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  1. HIV resistance to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Francois

    2009-11-24

    Similar to all antiretroviral drugs, failure of raltegravir-based treatment regimens to fully supress HIV replication almost invariably results in emergence of HIV resistance to this new drug. HIV resistance to raltegravir is the consequence of mutations located close to the integrase active site, which can be divided into three main evolutionary pathways: the N155H, the Q148R/H/K and the Y143R/C pathways. Each of these primary mutations can be accompanied by a variety of secondary mutations that both increase resistance and compensate for the variable loss of viral replicative capacity that is often associated with primary resistance mutations. One unique property of HIV resistance to raltegravir is that each of these different resistance pathways are mutually exclusive and appear to evolve separately on distinct viral genomes. Resistance is frequently initiated by viruses carrying mutations of the N155H pathway, followed by emergence and further dominance of viral genomes carrying mutations of the Q148R/H/K or of the Y143R/C pathways, which express higher levels of resistance. Even if some natural integrase polymorphisms can be part of this evolution process, these polymorphisms do not affect HIV susceptibility in the absence of primary mutations. Therefore, all HIV-1 subtypes and groups, together with HIV-2, are naturally susceptible to raltegravir. Finally, because interaction of integrase strand transfer inhibitors with the HIV integrase active site is comparable from one compound to another, raltegravir-resistant viruses express significant cross resistance to most other compounds of this new class of antiretroviral drugs.

  2. The HIVdb system for HIV-1 genotypic resistance interpretation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Michele W; Liu, Tommy F; Shafer, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    The Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database hosts a freely available online genotypic resistance interpretation system called HIVdb to help clinicians and laboratories interpret HIV-1 genotypic resistance tests. These tests are designed to assess susceptibility to nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI and NNRTI), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. The HIVdb genotypic resistance interpretation system output consists of (1) a list of penalty scores for each antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutation in a submitted sequence, (2) estimates of decreased NRTI, NNRTI, protease and integrase inhibitor susceptibility, and (3) comments about each ARV resistance mutation in the submitted sequence. The application's strengths are its convenience for submitting sequences, its quality control analysis, its transparency and its extensive comments. The Sierra Web service is an extension that enables laboratories analyzing many sequences to individualize the format of their results. The algorithm specification interface compiler makes it possible for HIVdb to provide results using a variety of different HIV-1 genotypic resistance interpretation algorithms.

  3. Creating genetic resistance to HIV.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John C; Zaia, John A; Rossi, John J

    2012-10-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a chronic and incurable disease, in spite of the notable successes of combination antiretroviral therapy. Gene therapy offers the prospect of creating genetic resistance to HIV that supplants the need for antiviral drugs. In sight of this goal, a variety of anti-HIV genes have reached clinical testing, including gene-editing enzymes, protein-based inhibitors, and RNA-based therapeutics. Combinations of therapeutic genes against viral and host targets are designed to improve the overall antiviral potency and reduce the likelihood of viral resistance. In cell-based therapies, therapeutic genes are expressed in gene modified T lymphocytes or in hematopoietic stem cells that generate an HIV-resistant immune system. Such strategies must promote the selective proliferation of the transplanted cells and the prolonged expression of therapeutic genes. This review focuses on the current advances and limitations in genetic therapies against HIV, including the status of several recent and ongoing clinical studies.

  4. HIV-1 drug resistance and resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Dana S; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (ART) has led to dramatic reductions in HIV-1 mortality and incidence. However, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) poses a potential threat to the long-term success of ART and is emerging as a threat to the elimination of AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. In this review we describe the genetic mechanisms, epidemiology, and management of HIVDR at both individual and population levels across diverse economic and geographic settings. To describe the genetic mechanisms of HIVDR, we review the genetic barriers to resistance for the most commonly used ARVs and describe the extent of cross-resistance between them. To describe the epidemiology of HIVDR, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We also review to two categories of HIVDR with important public health relevance: (i) pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR), a World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR surveillance metric and (ii) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-related drug resistance, a type of ADR that can impact clinical outcomes if present at the time of treatment initiation. To summarize the implications of HIVDR for patient management, we review the role of genotypic resistance testing and treatment practices in both high-income and LMIC settings. In high-income countries where drug resistance testing is part of routine care, such an understanding can help clinicians prevent virological failure and accumulation of further HIVDR on an individual level by selecting the most efficacious regimens for their patients. Although there is reduced access to diagnostic testing and to many ARVs in LMIC, understanding the scientific basis and clinical implications of HIVDR is useful in all regions in order to shape appropriate surveillance, inform treatment algorithms, and manage difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  5. Using HIV resistance tests in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephen; Jayasuriya, Ashini; Smit, Erasmus

    2009-08-01

    Genotypic resistance testing is now a standard of care in HIV management. Although there are clear, published guidelines to recommend the appropriate use of these tests, clinicians and scientists still struggle to determine the optimal use of resistance tests given the finite budgets and time constraints under which they work. In this article we discuss some 'real-life' clinical situations and aim to provide a useful insight into when and where genotypic resistance testing can be optimally applied in the management of HIV-positive adults.

  6. Innate immunity in resistance to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Biasin, Mara; Clerici, Mario; Piacentini, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in subjects who do not seroconvert despite multiple exposures to the virus and to the progression to AIDS in HIV‐infected individuals depends on multiple factors involving both the innate and the adaptive immune system. The contribution of natural immunity in preventing HIV infection has so far received little attention, but many recently published articles suggest a key role for Toll‐like receptors, natural killer cells, interleukin‐22, acute‐phase amyloid A protein, and APOBEC3G in conferring resistance to HIV infection. The study of these factors will shed light on HIV pathogenesis and contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to this elusive disease.

  7. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  8. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  9. Clinical management of HIV-1 resistance.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Roger; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2010-01-01

    Antiretroviral drug resistance is a fundamental survival strategy for the virus that stems from its vast capacity to generate diversity. With the recent availability of new ARV drugs and classes, it is now possible to prescribe fully active ART to most HIV-infected subjects and achieve viral suppression even in those with multidrug-resistant HIV. It is uncertain, however, if this scenario will endure. Given that ART must be given for life, and new compounds other than second-generation integrase inhibitors may not reach the clinic soon, all efforts must be done to avoid the development of resistance to the new agents. Here, we discuss relevant aspects for the clinical management of antiretroviral drug resistance, leaving detailed explanations of mechanisms and mutation patterns to other articles in this issue. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, vol. 85, issue 1, 2010. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent trends in HIV-1 drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    Once considered an inevitable consequence of HIV treatment, drug resistance is declining. This decline supports the hypothesis that antiretroviral therapy can arrest replication and prevent the evolution of resistance. Further support comes from excellent clinical outcomes, the failure of treatment intensification to reduce residual viremia, the lack of viral evolution in patients on optimal therapy, pharmacodynamics studies explaining the extraordinarily high antiviral activity of modern regimens, and recent reports of potential cures. Evidence supporting ongoing replication includes higher rates of certain complications in treated patients and an increase in circular forms of the viral genome after intensification with integrase inhibitors. Recent studies also provide an explanation for the observation that some patients fail protease-inhibitor based regimens without evidence for resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent Trends in HIV-1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered an inevitable consequence of HIV treatment, drug resistance is declining. This decline supports the hypothesis that antiretroviral therapy can arrest replication and prevent the evolution of resistance. Further support comes from excellent clinical outcomes, the failure of treatment intensification to reduce residual viremia, the lack of viral evolution in patients on optimal therapy, pharmacodynamics studies explaining the extraordinarily high antiviral activity of modern regimens, and recent reports of potential cures. Evidence supporting ongoing replication includes higher rates of certain complications in treated patients and an increase in circular forms of the viral genome after intensification with integrase inhibitors. Recent studies also provide an explanation for the observation that some patients fail protease-inhibitor based regimens without evidence for resistance. PMID:24021560

  12. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  13. Transmitted drug resistance in French HIV-2-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Visseaux, Benoit; Bénard, Antoine; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Roy, Céline; Taieb, Audrey; Chêne, Geneviève; Matheron, Sophie; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2013-06-19

    We report the first transmitted drug resistance survey study in HIV-2-infected patients living in France. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was 5.0% (95% confidence interval, 0.1-9.9) with mutations detected only in protease, not in reverse transcriptase. In this series, 10% of patients displayed X4/dual-mixed viruses. These findings classified the rate of transmitted drug resistance in the HIV-2 French Cohort as low prevalence.

  14. HIV-1 drug resistance in HIV-1-infected children in the United Kingdom from 1998 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Rana; Smith, Colette J; Dunn, David; Green, Hannah; Duong, Trinh; Doerholt, Katja; Riordon, Andrew; Lyall, Hermione; Tookey, Pat; Butler, Karina; Sabin, Caroline A; Gibb, Di; Pillay, Deenan

    2008-05-01

    We reviewed HIV-1 genotypes from 200 of 979 (20%) HIV-infected children in the U.K. Collaborative HIV in Pediatric Study (CHIPS) cohort (343 resistance tests). Three of 44 samples had major primary resistance mutations before antiretroviral therapy. Three-class resistance was noted in 42 samples (14.1%). Our study also highlighted underutilization of testing and the need for prompt genotyping after drug discontinuation which may have lead to an underestimation of HIV-1 resistance.

  15. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs) that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the design of novel inhibitors that

  16. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  17. Optimal Antiviral Switching to Minimize Resistance Risk in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rutao; Piovoso, Michael J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    The development of resistant strains of HIV is the most significant barrier to effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The most common causes of resistance development are patient noncompliance and pre-existence of resistant strains. In this paper, methods of antiviral regimen switching are developed that minimize the risk of pre-existing resistant virus emerging during therapy switches necessitated by virological failure. Two distinct cases are considered; a single previous virological failure and multiple virological failures. These methods use optimal control approaches on experimentally verified mathematical models of HIV strain competition and statistical models of resistance risk. It is shown that, theoretically, order-of-magnitude reduction in risk can be achieved, and multiple previous virological failures enable greater success of these methods in reducing the risk of subsequent treatment failures. PMID:22073250

  18. Future technologies for monitoring HIV drug resistance and cure.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Urvi M; McCormick, Kevin; van Zyl, Gert; Mellors, John W

    2017-03-01

    Sensitive, scalable and affordable assays are critically needed for monitoring the success of interventions for preventing, treating and attempting to cure HIV infection. This review evaluates current and emerging technologies that are applicable for both surveillance of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and characterization of HIV reservoirs that persist despite antiretroviral therapy and are obstacles to curing HIV infection. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the potential to be adapted into high-throughput, cost-efficient approaches for HIVDR surveillance and monitoring during continued scale-up of antiretroviral therapy and rollout of preexposure prophylaxis. Similarly, improvements in PCR and NGS are resulting in higher throughput single genome sequencing to detect intact proviruses and to characterize HIV integration sites and clonal expansions of infected cells. Current population genotyping methods for resistance monitoring are high cost and low throughput. NGS, combined with simpler sample collection and storage matrices (e.g. dried blood spots), has considerable potential to broaden global surveillance and patient monitoring for HIVDR. Recent adaptions of NGS to identify integration sites of HIV in the human genome and to characterize the integrated HIV proviruses are likely to facilitate investigations of the impact of experimental 'curative' interventions on HIV reservoirs.

  19. HIV-1 protease-substrate coevolution in nelfinavir resistance.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Madhavi; Ozen, Ayşegül; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. The virus accumulates mutations within the protease (PR) that render the PIs less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also coevolve with mutations at PR cleavage sites contributing to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution of the p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations by determining crystal structures of wild-type and NFV-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with p1-p6 substrate peptide variants with L449F and/or S451N. Alterations of residue 30's interaction with the substrate are compensated by the coevolving L449F and S451N cleavage site mutations. This interdependency in the PR-p1-p6 interactions enhances intermolecular contacts and reinforces the overall fit of the substrate within the substrate envelope, likely enabling coevolution to sustain substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of PR resistance mutations. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. Mutations in HIV-1 protease selected under the pressure of protease inhibitors render the inhibitors less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also mutate and coevolve with protease, contributing to maintenance of viral fitness and to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution at the Gag p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations. Our structural analysis reveals the interdependency of protease-substrate interactions and how coevolution may restore substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of protease drug resistance mutations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. HIV drug resistance transmission threshold survey in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Pankam, Tippawan; O-Charoen, Rachanee; Sutherland, Donald; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2008-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) began in Thailand in the Bangkok Metropolitan Area (BMA) in 1988 and scale-up began in 2001. The national first-line regimen is stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine in fixed-dose combination, which is a regimen with a low genetic barrier for resistance. Because viral load and resistance testing are not widely available, unidentified HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) may occur during treatment and could be transmitted. We undertook a threshold survey to assess HIVDR transmission in two subsets of recently infected individuals in the BMA. The first group consisted of returning blood donors tested at the Thai Red Cross National Blood Centre who seroconverted within the past 12 months. The second group comprised recently infected (as defined by BED assay) clients of the Thai Red Cross voluntary counselling and testing centre (VCT). Genotyping of 50 consecutive specimens each from blood donors and VCT clients during 2005-2006 showed no mutations associated with HIVDR in the reverse transcriptase or protease regions of the HIV pol gene. These results are categorized by the WHO HIV drug resistance threshold survey method as representing a low prevalence (<5%) of transmitted HIV drug resistance. Every effort should be made to minimize the emergence of resistance in treated individuals and to prevent primary and secondary HIV transmission. To continue to monitor HIVDR transmission, Thailand has planned additional surveys--including longitudinal surveys--in these and additional groups of individuals.

  1. Quantifying Ongoing HIV-1 Exposure in HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples to Identify Individuals With Potential Host Resistance to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mackelprang, Romel D.; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Farquhar, Carey; de Bruyn, Guy; Essex, Max; McElrath, M. Juliana; Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Lingappa, Jairam R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunogenetic correlates of resistance to HIV-1 in HIV-1–exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals with consistently high exposure may inform HIV-1 prevention strategies. We developed a novel approach for quantifying HIV-1 exposure to identify individuals remaining HIV-1 uninfected despite persistent high exposure. Methods. We used longitudinal predictors of HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to score HIV-1 exposure and define HESN clusters with persistently high, low, and decreasing risk trajectories. The model was validated in an independent cohort of serodiscordant couples. We describe a statistical tool that can be applied to other HESN cohorts to identify individuals with high exposure to HIV-1. Results. HIV-1 exposure was best quantified by frequency of unprotected sex with, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels among, and presence of genital ulcer disease among HIV-1–infected partners and by age, pregnancy status, herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus, and male circumcision status among HESN participants. Overall, 14% of HESN individuals persistently had high HIV-1 exposure and exhibited a declining incidence of HIV-1 infection over time. Conclusions. A minority of HESN individuals from HIV-1–discordant couples had persistent high HIV-1 exposure over time. Decreasing incidence of infection in this group suggests these individuals were selected for resistance to HIV-1 and may be most appropriate for identifying biological correlates of natural host resistance to HIV-1 infection. PMID:22926009

  2. Rapid enzymatic test for phenotypic HIV protease drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Assfalg-Machleidt, Irmgard; Nitschko, Hans; von der Helm, Klaus; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Machleidt, Werner

    2003-07-01

    A phenotypic resistance test based on recombinant expression of the active HIV protease in E. coli from patient blood samples was developed. The protease is purified in a rapid one-step procedure as active enzyme and tested for inhibition by five selected synthetic inhibitors (amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir) used presently for chemotherapy of HIV-infected patients. The HPLC system used in a previous approach was replaced by a continuous fluorogenic assay suitable for high-throughput screening on microtiter plates. This reduces significantly the total assay time and allows the determination of inhibition constants (Ki). The Michaelis constant (Km) and the inhibition constant (Ki) of recombinant wild-type protease agree well with published data for cloned HIV protease. The enzymatic test was evaluated with recombinant HIV protease derived from eight HIV-positive patients scored from 'sensitive' to 'highly resistant' according to mutations detected by genotypic analysis. The measured Ki values correlate well with the genotypic resistance scores, but allow a higher degree of differentiation. The non-infectious assay enables a more rapid yet sensitive detection of HIV protease resistance than other phenotypic assays.

  3. Cytotoxic T cell responses to multiple conserved HIV epitopes in HIV-resistant prostitutes in Nairobi.

    PubMed Central

    Rowland-Jones, S L; Dong, T; Fowke, K R; Kimani, J; Krausa, P; Newell, H; Blanchard, T; Ariyoshi, K; Oyugi, J; Ngugi, E; Bwayo, J; MacDonald, K S; McMichael, A J; Plummer, F A

    1998-01-01

    Many people who remain persistently seronegative despite frequent HIV exposure have HIV-specific immune responses. The study of these may provide information about mechanisms of natural protective immunity to HIV-1. We describe the specificity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to HIV in seronegative prostitutes in Nairobi who are apparently resistant to HIV infection. These women have had frequent exposure to a range of African HIV-1 variants, primarily clades A, C, and D, for up to 12 yr without becoming infected. Nearly half of them have CTL directed towards epitopes previously defined for B clade virus, which are largely conserved in the A and D clade sequences. Stronger responses are frequently elicited using the A or D clade version of an epitope to stimulate CTL, suggesting that they were originally primed by exposure to these virus strains. CTL responses have been defined to novel epitopes presented by HLA class I molecules associated with resistance to infection in the cohort, HLA-A*6802 and HLA-B18. Estimates using a modified interferon-gamma Elispot assay indicate a circulating frequency of CTL to individual epitopes of between 1:3,200 and 1:50,000. Thus, HIV-specific immune responses-particularly cross-clade CTL activity- may be responsible for protection against persistent HIV infection in these African women. PMID:9802890

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia I; Kempker, Russell; Moanna, Abeer; Rimland, David

    2010-01-01

    Concordant with the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the community setting, colonization and infections with this pathogen have become a prevalent problem among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population. A variety of different host- and, possibly, pathogen-related factors may play a role in explaining the increased prevalence and incidence observed. In this article, we review pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MRSA in the HIV-infected population. PMID:21694896

  5. [HIV genetic subtypes and HIV drug resistance in China: a Meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Wu, N N; Yin, Y Q; Yuan, R; Wang, B

    2016-11-10

    Objective: To assess the relationship between HIV genetic subtypes and HIV resistance in China. Methods: The literature retrieval was conducted by using Chinese Science-Technology Journal Database (VIP), Wanfang Data, Chinese Journal Full-text Database (CNKI), PubMed and Web of Science to select the papers on the relationship between HIV subtypes and HIV drug resistance in China during 2005-2015. Eligible papers were included according to the inclusion. Meta-analysis was performed by using software Stata 12.0. Results: A total of 43 papers were selected and the pooled rate of drug resistance was 15.1% and the rate of primary drug resistance was 9.5%, the subtypes associated drug resistance were CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_ BC, B/B'and C. The pooled rates of drug resistance of each subtype were 12.8%, 7.4%, 14.3%, 25.7% and 34.9% and the rates of primary drug resistance of each subtype were 7.3%, 5.7%, 11.5%,15.5% and 23.9%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that both treated and area subgroup showed a significant difference among groups (P<0.05). The rates of primary resistance of each subtype in northern China and southwestern China were higher than that in southern China. Conclusion: The distribution of HIV genotypes in China was complex and the prevalence of primary drug resistance of each subtype was high, together with a significant difference among subtypes. It is necessary to strengthen the monitoring of different subtypes of drug resistant strains in China to prevent the recombination and spreading of resistant strains.

  6. Persistence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T

    2013-11-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models.

  7. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy.

  8. Genotypic resistance testing in HIV by arrayed primer extension

    PubMed Central

    Bodem, Jochen; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Jacob, Anette; Fellenberg, Kurt; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of mutations that are associated with the occurrence of drug resistance is important for monitoring the antiretroviral therapy of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here, we describe the establishment and successful application of Arrayed Primer Extension (APEX) for genotypic resistance testing in HIV as a rapid and economical alternative to standard sequencing. The assay is based on an array of oligonucleotide primers that are immobilised via their 5′-ends. Upon hybridisation of template DNA, a primer extension reaction is performed in the presence of the four dideoxynucleotides, each labelled with a distinct fluorophore. The inserted label immediately indicates the sequence at the respective position. Any mutation changes the colour pattern. We designed a microarray for the analysis of 26 and 33 codons in the HIV protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively, which are of special interest with respect to drug resistance. The enormous genome variability of HIV represents a big challenge for genotypic resistance tests, which include a hybridisation step, both in terms of specificity and probe numbers. The use of degenerated oligonucleotides resulted in a significant reduction in the number of primers needed. For validation, DNA of 94 and 48 patients that exhibited resistance to inhibitors of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively, were analysed. The validation included HIV subtype B, prevalent in industrialised countries, as well as non-subtype B samples that are more common elsewhere. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00216-007-1775-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18202840

  9. Automated prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype data.

    PubMed

    Shen, ChenHsiang; Yu, Xiaxia; Harrison, Robert W; Weber, Irene T

    2016-08-31

    HIV/AIDS is a serious threat to public health. The emergence of drug resistance mutations diminishes the effectiveness of drug therapy for HIV/AIDS. Developing a computational prediction of drug resistance phenotype will enable efficient and timely selection of the best treatment regimens. A unified encoding of protein sequence and structure was used as the feature vector for predicting phenotypic resistance from genotype data. Two machine learning algorithms, Random Forest and K-nearest neighbor, were used. The prediction accuracies were examined by five-fold cross-validation on the genotype-phenotype datasets. A supervised machine learning approach for automatic prediction of drug resistance was developed to handle genotype-phenotype datasets of HIV protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT). It predicts the drug resistance phenotype and its relative severity from a query sequence. The accuracy of the classification was higher than 0.973 for eight PR inhibitors and 0.986 for ten RT inhibitors, respectively. The overall cross-validated regression R(2)-values for the severity of drug resistance were 0.772-0.953 for 8 PR inhibitors and 0.773-0.995 for 10 RT inhibitors. Machine learning using a unified encoding of sequence and protein structure as a feature vector provides an accurate prediction of drug resistance from genotype data. A practical webserver for clinicians has been implemented.

  10. HIV drug resistance in HIV positive individuals under antiretroviral treatment in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Sun, Xiaoguang; Su, Shengli; Lv, Cuixia; Zhang, Xiaofei; Lin, Lin; Wang, Rui; Fu, Jihua; Kang, Dianmin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of antiretroviral drugs is limited by the development of drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to examine HIV drug resistance following the nationwide implementation of drug resistance testing in China since 2009. We conducted drug resistance testing in patients who were already on or new to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Shandong Province, China, from 2011 to 2013, and grouped them based on the presence or absence of drug resistance to determine the effects of age, gender, ethnicity, marital status, educational level, route of transmission and treatment status on drug resistance. We then examined levels of drug resistance the following year. The drug resistance rates of HIV patients on ART in Shandong from 2011 to 2013 were 3.45% (21/608), 3.38% (31/916), and 4.29% (54/1259), per year, respectively. M184V was the most frequently found point mutation, conferring resistance to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, while Y181C, G190A, K103N and V179D/E/F were the most frequent point mutations conferring resistance to the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In addition, the protease inhibitor drug resistance mutations I54V and V82A were identified for the first time in Shandong Province. Primary resistance accounts for 20% of the impact factors for drug resistance. Furthermore, it was found that educational level and treatment regimen were high-risk factors for drug resistance in 2011 (P<0.05), while treatment regimen was a high risk factor for drug resistance in 2012 and 2013 (P<0.05). Among the 106 drug-resistant patients, 77 received immediate adjustment of treatment regimen following testing, and 69 (89.6%) showed a reduction in drug resistance the following year. HIV drug resistance has a low prevalence in Shandong Province. However, patients on second line ART regimens and those with low educational level need continuous monitoring. Active drug resistance testing can effectively prevent the development of drug

  11. HIV drug resistance in HIV positive individuals under antiretroviral treatment in Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Sun, Xiaoguang; Su, Shengli; Lv, Cuixia; Zhang, Xiaofei; Lin, Lin; Wang, Rui; Kang, Dianmin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of antiretroviral drugs is limited by the development of drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to examine HIV drug resistance following the nationwide implementation of drug resistance testing in China since 2009. We conducted drug resistance testing in patients who were already on or new to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Shandong Province, China, from 2011 to 2013, and grouped them based on the presence or absence of drug resistance to determine the effects of age, gender, ethnicity, marital status, educational level, route of transmission and treatment status on drug resistance. We then examined levels of drug resistance the following year. The drug resistance rates of HIV patients on ART in Shandong from 2011 to 2013 were 3.45% (21/608), 3.38% (31/916), and 4.29% (54/1259), per year, respectively. M184V was the most frequently found point mutation, conferring resistance to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, while Y181C, G190A, K103N and V179D/E/F were the most frequent point mutations conferring resistance to the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In addition, the protease inhibitor drug resistance mutations I54V and V82A were identified for the first time in Shandong Province. Primary resistance accounts for 20% of the impact factors for drug resistance. Furthermore, it was found that educational level and treatment regimen were high-risk factors for drug resistance in 2011 (P<0.05), while treatment regimen was a high risk factor for drug resistance in 2012 and 2013 (P<0.05). Among the 106 drug-resistant patients, 77 received immediate adjustment of treatment regimen following testing, and 69 (89.6%) showed a reduction in drug resistance the following year. HIV drug resistance has a low prevalence in Shandong Province. However, patients on second line ART regimens and those with low educational level need continuous monitoring. Active drug resistance testing can effectively prevent the development of drug

  12. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin testing.

    PubMed

    Özsoy, Sevim; İlki, Arzu

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and efficacy of screening stools submitted for C. difficile toxin assay for prevalence of VRE. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 158 stool samples submitted for C. difficile toxin to the Marmara University Microbiology Laboratory, were included in the study. Stool samples were analyzed by enzyme immuno assay test; VIDAS (bioMerieux, France) for Toxin A&B. Samples were inoculated on chromID VRE (bioMerieux, France) and incubated 24h at 37°C. Manuel tests and API20 STREP (bioMerieux, France) test were used to identify the Enterococci species. After the species identification, vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC's were performed by E test and molecular resistance genes for vanA vs vanB were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 158 stool samples, 88 were toxin positive. The prevalence of VRE was 17%(n:19) in toxin positives however, 11.4% in toxin negatives(n:70). All VRE isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium. These results were evaluated according to Fischer's exact chi-square test and p value between VRE colonization and C. difficile toxin positivity was detected 0.047 (p<0.05). PPV and NPV were 79% and 47% respectively. In our study, the presence of VRE in C. difficile toxin positives is statistically significant compared with toxin negatives (p<0.05). Screening for VRE is both additional cost and work load for the laboratories. Therefore VRE screening among C. difficile toxin positive samples, will be cost effective for determination of high risk patients in the hospitals especially for developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. HIV Drug-Resistant Patient Information Management, Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The science of information systems, management, and interpretation plays an important part in the continuity of care of patients. This is becoming more evident in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa. The high replication rates, selective pressure, and initial infection by resistant strains of HIV infer that drug resistance will inevitably become an important health care concern. This paper describes proposed research with the aim of developing a physician-administered, artificial intelligence-based decision support system tool to facilitate the management of patients on antiretroviral therapy. Methods This tool will consist of (1) an artificial intelligence computer program that will determine HIV drug resistance information from genomic analysis; (2) a machine-learning algorithm that can predict future CD4 count information given a genomic sequence; and (3) the integration of these tools into an electronic medical record for storage and management. Conclusion The aim of the project is to create an electronic tool that assists clinicians in managing and interpreting patient information in order to determine the optimal therapy for drug-resistant HIV patients. PMID:23611761

  14. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance Among Jamaican Men Who Have Sex with Men Should Be Prioritized for Reducing HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Ann M.; Nelson, Julie A.E.; Weir, Sharon S.; Figueroa, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is highest among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jamaica but no genotypic data are available on the virus strains that are responsible for the epidemic among this key population. HIV-1 polymerase (pol) genes from 65 MSM were sequenced and used to predict drug resistance mutations. An HIV drug resistance prevalence of 28% (minimum 13%) was observed among this cohort, with the most frequent mutations conferring resistance to efavirenz, nevirapine, and lamivudine. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed 10 times the number of linked HIV infections among this cohort than respondent reporting. HIV treatment and prevention efforts in Jamaica could benefit significantly from Pol genotyping of the HIV strains infecting socially vulnerable MSM prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), as this would guide suppressive ART and unearth HIV transmission clusters to enable more effective delivery of treatment and prevention programs. PMID:26133540

  15. Two cases of possible transmitted drug-resistant HIV: likely HIV superinfection and unmasking of pre-existing resistance.

    PubMed

    Martin, Fabiola; Lee, John; Thomson, Emma; Tarrant, Nick; Hale, Antony; Lacey, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    In the UK, patients undergo HIV viral load and genotype testing before they are prescribed antiretroviral therapy. The genotype test guides clinicians in prescribing antiretroviral therapy with maximum efficacy against the patient's specific viral strain. HIV viral load escape under antiretroviral drug therapy, to which the virus was thought to be genotypically susceptible, is commonly observed in patients with poor adherence. We observed early viral escapes in two-newly diagnosed patients, during antiretroviral treatment, with different sequences compared to their original viral resistance test and who reported excellent adherence to and tolerance of their therapy. HIV superinfection with a new viral strain was identified in a patient with multiple risk factors and co-infections with sexually transmitted infections. The second patient was a case of the emergence of primary resistant virus under drug pressure. Both suppressed their virus promptly after treatment switch. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Transmission of HIV drug resistance: lessons from sensitive screening assays.

    PubMed

    Geretti, Anna Maria; Paredes, Roger; Kozal, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The review discusses new technologies for the sensitive detection of HIV drug resistance, with a focus on applications in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve populations. Conventional sequencing is well established for detecting HIV drug resistance in routine care and guides optimal treatment selection in patients starting ART. Access to conventional sequencing is nearly universal in Western countries, but remains limited in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Technological advances now allow detection of resistance with greatly improved sensitivity compared with conventional sequencing, variably increasing the yield of resistance testing in ART-naïve populations. There is strong cumulative evidence from retrospective studies that sensitive detection of resistant mutants in baseline plasma samples lacking resistance by conventional sequencing more than doubles the risk of virological failure after starting efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based ART. Sensitive resistance testing methods are mainly confined to research applications and in this context have provided great insight into the dynamics of drug resistance development, persistence, and transmission. Adoption in care settings is becoming increasingly possible, although important challenges remain. Platforms for diagnostic use must undergo technical improvements to ensure good performance and ease of use, and clinical validation is required to ensure utility.

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  1. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N; Paredes, Roger; Battegay, Manuel; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Machala, Ladislav; Tomazic, Janez; Girard, Pierre M; Januskevica, Inga; Gronborg-Laut, Kamilla; Lundgren, Jens D; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro

    2015-07-17

    To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. Multinational cohort study. Individuals in EuroSIDA with virological failure (>1 RNA measurement >500 on ART after >6 months on ART) after 1997 were included. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for resistance testing following virological failure and aORs for the detection of resistance among those who had a test were calculated using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Compared to 74.2% of ART-experienced individuals in 1997, only 5.1% showed evidence of virological failure in 2012. The odds of resistance testing declined after 2004 (global P < 0.001). Resistance was detected in 77.9% of the tests, NRTI resistance being most common (70.3%), followed by NNRTI (51.6%) and protease inhibitor (46.1%) resistance. The odds of detecting resistance were lower in tests done in 1997-1998, 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, compared to those carried out in 2003-2004 (global P < 0.001). Resistance testing was less common in Eastern Europe [aOR 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.94] compared to Southern Europe, whereas the detection of resistance given that a test was done was less common in Northern (aOR 0.29, 95% CI 0.21-0.39) and Central Eastern (aOR 0.47, 95% CI 0.29-0.76) Europe, compared to Southern Europe. Despite a concurrent decline in virological failure and testing, drug resistance was commonly detected. This suggests a selective approach to resistance testing. The regional differences identified indicate that policy aiming to minimize the emergence of resistance is of particular relevance in some European regions, notably in the countries in Eastern Europe.

  2. Molecular mechanisms for insulin resistance in treated HIV-infection

    PubMed Central

    Hruz, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms contributing to the high incidence of insulin resistance in HIV infected patients treated with combined antiretroviral therapy remains a critically important goal in the quest to improve the safety of antiretroviral treatment regimens. The use of in vitro model systems together with the investigation of drug-mediated effects on glucose homeostasis in animals and healthy human volunteers has provided important insight into the contribution of individual drugs to insulin resistance and affected cellular pathways. HIV protease inhibitor mediated blockade of glucose transport and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mediated mitochondrial toxicity have been well characterized. Together with growing understanding of mediators of insulin resistance in non-HIV metabolic syndrome, additional cellular effects including the induction of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress, altered adipocytokine secretion, and lipotoxicity have been integrated into this developing picture. Further elucidation of these mechanisms provides potential for the continued development of safer antiviral drugs and targeted treatment of insulin resistance in affected patients. PMID:21663839

  3. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in the cervical mucosa of HIV-1-resistant sex workers.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; Boutilier, Julie; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua; Carpenter, Michael; Westmacott, Garrett; Cheng, Keding; Ball, Terry B; Plummer, Francis

    2008-10-01

    Novel tools are necessary to understand mechanisms of altered susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in women of the Pumwani Sex Worker cohort, Kenya. In this cohort, more than 140 of the 2000 participants have been characterized to be relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. Given that sexual transmission of HIV-1 occurs through mucosal surfaces such as that in the cervicovaginal environment, our hypothesis is that innate immune factors in the genital tract may play a role in HIV-1 infection resistance. Understanding this mechanism may help develop microbicides and/or vaccines against HIV-1. A quantitative proteomics technique (2D-DIGE: two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis) was used to examine cervical mucosa of HIV-1 resistant women ( n = 10) for biomarkers of HIV-1 resistance. Over 15 proteins were found to be differentially expressed between HIV-1-resistant women and control groups ( n = 29), some which show a greater than 8-fold change. HIV-1-resistant women overexpressed several antiproteases, including those from the serpin B family, and also cystatin A, a known anti-HIV-1 factor. Immunoblotting for a selection of the identified proteins confirmed the DIGE volume differences. Validation of these results on a larger sample of individuals will provide further evidence these biomarkers are associated with HIV-1 resistance and could help aid in the development of effective microbicides against HIV-1.

  4. IFN-λ Inhibits Drug-Resistant HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, He; Liu, Man-Qing; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Run-Hong; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated to inhibit a number of viruses, including HIV. Here, we further examined the anti-HIV effect of IFN-λs in macrophages. We found that IFN-λs synergistically enhanced anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals [azidothymidine (AZT), efavirenz, indinavir, and enfuvirtide] in infected macrophages. Importantly, IFN-λs could suppress HIV infection of macrophages with the drug-resistant strains, including AZT-resistant virus (A012) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant virus (TC49). Mechanistically, IFN-λs were able to induce the expression of several important anti-HIV cellular factors, including myxovirus resistance 2 (Mx2), a newly identified HIV post-entry inhibitor and tetherin, a restriction factor that blocks HIV release from infected cells. These observations provide additional evidence to support the potential use of IFN-λs as therapeutics agents for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:28321215

  5. Linking HIV and antiretroviral drug resistance surveillance in Peru: a model for a third-generation HIV sentinel surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lama, Javier R; Sanchez, Jorge; Suarez, Luis; Caballero, Patricia; Laguna, Alberto; Sanchez, Jose L; Whittington, William L H; Celum, Connie; Grant, Robert M

    2006-08-01

    HIV drug resistance surveillance is limited by recruitment and selection bias and by limited information regarding HIV incidence rates, secondary resistance, and treatment prevalence. A second-generation HIV sentinel surveillance among men who have sex with men (MSM), regardless of prior history of HIV screening, serostatus, or treatment, was conducted in Peru in 2002. Recent HIV infection was estimated using sensitive/less sensitive enzyme immunoassay testing. Genotypic resistance testing was performed. HIV prevalence was 13.9% (456 HIV positive of 3280 participants). HIV incidence was estimated to be 5.1 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval: 3.1-8.3). Among 143 MSM who were aware of their HIV infection before testing, only 20 (14.0%) were receiving antiretrovirals (ARV). Mutations conferring ARV resistance were found in 12 (3.3%) of 359 treatment-naive and 5 (31.3%) of 16 treatment-experienced participants with successful genotyping. One recently infected man from Lima demonstrated 3-class multidrug resistance. The most frequently observed mutations in treatment-naive, chronically infected persons from Lima were M184V (1.7%), D30N (1.3%), L90M (1.3%), and L10I (1.3%). The prevalence of ARV resistance among treatment-naive MSM in Peru is low, reflecting limited access to treatment before 2004, and contrasts with the history of ARV treatment in developed countries, where high levels of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance occurred before introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Linking ARV resistance and HIV sentinel surveillance in developing settings is feasible and should be considered in third-generation HIV sentinel surveillance programs.

  6. Predominance of CRF06_cpx and Transmitted HIV Resistance in Algeria: Update 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Abdellaziz, Akila; Papuchon, Jennifer; Khaled, Safia; Ouerdane, Dalila; Fleury, Hervé; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Since 2008, no data on HIV diversity or the transmission rate of HIV resistance mutations in naive patients have been presented for Algeria, a country of MENA region. Between 2013 and 2014, we studied 152 samples including 89 naive patients. The current study describes the change in HIV diversity in Algeria with the predominance of CRF06_cpx and the huge increase of transmitted HIV resistance, which now reaches 15%.

  7. Drug resistant HIV: Behaviors and characteristics among Los Angeles men who have sex with men with new HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Pamina M; Javanbakht, Marjan; Bornfleth, Lorelei; Bolan, Robert K; Lewis Blum, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology of drug resistant HIV has focused on trends and less attention has been given to identification of factors, especially behaviors including substance use, in acquisition of drug-resistant HIV. From 2009 to 2012 The Metromates Study enrolled and followed for one year men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking testing for HIV in a community clinic in Los Angeles assessing those testing positive for acute and recent HIV infection. Behavioral data were collected via Computer-Assisted Self-Interview from 125 classified as newly HIV infected and 91 as chronically infected (newly HIV-diagnosed); specimens were available and viable for resistance testing for 154 of the 216 HIV positives with new diagnoses. In this community clinic we found prevalence of resistance among MSM with new HIV-diagnosis was 19.5% (n = 30/154) with no difference by recency of HIV infection. Sexual partnership characteristics were associated with resistance; those who reported transgendered sex partners had a higher prevalence of resistance as compared to those who did not report transgendered sex partners (40% vs. 17%; p value = 0.04), while those who reported having a main partner had a lower prevalence of drug resistance (12% vs. 24%; p value = 0.07). In multivariable analyses adjusting for HIV recency and antiviral use, reporting a main partner decreased odds [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-0.87], reporting a transgendered partnered increased odds (AOR = 3.37; 95% CI 0.95-12.43); and being African American increased odds of drug resistance (AOR = 5.63, 95%CI 1.41-22.38). This suggests African American MSM and TG individuals in Los Angeles represent pockets of exceptional risk that will require special approaches to prevention and care to enhance their own health and reduce their likelihood to support transmission of drug resistance in the US.

  8. Drug resistant HIV: Behaviors and characteristics among Los Angeles men who have sex with men with new HIV diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Javanbakht, Marjan; Bornfleth, Lorelei; Bolan, Robert K.; Lewis Blum, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology of drug resistant HIV has focused on trends and less attention has been given to identification of factors, especially behaviors including substance use, in acquisition of drug-resistant HIV. From 2009 to 2012 The Metromates Study enrolled and followed for one year men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking testing for HIV in a community clinic in Los Angeles assessing those testing positive for acute and recent HIV infection. Behavioral data were collected via Computer-Assisted Self-Interview from 125 classified as newly HIV infected and 91 as chronically infected (newly HIV-diagnosed); specimens were available and viable for resistance testing for 154 of the 216 HIV positives with new diagnoses. In this community clinic we found prevalence of resistance among MSM with new HIV-diagnosis was 19.5% (n = 30/154) with no difference by recency of HIV infection. Sexual partnership characteristics were associated with resistance; those who reported transgendered sex partners had a higher prevalence of resistance as compared to those who did not report transgendered sex partners (40% vs. 17%; p value = 0.04), while those who reported having a main partner had a lower prevalence of drug resistance (12% vs. 24%; p value = 0.07). In multivariable analyses adjusting for HIV recency and antiviral use, reporting a main partner decreased odds [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13–0.87], reporting a transgendered partnered increased odds (AOR = 3.37; 95% CI 0.95–12.43); and being African American increased odds of drug resistance (AOR = 5.63, 95%CI 1.41–22.38). This suggests African American MSM and TG individuals in Los Angeles represent pockets of exceptional risk that will require special approaches to prevention and care to enhance their own health and reduce their likelihood to support transmission of drug resistance in the US. PMID:28333950

  9. Fidelity of classwide-resistant HIV-2 reverse transcriptase and differential contribution of K65R to the accuracy of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptases

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Mar; Sebastián-Martín, Alba; García-Marquina, Guillermo; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors constitute the backbone of current therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively). However, mutational pathways leading to the development of nucleoside analogue resistance are different in both types of HIV. In HIV-2, resistance to all approved nucleoside analogues is conferred by the combination of RT substitutions K65R, Q151M and M184V. Nucleotide incorporation kinetic analyses of mutant and wild-type (WT) HIV-2 RTs show that the triple-mutant has decreased catalytic efficiency due to the presence of M184V. Although similar effects were previously reported for equivalent mutations in HIV-1 RT, the HIV-2 enzymes were catalytically less efficient. Interestingly, in highly divergent HIV-1 RTs, K65R confers several-fold increased accuracy of DNA synthesis. We have determined the intrinsic fidelity of DNA synthesis of WT HIV-2 RT and mutants K65R and K65R/Q151M/M184V. Our results show that those changes in HIV-2 RT have a relatively small impact on nucleotide selectivity. Furthermore, we found that there were less than two-fold differences in error rates obtained with forward mutation assays using mutant and WT HIV-2 RTs. A different conformation of the β3-β4 hairpin loop in HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs could probably explain the differential effects of K65R. PMID:28333133

  10. Fidelity of classwide-resistant HIV-2 reverse transcriptase and differential contribution of K65R to the accuracy of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Mar; Sebastián-Martín, Alba; García-Marquina, Guillermo; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2017-03-23

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors constitute the backbone of current therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively). However, mutational pathways leading to the development of nucleoside analogue resistance are different in both types of HIV. In HIV-2, resistance to all approved nucleoside analogues is conferred by the combination of RT substitutions K65R, Q151M and M184V. Nucleotide incorporation kinetic analyses of mutant and wild-type (WT) HIV-2 RTs show that the triple-mutant has decreased catalytic efficiency due to the presence of M184V. Although similar effects were previously reported for equivalent mutations in HIV-1 RT, the HIV-2 enzymes were catalytically less efficient. Interestingly, in highly divergent HIV-1 RTs, K65R confers several-fold increased accuracy of DNA synthesis. We have determined the intrinsic fidelity of DNA synthesis of WT HIV-2 RT and mutants K65R and K65R/Q151M/M184V. Our results show that those changes in HIV-2 RT have a relatively small impact on nucleotide selectivity. Furthermore, we found that there were less than two-fold differences in error rates obtained with forward mutation assays using mutant and WT HIV-2 RTs. A different conformation of the β3-β4 hairpin loop in HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs could probably explain the differential effects of K65R.

  11. [Pathological neocortical findings in patients with medication-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy submitted to surgery].

    PubMed

    Estupiñán-Díaz, B; Morales-Chacón, L M; Lorigados-Pedre, L; García-Maeso, I; Bender-del Busto, J E; Trápaga-Quincoses, O; Hidalgo-Portal, L; García-Navarro, M E; Sánchez-Coroneaux, A; Orozco-Suárez, S

    The dual pathology consisting of hippocampal sclerosis plus focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often reported in patients with medication-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). To determine the histopathological changes that take place in the neocortex of patients with medication-resistant MTLE submitted to surgery and to evaluate the relation between the histopathological changes, pathological background and the clinical course of patients who had received surgical treatment. Tissue obtained by en bloc resection from the neocortex of 18 patients with MTLE refractory to medical treatment was processed histologically and a tailored temporal lobectomy was performed with electrocorticography. Dual pathology was diagnosed in 13 patients (72.2%). Imaging studies confirmed the existence of mesial sclerosis of the temporal in 100% of cases and there was no evidence of neocortical lesions. Histologically, 46.15% and 38.46% of the patients were diagnosed as belonging to FCD type 1a and FCD type 1b, respectively. Only one patient presented FCD type 2a. A statistically significant relation was found between the presence of dual pathology and the existence of an early precipitating injury (p = 0.04). One year after surgery, 72.7% (8/11) patients with dual pathology were classified as belonging to Engel class I. In patients with MTLE there are microscopic FCD-type alterations in the neocortex. There is an association between these alterations and the existence of an initial precipitating injury. Complete resection of the epileptogenic area, which is guaranteed by the lobectomy tailored by electrocorticography, allows patients to enjoy a favourable post-surgical progression one year after surgery.

