADCs. Characteristic ADC map features were identified for protrusion, extrusion and sequester types of lumbar disk herniations, spondylolisthesis, reactive Modic endplate changes, Pfirrmann grades of IVD degeneration, and compromised spinal nerves. Compromised nerve roots had significantly higher mean ADC values than adjacent (p < 0.001), contralateral (p < 0.001) or adjacent contralateral (p < 0.001) nerve roots. Compared to the normal bone marrow, Modic I changes showed higher ADC values (p = 0.01) and Modic 2 changes showed lower ADC values (p = 0.02) respectively. ADC values correlated with the Pfirrmann grading, however differed from herniated and non-herniated disks of the matched Pfirrmann 3 and 4 grades. Conclusion Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of ADC mapping may provide additional useful information regarding the fluid dynamics of the degenerated spine and may complement standard MRI imaging protocol for the comprehensive assessment of surgical patients with lumbar spine pathology. ADC maps were advantageous in differentiating reactive bone marrow changes, and more precise assessment of the disk degeneration state. ADC mapping of compressed nerve roots showed promise but requires further investigation on a larger cohort of patients. PMID:28846710

  8. Apparent diffusion coefficient maps in the assessment of surgical patients with lumbar spine degeneration.

    PubMed

    Belykh, Evgenii; Kalinin, Andrey A; Patel, Arpan A; Miller, Eric J; Bohl, Michael A; Stepanov, Ivan A; Bardonova, Liudmila A; Kerimbaev, Talgat; Asantsev, Anton O; Giers, Morgan B; Preul, Mark C; Byvaltsev, Vadim A

    2017-01-01

    To assess the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for the assessment of patients with advanced degenerative lumbar spine disease and describe characteristic features of ADC maps in various degenerative lumbar spinal conditions. T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion weighted (DWI) MR images of 100 consecutive patients admitted to the spinal surgery service were assessed. ADC maps were generated from DWI images using Osyrix software. The ADC values and characteristic ADC maps were assessed in the regions of interest over the different pathological entities of the lumbar spine. The study included 452 lumbar vertebral segments available for analysis of ADCs. Characteristic ADC map features were identified for protrusion, extrusion and sequester types of lumbar disk herniations, spondylolisthesis, reactive Modic endplate changes, Pfirrmann grades of IVD degeneration, and compromised spinal nerves. Compromised nerve roots had significantly higher mean ADC values than adjacent (p < 0.001), contralateral (p < 0.001) or adjacent contralateral (p < 0.001) nerve roots. Compared to the normal bone marrow, Modic I changes showed higher ADC values (p = 0.01) and Modic 2 changes showed lower ADC values (p = 0.02) respectively. ADC values correlated with the Pfirrmann grading, however differed from herniated and non-herniated disks of the matched Pfirrmann 3 and 4 grades. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of ADC mapping may provide additional useful information regarding the fluid dynamics of the degenerated spine and may complement standard MRI imaging protocol for the comprehensive assessment of surgical patients with lumbar spine pathology. ADC maps were advantageous in differentiating reactive bone marrow changes, and more precise assessment of the disk degeneration state. ADC mapping of compressed nerve roots showed promise but requires further investigation on a larger cohort of patients.

  9. Rehabilitation following surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alison H; Probyn, Katrin; Cro, Suzie; Doré, Caroline J; Burton, A Kim; Balagué, Federico; Pincus, Tamar; Fairbank, Jeremy