  12. Recovery of airflow resistivity of poroelastic beams submitted to transient mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogam, Erick

    2013-01-01

    The airflow resistivities of air-saturated poroelastic slender beams submitted to transient mechanical stress are recovered using fluid and solid borne compressional mode phase velocity expressions drawn from a modified Biot theory. A point where the two dilatational modes intersect and their phase velocities equal is first sought. This point also corresponds to the Biot transitional frequency indicating the frequency at which the solid and the pore fluid start disassociating due to the weakening of the viscous forces by the thinning of the viscous boundary layer in the pores. A bilinear time-frequency (TF) distribution is used to represent on the time-frequency plane, the captured transient mechanical stress waves from which the point of intersection/separation of the two modes is located. The projection of the Eigenfrequencies obtained from a simple 3D finite element modeling of the thin poroelastic beam, on a (TF) diagram, facilitates the identification of the modes. The transition frequencies for the poroelastic beams thus retrieved are verified through the use of variable frequency, single cycle sine wave bursts. The anisotropy of the foams are also revealed by analyzing the transient responses of the poroelastic beam specimens cut from the same panel but in two perpendicular directions in orientation to each other.

  13. Brief Report: HIV Drug Resistance in Adults Failing Early Antiretroviral Treatment: Results From the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 Trial.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Jessica M; Hudelson, Sarah E; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi C; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Santos, Breno R; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350-550 cells per cubic millimeter and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7 of 8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts.

  14. Extracting causal relations on HIV drug resistance from literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In HIV treatment it is critical to have up-to-date resistance data of applicable drugs since HIV has a very high rate of mutation. These data are made available through scientific publications and must be extracted manually by experts in order to be used by virologists and medical doctors. Therefore there is an urgent need for a tool that partially automates this process and is able to retrieve relations between drugs and virus mutations from literature. Results In this work we present a novel method to extract and combine relationships between HIV drugs and mutations in viral genomes. Our extraction method is based on natural language processing (NLP) which produces grammatical relations and applies a set of rules to these relations. We applied our method to a relevant set of PubMed abstracts and obtained 2,434 extracted relations with an estimated performance of 84% for F-score. We then combined the extracted relations using logistic regression to generate resistance values for each pair. The results of this relation combination show more than 85% agreement with the Stanford HIVDB for the ten most frequently occurring mutations. The system is used in 5 hospitals from the Virolab project http://www.virolab.org to preselect the most relevant novel resistance data from literature and present those to virologists and medical doctors for further evaluation. Conclusions The proposed relation extraction and combination method has a good performance on extracting HIV drug resistance data. It can be used in large-scale relation extraction experiments. The developed methods can also be applied to extract other type of relations such as gene-protein, gene-disease, and disease-mutation. PMID:20178611

  15. HIV, transmitted drug resistance, and the paradox of preexposure prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Supervie, Virginie; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Heneine, Walid; Blower, Sally

    2010-01-01

    The administration of antiretrovirals before HIV exposure to prevent infection (i.e., preexposure prophylaxis; PrEP) is under evaluation in clinical trials. Because PrEP is based on antiretrovirals, there is considerable concern that it could substantially increase transmitted resistance, particularly in resource-rich countries. Here we use a mathematical model to predict the effect of PrEP interventions on the HIV epidemic in the men-who-have-sex-with-men community in San Francisco. The model is calibrated using Monte Carlo filtering and analyzed by constructing nonlinear response hypersurfaces. We predict PrEP interventions could substantially reduce transmission but significantly increase the proportion of new infections caused by resistant strains. Two mechanisms can cause this increase. If risk compensation occurs, the proportion increases due to increasing transmission of resistant strains and decreasing transmission of wild-type strains. If risk behavior remains stable, the increase occurs because of reduced transmission of resistant strains coupled with an even greater reduction in transmission of wild-type strains. We define this as the paradox of PrEP (i.e., resistance appears to be increasing, but is actually decreasing). We determine this paradox is likely to occur if the efficacy of PrEP regimens against wild-type strains is greater than 30% and the relative efficacy against resistant strains is greater than 0.2 but less than the efficacy against wild-type. Our modeling shows, if risk behavior increases, that it is a valid concern that PrEP could significantly increase transmitted resistance. However, if risk behavior remains stable, we find the concern is unfounded and PrEP interventions are likely to decrease transmitted resistance. PMID:20616092

  16. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M; Myatt, Mark; Hearps, Anna C; Jordan, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented.

  17. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A.; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Myatt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Methods Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. Results The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. Conclusions The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented. PMID:28146591

  18. Impact of HIV-1 group O genetic diversity on genotypic resistance interpretation by algorithms designed for HIV-1 group M.

    PubMed

    Depatureaux, Agnès; Charpentier, Charlotte; Leoz, Marie; Unal, Guillemette; Damond, Florence; Kfutwah, Anfunbom; Vessière, Aurélia; Simon, François; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2011-02-01

    HIV-1 group O (HIV-O) is characterized by a high genetic divergence from HIV-1 group M viruses. Little is known about the therapeutic impact of this diversity. The aim of this study was to assess in a large series of samples (1) the genotypic impact of natural polymorphism of the HIV-O reverse transcriptase and protease genes; and (2) the predictive value of resistance interpretation algorithms developed for HIV-1 group M when used for highly mutated HIV-O viruses. Sixty-eight antiretroviral-naive and 9 highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-O-infected patients were included. The viruses were sequenced and resistance-associated mutations were identified using 3 different algorithms (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les hépatites virales, Rega, Stanford). All HIV-O samples naturally exhibited the A98G and V179E resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase region; 54% of samples presented the Y181C mutation, conferring resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Twelve minor resistance mutations, present in more than 75% of the protease sequences, led to the different algorithms giving discrepant results for nelfinavir and saquinavir susceptibility. A marked virological response was observed in 8 of the 9 antiretroviral-experienced patients, despite the prediction of limited activity of the combination for 5 to 8 patients according to the algorithm used. The high level of natural polymorphism in HIV-O genes, and the important discrepancies between genotypic resistance interpretation and the virological response, emphasize the need for resistance algorithm rules better adapted to HIV-O.

  19. Antiretroviral prophylaxis of perinatal HIV-1 transmission and the potential impact of antiretroviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Monica; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2002-06-01

    Since 1994, trials of zidovudine, zidovudine and lamivudine, and nevirapine have demonstrated that these antiretroviral drugs can substantially reduce the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. With reductions in drug price, identification of simple, effective antiretroviral regimens to prevent perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and an increasing international commitment to support health care infrastructure, antiretrovirals for both perinatal HIV-1 prevention and HIV-1 treatment will likely become more widely available to HIV-1-infected persons in resource-limited countries. In the United States, widespread antiretroviral usage has been associated with increased antiretroviral drug resistance. This raises concern that drug resistance may reduce the effectiveness of perinatal antiretroviral prophylaxis as well as therapeutic intervention strategies. The purpose of this article is to review what is known about resistance and risk of perinatal HIV transmission, assess the interaction between antiretroviral resistance and the prevention of perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and discuss implications for current global prevention and treatment strategies.

  20. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study.

    PubMed

    Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick C K; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K C; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-04-15

    Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia.

  1. Primary HIV drug resistance and efficacy of first-line antiretroviral therapy guided by resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Oette, Mark; Kaiser, Rolf; Däumer, Martin; Petch, Ruth; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Carls, Horst; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Schmalöer, Dirk; Stechel, Jürgen; Feldt, Torsten; Pfister, Herbert; Häussinger, Dieter

    2006-04-15

    Primary HIV drug resistance has been associated with poor treatment outcome of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in several trials. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of first-line HAART guided by resistance testing. In a prospective multicenter study in the state of Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, chronically HIV-infected patients underwent genotypic resistance testing and were monitored for 48 weeks after initiation of HAART. Primary drug resistance was found in 30 of 269 patients entering the study between January 2001 and December 2003 [11.2%; 95% confidence interval, 7.4-14.9]. In intent-to-treat analysis, the proportion of patients with viral load below 50 copies/mL after 24 and 48 weeks was 70.0% and 66.7%, respectively, in patients with resistance and 74.1% and 73.6%, respectively, in patients without (P = 0.66 and 0.51). In on-treatment analysis, the proportions were 80.8% and 83.3%, respectively, in patients with resistance and 81.9% and 85.0%, respectively, in patients without (P= 0.79 and 0.77). These results were also valid considering a detection limit of 400 copies/mL. The prevalence of primary drug resistance was 11.2% in chronically HIV-infected patients. HAART guided by resistance testing had similar efficacy in patients with primary drug resistance as compared with patients with wild-type virus. Based on these facts, resistance-adapted first-line HAART is suggested as routine practice.

  2. From 'half-dead' to being 'free': resistance to HIV stigma, self-disclosure and support for PMTCT/HIV care among couples living with HIV in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Sydney A; Abuogi, Lisa L; Akama, Eliud; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Helova, Anna; Musoke, Pamela; Nalwa, Wafula Z; Odeny, Thomas A; Onono, Maricianah; Wanga, Iris; Turan, Janet M

    2017-08-16

    In sub-Saharan Africa, self-disclosure of HIV-positive status may be a pivotal action for improving access to prevention of mother-to-child transmission services. However, understanding of HIV stigma and disclosure, and their effects on demand for care remains incomplete - particularly in the current context of new antiretroviral therapy guidelines. The purpose of this study was to explore these issues among self-disclosed couples living in southwest Kenya. We conducted 38 in-depth interviews with HIV-positive pregnant or postpartum women and their male partners. Of the 19 couples, 10 were HIV seroconcordant and 9 were serodiscordant. The textual analysis showed that HIV stigma continues to restrict full participation in community life and limit access to care by promoting fear, isolation and self-censorship. Against this backdrop, however, participants' narratives revealed varying forms and degrees of resistance to HIV stigma, which appeared to both produce and emerge from acts of self-disclosure. Such disclosure enabled participants to overcome fears and gain critical support for engaging in HIV care while further resisting HIV stigma. These findings suggest that programme interventions designed explicitly to stimulate and support processes of HIV stigma resistance and safe self-disclosure may be key to improving demand for and retention in HIV services.

  3. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  4. Profile of the HIV Epidemic in Cape Verde: Molecular Epidemiology and Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected Patients from Distinct Islands of the Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M.; Guimarães, Monick L.; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010–2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1–75) and 47 (IQR = 12–84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be

  5. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    PubMed

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented.

  6. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy.

  7. HIV drug resistance in adults failing early antiretroviral treatment: results from the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Jessica M.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi Cindy; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Santos, Breno Riegel; Godbole, Sheela V.; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Chen, Ying Q.; Cohen, Myron S.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2016-01-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HPTN 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350–550 cells/mm3 and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7/8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts. PMID:26859828

  8. Genetic diversity and drug resistance profiles in HIV type 1- and HIV type 2-infected patients from Cape Verde Islands.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vânia; Bártolo, Inês; Borrego, Pedro; Rocha, Cheila; Valadas, Emília; Barreto, Jorge; Almeida, Elsa; Antunes, Francisco; Taveira, Nuno

    2012-05-01

    Our aim was to characterize for the first time the genetic diversity of HIV in Cape Verde Islands as well as the drug resistance profiles in treated and untreated patients. Blood specimens were collected from 41 HIV-1 and 14 HIV-2 patients living in Santiago Island. Half of the patients were on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Pol and env gene sequences were obtained using in-house methods. Phylogenetic analysis was used for viral subtyping and the Stanford Algorithm was used for resistance genotyping. For HIV-1, the amplification of pol and env was possible in 27 patients (66%). HIV-1 patients were infected with subtypes G (13, 48%), B (2, 7%), F1 (2, 7%), and CRF02_AG (2, 7%), and complex recombinant forms including a new C/G variant (n=8, 30%). Drug resistance mutations were detected in the PR and RT of three (10%) treated patients. M41L and K103N transmitted drug resistance mutations were found in 2 of 17 (12%) untreated patients. All 14 HIV-2 isolates belonged to group A. The origin of 12 strains was impossible to determine whereas two strains were closely related to the historic ROD strain. In conclusion, in Cape Verde there is a long-standing HIV-2 epidemic rooted in ROD-like strains and a more recent epidemic of unknown origin. The HIV-1 epidemic is caused by multiple subtypes and complex recombinant forms. Drug resistance HIV-1 strains are present at moderate levels in both treated and untreated patients. Close surveillance in these two populations is crucial to prevent further transmission of drug-resistant strains.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of bovine Salmonella enterica isolates submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory: 2006-2015.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, J R; Sethi, A K; Aulik, N A; Poulsen, K P

    2017-02-01

    Salmonellosis on the dairy continues to have a significant effect on animal health and productivity and in the United States. Additionally, Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica causes an estimated 1.2 million cases of human illness annually. Contributing to the morbidity and mortality in both human and domestic animal species is emergence of antimicrobial resistance by Salmonella species and increased incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates. This study describes serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns for various Salmonella serotypes isolated from bovine samples submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (WVDL) over the past 10 yr. Salmonella serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing data were obtained from the laboratory information management system at WVDL. Data from accessions were limited to bovine samples submitted to the WVDL between January 2006 and June 2015 and those that had both a definitive serotype and complete results for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 4,976 isolates were identified. Salmonella enterica ser. Dublin was the most prevalent serotype identified among bovine samples submitted to the WVDL, accounting for a total of 1,153 isolates (23% of total isolates) over the study period. Along with Dublin, Salmonella enterica ser. Cerro (795, 16%), Newport (720, 14%), Montevideo (421, 8%), Kentucky (419, 8%), and Typhimurium (202, 4%) comprised the top 6 most commonly isolated serotypes during that time. Overall, resistance of bovine Salmonella isolates in the study population remained stable, although decreases in resistance were noted for gentamicin, neomycin, and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole during the study period. All isolates remained susceptible to enrofloxacin. These data show that antimicrobial susceptibility for bovine Salmonella has changed in the population served by WVDL in the past 10 yr. This information is important for understanding Salmonella disease ecology in

  10. Transmitted drug resistance in patients with acute/recent HIV infection in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Cristina G; Coelho, Lara E; Grinsztejn, Eduarda; Jesus, Carlos S de; Guimarães, Monick L; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Cardoso, Sandra W

    The widespread use of antiretroviral therapy increased the transmission of antiretroviral resistant HIV strains. Antiretroviral therapy initiation during acute/recent HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and improves immune response in HIV infected individuals. Transmitted drug resistance may jeopardize the early goals of early antiretroviral treatment among acute/recent HIV infected patients. Patients with acute/recent HIV infection who underwent resistance test before antiretroviral treatment initiation were included in this analysis. HIV-1 sequences were obtained using an in house protease/reverse transcriptase genotyping assay. Transmitted drug resistance was identified according to the Stanford HIV Database for Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations, based on WHO 2009 surveillance list, and HIV-1 subtyping according to Rega HIV-1 subtyping tool. Comparison between patients with and without transmitted drug resistance was made using Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests. Forty-three patients were included, 13 with acute HIV infection and 30 with recent HIV infection. The overall transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 16.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.1-30.0%). The highest prevalence of resistance (11.6%, 95% CI: 8.1-24.5) was against non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and K103N was the most frequently identified mutation. The high prevalence of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors resistance indicates that efavirenz-based regimen without prior resistance testing is not ideal for acutely/recently HIV-infected individuals in our setting. In this context, the recent proposal of including integrase inhibitors as a first line regimen in Brazil could be an advantage for the treatment of newly HIV infected individuals. However, it also poses a new challenge, since integrase resistance test is not routinely performed for antiretroviral naive individuals. Further studies on transmitted drug resistance among acutely/recently HIV-infected are

  11. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a...

  12. HIV Resistance and Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission Regimen in HIV-Infected Infants in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Dow, Dorothy E; Schimana, Werner; Nyombi, Balthazar M; Mmbaga, Blandina T; Shayo, Aisa M; Bartlett, John A; Massambu, Charles G; Kifaro, Emmanuel G; Turner, Elizabeth L; DeMarco, Todd; Cai, Fangping; Cunningham, Coleen K; Buchanan, Ann M

    2017-10-05

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) guidelines recommend that all HIV-infected pregnant women receive antiretroviral therapy (Option B) and HIV-infected infants should initiate therapy with a protease inhibitor-based regimen; however, implementation of these guidelines has lagged in many resource-limited settings. Tanzania only recently implemented these guidelines with little country-specific data to inform whether HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance was present among infected infants under the Option A guidelines. This study aimed to identify primary resistance mutations in HIV-infected infants and to identify risk of nevirapine (NVP) resistance based on maternal and infant NVP exposure. Infant dried blood spots (DBSs) were sent to the zonal reference laboratory at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre Clinical Laboratory and underwent DNA polymerase chain reaction testing for HIV as standard of care. Using the clinical laboratory registry, HIV-positive DBS cards, stored at ambient temperature, were identified and sent for further viral load testing, nucleotide sequencing, and analysis. Clinical information was obtained from the PMTCT clinical sites and the National PMTCT registry for information regarding maternal and infant demographics and PMTCT treatment regimen. Results demonstrated that infants exposed to NVP were more likely to have high level resistance mutations (HLRMs) to NVP than those infants not exposed to NVP (p = .002). The most common HLRMs to NVP were K103 N, Y181C, and Y188 L. HIV subtype A was most common, followed by subtype C. Approximately one-third of HIV-infected infants had documented referral to HIV care. This study demonstrated the ongoing need to scale up and strengthen points along the PMTCT continuum and supported the recommendation for all HIV-infected infants to initiate a lopinavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral therapy regimen.

  13. HIV type 1 drug resistance among naive patients from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Morella; Masquelier, Bernard; Moreno, Melcenia; Deibis, Leopoldo; De Pérez, Gloria Echeverría; Fleury, Herve; Castro, Erika

    2007-03-01

    In this study, we characterize proviral DNA of 20 HIV-1 asymptomatic antiretroviral-naive patients from Venezuela in env, gag, and pol genes regions. Results from both env/gag HMA subtyping and phylogenetic analysis of pol partial sequences led to the description of clade B in all cases. Nevertheless, the high prevalence of polymorphisms was particularly evident among the protease sequences. A 10% prevalence of major resistance mutations to RTIs was found. Our data also suggested that the protease polymorphisms I62T and V77T could be considered as molecular markers of the subtype B local epidemic. In addition, we show how proviral DNA can be used as a reliable tool to follow trends of resistance mutation transmission.

  14. Prevalence of HIV-1 resistant strains in recent seroconverters.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Gori, A; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Senese, D; Dehò, L; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-nine HIV-1 recently infected subjects were retrospectively studied to investigate both the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection and the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in protease inhibitor (PI)-naive patients. Neither HIV-1 plasma viremia nor CD4 absolute count at baseline could distinguish patients with NRTI pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus. An increasing proportion of ZDV-related mutations was observed over time with an overall frequency of 20.7% in the study period. Only 1 out of 6 patients (16.7%) with ZDV-related mutations showed a phenotypically ZDV resistant isolate. A striking proportion of polymorphic changes was present in the protease region of pol gene in newly infected individuals. As many as 80% of seroconverters presented at least one naturally occurring substitution. Some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. Their role following PI administration remains to be elucidated. Our data suggest that the choice of drugs should be oriented by both genotypic and phenotypic evaluations to tailor individual regimens in seroconverters.

  15. Genotypic resistance tests in the management of the HIV-infected patient at virological failure.

    PubMed

    Aceti, Antonio; Carosi, Giampiero

    2003-01-01

    Witness for the prosecution: The IAS-USA and Euro-Resistance Group HIV guidelines recommend the use of resistance testing for all patients experiencing treatment failure for whom therapy change is being considered. However, these assays suffer from several limitations (problems in sensitivity, specificity, complexity of interpretation, cost) and the results of the prospective studies evaluating genotype-guided treatment in HIV patients failing antiretroviral treatment are inconclusive and partially contrasting (virological benefit is short-term). On this basis, incorporating genotypic resistance assays into the clinical management of HIV patients experiencing first treatment failure is not a sufficiently evidence-based practice. Witness for the defence: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has markedly improved the prognosis of HIV-infected patients by controlling HIV replication. However, HAART fails to control HIV replication in an increasing number of patients as a result of a complex array of causes. There is now substantial evidence that the emergence of drug resistance is a leading cause (as well as consequence) of antiretroviral therapy failure. Moreover, HIV drug resistance can be transmitted and this can favour initial treatment failure. Several retrospective and prospective studies have indicated that both genotypic and phenotypic HIV-1 drug resistance testing results are associated with, or predictive of, the virological outcome. As a consequence, international guidelines have soundly recommended the use of resistance testing to guide treatment choices after virological failure. The rationale and advantages of using such testing after first virological failure will be discussed.

  16. Routine surveillance for the detection of acute and recent HIV infections and transmission of antiretroviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Grant, Robert M; McFarland, Willi; Kellogg, Timothy; Kent, Charlotte; Louie, Brian; Wong, Ernest; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2006-11-14

    To estimate the rate of acute and recent HIV infections and the prevalence of primary antiretroviral resistance. A consecutive sample of individuals presenting for HIV testing at the San Francisco municipal sexually transmitted diseased (STD) clinic in 2004 (n = 3789). HIV antibody-positive specimens were screened by BED IgG capture enzyme immunoassay to identify recent infections. HIV antibody-negative specimens were screened by nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) to detect acute infections. Newly detected infections were genotyped to detect primary antiretroviral resistance. There were 11 acute and 44 recent HIV infections among the total 136 newly detected cases. NAAT increased case identification by 8.08% over standard antibody testing. Acute HIV infections were associated with having a known HIV-positive partner, and a history of hepatitis B, syphilis, and chlamydia. The prevalence of primary antiretroviral resistance was 13.2%, with drug-resistant mutations detected in 17 of 129 cases genotyped. Mutations conferring resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) were present in 11 of 17 cases. The integration of HIV nucleic acid amplification, recent infection, and antiretroviral resistance testing enhanced HIV/STD surveillance. The high proportion of NNRTI mutations detected suggests they may be more common in source partners or more fit for transmission than other forms of drug-resistant HIV-1. Primary antiretroviral resistance monitoring in STD clinic patients may guide the selection of treatment and post-exposure prophylaxis regimens active against viruses being transmitted in the community, and provide health departments with surveillance data in a sentinel population at risk of HIV transmission.

  17. Generation of Rhesus Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Clones That Are Resistant to Major Anti-HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nomaguchi, Masako; Yokoyama, Masaru; Kono, Ken; Nakayama, Emi E.; Shioda, Tatsuo; Doi, Naoya; Fujiwara, Sachi; Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Ryo, Akihide; Ode, Hirotaka; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in macaque cells is restricted mainly by antiviral cellular APOBEC3, TRIM5α/TRIM5CypA, and tetherin proteins. For basic and clinical HIV-1/AIDS studies, efforts to construct macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) have been made by us and others. Although rhesus macaques are commonly and successfully used as infection models, no HIV-1 derivatives suitable for in vivo rhesus research are available to date. In this study, to obtain novel HIV-1mt clones that are resistant to major restriction factors, we altered Gag and Vpu of our best HIV-1mt clone described previously. First, by sequence- and structure-guided mutagenesis, three amino acid residues in Gag-capsid (CA) (M94L/R98S/G114Q) were found to be responsible for viral growth enhancement in a macaque cell line. Results of in vitro TRIM5α susceptibility testing of HIV-1mt carrying these substitutions correlated well with the increased viral replication potential in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different TRIM5 alleles, suggesting that the three amino acids in HIV-1mt CA are involved in the interaction with TRIM5α. Second, we replaced the transmembrane domain of Vpu of this clone with the corresponding region of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgsn166 Vpu. The resultant clone, MN4/LSDQgtu, was able to antagonize macaque but not human tetherin, and its Vpu effectively functioned during viral replication in a macaque cell line. Notably, MN4/LSDQgtu grew comparably to SIVmac239 and much better than any of our other HIV-1mt clones in rhesus macaque PBMCs. In sum, MN4/LSDQgtu is the first HIV-1 derivative that exhibits resistance to the major restriction factors in rhesus macaque cells. PMID:23966385

  18. Modeling HIV-1 Drug Resistance as Episodic Directional Selection

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Ben; de Oliveira, Tulio; Seebregts, Chris; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Scheffler, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS) which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:22589711

  19. Moderate Levels of Pre-Treatment HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Detected in the First South African National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Steegen, Kim; Carmona, Sergio; Bronze, Michelle; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; van Zyl, Gert; Goedhals, Dominique; MacLeod, William; Sanne, Ian; Stevens, Wendy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to assess the level of transmitted and/or pre-treatment antiretroviral drug resistance to HIV-1, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that regular surveys are conducted. This study’s objective was to assess the frequency of HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance in patients initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the public sector throughout South Africa. Methods A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted using probability proportional to size sampling. This method ensured that samples from each province were proportionally collected, based on the number of patients receiving ART in each region. Samples were collected between March 2013 and October 2014. Pol sequences were obtained using RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing and submitted to the Stanford Calibrated Population Resistance tool v6.0. Results A total of 277 sequences were available for analysis. Most participants were female (58.8%) and the median age was 34 years (IQR: 29–42). The median baseline CD4-count was 149 cells/mm3 (IQR: 62–249) and, based on self-reporting, participants had been diagnosed as HIV-positive approximately 44 days prior to sample collection (IQR: 23–179). Subtyping revealed that 98.2% were infected with HIV-1 subtype C. Overall, 25 out of 277 patients presented with ≥1 surveillance drug resistance mutation (SDRM, 9.0%, 95% CI: 6.1–13.0%). Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations were the most numerous mutations detected (n = 23). Only two patients presented with a protease inhibitor (PI) mutation. In four patients ≥4 SDRMs were detected, which might indicate that these patients were not truly ART-naïve or were infected with a multi-resistant virus. Conclusions These results show that the level of antiretroviral drug resistance in ART-naïve South Africans has reached moderate levels, as per the WHO classification. Therefore, regular surveys of pre-treatment drug resistance levels in all regions of South Africa

  20. Implementing antiretroviral resistance testing in a primary health care HIV treatment programme in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: early experiences, achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lessells, Richard J; Stott, Katharine E; Manasa, Justen; Naidu, Kevindra K; Skingsley, Andrew; Rossouw, Theresa; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-03-07

    Antiretroviral drug resistance is becoming increasingly common with the expansion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment programmes in high prevalence settings. Genotypic resistance testing could have benefit in guiding individual-level treatment decisions but successful models for delivering resistance testing in low- and middle-income countries have not been reported. An HIV Treatment Failure Clinic model was implemented within a large primary health care HIV treatment programme in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Genotypic resistance testing was offered to adults (≥16 years) with virological failure on first-line antiretroviral therapy (one viral load >1000 copies/ml after at least 12 months on a standard first-line regimen). A genotypic resistance test report was generated with treatment recommendations from a specialist HIV clinician and sent to medical officers at the clinics who were responsible for patient management. A quantitative process evaluation was conducted to determine how the model was implemented and to provide feedback regarding barriers and challenges to delivery. A total of 508 specimens were submitted for genotyping between 8 April 2011 and 31 January 2013; in 438 cases (86.2%) a complete genotype report with recommendations from the specialist clinician was sent to the medical officer. The median turnaround time from specimen collection to receipt of final report was 18 days (interquartile range (IQR) 13-29). In 114 (26.0%) cases the recommended treatment differed from what would be given in the absence of drug resistance testing. In the majority of cases (n = 315, 71.9%), the subsequent treatment prescribed was in line with the recommendations of the report. Genotypic resistance testing was successfully implemented in this large primary health care HIV programme and the system functioned well enough for the results to influence clinical management decisions in real time. Further research will explore the impact and cost

  1. Implementing antiretroviral resistance testing in a primary health care HIV treatment programme in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: early experiences, achievements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral drug resistance is becoming increasingly common with the expansion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment programmes in high prevalence settings. Genotypic resistance testing could have benefit in guiding individual-level treatment decisions but successful models for delivering resistance testing in low- and middle-income countries have not been reported. Methods An HIV Treatment Failure Clinic model was implemented within a large primary health care HIV treatment programme in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Genotypic resistance testing was offered to adults (≥16 years) with virological failure on first-line antiretroviral therapy (one viral load >1000 copies/ml after at least 12 months on a standard first-line regimen). A genotypic resistance test report was generated with treatment recommendations from a specialist HIV clinician and sent to medical officers at the clinics who were responsible for patient management. A quantitative process evaluation was conducted to determine how the model was implemented and to provide feedback regarding barriers and challenges to delivery. Results A total of 508 specimens were submitted for genotyping between 8 April 2011 and 31 January 2013; in 438 cases (86.2%) a complete genotype report with recommendations from the specialist clinician was sent to the medical officer. The median turnaround time from specimen collection to receipt of final report was 18 days (interquartile range (IQR) 13–29). In 114 (26.0%) cases the recommended treatment differed from what would be given in the absence of drug resistance testing. In the majority of cases (n = 315, 71.9%), the subsequent treatment prescribed was in line with the recommendations of the report. Conclusions Genotypic resistance testing was successfully implemented in this large primary health care HIV programme and the system functioned well enough for the results to influence clinical management decisions in real time. Further

  2. Drug resistance mutations in HIV-2 patients failing raltegravir and influence on dolutegravir response.

    PubMed

    Requena, Silvia; Treviño, Ana; Cabezas, Teresa; Garcia-Delgado, Rosa; Amengual, María José; Lozano, Ana Belén; Peñaranda, María; Fernández, Juan Manuel; Soriano, Vicente; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    A broader extent of amino acid substitutions in the integrase of HIV-2 compared with HIV-1 might enable greater cross-resistance between raltegravir and dolutegravir in HIV-2 infection. Few studies have examined the virological response to dolutegravir in HIV-2 patients that failed raltegravir. All patients recorded in the HIV-2 Spanish cohort were examined. The integrase coding region was sequenced in viraemic patients. Changes associated with resistance to raltegravir and dolutegravir in HIV-1 were recorded. From 319 HIV-2-infected patients recorded in the HIV-2 Spanish cohort, 53 integrase sequences from 30 individuals were obtained (20 raltegravir naive and 10 raltegravir experienced). Only one secondary mutation (E138A) was found in one of the 20 raltegravir-naive HIV-2 patients. For raltegravir-experienced individuals, the resistance mutation profile in 9 of 10 viraemic patients was as follows: N155H + A153G/S (four); Y143G + A153S (two); Q148R + G140A/S (two); and Y143C + Q91R (one). Of note, all patients with Y143G and N155H developed a rare non-polymorphic mutation at codon 153. Rescue therapy with dolutegravir was given to 5 of these 10 patients. After >6 months on dolutegravir therapy, three patients with baseline N155H experienced viral rebound. In two of them N155H was replaced by Q148K/R and in another by G118R. A wide repertoire of resistance mutations in the integrase gene occur in HIV-2-infected patients failing on raltegravir. Although dolutegravir may allow successful rescue in most HIV-2 raltegravir failures, we report and characterize three cases of dolutegravir resistance in HIV-2 patients, emerging variants Q148K and Q148R and a novel change G118R.

  3. In vitro activity of dolutegravir against wild-type and integrase inhibitor-resistant HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Raugi, Dana N; Pan, Charlotte; Sow, Papa Salif; Seydi, Moussa; Mullins, James I; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S

    2015-02-05

    Dolutegravir recently became the third integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) approved for use in HIV-1-infected individuals. In contrast to the extensive dataset for HIV-1, in vitro studies and clinical reports of dolutegravir for HIV-2 are limited. To evaluate the potential role of dolutegravir in HIV-2 treatment, we compared the susceptibilities of wild-type and INSTI-resistant HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains to the drug using single-cycle assays, spreading infections of immortalized T cells, and site-directed mutagenesis. HIV-2 group A, HIV-2 group B, and HIV-1 isolates from INSTI-naïve individuals were comparably sensitive to dolutegravir in the single-cycle assay (mean EC50 values = 1.9, 2.6, and 1.3 nM, respectively). Integrase substitutions E92Q, Y143C, E92Q + Y143C, and Q148R conferred relatively low levels of resistance to dolutegravir in HIV-2ROD9 (2- to 6-fold), but Q148K, E92Q + N155H, T97A + N155H and G140S + Q148R resulted in moderate resistance (10- to 46-fold), and the combination of T97A + Y143C in HIV-2ROD9 conferred high-level resistance (>5000-fold). In contrast, HIV-1NL4-3 mutants E92Q + N155H, G140S + Q148R, and T97A + Y143C showed 2-fold, 4-fold, and no increase in EC50, respectively, relative to the parental strain. The resistance phenotypes for E92Q + N155H, and G140S + Q148R HIV-2ROD9 were also confirmed in spreading infections of CEM-ss cells. Our data support the use of dolutegravir in INSTI-naïve HIV-2 patients but suggest that, relative to HIV-1, a broader array of replacements in HIV-2 integrase may enable cross-resistance between dolutegravir and other INSTI. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of dolutegravir in HIV-2-infected individuals, including patients previously treated with raltegravir or elvitegravir.

  4. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  5. Clinical and resistance consequences of misquantification of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in samples from an HIV-1 subtype G-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Delaugerre, Constance; Denis, Blandine; Peytavin, Gilles; Palmer, Pierre; Mourez, Thomas; Le Goff, Jerôme; Molina, Jean-Michel; Simon, François

    2009-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load is the main marker used to monitor antiviral treatment efficacy and resistance. We report a case of underquantification of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from an HIV-1 subtype G-infected woman, leading to delayed diagnosis of HIV encephalitis and to the emergence of drug resistance.

  6. Association between risk behaviors and antiretroviral resistance in HIV-infected patients receiving opioid agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Tetrault, Jeanette M; Kozal, Michael J; Chiarella, Jennifer; Sullivan, Lynn E; Dinh, An T; Fiellin, David A

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) resistance is of concern. Opioid agonist treatment (ie, methadone or buprenorphine) is effective and decreases HIV transmission risk behaviors and HIV seroconversion. Despite prevention efforts, injection drug use (IDU) and risky sexual behaviors remain prevalent in patients receiving opioid agonist treatment. The purpose of this study is to determine in HIV-infected patients receiving opioid agonist treatment, the prevalence of HIV transmission risk behaviors, the prevalence of ARV resistance, and the prevalence of ARV resistance among those with risk behaviors. The design was a cross-sectional study of patients recruited from opioid treatment programs and outpatient practices. We measured demographic, drug treatment, and HIV clinical information (including ARV adherence), self-reported HIV risk behaviors and drug use, urine toxicologies, and genotype testing for ARV resistance (with both standard assays and ultradeep sequencing). Data analysis included descriptive statistics. Fifty-nine subjects were enrolled, 64% were male, 24% were white, and mean age was 46 years. Fifty-three percent were receiving methadone, 47% were receiving buprenorphine, and 80% were receiving opioid agonist treatment for 12 weeks or more. Fourteen percent reported unprotected sex, 7% reported sharing needles or works, and 60% had positive urine toxicology for illicit drug use. Fifteen percent had evidence of HIV resistance by standard genotyping; 7% with single class resistance, 3% with double class resistance, and 5% with triple class resistance. Ultradeep sequencing found additional class resistance in 5 subjects. Twenty-two percent of subjects with evidence of transmission risk behaviors versus 14% of subjects without risk behaviors had evidence of ARV resistance. Improved prevention and treatment efforts may be needed for HIV-infected, opioid dependent individuals receiving opioid agonist treatment to decrease transmission of ARV resistant virus, especially in

  7. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Jr., Arthur D.; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Eddy

    2011-11-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  8. Combining classifiers for HIV-1 drug resistance prediction.

    PubMed

    Srisawat, Anantaporn; Kijsirikul, Boonserm

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies and studies the behavior of three learning algorithms, i.e. the Support Vector machine (SVM), the Radial Basis Function Network (the RBF network), and k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) for predicting HIV-1 drug resistance from genotype data. In addition, a new algorithm for classifier combination is proposed. The results of comparing the predictive performance of three learning algorithms show that, SVM yields the highest average accuracy, the RBF network gives the highest sensitivity, and k-NN yields the best in specificity. Finally, the comparison of the predictive performance of the composite classifier with three learning algorithms demonstrates that the proposed composite classifier provides the highest average accuracy.

  9. [Volumetric measurement and digital electroencephalography in patients with medication-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy submitted to surgery].

    PubMed

    Trápaga-Quincoses, O; Morales-Chacon, L M

    To assess the value of volumetric measurement by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and interictal electroencephalogram (EEG) in pre- and post-operative assessment of patients with medication-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who were submitted to surgery. We evaluated 12 volumetric studies carried out using MRI and 24 digital EEG records for six patients suffering from complex partial seizures that were resistant to medical treatment and had their origin in the temporal lobe. A volumetric analysis was performed using MRI to study the epileptogenic region and the frequencies at which interictal epileptiform discharges (IED/minute) appeared before, at six months and at one year after surgery were calculated; a correlation was observed between the volumetric analysis and the irritative and epileptogenic region. The volumes of both the ipso and contralateral hippocampuses were smaller in comparison to the increased frequency of the IED in the mesial regions. The inferior temporal lobes and the parahippocampal cortex have reduced volumes ipsolateral to the epileptogenic region. At six months after performing the temporal lobectomy, the IED frequency decreased with respect to the pre-operative IED. A negative correlation was found between the resected volume of the parahippocampal cortex and the inferior temporal lobe, and the post-operative IED frequency at one year. In patients with medication resistant MTLE the volumes of other structures in the medial temporal lobe are diminished, in addition to the hippocampus, and they are seen to have a smaller volume on the side that is ipsolateral to the epileptogenic region. There is a relation between the volume of the resected hippocampus and the post-operative IED frequency in patients with MTLE who successfully underwent a temporal lobectomy. Volumetric analysis of the epileptogenic lesion using MRI provides localising information that is valuable in the pre-operative assessment of patients with

  10. Characteristics of drug resistance and HIV among tuberculosis patients in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mac-Arthur, A; Gloyd, S; Perdigão, P; Noya, A; Sacarlal, J; Kreiss, J

    2001-10-01

    The rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence among tuberculosis patients varies between 2% and 53% in Mozambique, depending on the region. Drug resistance surveillance has been performed in only a few cities in Mozambique. To establish the extent of drug resistance in areas of Mozambique with different levels of HIV prevalence, to estimate the prevalence of HIV among tuberculosis (TB) patients, and to examine the association between drug resistance and HIV infection. All tuberculosis patients diagnosed at randomly selected health facilities over 9 months (September 1998 to June 1999) were enrolled in the study. Sputum was collected, smeared and cultured, and drug susceptibility tests were performed. Blood was tested for HIV in the respective provinces, and patients received pre-test and post-test counselling. Of 709 culture-positive cases, 25.5% were HIV-positive. HIV-positive patients were significantly more likely to have a prior history of treatment (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.9-3.6) and resistance to both isoniazid and streptomycin (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.3, 4.5). In patients with no history of prior tuberculosis treatment, the multidrug resistance rate was 3.4% and resistance to isoniazid and streptomycin (HS) was 5.2%. Any drug resistance was significantly more common among those with a history of prior treatment (OR 3.1; 95% CI 2.1-4.7), particularly resistance to HS (OR 4.5; 95% CI 2.6-7.9). This study demonstrates substantial levels of drug resistance in Mozambique. Differences in drug resistance between high and low HIV prevalence areas may be related to prior treatment.

  11. HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance profiles in a cohort of heterosexual patients in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Muammer Osman; Beka, Hayati; Lübke, Nadine; Verheyen, Jens; Eraksoy, Haluk; Cagatay, Atahan; Kaiser, Rolf; Akgül, Baki; Agacfidan, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Turkey is seeing a steady rise in rates of HIV infection in the country. The number of individuals with HIV/AIDS was greater than 7000 in 2014 according to data released by the Ministry of Health, and heterosexual contacts were reported to be the main transmission routes. Istanbul has the highest number of reported cases of HIV infection. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in 50 heterosexual patients from Istanbul. The most prevalent subtype was found to be subtype B (56.2 %). Resistance-associated mutations were found in 14 patients with 6/14 patients being therapy-experienced and 8/14 therapy naive at the time point of analysis. With increasing number of patients who require treatment and the rapid up-scaling of the antiretroviral therapy in Turkey, HIV-1 drug resistance testing is recommended before starting treatment in order to achieve better clinical outcomes.

  12. Comparison of the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance among HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Margeridon-Thermet, Severine; Shafer, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most prevalent deadly chronic viral diseases. HIV is treated by small molecule inhibitors. HBV is treated by immunomodulation and small molecule inhibitors. HCV is currently treated primarily by immunomodulation but many small molecules are in clinical development. Although HIV is a retrovirus, HBV is a double-stranded DNA virus, and HCV is a single-stranded RNA virus, antiviral drug resistance complicates the development of drugs and the successful treatment of each of these viruses. Although their replication cycles, therapeutic targets, and evolutionary mechanisms are different, the fundamental approaches to identifying and characterizing HIV, HBV, and HCV drug resistance are similar. This review describes the evolution of HIV, HBV, and HCV within individuals and populations and the genetic mechanisms associated with drug resistance to each of the antiviral drug classes used for their treatment. PMID:21243082

  13. Occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among Drug-naïve pregnant women in selected HIV-care centres in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Martin-Odoom, Alexander; Adiku, Theophilus; Delgado, Elena; Lartey, Margaret; Ampofo, William K

    2017-03-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy in Ghana has been scaled up across the country over the last decade. This study sought to determine the occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in pregnant HIV-1 positive women yet to initiate antiretroviral therapy at selected HIV Care Centres in Ghana. Plasma specimens from twenty-six (26) HIV seropositive pregnant women who were less than 28weeks pregnant with their first pregnancy and ART naïve were collected from selected HIV care centres in three (3) regions in Ghana. Genotypic testing was done for the reverse transcriptase gene and the sequences generated were analyzed for HIV-1 drug resistance mutations using the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Resistance mutations associated with the reverse transcriptase gene were detected in 4 (15.4%) of the participants. At least one major drug resistance mutation in the reverse transcriptase gene was found in 3 (11.5%) of the women. The detection of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in this drug-naïve group in two regional HIV care sites is an indication of the need for renewed action in monitoring the emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Ghana. None declared.

  14. Synthetic lethals in HIV: ways to avoid drug resistance : Running title: Preventing HIV resistance.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Michel; Badel, Anne; Veitia, Reiner A; Vanet, Anne

    2015-04-17

    RNA viruses rapidly accumulate genetic variation, which can give rise to synthetic lethal (SL) and deleterious (SD) mutations. Synthetic lethal mutations (non-lethal when alone but lethal when combined in one genome) have been studied to develop cancer therapies. This principle can also be used against fast-evolving RNA-viruses. Indeed, targeting protein sites involved in SD + SL interactions with a drug would render any mutation of such sites, lethal. Here, we set up a strategy to detect intragenic pairs of SL and SD at the surface of the protein to predict less escapable drug target sites. For this, we detected SD + SL, studying HIV protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence alignments from two groups of VIH(+) individuals: treated with drugs (T) or not (NT). Using a series of statistical approaches, we were able to propose bona fide SD + SL couples. When focusing on spatially close co-variant SD + SL couples at the surface of the protein, we found 5 SD + SL groups (2 in the protease and 3 in the reverse transcriptase), which could be good candidates to form pockets to accommodate potential drugs. Thus, designing drugs targeting these specific SD + SL groups would not allow the virus to mutate any residue involved in such groups without losing an essential function. Moreover, we also show that the selection pressure induced by the treatment leads to the appearance of new mutations, which change the mutational landscape of the protein. This drives the existence of differential SD + SL couples between the drug-treated and non-treated groups. Thus, new anti-viral drugs should be designed differently to target such groups.

  15. Dried blood spots for HIV-1 drug resistance and viral load testing: A review of current knowledge and WHO efforts for global HIV drug resistance surveillance.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolio, Silvia; Parkin, Neil T; Jordan, Michael; Brooks, James; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping is an essential component of the World Health Organization global HIV Drug Resistance (HIVDR) prevention and assessment strategy. Plasma is considered to be the most appropriate specimen type for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping. However, use of plasma may not be feasible in rural, remote areas in resource-limited settings since its preparation and storage requires personnel and laboratory infrastructure that is often lacking. An alternative specimen type for HIVDR genotyping is dried blood spots (DBS). DBS can be made from blood drawn for routine clinical or surveillance purposes without special laboratory processing. The filter paper used is relatively inexpensive, easily obtained and stored, and although procedures for making DBS must be followed precisely, the training required is less intensive than that required for plasma separation. HIV nucleic acids are generally stable over long periods of time and freezing is not required unless storage over two weeks is planned. In addition, DBS are more easily transported than plasma because they can be shipped as non-hazardous materials using regular mail or courier services. Many studies have reported the successful genotyping of HIV-1 from DBS and some have shown a high genotypic concordance with plasma genotypes despite potential DNA interferences. During the past few years DBS have started to be widely used for HIV-1 drug resistance testing, and an increased number of reports from resource-limited areas have indicated DBS as the preferred specimen type for transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance surveillance where plasma collection is not feasible. The World Health Organization has brought together a group of experts (WHO HIVResNet DBS working group) to review current data on DBS preparation, storage, and transport conditions, and provide a reference protocol, which is also summarized in this article.

  16. An analysis of drug resistance among people living with HIV/AIDS in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Sun, Jianjun; Lu, Hongzhou

    2017-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance can facilitate better management of antiretroviral therapy, helping to prevent transmission and decrease the morbidity and mortality of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is little data about transmitted drug resistance and acquired drug resistance for HIV/AIDS patients in Shanghai. Methods A retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients who visited the Department of Infectious Disease from June 2008 to June 2015 was conducted in Shanghai, China. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze risk factors for drug resistance among HIV-infected people with virological failure. The related collected factors included patient age, gender, marital status, infection route, baseline CD4 count, antiretroviral therapy regimens, time between HIV diagnosis and initiating antiretroviral therapy. Factors with p<0.1 in the univariate logistic regression test were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression test. Results There were 575 subjects selected for this study and 369 participated in this research. For the antiretroviral therapy drugs, the rates of transmitted drug resistance and acquired drug resistance were significantly different. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) had the highest drug resistance rate (transmitted drug resistance, 10.9%; acquired drug resistance, 53.3%) and protease inhibitors (PIs) had the lowest drug resistance rate (transmitted drug resistance, 1.7%; acquired drug resistance, 2.7%). Logistic regression analysis found no factors that were related to drug resistance except marital status (married status for tenofovir: odds ratio = 6.345, 95% confidence interval = 1.553–25.921, P = 0.010) and the time span between HIV diagnosis and initiating antiretroviral therapy (≤6M for stavudine: odds ratio = 0.271, 95% confidence interval = 0.086–0.850, P = 0.025; ≤6M for didanosine: odds ratio = 0.284, 95% confidence interval = 0.096–0.842, P = 0

  17. [HIV-1 drug resistance transmission threshold survey in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province, 2015].

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Wang, J B; Xing, H; Ma, Y L; Yang, J; Chen, H C; Yao, S T; Luo, H B; Duan, X; Wang, Y K; Duan, S; Jia, M H

    2017-07-10

    Objective: To study the HIV-1 drug resistance transmission level in HIV infected persons receiving no antiviral therapy in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province in 2015. Methods: A total of 72 plasma samples were collected from recently reported HIV-infected persons aged 16-25 years in Dehong from January to July 2015 for drug resistance gene detection. Results: Forty eight samples were successfully sequenced and analyzed. Among them, 31.2% (15/48) were from Chinese, and 68.8% (33/48) were from Burmese. Based on pol sequences, HIV genotypes included URF (52.08%, 25/48), CRF01_AE (16.67%, 8/48), RF07_BC (10.42%, 5/48), subtype B (6.25%, 3/48), subtype C (6.25%, 3/48), CRF57_BC (6.25%, 3/48) and CRF08_BC (2.08%, 1/48). One drug resistant mutation site to non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) and two drug resistant mutation site to nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) were detected in four sequences. Based on the statistical method of HIV drug resistance threshold survey, the prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistant strain was 5%-15%. Conclusions: The proportion of Burmese among newly reported HIV-infected individuals aged 16-25 years in Dehong in 2015 was higher. HIV-1 genetic diversity was found in Dehong. The prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistant strain had reached a moderate level in Dehong.

  18. HIV-1 genetic diversity, geographical linkages and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed; Zahid, Maria; Qureshi, Muhammad Asif; Mughal, Muhammad Nouman; Ujjan, Ikram Din

    2017-09-23

    Worldwide antiretroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the mortality and morbidity rates in individuals with HIV infection. However, the increasing occurrence of drug resistance is limiting treatment options. In recent years, Pakistan has witnessed a concentrated epidemic of HIV. It is very important to identify geographical linkages and mutations that generate selective pressure and drive resistance of HIV in our population. The aim of this work was to identify genetic diversity and drug resistance patterns of HIV in Pakistan, using available sequences and bioinformatics tools, which may help in selecting effective combination of available drugs. A total of 755 Pakistani HIV gag, pol and env sequences were retrieved from the Los Alamos HIV database. Sequences were aligned with reference sequences of different subtypes. For geographical linkages, sequences of predominant subtypes were aligned with sequences of the same subtypes from different countries. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the maximum-likelihood method in MEGA 7 software. For drug resistance analysis, sequences were entered into the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Phylogenetic trees for studying genetic diversity showed that 82% of the sequences were of subtype A, while the rest of the sequences were of subtypes B (9.5%), K (2%), D (2%) and AE (1%). Moreover, trees that were constructed to examine geographical linkages showed close clustering of strains with those of the neighboring countries Afghanistan and India, as well as some African countries. A search for drug resistance mutations showed that 93% of the sequences had no major or minor mutations. The remaining 7% of the sequences contained a major mutation, Y115F, which causes the virus to exhibit low to intermediate resistance against lamivudine and emtricitabine. Our data indicate that HIV subtype A is the major subtype, while subtypes K, D and AE are also present in our country, suggesting gradual viral evolution and

  19. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance. PMID:27404981

  20. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kristine E; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-07-12

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance.

  1. Sociodemographic correlates of HIV drug resistance and access to drug resistance testing in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Genevieve; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Oliveira, Natalia; Brumme, Zabrina L; Rusch, Melanie; Shoveller, Jeannie; Brumme, Chanson J; Harrigan, P Richard

    2017-01-01

    Sociodemographic correlates of engagement in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care are well studied, however the association with accessing drug resistance testing (DRT) and the development of drug resistance have not been characterized. Between 1996-2014, 11 801 HIV patients accessing therapy in British Columbia were observed longitudinally. A subset of 9456 patients had testable viral load; of these 8398 were linked to census data. Sociodemographic (census tract-level) and clinical (individual-level) correlates of DRT were assessed using multivariable General Estimating Equation logistic regression adjusted odds ratios (aOR). The mean number of tests per patient was 2.1 (Q1-Q3; 0-3). Separately, any drug resistance was determined using IAS-USA (2013) list for 5703 initially treatment naïve patients without baseline resistance; 5175 were census-linked (mean of 1.5 protease-reverse transcriptase sequences/patient, Q1-Q3; 0-2). Correlates of detecting drug resistance in this subset were analyzed using Cox PH regression adjusted hazard ratios (aHR). Our results indicate baseline CD4 <200 cells/μL (aOR: 1.5, 1.3-1.6), nRTI-only baseline regimens (aOR: 1.4, 1.3-1.6), and unknown (therapy initiation before routine pVL in BC) baseline pVL (aOR: 1.8, 1.5-2.1) were among individual-level clinical covariates strongly associated with having accessed DRT; while imperfect adherence (aHR: 2.2, 1.9-2.5), low baseline CD4 count (aHR: 1.9, 1.6-2.3), and high baseline pVL (aHR: 2.0, 1.6-2.6) were associated with a higher likelihood of developing drug resistance. A higher median income (aOR: 0.83, 0.77-0.89) and higher percentage of those with aboriginal ancestry (aOR: 0.85, 0.76-0.95) were census tract-level sociodemographic covariates associated with decreased access to DRT. Similarly, aboriginal ancestry (aHR: 1.2, 1.1-1.5) was associated with development of drug resistance. In conclusion, clinical covariates continue to be the strongest correlates of development of drug

  2. Are countries using global fund support to implement HIV drug resistance surveillance? A review of funded HIV grants.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Karen F; Caudwell, Emily; Xueref, Serge; Ha, Thuy Huong; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2012-05-01

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) is the largest funder of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and treatment programs worldwide. Since 2002, the Global Fund has encouraged grant recipients to implement drug resistance surveillance (DRS) as part of treatment programs. We reviewed documentation of 147 grants funded in 2004-2008 (funding rounds 4-8) to assess grantees' use of funds to support HIV DRS. Overall, 94 grants (64%) described HIV DRS as part of the national treatment program. However, only 32 grants (22%) specifically documented DRS as a grant-funded activity. This review provides baseline information suggesting limited use by countries of Global Fund financing to support HIV DRS. Additional assessment is required to evaluate barriers to using Global Fund grants to support DRS.

  3. HIV-1 protease inhibitor mutations affect the development of HIV-1 resistance to the maturation inhibitor bevirimat.

    PubMed

    Fun, Axel; van Maarseveen, Noortje M; Pokorná, Jana; Maas, Renée Em; Schipper, Pauline J; Konvalinka, Jan; Nijhuis, Monique

    2011-08-24

    Maturation inhibitors are an experimental class of antiretrovirals that inhibit Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) particle maturation, the structural rearrangement required to form infectious virus particles. This rearrangement is triggered by the ordered cleavage of the precursor Gag polyproteins into their functional counterparts by the viral enzyme protease. In contrast to protease inhibitors, maturation inhibitors impede particle maturation by targeting the substrate of protease (Gag) instead of the protease enzyme itself. Direct cross-resistance between protease and maturation inhibitors may seem unlikely, but the co-evolution of protease and its substrate, Gag, during protease inhibitor therapy, could potentially affect future maturation inhibitor therapy. Previous studies showed that there might also be an effect of protease inhibitor resistance mutations on the development of maturation inhibitor resistance, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We used wild-type and protease inhibitor resistant viruses to determine the impact of protease inhibitor resistance mutations on the development of maturation inhibitor resistance. Our resistance selection studies demonstrated that the resistance profiles for the maturation inhibitor bevirimat are more diverse for viruses with a mutated protease compared to viruses with a wild-type protease. Viral replication did not appear to be a major factor during emergence of bevirimat resistance. In all in vitro selections, one of four mutations was selected: Gag V362I, A364V, S368N or V370A. The impact of these mutations on maturation inhibitor resistance and viral replication was analyzed in different protease backgrounds. The data suggest that the protease background affects development of HIV-1 resistance to bevirimat and the replication profiles of bevirimat-selected HIV-1. The protease-dependent bevirimat resistance and replication levels can be explained by differences in CA/p2 cleavage processing by the different

  4. Prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance in Iran between 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Ibe, Shiro; Monavari, Seyed-Hamid R; Memarnejadian, Arash; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad R; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Mohraz, Minoo; Jabbari, Hossain; Kamali, Kianoush; Keyvani, Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Sugiura, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant (DR) HIV emerges during combined antiretroviral treatment (cART), creating concern about widespread transmission of DR-HIV as cART is expanded in resource-limited countries. The aim of this study was to determine the predominant HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of transmitted DR mutations among antiretroviral-naïve patients in Iran. To monitor transmission of DR HIV, a threshold surveillance based on the world health organization (WHO) guidelines was implemented in Iran. For this HIVDR threshold surveillance study, blood samples were collected from 50 antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients. Antiretroviral-resistant mutations were determined by sequencing HIV-1 protease, reverse transcriptase and integrase regions. The HIV-1 subtype was determined by sequencing the p17 and C2-V5 regions of the gag and env genes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that 45 (95.7%) of 47 samples that were successfully obtained were CRF35_AD. The remaining two cases were subtype B (2.1%) and CRF01_AE (2.1%). Consistent results were obtained also from Env and Gag sequences. Regarding prevalence of transmitted DR viruses, two cases were found to harbor reverse transcriptase-inhibitor-resistant mutations (4.3%). In addition, although not in the WHO list for surveillance of transmitted mutations, 13 minor protease-inhibitor-resistant mutations listed in the International AIDS Society-USA panel of drug resistance mutations were found. No DR mutations were detected in the integrase region. Our study clarified that CRF35_AD is the major subtype among HIV-1-infected patients in Iran. According to the WHO categorization method of HIVDR threshold survey, the prevalence of transmitted drug resistant HIV in Iran was estimated as moderate (5-15%).

  5. Effects of Political Conflict Induced Treatment Interruptions on HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Marita; Lurie, Mark N.; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Kantor, Rami

    2013-01-01

    34 million people worldwide were living with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) by the end of 2010. Despite significant advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART), drug resistance remains a major deterrent to successful, enduring treatment. Unplanned interruptions in ART have negative effects on HIV treatment outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality, as well as development of drug resistance. Treatment interruptions due to political conflicts, not infrequent in resource-limited settings, result in disruptions in health care, infrastructure, or treatment facilities and patient displacement. Such circumstances are ideal bases for ART resistance development, however there is limited awareness of and data available on the association between political conflicts and the development of HIV drug resistance. In this review we identify and discuss this association and review how varying ART half-lives, genetic barriers, different HIV subtypes, and archived resistance can lead to lack of medication effectiveness upon post-conflict resumption of care. Optimized ART stopping strategies as well as infrastructural concerns and stable HIV treatment systems to ensure continuity of care and rapid resumption of care must be addressed in order to mitigate risks of HIV drug resistance development during and after political conflicts. Increased awareness of such associations by clinicians as well as politicians and stakeholders is essential. PMID:23449225

  6. Active surveillance for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae using stool specimens submitted for testing for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Francois, Jeannette; Blash, Stephanie; Patel, Gopi; Jenkins, Stephen G; LaBombardi, Vincent; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Srinivasan, Arjun; Calfee, David P

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance to identify asymptomatic carriers of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is a recommended strategy for CRE control in healthcare facilities. Active surveillance using stool specimens tested for Clostridium difficile is a relatively low-cost strategy to detect CRE carriers. Further evaluation of this and other risk factor-based active surveillance strategies is warranted.

  7. HIV/AIDS and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters HIV/AIDS and the Flu Questions & Answers Language: English Españ ... with HIV and AIDS. Should people with HIV/AIDS receive the inactivated influenza vaccine? People with HIV ...

  8. Outwitting Evolution: Fighting Drug Resistance in the Treatment of TB, Malaria and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Daniel E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Although caused by vastly different pathogens, the world’s three most serious infectious diseases, tuberculosis, malaria and HIV-1 infection, share the common problem of drug resistance. The pace of drug development has been very slow for tuberculosis and malaria and rapid for HIV-1. But for each disease, resistance to most drugs has appeared quickly after the introduction of the drug. Learning how to manage and prevent resistance is a major medical challenge that requires an understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of each pathogen. This review summarized the similarities and differences in the evolution of drug resistance for these three pathogens. PMID:22424234

  9. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  10. Eric Freed Named Deputy Director of HIV Drug Resistance Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: The text for this article was adapted from an e-mail announcement to the Center for Cancer Research community from Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., on September 8, 2014. Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., director, NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), recently announced the appointment of Eric Freed, Ph.D., as deputy director of the HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP). Freed will join Stephen Hughes, Ph.D., director of HIV DRP, in leading this CCR program that focuses on understanding HIV replication and pathogenesis, with the goal of developing more effective strategies for treating HIV infections, and also builds on the existing strength of HIV and retrovirus research within NCI.

  11. Eric Freed Named Deputy Director of HIV Drug Resistance Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: The text for this article was adapted from an e-mail announcement to the Center for Cancer Research community from Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., on September 8, 2014. Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., director, NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), recently announced the appointment of Eric Freed, Ph.D., as deputy director of the HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP). Freed will join Stephen Hughes, Ph.D., director of HIV DRP, in leading this CCR program that focuses on understanding HIV replication and pathogenesis, with the goal of developing more effective strategies for treating HIV infections, and also builds on the existing strength of HIV and retrovirus research within NCI.

  12. Potent Inhibitor of Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains Identified from the Medicinal Plant Justicia gendarussa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Dong-Ying; Liu, Kang-Lun; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van H; Cuong, Nguyen M; Soejarto, Djaja D; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-06-23

    Justicia gendarussa, a medicinal plant collected in Vietnam, was identified as a potent anti-HIV-1 active lead from the evaluation of over 4500 plant extracts. Bioassay-guided separation of the extracts of the stems and roots of this plant led to the isolation of an anti-HIV arylnaphthalene lignan (ANL) glycoside, patentiflorin A (1). Evaluation of the compound against both the M- and T-tropic HIV-1 isolates showed it to possess a significantly higher inhibition effect than the clinically used anti-HIV drug AZT. Patentiflorin A and two congeners were synthesized, de novo, as an efficient strategy for resupply as well as for further structural modification of the anti-HIV ANL glycosides in the search for drug leads. Subsequently, it was determined that the presence of a quinovopyranosyloxy group in the structure is likely essential to retain the high degree of anti-HIV activity of this type of compounds. Patentiflorin A was further investigated against the HIV-1 gene expression of the R/U5 and U5/gag transcripts, and the data showed that the compound acts as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription. Importantly, the compound displayed potent inhibitory activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates of both the nucleotide analogue (AZT) and non-nucleotide analogue (nevaripine). Thus, the ANL glycosides have the potential to be developed as novel anti-HIV drugs.

  13. Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Persons, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Pablo E.; Suarez, Pedro G.; Sanchez, Jorge; Zavala, David; Arevalo, Jorge; Ticona, Eduardo; Nolan, Charles M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    During 1999 to 2000, we identified HIV-infected persons with new episodes of tuberculosis (TB) at 10 hospitals in Lima-Peru and a random sample of other Lima residents with TB. Multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB was documented in 35 (43%) of 81 HIV-positive patients and 38 (3.9%)of 965 patients who were HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status (p < 0.001). HIV-positive patients with MDR-TB were concentrated at three hospitals that treat the greatest numbers of HIV-infected persons with TB. Of patients with TB, those with HIV infection differed from those without known HIV infection in having more frequent prior exposure to clinical services and more frequent previous TB therapy or prophylaxis. However, MDR-TB in HIV-infected patients was not associated with previous TB therapy or prophylaxis. MDR-TB is an ongoing problem in HIV-infected persons receiving care in public hospitals in Lima and Callao; they represent sentinel cases for a potentially larger epidemic of nosocomial MDR-TB. PMID:14720398

  14. Clinical significance and characterization of AZT-resistant strains of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A; Rooke, Ronald; Tremblay, Michel; Li, XuGuang; Parniak, Michael A; Gao, Qing; Yao, Xiao-Jian; Tsoukas, Chris; Montaner, JSG; Fanning, M; Ruedy, J

    1991-01-01

    A number of laboratories have now independently confirmed that zidovudine (AZT)-resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may be isolated from patients undergoing prolonged therapy with this drug. In certain instances, such drug-resistant viral isolates have been obtained from patients with clinical acquired immune deficiency syndrome (aids), while in others, isolation of drug-resistant strains has been achieved in the case of HIV seropositive, asymptomatic subjects. Most of the evidence points to a series of mutations within the polymerase gene of HIV-1, which encodes viral reverse transcriptase, as being responsible for development of the drug-resistant phenotype. It further appears that over 50% of patients treated with AZT for periods longer than six months are likely to yield drug-resistant strains of HIV-1 in their circulation. Furthermore, the development of drug resistance soon after initiation of AZT therapy may potentially be correlated with the likelihood of AZT treatment failure. In several instances, cross resistance has been observed between AZT and other nucleosides being considered for potential therapy of HIV-1-associated disease. PMID:22451746

  15. Evolution and Recombination of Genes Encoding HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Tropism during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Binshan; Kitchen, Christina; Weiser, Barbara; Mayers, Douglas; Foley, Brian; Kemal, Kimdar; Anastos, Kathryn; Suchard, Marc; Parker, Monica; Brunner, Cheryl; Burger, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of residual plasma virus during antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a high priority to improve understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis and therapy. To understand the evolution of HIV-1 pol and env genes in viremic patients under selective pressure of ART, we performed longitudinal analyses of plasma-derived pol and env sequences from single HIV-1 genomes. We tested the hypotheses that drug resistance in pol was unrelated to changes in coreceptor usage (tropism), and that recombination played a role in evolution of viral strains. Recombinants were identified by using Bayesian and other computational methods. High-level genotypic resistance was seen in ~70% of X4 and R5 strains during ART. There was no significant association between resistance and tropism. Each patient displayed at least one recombinant encompassing env and representing a change in predicted tropism. These data suggest that, in addition to mutation, recombination can play a significant role in shaping HIV-1 evolution. PMID:20451945

  16. HIV genotypes and primary drug resistance among HIV seropositive blood donors in Brazil: role of infected blood donors as sentinel populations for molecular surveillance of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, CS; Sabino, EC; Carvalho, SMF; Leao, S; Carneiro- Proietti, AB; Capuani, L; Oliveira, CL; Carrick, D; Birch, RJ; Gonçalez, TT; Keating, S; Swanson, P; Hackett, J; Busch, MP

    2013-01-01

    Background There are few surveillance studies analyzing genotypes or primary (transmitted) drug resistance in HIV-infected blood donors in Brazil. The aim of this study was to characterize patterns of HIV genotypes and primary resistance among HIV seropositive donors identified at 4 geographically dispersed blood centers in Brazil. Methods All HIV-infected donors who returned for counseling at the 4 REDS-II Hemocenters in Brazil from January 2007–March 2011 were invited to participate in a case-control study involving a questionnaire on risk factors. Viral sequencing was also offered to positive cases to assign genotypes and to detect and characterize primary resistance to RT and protease inhibitors according to WHO guidelines. Results Of the 341 HIV seropositive donors who consented to participate in the risk-factor and genetics study, pol sequences were obtained for 331 (97%). Clade B was predominant (76%) followed by F (15%) and C (5%). Primary resistance was present in 36 (12.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.2,15.5) of the 303 individuals not exposed to antiretroviral therapy (ART), varying from 8.2% (95%CI 2,7,13.6) in Recife to 19.4% in São Paulo (95%CI 9.5,29.2); there were no significant correlations with other demographics or risk factors. Conclusion Although subtype B remains the most prevalent genotype in all 4 areas, increasing rates of subtype C in Sao Paulo and F in Recife were documented relative to earlier reports. Transmitted drug resistance was relatively frequent, particularly in the city of Sao Paulo which showed an increase compared to previous HIV seropositive donor data from 10 years ago. PMID:23507660

  17. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  18. Correlation of Naturally Occurring HIV-1 Resistance to DEB025 with Capsid Amino Acid Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Philippe A.; Ptak, Roger G.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Dumont, Jean-Maurice; Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Rosenwirth, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    DEB025 (alisporivir) is a synthetic cyclosporine with inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). It binds to cyclophilin A (CypA) and blocks essential functions of CypA in the viral replication cycles of both viruses. DEB025 inhibits clinical HIV-1 isolates in vitro and decreases HIV-1 virus load in the majority of patients. HIV-1 isolates being naturally resistant to DEB025 have been detected in vitro and in nonresponder patients. By sequence analysis of their capsid protein (CA) region, two amino acid polymorphisms that correlated with DEB025 resistance were identified: H87Q and I91N, both located in the CypA-binding loop of the CA protein of HIV-1. The H87Q change was by far more abundant than I91N. Additional polymorphisms in the CypA-binding loop (positions 86, 91 and 96), as well as in the N-terminal loop of CA were detected in resistant isolates and are assumed to contribute to the degree of resistance. These amino acid changes may modulate the conformation of the CypA-binding loop of CA in such a way that binding and/or isomerase function of CypA are no longer necessary for virus replication. The resistant HIV-1 isolates thus are CypA-independent. PMID:23524389

  19. Impact of HIV co-infection on the evolution and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Eldholm, Vegard; Rieux, Adrien; Monteserin, Johana; Lopez, Julia Montana; Palmero, Domingo; Lopez, Beatriz; Ritacco, Viviana; Didelot, Xavier; Balloux, Francois

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic is fueled by a parallel Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic, but it remains unclear to what extent the HIV epidemic has been a driver for drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we assess the impact of HIV co-infection on the emergence of resistance and transmission of Mtb in the largest outbreak of multidrug-resistant TB in South America to date. By combining Bayesian evolutionary analyses and the reconstruction of transmission networks utilizing a new model optimized for TB, we find that HIV co-infection does not significantly affect the transmissibility or the mutation rate of Mtb within patients and was not associated with increased emergence of resistance within patients. Our results indicate that the HIV epidemic serves as an amplifier of TB outbreaks by providing a reservoir of susceptible hosts, but that HIV co-infection is not a direct driver for the emergence and transmission of resistant strains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16644.001 PMID:27502557

  20. HIV-GRADE: a publicly available, rules-based drug resistance interpretation algorithm integrating bioinformatic knowledge.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Martin; Pironti, Alejandro; Berg, Thomas; Braun, Patrick; Däumer, Martin; Eberle, Josef; Ehret, Robert; Kaiser, Rolf; Kleinkauf, Niels; Korn, Klaus; Kücherer, Claudia; Müller, Harm; Noah, Christian; Stürmer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Wolf, Eva; Walter, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    Genotypic drug resistance testing provides essential information for guiding treatment in HIV-infected patients. It may either be used for identifying patients with transmitted drug resistance or to clarify reasons for treatment failure and to check for remaining treatment options. While different approaches for the interpretation of HIV sequence information are already available, no other available rules-based systems specifically have looked into the effects of combinations of drugs. HIV-GRADE (Genotypischer Resistenz Algorithmus Deutschland) was planned as a countrywide approach to establish standardized drug resistance interpretation in Germany and also to introduce rules for estimating the influence of mutations on drug combinations. The rules for HIV-GRADE are taken from the literature, clinical follow-up data and from a bioinformatics-driven interpretation system (geno2pheno([resistance])). HIV-GRADE presents the option of seeing the rules and results of other drug resistance algorithms for a given sequence simultaneously. The HIV-GRADE rules-based interpretation system was developed by the members of the HIV-GRADE registered society. For continuous updates, this expert committee meets twice a year to analyze data from various sources. Besides data from clinical studies and the centers involved, published correlations for mutations with drug resistance and genotype-phenotype correlation data information from the bioinformatic models of geno2pheno are used to generate the rules for the HIV-GRADE interpretation system. A freely available online tool was developed on the basis of the Stanford HIVdb rules interpretation tool using the algorithm specification interface. Clinical validation of the interpretation system was performed on the data of treatment episodes consisting of sequence information, antiretroviral treatment and viral load, before and 3 months after treatment change. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. As the developed online

  1. HIV-1 Viral Load and Phenotypic Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Assays Based on Reverse Transcriptase Activity in Comparison to Amplification Based HIV-1 RNA and Genotypic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Napravnik, Sonia; Cachafeiro, Ada; Stewart, Paul; Eron, Joseph J.; Fiscus, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Amplification based HIV-1 viral load and genotypic resistance assays are expensive, technologically complex and may be difficult to implement in resource limited settings. Inexpensive, simpler assays are urgently needed. Objectives To determine the suitability of the ExaVir™ Load and ExaVir™ Drug assays for use in patient monitoring. Study Design Specimens from 108 adults were used to compare ExaVir™ Load HIV-1 RT to Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor® HIV-1 RNA, and ExaVir™ Drug phenotype to HIV GenoSure™ genotype. Results HIV-1 RT and HIV-1 RNA levels were comparable (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.83). Most (94%) had detectable results in both assays. The mean difference (HIV-1 RT minus HIV-1 RNA) was -0.21 log10 cps/mL equivalents. Relationship between HIV-1 RT and HIV-1 RNA was not affected by RT mutations, CD4 cell count, or efavirenz (EFV) or nevirapine (NVP) use. Phenotypes were generally consistent with genotype findings for EFV, but not for NVP. Most patients (93.9%) with phenotypic EFV resistance had at least one EFV mutation, while 78.0% of patients with phenotypic NVP resistance had at least one NVP mutation. Eleven of 49 samples tested for EFV susceptibility were found resistant (n=2) or with reduced susceptibility (n=9) despite the absence of genotypic resistance. Eleven of 45 samples tested for NVP susceptibility were found resistant (n=9) or with reduced susceptibility (n=2) with no evidence of genotypic mutations. Conclusions The ExaVir™ Load assay performed well and may be an alternative to amplification based techniques for HIV-1 RNA quantification. The ExaVir™ Drug assay for phenotypic resistance testing requires further evaluation, especially for NVP. PMID:19896416

  2. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  3. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  4. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of HIV-1 Variants with Increased Resistance to Sifuvirtide, a Novel HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Shan, Mei; Li, Li; Lu, Lu; Meng, Shu; Chen, Cheng; He, Yuxian; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Linqi

    2011-01-01

    Sifuvirtide, a novel fusion inhibitor against human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), which is more potent than enfuvirtide (T20) in cell culture, is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We now report that in vitro selection of HIV-1 variants resistant to sifuvirtide in the presence of increasing concentrations of sifuvirtide has led to several specific mutations in the gp41 region that had not been previously reported. Many of these substitutions were confined to the N-terminal heptad repeat region at positions 37, 38, 41, and 43, either singly or in combination. A downstream substitution at position 126 (N126K) in the C-terminal heptad repeat region was also found. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have further identified the critical amino acid substitutions and combinations thereof in conferring the resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the mutant viruses demonstrated variable degrees of cross-resistance to enfuvirtide, some of which are preferentially more resistant to sifuvirtide. Impaired infectivity was also found for many of the mutant viruses. Biophysical and structural analyses of the key substitutions have revealed several potential novel mechanisms against sifuvirtide. Our results may help to predict potential resistant patterns in vivo and facilitate the further clinical development and therapeutic utility of sifuvirtide. PMID:21098485

  5. HIV-1 genetic diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Roraima state, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Corado, André de Lima Guerra; Bello, Gonzalo; Leão, Renato Augusto Carvalho; Granja, Fabiana; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has spread towards the Northern country region, but little is known about HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of HIV strains with resistance mutations to antiretrovirals in some of the Northern states. HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were obtained from 73 treatment-naive and -experienced subjects followed between 2013 and 2014 at a public health reference unit from Roraima, the northernmost Brazilian state. The most prevalent HIV-1 clade observed in the study population was the subtype B (91%), followed by subtype C (9%). Among 12 HIV-1 strains from treatment-naïve patients, only one had a transmitted drug resistance mutation for NNRTI. Among 59 treatment-experienced patients, 12 (20%) harbored HIV-1 strains with acquired drug resistance mutations (ADRM) that reduce the susceptibility to two classes of antiretroviral drugs (NRTI and NNRTI or NRTI and PI), and five (8%) harbored HIV-1 strains with ADRM that reduced susceptibility to only one class of antiretroviral drugs (NNRTI or PI). No patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility to all three classes of antiretroviral drugs were detected. A substantial fraction of treatment-experienced patients with (63%) and without (70%) ADRM had undetectable plasma viral loads (<40 copies/ml) at the time of sampling. Among treatment-experienced with plasma viral loads above 2,000 copies/ml, 44% displayed no ADRM. This data showed that the HIV-1 epidemic in Roraima displayed a much lower level of genetic diversity and a lower prevalence of ADRM than that described in other Brazilian states.

  6. HIV-1 genetic diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Roraima state, northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Renato Augusto Carvalho; Granja, Fabiana; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has spread towards the Northern country region, but little is known about HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of HIV strains with resistance mutations to antiretrovirals in some of the Northern states. HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were obtained from 73 treatment-naive and -experienced subjects followed between 2013 and 2014 at a public health reference unit from Roraima, the northernmost Brazilian state. The most prevalent HIV-1 clade observed in the study population was the subtype B (91%), followed by subtype C (9%). Among 12 HIV-1 strains from treatment-naïve patients, only one had a transmitted drug resistance mutation for NNRTI. Among 59 treatment-experienced patients, 12 (20%) harbored HIV-1 strains with acquired drug resistance mutations (ADRM) that reduce the susceptibility to two classes of antiretroviral drugs (NRTI and NNRTI or NRTI and PI), and five (8%) harbored HIV-1 strains with ADRM that reduced susceptibility to only one class of antiretroviral drugs (NNRTI or PI). No patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility to all three classes of antiretroviral drugs were detected. A substantial fraction of treatment-experienced patients with (63%) and without (70%) ADRM had undetectable plasma viral loads (<40 copies/ml) at the time of sampling. Among treatment-experienced with plasma viral loads above 2,000 copies/ml, 44% displayed no ADRM. This data showed that the HIV-1 epidemic in Roraima displayed a much lower level of genetic diversity and a lower prevalence of ADRM than that described in other Brazilian states. PMID:28301548

  7. Simple PCR Assays Improve the Sensitivity of HIV-1 Subtype B Drug Resistance Testing and Allow Linking of Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Jin-Fen; Wei, Xierong; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Bennett, Diane; Brant, Ashley; Cong, Mian-er; Spira, Thomas; Shafer, Robert W.; Heneine, Walid

    2007-01-01

    Background The success of antiretroviral therapy is known to be compromised by drug-resistant HIV-1 at frequencies detectable by conventional bulk sequencing. Currently, there is a need to assess the clinical consequences of low-frequency drug resistant variants occurring below the detection limit of conventional genotyping. Sensitive detection of drug-resistant subpopulations, however, requires simple and practical methods for routine testing. Methodology We developed highly-sensitive and simple real-time PCR assays for nine key drug resistance mutations and show that these tests overcome substantial sequence heterogeneity in HIV-1 clinical specimens. We specifically used early wildtype virus samples from the pre-antiretroviral drug era to measure background reactivity and were able to define highly-specific screening cut-offs that are up to 67-fold more sensitive than conventional genotyping. We also demonstrate that sequencing the mutation-specific PCR products provided a direct and novel strategy to further detect and link associated resistance mutations, allowing easy identification of multi-drug-resistant variants. Resistance mutation associations revealed in mutation-specific amplicon sequences were verified by clonal sequencing. Significance Combined, sensitive real-time PCR testing and mutation-specific amplicon sequencing provides a powerful and simple approach that allows for improved detection and evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations. PMID:17653265

  8. Estimation of the HIV-1 backward mutation rate from transmitted drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Kitayimbwa, J M; Mugisha, J Y T; Saenz, R A

    2016-12-01

    One of the serious threats facing the administration of antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infected patients is the reported increasing prevalence of transmitted drug resistance. However, given that HIV-1 drug-resistant strains are often less fit than the wild-type strains, it is expected that drug-resistant strains that are present during the primary phase of the HIV-1 infection are replaced by the fitter wild-type strains. This replacement of HIV-1 resistant mutations involves the emergence of wild-type strains by a process of backward mutation. How quickly the replacement happens is dependent on the class of HIV-1 mutation group. We estimate the backward mutation rates and relative fitness of various mutational groups known to confer HIV-1 drug resistance. We do this by fitting a stochastic model to data for individuals who were originally infected by an HIV-1 strain carrying any one of the known drug resistance-conferring mutations and observed over a period of time to see whether the resistant strain is replaced. To do this, we seek a distribution, generated from simulations of the stochastic model, that best describes the observed (clinical data) replacement times of a given mutation. We found that Lamivudine/Emtricitabine-associated mutations have a distinctly higher, backward mutation rate and low relative fitness compared to the other classes (as has been reported before) while protease inhibitors-associated mutations have a slower backward mutation rate and high relative fitness. For the other mutation classes, we found more uncertainty in their estimates.

  9. Computational mutation scanning and drug resistance mechanisms of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-07-29

    The drug resistance of various clinically available HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been studied using a new computational protocol, that is, computational mutation scanning (CMS), leading to valuable insights into the resistance mechanisms and structure-resistance correction of the HIV-1 protease inhibitors associated with a variety of active site and nonactive site mutations. By using the CMS method, the calculated mutation-caused shifts of the binding free energies linearly correlate very well with those derived from the corresponding experimental data, suggesting that the CMS protocol may be used as a generalized approach to predict drug resistance associated with amino acid mutations. Because it is essentially important for understanding the structure-resistance correlation and for structure-based drug design to develop an effective computational protocol for drug resistance prediction, the reasonable and computationally efficient CMS protocol for drug resistance prediction should be valuable for future structure-based design and discovery of antiresistance drugs in various therapeutic areas.

  10. [Primary HIV drug resistance in a prison population. REPRICOVA-2 Study].

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, Julio; Herrero, Agustín; Bedia, Miguel; Araújo, Rosa; Castellano, Juan C

    2004-01-01

    Currently, there are few reports on primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance in the prison population. This is a descriptive, one-day prevalence study to identify HIV drug-resistant mutations in chronically infected treatment-naïve prisoners. Systematic randomized sampling was performed and genotyping was done by automatic sequencing. A total of 90 patients were studied. Two samples were found to have nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-resistant mutations, four had non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant mutations and one had protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant mutations. There was a low rate of primary resistance in our series. Therefore, resistance testing is not required before prescribing initial antiretroviral therapy in these patients.

  11. Antiretroviral Resistance and Pregnancy Characteristics of Women with Perinatal and Nonperinatal HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mmeje, Okeoma; Fisher, Barbra M.; Weinberg, Adriana; Aaron, Erika K.; Keating, Maria; Luque, Amneris E.; Willers, Denise; Cohan, Deborah; Money, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare HIV drug resistance in pregnant women with perinatal HIV (PHIV) and those with nonperinatal HIV (NPHIV) infection. Methods. We conducted a multisite cohort study of PHIV and NPHIV women from 2000 to 2014. Sample size was calculated to identify a fourfold increase in antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance in PHIV women. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ 2 and Fisher's exact tests. Univariate analysis was used to determine factors associated with antiretroviral drug resistance. Results. Forty-one PHIV and 41 NPHIV participants were included. Women with PHIV were more likely to have drug resistance than those with NPHIV ((55% versus 17%, p = 0.03), OR 6.0 (95% CI 1.0–34.8), p = 0.05), including multiclass resistance (15% versus 0, p = 0.03), and they were more likely to receive nonstandard ARVs during pregnancy (27% versus 5%, p = 0.01). PHIV and NPHIV women had similar rates of preterm birth (11% versus 28%, p = 0.08) and cesarean delivery (47% versus 46%, p = 0.9). Two infants born to a single NPHIV woman acquired HIV infection. Conclusions. PHIV women have a high frequency of HIV drug resistance mutations, leading to nonstandard ARVs use during pregnancy. Despite nonstandard ARV use during pregnancy, PHIV women did not experience increased rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27413359

  12. HemaSpot, a Novel Blood Storage Device for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, K; DeLong, A; Balamane, M; Schreier, L; Orido, M; Chepkenja, M; Kemboi, E; D'Antuono, M; Chan, P A; Emonyi, W; Diero, L; Coetzer, M; Kantor, R

    2016-01-01

    HemaSpot, a novel dried-blood storage filter device, was used for HIV-1 pol resistance testing in 30 fresh United States blood samples and 54 previously frozen Kenyan blood samples. Genotyping succeeded in 79% and 58% of samples, respectively, improved with shorter storage and higher viral load, and had good (86%) resistance mutation concordance to plasma.

  13. Simplified Paper Format for Detecting HIV Drug Resistance in Clinical Specimens by Oligonucleotide Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A.; Chung, Michael H.; Kiarie, James N.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Lutz, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic infection that can be managed by antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, periods of suboptimal viral suppression during lifelong ART can select for HIV drug resistant (DR) variants. Transmission of drug resistant virus can lessen or abrogate ART efficacy. Therefore, testing of individuals for drug resistance prior to initiation of treatment is recommended to ensure effective ART. Sensitive and inexpensive HIV genotyping methods are needed in low-resource settings where most HIV infections occur. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a sensitive point mutation assay for detection of drug resistance mutations in HIV pol. The current OLA involves four main steps from sample to analysis: (1) lysis and/or nucleic acid extraction, (2) amplification of HIV RNA or DNA, (3) ligation of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect single nucleotide mutations that confer HIV drug resistance, and (4) analysis via oligonucleotide surface capture, denaturation, and detection (CDD). The relative complexity of these steps has limited its adoption in resource-limited laboratories. Here we describe a simplification of the 2.5-hour plate-format CDD to a 45-minute paper-format CDD that eliminates the need for a plate reader. Analysis of mutations at four HIV-1 DR codons (K103N, Y181C, M184V, and G190A) in 26 blood specimens showed a strong correlation of the ratios of mutant signal to total signal between the paper CDD and the plate CDD. The assay described makes the OLA easier to perform in low resource laboratories. PMID:26751207

  14. Drug induced superinfection in HIV and the evolution of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Vladimir V; Maury, Wendy J; Hadany, Lilach

    2008-01-01

    The rapid evolution of HIV drug resistance is a major cause of AIDS treatment failure. Superinfection, the infection of an already infected cell by additional virions, can be a major factor contributing to the evolution of drug resistance. However, the pattern and consequences of superinfection in HIV populations are far from fully understood. In this paper we study the implications of the fact that superinfection is regulated by HIV. We propose that superinfection is negatively associated with the success of the virus, so that more successful viruses are less likely to allow superinfection. We use computational models to investigate the effect that regulated superinfection would have on the evolution of drug resistance in HIV population. We find that regulated, fitness-associated superinfection can provide a distinct advantage to the virus in adapting to anti-HIV drugs in comparison with unregulated superinfection. Based on the results of the computational models and on current biological evidence, we suggest that the mechanism of fitness-associated regulation of coinfection in HIV is plausible, and that its investigation can lead to new ways to fight viral drug resistance.

  15. Low-Frequency Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected Ugandans on Antiretroviral Treatment Is Associated with Regimen Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kyeyune, Fred; Gibson, Richard M.; Nankya, Immaculate; Venner, Colin; Metha, Samar; Akao, Juliet; Ndashimye, Emmanuel; Kityo, Cissy M.; Salata, Robert A.; Mugyenyi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Most patients failing antiretroviral treatment in Uganda continue to fail their treatment regimen even if a dominant drug-resistant HIV-1 genotype is not detected. In a recent retrospective study, we observed that approximately 30% of HIV-infected individuals in the Joint Clinical Research Centre (Kampala, Uganda) experienced virologic failure with a susceptible HIV-1 genotype based on standard Sanger sequencing. Selection of minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants (not detectable by Sanger sequencing) under antiretroviral therapy pressure can lead to a shift in the viral quasispecies distribution, becoming dominant members of the virus population and eventually causing treatment failure. Here, we used a novel HIV-1 genotyping assay based on deep sequencing (DeepGen) to quantify low-level drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in 33 patients failing a first-line antiretroviral treatment regimen in the absence of drug-resistant mutations, as screened by standard population-based Sanger sequencing. Using this sensitive assay, we observed that 64% (21/33) of these individuals had low-frequency (or minority) drug-resistant variants in the intrapatient HIV-1 population, which correlated with treatment failure. Moreover, the presence of these minority HIV-1 variants was associated with higher intrapatient HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a dynamic selection or fading of drug-resistant HIV-1 variants from the viral quasispecies in the presence or absence of drug pressure, respectively. This study identified low-frequency HIV drug resistance mutations by deep sequencing in Ugandan patients failing antiretroviral treatment but lacking dominant drug resistance mutations as determined by Sanger sequencing methods. We showed that these low-abundance drug-resistant viruses could have significant consequences for clinical outcomes, especially if treatment is not modified based on a susceptible HIV-1 genotype by Sanger sequencing. Therefore, we propose to make clinical decisions using more

  16. HIV Infection and Geographically Bound Transmission of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    López, Beatriz; Ambroggi, Marta; Palmero, Domingo; Salvadores, Bernardo; Gravina, Elida; Mazzeo, Eduardo; Imaz, Susana; Barrera, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    During 2003–2009, the National Tuberculosis (TB) Laboratory Network in Argentina gave 830 patients a new diagnosis of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and 53 a diagnosis of extensively drug- resistant (XDR) TB. HIV co-infection was involved in nearly one third of these cases. Strain genotyping showed that 7 major clusters gathered 56% of patients within restricted geographic areas. The 3 largest clusters corresponded to epidemic MDR TB strains that have been undergoing transmission for >10 years. The indigenous M strain accounted for 29% and 40% of MDR and XDR TB cases, respectively. Drug-resistant TB trends in Argentina are driven by spread of a few strains in hotspots where the rate of HIV infection is high. To curb transmission, the national TB program is focusing stringent interventions in these areas by strengthening infection control in large hospitals and prisons, expediting drug resistance detection, and streamlining information-sharing systems between HIV and TB programs. PMID:23092584

  17. The role of autophagy in THP-1 macrophages resistance to HIV- vpr-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua-Ying; Zheng, Yu-Huang; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Macrophages are resistant to cell death and are one of HIV reservoirs. HIV viral protein Vpr has the potential to promote infection of and survival of macrophages, which could be a highly significant factor in the development and/or maintenance of macrophage viral reservoirs. However, the impact of vpr on macrophages resistance to apoptosis is yet to be comprehended. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism under stress state. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is involved in macrophages resistant to vpr-induced apoptosis. Using the THP1 macrophages, we studied the interconnection between macrophages resistance to apoptosis and autophagy. We found that vpr is able to trigger autophagy in transfected THP-1 macrophages confirmed by electron microscopy (EM) and western blot analysis, and inhibition of autophagy with 3MA increased vpr-induced apoptosis. The results indicate that autophagy may be responsible for maintenance of macrophage HIV reservoirs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In Vitro Assessment of the Abrasion Resistance of Two Types of Artificial Teeth Submitted to Brushing.