    2013-12-09

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common cause of back pain that can also give rise to pain in the buttock, thigh or leg, particularly when walking. Several possible treatments are available, of which surgery appears to be best at restoring function and reducing pain. Surgical outcome is not ideal, and a sizeable proportion of patients do not regain good function. No accepted evidence-based approach to postoperative care is known-a fact thathas prompted this review. To determine whether active rehabilitation programmes following primary surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis have an impact on functional outcomes and whether such programmes are superior to 'usual postoperative care'. We searched the following databases from their first issues to March 2013: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, most recent issue), the Cochrane Back Review Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PEDro. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effectiveness of active rehabilitation versus usual care in adults (> 18 years of age) with confirmed lumbar spinal stenosis who had undergone spinal decompressive surgery (with or without fusion) for the first time. Two review authors independently extracted data from the included trials by using a predeveloped form. We contacted authors of original trials to request additional unpublished data as required. We recorded baseline characteristics of participants, interventions, comparisons, follow-up and outcome measures to enable assessment of clinical homogeneity. Clinical relevance was independently assessed by using the five questions recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG), and risk of bias within studies was determined by using CBRG criteria.We pooled individual study results in a meta-analysis when appropriate. For continuous outcomes, we calculated the mean difference (MD) when the same measurement scales were used in all studies and the standardised mean difference (SMD) when different measurement scales

  10. Quality criteria implementation for brain and lumbar spine CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Calzado, A; Rodríguez, R; Muñoz, A

    2000-04-01

    A study was undertaken to implement the quality criteria proposed by the European Commission for brain general and lumbar spine (disc herniation) CT examinations. The proposed criteria were evaluated for samples including 93 brain and 86 lumbar spine CT examinations, with special emphasis on the diagnostic and radiation dose requirements. The extent to which the image criteria had been achieved was evaluated after two independent observers had each read the images twice. Dose measurements were conducted in parallel to estimate the proposed dose quantities needed to obtain the images. For brain examinations, we found that a group of image criteria were largely met, and met uniformly in all sites. One criterion (1.2.5) was frequently fulfilled but had intermediate values for two sites; the remaining criteria were fulfilled to different extents, although for criteria 1.2.1 and 1.2.2, scores were lower than 50% and 70%, respectively. The mean percentage image quality score had values between 57% and 78%, with variation coefficients in the range 30-68%. Mean values of the dose quantities were in the ranges 44-74 mGy for weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), 497-1018 mGy cm for dose-length product (DLP) and 1.1-2.2 mSv for effective dose (E). CTDIw and DLP were not correlated because of significant variations in the scanned length, whereas DLP and E were strongly correlated. A weak relationship between image quality score and DLP was found for the sample as a whole. For lumbar spine examinations, none of the critical reproduction image criteria was systematically achieved. One group of criteria (1.2.7, 1.2.8 and 1.2.9) was fulfilled to a large extent in many departments, but fulfilment of the remainder varied widely. The mean score fluctuated in the range 39-88%, with three groups of differences: low (39-51%), intermediate (67-71%) and high (85-88%). Mean values of the CTDIw varied between sites in the range 27-48 mGy. Mean DLP values varied between 188 mGy cm and 333 mGy cm

  11. Midsagittal anatomy of lumbar lordosis in adult egyptians: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Abdelmonem A; Hegazy, Raafat A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the functional and clinical importance of lumbar lordosis, little is known about its description, particularly in Egypt. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced as a noninvasive diagnostic technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis using midsagittal MRIs. Normal lumbar spine MRIs obtained from 93 individuals (46 males, 47 females; 25-57 years old) were evaluated retrospectively. The lumbar spine curvature and its segments "vertebrae and discs" were described and measured. The lumbar lordosis angle (LLA) was larger in females than in males. Its mean values increased by age. The lumbar height (LH) was longer in males than in females. At the same time, the lumbar breadth (LB) was higher in females than in males. Lumbar index (LI = LB/LH × 100) showed significant gender differences (P < 0.0001). Lordosis was formed by wedging of intervertebral discs and bodies of lower lumbar vertebrae. In conclusion, MRI might clearly reveal the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis. Use of LI in association with LLA could be useful in evaluation of lumbar lordosis.