    PubMed

    Policastro, Vivian Barnabé; Giro, Gabriela; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; Mendoza-Marin, Danny Omar; Paleari, André Gustavo; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio; Pero, Ana Carolina

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effect of brushing with different solutions on the abrasion resistance of two types of acrylic resin teeth. Maxillary premolars from two types of acrylic teeth (Biotone and Biotone IPN) were divided into six groups (n = 12), according to the solution used during brushing: distilled water (control), coconut soap, or dentifrice. A mechanical brushing machine was used to simulate approximately 1 year of brushing (11,000 strokes). The weight loss (WL) of teeth was obtained from the difference between the initial (IW) and final weight (FW) of each specimen, and the mean of percentage of weight loss (PWL) was calculated for each group. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Bonferroni's post-test comparison (α = 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found for the factor solution (p < 0.001). Brushing using dentifrice caused the highest values of weight loss (-0.50%), in comparison with the groups brushed with coconut soap (0.00%) or distilled water (0.00%). For both types of artificial teeth, brushing with dentifrice produced higher abrasion than brushing with coconut soap or water. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Burden in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Kyle J.; Hota, Bala; Aroutcheva, Alla; Kurien, Lisa; Patel, Janki; Lyles-Banks, Rosie; Grasso, Amanda E.; Spec, Andrej; Beavis, Kathleen G.; Hayden, Mary K.; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has had a disproportionate impact on patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods. We evaluated CA-MRSA colonization burden (number of colonized sites per total number sampled) among HIV-infected and HIV-negative inpatients within 72 hours of hospitalization. From March 2011 through April 2012, we obtained cultures from nasal and extranasal sites (throat, axilla, inguinal, perirectal, and chronic wound if present) and collected risk factor data. Results. Of 745 patients (374 HIV-infected, 371 HIV-negative), 15.7% were colonized with CA-MRSA at any site: 20% of HIV and 11% of HIV-negative patients (relative prevalence = 1.8, P = .002). HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of nasal, extranasal, and exclusive extranasal colonization as well as higher colonization burden. Perirectal and inguinal areas were the extranasal sites most frequently colonized, and 38.5% of colonized patients had exclusive extranasal colonization. Seventy-three percent of isolates were identified as USA300. Among HIV-infected patients, male sex, younger age, and recent incarceration were positively associated whereas Hispanic ethnicity was negatively associated with higher colonization burden. Among HIV-negative patients, temporary housing (homeless, shelter, or substance abuse center) was the only factor associated with higher colonization burden. Predictors of USA300 included HIV, younger age, illicit drug use, and male sex; all but 1 colonized individual with current or recent incarceration carried USA300. Conclusions. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have a higher CA-MRSA colonization burden and carry USA300. In certain populations, enhanced community and outpatient-based infection control strategies may be needed to prevent CA-MRSA cross-transmission and infection. PMID:23325428

  20. Natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations in HIV-1 protease with potential antiretroviral resistance: a bioinformatic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The correlations of genotypic and phenotypic tests with treatment, clinical history and the significance of mutations in viruses of HIV-infected patients are used to establish resistance mutations to protease inhibitors (PIs). Emerging mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease confer resistance to PIs by inducing structural changes at the ligand interaction site. The aim of this study was to establish an in silico structural relationship between natural HIV-1 polymorphisms and unusual HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to PIs. Results Protease sequences isolated from 151 Mexican HIV-1 patients that were naïve to, or subjected to antiretroviral therapy, were examined. We identified 41 unrelated resistance mutations with a prevalence greater than 1%. Among these mutations, nine exhibited positive selection, three were natural polymorphisms (L63S/V/H) in a codon associated with drug resistance, and six were unusual mutations (L5F, D29V, L63R/G, P79L and T91V). The D29V mutation, with a prevalence of 1.32% in the studied population, was only found in patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Using in silico modelling, we observed that D29V formed unstable protease complexes when were docked with lopinavir, saquinavir, darunavir, tipranavir, indinavir and atazanavir. Conclusions The structural correlation of natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations with drug resistance is useful for the identification of HIV-1 variants with potential resistance to PIs. The D29V mutation likely confers a selection advantage in viruses; however, in silico, presence of this mutation results in unstable enzyme/PI complexes, that possibly induce resistance to PIs. PMID:24629078

  1. Vpu-Mediated Counteraction of Tetherin Is a Major Determinant of HIV-1 Interferon Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, Dorota; Iyer, Shilpa S; Stürzel, Christina M; Sauter, Daniel; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-08-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) groups M, N, O, and P are the result of independent zoonotic transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting great apes in Africa. Among these, only Vpu proteins of pandemic HIV-1 group M strains evolved potent activity against the restriction factor tetherin, which inhibits virus release from infected cells. Thus, effective Vpu-mediated tetherin antagonism may have been a prerequisite for the global spread of HIV-1. To determine whether this particular function enhances primary HIV-1 replication and interferon resistance, we introduced mutations into the vpu genes of HIV-1 group M and N strains to specifically disrupt their ability to antagonize tetherin, but not other Vpu functions, such as degradation of CD4, down-modulation of CD1d and NTB-A, and suppression of NF-κB activity. Lack of particular human-specific adaptations reduced the ability of HIV-1 group M Vpu proteins to enhance virus production and release from primary CD4(+) T cells at high levels of type I interferon (IFN) from about 5-fold to 2-fold. Interestingly, transmitted founder HIV-1 strains exhibited higher virion release capacity than chronic control HIV-1 strains irrespective of Vpu function, and group M viruses produced higher levels of cell-free virions than an N group HIV-1 strain. Thus, efficient virus release from infected cells seems to play an important role in the spread of HIV-1 in the human population and requires a fully functional Vpu protein that counteracts human tetherin. Understanding which human-specific adaptations allowed HIV-1 to cause the AIDS pandemic is of great importance. One feature that distinguishes pandemic HIV-1 group M strains from nonpandemic or rare group O, N, and P viruses is the acquisition of mutations in the accessory Vpu protein that confer potent activity against human tetherin. Adaptation was required because human tetherin has a deletion that renders it resistant to the Nef protein used by

  2. HIV-1 group O integrase displays lower susceptibility to raltegravir and has a different mutational pathway for resistance than HIV-1 group M.

    PubMed

    Depatureaux, Agnès; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma; Wainberg, Mark

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 group O (HIV-O) is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase gene, e.g. positions L74I, S153A, G163Q and T206S. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on susceptibility to integrase inhibitors and emergence of resistance associated mutations. Viruses and Methods: We cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 Group O clades A (HIV-O/A) and B (HIV-O/B), a HIV-O divergent strain (HIV-O/Div), and HIV-1 group M (subtype B, HIV-M/B) and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of varying concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki) and IC50 were calculated and compared for HIV-M and HIV-O integrases. Selections for resistance-related mutations were performed using cord blood mononuclear cells and increasing concentration of INSTIs. HIV-O integrase and viruses were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL) in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. During selection, we observed different pathways of resistance depending on the drug and clade. Mutations selected in HIV-O can be classified as follows: (1) mutations described for HIV-M such as T97A, Q148R, V151A/I (RAL), T66I, E92Q, E157Q (EVG) and M50I, R263K (DTG) and (2) signature mutations for HIV-O (i.e. not described in HIV-M) F121C (HIV-O/B for RAL), V75I (HIV-O/A for RAL) and S153V (HIV-O/A for DTG). Only the HIV-O/Div selected the Q148R mutation for RAL and R263K+M50I for DTG, as previously described for HIV-M. None of the HIV-O viruses selected either N155H or Y143C. The selection of the specific S153V mutation could be explained at the nucleotide level: HIV-O at this position contains an alanine and substitution of alanine to valine (153AGGC→153VGTC

  3. Clonal plasticity of aquatic plant species submitted to mechanical stress: escape versus resistance strategy.

    PubMed

    Puijalon, Sara; Bouma, Tjeerd J; van Groenendael, Jan; Bornette, Gudrun

    2008-12-01

    The plastic alterations of clonal architecture are likely to have functional consequences, as they affect the spatial distribution of ramets over patchy environments. However, little is known about the effect of mechanical stresses on the clonal growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clonal plasticity induced by mechanical stress consisting of continuous water current encountered by aquatic plants. More particularly, the aim was to test the capacity of the plants to escape this stress through clonal plastic responses. The transplantation of ramets of the same clone in two contrasting flow velocity conditions was carried out for two species (Potamogeton coloratus and Mentha aquatica) which have contrasting clonal growth forms. Relative allocation to clonal growth, to creeping stems in the clonal biomass, number and total length of creeping stems, spacer length and main creeping stem direction were measured. For P. coloratus, plants exposed to water current displayed increased total length of creeping stems, increased relative allocation to creeping stems within the clonal dry mass and increased spacer length. For M. aquatica, plants exposed to current displayed increased number and total length of creeping stems. Exposure to current induced for both species a significant increase of the proportion of creeping stems in the downstream direction to the detriment of creeping stems perpendicular to flow. This study demonstrates that mechanical stress from current flow induced plastic variation in clonal traits for both species. The responses of P. coloratus could lead to an escape strategy, with low benefits with respect to sheltering and anchorage. The responses of M. aquatica that may result in a denser canopy and enhancement of anchorage efficiency could lead to a resistance strategy.

  4. Clonal Plasticity of Aquatic Plant Species Submitted to Mechanical Stress: Escape versus Resistance Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Puijalon, Sara; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Van Groenendael, Jan; Bornette, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The plastic alterations of clonal architecture are likely to have functional consequences, as they affect the spatial distribution of ramets over patchy environments. However, little is known about the effect of mechanical stresses on the clonal growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clonal plasticity induced by mechanical stress consisting of continuous water current encountered by aquatic plants. More particularly, the aim was to test the capacity of the plants to escape this stress through clonal plastic responses. Methods The transplantation of ramets of the same clone in two contrasting flow velocity conditions was carried out for two species (Potamogeton coloratus and Mentha aquatica) which have contrasting clonal growth forms. Relative allocation to clonal growth, to creeping stems in the clonal biomass, number and total length of creeping stems, spacer length and main creeping stem direction were measured. Key Results For P. coloratus, plants exposed to water current displayed increased total length of creeping stems, increased relative allocation to creeping stems within the clonal dry mass and increased spacer length. For M. aquatica, plants exposed to current displayed increased number and total length of creeping stems. Exposure to current induced for both species a significant increase of the proportion of creeping stems in the downstream direction to the detriment of creeping stems perpendicular to flow. Conclusions This study demonstrates that mechanical stress from current flow induced plastic variation in clonal traits for both species. The responses of P. coloratus could lead to an escape strategy, with low benefits with respect to sheltering and anchorage. The responses of M. aquatica that may result in a denser canopy and enhancement of anchorage efficiency could lead to a resistance strategy. PMID:18854376

  5. Increasing trends in primary NNRTI resistance among newly HIV-1-diagnosed individuals in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Duran, Adriana; Bouzas, María Belen; Zapiola, Ines; Vila, Marcelo; Indyk, Debbie; Bissio, Emiliano; Salomon, Horacio; Dilernia, Dario A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to estimate primary resistance in an urban setting in a developing country characterized by high antiretroviral (ARV) coverage over the diagnosed population and also by an important proportion of undiagnosed individuals, in order to determine whether any change in primary resistance occurred in the past five years. Design We carried out a multi-site resistance surveillance study according to WHO HIV resistance guidelines, using a weighted sampling technique based on annual HIV case reports per site. Methods Blood samples were collected from 197 drug-naive HIV-1-infected individuals diagnosed between March 2010 and August 2011 at 20 HIV voluntary counselling and testing centres in Buenos Aires. Clinical records of enrolled patients at the time of diagnosis were compiled. Viral load and CD4 counts were performed on all samples. The pol gene was sequenced and the resistance profile determined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed by neighbour-joining (NJ) trees and bootscanning analysis. Results We found that 12 (7.9%) of the 152 successfully sequenced samples harboured primary resistance mutations, of which K103N and G190A were the most prevalent. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) resistance mutations were largely the most prevalent (5.9%), accounting for 75% of all primary resistance and exhibiting a significant increase (p=0.0072) in prevalence during the past 10 years as compared to our previous study performed in 1997–2000 and in 2003–2005. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and protease inhibitor primary resistance were low and similar to the one previously reported. Conclusions Levels of primary NNRTI resistance in Buenos Aires appear to be increasing in the context of a sustained ARV coverage and a high proportion of undiagnosed HIV-positive individuals. PMID:24093951

  6. Biochemical Mechanism of HIV-1 Resistance to Rilpivirine*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamalendra; Marchand, Bruno; Rai, Devendra K.; Sharma, Bechan; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ryan, Emily M.; Matzek, Kayla B.; Leslie, Maxwell D.; Hagedorn, Ariel N.; Li, Zhe; Norden, Pieter R.; Hachiya, Atsuko; Parniak, Michael A.; Xu, Hong-Tao; Wainberg, Mark A.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is a second generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI) that efficiently inhibits HIV-1 resistant to first generation NNRTIs. Virological failure during therapy with RPV and emtricitabine is associated with the appearance of E138K and M184I mutations in RT. Here we investigate the biochemical mechanism of RT inhibition and resistance to RPV. We used two transient kinetics approaches (quench-flow and stopped-flow) to determine how subunit-specific mutations in RT p66 or p51 affect association and dissociation of RPV to RT as well as their impact on binding of dNTP and DNA and the catalytic incorporation of nucleotide. We compared WT with four subunit-specific RT mutants, p66M184I/p51WT, p66E138K/p51E138K, p66E138K/M184I/p51E138K, and p66M184I/p51E138K. Ile-184 in p66 (p66184I) decreased the catalytic efficiency of RT (kpol/Kd.dNTP), primarily through a decrease in dNTP binding (Kd.dNTP). Lys-138 either in both subunits or in p51 alone abrogated the negative effect of p66184I by restoring dNTP binding. Furthermore, p51138K reduced RPV susceptibility by altering the ratio of RPV dissociation to RPV association, resulting in a net reduction in RPV equilibrium binding affinity (Kd.RPV = koff.RPV/kon.RPV). Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics hybrid molecular modeling revealed that p51E138K affects access to the RPV binding site by disrupting the salt bridge between p51E138 and p66K101. p66184I caused repositioning of the Tyr-183 active site residue and decreased the efficiency of RT, whereas the addition of p51138K restored Tyr-183 to a WT-like conformation, thus abrogating the Ile-184-induced functional defects. PMID:22955279

  7. Current status of HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance monitoring in the former USSR.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Marina

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the available data on the molecular epidemiology of HIV and the transmission of HIV drug resistance in the former USSR (FSU) in recent decades. The data presented here were obtained from publications or personal communication with colleagues in these countries as well as from studies the author was involved in. The molecular epidemiology data demonstrate the preservation of a relatively low diversity of HIV-1 in FSU countries, where infections are predominantly caused by subtype A, IDU-A variant. Subtype B was the second most common variant, followed by CRF03_AB and CRF02_AG, with CRF02_AG spreading rapidly in Central Asian countries and the Asian part of Russia. Mosaic variants formed from CRF02_AG and IDU-A were found elsewhere, as were subtypes C, G, and CRF01_AE. The status of HIV drug resistance monitoring in FSU countries is cause for serious concern because, so far, no regular action has been undertaken. HIV genotyping has been available in Russia for several years and is becoming accessible to patients in Belarus, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan. Nevertheless, this subject has not been systematically studied, and no data have been presented to the scientific community. Several recent studies suggest a low level of HIV drug resistance transmission in the FSU (3-7%); however, problems with irregular drug supply and possible low adherence may lead to the rapid growth of these figures. These findings support the urgent need to develop a shared HIV drug resistance monitoring system for FSU countries to better control the HIV epidemic in the region.

  8. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Delaugerre, Constance; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stephane; Warszawski, Josiane; Cornet, Dorine; Dollfus, Catherine; Schneider, Veronique; Burgard, Marianne; Faye, Albert; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tubiana, Roland; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%): drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available) and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8) suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10) and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8) suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%), drug resistance was archived in

  9. The analysis of HIV/AIDS drug-resistant on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoxing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) drug-resistant model using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model on scale-free networks. We derive the threshold for the epidemic to be zero in infinite scale-free network. We also prove the stability of disease-free equilibrium (DFE) and persistence of HIV/AIDS infection. The effects of two immunization schemes, including proportional scheme and targeted vaccination, are studied and compared. We find that targeted strategy compare favorably to a proportional condom using has prominent effect to control HIV/AIDS spread on scale-free networks.

  10. [Comparison of three genotyping methods for the detection of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs].

    PubMed

    Suárez, A; Picazo, J; Alonso, R; Bouza, E; Delgado, R; Rodríguez-Noriega, A; Bernal, A; García, A

    2002-03-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (P) genes confer drug failure. Evaluation of drug resistance genotyping in HIV-1 has proven to be useful for the selection of drug combinations with maximum antiretroviral activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal procedure to determine the resistance profile in the laboratory. Plasma from 90 antiretroviral-treated patients was analyzed by reverse hybridization, which identifies the presence of wild-types or mutations at the 19 key codons for protease and RT regions, and was compared with two other methods of direct cDNA sequencing. A total of 408 mutations were detected by InnoLiPA HIV-1, (Line Probe Assay, Innogenetics, Belgium), 572 by TrueGene HIV-1 Genotyping System (Visible Genetics, Canada), and 721 by ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System (Perkin Elmer/Applied Biosystems, California). Hybridization detected a significantly higher number of primary mutations which are associated with a high level of drug resistance (p <0.001). Hybridization also detected a higher number of mixtures of wild-type and mutant viruses. There was a good concordance among the three methods, although it was higher between the two sequencing methods. Sequencing determines a higher number of mutations, but hybridization better identifies primary mutations correlated with a high level of drug resistance. Hybridization is more suitable for detecting mixed populations and is easier to implement in clinical laboratories but does not eliminate the need for sequence analysis for detection of drug-resistant HIV.

  11. Relative resistance of HIV-1 founder viruses to control by interferon-alpha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Following mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission, type 1 interferons (IFNs) are rapidly induced at sites of initial virus replication in the mucosa and draining lymph nodes. However, the role played by IFN-stimulated antiviral activity in restricting HIV-1 replication during the initial stages of infection is not clear. We hypothesized that if type 1 IFNs exert selective pressure on HIV-1 replication in the earliest stages of infection, the founder viruses that succeed in establishing systemic infection would be more IFN-resistant than viruses replicating during chronic infection, when type 1 IFNs are produced at much lower levels. To address this hypothesis, the relative resistance of virus isolates derived from HIV-1-infected individuals during acute and chronic infection to control by type 1 IFNs was analysed. Results The replication of plasma virus isolates generated from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 and molecularly cloned founder HIV-1 strains could be reduced but not fully suppressed by type 1 IFNs in vitro. The mean IC50 value for IFNα2 (22 U/ml) was lower than that for IFNβ (346 U/ml), although at maximally-inhibitory concentrations both IFN subtypes inhibited virus replication to similar extents. Individual virus isolates exhibited differential susceptibility to inhibition by IFNα2 and IFNβ, likely reflecting variation in resistance to differentially up-regulated IFN-stimulated genes. Virus isolates from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 were significantly more resistant to in vitro control by IFNα than virus isolates generated from the same individuals during chronic, asymptomatic infection. Viral IFN resistance declined rapidly after the acute phase of infection: in five subjects, viruses derived from six-month consensus molecular clones were significantly more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFNs than the corresponding founder viruses. Conclusions The establishment of systemic HIV-1 infection by

  12. Nevirapine resistance by timing of HIV type 1 infection in infants treated with single-dose nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Micek, Mark A; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A; Dross, Sandra; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Seidel, Kristy; Gantt, Soren; Matediane, Eduardo; Jamisse, Lilia; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2010-05-15

    In women, single-dose nevirapine for prophylaxis against mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) selects for nevirapine-resistant HIV-1, which subsequently decays rapidly. We hypothesized that the selection, acquisition, and decay of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 differs in infants, varying by the timing of HIV-1 infection. We conducted a prospective, observational study of 740 Mozambican infants receiving single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis and determined the timing of infection and concentrations of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 over time. Infants with established in utero infection had a high rate (87.0%) of selection of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 mutants, which rapidly decayed to undetectable levels. The few without nevirapine resistance received zidovudine with single-dose nevirapine and/or their mothers took alternative antiretroviral drugs. Infants with acute in utero infection had a lower rate of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 (33.3%; P = .006, compared with established in utero infection), but mutants persisted over time. Infants with peripartum infection also had a lower rate of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 (38.1%; P = .001, compared with established in utero infection) but often acquired 100% mutant virus that persisted over time (P = .017, compared with established in utero infection). The detection and persistence of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 in infants after single-dose nevirapine therapy vary by the timing of infection and the antiretroviral regimen. In infants with persistent high-level nevirapine-resistant HIV-1, nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy is unlikely to ever be efficacious because of concentrations in long-lived viral reservoirs. However, the absence or decay of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 in many infants suggests that nevirapine antiretroviral therapy may be effective if testing can identify these individuals.

  13. Nevirapine Resistance by Timing of HIV Type 1 Infection in Infants Treated with Single-Dose Nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Micek, Mark A.; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A.; Dross, Sandra; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Seidel, Kristy; Gantt, Soren; Matediane, Eduardo; Jamisse, Lilia; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Background In women, single-dose nevirapine for prophylaxis against mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) selects for nevirapine-resistant HIV-1, which subsequently decays rapidly. We hypothesized that the selection, acquisition, and decay of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 differs in infants, varying by the timing of HIV-1 infection. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of 740 Mozambican infants receiving single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis and determined the timing of infection and concentrations of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 over time. Results Infants with established in utero infection had a high rate (87.0%) of selection of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 mutants, which rapidly decayed to undetectable levels. The few without nevirapine resistance received zidovudine with single-dose nevirapine and/or their mothers took alternative antiretroviral drugs. Infants with acute in utero infection had a lower rate of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 (33.3%; P =.006, compared with established in utero infection), but mutants persisted over time. Infants with peripartum infection also had a lower rate of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 (38.1%; P =.001, compared with established in utero infection) but often acquired 100% mutant virus that persisted over time (P =.017, compared with established in utero infection). Conclusions The detection and persistence of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 in infants after single-dose nevirapine therapy vary by the timing of infection and the antiretroviral regimen. In infants with persistent high-level nevirapine-resistant HIV-1, nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy is unlikely to ever be efficacious because of concentrations in long-lived viral reservoirs. However, the absence or decay of nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 in many infants suggests that nevirapine antiretroviral therapy may be effective if testing can identify these individuals. PMID:20384494

  14. Surveillance of HIV type 1 drug resistance among naive patients from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Julio; Comegna, Mario; Quijada, Wilmary; Jauvin, Valérie; Pinson, Patricia; Masquelier, Bernard; Fleury, Hervé; Castro, Erika

    2009-12-01

    We have studied 65 HIV-1-infected untreated patients recruited in Caracas, Venezuela with TCD4 counts > or =350/microl. The reverse transcriptase and protease sequences of the virus were sequenced, aligned with reference HIV-1 group M strains, and analyzed for drug resistance mutations. Most of the viruses were subtype B genotype in both the protease and RT genomic regions. Five of the 62 virus isolates successfully amplified showed evidence of recombination between protease and RT, with their protease region being non-B while their RT region was derived from subtype B. Four strains were found bearing resistance mutations either to NRTIs, NNRTIs, or PIs. The prevalence of HIV-1 isolates bearing resistance mutations was therefore above the 5% threshold of WHO.

  15. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  16. Evolution of Primary HIV Drug Resistance in a Subtype C Dominated Epidemic in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Bila, Dulce Celina Adolfo; Young, Peter; Merks, Harriet; Vubil, Adolfo Salvador; Mahomed, Mussagy; Augusto, Angelo; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Mabunda, Nédio Jonas; Brooks, James I.; Tanuri, Amilcar; Jani, Ilesh Vinodrai

    2013-01-01

    Objective In Mozambique, highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) was introduced in 2004 followed by decentralization and expansion, resulting in a more than 20-fold increase in coverage by 2009. Implementation of HIV drug resistance threshold surveys (HIVDR-TS) is crucial in order to monitor the emergence of transmitted viral resistance, and to produce evidence-based recommendations to support antiretroviral (ARV) policy in Mozambique. Methods World Health Organization (WHO) methodology was used to evaluate transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected pregnant women attending ante-natal clinics in Maputo and Beira to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Subtypes were assigned using REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool and phylogenetic trees constructed using MEGA version 5. Results Although mutations associated with resistance to all three drug were detected in these surveys, transmitted resistance was analyzed and classified as <5% in Maputo in both surveys for all three drug classes. Transmitted resistance to NNRTI in Beira in 2009 was classified between 5–15%, an increase from 2007 when no NNRTI mutations were found. All sequences clustered with subtype C. Conclusions Our results show that the epidemic is dominated by subtype C, where the first-line option based on two NRTI and one NNRTI is still effective for treatment of HIV infection, but intermediate levels of TDR found in Beira reinforce the need for constant evaluation with continuing treatment expansion in Mozambique. PMID:23935858

  17. Declining prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in antiretroviral treatment-exposed individuals in Western Europe.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Andrea; Dunn, David; Zazzi, Maurizio; Camacho, Ricardo; Torti, Carlo; Fanti, Iuri; Kaiser, Rolf; Sönnerborg, Anders; Codoñer, Francisco M; Van Laethem, Kristel; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Bansi, Loveleen; Ghisetti, Valeria; van de Vijver, David A M C; Asboe, David; Prosperi, Mattia C F; Di Giambenedetto, Simona

    2013-04-15

    HIV-1 drug resistance represents a major obstacle to infection and disease control. This retrospective study analyzes trends and determinants of resistance in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-exposed individuals across 7 countries in Europe. Of 20 323 cases, 80% carried at least one resistance mutation: these declined from 81% in 1997 to 71% in 2008. Predicted extensive 3-class resistance was rare (3.2% considering the cumulative genotype) and peaked at 4.5% in 2005, decreasing thereafter. The proportion of cases exhausting available drug options dropped from 32% in 2000 to 1% in 2008. Reduced risk of resistance over calendar years was confirmed by multivariable analysis.

  18. HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations among people seeking HIV diagnosis in voluntary counseling and testing sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Velasco-de-Castro, Carlos A; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Bastos, Francisco I; Pilotto, José H; Fernandes, Nilo; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs) sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005-2007. Recent (RS) and long-term (LTS) HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005-2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR) Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6%) or age (<25yo 17.9% vs >25yo 16.6%) along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF/URF emergence

  19. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations Among Treatment-Naive Adult Patients in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Abdoel Wahid, Firoz; Sno, Rachel; Darcissac, Edith; Lavergne, Anne; Adhin, Malti R; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    The molecular epidemiologic profile of HIV-1 in Suriname was determined through protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences obtained from HIV-1 strains collected from 100 drug-naive HIV-1-infected persons. Subtype determination revealed that most viruses were of subtype B (94.9%) in both PR and RT genomic regions, followed by B/D recombinants (5.1%). Analysis of drug resistance mutations showed only one transmitted dug resistance mutation (TDRM) (V75M) in a single strain. The genetic data obtained can serve as a baseline for Suriname to monitor emerging mutations. This study reveals that the HIV-1 epidemic in Suriname is still characterized by a low TDRM rate (1%) and a low level of subtype diversity. However, both genes display a high genetic polymorphism. This high polymorphism may ultimately lead to drug resistance. Continuous monitoring of the baseline resistance is therefore a prerequisite to safeguard effective long-term treatment for people living with HIV-1 in Suriname.

  20. Development of antiretroviral resistance in children with HIV in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Felicity; Penazzato, Martina; Gibb, Diana

    2013-06-15

    With antiretroviral therapy (ART) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for children aged <2 years with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and continuing global ART roll-out, ART coverage in children is rising. However ART coverage in children lags considerably behind that in adults (28% vs 58%). Long duration of therapy needed for HIV-infected children requires maximal efficacy, minimal toxicity, and prevention of development of drug resistance. This requires consideration of ways to improve sequencing of regimens during childhood to minimize development of resistance and treatment failure. We consider aspects of virological failure and development of resistance in vertically HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings. We review evidence guiding choices of first- and second-line ART, the impact of drugs given to prevent mother-to-child transmission, adherence issues and, availability of appropriate drug formulations. Recommendations made during the Collaborative HIV and Anti-HIV Drug Resistance Network (CHAIN)/WHO meeting (October 2012) are summarized.

  1. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance using a protein-inhibitor flexible docking approach.

    PubMed

    Jenwitheesuk, Ekachai; Samudrala, Ram

    2005-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance remains one of the most challenging issues in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Here we focus on resistance to HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) at a molecular level, which can be analysed genotypically or phenotypically. Genotypic assays are based on the analysis of mutations associated with reduced drug susceptibility, but are problematic because of the numerous mutations and mutational patterns that confer drug resistance. Phenotypic resistance or susceptibility can be experimentally evaluated by measuring the amount of free drug bound to HIV-1 protease molecules, but this procedure is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome these problems, we have developed a docking protocol that takes protein-inhibitor flexibility into account to predict phenotypic drug resistance. For six FDA-approved Pls and a total of 1792 HIV-1 protease sequence mutants, we used a combination of inhibitor flexible docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate protein-inhibitor binding energies. Prediction results were expressed as fold changes of the calculated inhibitory constant (Ki), and the samples predicted to have fold-increase in calculated Ki above the fixed cut-off were defined as drug resistant. Our combined docking and MD protocol achieved accuracies ranging from 72-83% in predicting resistance/susceptibility for five of the six drugs evaluated. Evaluating the method only on samples where our predictions concurred with established knowledge-based methods resulted in increased accuracies of 83-94% for the six drugs. The results suggest that a physics-based approach, which is readily applicable to any novel PI and/or mutant, can be used judiciously with knowledge-based approaches that require experimental training data to devise accurate models of HIV-1 Pl resistance prediction.

  2. HIV behind bars: human immunodeficiency virus cluster analysis and drug resistance in a reference correctional unit from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Prellwitz, Isabel M; Alves, Brunna M; Ikeda, Maria Letícia R; Kuhleis, Daniele; Picon, Pedro D; Jarczewski, Carla A; Osório, Marta R; Sánchez, Alexandra; Seuánez, Héctor N; Larouzé, Bernard; Soares, Marcelo A; Soares, Esmeralda A

    2013-01-01

    People deprived of liberty in prisons are at higher risk of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to their increased exposure through intravenous drug use, unprotected sexual activity, tattooing in prison and blood exposure in fights and rebellions. Yet, the contribution of intramural HIV transmission to the epidemic is scarcely known, especially in low- and middle-income settings. In this study, we surveyed 1,667 inmates incarcerated at Presídio Central de Porto Alegre, located in southern Brazil, for HIV infection and molecular characterization. The HIV seroprevalence was 6.6% (110/1,667). Further analyses were carried out on 40 HIV-seropositive inmates to assess HIV transmission clusters and drug resistance within the facility with the use of molecular and phylogenetic techniques. The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 subtypes observed was similar to the one reported for the general population in southern Brazil, with the predominance of HIV-1 subtypes C, B, CRF31_BC and unique BC recombinants. In particular, the high rate (24%) of URF_BC found here may reflect multiple exposures of the population investigated to HIV infection. We failed to find HIV-infected inmates sharing transmission clusters with each other. Importantly, the analysis of HIV-1 pol genomic fragments evidenced high rates of HIV primary and secondary (acquired) drug resistance and an alarming proportion of virologic failure among patients under treatment, unveiling suboptimal access to antiretroviral therapy (ARV), low ARV adherence and dissemination of drug resistant HIV strains in primary infections. Our results call for immediate actions of public authority to implement preventive measures, serological screening and, for HIV-seropositive subjects, clinical and treatment follow-up in order to control HIV infection and limit the spread of drug resistance strains in Brazilian prisons.

  3. HIV behind Bars: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cluster Analysis and Drug Resistance in a Reference Correctional Unit from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Letícia R.; Kuhleis, Daniele; Picon, Pedro D.; Jarczewski, Carla A.; Osório, Marta R.; Sánchez, Alexandra; Seuánez, Héctor N.; Larouzé, Bernard; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soares, Esmeralda A.

    2013-01-01

    People deprived of liberty in prisons are at higher risk of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to their increased exposure through intravenous drug use, unprotected sexual activity, tattooing in prison and blood exposure in fights and rebellions. Yet, the contribution of intramural HIV transmission to the epidemic is scarcely known, especially in low- and middle-income settings. In this study, we surveyed 1,667 inmates incarcerated at Presídio Central de Porto Alegre, located in southern Brazil, for HIV infection and molecular characterization. The HIV seroprevalence was 6.6% (110/1,667). Further analyses were carried out on 40 HIV-seropositive inmates to assess HIV transmission clusters and drug resistance within the facility with the use of molecular and phylogenetic techniques. The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 subtypes observed was similar to the one reported for the general population in southern Brazil, with the predominance of HIV-1 subtypes C, B, CRF31_BC and unique BC recombinants. In particular, the high rate (24%) of URF_BC found here may reflect multiple exposures of the population investigated to HIV infection. We failed to find HIV-infected inmates sharing transmission clusters with each other. Importantly, the analysis of HIV-1 pol genomic fragments evidenced high rates of HIV primary and secondary (acquired) drug resistance and an alarming proportion of virologic failure among patients under treatment, unveiling suboptimal access to antiretroviral therapy (ARV), low ARV adherence and dissemination of drug resistant HIV strains in primary infections. Our results call for immediate actions of public authority to implement preventive measures, serological screening and, for HIV-seropositive subjects, clinical and treatment follow-up in order to control HIV infection and limit the spread of drug resistance strains in Brazilian prisons. PMID:23874857

  4. An international multicenter study on HIV-1 drug resistance testing by 454 ultra-deep pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Simen, Birgitte B; Braverman, Michael S; Abbate, Isabella; Aerssens, Jeroen; Bidet, Yannick; Bouchez, Olivier; Gabriel, Christian; Izopet, Jacques; Kessler, Harald H; Stelzl, Evelyn; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlapbach, Ralph; Radonic, Aleksander; Paredes, Roger; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Sakwa, James; St John, Elizabeth P; Schmitz-Agheguian, Gudrun G; Metzner, Karin J; Däumer, Martin P

    2014-08-01

    The detection of mutant spectra within the viral quasispecies is critical for therapeutic management of HIV-1 infections. Routine clinical application of ultrasensitive genotyping requires reproducibility and concordance within and between laboratories. The goal of the study was to evaluate a new protocol on HIV-1 drug resistance testing by 454 ultra-deep pyrosequencing (454-UDS) in an international multicenter study. Sixteen blinded HIV-1 subtype B samples were provided for 454-UDS as both RNA and cDNA with viral titers of 88,600-573,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. Eight overlapping amplicons spanning protease (PR) codons 10-99 and reverse transcriptase (RT) codons 1-251 were generated using molecular barcoded primers. 454-UDS was performed using the 454 Life Sciences/Roche GS FLX platform. PR and RT sequences were analyzed using 454 Life Sciences Amplicon Variant Analyzer (AVA) software. Quantified variation data were analyzed for intra-laboratory reproducibility and inter-laboratory concordance. Routine population sequencing was performed using the ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system. Eleven laboratories and the reference laboratory 454 Life Sciences sequenced the HIV-1 sample set. Data presented are derived from seven laboratories and the reference laboratory since severe study protocol execution errors occurred in four laboratories leading to exclusion. The median sequencing depth across all sites was 1364 reads per position (IQR=809-2065). 100% of the ViroSeq-reported mutations were also detected by 454-UDS. Minority HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, defined as HIV-1 drug resistance mutations identified at frequencies of 1-25%, were only detected by 454-UDS. Analysis of 10 preselected majority and minority mutations were consistently found across sites. The analysis of drug-resistance mutations detected between 1 and 10% demonstrated high intra- and inter-laboratory consistency in frequency estimates for both RNA and prepared cDNA samples, indicating robustness of the

  5. Antiretroviral drug use and HIV drug resistance among HIV-infected Black men who have sex with men: HIV Prevention Trials Network 061

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Connor, Matthew B.; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A.; Cummings, Vanessa; Breaud, Autumn; Fogel, Jessica M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Fields, Sheldon D.; Donnell, Deborah; Griffith, Sam; Scott, Hyman M.; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HPTN 061 enrolled Black men who have sex with men in the United States. Some men with low/undetectable HIV RNA had unusual patterns of antiretroviral (ARV) drug use or had drugs detected in the absence of viral suppression. This report includes a comprehensive analysis of ARV drug use and drug resistance among men in HPTN 061 who were not virally suppressed. METHODS The analysis included 169 men who had viral loads >400 copies/mL at enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection. By self-report, 88 were previously diagnosed, including 31 in care; 137 men reported no ARV drug use. Samples from these 169 men and 23 seroconverters were analyzed with HIV genotyping and ARV drug assays. RESULTS Forty-eight (28%) of the 169 men had ≥1 drug resistance mutation (DRM); 19 (11%) had multi-class resistance. Sixty men (36%) had ≥1 ARV drug detected, 42 (70%) of whom reported no ARV drug use. Nine (23%) of 39 newly-infected men had ≥1 DRM; 10 had ≥1 ARV drug detected. Unusual patterns of ARV drugs were detected more frequently in newly-diagnosed men than previously-diagnosed men. The rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was 23% based on HIV genotyping and self-reported ARV drug use, but was 12% after adjusting for ARV drug detection. CONCLUSIONS Many men in HPTN 061 had drug-resistant HIV and many were at risk of acquiring additional DRMs. ARV drug testing revealed unusual patterns of ARV drug use and provided a more accurate estimate of TDR. PMID:25861015

  6. Substrate mimicry—overcoming HIV-1 integrase resistance mutations | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    HIV integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are among the newest anti-AIDS drugs; however, mutant forms of IN can confer resistance. We developed noncytotoxic naphthyridine-containing INSTIs that retain low nanomolar IC50 values against HIV-1 variants harboring all of the major INSTI-resistant mutations. We found by analyzing crystal structures of inhibitors bound to the IN from the prototype foamy virus (PFV) that the most successful inhibitors show striking mimicry of the bound viral DNA prior to 3'-processing and the bound host DNA prior to strand transfer.

  7. Enhanced antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 variants that are resistant to fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muntasir; Kuwata, Takeo; Shimura, Kazuya; Yokoyama, Masaru; Ramirez Valdez, Kristel Paola; Tanaka, Kazuki; Maruta, Yasuhiro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Sato, Hironori; Matsuoka, Masao; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2016-09-27

    HIV-1 typically develops resistance to any single antiretroviral agent. Combined anti-retroviral therapy to reduce drug-resistance development is necessary to control HIV-1 infection. Here, to assess the utility of a combination of antibody and fusion inhibitor treatments, we investigated the potency of monoclonal antibodies at neutralizing HIV-1 variants that are resistant to fusion inhibitors. Mutations that confer resistance to four fusion inhibitors, enfuvirtide, C34, SC34, and SC34EK, were introduced into the envelope of HIV-1JR-FL, a CCR5-tropic tier 2 strain. Pseudoviruses with these mutations were prepared and used for the assessment of neutralization sensitivity to an array of antibodies. The resulting neutralization data indicate that the potencies of some antibodies, especially of those against the CD4 binding site, V3 loop, and membrane-proximal external region epitopes, were increased by the mutations in gp41 that conferred resistance to the fusion inhibitors. C34-, SC34-, and SC34EK-resistant mutants showed more sensitivity to monoclonal antibodies than enfuvirtide-resistant mutants. An analysis of C34-resistant mutations revealed that the I37K mutation in gp41 HR1 is a key mutation for C34 resistance, low infectivity, neutralization sensitivity, epitope exposure, and slow fusion kinetics. The N126K mutation in the gp41 HR2 domain contributed to C34 resistance and neutralization sensitivity to anti-CD4 binding site antibodies. In the absence of L204I, the effect of N126K was antagonistic to that of I37K. The results of a molecular dynamic simulation of the envelope trimer confirmation suggest that an I37K mutation induces the augmentation of structural fluctuations prominently in the interface between gp41 and gp120. Our observations indicate that the "conformational unmasking" of envelope glycoprotein by an I37K mutation is one of the mechanisms of neutralization sensitivity enhancement. Furthermore, the enhanced neutralization of C34-resistant

  8. Vpu-Mediated Counteraction of Tetherin Is a Major Determinant of HIV-1 Interferon Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kmiec, Dorota; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Stürzel, Christina M.; Sauter, Daniel; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) groups M, N, O, and P are the result of independent zoonotic transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting great apes in Africa. Among these, only Vpu proteins of pandemic HIV-1 group M strains evolved potent activity against the restriction factor tetherin, which inhibits virus release from infected cells. Thus, effective Vpu-mediated tetherin antagonism may have been a prerequisite for the global spread of HIV-1. To determine whether this particular function enhances primary HIV-1 replication and interferon resistance, we introduced mutations into the vpu genes of HIV-1 group M and N strains to specifically disrupt their ability to antagonize tetherin, but not other Vpu functions, such as degradation of CD4, down-modulation of CD1d and NTB-A, and suppression of NF-κB activity. Lack of particular human-specific adaptations reduced the ability of HIV-1 group M Vpu proteins to enhance virus production and release from primary CD4+ T cells at high levels of type I interferon (IFN) from about 5-fold to 2-fold. Interestingly, transmitted founder HIV-1 strains exhibited higher virion release capacity than chronic control HIV-1 strains irrespective of Vpu function, and group M viruses produced higher levels of cell-free virions than an N group HIV-1 strain. Thus, efficient virus release from infected cells seems to play an important role in the spread of HIV-1 in the human population and requires a fully functional Vpu protein that counteracts human tetherin. PMID:27531907

  9. HIV drug resistance in infants increases with changing prevention of mother-to-child transmission regimens.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Lisa K; Chunda-Liyoka, Catherine; Kwon, Eun H; Gondwe, Clement; West, John T; Kankasa, Chipepo; Ndongmo, Clement B; Wood, Charles

    2017-08-24

    The objectives of this study were to determine HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) prevalence in Zambian infants upon diagnosis, and to determine how changing prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) drug regimens affect drug resistance. Dried blood spot (DBS) samples from infants in the Lusaka District of Zambia, obtained during routine diagnostic screening, were collected during four different years representing three different PMTCT drug treatment regimens. DNA extracted from dried blood spot samples was used to sequence a 1493 bp region of the reverse transcriptase gene. Sequences were analyzed via the Stanford HIVDRdatabase (http://hivdb.standford.edu) to screen for resistance mutations. HIVDR in infants increased from 21.5 in 2007/2009 to 40.2% in 2014. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance increased steadily over the sampling period, whereas nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance and dual class resistance both increased more than threefold in 2014. Analysis of drug resistance scores in each group revealed increasing strength of resistance over time. In 2014, children with reported PMTCT exposure, defined as infant prophylaxis and/or maternal treatment, showed a higher prevalence and strength of resistance compared to those with no reported exposure. HIVDR is on the rise in Zambia and presents a serious problem for the successful lifelong treatment of HIV-infected children. PMTCT affects both the prevalence and strength of resistance and further research is needed to determine how to mitigate its role leading to resistance.

  10. The higher barrier of darunavir and tipranavir resistance for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-11-17

    Darunavir and tipranavir are two inhibitors that are active against multi-drug resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease variants. In this study, the invitro inhibitory efficacy was tested against a MDR HIV-1 protease variant, MDR 769 82T, containing the drug resistance mutations of 46L/54V/82T/84V/90M. Crystallographic and enzymatic studies were performed to examine the mechanism of resistance and the relative maintenance of potency. The key findings are as follows: (i) The MDR protease exhibits decreased susceptibility to all nine HIV-1 protease inhibitors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), among which darunavir and tipranavir are the most potent; (ii) the threonine 82 mutation on the protease greatly enhances drug resistance by altering the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket; (iii) darunavir or tipranavir binding facilitates closure of the wide-open flaps of the MDR protease; and (iv) the remaining potency of tipranavir may be preserved by stabilizing the flaps in the inhibitor-protease complex while darunavir maintains its potency by preserving protein main chain hydrogen bonds with the flexible P2 group. These results could provide new insights into drug design strategies to overcome multi-drug resistance of HIV-1 protease variants.