  12. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  13. Lumbar iEMG during isotonic exercise: chronic low back pain patients versus controls.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M E; Cassisi, J E; O'Connor, P D; MacMillan, M

    1992-03-01

    Two studies investigated the use of lumbar integrated electromyography (iEMG) during flexion-extension exercises of the lumbar spine. The first study compared the iEMG fatigue slopes of 12 pain-free controls during a standardized isotonic workout with a heavy weight and a light weight. Results indicated that the slopes of the iEMG across flexion-extension repetition was negative in both conditions, with the heavy weight producing significantly steeper fatigue slopes. In the second study, iEMG was compared from 16 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and 12 asymptomatic controls during isotonic exercise. Integrated EMG was recorded during 18 lumbar extension-flexion cycles (3 min) at a standard pace. Each subject exercised at a weight equal to 60% of his maximum isometric torque produced at the most extended position. Results indicated significantly less iEMG was produced by the CLBP group during both concentric and eccentric exertion. For both groups, eccentric exertion produced significantly less iEMG than concentric exertion. The groups showed significantly different iEMG fatigue slopes, with the control group showing declining iEMG by repetition, while the CLBP group showed flatter, slightly increasing iEMG. This occurred for both eccentric and concentric comparisons. A muscle deficiency model of CLBP is supported and results suggest the importance of endurance factors in addition to strength in rehabilitation efforts. Results also suggest the possibility of using this methodology for detecting insincere efforts in lumbar spine assessment.

  14. Lumbar spine anomalies in a pycnodysostosis case.

    PubMed

    Beguiristain, J L; Arriola, F J; Leyes, M

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of pycnodysostosis in which several clefts in the laminas, interarticular parts, and pedicles of the whole lumbar spine were revealed for the first time on CT. We review similar findings in the literature, and discuss their pathogenesis.

  15. [A case of giant lumbar neurinoma].

    PubMed

    Bocchini, R; Broggi, S; Gandini, G; Nessi, F; Ponzio, F

    1987-11-30

    A rare case of a giant extradural neurinoma of the IV lumbar root with an anterior development and a soft neurological picture is reported. The Authors stress the important role of CT both in the neurinoma diagnosis and in the correct preoperative evaluation of its extension and its relationship with contiguous organs.

  16. Multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, S; Cassarino, A; Braidotti, P

    1986-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts are a rare cause of compression of the contents of the lumbar spinal canal; in the literature only about 100 cases are reported. The various methods of diagnosis are discussed in the light of a recent case observed by the authors.

  17. Lumbar Discitis Caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M. R.; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  18. Lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Popoff, M R; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. [Lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses].

    PubMed

    García, Elena; Sánchez, Raquel; Martínez, Guillermo; Bernal, Carmen; Calatayud, M; Partida, M; Hawkins, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Many problems may arise when defining whether adrenal lesions are primary to the adrenal glands or represent other tissue, whether they are benign or malignant and whether they are functioning or nonfunctioning. Adrenal imaging complements the clinical and hormonal evaluation of these patients. We present a patient with lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses.

  20. Intrathecal Clonidine via Lumbar Puncture Decreases Blood Pressure in Patients With Poorly Controlled Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Komanski, Chris B; Rauck, Richard L; North, James M; Hong, Kyung S; D'Angelo, Robert; Hildebrand, Keith R