  11. HIV gp120 H375 is unique to HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE and confers strong resistance to the entry inhibitor BMS-599793, a candidate microbicide drug.

    PubMed

    Schader, Susan M; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Quashie, Peter K; Oliveira, Maureen; Ibanescu, Ruxandra-Ilinca; Moisi, Daniela; Mespléde, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    BMS-599793 is a small molecule entry inhibitor that binds to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120, resulting in the inhibition of CD4-dependent entry into cells. Since BMS-599793 is currently considered a candidate microbicide drug, we evaluated its efficacy against a number of primary patient HIV isolates from different subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and showed that activity varied between ∼3 ρM and 7 μM at 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s). Interestingly, CRF01_AE HIV-1 isolates consistently demonstrated natural resistance against this compound. Genotypic analysis of >1,600 sequences (Los Alamos HIV sequence database) indicated that a single amino acid polymorphism in Env, H375, may account for the observed BMS-599793 resistance in CRF01_AE HIV-1. Results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed this hypothesis, and in silico drug docking simulations identified a drug resistance mechanism at the molecular level. In addition, CRF01_AE viruses were shown to be resistant to multiple broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Thus, our results not only provide insight into how Env polymorphisms may contribute to entry inhibitor resistance but also may help to elucidate how HIV can evade some broadly neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, the high frequency of H375 in CRF01_AE HIV-1, and its apparent nonoccurrence in other subtypes, could serve as a means for rapid identification of CRF01_AE infections.

  12. Insulin resistance, hepatic lipid and adipose tissue distribution in HIV infected men

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Engelson, Ellen S.; Ionescu, Gabriel; Glesby, Marshall J.; Albu, Jeanine B.; Kotler, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Background A large proportion of HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral medication develop insulin resistance, especially in the context of fat redistribution. This study investigates the interrelationships among fat distribution, hepatic lipid content, and insulin resistance in HIV-infected men. Design and methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from twenty-three HIV-infected participants in 3 prospective clinical studies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to quantify hepatic lipid concentrations. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify whole body adipose tissue compartments, i.e., subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes as well as inter-muscular adipose tissue (IMAT) subcompartment, and omental-mesenteric adipose tissue (OMAT) and retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT) subcompartments of VAT. Homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results Hepatic lipid content correlated significantly with total VAT (r=0.62, p=0.0014) but not with SAT (r=0.053, p=0.81). In univariate analysis, hepatic lipid content was associated with the OMAT (r=0.67, p=0.0004) and RPAT (r=0.53, p=0.009) subcompartments; HOMA-IR correlated with both VAT and hepatic lipid contents (r=0.61, p=0.057 and 0.68, p=0.0012, respectively). In stepwise linear regression models, hepatic lipid had the strongest associations with OMAT and with HOMA-IR. Conclusion Hepatic lipid content is associated with VAT volume, especially the omental-mesenteric subcompartment, in HIV-infected men. Hepatic lipid content is associated with insulin resistance in HIV-infected men. Hepatic lipid content might mediate the relationship between VAT and insulin resistance among treated, HIV-infected men. PMID:18572755

  13. Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance Is High and Longstanding in Metropolitan Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Kassaye, Seble G; Grossman, Zehava; Balamane, Maya; Johnston-White, Betsy; Liu, Chenglong; Kumar, Princy; Young, Mary; Sneller, Michael C; Sereti, Irini; Dewar, Robin; Rehm, Catherine; Meyer, William; Shafer, Robert; Katzenstein, David; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-09-15

    Washington, DC, has 2.5% human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence, 3.9% among African Americans. Antiretrovirals (ARTs) are the cornerstone for treatment and prevention. Monitoring changes in transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is critical for effective HIV care. HIV genotype data for individuals enrolled in research studies in metropolitan Washington, D.C., were used to identify TDR using the World Health Organization mutation list [Bennett DE, Camacho RJ, Otelea D, et al. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update. PloS One 2009; 4:e4724]. HIV phylogenies were reconstructed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. HIV transmission clusters were supported by 1000 bootstrap values >0.70 and posterior probability >0.95 of having a common ancestor. Among 710 individuals enrolled in 1994-2013, the median age was 38.6 years, 46.2% were female, and 53.3% were African-American. TDR was 22.5% among 566 treatment-naive individuals; 15.8% had nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance, 9.8% had nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance, and 4.2% had protease inhibitor (PI) resistance. Single class TDR was 10.0%, 5.1%, and 1.6% to NRTIs, NNRTIs, and PIs. Dual TDR to PI and NRTI was seen in 1.6%, NRTI and NNRTI in 3.4%, and triple class TDR in 0.9%. TDR frequency decreased from 1994-2006 (27.1%) to 2007-2013 (19.4%; P = .02). Only 6/79 (7.6%) individuals within transmission clusters had evidence of TDR. We identified high prevalence of TDR among HIV-infected individuals in metropolitan Washington, DC, regardless of gender. Active surveillance for TDR is needed to guide ART usage and analyses of risk group contributions to HIV transmission and resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Analysis on HIV-1 genetics and threshold of drug resistance in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province in 2013].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanling; Wang, Jibao; Xing, Hui; Chen, Min; Yao, Shitang; Chen, Huichao; Yang, Jin; Li, Yanling; Duan, Song; Jia, Manhong

    2015-06-01

    To study the HIV-1 genotypes and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province in 2013. Referring to the guidelines for HIV drug resistance threshold survey (HIVDR-TS), 54 plasma samples of recently reported HIV-infected individuals, aged between 16 and 25 years, were collected in Dehong prefecture from January to August 2013. Genotyping of partial pol gene was performed by using reverse transcriptional PCR. HIV-1 genotype. Prevalent levels of HIV-1 drug resistance transmission were analyzed. Forty-eight plasma samples were successfully sequenced and analyzed. Among them, 45.8% were Chinese and the rest 54.2% were all Burmese. Based on pol sequences, identified HIV genotypes included subtype C (41.7%), URF (31.3%), CRF01_AE (12.5%), CRF07_BC (10.4%), CRF08_BC (2.1%) and subtype B (2.1%), C subtype appeared dominated in Chinese while URF was dominated in Burmese. One drug resistant mutation to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was detected in one sequence from Burmese. Based on the statistical method of HIVDR-TS, the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance was adjusted as < 5%. Diverse HIV-1 genotypes were found in this study, and the current HIV-1 drug resistant strains transmission was catalogued as at low prevalence level, in Dehong. To prevent the increase of the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance, standard treatment and scientific management for people living with HIV/AIDS should be strictly followed. Meanwhile, relevant surveillance, including drug resistance surveillance should also be performed among cross-border migrant population.

  15. HIV Viral Load

    MedlinePlus

    ... Count ; HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) ; HIV Drug Resistance ( Genotypic and Phenotypic ) All content on Lab Tests ... have their therapy changed. They should undergo HIV drug resistance testing to help in the selection of an ...

  16. Different Frequencies of Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 Subtypes Circulating in China: A Comprehensive Study

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Hongshuai; Gui, Tao; Jia, Lei; Guo, Wei; Han, Jingwan; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Hanping; Li, Jingyun; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05). Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05). All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China. PMID:24663120

  17. IL-27 Found to Play Significant Role in Conferring HIV Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets specific immune cells in the body known as macrophages because these are the cells that eliminate foreign material such as bacteria or viruses. HIV is able to reproduce and spread throughout the body if it can avoid destruction by macrophages. A recent study by Lue Dai, Ph.D., and colleagues revealed that the human cytokine IL-27 helps promote the body’s production of macrophages that are resistant to HIV. The study further found that IL-27 suppresses a gene known as SPTBN1, which facilitates the survival of HIV cells. This breakthrough research was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

  18. IL-27 Found to Play Significant Role in Conferring HIV Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets specific immune cells in the body known as macrophages because these are the cells that eliminate foreign material such as bacteria or viruses. HIV is able to reproduce and spread throughout the body if it can avoid destruction by macrophages. A recent study by Lue Dai, Ph.D., and colleagues revealed that the human cytokine IL-27 helps promote the body’s production of macrophages that are resistant to HIV. The study further found that IL-27 suppresses a gene known as SPTBN1, which facilitates the survival of HIV cells. This breakthrough research was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

  19. Surveillance of HIV antiretroviral drug resistance in treated individuals in England: 1998-2000.

    PubMed

    Scott, Paul; Arnold, Eve; Evans, Barry; Pozniak, Anton; Moyle, Graeme; Shahmenesh, Mohsen; White, David; Shirley, Jane; Cane, Patricia; Pillay, Deenan

    2004-03-01

    To establish a surveillance programme for HIV drug resistance within the UK covering the years from 1998 to 2000, following the introduction of triple combination antiretroviral therapy. Sentinel sites included large, medium sized and small clinical centres. Data were analysed until December 2000. Of nearly 300 samples tested, results from 91, 92 and 92 patients, respectively in 1998, 1999 and 2000, who were receiving HIV therapy with a viral load >2000 copies/mL, the majority had viruses with some degree of drug resistance. Overall, the presence of any resistance increased between 1998 and 1999, and fell again in 2000 (69% versus 88% versus 55%). However, major differences were observed between drug classes, such that non-nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance rose dramatically over the period studied. We show that this correlated with increased NNRTI prescribing. Furthermore, an overall increase in prevalence of viruses with resistance to one or more drugs within all three available classes was observed. A higher prevalence of drug resistance was observed in patients from smaller clinical centres. This is the first such sentinel surveillance dataset from the UK, and is unique in correlating these data with national antiretroviral prescribing patterns. Our findings are relevant to the increased transmission of HIV drug resistance observed over this period.

  20. 2004: which HIV-1 drug resistance mutations are common in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Cheung, Peter K; Wynhoven, Brian; Harrigan, P Richard

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance remains a major problem for the treatment of HIV-infected patients. However, the variety of mutational patterns that evolve in clinical practice have made the application of resistance data to clinical decision-making challenging. Despite (or because of) an abundance of drug-resistance data from disparate sources, there is only limited information available describing the patterns of drug resistance which usually appear in the clinic. Here we attempt to address this issue by reviewing HIV drug resistance in the population of patients failing antiretroviral therapy in British Columbia, Canada from June 1996 to December 2003 as an example. Our findings suggest that, although hundreds of mutations have been associated with resistance, relatively few key mutations occur at a high frequency. For example, only the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutations M184V, M41L T215Y, D67N, K70R and L210W, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and Y181C, and protease inhibitor (PI) mutation L90M, occur in more than 10% of samples tested for resistance in this population. The introduction of new drugs allows for the selection of new mutations. Trends in the prevalence of resistance-associated mutations have generally followed trends in drug usage, but have not always mirrored them. The phenomenon of cross-resistance can play an important role in the efficacy of new antiretroviral agents, even before they become available. The extent of this cross-resistance depends in part on the prevalence of specific mutations in the population of individuals who have previously received antiretroviral therapy. Hence there is a need to determine which mutations are prevalent in the treated population. The tremendous capacity of HIV to adapt means that common resistance pathways are likely to change over time, and new pathways to resistance are likely to continue to be discovered in the future.

  1. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Among Antiretroviral-Naïve HIV-1–Infected Patients in Asia: Results From the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study

    PubMed Central

    Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K. C.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G.; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-01-01

    (See editorial commentary by Jordan on pages 1058–1060.) Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia. PMID:21460324

  2. Unique Flap Conformation in an HIV-1 Protease with High-Level Darunavir Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaaki; Ode, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Koji; Fujino, Masayuki; Maejima, Masami; Kimura, Yuki; Masaoka, Takashi; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Atsuo; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV) is one of the most powerful protease inhibitors (PIs) for treating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and presents a high genetic barrier to the generation of resistant viruses. However, DRV-resistant HIV-1 infrequently emerges from viruses exhibiting resistance to other protease inhibitors. To address this resistance, researchers have gathered genetic information on DRV resistance. In contrast, few structural insights into the mechanism underlying DRV resistance are available. To elucidate this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the ligand-free state of a protease with high-level DRV resistance and six DRV resistance-associated mutations (including I47V and I50V), which we generated by in vitro selection. This crystal structure showed a unique curling conformation at the flap regions that was not found in the previously reported ligand-free protease structures. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the curled flap conformation altered the flap dynamics. These results suggest that the preference for a unique flap conformation influences DRV binding. These results provide new structural insights into elucidating the molecular mechanism of DRV resistance and aid to develop PIs effective against DRV-resistant viruses. PMID:26870021

  3. HIV-1 resistance to dolutegravir is affected by cellular histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Anstett, Kaitlin; Brenner, Bluma; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2017-08-23

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors are the newest class of antiretrovirals to have been approved for the treatment of HIV. Canonical resistance to these competitive inhibitors develops through substitutions in the integrase active site that disrupt drug-protein interactions. However resistance against the newest integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) is associated with a R263K substitution at the C-terminus of integrase that causes resistance through an unknown mechanism. The integrase C-terminal domain is involved in many processes over the course of infection and is post-translationally modified via acetylation of three lysine residues, that are important for enzyme activity, integrase multimerization, and protein-protein interactions. Here, we report that regulation of the acetylation of integrase is integral to the replication of HIV in the presence of DTG and that R263K specifically disrupts this regulation, likely due to enhancement of interactions with the histone deacetylase I complex, as suggested by co-immunoprecipitation. Although no detectable differences were observed in levels of cell-free acetylation of wild-type (WT) and mutated R263K enzymes, the inhibition of cellular histone acetyltransferase enzymes sensitized NL4.3WT viruses to DTG while NL4.3R263K was almost completely unaffected. When levels of endogenous acetylation were manipulated in virus-producing cells, inhibitors of acetylation enhanced the replication of NL4.3R263K whereas inhibition of deacetylation greatly diminished the replication of NL4.3WT Taken together, these results point to a pivotal role of acetylation in the resistance mechanism of HIV to some second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitors such as DTG.IMPORTANCE This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the influence of post-translational modifications on HIV drug resistance. Both viral replication and resistance to second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitors of both WT and INSTI-resistant HIV

  4. Transmitted resistance to HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: right on schedule.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    Transmitted drug resistance (TDR), the primary acquisition of an HIV variant already resistant to antiretrovirals, affects approximately 15% of all new infections in the United States. Historically, from the time initial agents in the reverse transcriptase, protease and entry inhibitor classes were introduced, it took 3-5 years before the first case reports of TDR appeared. With the description of the first two cases of transmitted integrase stand-transfer inhibitor resistance, it is only a matter of time before the prevalence of TDR affecting this newest antiretroviral class reaches a level warranting baseline resistance testing for all patients entering care.

  5. Nasopharyngeal carriage of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in institutionalized HIV-infected and HIV-negative children in northeastern Romania.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, E; Dragomir, C; Sfartz, S; Porat, N; Yagupsky, P; Jica, S; Florescu, L; Dagan, R

    1999-01-01

    The study compared nasopharyngeal carriage of resistant pneumoniae in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and -seronegative children. Nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae was investigated during May 1996 in 162 HIV-negative infants and children (age range, 1-38 mo) and 40 HIV-infected children (age range, 39-106 mo) living in an orphanage in Iasi, northeastern Romania. The HIV-infected children lived separated from the other children and were cared for by a different staff. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from 12 of 40 (30%) HIV-infected and from 81 of 160 (50%) HIV-negative children. Antimicrobial susceptibility to penicillin and ceftriaxone was determined by E-test, and to another five antibiotics by disk diffusion. Serotyping was performed by the Quellung method on 81 of 93 (87%) isolates. Serotypes 6A, 6B, 19A, and 23F together represented 98% of all isolates. Ninety-nine percent of S. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to penicillin, and 74% were highly resistant to penicillin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] > 1 mg/mL); MIC50 and MIC90 to penicillin of the isolates were 2 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, respectively. Eighty-nine of ninety-one isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone; 99%, 87%, 87%, 48%, and 21% of the isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Eighty-two (89%) isolates were multidrug resistant (resistant to =/>3 antibiotic classes); 37 of 92 (40%) isolates were resistant to 5 or more antibiotic classes, and 16 of these 37 (43%) belonged to serotype 19A. All serotype 19 isolates were highly resistant to penicillin. No significant differences were observed in the resistance rates of S. pneumoniae in HIV-infected children compared to HIV-negative children. Multidrug-resistant pneumococci were highly prevalent in this Romanian orphanage in both HIV-negative and older HIV-infected children. The observed high prevalence of

  6. HIV-1 Variants and Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women from Bata (Equatorial Guinea): 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Patricia; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study describing drug resistance mutations (DRM) and HIV-1 variants among infected pregnant women in Equatorial Guinea (GQ), a country with high (6.2%) and increasing HIV prevalence. Dried blood spots (DBS) were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 from 69 HIV-1 infected women participating in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in the Hospital Regional of Bata and Primary Health Care Centre María Rafols, Bata, GQ. The transmitted (TDR) or acquired (ADR) antiretroviral drug resistance mutations at partial pol sequence among naive or antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed women were defined following WHO or IAS USA 2015 lists, respectively. HIV-1 variants were identified by phylogenetic analyses. A total of 38 of 69 HIV-1 specimens were successfully amplified and sequenced. Thirty (79%) belonged to ART-experienced women: 15 exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) monotherapy, and 15 to combined ART (cART) as first regimen including two NRTI and one non-NRTI (NNRTI) or one protease inhibitor (PI). The TDR rate was only found for PI (3.4%). The ADR rate was 37.5% for NNRTI, 8.7% for NRTI and absent for PI or NRTI+NNRTI. HIV-1 group M non-B variants caused most (97.4%) infections, mainly (78.9%) recombinants: CRF02_AG (55.2%), CRF22_A101 (10.5%), subtype C (10.5%), unique recombinants (5.3%), and A3, D, F2, G, CRF06_cpx and CRF11_cpx (2.6% each). The high rate of ADR to retrotranscriptase inhibitors (mainly to NNRTIs) observed among pretreated pregnant women reinforces the importance of systematic DRM monitoring in GQ to reduce HIV-1 resistance transmission and to optimize first and second-line ART regimens when DRM are present.

  7. HIV-1 Variants and Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women from Bata (Equatorial Guinea): 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Patricia; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This is the first study describing drug resistance mutations (DRM) and HIV-1 variants among infected pregnant women in Equatorial Guinea (GQ), a country with high (6.2%) and increasing HIV prevalence. Methods Dried blood spots (DBS) were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 from 69 HIV-1 infected women participating in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in the Hospital Regional of Bata and Primary Health Care Centre María Rafols, Bata, GQ. The transmitted (TDR) or acquired (ADR) antiretroviral drug resistance mutations at partial pol sequence among naive or antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed women were defined following WHO or IAS USA 2015 lists, respectively. HIV-1 variants were identified by phylogenetic analyses. Results A total of 38 of 69 HIV-1 specimens were successfully amplified and sequenced. Thirty (79%) belonged to ART-experienced women: 15 exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) monotherapy, and 15 to combined ART (cART) as first regimen including two NRTI and one non-NRTI (NNRTI) or one protease inhibitor (PI). The TDR rate was only found for PI (3.4%). The ADR rate was 37.5% for NNRTI, 8.7% for NRTI and absent for PI or NRTI+NNRTI. HIV-1 group M non-B variants caused most (97.4%) infections, mainly (78.9%) recombinants: CRF02_AG (55.2%), CRF22_A101 (10.5%), subtype C (10.5%), unique recombinants (5.3%), and A3, D, F2, G, CRF06_cpx and CRF11_cpx (2.6% each). Conclusions The high rate of ADR to retrotranscriptase inhibitors (mainly to NNRTIs) observed among pretreated pregnant women reinforces the importance of systematic DRM monitoring in GQ to reduce HIV-1 resistance transmission and to optimize first and second-line ART regimens when DRM are present. PMID:27798676

  8. The emergence of drug resistant HIV variants and novel anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paydary, Koosha; Khaghani, Parisa; Emamzadeh-Fard, Sahra; Alinaghi, Seyed Ahmad Seyed; Baesi, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    After its identification in 1980s, HIV has infected more than 30 million people worldwide. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, anti-retroviral drug resistance results from insufficient anti-retroviral pressure, which may lead to treatment failure. Preliminary studies support the idea that anti-retroviral drug resistance has evolved largely as a result of low-adherence of patients to therapy and extensive use of anti-retroviral drugs in the developed world; however, a highly heterogeneous horde of viral quasi-species are currently circulating in developing nations. Thus, the prioritizing of strategies adopted in such two worlds should be quite different considering the varying anti-retroviral drug resistance prevalence. In this article, we explore differences in anti-retroviral drug resistance patterns between developed and developing countries, as they represent two distinct ecological niches of HIV from an evolutionary standpoint. PMID:23835806

  9. Characteristics Associated with HIV Drug Resistance Among Women Screening for an HIV Prevention Trial in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mensch, Barbara S; Gorbach, Pamina M; Kelly, Cliff; Kiepiela, Photini; Gomez, Kailazarid; Ramjee, Gita; Ganesh, Shayhana; Morar, Neetha; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Parikh, Urvi M

    2015-11-01

    While the expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has reduced morbidity and mortality from HIV/AIDS, it has increased concern about drug resistance. The Microbicide Trials Network 009 study assessed the prevalence of drug-resistance mutations among women at clinical sites in Durban, South Africa who tested seropositive for HIV-1 at screening for the VOICE trial. The objective of this paper was to identify characteristics and behaviors associated with drug resistance. Factors found to be significantly associated with increased resistance were high perceived risk of getting HIV and prior participation in a microbicide trial, a likely proxy for familiarity with the health care system. Two factors were found to be significantly associated with reduced resistance: having a primary sex partner and testing negative for HIV in the past year. Other variables hypothesized to be important in identifying women with resistant virus, including partner or friend on ART who shared with the participant and being given antiretrovirals during pregnancy or labor, or the proxy variable-number of times given birth in a health facility-were not significantly associated. The small number of participants with resistant virus and the probable underreporting of sensitive behaviors likely affected our ability to construct a comprehensive profile of the type of HIV-positive women at greatest risk of developing resistance mutations.

  10. Detecting and understanding combinatorial mutation patterns responsible for HIV drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Hou, Tingjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a systematic approach for a better understanding of how HIV viruses employ various combinations of mutations to resist drug treatments, which is critical to developing new drugs and optimizing the use of existing drugs. By probabilistically modeling mutations in the HIV-1 protease or reverse transcriptase (RT) isolated from drug-treated patients, we present a statistical procedure that first detects mutation combinations associated with drug resistance and then infers detailed interaction structures of these mutations. The molecular basis of our statistical predictions is further studied by using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. We have demonstrated the usefulness of this systematic procedure on three HIV drugs, (Indinavir, Zidovudine, and Nevirapine), discovered unique interaction features between viral mutations induced by these drugs, and revealed the structural basis of such interactions. PMID:20080674

  11. "Second generation" of TSAO compounds directed against HIV-1 TSAO-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, E; Velázquez, S; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Jimeno, M L; San-Félix, A; De Clercq, E; Balzarini, J; Camarasa, M J

    2001-01-01

    A "second generation" of TSAO molecules directed against TSAO-resistant strains have been prepared. The presence of two neighboring carbonyl groups at the 4" position of the 3'-spiro moiety seems to be important for the anti-HIV-1 activity against both wild type and TSAO-resistant strains. NMR conformational studies in solution and theoretical calculations of the novel compounds have also been carried out.

  12. In Vivo Patterns of Resistance to the HIV Attachment Inhibitor BMS-488043▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nannan; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Zhang, Sharon; Fan, Li; Fang, Jie; Fang, Hua; Gong, Yi-Fei; Eggers, Betsy; Langley, David R.; Wang, Tao; Kadow, John; Grasela, Dennis; Hanna, George J.; Alexander, Louis; Colonno, Richard; Krystal, Mark; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Attachment inhibitors (AI) are a novel class of HIV-1 antivirals, with little information available on clinical resistance. BMS-488043 is an orally bioavailable AI that binds to gp120 of HIV-1 and abrogates its binding to CD4+ lymphocytes. A clinical proof-of-concept study of the AI BMS-488043, administered as monotherapy for 8 days, demonstrated significant viral load reductions. In order to examine the effects of AI monotherapy on HIV-1 sensitivity, phenotypic sensitivity assessment of baseline and postdosing (day 8) samples was performed. These analyses revealed that four subjects had emergent phenotypic resistance (a 50% effective concentration [EC50] >10-fold greater than the baseline value) and four had high baseline EC50s (>200 nM). Population sequencing and sequence determination of cloned envelope genes uncovered five gp120 mutations at four loci (V68A, L116I, S375I/N, and M426L) associated with BMS-488043 resistance. Substitution at the 375 locus, located near the CD4 binding pocket, was the most common (maintained in 5/8 subjects at day 8). The five substitutions were evaluated for their effects on AI sensitivity through reverse genetics in functional envelopes, confirming their role in decreasing sensitivity to the drug. Additional analyses revealed that these substitutions did not alter sensitivity to other HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Thus, our studies demonstrate that although the majority of the subjects' viruses maintained sensitivity to BMS-488043, substitutions can be selected that decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to the AI. Most importantly, the substitutions described here are not associated with resistance to other approved antiretrovirals, and therefore, attachment inhibitors could complement the current arsenal of anti-HIV agents. PMID:21078948

  13. A Mathematical Model for HIV Drug-Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Ivan; Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of the transmission of HIV infection here the individuals receive antiretroviral drugs but may not respond to treatment. In such case the latter can be changed to a different therapy, and individuals may or may not respond also to this second set of drugs.

  14. Emergence of HIV Drug Resistance During First- and Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Gupta, Ravindra K; Van Zyl, Gert; Eron, Joseph J.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings has expanded in the last decade, reaching >8 million individuals and reducing AIDS mortality and morbidity. Continued success of ART programs will require understanding the emergence of HIV drug resistance patterns among individuals in whom treatment has failed and managing ART from both an individual and public health perspective. We review data on the emergence of HIV drug resistance among individuals in whom first-line therapy has failed and clinical and resistance outcomes of those receiving second-line therapy in resource-limited settings. Results Resistance surveys among patients initiating first-line nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)–based therapy suggest that 76%–90% of living patients achieve HIV RNA suppression by 12 months after ART initiation. Among patients with detectable HIV RNA at 12 months, HIV drug resistance, primarily due to M184V and NNRTI mutations, has been identified in 60%–72%, although the antiretroviral activity of proposed second-line regimens has been preserved. Complex mutation patterns, including thymidine-analog mutations, K65R, and multinucleoside mutations, are prevalent among cases of treatment failure identified by clinical or immunologic methods. Approximately 22% of patients receiving second-line therapy do not achieve HIV RNA suppression by 6 months, with poor adherence, rather than HIV drug resistance, driving most failures. Major protease inhibitor resistance at the time of second-line failure ranges from 0% to 50%, but studies are limited. Conclusions Resistance of HIV to first-line therapy is predictable at 12 months when evaluated by means of HIV RNA monitoring and, when detected, largely preserves second-line therapy options. Optimizing adherence, performing resistance surveillance, and improving treatment monitoring are critical for long-term prevention of drug resistance. PMID:23687289

  15. High incidence of antimicrobial resistant organisms including extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nasopharyngeal and blood isolates of HIV-infected children from Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Mark F; Wasserman, Elizabeth; Smit, Juanita; Whitelaw, Andrew; Zar, Heather J

    2008-01-01

    Background There is little information on nasopharyngeal (NP) flora or bacteremia in HIV-infected children. Our aim was to describe the organisms and antimicrobial resistance patterns in children enrolled in a prospective study comparing daily and three times weekly trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and isoniazid (INH) or placebo prophylaxis. Methods NP swabs were taken at baseline from HIV-infected children enrolled in the study. Standard microbiological techniques were used. Children were grouped according to previous or current exposure to TMP-SMX and whether enrolled to the study during a period of hospitalization. Blood culture results were also recorded within 12 months of baseline. Results Two hundred and three children, median age 1.8 (Interquartile [IQ]: 0.7–4) years had NP swabs submitted for culture. One hundred and eighty-four (90.7%) had either stage B or C HIV disease. One hundred and forty-one (69.8%) were receiving TMP-SMX and 19 (9.4%) were on antiretroviral therapy. The majority, 168 (82%) had a history of hospitalization and 91 (44.8%) were enrolled during a period of hospitalization. Thirty-two subjects (16.2%) died within 12 months of study entry. One hundred and eighty-one potential pathogens were found in 167 children. The most commonly isolated organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (48: 22.2%), Gram-negative respiratory organisms (Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis) (47: 21.8%), Staphylococcus aureus (44: 20.4%), Enterobacteriaceae 32 (14.8%) and Pseudomonas 5 (2.3%). Resistance to TMP-SMX occurred in > 80% of pathogens except for M. catarrhalis (2: 18.2% of tested organisms). TMP-SMX resistance tended to be higher in those receiving it at baseline (p = 0.065). Carriage of Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was significantly associated with being on TMP-SMX at baseline (p = 0.002). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to penicillin were determined for 18 S. pneumoniae isolates: 7 (38.9%) were fully sensitive

  16. Genetic diversity of HIV-1 and transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed individuals with HIV infection in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Guo, Zhihong; Yang, Jiezhe; Pan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Jun; Ding, Xiaobei; Zhang, Wenjun; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yun; Huang, Jingjing

    2015-10-01

    HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR) can compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited countries like China where ART has been scaled up and thus leads to an important public health concern. The aim of the study was to elucidate the HIV-1 genetic characteristics and TDR in Hangzhou, China. Two-hundred eleven ART-naive, newly diagnosed individuals were enrolled during January and August 2013. Specimens were classified as recent or chronic infections using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA). The pol fragment covering the entire protease and the first 300 codons of the reverse transcriptase gene was amplified by RT-PCR and nested PCR. Genotypic drug resistance (DR) and phylogenetic analysis were performed on the 200 obtained sequences. Multiple genotypes were identified, including CRF01_AE (62.0%), CRF07_BC (31.0%), subtype B (2.0%), CRF08_BC (1.5%), CRF55_01B (1.0%), CRF18_cpx (0.5%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 2.0%). All the four URFs were found in men who have sex with men, consisting of a recombination of CRF01_AE with subtype B or CRF07_BC. The prevalence of primary DR in newly diagnosed individuals in Hangzhou was low (4.0%). The proportion of DR mutation to protease inhibitors (PIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was 1.5%, 1.5%, and 1.0%, respectively. BED-CEIA revealed that 21.8% (45/211) of the specimens were associated with recent infections. The prevalence of TDR in recent infections was moderate (6.5%). High HIV diversity and relatively high prevalence of TDR in new infections has been found in Hangzhou, indicating an increasing challenge for future HIV prevention and treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genotypic resistance profiles of HIV-2-treated patients in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Eholié, Serge; Anglaret, Xavier; Bertine, Mélanie; Rouzioux, Christine; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Messou, Eugène; Minga, Albert; Damond, Florence; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Dabis, François; Peytavin, Gilles; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Ekouevi, Didier K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the virological response, genotypic resistance profiles, and antiretroviral plasma concentrations in HIV-2 antiretroviral-treated (antiretroviral therapy, ART) patients in Côte d‘Ivoire. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among HIV-2 patients receiving ART. Plasma HIV-2 viral load was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les hépatites virales (ANRS) assay. Protease and reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed using in-house methods and antiretroviral plasma concentrations were assessed using ultra performance liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Results One hundred and forty-five HIV-2-treated patients were enrolled with a median CD4+ cell count of 360 cells/µl (interquartile range, IQR = 215–528). Median duration of ART was 4 years (IQR = 2–7) and 74% of patients displayed viral load less than 50 copies/ml. Median plasma HIV-2 RNA among patients with viral load more than 50 copies/ml was 3016 copies/ml (IQR = 436–5156). Most patients (84%) received a lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimen. HIV-2 resistance mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors were detected in 21 of 25 (84%) and 20 of 29 (69%) samples, respectively. The most prevalent nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were M184I/V (90%), Q151M (24%), and S215F/Y (24%). The most prevalent protease inhibitor resistance mutations were V47A (60%) and I54M (30%). Median CD4+ cell counts were 434 cells/µl (292–573) and 204 cells/µl (122–281) in patients with viral load less than 50 copies/ml and those exhibiting virological failure (P < 0.0001), respectively. The proportions of patients with adequate antiretroviral plasma concentrations were 81 and 93% in patients displaying virological failure and in those with viral load less than 50 copies/ml, respectively (P = 0.046), suggesting good treatment adherence. Conclusion We observed adequate drug

  18. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 in Europe remains limited to single classes.

    PubMed

    2008-03-12

    The spread of drug-resistant HIV-1 might compromise the future success of current first-line regimens. To analyse the extent and impact of transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Europe. The European prospective programme (SPREAD) collected demographic, clinical and virological data from 1245 HIV-1-infected individuals in 17 countries diagnosed in 2002-2003. The potential impact of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs) on therapy response was determined by using genotypic interpretation algorithms. The overall prevalence of viruses with drug-resistance mutations was 9.1% [96/1050; 95% confidence interval: 7.5-11.1]. The majority (71%) harboured only a single amino acid substitution with limited effect on predicted drug susceptibility. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were observed most frequently [57/1050 (5.4%)], followed by mutations related to protease inhibitors [32/1050 (3.0%)] and mutations related to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) [27/1050 (2.6%)]. In some cases, however, resistance was quite extensive. Four individuals were infected with viruses with reduced susceptibility to all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 3 to all protease inhibitors and 20 to both NNRTIs. Remarkably, in one individual, the resistance pattern was so extensive that none of the available current antiretroviral drugs was predicted to be fully active. The prevalence of TDRM-HIV is quite prominent (9.1%) but did not increase in comparison with a large retrospective European study. Particularly the presence of single NNRTI mutations may impact the efficacy of the first-line regimens. Continuous prospective monitoring remains indicated to explore the patterns and factors contributing to the transmission of TDRMs as well as the potential clinical consequences.

  19. Automating HIV Drug Resistance Genotyping with RECall, a Freely Accessible Sequence Analysis Tool

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Conan K.; Brumme, Chanson J.; Liu, Tommy F.; Chui, Celia K. S.; Chu, Anna L.; Wynhoven, Brian; Hall, Tom A.; Trevino, Christina; Shafer, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Genotypic HIV drug resistance testing is routinely used to guide clinical decisions. While genotyping methods can be standardized, a slow, labor-intensive, and subjective manual sequence interpretation step is required. We therefore performed external validation of our custom software RECall, a fully automated sequence analysis pipeline. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed on 981 clinical samples at the Stanford Diagnostic Virology Laboratory. Sequencing trace files were first interpreted manually by a laboratory technician and subsequently reanalyzed by RECall, without intervention. The relative performances of the two methods were assessed by determination of the concordance of nucleotide base calls, identification of key resistance-associated substitutions, and HIV drug resistance susceptibility scoring by the Stanford Sierra algorithm. RECall is freely available at http://pssm.cfenet.ubc.ca. In total, 875 of 981 sequences were analyzed by both human and RECall interpretation. RECall analysis required minimal hands-on time and resulted in a 25-fold improvement in processing speed (∼150 technician-hours versus ∼6 computation-hours). Excellent concordance was obtained between human and automated RECall interpretation (99.7% agreement for >1,000,000 bases compared). Nearly all discordances (99.4%) were due to nucleotide mixtures being called by one method but not the other. Similarly, 98.6% of key antiretroviral resistance-associated mutations observed were identified by both methods, resulting in 98.5% concordance of resistance susceptibility interpretations. This automated sequence analysis tool provides both standardization of analysis and a significant improvement in data workflow. The time-consuming, error-prone, and dreadfully boring manual sequence analysis step is replaced with a fully automated system without compromising the accuracy of reported HIV drug resistance data. PMID:22403431

  20. Prevention of perinatal transmission of zidovudine- and nevirapine-resistant HIV.

    PubMed

    Cha, Agnes; Elsamadisi, Pansy; Su, Christy Peggy; Phipps, Emmet; Birnbaum, Jeffrey M

    2016-04-01

    The use of a three-drug regimen for the prevention of perinatal transmission of zidovudine- and nevirapine-resistant HIV is described. A 17-year-old Hispanic woman infected with HIV arrived at our clinic for the management of her first pregnancy. The patient was in her second trimester of her pregnancy, had not previously been treated with antiretroviral therapy, and was only taking daily prenatal vitamins at the time of her first clinic visit. Her HIV RNA viral load was 240 copies/mL, and the virus was resistant to both zidovudine and nevirapine. Nelfinavir (compounded suspension), lamivudine, and zidovudine were prescribed for the mother, though she was generally nonadherent to therapy. Nelfinavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine were initiated for the newborn within eight hours of delivery. Six months later, the patient returned to the clinic in the first trimester of her second pregnancy. At this visit, her HIV RNA viral load was 120 copies/mL. After the birth of her second child, the infant received the same regimen received by her firstborn: zidovudine 4 mg/kg orally twice daily for six weeks, lamivudine 2 mg/kg orally twice daily for two weeks, and nelfinavir 55 mg/kg orally twice daily for two weeks. At four months of age, each infant was found to be HIV-negative. A prophylactic regimen that included nelfinavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine was used to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV in two neonates. The regimen was well tolerated, and both infants were determined to be HIV-negative at four months of age. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Mechanisms of resistance to sexual transmission of HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Eberhard, A; Ponceau, B; Biron, F; Verrier, B

    2005-11-01

    Sexual transmission is the most common pathway for HIV-1; nevertheless some individuals remain seronegative despite repeated high risk sexual exposure. These were grouped in cohorts of "highly exposed but persistently seronegative" individuals, mostly prostitutes and flailing couples. Three lines of defence were observed in these cohorts. The first one is the mucosal barrier, the determining factors of which are the type of epithelium (monolayer or multilayer), epithelial integrity, and the pre-existing microflora. The second one is linked to innate immunity directly related to the genetic and/or immune predispositions of the individual: mutations affecting the CCR5 chemokine receptor, secretion of protective soluble factors, and particular HLA alleles. The third one is acquired immunity via the mechanisms of humoral and/or specific cellular immunity. These studies suggest anti HIV-1 vaccinal strategies aiming at a local immunization combining the different types of responses observed in these individuals.

  2. Alarming Levels of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Metropolitan Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Kumar, Ajay M V; Peskett, Christopher; Khetarpal, Minni; Bamne, Arun; Adsul, Balkrishna; Manglani, Mamta; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Parmar, Malik; Kanchar, Avinash; Rewari, B.B.; Deshpande, Alaka; Rodrigues, Camilla; Shetty, Anjali; Rebello, Lorraine; Saranchuk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug) in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART) centers in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults and children ART-center attendees. Smear microscopy, culture and drug-susceptibility-testing (DST) against all first and second-line TB-drugs using phenotypic liquid culture (MGIT) were conducted on all presumptive tuberculosis patients. Analyses were performed to determine DR-TB prevalence and resistance patterns separately for new and previously treated, culture-positive TB-cases. Results Between March 2013 and January 2014, ART-center attendees were screened during 14135 visits, of whom 1724 had presumptive TB. Of 1724 attendees, 72 (4%) were smear-positive and 202 (12%) had a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall DR-TB was diagnosed in 68 (34%, 95% CI: 27%–40%) TB-patients. The proportions of DR-TB were 25% (29/114) and 44% (39/88) among new and previously treated cases respectively. The patterns of DR-TB were: 21% mono-resistant, 12% poly-resistant, 38% multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), 21% pre-extensively-drug-resistant (MDR-TB plus resistance to either a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable), 6% extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB) and 2% extremely drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB plus resistance to any group-IV/V drug). Only previous history of TB was significantly associated with the diagnosis of DR-TB in multivariate models. Conclusion The burden of DR-TB among HIV-infected patients attending public ART-centers in Mumbai was alarmingly high, likely representing ongoing

  3. The evolving landscape of HIV drug resistance diagnostics for expanding testing in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Inzaule, Seth C; Hamers, Raph L; Paredes, Roger; Yang, Chunfu; Schuurman, Rob; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F

    2017-02-09

    Global scale-up of antiretroviral treatment (ART) has dramatically changed the prospects of HIV/AIDS disease rendering life-long chronic care and treatment a reality for millions of HIV-infected patients. Affordable technologies to monitor ART are needed to ensure long-term durability of limited available drug regimens. HIV drug resistance tests can complement existing strategies in optimizing clinical decision-making for patients with treatment failure, in addition to facilitating population-based surveillance of HIV drug resistance. This review assesses the current landscape of HIV drug resistance technologies and discuss the strengths and limitations of existing assays available for expanding testing in resource limited settings (RLS). These include sequencing-based assays (Sanger sequencing assays and next-generation sequencing), point mutation assays and genotype-free data-based prediction systems. The Sanger assays are currently considered gold standard genotyping technology, though available at a limited number of RLS reference and regional laboratories, but high capital and test cost have limited their wide expansion. The point mutation assays present opportunities for simplified laboratory assays, but HIV genetic variability, extensive codon redundancy at or near the mutation target sites with limited multiplexing capability have restricted their utility. Next-generation sequencing (despite high cost) may have potential to reduce the testing cost significantly through multiplexing in high-throughput facilities, although the level of bioinformatics expertise required for data analysis is currently still complex and expensive and lacks standardization. Web-based genotype-free prediction systems may provide enhanced ART decision-making without the need for laboratory testing, but require further clinical field evaluation and implementation science research in resource-limited settings.

  4. Short communication: Transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive pregnant women in north central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Imade, Godwin E; Sagay, Atiene S; Chaplin, Beth; Chebu, Philippe; Musa, Jonah; Okpokwu, Jonathan; Hamel, Donald J; Pam, Ishaya C; Agbaji, Oche; Samuels, Jay; Meloni, Seema; Sankale, Jean-Louis; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis

    2014-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends periodic surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in communities in which antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been scaled-up for greater than 3 years. We conducted a survey of TDR mutations among newly detected HIV-infected antiretroviral (ARV)-naive pregnant women. From May 2010 to March 2012, 38 ARV-naive pregnant women were recruited in three hospitals in Jos, Plateau state, north central Nigeria. Eligible subjects were recruited using a modified version of the binomial sequential sampling technique recommended by WHO. HIV-1 genotyping was performed and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were characterized according to the WHO 2009 surveillance drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list. HIV subtypes were determined by phylogenetic analysis. The women's median age was 25.5 years; the median CD4(+) cell count was 317 cells/μl and the median viral load of 16 was 261 copies/ml. Of the 38 samples tested, 34 (89%) were successfully genotyped. The SDRM rate was <5% for all ART drug classes, with 1/34 (2.9%) for NRTIs/NNRTIs and none for protease inhibitors 0/31 (0%). The specific SDRMs detected were M41L for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and G190A for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). HIV-1 subtypes detected were CRF02_AG (38.2%), G' (41.2%), G (14.7%), CRF06-CPX (2.9%), and a unique AG recombinant form (2.9%). The single ARV-native pregnant woman with SDRMs was infected with HIV-1 subtype G'. Access to ART has been available in the Jos area for over 8 years. The prevalence of TDR lower than 5% suggests proper ART administration, although continued surveillance is warranted.