    2015-08-01

    Oral clonidine is used to treat hypertension but often produces sedation and severe dry mouth; intrathecal clonidine is used to treat chronic pain but may produce hypotension. This clinical feasibility study was conducted to determine if intrathecal clonidine decreases blood pressure in patients with poorly controlled hypertension. This prospective, single-arm, open-label study was conducted in ten subjects who were taking at least three antihypertensive medications including a diuretic and had an in-office systolic blood pressure between 140 and 190 mm Hg. On the day of treatment, blood pressure was measured before and after a single lumbar intrathecal dose (150 mcg) of clonidine using an automatic oscillometric device every 10-15 min for four hours. Student's paired t-test was used for statistical comparisons. Maximal reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures averaging 63 ± 20/29 ± 13 mm Hg were observed approximately two hours after clonidine administration. Decreases in systolic pressure were strongly correlated with baseline systolic pressure. Clonidine produced a significant decrease in heart rate of 11 ± 7 beats/min. No subject required intravenous fluids or vasopressor rescue therapy, or reported spinal headache. This is the first clinical study in subjects with hypertension that demonstrates significant and profound acute reductions in blood pressure after a single dose of intrathecal clonidine. Future placebo-controlled, dose-escalating studies are warranted to assess the long-term effects of intrathecal clonidine infusion via an implantable drug pump in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension at risk of stroke or myocardial infarction. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. [Motion Analysis of Lumbar Spine and Hip Joint on Sequential Radiographs Acquired with a Dynamic Flat-panel Detector (FPD) System].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kosuke; Kawashima, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    To design an evaluation method for lumbar spine and hip joint function using dynamic radiography using a flat-panel detector (FPD) system. Sixteen healthy subjects (males; age range, 22-60 years; median, 27 years) and 9 patients (7 males and 2 females; age range, 67-85 years; median, 73 years) with L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis were examined using a dynamic FPD system (CANON Inc.). Sequential images were captured with the subjects in the standing position with maximal forward bending followed by backward bending for 10 s. The lateral lumbar radiographs were obtained at 2 frames/s (fps). The flexion-extension angles of L1 and S1 were measured on those images. The range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar joints was significantly larger in the healthy group (82.4 ± 8.7°) than in the disease group (50.4 ± 8.5°; p<0.05). The ROM of the pelvic region was significantly smaller in the healthy group (26.9 ± 17.1°) than in the disease group (53.1 ± 17.6°; p<0.05). The healthy subjects exhibited a normal lumbar-pelvic rhythm. In the disease group, hip joint movements tended to be completed earlier compared with those in the healthy group. In the disease group, the loss of lumbar flexibility was compensated by an increase in hip joint motion due to the lumbar disease. The dynamic FPD system is a convenient imaging modality for the diagnosis of lumbar diseases through the assessment of locomotive function in the lumbar spine and hip joints.

  2. The sagittal diameter of the lumbar vertebral canal in normal adult Nigerians.

    PubMed Central

    Amonoo-Kuofi, H S

    1985-01-01

    An osteometric study of the anteroposterior diameter of the lumbar vertebral canal and intervertebral foramina of normal adult Nigerians is reported. The results show that the midsagittal diameter of the canal is subject to racial variations, and is determined primarily by the thickness and orientation of the lamina and to a lesser extent by the height of the pedicle. The significance of the findings is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:4066472

  3. Effect of tamoxifen on lumbar spine bone mineral density in postmenopausal women after 5 years.

    PubMed

    Love, R R; Barden, H S; Mazess, R B; Epstein, S; Chappell, R J

    1994-11-28

    Because adjuvant tamoxifen citrate is given to women with early-stage breast cancer for long periods, it is important to know how it affects risk factors for osteoporotic bone fractures, particularly since rates of bone fracture increase rapidly with age in postmenopausal women. In a 2-year randomized placebo-controlled toxicity study in 140 subjects, we demonstrated that tamoxifen was associated with preservation of bone mineral density (BMD), a major risk factor for fractures, in the lumbar spine. Five years after entry on this study we reexamined 62 of the original subjects with lumbar spine BMD and serum osteocalcin measurements. These were women available for study because they had not suffered major illnesses and had continued to receive (1) tamoxifen or (2) the no-tamoxifen regimen that they had originally been randomized to receive for the entire 5 years. For lumbar spine BMD at baseline, the 30 subjects in the long-term tamoxifen group and the 32 subjects in the long-term no-tamoxifen group were not significantly different (P = .26). During the first 2 years of follow-up, the 30 subjects in the long-term tamoxifen group showed the same BMD pattern as the entire 70-patient tamoxifen cohort, and similarly the 32 subjects in the long-term no-tamoxifen group showed the same pattern as the entire 70-patient cohort who received placebo. Five-year mean BMD measurements for each long-term follow-up group showed no significant changes from their respective 2-year levels. However, 5-year BMD measurements between the two groups differed (tamoxifen group, +0.8%; placebo group, -0.7%) (P = .06), and the mean regression lines for the changes in BMD over 5 years differed significantly between the two groups (P = .0005). Adjustment for differences in body mass index, reported exercise, and calcium supplementation between these two groups did not change these results. Osteocalcin levels, also comparable at baseline in the two groups, were significantly lower in tamoxifen