  5. Short Communication: Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in Antiretroviral-Naive Pregnant Women in North Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Sagay, Atiene S.; Chaplin, Beth; Chebu, Philippe; Musa, Jonah; Okpokwu, Jonathan; Hamel, Donald J.; Pam, Ishaya C.; Agbaji, Oche; Samuels, Jay; Meloni, Seema; Sankale, Jean-Louis; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends periodic surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in communities in which antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been scaled-up for greater than 3 years. We conducted a survey of TDR mutations among newly detected HIV-infected antiretroviral (ARV)-naive pregnant women. From May 2010 to March 2012, 38 ARV-naive pregnant women were recruited in three hospitals in Jos, Plateau state, north central Nigeria. Eligible subjects were recruited using a modified version of the binomial sequential sampling technique recommended by WHO. HIV-1 genotyping was performed and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were characterized according to the WHO 2009 surveillance drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list. HIV subtypes were determined by phylogenetic analysis. The women's median age was 25.5 years; the median CD4+ cell count was 317 cells/μl and the median viral load of 16 was 261 copies/ml. Of the 38 samples tested, 34 (89%) were successfully genotyped. The SDRM rate was <5% for all ART drug classes, with 1/34 (2.9%) for NRTIs/NNRTIs and none for protease inhibitors 0/31 (0%). The specific SDRMs detected were M41L for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and G190A for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). HIV-1 subtypes detected were CRF02_AG (38.2%), G′ (41.2%), G (14.7%), CRF06-CPX (2.9%), and a unique AG recombinant form (2.9%). The single ARV-native pregnant woman with SDRMs was infected with HIV-1 subtype G′. Access to ART has been available in the Jos area for over 8 years. The prevalence of TDR lower than 5% suggests proper ART administration, although continued surveillance is warranted. PMID:24164431

  6. Nevirapine Resistance in Previously Nevirapine-Unexposed HIV-1-Infected Kenyan Infants Initiating Early Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Bhavna H.; Tapia, Kenneth; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Khasimwa, Brian; Ngayo, Musa; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Wamalwa, Dalton; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nevirapine (NVP) resistance occurs frequently in infants following NVP use in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens. However, among previously NVP-unexposed infants treated with NVP-antiretroviral therapy (ART), the development and impact of NVP resistance have not been well characterized. In a prospective clinical trial providing early ART to HIV-infected infants<5 months of age in Kenya (OPH03 study), we followed NVP-unexposed infants who initiated NVP-ART for 12 months. Viral loads were assessed and resistance determined using a population-based genotypic resistance assay. Of 99 infants screened, 33 had no prior NVP exposure, 22 of whom were initiated on NVP-ART. Among 19 infants with follow-up, seven (37%) infants developed resistance: one at 3 months and six at 6 months after ART initiation. The cumulative probability of NVP resistance was 5.9% at 3 months and 43.5% at 6 months. Baseline HIV RNA levels (p=0.7) and other characteristics were not associated with developing resistance. Post-ART, higher virus levels at visits preceding the detection of resistance were significantly associated with increased detection of resistance (p=0.004). Virus levels after 6 and 12 months of ART were significantly higher in infants with resistance than those without (p=0.007, p=0.030, respectively). Among infants without previous NVP exposure, development of NVP resistance was frequent and was associated with virologic failure during the first year of ART. Earlier development of NVP resistance in infants than in adults initiating NVP-ART may be due to longer viremia following ART or inadequate NVP levels resulting from NVP lead-in dosing. The development of NVP resistance may, in part, explain the superiority of protease inhibitor-based ART in infants. PMID:25819584

  7. Nevirapine Resistance in Previously Nevirapine-Unexposed HIV-1-Infected Kenyan Infants Initiating Early Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Bhavna H; Tapia, Kenneth; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Khasimwa, Brian; Ngayo, Musa; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Wamalwa, Dalton; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-08-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) resistance occurs frequently in infants following NVP use in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens. However, among previously NVP-unexposed infants treated with NVP-antiretroviral therapy (ART), the development and impact of NVP resistance have not been well characterized. In a prospective clinical trial providing early ART to HIV-infected infants <5 months of age in Kenya (OPH03 study), we followed NVP-unexposed infants who initiated NVP-ART for 12 months. Viral loads were assessed and resistance determined using a population-based genotypic resistance assay. Of 99 infants screened, 33 had no prior NVP exposure, 22 of whom were initiated on NVP-ART. Among 19 infants with follow-up, seven (37%) infants developed resistance: one at 3 months and six at 6 months after ART initiation. The cumulative probability of NVP resistance was 5.9% at 3 months and 43.5% at 6 months. Baseline HIV RNA levels (p=0.7) and other characteristics were not associated with developing resistance. Post-ART, higher virus levels at visits preceding the detection of resistance were significantly associated with increased detection of resistance (p=0.004). Virus levels after 6 and 12 months of ART were significantly higher in infants with resistance than those without (p=0.007, p=0.030, respectively). Among infants without previous NVP exposure, development of NVP resistance was frequent and was associated with virologic failure during the first year of ART. Earlier development of NVP resistance in infants than in adults initiating NVP-ART may be due to longer viremia following ART or inadequate NVP levels resulting from NVP lead-in dosing. The development of NVP resistance may, in part, explain the superiority of protease inhibitor-based ART in infants.

  8. Resolution of discordant HIV-1 protease resistance rankings using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wright, David W; Coveney, Peter V

    2011-10-24

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major challenge for the effective treatment of HIV. In this article, we explore the application of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the level of resistance of a patient-derived HIV-1 protease sequence to the inhibitor lopinavir. A comparative drug ranking methodology was developed to compare drug resistance rankings produced by the Stanford HIVdb, ANRS, and RegaDB clinical decision support systems. The methodology was used to identify a patient sequence for which the three rival online tools produced differing resistance rankings. Mutations at only three positions ( L10I , A71IV, and L90M ) influenced the resistance level assigned to the sequence. We use ensemble molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the origin of these discrepancies and the mechanism of resistance. By simulating not only the full patient sequences but also systems containing the constituent mutations, we gain insight into why resistance estimates vary and the interactions between the various mutations. In the same way, we also gain valuable knowledge of the mechanistic causes of resistance. In particular, we identify changes in the relative conformation of the two beta sheets that form the protease dimer interface which suggest an explanation of the relative frequency of different amino acids observed in patients at residue 71.

  9. Evolution of CCR5 Antagonist Resistance in an HIV-1 Subtype C Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Tsibris, Athe M.N.; Lewine, Nicolas R.P.; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Leopold, Kay E.; Sagar, Manish; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We previously reported vicriviroc (VCV) resistance in an HIV-infected subject and used deep sequencing and clonal analyses to track the evolution of V3 sequence forms over 28 weeks of therapy. Here, we test the contribution of gp120 mutations to CCR5 antagonist resistance and investigate why certain minority V3 variants emerged as the dominant species under drug pressure. Methods 19 site-directed HIV-1 mutants were generated that contained gp120 VCV-resistance mutations. Viral sensitivities to VCV, maraviroc, TAK-779 and HGS004 were determined. Results Three patterns of susceptibilities were observed: sigmoid inhibition curves with IC50s similar to pre-treatment virus (07J-week 0 [W0]), single mutants with decreased IC50s compared to 07J-W0, and mutants that contained ≥5 of 7 VCV-resistance mutations with flattened inhibition curves and decreased or negative percent maximal inhibition. Substitutions such as S306P, which sensitized virus to CCR5 antagonists when present as single mutations, were not detected in the baseline virus population but were necessary for maximal resistance when incorporated into V3 backbones that included pre-existing VCV resistance mutations. Conclusion CCR5 antagonist resistance was reproduced only when a majority of V3 mutations were present. Minority V3 loop variants may serve as a scaffold upon which additional mutations lead to complete VCV resistance. PMID:20856130

  10. Long-term persistence of primary genotypic resistance after HIV-1 seroconversion.

    PubMed

    Pao, David; Andrady, Ushan; Clarke, Janette; Dean, Gillian; Drake, Susan; Fisher, Martin; Green, Tanya; Kumar, Siva; Murphy, Maurice; Tang, Alan; Taylor, Stephen; White, David; Underhill, Gillian; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia

    2004-12-15

    Primary infection with drug-resistant HIV-1 is well documented. We have followed up patients infected with such viruses to determine the stability of resistance-associated mutations. Fourteen patients who experienced primary infection with genotypic evidence of resistance were followed for up to 3 years. Drug resistance-associated mutations persisted over time in most patients studied. In particular, M41L, T69N, K103N, and T215 variants within reverse transcriptase (RT) and multidrug resistance demonstrated little reversion to wild-type virus. By contrast, Y181C and K219Q in RT, occurring alone, disappeared within 25 and 9 months, respectively. Multidrug resistance in 2 patients was found to be stable for up to 18 months, the maximum period studied. We conclude that certain resistance-associated mutations are highly stable and these data support the recommendation that all new HIV diagnoses in areas where primary resistance may occur should undergo genotyping irrespective of whether the date of seroconversion is known.

  11. Antiretroviral drug resistance and HIV-1 subtypes among treatment-naive prisoners in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, Tengku Ahmad Akram Tengku Mohd; Mohamad, Suharni; Yusuf, Wan Nazirah Wan; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim

    2014-08-13

    The widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and continuous reports of HIV-1 strains developing resistance to these drugs is rather alarming, as transmission of resistant viruses to newly infected persons is possible. This study aimed to determine HIV-1 subtypes and the prevalence of primary mutations associated with antiretroviral (ARV) resistance among treatment-naive prisoners on the east coast of Malaysia. Viral RNA was extracted from plasma samples of 21 treatment-naive prisoners. Protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions were amplified and sequenced. Stanford HIV database algorithms were used for interpretation of resistance, and phylogenetic analysis was performed for subtype assignment. In the PR gene, no antiviral resistance-associated mutation was detected. For RT-associated mutations, K103N was the most prevalent in sequenced samples (14.3%). Genetic subtyping on the pol gene revealed that the majority of the prisoners were infected with subtype CRF33_01B (52.4%). Continuous surveillance of newly infected individuals is required to help strategize the best antiviral treatment for these patients.

  12. Antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae colonising the nasopharynx of HIV-exposed Tanzanian infants.

    PubMed

    Bles, P; de Mast, Q; van der Gaast-de Jongh, C E; Kinabo, G D; Kibiki, G; van de Ven, A; de Jonge, M I

    2015-11-01

    To determine antibiotic susceptibility of colonising pneumococcal serotypes in HIV-exposed infants before the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), because HIV-exposed infants are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal infections. Antibiotic susceptibility of 104 pneumococcal isolates, cultured from the nasopharynx from Tanzanian HIV-exposed infants, was determined using the disc diffusion method and the E-test according to EUCAST version 4.0 (2014) criteria. A total of 69.2% of isolates were intermediately susceptible for benzyl penicillin (MIC 0.06-2 mg/l ); no high-level resistance was found. All isolates but one were susceptible to ampicillin. Regarding non-beta-lactam antibiotics, 19.2% of isolates were resistant to doxycycline, 3.8% to erythromycin and 97.1% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. A total of 15.4% of isolates were resistant to three antibiotic classes or more. There were no differences in antibiotic susceptibility between vaccine and non-vaccine serotypes. Reduced susceptibility of colonising pneumococcal isolates for commonly used antibiotics is common in HIV-exposed Tanzanian infants. High-dose penicillin and ampicillin remain appropriate first choices for non-meningeal pneumococcal infections in this group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection, viral tropism and resistance to antiretrovirals].

    PubMed

    García, Federico; Álvarez, Marta; Bernal, Carmen; Chueca, Natalia; Guillot, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    The accurate diagnosis of HIV infection demands that to consider a positive result, at least three assays with different antigenic base should be used, one of them, Western-Blot being mandatory for confirmation. Fourth generation ELISAs shorten the window phase to 13-15 days, as they now include p24 antigen detection. Proviral DNA or Viral RNA detection by molecular methods have proved useful for addressing complex situations in which serology was inconclusive. Viral load (HIV-RNA) is routinely used to follow-up HIV infected patients and is used for treatment initiation decisions. It is also used to monitor viral failure. When this happens, resistance tests are needed to guide treatment changes. Resistance is also used to assess the transmission of drug resistance to newly diagnosed patients. Finally, before using an anti-CCR5 drug, viral tropism needs to be determined. This can be done using genotypic tests, widely available in many HIV labs, or phenotypic tests, only available at certain sites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of drug resistance mutations in HIV from constraints on natural evolution.

    PubMed

    Butler, Thomas C; Barton, John P; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evolves with extraordinary rapidity. However, its evolution is constrained by interactions between mutations in its fitness landscape. Here we show that an Ising model describing these interactions, inferred from sequence data obtained prior to the use of antiretroviral drugs, can be used to identify clinically significant sites of resistance mutations. Successful predictions of the resistance sites indicate progress in the development of successful models of real viral evolution at the single residue level and suggest that our approach may be applied to help design new therapies that are less prone to failure even where resistance data are not yet available.

  15. Identification of drug resistance mutations in HIV from constraints on natural evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas C.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evolves with extraordinary rapidity. However, its evolution is constrained by interactions between mutations in its fitness landscape. Here we show that an Ising model describing these interactions, inferred from sequence data obtained prior to the use of antiretroviral drugs, can be used to identify clinically significant sites of resistance mutations. Successful predictions of the resistance sites indicate progress in the development of successful models of real viral evolution at the single residue level and suggest that our approach may be applied to help design new therapies that are less prone to failure even where resistance data are not yet available.

  16. Recent trends and patterns in HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tostevin, A; White, E; Dunn, D; Croxford, S; Delpech, V; Williams, I; Asboe, D; Pozniak, A; Churchill, D; Geretti, A M; Pillay, D; Sabin, C; Leigh-Brown, A; Smit, E

    2017-03-01

    Transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 has decreased in the UK since the early 2000s. This analysis reports recent trends and characteristics of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in the UK from 2010 to 2013. Resistance tests conducted in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve individuals between 2010 and 2013 were analysed for the presence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs), defined as any mutations from a modified 2009 World Health Organization surveillance list, or a modified 2013 International Antiviral Society-USA list for integrase tests. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between demographics and the prevalence of TDRMs. TDRMs were observed in 1223 (7.5%) of 16 425 individuals; prevalence declined from 8.1% in 2010 to 6.6% in 2013 (P = 0.02). The prevalence of TDRMs was higher among men who have sex with men (MSM) compared with heterosexual men and women (8.7% versus 6.4%, respectively) with a trend for decreasing TDRMs among MSM (P = 0.008) driven by a reduction in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-related mutations. The most frequently detected TDRMs were K103N (2.2%), T215 revertants (1.6%), M41L (0.9%) and L90M (0.7%). Predicted phenotypic resistance to first-line ART was highest to the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) rilpivirine and efavirenz (6.2% and 3.4%, respectively) but minimal to NRTIs, including tenofovir, and protease inhibitors (PIs). No major integrase TDRMs were detected among 101 individuals tested while ART-naïve. We observed a decrease in TDRMs in recent years. However, this was confined to the MSM population and rates remained stable in those with heterosexually acquired HIV infection. Resistance to currently recommended first-line ART, including integrase inhibitors, remained reassuringly low. © 2016 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  17. Dolutegravir Interactions with HIV-1 Integrase-DNA: Structural Rationale for Drug Resistance and Dissociation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    DeAnda, Felix; Hightower, Kendra E.; Nolte, Robert T.; Hattori, Kazunari; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kawasuji, Takashi; Underwood, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Signature HIV-1 integrase mutations associated with clinical raltegravir resistance involve 1 of 3 primary genetic pathways, Y143C/R, Q148H/K/R and N155H, the latter 2 of which confer cross-resistance to elvitegravir. In accord with clinical findings, in vitro drug resistance profiling studies with wild-type and site-directed integrase mutant viruses have shown significant fold increases in raltegravir and elvitegravir resistance for the specified viral mutants relative to wild-type HIV-1. Dolutegravir, in contrast, has demonstrated clinical efficacy in subjects failing raltegravir therapy due to integrase mutations at Y143, Q148 or N155, which is consistent with its distinct in vitro resistance profile as dolutegravir’s antiviral activity against these viral mutants is equivalent to its activity against wild-type HIV-1. Kinetic studies of inhibitor dissociation from wild-type and mutant integrase-viral DNA complexes have shown that dolutegravir also has a distinct off-rate profile with dissociative half-lives substantially longer than those of raltegravir and elvitegravir, suggesting that dolutegravir’s prolonged binding may be an important contributing factor to its distinct resistance profile. To provide a structural rationale for these observations, we constructed several molecular models of wild-type and clinically relevant mutant HIV-1 integrase enzymes in complex with viral DNA and dolutegravir, raltegravir or elvitegravir. Here, we discuss our structural models and the posited effects that the integrase mutations and the structural and electronic properties of the integrase inhibitors may have on the catalytic pocket and inhibitor binding and, consequently, on antiviral potency in vitro and in the clinic. PMID:24146996

  18. Colonisation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in a cohort of HIV infected children in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sampane-Donkor, Eric; Badoe, Ebenezer Vincent; Annan, Jennifer Adoley; Nii-Trebi, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic use not only selects for resistance in pathogenic bacteria, but also in commensal flora of exposed individuals. Little is known epidemiologically about antibiotic resistance in relation to people with HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated the carriage of antibiotic resistant bacteria among HIV infected children at a tertiary hospital in Ghana. One hundred and eighteen HIV positive children were recruited at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana and nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from them. The specimens were cultured for bacteria, and the isolates were identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were carried out on selected bacterial organisms by the Kirby Bauer method. Bacteria isolated from the study subjects included Moraxella catarrhalis (39.8%), coagulase negative staphylococci (33.1%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (30.5%), diptheroids (29.7%), viridian streptococci (27.1%), Staphylococcus aureus (22.0%), Citrobacter spp. (4.2%) and Neisseria meningitidis (0.9%). Prevalence of antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae ranged from 5.6% (ceftriaxone) to 58.3% (cotrimoxazole), M. catarrhalis ranged from 2.1% (gentamicin) to 80.6% (ampicillin), and S. aureus ranged from 7.7% (cefoxitin) to 100% (penicillin). The prevalence of multiple drug resistance was 16.7% for S. pneumoniae, 57.4% for M. catarrhalis and 84.6% for S. aureus. HIV infected children in the study area commonly carry multi-drug resistant isolates of several pathogenic bacteria such as S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. Infections arising in these patients that are caused by S. aureus and S. pneumoniae could be treated with ceftriaxone and cefoxitin respectively.

  19. Characterization of HIV diversity, phylodynamics and drug resistance in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Castel, Amanda D; Lewis, Brittany; Kharfen, Michael; Cartwright, Charles P; Huang, Bruce; Maxwell, Taylor; Greenberg, Alan E; Crandall, Keith A

    2017-01-01

    Washington DC has a high burden of HIV with a 2.0% HIV prevalence. The city is a national and international hub potentially containing a broad diversity of HIV variants; yet few sequences from DC are available on GenBank to assess the evolutionary history of HIV in the US capital. Towards this general goal, here we analyze extensive sequence data and investigate HIV diversity, phylodynamics, and drug resistant mutations (DRM) in DC. Molecular HIV-1 sequences were collected from participants infected through 2015 as part of the DC Cohort, a longitudinal observational study of HIV+ patients receiving care at 13 DC clinics. Sequences were paired with Cohort demographic, risk, and clinical data and analyzed using maximum likelihood, Bayesian and coalescent approaches of phylogenetic, network and population genetic inference. We analyzed 601 sequences from 223 participants for int (~864 bp) and 2,810 sequences from 1,659 participants for PR/RT (~1497 bp). Ninety-nine and 94% of the int and PR/RT sequences, respectively, were identified as subtype B, with 14 non-B subtypes also detected. Phylodynamic analyses of US born infected individuals showed that HIV population size varied little over time with no significant decline in diversity. Phylogenetic analyses grouped 13.5% of the int sequences into 14 clusters of 2 or 3 sequences, and 39.0% of the PR/RT sequences into 203 clusters of 2-32 sequences. Network analyses grouped 3.6% of the int sequences into 4 clusters of 2 sequences, and 10.6% of the PR/RT sequences into 76 clusters of 2-7 sequences. All network clusters were detected in our phylogenetic analyses. Higher proportions of clustered sequences were found in zip codes where HIV prevalence is highest (r = 0.607; P<0.00001). We detected a high prevalence of DRM for both int (17.1%) and PR/RT (39.1%), but only 8 int and 12 PR/RT amino acids were identified as under adaptive selection. We observed a significant (P<0.0001) association between main risk factors (men who

  20. Change in the Prevalence of HIV-1 and the Rate of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Viet; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Cuong Hung; Saina, Matilda Chelimo; Hoang, Huyen Thi Thanh; Tran, Vuong Thi; Bi, Xiuqiong; Pham, Thuc Van; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported a significant decrease in HIV-1 prevalence, with no increase in drug-resistant HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDU), female sex workers (FSW), and blood donors (BD), in Haiphong, Vietnam, from 2007 to 2009. In 2012, 388 IDU, 51 FSW, and 200 BD were recruited for further analysis. None had a history of antiretroviral treatment. From 2007 to 2012, HIV-1 prevalence was reduced from 35.9% to 18.6% (p<0.001), 23.1% to 9.8% (p<0.05), and 2.9% to 1% (p=0.29) in IDU, FSW, and BD, respectively. Of 79 anti-HIV-1 antibody-positive samples, 61 were successfully analyzed for the pol-reverse transcriptase (RT) region. All HIV-1 strains were CRF01_AE. Nonnucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations, Y181C/I, were detected in three subjects; one had the nucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations L74V and M184V and one had E138K. The prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong increased slightly from 1.8% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2012 (p=0.06).

  1. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from canine urinary samples submitted to a New Zealand veterinary diagnostic laboratory between 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    McMeekin, C H; Hill, K E; Gibson, I R; Bridges, J P; Benschop, J

    2017-03-01

    To identify and describe culture and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns in bacteria isolated from canine urinary samples submitted to a New Zealand veterinary diagnostic laboratory. Records from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory were examined for bacterial isolates cultured from canine urine samples between January 2005 and December 2012. Culture and susceptibility results were compiled with information on the age, sex and breed of dog. Repeat submissions were removed. Susceptibility was assessed using results of the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, for a standard panel including amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC), cefovecin (from 2010-2012), cephalothin, clindamycin, enrofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulphonamide (TMS). A total of 5,786 urine samples were submitted for analysis, and 3,135 bacterial isolates were cultured from 2,184 samples. Of these 3,135 isolates, 1,104 (35.2%) were Escherichia coli, 442 (14.1%) were Staphylococcus spp., 357 (11.4%) Proteus mirabilis and 276 (8.8%) were Enterococcus spp. The frequency of culture-positive samples increased with increasing age in both female and male dogs (p<0.001). The percentage of E. coli isolates resistant to AMC and cephalothin increased between 2005 and 2012 (p<0.001), as did resistance to enrofloxacin (p=0.022), but there was no change in resistance to TMS (p=0.696). Enrofloxacin was the antimicrobial with the least resistance shown by the four most common bacteria isolated during the course of the study. The results of this study provide important regional information regarding the prevalence of bacterial uropathogens and their susceptibility patterns. There was an increase in resistance to some commonly used antimicrobials in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Having access to regional antimicrobial susceptibility results is crucial when forming guidelines for the use of antimicrobials for the treatment of urinary tract infections. Given changes in practising habits and antimicrobial usage over

  2. Bacterial resistance and immunological profiles in HIV-infected and non-infected patients at Mbouda AD LUCEM Hospital in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Marbou, Wiliane J T; Kuete, Victor

    2016-04-28

    This study investigated the variations in some cells of the immune system, as well as the antibiotic resistance of the bacteria responsible for enteric infections among HIV+ patients compared to HIV- patients in Mbouda AD LUCEM Hospital, Cameroon. A cross-sectional study was performed from September 2014 to February 2015 in 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive (HIV+) and 37 HIV-seronegative (HIV-) patients. Blood collected from these patients was used to perform cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) and cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) lymphocyte blood counts and a white blood cell count, as well as to measure C-reactive protein (CRP) blood by flow cytometry and perform optical and immuno-turbidimetric detection. Enteric bacteria were isolated from the stool of patients, and their antibiotic susceptibility profiles were determined using agar diffusion methods. The results showed that Escherichia coli was the main pathogenic bacteria in the digestive tracts of HIV+ (85.3%) and HIV- (81.1%) patients, and infections with Klebsiella sp. were also predominant among HIV- patients (29.4%). Resistance of Klebsiella sp. to ceftriaxone (CRO; P=0.001), gentamicin (GEN; P=0.005), chloramphenicol (CHL; P=0.0004), ciprofloxacin (CIP; P=0.005) and doxycycline (DOX; P<0.0001) was significantly higher in HIV+ patients than in HIV- patients. Enterobacter sp. showed high resistance to GEN (P=0.009) and CIP (P=0.001) in HIV+ patients compared to HIV- patients. Citrobacter sp. was resistant to GEN (P=0.009) in HIV+ patients compared to HIV- patients. Salmonella sp. showed high resistance to CHL (P<0.0001) and DOX (P<0.0001) in HIV+ patients compared to HIV- patients. Resistance of Serratia sp. to AMO (P=0.005), AMC (P=0.005) and CHL (P=0.005) was significantly higher in HIV+ patients than in HIV- patients. Lymphopenia was higher in HIV+ patients (36.8%) than in HIV- patients (2.7%). In 45.9% of the HIV- patients, the CRP rate was higher than 6mg/L compared to 16.2% in HIV

  3. 2015 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in July 2014. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  4. 2017 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    The 2017 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  5. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry by the inhibitor.

  6. Analysis of transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 subtypes using dried serum spots of recently HIV-infected individuals in 2013 in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Andrea, Hauser; Alexandra, Hofmann; Claudia, Santos-Hoevener; Ruth, Zimmermann; Osamah, Hamouda; Norbert, Bannert; Claudia, Kuecherer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) aimed to assess a molecular surveillance strategy based on filter-dried serum spots (DSS) of all newly diagnosed HIV infections in Germany. In 2013, diagnostic laboratories sent DSS to the RKI representing 55% of the newly diagnosed HIV infections reported to the RKI (protection against infection act). DSS were first tested serologically to identify recently acquired infections (<140 days duration of infection); those classified as “recent infection” were processed for HIV-1 genotyping. The aim of this study was to assess the level of TDR and the current HIV-1 subtypes in the main HIV transmission group categories (TrGrpC) in 2013: men who have sex with men (MSM), women/men with heterosexual contacts (HET) and injecting drug users (IDUs). Materials and Methods DSS were tested for recency of infection using the BED capture EIA. Viral RNA from “recent infections” was amplified by HIV-1 group M generic pol-RT-PCR covering all resistance-associated positions in the HIV-1 protease (AS1-99) and reverse transcriptase (AS1-252) if viral loads were ≥6,500 copies/mL. PCR amplicons were sequenced (Sanger) to analyze genotypic resistance and the HIV-1 subtype. Results were merged to data from the HIV report, i.e. the TrGrpC. Results In 2013, 1027 DSS were classified as recent HIV infections (506 MSM, 118 HET, 31 IDUs, 6 others, 366 unknown). RNA was extracted from 703 recent cases and 389/503 samples with sufficient viral load were PCR-positive. By June 2014, 276/389 samples were sequenced: TDR was identified in 13% (35/276) of the recent infections including single (PI, NRTI, NNRTI) and dual drug class resistant strains (NRTI/NNRTI; NNRTI/PI). 18% (51/276) of recent HIV-1 infections were caused by non-B subtypes (A1, C, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, D, F, G, URFs). TDR was observed at comparable levels in all TrGrpC. Proportions of non-B infections were significantly higher in HET (78%; 14/18) and IDUs (60%; 3/5) compared to MSM (8

  7. Analysis of transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 subtypes using dried serum spots of recently HIV-infected individuals in 2013 in Germany.

    PubMed

    Andrea, Hauser; Alexandra, Hofmann; Claudia, Santos-Hoevener; Ruth, Zimmermann; Osamah, Hamouda; Norbert, Bannert; Claudia, Kuecherer

    2014-01-01

    The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) aimed to assess a molecular surveillance strategy based on filter-dried serum spots (DSS) of all newly diagnosed HIV infections in Germany. In 2013, diagnostic laboratories sent DSS to the RKI representing 55% of the newly diagnosed HIV infections reported to the RKI (protection against infection act). DSS were first tested serologically to identify recently acquired infections (<140 days duration of infection); those classified as "recent infection" were processed for HIV-1 genotyping. The aim of this study was to assess the level of TDR and the current HIV-1 subtypes in the main HIV transmission group categories (TrGrpC) in 2013: men who have sex with men (MSM), women/men with heterosexual contacts (HET) and injecting drug users (IDUs). DSS were tested for recency of infection using the BED capture EIA. Viral RNA from "recent infections" was amplified by HIV-1 group M generic pol-RT-PCR covering all resistance-associated positions in the HIV-1 protease (AS1-99) and reverse transcriptase (AS1-252) if viral loads were ≥6,500 copies/mL. PCR amplicons were sequenced (Sanger) to analyze genotypic resistance and the HIV-1 subtype. RESULTS were merged to data from the HIV report, i.e. the TrGrpC. In 2013, 1027 DSS were classified as recent HIV infections (506 MSM, 118 HET, 31 IDUs, 6 others, 366 unknown). RNA was extracted from 703 recent cases and 389/503 samples with sufficient viral load were PCR-positive. By June 2014, 276/389 samples were sequenced: TDR was identified in 13% (35/276) of the recent infections including single (PI, NRTI, NNRTI) and dual drug class resistant strains (NRTI/NNRTI; NNRTI/PI). 18% (51/276) of recent HIV-1 infections were caused by non-B subtypes (A1, C, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, D, F, G, URFs). TDR was observed at comparable levels in all TrGrpC. Proportions of non-B infections were significantly higher in HET (78%; 14/18) and IDUs (60%; 3/5) compared to MSM (8%; 14/169) (p<0.01). The proportion of TDR was

  8. Prevalence of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance differs between acutely and chronically HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Napravnik, Sonia; Hurt, Christopher B; Dennis, Ann; Quinlivan, E Byrd; Sebastian, Joe; Kuruc, Joann D; Eron, Joseph J

    2012-10-01

    The associations of acute HIV infection (AHI) and other predictors with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence were assessed in a cohort of HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naïve patients. AHI was defined as being seronegative with detectable HIV RNA. Binomial regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations with TDR. Among 43 AHI patients, TDR prevalence was 20.9%, whereas prevalence was 8.6% among 677 chronically infected patients. AHI was associated with 1.9 times the prevalence of TDR (95% confidence intervals: 1.0 to 3.6) in multivariable analysis. AHI patients may represent a vanguard group that portends increasing TDR in the future.

  9. Prevalence of Transmitted Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Differs between Acutely and Chronically HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    YANIK, Elizabeth L.; NAPRAVNIK, Sonia; HURT, Christopher B.; DENNIS, Ann; QUINLIVAN, E. Byrd; SEBASTIAN, Joe; KURUC, Joann D.; ERON, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    The associations of acute HIV infection (AHI) and other predictors with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence were assessed in a cohort of HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naïve patients. AHI was defined as being seronegative with detectable HIV RNA. Binomial regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with TDR. Among 43 AHI patients, TDR prevalence was 20.9%, while prevalence was 8.6% among 677 chronically-infected patients. AHI was associated with 1.9 times the prevalence of TDR (95% CI: 1.0, 3.6) in multivariable analysis. AHI patients may represent a vanguard group that portends increasing TDR in the future. PMID:22692092

  10. The R263K Dolutegravir Resistance-Associated Substitution Progressively Decreases HIV-1 Integration.

    PubMed

    Mesplède, Thibault; Leng, Jing; Pham, Hanh Thi; Liang, Jiaming; Quan, Yudong; Han, Yingshan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2017-04-04

    levels might represent a path to eradication. The integrase inhibitor dolutegravir is less susceptible than any other anti-HIV drug to the emergence of resistance in treatment-naive individuals. In treatment-experienced individuals, in contrast, rare cases of treatment failure were commonly associated with emergence of an R263K integrase substitution that confers low-level resistance to dolutegravir. It is unclear why this substitution is not more common in individuals experiencing failure with dolutegravir. We report here that R263K progressively diminishes the levels of integrated HIV-1 DNA in tissue culture over multiple cycles of infection. Our results help to explain aspects of the clinical efficacy of dolutegravir and suggest that this drug may be able to reduce HIV DNA levels within infected individuals compared to other drugs. Copyright © 2017 Mesplède et al.

  11. Minimizing Next-Generation Sequencing Errors for HIV Drug Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, José A; Chueca, Natalia; Poveda, Eva; García, Federico

    2017-05-23

    Next-generation sequencing prototypes for the routine diagnosis of resistance to antiretrovirals approved for the treatment of HIV infection are now being used in many clinical diagnostic laboratories. As some of the next-generation sequencing platforms may be a source of errors, it is necessary to improve the currently available protocols and implement bioinformatic tools that may help to correctly identify the presence of resistance mutations with clinical impact. Several studies have addressed these issues in recent years. Some of them are mainly focused on improving protocols for decreasing the magnitude of errors during the polymerase change reaction. Other studies propose specific bioinformatic tools, able to reach both a 93-98% reduction of indels (insertions/deletions) and a sensitivity and specificity close to 100% in single nucleotide polymorphism variant calling. The implementation of new protocols and bioinformatic tools improving the accuracy of next-generation sequencing results must be considered for a correct analysis of HIV resistance mutations for making clinical decisions. This review summarizes the most relevant data available for the optimization of next-generation sequencing applied to HIV resistance testing.

  12. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rosin, C D; Belew, R K; Morris, G M; Olson, A J; Goodsell, D S

    1999-02-16

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site-the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible.

  13. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher D.; Belew, Richard K.; Morris, Garrett M.; Olson, Arthur J.; Goodsell, David S.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site—the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible. PMID:9990030

  14. Incidence of HIV-1 drug resistance among antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals starting modern therapy combinations.

    PubMed

    von Wyl, Viktor; Yerly, Sabine; Böni, Jürg; Shah, Cyril; Cellerai, Cristina; Klimkait, Thomas; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Cavassini, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Hirschel, Bernard; Vernazza, Pietro L; Ledergerber, Bruno; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of drug resistance incidence to modern first-line combination antiretroviral therapies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 are complicated by limited availability of genotypic drug resistance tests (GRTs) and uncertain timing of resistance emergence. Five first-line combinations were studied (all paired with lamivudine or emtricitabine): efavirenz (EFV) plus zidovudine (AZT) (n = 524); EFV plus tenofovir (TDF) (n = 615); lopinavir (LPV) plus AZT (n = 573); LPV plus TDF (n = 301); and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATZ/r) plus TDF (n = 250). Virological treatment outcomes were classified into 3 risk strata for emergence of resistance, based on whether undetectable HIV RNA levels were maintained during therapy and, if not, whether viral loads were >500 copies/mL during treatment. Probabilities for presence of resistance mutations were estimated from GRTs (n = 2876) according to risk stratum and therapy received at time of testing. On the basis of these data, events of resistance emergence were imputed for each individual and were assessed using survival analysis. Imputation was repeated 100 times, and results were summarized by median values (2.5th-97.5th percentile range). Six years after treatment initiation, EFV plus AZT showed the highest cumulative resistance incidence (16%) of all regimens (<11%). Confounder-adjusted Cox regression confirmed that first-line EFV plus AZT (reference) was associated with a higher median hazard for resistance emergence, compared with other treatments: EFV plus TDF (hazard ratio [HR], 0.57; range, 0.42-0.76), LPV plus AZT (HR, 0.63; range, 0.45-0.89), LPV plus TDF (HR, 0.55; range, 0.33-0.83), ATZ/r plus TDF (HR, 0.43; range, 0.17-0.83). Two-thirds of resistance events were associated with detectable HIV RNA level ≤500 copies/mL during treatment, and only one-third with virological failure (HIV RNA level, >500 copies/mL). The inclusion of TDF instead of AZT and ATZ/r was correlated with lower rates of

  15. HIV-1 drug resistance among newly HIV-1 infected individuals attending tertiary referral center in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Hussain Syed; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Vidya, Madhavan; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Solomon, Suniti; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu

    2011-11-01

    In the era of free HAART, accessibility and availability of ARV has been dramatically increased in India. However, rates of treatment literacy and adherence appear to be sub-optimal. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the extent of primary drug resistance in such settings. Between July and October 2006, 18 anti-retroviral-naοve individuals were identified as recent infected by the BED-Capture enzyme immunoassay in a VCTC clinic in Chennai. Specimens from these individuals were subjected to genotypic drug resistance testing. Phylogenetic trees were generated using MEGA for Windows version 4.0 using neighbor-joining method. The significant differences in polymorphic mutation frequencies between the study specimens and established subtype C-specific polymorphisms were examined using the Chi-square test. Amino acid substitution (K103N and V106MV) at drug resistance positions occurred in two (11%) isolates, conferring high-level resistance to the non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV), delavirdine (DLV) and notably extensive genetic variations were observed. K122E (94.4%) and K49R/KR (11.1%) polymorphisms identified in this study have not been previously described in established subtype-C specific polymorphisms. The rate of polymorphisms showed marked difference at the locations V60, D121, V35, and D123 (P < 0.0001). All the sequences showed maximum homology with Indian HIV-1 subtype C reference strain C.IN.95IN21068. The finding of resistance to NNRTIs is of public health importance. There is an urgent need to establish surveillance for primary drug resistance in large scale. Further studies are required to determine the phenotype impact of newer polymorphic mutations in relation to drug resistance and viral fitness.

  16. The effect of intrinsic stochasticity on transmitted HIV drug resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    Marks, Alison J; Pillay, Deenan; McLean, Angela R

    2010-01-07

    Estimates of transmitted HIV drug-resistance prevalence vary widely among and within epidemiological surveys. Interpretation of trends from available survey data is therefore difficult. Because the emergence of drug-resistance involves small populations of infected drug-resistant individuals, the role of stochasticity (chance events) is likely to be important. The question addressed here is: how much variability in transmitted HIV drug-resistance prevalence patterns arises due to intrinsic stochasticity alone, i.e., if all starting conditions in the different epidemics surveyed were identical? This 'thought experiment' gives insight into the minimum expected variabilities within and among epidemics. A simple stochastic mathematical model was implemented. Our results show that stochasticity alone can generate a significant degree of variability and that this depends on the size and variation of the pool of new infections when drug treatment is first introduced. The variability in transmitted drug-resistance prevalence within an epidemic (i.e., the temporal variability) is large when the annual pool of all new infections is small (fewer than 200, typical of the HIV epidemics in Central European and Scandinavian countries) but diminishes rapidly as that pool grows. Epidemiological surveys involving hundreds of new infections annually are therefore needed to allow meaningful interpretation of temporal trends in transmitted drug-resistance prevalence within individual epidemics. The stochastic variability among epidemics shows a similar dependence on the pool of new infections if treatment is introduced after endemic equilibrium is established, but can persist even when there are more than 10,000 new infections annually if drug therapy is introduced earlier. Stochastic models may therefore have an important role to play in interpreting differences in transmitted drug-resistance prevalence trends among epidemiological surveys.

  17. Evolutionary analysis identifies an MX2 haplotype associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Manuela; Biasin, Mara; Cagliani, Rachele; Gnudi, Federica; Saulle, Irma; Ibba, Salomè; Filippi, Giulia; Yahyaei, Sarah; Tresoldi, Claudia; Riva, Stefania; Trabattoni, Daria; De Gioia, Luca; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Mazzotta, Francesco; Forni, Diego; Pontremoli, Chiara; Pineda, Juan Antonio; Pozzoli, Uberto; Rivero-Juarez, Antonio; Caruz, Antonio; Clerici, Mario

    2014-09-01

    The protein product of the myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) gene restricts HIV-1 and simian retroviruses. We demonstrate that MX2 evolved adaptively in mammals with distinct sites representing selection targets in distinct branches; selection mainly involved residues in loop 4, previously shown to carry antiviral determinants. Modeling data indicated that positively selected sites form a continuous surface on loop 4, which folds into two antiparallel α-helices protruding from the stalk domain. A population genetics-phylogenetics approach indicated that the coding region of MX2 mainly evolved under negative selection in the human lineage. Nonetheless, population genetic analyses demonstrated that natural selection operated on MX2 during the recent history of human populations: distinct selective events drove the frequency increase of two haplotypes in the populations of Asian and European ancestry. The Asian haplotype carries a susceptibility allele for melanoma; the European haplotype is tagged by rs2074560, an intronic variant. Analyses performed on three independent European cohorts of HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals with different geographic origin and distinct exposure route showed that the ancestral (G) allele of rs2074560 protects from HIV-1 infection with a recessive effect (combined P = 1.55 × 10(-4)). The same allele is associated with lower in vitro HIV-1 replication and increases MX2 expression levels in response to IFN-α. Data herein exploit evolutionary information to identify a novel host determinant of HIV-1 infection susceptibility.

  18. A decade of viral mutations and associated drug resistance in a population of HIV-1+ Puerto Ricans: 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Torres, Lycely Del C; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Rogers, Maria Luisa; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Boukli, Nawal; Jordan, I King; Cubano, Luis A

    2017-01-01

    Puerto Rico has one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS seen for any US state or territory, and antiretroviral therapy has been a mainstay of efforts to mitigate the HIV/AIDS public health burden on the island. We studied the evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 mutation and antiretroviral drug resistance in Puerto Rico by monitoring the population frequency of resistance-associated mutations from 2002 to 2011. Whole blood samples from 4,475 patients were analyzed using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System in the Immunoretrovirus Research Laboratory at Universidad Central del Caribe. Results show that 64.0% of female and 62.9% of male patients had HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to at least one antiretroviral medication. L63P and M184V were the dominant mutations observed for the protease (PRO) and reverse transcriptase (RT) encoding genes, respectively. Specific resistance mutations, along with their associated drug resistance profiles, can be seen to form temporal clusters that reveal a steadily changing landscape of resistance trends over time. Both women and men showed resistance mutations for an average of 4.8 drugs over the 10-year period, further underscoring the strong selective pressure exerted by antiretrovirals along with the rapid adaptive response of HIV. Nevertheless, both female and male patients showed a precipitous decrease for overall drug resistance, and for PRO mutations in particular, over the entire course of the study, with the most rapid decrease in frequency seen after 2006. The reduced HIV-1 mutation and drug resistance trends that we observed are consistent with previous reports from multi-year studies conducted around the world. Reduced resistance can be attributed to the use of more efficacious antiretroviral drug therapy, including the introduction of multi-drug combination therapies, which limited the ability of the virus to mount rapid adaptive responses to antiretroviral selection pressure.

  19. A decade of viral mutations and associated drug resistance in a population of HIV-1+ Puerto Ricans: 2002–2011

    PubMed Central

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Rogers, Maria Luisa; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Boukli, Nawal; Jordan, I. King; Cubano, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    Puerto Rico has one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS seen for any US state or territory, and antiretroviral therapy has been a mainstay of efforts to mitigate the HIV/AIDS public health burden on the island. We studied the evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 mutation and antiretroviral drug resistance in Puerto Rico by monitoring the population frequency of resistance-associated mutations from 2002 to 2011. Whole blood samples from 4,475 patients were analyzed using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System in the Immunoretrovirus Research Laboratory at Universidad Central del Caribe. Results show that 64.0% of female and 62.9% of male patients had HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to at least one antiretroviral medication. L63P and M184V were the dominant mutations observed for the protease (PRO) and reverse transcriptase (RT) encoding genes, respectively. Specific resistance mutations, along with their associated drug resistance profiles, can be seen to form temporal clusters that reveal a steadily changing landscape of resistance trends over time. Both women and men showed resistance mutations for an average of 4.8 drugs over the 10-year period, further underscoring the strong selective pressure exerted by antiretrovirals along with the rapid adaptive response of HIV. Nevertheless, both female and male patients showed a precipitous decrease for overall drug resistance, and for PRO mutations in particular, over the entire course of the study, with the most rapid decrease in frequency seen after 2006. The reduced HIV-1 mutation and drug resistance trends that we observed are consistent with previous reports from multi-year studies conducted around the world. Reduced resistance can be attributed to the use of more efficacious antiretroviral drug therapy, including the introduction of multi-drug combination therapies, which limited the ability of the virus to mount rapid adaptive responses to antiretroviral selection pressure. PMID:28493944

  20. Structures of HIV Protease Guide Inhibitor Design to Overcome Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV/AIDS infection continues to be a major epidemic worldwide despite the initial promise of antiviral drugs. Current therapy includes a combination of drugs that inhibit two of the virally-encoded enzymes, the reverse transcriptase and the protease. The first generation of HIV protease inhibitors that have been in clinical use for treatment of AIDS since 1995 was developed with the aid of structural analysis of protease-inhibitor complexes. These drugs were successful in improving the life span of HIV-infected people. Subsequently, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has necessitated the design of new inhibitors that target mutant proteases. This second generation of antiviral protease inhibitors has been developed with the aid of data from medicinal chemistry, kinetics, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Traditional computational methods such as molecular mechanics and dynamics can be supplemented with intelligent data mining approaches. One approach, based on similarities to the protease interactions with substrates, is to incorporate additional interactions with main chain atoms that cannot easily be eliminated by mutations. Our structural and inhibition data for darunavir have helped to understand its antiviral activity and effectiveness on drug resistant HIV and demonstrate the success of this approach.