  4. Posterior lumbar osteotomy for flat back in adults.

    PubMed

    Noun, Z; Lapresle, P; Missenard, G

    2001-08-01

    Several studies describe sagittal realignment for flat back and related kyphotic decompensation. Official guidelines for sagittal and the frontal realignment have not been developed. In this retrospective study, the authors examined 10 patients with flat back syndrome and treated a related kyphotic decompensation syndrome by posterior wedge osteotomy. The authors' goal was to determine the efficacy of one-level osteotomy on sagittal and frontal realignment. The effectiveness of osteotomy performed mainly in L3 or L4 was measured in terms of radiographic sagittal and frontal alignment. Sagittal unbalance was improved in all patients. The correction is related to the restitution of lumbar lordosis (5 degrees of lordosis allows 1 cm of sagittal correction). However, frontal balance is difficult to restore or even to maintain. In one patient, it was worsened and required repeated operation. One-level lumbar osteotomy is a safe procedure to correct sagittal unbalance. Peroperative lordosis correction allows reliable correction planning. The remaining problem is planning for frontal balance correction.

  5. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  6. Prevalence, Spinal Alignment, and Mobility of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with or without Chronic Low Back Pain: A Community-Dwelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Shimada, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    Although lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) occurs almost universally with aging, little is known regarding its actual prevalence and relationships to chronic low back pain (CLBP) in the general population. The presence of CLBP in subjects with LSS may have negative impacts on spinal alignment and mobility. This study evaluated the prevalence of LSS using a self-administered, self-reported history questionnaire in 630 community-dwelling individuals ≥50 years old. Subjects with LSS were further divided into LSS+CLBP and LSS alone groups, and spinal alignment and mobility were compared using a computer-assisted device. Prevalence of LSS was 10.8% in this cohort. Subjects in the LSS+CLBP group (n = 46) showed a significantly more kyphotic lumbar spinal alignment with limited lumbar extension (P < .05), resulting in a stooped trunk compared to subjects in the LSS alone group (n = 22). However, no significant difference in spinal mobility was seen between groups. PMID:22110922

  7. Lumbar position sense acuity during an electrical shock stressor

    PubMed Central

    Hjortskov, Nis; Hye-Knudsen, Christian; Fallentin, Nils

    2005-01-01

    Background Optimal motor control of the spine depends on proprioceptive input as a prerequisite for co-ordination and the stability of the spine. Muscle spindles are known to play an important role in proprioception. Animal experiments suggest that an increase in sympathetic outflow can depress muscle spindle sensitivity. As the muscle spindle may be influenced by sympathetic modulation, we hypothesized that a state of high sympathetic activity as during mental stress would affect the proprioceptive output from the muscle spindles in the back muscles leading to alterations in proprioception and position sense acuity. The aim was to investigate the effect of mental stress, in this study the response to an electrical shock stressor, on position sense acuity in the rotational axis of the lumbar spine. Methods Passive and active position sense acuity in the rotational plane of the lumbar spine was investigated in the presence and absence of an electrical shock stressor in 14 healthy participants. An electrical shock-threat stressor lasting for approximately 12 minutes was used as imposed stressor to build up a strong anticipatory arousal: The participants were told that they were going to receive 8 painful electrical shocks however the participants never received the shocks. To quantify the level of physiological arousal and the level of sympathetic outflow continuous beat-to-beat changes in heart rate (beats*min-1) and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure (mmHg) were measured. To quantify position sense acuity absolute error (AE) expressed in degrees was measured. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measurements (subjects as random factor and treatments as fixed factors) was used to compare the different treatments. Results Significant increases were observed in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate during the stress sessions indicating elevated sympathetic activity (15, 14 and 10%, respectively). Despite pronounced