  1. Multiple drug resistant mechanisms against darunavir, amprenavir, and nelfinavir of HIV-1 PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Xiu, Zhilong

    2013-02-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is infecting more humans and is expanding faster in the world. The illness interferes with the immune system, making people with AIDS much more likely to get infections, including opportunistic infections and tumors that do not affect people with working immune systems. HIV-1 PR is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. It is, therefore, necessary to develop some inhibitors against HIV-1 PR. In this work, we executed molecular dynamics (MDs) simulation of HIV-1 PR with drugs darunavir (DRV), amprenavir (APV), nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the resistant mechanism of L10I, G48V, I54V, and L90M mutations of this PR, aiming at designing promising drugs. The comparative analysis suggests that the existences of dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at P1' subsite, 4-aminophenylsulfonamide at P2' subsite, and bis-tetrahydrofuranylurethane at P2 subsite are helpful for maintaining the high affinity of the inhibitor for the protease and exhibiting high potency against multiple drug resistance (MDR) mutant protease.

  2. HIV-1 Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations among People Seeking HIV Diagnosis in Voluntary Counseling and Testing Sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-de-Castro, Carlos A.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Bastos, Francisco I.; Pilotto, José H.; Fernandes, Nilo; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs) sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005–2007. Recent (RS) and long-term (LTS) HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005–2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR) Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6%) or age (<25yo 17.9% vs >25yo 16.6%) along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF

  3. Increasing HIV-1 Drug Resistance Between 2010 and 2012 in Adults Participating in Population-Based HIV Surveillance in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Manasa, Justen; Danaviah, Siva; Lessells, Richard; Elshareef, Muna; Tanser, Frank; Wilkinson, Eduan; Pillay, Sureshnee; Mthiyane, Hloniphile; Mwambi, Henry; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-08-01

    As more human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients access combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), higher proportions of newly infected patients may be infected with drug-resistant viruses. Regular surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is required in southern Africa where high rates of transmission persist despite rapid expansion of ART. Dried blood spot samples from cART-naive participants from two rounds of an annual population-based HIV surveillance program in rural KwaZulu-Natal were tested for HIV RNA, and samples with HIV RNA >10,000 copies/ml were genotyped for drug resistance. The 2009 surveillance of drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list was used for drug resistance interpretation. The data were added to previously published data from the same program, and the χ(2) test for trend was used to test for trend in estimated prevalence of any TDR. Seven hundred and one participants' data were analyzed: 67 (2010), 381 (2011), and 253 (2012). No TDR was detected in 2010. Years 2011 and 2012 had 18 participants with SDRMs 4.7% and 7.1%, respectively (p = .02, χ(2) test for trend). The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation, K103N, was the most common mutation, occurring in 27 (3.8%) of the participants, while nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) SDRMs were detected in 10 (1.4%) of the participants, of whom eight had only a single NRTI SDRM. The increase in levels of drug resistance observed in this population could be a signal of increasing transmission of drug-resistant HIV. Thus, continued surveillance is critical to inform public health policies around HIV treatment and prevention.

  4. Increasing HIV-1 Drug Resistance Between 2010 and 2012 in Adults Participating in Population-Based HIV Surveillance in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Danaviah, Siva; Lessells, Richard; Elshareef, Muna; Tanser, Frank; Wilkinson, Eduan; Pillay, Sureshnee; Mthiyane, Hloniphile; Mwambi, Henry; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As more human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients access combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), higher proportions of newly infected patients may be infected with drug-resistant viruses. Regular surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is required in southern Africa where high rates of transmission persist despite rapid expansion of ART. Dried blood spot samples from cART-naive participants from two rounds of an annual population-based HIV surveillance program in rural KwaZulu-Natal were tested for HIV RNA, and samples with HIV RNA >10,000 copies/ml were genotyped for drug resistance. The 2009 surveillance of drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list was used for drug resistance interpretation. The data were added to previously published data from the same program, and the χ2 test for trend was used to test for trend in estimated prevalence of any TDR. Seven hundred and one participants' data were analyzed: 67 (2010), 381 (2011), and 253 (2012). No TDR was detected in 2010. Years 2011 and 2012 had 18 participants with SDRMs 4.7% and 7.1%, respectively (p = .02, χ2 test for trend). The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation, K103N, was the most common mutation, occurring in 27 (3.8%) of the participants, while nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) SDRMs were detected in 10 (1.4%) of the participants, of whom eight had only a single NRTI SDRM. The increase in levels of drug resistance observed in this population could be a signal of increasing transmission of drug-resistant HIV. Thus, continued surveillance is critical to inform public health policies around HIV treatment and prevention. PMID:27002368

  5. Clinical Correlates and Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Chandy; Elsa, Heylen; Baijayanti, Mishra; Lennartsdotter, Ekstrand Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine demographics, clinical correlates, sputum AFB (acid fast bacilli) smear grading DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy Short Course) uptake, and drug resistance in a cohort of newly-diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients with respect to HIV status at baseline, and compare smear conversion rates, side effects and mortality after two months. Design A prospective study among 54 HIV positive and 41 HIV negative pulmonary TB patients. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, review of medical records, and lab tests. Results HIVTB co-infected patients, though more symptomatic at baseline, showed more improvement in their symptoms compared to HIV-uninfected TB patients at follow-up. The HIV co-infected group had more prevalent perceived side effects, and sputum smear positivity was marginally higher compared to the HIV negative group at follow-up. Mortality was higher among the HIV-infected group. Both groups had high rates of resistance to first-line anti-tubercular drugs, particularly isoniazid. There was no significant difference in the drug resistance patterns between the groups. Conclusions Prompt initiation and provision of daily regimens of ATT (Anti-Tubercular treatment) along with ART (Anti-Retroviral treatment) via ART centers is urgently needed in India. As resistance to ART and/or ATT is directly linked to medication non-adherence, the use of counseling, regular reinforcement, early detection and appropriate intervention strategies to tackle this complex issue could help prevent premature mortality and development of resistance in HIV-TB co-infected patients. The high rate of isoniazid resistance might preclude its use in India as prophylaxis for latent TB in HIV infected persons as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. PMID:27708985

  6. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  7. Discovery of TSAO derivatives with an unusual HIV-1 activity/resistance profile.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Sonia; García-Aparicio, Carlos; Van Laethem, Kristel; Gago, Federico; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2006-08-01

    The very first TSAO derivative that lacks the 4''-amino group at the 3'-spiro moiety (compound 3) has been prepared and the effect of this modification on the activity/resistance profile has been evaluated. This molecule proved HIV-1 specific (NNRTI-characteristic). A mixture of wild-type and V106V/A or L234L/I mutations were found in the RT of some, but not all compound 3-resistant virus strains. Compound 3 does not select for the TSAO-specific E138K mutation in the RT. However, the compound markedly lost its antiviral potential against a variety of virus strains that contain NNRTI-characteristic mutations in RT including E138K. The deaminated TSAO compound must fit differently in the HIV-1 RT enzyme than its prototype TSAO-m(3)T.

  8. HIV drug resistance in mothers and infants following use of antiretrovirals to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

    PubMed

    Ton, Quy; Frenkel, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to review prominent studies on HIV drug-resistance in mothers and their infants after the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent mother-to-child-transmission in resource-limited communities. The effects of drug-resistance on subsequent combination antiretroviral therapy are discussed, as are the probable mechanisms of acquisition and decay or persistence of drug-resistant mutants. Differences in the rates of HIV drug-resistance from interventions used to prevent mother-to-child-transmission in North America and Europe are contrasted to the simplified regimens used in resource-limited settings. Unresolved issues related to HIV drug-resistance are reviewed, including: whether maternal zidovudine monotherapy selects significant resistance; the clinical relevance of HIV drug-resistant variants selected by single-dose nevirapine that persist as minority viral variants and can affect the outcome of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based therapy; and the use of maternal combination antiretroviral therapy during breastfeeding. Finally, the current and upcoming strategies to reduce HIV drug-resistance related to use of antiretrovirals to prevent mother-to-child-transmission are discussed and contrasted with the challenges of financing and administering antiretrovirals to prevent mother-to-child-transmission in resource-limited communities.

  9. Antiviral molecules correlate with vitamin D pathway genes and are associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Jimenez, Wbeimar; Zapata, Wildeman; Rugeles, María T

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the immunomodulatory effects of Vitamin D (VitD) and the expression of anti-HIV-1 molecules has not been explored in HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs). Higher mRNA levels of cathelicidin and HAD-4 in oral-mucosa and peripheral-blood, along with higher CYP24A1 mRNA in vaginal-mucosa and lower TLR2 mRNA in endocervical-mucosa were found in HESNs compared to non-exposed controls. Furthermore, the mRNA of anti-HIV molecules Elafin, TRIM5, Cathelicidin, HAD-4 and RNase7, previously associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection, positively correlated with the mRNA expression of VDR in HESNs, suggesting the potential participation of VitD in natural resistance to HIV-1.

  10. Drug resistance mutations and genetic diversity in adults treated for HIV type 1 infection in Mauritania.

    PubMed

    Fall-Malick, F-Zahra; Tchiakpé, Edmond; Ould Soufiane, Sid'Ahmed; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mouhamedoune Baye, Abderrahmane; Ould Horma Babana, Abdallah; Touré Kane, Coumba; Lo, Baidy; Mboup, Souleymane

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the drug resistance mutationprofile observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with virological failure and to document the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Mauritania. Eighty-six subjects were included and 65 samples were amplified successfully and sequenced. HIV-1 genotyping was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA AC11 resistance procedure. The median treatment duration was 32 months (range: 6-88) and the median viral load, 5 log10 copies/ml (range: 3.13-7). Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) were on first line regimens including 32.0% (19/59) on triomune fixed-dose and six on second-line therapy with NonNucleoside Reverse Transcriptase plus a protease inhibitor. Forty-seven patients (72.3%) had at least one drug resistance mutation including 73.0% (43/59) on first-line therapy. For the second-line, one out of six patients presented resistance mutations and only one presented PI DRM. Overall, the most common DRMs detected were M184V/I (n = 32; 49.2%), K103N (n = 28; 43%), and Y181C (n = 13; 20%). Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs) were found in 26.0% (n = 17) of strains and the most common was T215Y (n = 11, 16.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 17 HIV-1 variants with the predominance of CRF02_AG (n = 42; 64.6%). A high rate of DRM was found in this study and shows the potential need for a structured virological surveillance including viral load quantification and genotyping. Further studies may also be needed in regards to the great variability of HIV-1 strains in Mauritania. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathy, Kesavaram; Padma, Krishnan; Rajasekaran, Sikhamani

    2016-01-01

    Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients from South India were screened for blaCTX-M, AmpC production, multidrug resistance, and nine virulence associated genes (VAGs), fimH, pap, afa/dra, sfa/foc, iutA, fyuA, iroN, usp, and kpsMII. The majority (70.2%) of the ESBL producers harbored blaCTX-M and were AmpC coproducers. Among the CTX-M producers, 47.5% were found to be UPEC, 10% harbored as many as 7 VAGs, and 45% possessed kpsMII. Multidrug resistance (CIPRSXTRGENR) was significantly more common among the CTX-M producers compared to the nonproducers (70% versus 41.2%). However, 71.4% of the multidrug resistant CTX-M producers exhibited susceptibility to nitrofurantoin thereby making it an effective alternative to cephalosporins/fluoroquinolones. The emergence of CTX-M-producing highly virulent, multidrug resistant uropathogenic E. coli is of significant public health concern in countries like India with a high burden of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27123344

  12. Maternal Neutralization-Resistant Virus Variants Do Not Predict Infant HIV Infection Risk.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Caitlin; Omenda, Maxwel M; Chohan, Vrasha; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Richardson, Barbra A; Nduati, Ruth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2016-02-02

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV provides a setting for studying immune correlates of protection. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are suggested to contribute to a viral bottleneck during MTCT, but their role in blocking transmission is unclear, as studies comparing the NAb sensitivities of maternal viruses have yielded disparate results. We sought to determine whether transmitting mothers differ from nontransmitting mothers in the ability to neutralize individual autologous virus variants present at transmission. Ten transmitting and 10 nontransmitting HIV-infected mothers at high risk of MTCT were included in this study. Full-length HIV envelope genes (n = 100) were cloned from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained near transmission from transmitting mothers and at similar time points from nontransmitting mothers. Envelope clones were tested as pseudoviruses against contemporaneous, autologous maternal plasma in neutralization assays. The association between transmission and the log2 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for multiple virus variants per mother was estimated by using logistic regression with clustered standard errors. t tests were used to compare proportions of neutralization-resistant viruses. Overall, transmitting mothers had a median IC50 of 317 (interquartile range [IQR], 202 to 521), and nontransmitting mothers had a median IC50 of 243 (IQR, 95 to 594). Transmission risk was not significantly associated with autologous NAb activity (odds ratio, 1.25; P = 0.3). Compared to nontransmitting mothers, transmitting mothers had similar numbers of or fewer neutralization-resistant virus variants, depending on the IC50 neutralization resistance cutoff. In conclusion, HIV-infected mothers harbor mostly neutralization-sensitive viruses, although resistant variants were detected in both transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. These results suggest that MTCT during the breastfeeding period is not driven solely by the presence of maternal

  13. Inference of Epistatic Effects Leading to Entrenchment and Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, William F.; Haldane, Allan; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the complex mutation patterns that give rise to drug resistant viral strains provides a foundation for developing more effective treatment strategies for HIV/AIDS. Multiple sequence alignments of drug-experienced HIV-1 protease sequences contain networks of many pair correlations which can be used to build a (Potts) Hamiltonian model of these mutation patterns. Using this Hamiltonian model, we translate HIV-1 protease sequence covariation data into quantitative predictions for the probability of observing specific mutation patterns which are in agreement with the observed sequence statistics. We find that the statistical energies of the Potts model are correlated with the fitness of individual proteins containing therapy-associated mutations as estimated by in vitro measurements of protein stability and viral infectivity. We show that the penalty for acquiring primary resistance mutations depends on the epistatic interactions with the sequence background. Primary mutations which lead to drug resistance can become highly advantageous (or entrenched) by the complex mutation patterns which arise in response to drug therapy despite being destabilizing in the wildtype background. Anticipating epistatic effects is important for the design of future protease inhibitor therapies. PMID:28369521

  14. Nucleotide substitution patterns can predict the requirements for drug-resistance of HIV-1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Keulen, W; Boucher, C; Berkhout, B

    1996-06-01

    The enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a fundamental role in the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and several antiviral agents that target this key enzyme have been developed. Unfortunately, treatment of patients with RT inhibitors results in the appearance of drug-resistant variants with specific mutations in the RT protein. We hypothesized that if "difficult' resistance mutations (e.g. transversions/double-hits) are consistently observed at certain positions, it is likely that "easier' nucleotide substitutions (transitions/single-hits) at that codon do not result in a drug-resistant and/or active RT enzyme. In this study, we examined codon changes involved in RT drug resistance against nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors and listed all easier substitutions, which apparently were not selected, either due to reduced enzyme RT activity or lack of drug resistance. These predictions on the requirements for resistance were confirmed by published mutational data on RT variants. We also propose that differences in mutation type can explain the order of appearance of substitutions in case multiple amino acid changes are required for optimal fitness. Differences in mutation pattern have been reported for drug-resistant HIV-1 variants selected in tissue culture compared with variants found in treated patients. In contrast to the in vivo situation, a relatively small population size is handled in in vitro tissue culture systems and this may limit the chances of creating a resistance mutation. Indeed, inspection of the codon changes indicates that the in vitro culture system is more strongly biased towards the relatively easy nucleotide substitutions. These results suggest that the nucleotide substitution pattern can provide important information on RT drug resistance.

  15. High levels of pre-treatment HIV drug resistance and treatment failure in Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Ragna S; Boender, T Sonia; Sigaloff, Kim C.E.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Ndembi, Nicaise; Adeyemo, Titilope; Temiye, Edamisan O; Osibogun, Akin; Ondoa, Pascale; Calis, Job C; Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pre-treatment HIV drug resistance (PDR) is an increasing problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Children are an especially vulnerable population to develop PDR given that paediatric second-line treatment options are limited. Although monitoring of PDR is important, data on the paediatric prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and its consequences for treatment outcomes are scarce. We designed a prospective paediatric cohort study to document the prevalence of PDR and its effect on subsequent treatment failure in Nigeria, the country with the second highest number of HIV-infected children in the world. Methods HIV-1-infected children ≤12 years, who had not been exposed to drugs for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT), were enrolled between 2012 and 2013, and followed up for 24 months in Lagos, Nigeria. Pre-antiretroviral treatment (ART) population-based pol genotypic testing and six-monthly viral load (VL) testing were performed. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the effect of PDR (World Health Organization (WHO) list for transmitted drug resistance) on subsequent treatment failure (two consecutive VL measurements >1000 cps/ml or death). Results Of the total 82 PMTCT-naïve children, 13 (15.9%) had PDR. All 13 children harboured non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations, of whom seven also had nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance. After 24 months, 33% had experienced treatment failure. Treatment failure was associated with PDR and a higher log VL before treatment initiation (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 7.53 (95%CI 1.61–35.15) and 2.85 (95%CI 1.04–7.78), respectively). Discussion PDR was present in one out of six Nigerian children. These high numbers corroborate with recent findings in other African countries. The presence of PDR was relevant as it was the strongest predictor of first-line treatment failure. Conclusions Our findings stress the importance of implementing fully active regimens

  16. The molecular mechanism of human resistance to HIV-1 infection in persistently infected individuals--a review, hypothesis and implications.

    PubMed

    Becker, Yechiel

    2005-08-01

    Resistance to HIV-1 infection in Europeans is associated with a mutation in the gene that codes for the CCR5 protein that is present in Th2 cells and serves as a coreceptor for HIV-1 R5 strain. A deletion of 32 amino acids from the cytokine receptor prevents infection. This mutation prevails in Europeans and is absent in Africans. However, duplication of a gene that codes for a chemokine that binds to the CCR5 was discovered in Africans (mean gene copy 6 while in non-Africans the mean gene copy is 3). Higher expression of these genes protects T cells against HIV-1 infection in vitro. It should be noted that resistance to HIV-1 R5 variant does not protect against HIV-1 R4 variant. It was reported that a minority of highly HIV-1 exposed African professional sex workers (APSW) were resistant to the virus infection during a 10 years period. Recently, the analysis of the cytokines in the serum of the persistently infected seronegative women revealed that the latter hypo-expresses the cytokine IL-4. Since the molecular events during HIV-1 infection are associated with a marked increase in the levels of IL-4 and IgE in the sera of the infected individuals, it suggests that AIDS is an allergy. Thus, a very low level of IL-4 production may abrogate the virus infection. Studies on the human IL-4 gene revealed that together with the IL-4 mRNA a spliced variant with a deletion of exon 2 is synthesized. The latter is a natural antagonist of IL-4 and when expressed in an individual at a level higher than IL-4, the person will resist a microbial infection (e.g. Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or asthma. The present hypothesis suggests that the HIV-1 resistant APSWs produce more IL-4 delta 2 molecules than IL-4 molecules. The binding of IL-4 delta 2 to IL-4 receptors on T and B cells prevents their functions and the infection by HIV-1. The implications of these studies are that treatment of HIV-1 infected people with drugs that will block the IL-4 receptors will stop HIV-1 infections

  17. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Israel; Rojas, Patricia; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance of drug-resistance

  18. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricia; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance of drug-resistance

  19. Analysis of Clinical HIV-1 Strains with Resistance to Maraviroc Reveals Strain-Specific Resistance Mutations, Variable Degrees of Resistance, and Minimal Cross-Resistance to Other CCR5 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Ellenberg, Paula; Duncan, Renee; Ellett, Anne; Zhou, Jingling; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Gray, Lachlan R; Lewis, Marilyn; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Lee, Benhur; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa; Roche, Michael; Gorry, Paul R

    2017-09-26

    Maraviroc (MVC) is an allosteric inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and is the only CCR5 antagonist licensed for use as an anti-HIV-1 therapeutic. It acts by altering the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops, rendering CCR5 unrecognizable by the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. This study aimed to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of MVC resistance in HIV-1-infected patients. To do this, we obtained longitudinal plasma samples from eight subjects who experienced treatment failure with phenotypically verified, CCR5-tropic MVC resistance. We then cloned and characterized HIV-1 Envs (n = 77) from plasma of pretreatment (n = 36) and treatment failure (n = 41) samples. Our results showed variation in the magnitude of MVC resistance as measured by reductions in maximal percent inhibition of Env-pseudotyped viruses, which was more pronounced in 293-Affinofile cells compared to other cells with similar levels of CCR5 expression. Amino acid determinants of MVC resistance localized to the V3 Env region and were strain specific. We also observed minimal cross-resistance to other CCR5 antagonists by MVC-resistant strains. We conclude that 293-Affinofile cells are highly sensitive for detecting and measuring MVC resistance through a mechanism that is CCR5-dependent yet independent of CCR5 expression levels. The strain-specific nature of resistance mutations suggests that sequence-based diagnostics and prognostics will need to be more sophisticated than simple position scoring to be useful for managing resistance in subjects taking MVC. Finally, the minimal levels of cross-resistance suggests that recognition of the MVC-modified form of CCR5 does not necessarily lead to recognition of other antagonist-modified forms of CCR5.

  20. Pre-existence and emergence of drug resistance in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoeffer, S; Nowak, M A

    1997-01-01

    Antiviral treatment of HIV-1 infection often fails because of the rapid emergence of resistant virus within weeks of the start of therapy. This raises the question of whether resistant viruses pre-exist in drug-naive patients or whether it is produced after the start of therapy. Here we compare the likelihood of pre-existence with the likelihood of production of resistant virus during therapy. We show that provided resistant virus pre-exists, then a stronger therapy may lead to a greater initial reduction of virus load, but will also cause a faster rise of resistant virus. In this case the total benefit of treatment is independent of the degree of inhibition of sensitive virus. If, on the other hand, resistant mutants do not pre-exist, then the emergence of resistance during treatment depends on the efficacy of the drug. If the drug is sufficiently potent to eradicate sensitive virus, then the probability that resistant mutants first appear during therapy is smaller than the probability that they existed before therapy. If the drug cannot eradicate the sensitive virus, then after sufficiently long time resistant mutants will appear. However, mutants that are unlikely to pre-exist may taken long time to appear. PMID:9178534

  1. Absence of primary integrase resistance mutations in HIV type 1-infected patients in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Héctor R; Garzaro, Domingo; Fabbro, Rona; Martinez, Nahir; Ossenkop, John; Torres, Jaime R; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Pujol, Flor H

    2010-08-01

    The preexistence of mutations to integrase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected Venezuelan patients was evaluated. The integrase region of the HIV-1 genome was amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced in 57 isolates from both naive (n = 24) and treated patients who received protease and/or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (PI and RTI, n = 33), but were never exposed to integrase inhibitors. Only one primary integrase resistance mutation, not conferring drug resistance by itself, was found among these patients, although several minor viral mutations, equally distributed among naive and PI- and RTI-treated patients, were also found. In the limited number of samples, no relation was found among the presence of resistance mutations to PI or RTI and the presence of minor mutations to integrase. The absence of resistance to integrase inhibitors may be related to the recent introduction of these drugs in our country. The availability of in-house assays allows for a more comprehensive surveillance of drug resistance to integrase inhibitors in Venezuela.

  2. Assault on resistance: the use of computational chemistry in the development of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marilyn B Kroeger; Smith, Richard H; Jorgensen, William L

    2006-01-01

    While many inhibitors of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the causative agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), have been developed, the problem of drug resistance has continued to plague the fight against the disease. The ability of computers to aid in the drug discovery process, and by default the resistance problem, has increased dramatically as the speed of computers and sophistication of associated calculation programs has grown. In particular, the capability of predicting a compound's ability to combat resistance prior to synthesis of drug candidates has proven particularly desirable. Since resistance can develop against a specific drug designed to inhibit only one stage of the viral cycle, combinations of drugs directed at more than one step have proven to be more effective than a single drug given alone. While the introduction of this combination therapy (termed highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)) has significantly decreased the death rate from HIV infections, resistance problems still arise. This paper will review previous approaches and address current and future computational strategies used in the design of second-generation and beyond drugs.

  3. Detection of treatment-resistant infectious HIV after genome-directed antiviral endonuclease therapy.

    PubMed

    De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S; Stone, Daniel; Pietz, Harlan L; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alex L; Schiffer, Joshua T; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-02-01

    Incurable chronic viral infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. One potential approach to cure persistent viral infections is via the use of targeted endonucleases. Nevertheless, a potential concern for endonuclease-based antiviral therapies is the emergence of treatment resistance. Here we detect for the first time an endonuclease-resistant infectious virus that is found with high frequency after antiviral endonuclease therapy. While testing the activity of HIV pol-specific zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) alone or in combination with three prime repair exonuclease 2 (Trex2), we identified a treatment-resistant and infectious mutant virus that was derived from a ZFN-mediated disruption of reverse transcriptase (RT). Although gene disruption of HIV protease, RT and integrase could inhibit viral replication, a chance single amino acid insertion within the thumb domain of RT produced a virus that could actively replicate. The endonuclease-resistant virus could replicate in primary CD4(+) T cells, but remained susceptible to treatment with antiretroviral RT inhibitors. When secondary ZFN-derived mutations were introduced into the mutant virus's RT or integrase domains, replication could be abolished. Our observations suggest that caution should be exercised during endonuclease-based antiviral therapies; however, combination endonuclease therapies may prevent the emergence of resistance.

  4. Analysis of HIV Integrase Resistance in Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Iris; Zhang, Yinfeng; Cummings, Vanessa; Cloherty, Gavin A; Connor, Matthew; Beauchamp, Geetha; Griffith, Sam; Rose, Scott; Gallant, Joel; Scott, Hyman M; Shoptaw, Steven; Del Rio, Carlos; Kuo, Irene; Mannheimer, Sharon; Tieu, Hong-Van; Hurt, Christopher B; Fields, Sheldon D; Wheeler, Darrell P; Mayer, Kenneth H; Koblin, Beryl A; Eshleman, Susan H

    2017-04-06

    Resistance to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors was frequently detected in HIV from black men who have sex with men (MSM) enrolled in the HIV prevention trials network (HPTN) 061 study. In this study, integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) resistance was analyzed in black MSM enrolled in HPTN 061 (134 infected at enrollment and 23 seroconverters) and a follow-up study, HPTN 073 (eight seroconverters). The ViroSeq HIV-1 Integrase Genotyping Kit (Abbott Molecular) was used for analysis. Major INSTI resistance mutations were not detected in any of the samples. HIV from 14 (8.4%) of the 165 men, including 4 (12.9%) of 31 seroconverters, had accessory or polymorphic INSTI-associated mutations. The most frequently detected mutation was E157Q. These findings are promising because INSTI-based regimens are now recommended for first-line antiretroviral treatment and because long-acting cabotegravir is being evaluated for pre-exposure prophylaxis.

  5. Genetic characterization and antiretroviral resistance mutations among treatment-naive HIV-infected individuals in Jiaxing, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinlei; Yan, Yong; Zhang, Jiafeng; Ji, Jimei; Ge, Zhijian; Ge, Rui; Zhang, Xiaofei; Wang, Henghui; Chen, Zhongwen; Luo, Jianyong

    2017-03-14

    The aim of this study was to characterize HIV-1 genotypes and antiretroviral resistance mutations among treatment-naive HIV-infected individuals in Jiaxing, China. The HIV-1 partial polymerase (pol) genes in 93 of the 99 plasma samples were successfully amplified and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of five HIV-1 genotypes, of which the most prevalent genotype was CRF01_AE (38.7%), followed by CRF07_BC (34.4%), CRF08_BC (16.1%), subtype B/B' (5.4%), and CRF55_01B (2.1%). Besides, three types of unique recombination forms (URFs) were also observed, including C/F2/A1, CRF01_AE/B, and CRF08_BC/CRF07_BC. Among 93 amplicons, 46.2% had drug resistance-associated mutations, including 23.7% for protease inhibitors (PIs) mutations, 1.1% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) mutations, and 20.4% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) mutations. Six (6.5%) out of 93 treatment-naive subjects were identified to be resistant to one or more NNRTIs, while resistance to NRTIs or PIs was not observed. Our study showed the genetic diversity of HIV-1 strains circulating in Jiaxing and a relative high proportion of antiretroviral resistance mutations among treatment-naive patients, indicating a serious challenge for HIV prevention and treatment program.

  6. Universal access to HIV treatment versus universal 'test and treat': transmission, drug resistance & treatment costs.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bradley G; Blower, Sally

    2012-01-01

    In South Africa (SA) universal access to treatment for HIV-infected individuals in need has yet to be achieved. Currently ~1 million receive treatment, but an additional 1.6 million are in need. It is being debated whether to use a universal 'test and treat' (T&T) strategy to try to eliminate HIV in SA; treatment reduces infectivity and hence transmission. Under a T&T strategy all HIV-infected individuals would receive treatment whether in need or not. This would require treating 5 million individuals almost immediately and providing treatment for several decades. We use a validated mathematical model to predict impact and costs of: (i) a universal T&T strategy and (ii) achieving universal access to treatment. Using modeling the WHO has predicted a universal T&T strategy in SA would eliminate HIV within a decade, and (after 40 years) cost ~$10 billion less than achieving universal access. In contrast, we predict a universal T&T strategy in SA could eliminate HIV, but take 40 years and cost ~$12 billion more than achieving universal access. We determine the difference in predictions is because the WHO has under-estimated survival time on treatment and ignored the risk of resistance. We predict, after 20 years, ~2 million individuals would need second-line regimens if a universal T&T strategy is implemented versus ~1.5 million if universal access is achieved. Costs need to be realistically estimated and multiple evaluation criteria used to compare 'treatment as prevention' with other prevention strategies. Before implementing a universal T&T strategy, which may not be sustainable, we recommend striving to achieve universal access to treatment as quickly as possible. We predict achieving universal access to treatment would be a very effective 'treatment as prevention' approach and bring the HIV epidemic in SA close to elimination, preventing ~4 million infections after 20 years and ~11 million after 40 years.

  7. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS email updates Enter email Submit HIV and AIDS The human immunodeficiency (IH-myoo-noh-di-FISH- ... health Pregnancy and HIV View more HIV and AIDS resources Related information Birth control methods Sexually transmitted ...

  8. Time trends in drug resistant HIV-1 infections in the United Kingdom up to 2009: multicentre observational study.

    PubMed

    Dolling, David; Sabin, Caroline; Delpech, Valerie; Smit, Erasmus; Pozniak, Anton; Asboe, David; Brown, Andrew Leigh; Churchill, Duncan; Williams, Ian; Geretti, Anna Maria; Phillips, Andrew; Mackie, Nicola; Murphy, Gary; Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Dunn, David; Dolling, David

    2012-08-21

    To evaluate whether the prevalence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance has continued to decline in infections probably acquired within the United Kingdom. Multicentre observational study. All UK public laboratories conducting tests for genotypic HIV resistance as a part of routine care. 14,584 patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B virus, who were first tested for resistance before receiving antiretroviral therapy between January 2002 and December 2009. Prevalence of transmitted drug resistance, defined as one or more resistance mutations from the surveillance list recommended by the World Health Organization. 1654 (11.3%, 95% confidence interval 10.8% to 11.9%) patients had one or more mutations associated with transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance; prevalence was found to decline from 15.5% in 2002 to 9.6% in 2007, followed by a slight increase to 10.9% in 2009 (P=0.21). This later rise was mainly a result of increases in resistance to nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (from 5.4% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2009, P=0.24) and protease inhibitors (1.5% to 2.1%, P=0.12). Thymidine analogue mutations, including T215 revertants, remained the most frequent mutations associated with nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite a considerable fall in stavudine and zidovudine use between 2002 and 2009 (from 29.4% of drug regimens in 2002 to 0.8% in 2009, from 47.9% to 8.8%, respectively). The previously observed decline in the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in HIV-1 infections probably acquired in the UK seems to have stabilised. The continued high prevalence of thymidine analogue mutations suggests that the source of this resistance may be increasingly from patients who have not undergone antiretroviral therapy and who harbour resistant viruses. Testing of all newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive people should be continued.

  9. Evaluations of an in-house drug resistance method for HIV-1 drug resistance using ViroSeq™ 2.0 genotyping system as a gold standard.

    PubMed

    Chaturbhuj, Devidas N; Deshmukh, Pravin S; Hingankar, Nitin K; Siddhaarth, K; Deshpande, Sohan N; Sen, Sourav; Kabra, Sandhya; Paranjape, Ramesh S; Tripathy, Srikanth P

    2013-04-01

    An in-house method was evaluated for its efficiency to detect the HIV-1 drug resistance mutations. This method was compared with the ViroSeq™ Genotyping System 2.0 (Celera Diagnostics, US) a gold standard. Sixty-five stored plasma samples, previously tested for HIV-1 drug resistance using the ViroSeq™ method were used to evaluate the in-house method. Out of the sixty five plasma samples, sixty were HIV-1 positive clinical samples; four samples from the Virology Quality Assessment (VQA) program and one positive control from the ViroSeq™ kit were used in this study. The sequences generated by the ViroSeq™ and an in-house method showed 99.5±0.5% and 99.7±0.4% (mean±SD) nucleotide and amino acid identity, respectively. Out of 214 Stanford HIVdb listed HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in the protease and reverse transcriptase regions, concordance was observed in 203 (94.9%), partial discordance in 11 (5.1%) and complete discordance was absent. The in-house primers are broadly sensitive in genotyping multiple HIV-1 group M subtypes. The amplification sensitivity of the in-house method was 1000 copies/ml. The evaluation of the in-house method provides results comparable with that of ViroSeq™ method thus, making the in-house method suitable for HIV-1 drug resistance testing in the developing countries.

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis: Combined Impact on HIV Transmission and Drug Resistance in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ume L.; Glaubius, Robert; Mubayi, Anuj; Hood, Gregory; Mellors, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The potential impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with overlapping and nonoverlapping antiretrovirals (ARVs) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and drug resistance is unknown. Methods. A detailed mathematical model was used to simulate the epidemiological impact of ART alone, PrEP alone, and combined ART + PrEP in South Africa. Results. ART alone initiated at a CD4 lymphocyte cell count <200 cells/µL (80% coverage and 96% effectiveness) prevents 20% of HIV infections over 10 years but increases drug resistance prevalence to 6.6%. PrEP alone (30% coverage and 75% effectiveness) also prevents 21% of infections but with lower resistance prevalence of 0.5%. The ratio of cumulative infections prevented to prevalent drug-resistant cases after 10 years is 7-fold higher for PrEP than for ART. Combined ART + PrEP with overlapping ARVs prevents 35% of infections but increases resistance prevalence to 8.2%, whereas ART + PrEP with nonoverlapping ARVs prevents slightly more infections (37%) and reduces resistance prevalence to 7.2%. Conclusions. Combined ART + PrEP is likely to prevent more HIV infections than either strategy alone, but with higher prevalence of drug resistance. ART is predicted to contribute more to resistance than is PrEP. Optimizing both ART and PrEP effectiveness and delivery are the keys to preventing HIV transmission and drug resistance. PMID:23570850

  11. Computational Models of HIV-1 Resistance to Gene Therapy Elucidate Therapy Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Aviran, Sharon; Shah, Priya S.; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy is an emerging alternative to conventional anti-HIV-1 drugs, and can potentially control the virus while alleviating major limitations of current approaches. Yet, HIV-1's ability to rapidly acquire mutations and escape therapy presents a critical challenge to any novel treatment paradigm. Viral escape is thus a key consideration in the design of any gene-based technique. We develop a computational model of HIV's evolutionary dynamics in vivo in the presence of a genetic therapy to explore the impact of therapy parameters and strategies on the development of resistance. Our model is generic and captures the properties of a broad class of gene-based agents that inhibit early stages of the viral life cycle. We highlight the differences in viral resistance dynamics between gene and standard antiretroviral therapies, and identify key factors that impact long-term viral suppression. In particular, we underscore the importance of mutationally-induced viral fitness losses in cells that are not genetically modified, as these can severely constrain the replication of resistant virus. We also propose and investigate a novel treatment strategy that leverages upon gene therapy's unique capacity to deliver different genes to distinct cell populations, and we find that such a strategy can dramatically improve efficacy when used judiciously within a certain parametric regime. Finally, we revisit a previously-suggested idea of improving clinical outcomes by boosting the proliferation of the genetically-modified cells, but we find that such an approach has mixed effects on resistance dynamics. Our results provide insights into the short- and long-term effects of gene therapy and the role of its key properties in the evolution of resistance, which can serve as guidelines for the choice and optimization of effective therapeutic agents. PMID:20711350

  12. Collaborative update of a rule-based expert system for HIV-1 genotypic resistance test interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Roger; Tzou, Philip L.; van Zyl, Gert; Barrow, Geoff; Camacho, Ricardo; Carmona, Sergio; Grant, Philip M.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Hamers, Raph L.; Harrigan, P. Richard; Jordan, Michael R.; Kantor, Rami; Katzenstein, David A.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Maldarelli, Frank; Otelea, Dan; Wallis, Carole L.; Schapiro, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction HIV-1 genotypic resistance test (GRT) interpretation systems (IS) require updates as new studies on HIV-1 drug resistance are published and as treatment guidelines evolve. Methods An expert panel was created to provide recommendations for the update of the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database (HIVDB) GRT-IS. The panel was polled on the ARVs to be included in a GRT report, and the drug-resistance interpretations associated with 160 drug-resistance mutation (DRM) pattern-ARV combinations. The DRM pattern-ARV combinations included 52 nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (13 patterns x 4 NRTIs), 27 nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (9 patterns x 3 NNRTIs), 39 protease inhibitor (PI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (13 patterns x 3 PIs) and 42 integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (14 patterns x 3 INSTIs). Results There was universal agreement that a GRT report should include the NRTIs lamivudine, abacavir, zidovudine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate; the NNRTIs efavirenz, etravirine, nevirapine, and rilpivirine; the PIs atazanavir/r, darunavir/r, and lopinavir/r (with “/r” indicating pharmacological boosting with ritonavir or cobicistat); and the INSTIs dolutegravir, elvitegravir, and raltegravir. There was a range of opinion as to whether the NRTIs stavudine and didanosine and the PIs nelfinavir, indinavir/r, saquinavir/r, fosamprenavir/r, and tipranavir/r should be included. The expert panel members provided highly concordant DRM pattern-ARV interpretations with only 6% of NRTI, 6% of NNRTI, 5% of PI, and 3% of INSTI individual expert interpretations differing from the expert panel median by more than one resistance level. The expert panel median differed from the HIVDB 7.0 GRT-IS for 20 (12.5%) of the 160 DRM pattern-ARV combinations including 12 NRTI, two NNRTI, and six INSTI pattern-ARV combinations. Eighteen of these differences were updated in

  13. Collaborative update of a rule-based expert system for HIV-1 genotypic resistance test interpretation.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Roger; Tzou, Philip L; van Zyl, Gert; Barrow, Geoff; Camacho, Ricardo; Carmona, Sergio; Grant, Philip M; Gupta, Ravindra K; Hamers, Raph L; Harrigan, P Richard; Jordan, Michael R; Kantor, Rami; Katzenstein, David A; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Maldarelli, Frank; Otelea, Dan; Wallis, Carole L; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Shafer, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 genotypic resistance test (GRT) interpretation systems (IS) require updates as new studies on HIV-1 drug resistance are published and as treatment guidelines evolve. An expert panel was created to provide recommendations for the update of the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database (HIVDB) GRT-IS. The panel was polled on the ARVs to be included in a GRT report, and the drug-resistance interpretations associated with 160 drug-resistance mutation (DRM) pattern-ARV combinations. The DRM pattern-ARV combinations included 52 nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (13 patterns x 4 NRTIs), 27 nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (9 patterns x 3 NNRTIs), 39 protease inhibitor (PI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (13 patterns x 3 PIs) and 42 integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) DRM pattern-ARV combinations (14 patterns x 3 INSTIs). There was universal agreement that a GRT report should include the NRTIs lamivudine, abacavir, zidovudine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate; the NNRTIs efavirenz, etravirine, nevirapine, and rilpivirine; the PIs atazanavir/r, darunavir/r, and lopinavir/r (with "/r" indicating pharmacological boosting with ritonavir or cobicistat); and the INSTIs dolutegravir, elvitegravir, and raltegravir. There was a range of opinion as to whether the NRTIs stavudine and didanosine and the PIs nelfinavir, indinavir/r, saquinavir/r, fosamprenavir/r, and tipranavir/r should be included. The expert panel members provided highly concordant DRM pattern-ARV interpretations with only 6% of NRTI, 6% of NNRTI, 5% of PI, and 3% of INSTI individual expert interpretations differing from the expert panel median by more than one resistance level. The expert panel median differed from the HIVDB 7.0 GRT-IS for 20 (12.5%) of the 160 DRM pattern-ARV combinations including 12 NRTI, two NNRTI, and six INSTI pattern-ARV combinations. Eighteen of these differences were updated in HIVDB 8.1 GRT-IS to reflect the

  14. A comparative analysis of HIV drug resistance interpretation based on short reverse transcriptase sequences versus full sequences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) becomes more accessible in resource-limited settings (RLS), the need for more affordable monitoring tools such as point-of-care viral load assays and simplified genotypic HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) tests increases substantially. The prohibitive expenses of genotypic HIVDR assays could partly be addressed by focusing on a smaller region of the HIV reverse transcriptase gene (RT) that encompasses the majority of HIVDR mutations for people on ART in RLS. In this study, an in silico analysis of 125,329 RT sequences was performed to investigate the effect of submitting short RT sequences (codon 41 to 238) to the commonly used virco®TYPE and Stanford genotype interpretation tools. Results Pair-wise comparisons between full-length and short RT sequences were performed. Additionally, a non-inferiority approach with a concordance limit of 95% and two-sided 95% confidence intervals was used to demonstrate concordance between HIVDR calls based on full-length and short RT sequences. The results of this analysis showed that HIVDR interpretations based on full-length versus short RT sequences, using the Stanford algorithms, had concordance significantly above 95%. When using the virco®TYPE algorithm, similar concordance was demonstrated (>95%), but some differences were observed for d4T, AZT and TDF, where predictions were affected in more than 5% of the sequences. Most differences in interpretation, however, were due to shifts from fully susceptible to reduced susceptibility (d4T) or from reduced response to minimal response (AZT, TDF) or vice versa, as compared to the predicted full RT sequence. The virco®TYPE prediction uses many more mutations outside the RT 41-238 amino acid domain, which significantly contribute to the HIVDR prediction for these 3 antiretroviral agents. Conclusions This study illustrates the acceptability of using a shortened RT sequences (codon 41-238) to obtain reliable genotype interpretations

  15. A randomised trial comparing genotypic and virtual phenotypic interpretation of HIV drug resistance: the CREST study.

    PubMed

    Hales, Gillian; Birch, Chris; Crowe, Suzanne; Workman, Cassy; Hoy, Jennifer F; Law, Matthew G; Kelleher, Anthony D; Lincoln, Douglas; Emery, Sean

    2006-07-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of different HIV drug resistance test reports (genotype and virtual phenotype) in patients who were changing their antiretroviral therapy (ART). Randomised, open-label trial with 48-week followup. The study was conducted in a network of primary healthcare sites in Australia and New Zealand. Patients failing current ART with plasma HIV RNA > 2000 copies/mL who wished to change their current ART were eligible. Subjects were required to be > 18 years of age, previously treated with ART, have no intercurrent illnesses requiring active therapy, and to have provided written informed consent. Eligible subjects were randomly assigned to receive a genotype (group A) or genotype plus virtual phenotype (group B) prior to selection of their new antiretroviral regimen. Patient groups were compared for patterns of ART selection and surrogate outcomes (plasma viral load and CD4 counts) on an intention-to-treat basis over a 48-week period. Three hundred and twenty seven patients completing >or= one month of followup were included in these analyses. Resistance tests were the primary means by which ART regimens were selected (group A: 64%, group B: 62%; p = 0.32). At 48 weeks, there were no significant differences between the groups for mean change from baseline plasma HIV RNA (group A: 0.68 log copies/mL, group B: 0.58 log copies/mL; p = 0.23) and mean change from baseline CD4+ cell count (group A: 37 cells/mm(3), group B: 50 cells/mm(3); p = 0.28). In the absence of clear demonstrated benefits arising from the use of the virtual phenotype interpretation, this study suggests resistance testing using genotyping linked to a reliable interpretive algorithm is adequate for the management of HIV infection.