  8. Lumbar Muscle Cross-Sectional Areas Do Not Predict Clinical Outcomes in Adults With Spinal Stenosis: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Suri, Pradeep; Rundell, Sean D; Olafsen, Nathan; Carlson, M Jake; Johnson, Steve; Fry, Adrielle; Annaswamy, Thiru M; Gilligan, Christopher; Comstock, Bryan; Heagerty, Patrick; Friedly, Janna; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2017-06-01

    Minimal longitudinal data exist regarding the role of lumbar musculature in predicting back pain and function. In cross-sectional study designs, there is often atrophy of the segmental multifidus muscle in subjects with low back pain compared with matched controls. However, the cross-sectional design of these studies prevents drawing conclusions regarding whether lumbar muscle characteristics predict or modify future back pain or function. The primary objective of this study is to determine whether the cross-sectional area (CSA) of lumbar muscles predict functional status or back pain at 6- or 12-month follow-up in older adults with spinal degeneration. The secondary objective is to evaluate whether these muscle characteristics improve outcome prediction above and beyond the prognostic information conferred by demographic and psychosocial variables. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. A total of 209 adults aged 50 years and older with clinical and radiographic spinal stenosis from the Lumbar Epidural steroid injection for Spinal Stenosis (LESS) trial. Using baseline magnetic resonance images, we calculated CSAs of the lumbar multifidus, psoas, and quadratus lumborum muscles using a standardized protocol by manually tracing the borders of each of the muscles. The relationship between lumbar muscle CSAs and baseline measures was assessed with Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients. The relationship between lumbar muscle characteristics and 6- and 12-month Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and back pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) responses was further evaluated with multivariate linear regression. A hierarchical approach to the regression was performed: a basic model with factors of conceptual importance including age, gender, BMI, and baseline RDQ score formed the first step. The second and third steps evaluated whether psychosocial variables or muscle measures conferred additional prognostic information to the basic model. Function

  9. From the international space station to the clinic: how prolonged unloading may disrupt lumbar spine stability.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeannie F; Miller, Stephanie L; Khieu, Kristine; O'Neill, Conor W; Healey, Robert M; Coughlin, Dezba G; Sayson, Jojo V; Chang, Douglas G; Hargens, Alan R; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2017-09-26

    Background context Prolonged microgravity exposure is associated with localized low back pain and an elevated risk of post-flight disc herniation. Though the mechanisms by which microgravity impairs the spine are unclear, they should be foundational for developing in-flight countermeasures for maintaining astronaut spine health. Because human spine anatomy has adapted to upright posture on Earth, observations of how spaceflight affects the spine should also provide new and potentially important information on spine biomechanics that benefit the general population. Purpose This study compares quantitative measures of lumbar spine anatomy, health, and biomechanics in astronauts before and after six months of microgravity exposure on board the International Space Station (ISS). Study Design Prospective longitudinal study. Sample Six astronanut crewmember volunteers from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with six month missions aboard the ISS. Outcome Measures For multifidus and erector spinae at L3-L4, measures include: cross-sectional area (CSA), functional cross-sectional area (FCSA), and FCSA/CSA. Other measures include: supine lumbar lordosis (L1-S1), active (standing) and passive (lying) flexion-extension range of motion (FE ROM) for each lumbar disc segment, disc water content from T2-weighted intensity, Pfirrmann grade, vertebral endplate pathology, and subject-reported incidence of chronic low back pain or disc injuries at one-year follow-up. Methods 3T MRI and dynamic fluoroscopy of the lumbar spine were collected for each subject at two time points: approximately 30 days before launch (pre-flight) and one day following six months spaceflight on the ISS (post-flight). Outcome measures were compared between time points using paired t-tests and regression analyses. Results Supine lumbar lordosis decreased (flattened) by an average of 11% (p=0.019). Active FE ROM decreased for the middle three lumbar discs (L2-L3: -22.1%, p=0.049; L3-L4

  10. A quantitative assessment of the mechanical effects on the lumbar spine and the effects on straight leg raising and lumbar flexion of segmental sustained rotation.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoetsu; Kamijo, Masayoshi; Hanaoka, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study were to examine the strength and relative direction of the applied force from lumbar segmental sustained rotation (LSSR) on the lumbar spinous process, and to clarify the effects of LSSR on straight leg raising (SLR) and lumbar flexion (LF). [Subjects] 18 pain-free healthy adults volunteered for this study. [Methods] Applied force and direction were measured between the L5-S1 segments using tri-axial pressure sensors. Subjects participated in 3 trials. Subjects underwent localized right rotation, held for 10 seconds, of the L5 in relation to the S1. Sham group subjects followed LSSR group protocols; however L5-S1 rotation was absent. Control subjects rested on a plinth. SLR and LF were measured pre and post-trial. [Results] Outcome data for LSSR forces were as follows; x (0.06N (±0.29)), y (‒5.26N (±0.01)), z (6.16N (±1.33)), and resultant vector magnitude (8.19N (±1.12)). LSSR relative direction results were as follows: x-axis angle, 89. 6 ° (±1.5); y-axis, 130.9 ° (±5.6); and z-axis, 41.6 ° (±4.7). The LSSR group's LF and SLR were significantly increased compared with those of the sham and control groups. [Conclusion] The identified resultant vector magnitude was 8.19N, less than other techniques. LSSR effectively improves LF and bilateral SLR.

  11. A quantitative assessment of the mechanical effects on the lumbar spine and the effects on straight leg raising and lumbar flexion of segmental sustained rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yoetsu; Kamijo, Masayoshi; Hanaoka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study were to examine the strength and relative direction of the applied force from lumbar segmental sustained rotation (LSSR) on the lumbar spinous process, and to clarify the effects of LSSR on straight leg raising (SLR) and lumbar flexion (LF). [Subjects] 18 pain-free healthy adults volunteered for this study. [Methods] Applied force and direction were measured between the L5–S1 segments using tri-axial pressure sensors. Subjects participated in 3 trials. Subjects underwent localized right rotation, held for 10 seconds, of the L5 in relation to the S1. Sham group subjects followed LSSR group protocols; however L5–S1 rotation was absent. Control subjects rested on a plinth. SLR and LF were measured pre and post-trial. [Results] Outcome data for LSSR forces were as follows; x (0.06N (±0.29)), y (‒5.26N (±0.01)), z (6.16N (±1.33)), and resultant vector magnitude (8.19N (±1.12)). LSSR relative direction results were as follows: x-axis angle, 89. 6 ° (±1.5); y-axis, 130.9 ° (±5.6); and z-axis, 41.6 ° (±4.7). The LSSR group’s LF and SLR were significantly increased compared with those of the sham and control groups. [Conclusion] The identified resultant vector magnitude was 8.19N, less than other techniques. LSSR effectively improves LF and bilateral SLR. PMID:27190475

  12. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension-flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation.

  13. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension–flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation. PMID:27390450

  14. The Effect of Kinesio Taping in Forward Bending of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping® technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping® influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility. PMID:25276018

  15. Absolute and relative reliability of lumbar interspinous process ultrasound imaging measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tozawa, Ryosuke; Katoh, Munenori; Aramaki, Hidefumi; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Fujinawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of lumbar interspinous process distances measured by ultrasound imaging were examined. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 10 males who had no history of orthopedic diseases or dysfunctions. Ten lumbar interspinous images from 360 images captured from 10 subjects were selected. The 10 images were measured by nine examiners. The lumbar interspinous process distance measurements were performed five times by each examiner. In addition, four of the nine examiners measured the distances again after 4 days for test-retest analysis. In statistical analysis, the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to investigate relative reliability, and Bland-Altman analysis was used to investigate absolute reliability. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficients (1, 1) for intra-examiner reliability ranged from 0.985 to 0.998. For inter-rater reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (2, 1) was 0.969. The intraclass correlation coefficients (1, 2) for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.991 to 0.999. The Bland-Altman analysis results indicated no systematic error. [Conclusion] The results indicate that ultrasound measurements of interspinous process distance are highly reliable even when measured only once by a single person. PMID:27630399

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of lumbar spondylolisthesis in elderly Chinese men and women

    PubMed Central

    He, Lai-Chang; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Gong, Jing-Shan; Griffith, James F; Zeng, Xian-Jun; Kwok, Anthony WL; Leung, Jason CS; Kwok, Timothy; Ahuja, Anil T; Leung, Ping Chung

    2014-01-01

    Objective A screening survey for osteoporotic fractures in men and women in Hong Kong represents the first large-scale prospective population-based study on bone health in elderly (≥65 years) Chinese men and women. This study aims to identify the prevalence and potential risk factors of lumbar spondylolisthesis in these subjects. Methods The lateral lumbar radiographs of 1,994 male and 1,996 female patients were analysed using the Meyerding classification. Results Amongst the men, 380 (19.1 %) had at least one spondylolisthesis and 43 (11.3 %) had slips at two or more levels; 283 had anterolisthesis, 85 had retrolisthesis, whereas 12 subjects had both anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis. Amongst the women, 499 (25.0 %) had at least one spondylolisthesis and 69 (13.8 %) had slips at two or more levels; 459 had anterolisthesis, 34 had retrolisthesis, whereas 6 subjects had both anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis. Advanced age, short height, higher body mass index (BMI), higher bone mineral density (BMD) and degenerative arthritis are associated with spondylolisthesis. Lower Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) score was associated with spondylolisthesis in men; higher body weight, angina and lower grip strength were associated with spondylolisthesis in women. Conclusion The male/female ratio of lumbar spondylolisthesis prevalence was 1:1.3 in elderly Chinese. Men are more likely to have retrolisthesis. PMID:24126641

  17. Impaired lumbar movement perception in association with postural stability and motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, Ville; Määttä, Sara; Taimela, Simo; Herno, Arto; Kankaanpää, Markku; Partanen, Juhani; Kansanen, Martti; Hänninen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2002-05-01

    A descriptive study of the associations between different neurophysiologic findings in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. To evaluate the ability to sense a change in lumbar position and the associations between lumbar movement perception, postural stability, and motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials. Patients with low back pain have impaired postural control and impaired lumbar proprioception. Altered motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials have been often observed in lumbar spinal stenosis. The study included 26 patients with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lumbar spinal stenosis. Their ability to sense lumbar rotation was assessed in a previously validated motorized trunk rotation unit in the seated position. The abilities to indicate the movement direction and the movement magnitude were used as indexes of the ability to sense the lumbar rotatory movement. The postural stability was measured with a vertical force platform. The motor-evoked potentials were elicited by transcranial and lumbar stimulation and recorded from anterior tibialis muscles. The somatosensory-evoked potentials were elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at the ankle. Twenty patients (76.9%; P = 0.006) reported the wrong movement direction. Furthermore, the patients consistently localized the movement sensation in their shoulders instead of the lumbar region. The altered motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials were observed in 11 and 16 patients, respectively. Abnormal motor-evoked potentials had inconsistent associations with impaired movement perception and postural stability and abnormal somatosensory-evoked potentials had no associations with other findings. Many patients with lumbar spinal stenosis have difficulties in sensing the lumbar rotational movement, which may indicate impaired proprioceptive abilities. Abnormal motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials are

  18. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... over each 1-hour period. 2. Each new and existing sulfur recovery unit: Option 2 (TRS limit). a. Select... percent excess air.sa Equation 1 of § 63.1568. h. Establish each operating limit in Table 30 of this... HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standards...

  19. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... over each 1-hour period. 2. Each new and existing sulfur recovery unit: Option 2 (TRS limit). a. Select... percent excess air.sa Equation 1 of § 63.1568. h. Establish each operating limit in Table 30 of this... HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standards...

  20. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... over each 1-hour period. 2. Each new and existing sulfur recovery unit: Option 2 (TRS limit). a. Select... percent excess air.sa Equation 1 of § 63.1568. h. Establish each operating limit in Table 30 of this... HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standards...