  16. Receipt and timing of HIV drug resistance testing in six U.S. jurisdictions.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Sharoda; Hall, H Irene; Hernandez, Angela L; Ocfemia, M Cheryl Bañez; Saduvala, Neeraja; Oster, Alexandra M

    2017-05-03

    The Department of Health and Human Services recommends drug resistance testing at linkage to HIV care. Because receipt and timing of testing are not well characterized, we examined testing patterns among persons with diagnosed HIV who are linked to care. Using surveillance data in six jurisdictions for persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed in 2013, we assessed the proportion receiving testing, and among these, the proportion receiving testing at linkage. Multivariable log-binomial regression modeling estimated associations between selected characteristics and receipt of testing (1) overall, and (2) at linkage among those tested. Of 9,408 persons linked to care, 66% received resistance testing, among whom 68% received testing at linkage. Less testing was observed among male persons who inject drugs (PWID), compared with men who have sex with men (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81-0.97) and persons living in areas with population <500,000 compared with those in areas with population ≥2,500,000 (aPR: 0.88; CI: 0.84-0.93). In certain jurisdictions, testing was lower for persons with initial CD4 counts ≥500 cells/mm(3), compared with those with CD4 counts <200 cells/mm(3) (aPR range: 0.80-0.85). Of those tested, testing at linkage was lower among male PWID (aPR: 0.85; CI: 0.75-0.95) and, in some jurisdictions, persons with CD4 counts ≥500 cells/mm(3) (aPR range: 0.63-0.73). Two-thirds of persons with diagnosed HIV who were linked to care received resistance testing, and most received testing at linkage as recommended. Improving receipt and timing of testing among male PWID, persons in less populous settings, and in all jurisdictions, regardless of CD4 count, may improve care outcomes.

  17. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  18. Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) RegaDB HIV drug resistance and clinical management database: supporting patient management, surveillance and research in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manasa, Justen; Lessells, Richard; Rossouw, Theresa; Naidu, Kevindra; Van Vuuren, Cloete; Goedhals, Dominique; van Zyl, Gert; Bester, Armand; Skingsley, Andrew; Stott, Katharine; Danaviah, Siva; Chetty, Terusha; Singh, Lavanya; Moodley, Pravi; Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Seebregts, Christopher J; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of data have been generated from patient management and academic exercises designed to better understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and design interventions to control it. A number of specialized databases have been designed to manage huge data sets from HIV cohort, vaccine, host genomic and drug resistance studies. Besides databases from cohort studies, most of the online databases contain limited curated data and are thus sequence repositories. HIV drug resistance has been shown to have a great potential to derail the progress made thus far through antiretroviral therapy. Thus, a lot of resources have been invested in generating drug resistance data for patient management and surveillance purposes. Unfortunately, most of the data currently available relate to subtype B even though >60% of the epidemic is caused by HIV-1 subtype C. A consortium of clinicians, scientists, public health experts and policy markers working in southern Africa came together and formed a network, the Southern African Treatment and Resistance Network (SATuRN), with the aim of increasing curated HIV-1 subtype C and tuberculosis drug resistance data. This article describes the HIV-1 data curation process using the SATuRN Rega database. The data curation is a manual and time-consuming process done by clinical, laboratory and data curation specialists. Access to the highly curated data sets is through applications that are reviewed by the SATuRN executive committee. Examples of research outputs from the analysis of the curated data include trends in the level of transmitted drug resistance in South Africa, analysis of the levels of acquired resistance among patients failing therapy and factors associated with the absence of genotypic evidence of drug resistance among patients failing therapy. All these studies have been important for informing first- and second-line therapy. This database is a free password-protected open source database available on

  19. Estimating Trends in the Proportion of Transmitted and Acquired HIV Drug Resistance in a Long Term Observational Cohort in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel; Kollan, Christian; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schülter, Eugen; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Jensen, Björn-Erik Ole; Stoll, Matthias; Bogner, Johannes R.; Eberle, Josef; Meixenberger, Karolin; Kücherer, Claudia; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed trends in the proportion of transmitted (TDR) and acquired (ADR) HIV drug resistance and associated mutations between 2001 and 2011 in the German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study. Method The German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study is a subset of the German ClinSurv-HIV Cohort. For the ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study all available sequences isolated from patients in five study centres of the long term observational ClinSurv-HIV Cohort were included. TDR was estimated using the first viral sequence of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve patients. One HIV sequence/patient/year of ART experienced patients was considered to estimate the proportion of ADR. Trends in the proportion of HIV drug resistance were calculated by logistic regression. Results 9,528 patients were included into the analysis. HIV-sequences of antiretroviral naïve and treatment experienced patients were available from 34% (3,267/9,528) of patients. The proportion of TDR over time was stable at 10.4% (95% CI 9.1–11.8; p for trend = 0.6; 2001–2011). The proportion of ADR among all treated patients was 16%, whereas it was high among those with available HIV genotypic resistance test (64%; 1,310/2,049 sequences; 95% CI 62–66) but declined significantly over time (OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.77–0.83; p for trend<0.001; 2001–2011). Viral load monitoring subsequent to resistance testing was performed in the majority of treated patients (96%) and most of them (67%) were treated successfully. Conclusions The proportion of TDR was stable in this study population. ADR declined significantly over time. This decline might have been influenced by broader resistance testing, resistance test guided therapy and the availability of more therapeutic options and not by a decline in the proportion of TDR within the study population. PMID:25148412

  20. Implementing HIV-1 genotypic resistance testing in antiretroviral therapy programs in Africa: needs, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lessells, Richard J; Avalos, Ava; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made with the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Africa, with an estimated seven million people now receiving antiretroviral therapy in the region. The long-term success of antiretroviral therapy programs depends on appropriate strategies to deal with potential threats, one of which is the emergence and spread of antiretroviral drug resistance. Whilst public health surveillance forms the mainstay of the World Health Organization approach to antiretroviral drug resistance, there is likely to be increasing demand for access to drug resistance testing as programs mature and as HIV clinical management becomes more complex. African-owned research initiatives have helped to develop affordable resistance testing appropriate for use in the region, and have developed delivery models for resistance testing at different levels of the public health system. Some upper-middle-income countries such as Botswana and South Africa have introduced drug resistance testing for selected patient groups to guide clinical management. The scale-up of resistance testing will require substantial expansion of clinical and laboratory capacity in the region, but the expertise and resources exist in Africa to support this. The long-term population health impact and cost-effectiveness of resistance testing in the region will also require further investigation.

  1. Epidemiological networks and drug resistance of HIV type 1 in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Rumyantseva, Olga A; Olkhovskiy, Igor A; Malysheva, Marina A; Ruzaeva, Ludmila A; Vasiliev, Alexander V; Kazennova, Elena V; Bobkova, Marina R; Lukashov, Vladimir V

    2009-09-01

    To study the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia, where HIV-1 has spread rapidly since 2000, we obtained pol sequences from individuals living in this region (n = 67) as well as in the geographically closely related Altay region (n = 13). In both regions, subtype A viruses specific for the former Soviet Union (IDU-A strains) were dominant (92.5%). Virus sequences clustered according to the geographic origin of the infected individuals rather than to their risk group, demonstrating the role of geographically defined epidemiological networks in the propagation of the HIV-1 epidemic in the region. Six viruses belonged to subtype B. Three of them were phylogenetically (and therefore epidemiologically) closely related to each other, demonstrating that even though IDU-A viruses dominate the epidemic, the spread of other virus strains does occur. Most viruses (75%) had an A62V mutation in reverse transcriptase, specific for HIV-1 strains in Russia. Remarkably, 26 of 47 (55%) patients under HAART with detectable virus loads did not have any known drug-resistant mutation, indicating the need to increase compliance to therapy.

  2. Human APOBEC3G drives HIV-1 evolution and the development of drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tamoy; Kim, Eun - Young; Koning, Fransje; Malim, Michael; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is an innate virus restriction factor that induces deamination of specific cytidine residues in single-stranded human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Whereas destructive hA3G editing leads to a profound loss of HIV-1 infectivity, more limited editing could be a source of adaptation and diversification. Here we show that the presence of hA3G in T-cells can drive the development of diversity in HIV-1 populations and that under selection pressure imposed by the nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3TC ((-)2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine), a single point mutation that confers 3TC resistance, methionine 184 to isoleucine (M1841), emerges rapidly and reaches fixation. These results provide strong evidence that mutation by hA3G is an important source of genetic variation on which natural selection acts to shape the structure of the viral population and drive the tempo of HIV-1 evolution.

  3. HIV-positive patients treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: clinical outcomes in the HAART era.

    PubMed

    Palacios, E; Franke, M; Muñoz, M; Hurtado, R; Dallman, R; Chalco, K; Guerra, D; Mestanza, L; Llaro, K; Bonilla, C; Sebastian, J; Bayona, J; Lygizos, M; Lyzigos, M; Anger, H; Shin, S

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pose two of the greatest threats to global tuberculosis (TB) control. Given expanding global access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and second-line TB drugs, more data are needed on experiences treating MDR-TB and HIV co-infection in resource-poor settings. To describe the clinical characteristics, management, outcomes, and factors associated with survival among HIV-positive individuals receiving treatment for MDR-TB. This was a retrospective case series of 52 HIV-positive individuals receiving treatment for MDR-TB in Lima, Peru. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to identify risk factors for mortality. A total of 31 (57%) of the cohort died on treatment, with the majority of deaths due to MDR-TB. Low baseline weight predicted a three-fold increased rate of death (aHR 3.1, 95%CI 1.5-6.7), while individuals receiving highly active ART experienced a significantly lower rate of death compared to those who were not (aHR 0.4, 95%CI 0.2-0.9). Early ART is likely a key component of effective MDR-TB management in co-infected individuals.

  4. Zinc-finger Nuclease Editing of Human cxcr4 Promotes HIV-1 CD4+ T Cell Resistance and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinyun; Wang, Jianbin; Crain, Karen; Fearns, Colleen; Kim, Kenneth A; Hua, Kevin L; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Torbett, Bruce E

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1-infected individuals can harbor viral isolates that can use CCR5, as well as CXCR4, for viral entry. To genetically engineer HIV-1 resistance in CD4+ T cells, we assessed whether transient, adenovirus delivered zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) disruption of genomic cxcr4 or stable lentiviral expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting CXCR4 mRNAs provides durable resistance to HIV-1 challenge. ZFN-modification of cxcr4 in CD4+ T cells was found to be superior to cell integrated lentivirus-expressing CXCR4 targeting shRNAs when CD4+ T cells were challenged with HIV-1s that utilizes CXCR4 for entry. Cxcr4 disruption in CD4+ T cells was found to be stable, conferred resistance, and provided for continued cell enrichment during HIV-1 infection in tissue culture and, in vivo, in peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplanted NSG mice. Moreover, HIV-1-infected mice with engrafted cxcr4 ZFN-modified CD4+ T cells demonstrated lower viral levels in contrast to mice engrafted with unmodified CD4+ T cells. These findings provide evidence that ZFN-mediated disruption of cxcr4 provides a selective advantage to CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection. PMID:22273578

  5. Exploiting the Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Acyclovir: Suppression of Primary and Drug-Resistant HIV Isolates and Potentiation of the Activity by Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Introini, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Munawwar, Arshi; Merbah, Melanie; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Derudas, Marco; McGuigan, Christopher; Balzarini, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) suppressive therapy using acyclovir (ACV) or valacyclovir in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected persons increased the patient's survival and decreased the HIV-1 load. It has been shown that the incorporation of ACV-monophosphate into the nascent DNA chain instead of dGMP results in the termination of viral DNA elongation and directly inhibits laboratory strains of HIV-1. We evaluated here the anti-HIV activity of ACV against primary HIV-1 isolates of different clades and coreceptor specificity and against viral isolates resistant to currently used drugs, including zidovudine, lamivudine, nevirapine, a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), a fusion inhibitor, and two protease inhibitors. We found that, at clinically relevant concentrations, ACV inhibits the replication of these isolates in human tissues infected ex vivo. Moreover, addition of ribavirin, an antiviral capable of depleting the pool of intracellular dGTP, potentiated the ACV-mediated HIV-1 suppression. These data warrant further clinical investigations of the benefits of using inexpensive and safe ACV alone or in combination with other drugs against HIV-1, especially to complement or delay highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation in low-resource settings. PMID:22314523

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance profile among treatment-naïve people in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Chehadeh, Wassim; Albaksami, Osama; Altawalah, Haya; Ahmad, Suhail; Madi, Nada; John, Sonia E; Abraham, Priya S; Al-Nakib, Widad

    2015-09-01

    Mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral therapy are a major cause of failure to treatment, and surveillance for the emergence of HIV resistance became a component of all antiretroviral treatment programs. As transmission of resistant viruses to newly infected persons is possible, we aimed to determine the prevalence of primary mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance among treatment-naïve patients, with respect to HIV subtype. Viral RNA was extracted from plasma samples of 43 treatment-naïve patients. Protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions were amplified and sequenced using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Assay. A phylogenetic analysis was performed for HIV subtype assignment. Complete sequence information could be obtained for 35 patients. A total of ten different HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant forms were found in Kuwait with predominance of subtypes B, C, and CRF01_AE. A62V and A98G were non-polymorphic resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) detected in the RT region of two and three patients, respectively. Non-polymorphic mutations associated with resistance to protease inhibitors were not detected. Our results support continuous surveillance of RAMs in newly infected individuals to assess the effectiveness of first-line antiretroviral regimen available in Kuwait.

  7. Minority HIV-1 resistant variants in recent infection and in patients who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy with no detectable resistance-associated mutations in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Le Nguyen, Hai; Pitakpolrat, Patrawadee; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Delaugerre, Constance; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2012-05-01

    Through the Thai National AIDS Program, approximately 200,000 patients infected with HIV are on antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Although studies have shown low prevalence of primary HIV-1 resistance transmission in Thailand and in Southeast Asia where subtype CRF01_AE is predominant, minority HIV-1 drug resistance has not been studied. Two groups of patients, whose conventional genotyping results showed no drug resistance-associated mutations, were investigated: 104 homosexual men recently infected with HIV-1, naïve to ARV treatment and 22 first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based failure patients. Pyrosequencing (PSQ) assay was developed to detect and quantify minority Y181C and M184V variants from the patients' plasma samples. The sensitivity of PSQ to detect minority Y181C and M184V variants was approximately 1%. 1/104 (0.5%) and 3/101 (3%) samples were found harboring Y181C and M184V in the group of homosexual men recently infected with HIV-1. In patients with first-line treatment failure, one had a minority M184V mutation (4.5%). The prevalence of Y181C and M184V minority variants in homosexual men recently infected and naïve to treatment was low in Thailand. Systematic monitoring of primary resistance transmission in Thailand and this region is essential to guide whether genotypic resistance test is required prior to commencing the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  8. A pièce de resistance: how HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John P.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Small molecule inhibitors targeting the CCR5 coreceptor represent a new class of drugs for treating HIV-1 infection. Maraviroc has received regulatory approvals, and vicriviroc is in phase 3 trials. Understanding how resistance to these drugs develops and is diagnosed is essential to guide clinical practice. We review what has been learned from in vitro resistance studies, and how this relates to what is being seen, or can be anticipated, in clinical studies. Recent findings The principal resistance pathway in vitro involves continued use of CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner; the resistant viruses recognize the inhibitor-CCR5 complex, as well as free CCR5. Switching to use the CXCR4 coreceptor is rare. The principal genetic pathway involves accumulating 2–4 sequence changes in the gp120 V3 region, but a non-V3 pathway is also known. The limited information available from clinical studies suggests that a similar escape process is followed in vivo. However, the most common change associated with virologic failure involves expansion of pre-existing, CXCR4-using viruses that are insensitive to CCR5 inhibitors. Summary HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors by continuing to use CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner, or evades them by expanding naturally insensitive, CXCR4-using variants. PMID:19339950

  9. New Insights into the In Silico Prediction of HIV Protease Resistance to Nelfinavir

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Dinler A.; Rigo, Maurício M.; Sinigaglia, Marialva; de Medeiros, Rúbia M.; Junqueira, Dennis M.; Almeida, Sabrina E. M.; Vieira, Gustavo F.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 protease enzyme (HIV-1 PR) is one of the most important targets of antiretroviral therapy used in the treatment of AIDS patients. The success of protease-inhibitors (PIs), however, is often limited by the emergence of protease mutations that can confer resistance to a specific drug, or even to multiple PIs. In the present study, we used bioinformatics tools to evaluate the impact of the unusual mutations D30V and V32E over the dynamics of the PR-Nelfinavir complex, considering that codons involved in these mutations were previously related to major drug resistance to Nelfinavir. Both studied mutations presented structural features that indicate resistance to Nelfinavir, each one with a different impact over the interaction with the drug. The D30V mutation triggered a subtle change in the PR structure, which was also observed for the well-known Nelfinavir resistance mutation D30N, while the V32E exchange presented a much more dramatic impact over the PR flap dynamics. Moreover, our in silico approach was also able to describe different binding modes of the drug when bound to different proteases, identifying specific features of HIV-1 subtype B and subtype C proteases. PMID:24498124

  10. High prevalence of secondary resistance mutations in Venezuelan HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Dieudonne, Mariacarolina; Garzaro, Domingo; Torres, Jaime; Naranjo, Laura; Suárez, José Antonio; Castro, Julio; Martínez, Nahir; Castro, Erika; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham; Devesa, Marisol; Rangel, Héctor R; Pujol, Flor Helene

    2006-03-01

    The genetic variability was studied in HIV-1 from Venezuelan patients with and without treatment, in order to evaluate the presence of polymorphisms and drug resistance mutations. Proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or viral RNA from plasma was extracted from the blood of 30 patients. Two regions from the polymerase gene, protease (Pr) and reverse transcriptase (RT) and one genomic fragment from the envelope (Env) gene were amplified and sequenced. All HIV-1 samples analyzed were classified as subtype B, without evidence of recombination. Although no primary protease mutations were detected, a high frequency of secondary mutations (86%, 19/22), associated to restoration of viral replicative fitness, was observed in strains circulating both in treated and non-treated patients. Resistance mutations to nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTI) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTI) were detected in 35% (6/17) and 12% (2/17) of the viruses circulating in treated patients, respectively. Resistance mutations were also present in the virus infecting one antiretroviral naive individual (7.7%), suggesting that local screening for resistant mutation in naive patient might be important to minimize therapy failure. Future studies are warranted to assess the role of secondary mutation in the success of viral infection.

  11. Understanding HIV resistance, fitness, replication capacity and compensation: targeting viral fitness as a therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, Robert W

    2004-08-01

    The increasingly prevalent emergence of drug-resistant virus strains in patients being treated with highly active antiretroviral regimens and the increasing rates of transmission of drug-resistant virus strains have focused attention on the critical need for additional antiretroviral agents with novel mechanisms of action and enhanced potency. Furthermore, novel means of employing highly active antiretroviral therapy are needed to reduce or eliminate the virological treatment failures that currently occur. Over the past several years, evidence has mounted supporting the fact that the emergence of resistant strains is associated with reductions in viral fitness, yielding decreases in plasma virus load in treated patients harbouring resistant populations of the virus. Additional mutations that serve to modify fitness (compensatory mutations) and mutations that impact the viral replication capacity also emerge under the selective pressure of drug treatment, and have both negative and positive effects on virus growth. Fitness is generally accepted to refer to the ability of HIV to replicate in a defined environment and thus is used to describe the viral replication potential in the absence of the drug. Although viral fitness and replication capacity are related in some ways, it is important to recognise that viral fitness is not the same as viral replication capacity. This review will assess the recent literature on antiviral drug resistance, viral fitness and viral replication capacity, and discuss means by which the adaptability of HIV to respond rapidly to antiviral treatment through mutation may be used against it. This would be done by treating patients with an aim to lock the deleterious mutations into the resistant virus genome, resulting in a positive therapeutic outcome despite the presence of resistance to the selecting agents. The review will specifically discuss the literature on nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease

  12. Mechanisms of HIV-1 subtype C resistance to GRFT, CV-N and SVN

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Kabamba B.; Moore, Penny L.; Nonyane, Molati; Gray, Elin S.; Ranchobe, Nthabeleng; Chakauya, Ereck; McMahon, James B.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    We examined the ability of HIV-1 subtype C to develop resistance to the inhibitory lectins, griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN), which bind multiple mannose-rich glycans on gp120. Four primary HIV-1 strains cultured under escalating concentrations of these lectins became increasingly resistant tolerating 2 to 12 times their 50% inhibitory concentrations. Sequence analysis of gp120 showed that most had deletions of 1 to 5 mannose-rich glycans. Glycosylation sites at positions 230, 234, 241, 289 located in the C2 region and 339, 392 and 448 in the C3-C4 region were affected. Furthermore, deletions and insertions of up to 5 amino acids in the V4 region were observed in 3 of the 4 isolates. These data suggest that loss of glycosylation sites on gp120 as well as rearrangement of glycans in V4 are mechanisms involved in HIV-1 subtype C escape from GRFT, CV-N and SVN. PMID:24074568

  13. Prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance among treatment-naive and treated HIV-infected patients in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Héctor Rafael; Garzaro, Domingo José; Torres, Jaime Rafael; Castro, Julio; Suarez, Jose Antonio; Naranjo, Laura; Ossenkopp, John; Martinez, Nahír; Gutierrez, Cristina; Pujol, Flor Helene

    2009-05-01

    An in-house, low-cost method was developed to determine the genotypic resistance of immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. All 179 Venezuelan isolates analysed belonged to subtype B. Primary drug resistance mutations were found in 11% of 63 treatment-naïve patients. The prevalence of resistance in isolates from 116 HIV-positive patients under antiretroviral treatment was 47% to protease inhibitors, 65% to nucleoside inhibitors and 38% to non-nucleoside inhibitors, respectively. Around 50% of patients in the study harboured viruses with highly reduced susceptibility to the three classical types of drugs after only five years from their initial diagnoses.

  14. Field Study of Dried Blood Spot Specimens for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Parry, C. M.; Diallo, K.; Mwebaza, S.; Batamwita, R.; DeVos, J.; Bbosa, N.; Lyagoba, F.; Magambo, B.; Jordan, M. R.; Downing, R.; Zhang, G.; Kaleebu, P.; Bertagnolio, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at −80°C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  15. Impact of resistance mutations on inhibitor binding to HIV-1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Buolamwini, John K.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Li, Aixiu; Xu, Qin; Cheng, Xiaolin; Wei, Dongqing

    2013-11-08

    Here, HIV-1 integrase (IN) is essential for HIV-1 replication, catalyzing two key reaction steps termed 3' processing and strand transfer. Therefore, IN has become an important target for antiviral drug discovery. However, mutants have emerged, such as E92Q/N155H and G140S/Q148H, which confer resistance to raltegravir (RAL), the first IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) approved by the FDA, and to the recently approved elvitegravir (EVG). To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand binding and drug resistance, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of homology models of the HIV-1 IN and four relevant mutants complexed with viral DNA and RAL. The results show that the structure and dynamics of the 140s loop, comprising residues 140 to 149, are strongly influenced by the IN mutations. In the simulation of the G140S/Q148H double mutant, we observe spontaneous dissociation of RAL from the active site, followed by an intrahelical swing-back of the 3' -OH group of nucleotide A17, consistent with the experimental observation that the G140S/Q148H mutant exhibits the highest resistance to RAL compared to other IN mutants. An important hydrogen bond between residues 145 and 148 is present in the wild-type IN but not in the G140S/Q148H mutant, accounting for the structural and dynamical differences of the 140s' loop and ultimately impairing RAL binding in the double mutant. End-point free energy calculations that broadly capture the experimentally known RAL binding profiles elucidate the contributions of the 140s' loop to RAL binding free energies and suggest possible approaches to overcoming drug resistance.

  16. Transmitted HIV Resistance to First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Jaime; Bull, Marta; Mitchell, Caroline; La Rosa, Alberto; Dross, Sandra; Kraft, Kelli; Coombs, Robert; Ticona, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Transmission of drug-resistant HIV (TDR) has been associated with virologic failure of “first-line,” nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). A national ART program began in Peru in 2004. We evaluated the prevalence of TDR in individuals initiating ART and their virologic outcome during 2 years of ART. HIV-infected, ARV-naive subjects who met criteria to start ART in Lima, Peru were enrolled in a longitudinal observational study between July 2007 and February 2009. Blood plasma and cells obtained prior to ART initiation were assessed for antiretroviral (ARV) resistance by an oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) sensitive to 2% mutant at reverse transcriptase (RT) codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, and M184V and a subset by consensus sequencing. A total of 112 participants were enrolled; the mean CD4 was 134±89 cells/μl and the median plasma HIV RNA was 93,556 copies/ml (IQR 62,776–291,364). Drug resistance mutations conferring high-level resistance to ARV were rare, detected in one of 96 (1%) evaluable participants. This subject had the Y181C mutation detected in both plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at a concentration of 100% by OLA and consensus sequencing; nevertheless nevirapine-ART suppressed her viral replication. Consensus sequencing of 37 (19%) participants revealed multiple polymorphisms that occasionally have been associated with low-level reductions in ARV susceptibility. A low prevalence of TDR was detected among Peruvians initiating ART. Given the increasing availability of ART, continuing surveillance is needed to determine if TDR increases and the mutant codons associated with virologic failure. PMID:21819256

  17. Transmitted HIV resistance to first-line antiretroviral therapy in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Soria, Jaime; Bull, Marta; Mitchell, Caroline; La Rosa, Alberto; Dross, Sandra; Kraft, Kelli; Coombs, Robert; Ticona, Eduardo; Frenkel, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    Transmission of drug-resistant HIV (TDR) has been associated with virologic failure of "first-line," nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). A national ART program began in Peru in 2004. We evaluated the prevalence of TDR in individuals initiating ART and their virologic outcome during 2 years of ART. HIV-infected, ARV-naive subjects who met criteria to start ART in Lima, Peru were enrolled in a longitudinal observational study between July 2007 and February 2009. Blood plasma and cells obtained prior to ART initiation were assessed for antiretroviral (ARV) resistance by an oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) sensitive to 2% mutant at reverse transcriptase (RT) codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, and M184V and a subset by consensus sequencing. A total of 112 participants were enrolled; the mean CD4 was 134 ± 89 cells/μl and the median plasma HIV RNA was 93,556 copies/ml (IQR 62,776-291,364). Drug resistance mutations conferring high-level resistance to ARV were rare, detected in one of 96 (1%) evaluable participants. This subject had the Y181C mutation detected in both plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at a concentration of 100% by OLA and consensus sequencing; nevertheless nevirapine-ART suppressed her viral replication. Consensus sequencing of 37 (19%) participants revealed multiple polymorphisms that occasionally have been associated with low-level reductions in ARV susceptibility. A low prevalence of TDR was detected among Peruvians initiating ART. Given the increasing availability of ART, continuing surveillance is needed to determine if TDR increases and the mutant codons associated with virologic failure.

  18. Mutations Located outside the Integrase Gene Can Confer Resistance to HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malet, Isabelle; Subra, Frédéric; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Descamps, Diane; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Delelis, Olivier

    2017-09-26

    Resistance to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir is often due to well-identified mutations in the integrase gene. However, the situation is less clear for patients who fail dolutegravir treatment. Furthermore, most in vitro experiments to select resistance to dolutegravir have resulted in few mutations of the integrase gene. We performed an in vitro dolutegravir resistance selection experiment by using a breakthrough method. First, MT4 cells were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Lai. After integration into the host cell genome, cells were washed to remove unbound virus and 500 nM dolutegravir was added to the cell medium. This high concentration of the drug was maintained throughout selection. At day 80, we detected a virus highly resistant to dolutegravir, raltegravir, and elvitegravir that remained susceptible to zidovudine. Sequencing of the virus showed no mutations in the integrase gene but highlighted the emergence of five mutations, all located in the nef region, of which four were clustered in the 3' polypurine tract (PPT). Mutations selected in vitro by dolutegravir, located outside the integrase gene, can confer a high level of resistance to all integrase inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 can use an alternative mechanism to develop resistance to integrase inhibitors by selecting mutations in the 3' PPT region. Further studies are required to determine to what extent these mutations may explain virological failure during integrase inhibitor therapy.IMPORTANCE Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are increasingly used both as first-line drugs and in rescue therapy because of their low toxicity and high efficacy in both treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients. Until now, resistance mutations selected by INSTI exposure have either been described in patients or selected in vitro and involve the integrase gene. Most mutations selected by raltegravir, elvitegravir, or dolutegravir exposure

  19. Update on World Health Organization HIV Drug Resistance Prevention and Assessment Strategy: 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D. E.; Wainberg, M. A.; Havlir, D.; Hammer, S.; Yang, C.; Morris, L.; Peeters, M.; Wensing, A. M.; Parkin, N.; Nachega, J. B.; Phillips, A.; De Luca, A.; Geng, E.; Calmy, A.; Raizes, E.; Sandstrom, P.; Archibald, C. P.; Perriëns, J.; McClure, C. M.; Hong, S. Y.; McMahon, J. H.; Dedes, N.; Sutherland, D.; Bertagnolio, S.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) prevention and assessment strategy, developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in partnership with HIVResNet, includes monitoring of HIVDR early warning indicators, surveys to assess acquired and transmitted HIVDR, and development of an accredited HIVDR genotyping laboratory network to support survey implementation in resource-limited settings. As of June 2011, 52 countries had implemented at least 1 element of the strategy, and 27 laboratories had been accredited. As access to antiretrovirals expands under the WHO/Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS Treatment 2.0 initiative, it is essential to strengthen HIVDR surveillance efforts in the face of increasing concern about HIVDR emergence and transmission. PMID:22544182

  20. Estimating the dynamics and dependencies of accumulating mutations with applications to HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Hesam; Günthard, Huldrych F; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a new model called the observed time conjunctive Bayesian network (OT-CBN) that describes the accumulation of genetic events (mutations) under partial temporal ordering constraints. Unlike other CBN models, the OT-CBN model uses sampling time points of genotypes in addition to genotypes themselves to estimate model parameters. We developed an expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain approximate maximum likelihood estimates by accounting for this additional information. In a simulation study, we show that the OT-CBN model outperforms the continuous time CBN (CT-CBN) (Beerenwinkel and Sullivant, 2009. Markov models for accumulating mutations. Biometrika 96: (3), 645-661), which does not take into account individual sampling times for parameter estimation. We also show superiority of the OT-CBN model on several datasets of HIV drug resistance mutations extracted from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database.

  1. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women in Jamaica A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Amarakoon, II; Ramkissoon, A; Pierre, R; Eyzaguirre, LM; Carr, JK; Blattner, WA; Roye, ME

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This preliminary report sought to provide insight into the genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance (HIVDR) in Jamaica. This was done by investigating the genetic diversity associated with drug resistance in pregnant women living with HIV attending antenatal clinics in Kingston, Jamaica. Blood samples were collected and viral RNA were extracted and analysed. The protease and reverse transcriptase (Pro-RT) genes were amplified using the nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Polymerase chain reaction amplicons were obtained for nine (56%) of 16 patients, of which five (55%) were antiretroviral (ARV) drug naïve and four (45%) were treatment experienced. Three minor protease inhibitor resistant-conferring mutations (A71AT, A71V, A71T) and five mutations conferring high to low-level resistance (K219EK, T69S, K103S, G190A and K103N) were detected in the RT region. More than 50% of the resistance mutations found were detected in ARV drug naïve individuals, implying that viruses are being transmitted with the ARV resistance. These preliminary results will inform the health practitioners of the level of drug resistance that is being transmitted as well as strengthen the need to initiate a national baseline survey on HIVDR in Jamaica. PMID:25803373

  2. Estimating the Prevalence of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance Using Pooled Samples

    PubMed Central

    Finucane, Mariel M.; Rowley, Christopher F.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Essex, Max; Pagano, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    In many resource-poor countries, hiv-infected patients receive a standardized antiretroviral (art) cocktail. In these settings, population-level surveillance of drug resistance is needed to characterize the prevalence of resistance mutations and to enable art programs to select the optimal regimen for their local population. The surveillance strategy currently recommended by the World Health Organization is prohibitively expensive in some settings and may not provide a sufficiently precise rendering of the emergence of drug resistance. By using a novel assay on pooled sera samples, we decrease surveillance costs while simultaneously increasing the accuracy of drug resistance prevalence estimates for an important mutation that impacts first-line antiretroviral therapy. We present a Bayesian model for pooled-testing data that garners more information from each resistance assay conducted, compared with individual testing. We expand on previous pooling methods to account for uncertainty about the population distribution of within-subject resistance levels. In addition, our model accounts for measurement error of the resistance assay, and this added uncertainty naturally propagates through the Bayesian model to our inference on the prevalence parameter. We conduct a simulation study that informs our pool size recommendations and that shows that this model renders the prevalence parameter identifiable in instances when an existing non-model-based estimator fails. PMID:23376965

  3. Estimating the prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance using pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Mariel M; Rowley, Christopher F; Paciorek, Christopher J; Essex, Max; Pagano, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    In many resource-poor countries, hiv-infected patients receive a standardized antiretroviral cocktail. In these settings, population-level surveillance of drug resistance is needed to characterize the prevalence of resistance mutations and to enable antiretroviral therapy programs to select the optimal regimen for their local population. The surveillance strategy currently recommended by the World Health Organization is prohibitively expensive in some settings and may not provide a sufficiently precise rendering of the emergence of drug resistance. By using a novel assay on pooled sera samples, we decrease surveillance costs while simultaneously increasing the accuracy of drug resistance prevalence estimates for an important mutation that impacts first-line antiretroviral therapy. We present a Bayesian model for pooled-testing data that garners more information from each resistance assay conducted, compared with individual testing. We expand on previous pooling methods to account for uncertainty about the population distribution of within-subject resistance levels. In addition, our model accounts for measurement error of the resistance assay, and this added uncertainty naturally propagates through the Bayesian model to our inference on the prevalence parameter. We conduct a simulation study that informs our pool size recommendations and that shows that this model renders the prevalence parameter identifiable in instances when an existing non-model-based estimator fails. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. The dual role of pharmacogenetics in HIV treatment: mutations and polymorphisms regulating antiretroviral drug resistance and disposition.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Veronique; Bar-Magen, Tamara; Turgeon, Jacques; Flockhart, David; Desta, Zeruesenay; Wainberg, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    Significant intra- and interindividual variability has been observed in response to use of pharmacological agents in treatment of HIV infection. Treatment of HIV infection is limited by high rates of adverse drug reactions and development of resistance in a significant proportion of patients as a result of suboptimal drug concentrations. The efficacy of antiretroviral therapy is challenged by the emergence of resistant HIV-1 mutants with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, pharmacotherapy of patients infected with HIV is challenging because a great number of comorbidities increase polypharmacy and the risk for drug-drug interactions. Drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters regulate drug access to the systemic circulation, target cells, and sanctuary sites. These factors, which determine drug exposure, along with the emergence of mutations conferring resistance to HIV medications, could explain variability in efficacy and adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs. In this review, the major factors affecting the disposition of antiretroviral drugs, including key drug-metabolizing enzymes and membrane drug transporters, are outlined. Genetic polymorphisms affecting the activity and/or the expression of cytochromes P450 or UGT isozymes and membrane drug transport proteins are highlighted and include such examples as the association of neurotoxicity with efavirenz, nephrotoxicity with tenofovir, hepatotoxicity with nevirapine, and hyperbilirubinemia with indinavir and atazanavir. Mechanisms of drug resistance conferred by specific viral mutations are also reviewed, with particular attention to replicative viral fitness and transmitted HIV drug resistance with the objectives of providing a better understanding of mechanisms involved in HIV drug resistance and helping health care providers to better manage interpatient variability in drug efficacy and toxicity.

  5. The “Connection” Between HIV Drug Resistance and RNase H

    PubMed Central

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Nikolenko, Galina N.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are two classes of antiretroviral agents that are approved for treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since both NRTIs and NNRTIs target the polymerase (pol) domain of reverse transcriptase (RT), most genotypic analysis for drug resistance is limited to the first ∼300 amino acids of RT. However, recent studies have demonstrated that mutations in the C-terminal domain of RT, specifically the connection subdomain and RNase H domain, can also increase resistance to both NRTIs and NNRTIs. In this review we will present the potential mechanisms by which mutations in the C-terminal domain of RT influence NRTI and NNRTI susceptibility, summarize the prevalence of the mutations in these regions of RT identified to date, and discuss their importance to clinical drug resistance. PMID:21088701

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study of HIV Whole Genome Sequences Validated using Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Power, Robert A.; Davaniah, Siva; Derache, Anne; Wilkinson, Eduan; Tanser, Frank; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably advanced our understanding of human traits and diseases. With the increasing availability of whole genome sequences (WGS) for pathogens, it is important to establish whether GWAS of viral genomes could reveal important biological insights. Here we perform the first proof of concept viral GWAS examining drug resistance (DR), a phenotype with well understood genetics. Method We performed a GWAS of DR in a sample of 343 HIV subtype C patients failing 1st line antiretroviral treatment in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The majority and minority variants within each sequence were called using PILON, and GWAS was performed within PLINK. HIV WGS from patients failing on different antiretroviral treatments were compared to sequences derived from individuals naïve to the respective treatment. Results GWAS methodology was validated by identifying five associations on a genetic level that led to amino acid changes known to cause DR. Further, we highlighted the ability of GWAS to identify epistatic effects, identifying two replicable variants within amino acid 68 of the reverse transcriptase protein previously described as potential fitness compensatory mutations. A possible additional DR variant within amino acid 91 of the matrix region of the Gag protein was associated with tenofovir failure, highlighting GWAS’s ability to identify variants outside classical candidate genes. Our results also suggest a polygenic component to DR. Conclusions These results validate the applicability of GWAS to HIV WGS data even in relative small samples, and emphasise how high throughput sequencing can provide novel and clinically relevant insights. Further they suggested that for viruses like HIV, population structure was only minor concern compared to that seen in bacteria or parasite GWAS. Given the small genome length and reduced burden for multiple testing, this makes HIV an ideal candidate for GWAS. PMID:27677172

  7. Short communication: prevalence of HIV type 1 transmitted drug resistance in Slovenia: 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Lunar, Maja M; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Abecasis, Ana B; Tomažič, Janez; Vidmar, Ludvik; Karner, Primož; Vovko, Tomaž D; Pečavar, Blaž; Maver, Polona J; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario

    2013-02-01

    Slovenia is a small European country with a total of 547 HIV-infected individuals cumulatively reported by the end of 2011. However, the estimated incidence rate of HIV infections increased from 7.0 per million in 2003 to 26.8 per million in 2011. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in the past 6 years (2005-2010) and analyzed the time trend of the proportion of men having sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 subtype B among newly diagnosed individuals in a 15-year period (1996-2010) in Slovenia. Among 150 patients included in the study, representing 63% of HIV-1 newly diagnosed patients in 2005-2010, TDR was found in seven patients (4.7%). The prevalence of TDR to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors was 2% (3/150), 2% (3/150), and 0.7% (1/150), respectively. The majority of patients were infected with subtype B (134/150, 89%), while subtype A was detected in 6.0% (9/150), subtype D in 1.3% (2/150), and subtype G and CRF02_AG in 0.7% (one patient each). Three of 150 sequences could not be typed. Infection with subtype B was found to be significantly associated with male gender, Slovenia being reported as the country of the patient's nationality and origin of the virus, CDC class A, mode of transmission with homosexual/bisexual contact, sex with an anonymous person, and a higher CD4(+) count. Among patients carrying the subtype B virus, an MSM transmission route was reported in 87% of patients. Although the prevalence of TDR in Slovenia is still below the European average, active surveillance should be continued, especially among MSM, the most vulnerable population for HIV-1 infection in this part of Europe.

  8. HIV, multidrug-resistant TB and depressive symptoms: when three conditions collide.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinalini; Isaakidis, Petros; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Kumar, Ajay M V; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Valikayath, Asmaa; Jha, Santosh; Jadhav, Bindoo; Ladomirska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Management of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly challenging. Such patients are subject to long and potentially toxic treatments and may develop a number of different psychiatric illnesses such as anxiety and depressive disorders. A mental health assessment before MDR-TB treatment initiation may assist in early diagnosis and better management of psychiatric illnesses in patients already having two stigmatising and debilitating diseases. To address limited evidence on the baseline psychiatric conditions of HIV-infected MDR-TB patients, we aimed to document the levels of depressive symptoms at baseline, and any alteration following individualized clinical and psychological support during MDR-TB therapy, using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) tool, among HIV-infected patients. This was a retrospective review of the medical records of an adult (aged >15 years) HIV/MDR-TB cohort registered for care during the period of August 2012 through to March 2014. A total of 45 HIV/MDR-TB patients underwent baseline assessment using the PHQ-9 tool, and seven (16%) were found to have depressive symptoms. Of these, four patients had moderate to severe depressive symptoms. Individualized psychological and clinical support was administered to these patients. Reassessments were carried out for all patients after 3 months of follow-up, except one, who died during the period. Among these 44 patients, three with baseline depressive symptoms still had depressive symptoms. However, improvements were observed in all but one after 3 months of follow-up. Psychiatric illnesses, including depressive symptoms, during MDR-TB treatment demand attention. Routine administration of baseline mental health assessments by trained staff has the potential to assist in determining appropriate measures for the management of depressive symptoms during MDR-TB treatment, and help in improving overall treatment outcomes. We recommend

  9. National Prevalence and Trends of HIV Transmitted Drug Resistance in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Garrido-Rodríguez, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Hernández-Juan, Ramón; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; González-Hernández, Luz A.; Torres-Escobar, Indiana; Navarro-Álvarez, Samuel; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Background Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) remains an important concern for the management of HIV infection, especially in countries that have recently scaled-up antiretroviral treatment (ART) access. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a study to assess HIV diversity and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence and trends in Mexico. 1655 ART-naïve patients from 12 Mexican states were enrolled from 2005 to 2010. TDR was assessed from plasma HIV pol sequences using Stanford scores and the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. TDR prevalence fluctuations over back-projected dates of infection were tested. HIV subtype B was highly prevalent in Mexico (99.9%). TDR prevalence (Stanford score>15) in the country for the study period was 7.4% (95% CI, 6.2∶8.8) and 6.8% (95% CI, 5.7∶8.2) based on the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. NRTI TDR was the highest (4.2%), followed by NNRTI (2.5%) and PI (1.7%) TDR. Increasing trends for NNRTI (p = 0.0456) and PI (p = 0.0061) major TDR mutations were observed at the national level. Clustering of viruses containing minor TDR mutations was observed with some apparent transmission pairs and geographical effects. Conclusions TDR prevalence in Mexico remains at the intermediate level and is slightly lower than that observed in industrialized countries. Whether regional variations in TDR trends are associated with differences in antiretroviral drug usage/ART efficacy or with local features of viral evolution remains to be further addressed. PMID:22110765

  10. National prevalence and trends of HIV transmitted drug resistance in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Garrido-Rodríguez, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E; Hernández-Juan, Ramón; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; González-Hernández, Luz A; Torres-Escobar, Indiana; Navarro-Álvarez, Samuel; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) remains an important concern for the management of HIV infection, especially in countries that have recently scaled-up antiretroviral treatment (ART) access. We designed a study to assess HIV diversity and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence and trends in Mexico. 1655 ART-naïve patients from 12 Mexican states were enrolled from 2005 to 2010. TDR was assessed from plasma HIV pol sequences using Stanford scores and the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. TDR prevalence fluctuations over back-projected dates of infection were tested. HIV subtype B was highly prevalent in Mexico (99.9%). TDR prevalence (Stanford score>15) in the country for the study period was 7.4% (95% CI, 6.2∶8.8) and 6.8% (95% CI, 5.7∶8.2) based on the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. NRTI TDR was the highest (4.2%), followed by NNRTI (2.5%) and PI (1.7%) TDR. Increasing trends for NNRTI (p = 0.0456) and PI (p = 0.0061) major TDR mutations were observed at the national level. Clustering of viruses containing minor TDR mutations was observed with some apparent transmission pairs and geographical effects. TDR prevalence in Mexico remains at the intermediate level and is slightly lower than that observed in industrialized countries. Whether regional variations in TDR trends are associated with differences in antiretroviral drug usage/ART efficacy or with local features of viral evolution remains to be further addressed.

  11. The prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance among MSM in Anhui province, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To optimize treatment regimens, we assessed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diversity and the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Anhui province, China. Methods A total of 139 MSM who were newly diagnosed and antiretroviral treatment-naive were enrolled in Anhui in 2011. A partial pol fragment was amplified and sequenced, and HIV subtypes were determined by phylogenetic analyses. Surveillance/transmitted drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) were identified according to the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list. Results A total of 133 (95.7%) samples were successfully amplified and sequenced. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the pol fragment, CRF01_AE accounted for 55.6% (74/133) of the infections, followed by CRF07_BC with 32.3% (43/133), B with 5.3% (7/133), and unique recombinant forms with 6.8% (9/133). A total of 3.0% (4/133) of the subjects were found to harbor HIV variants with SDRMs, including 1.5% with NRTI-related mutations and 1.5% with NNRTI-related mutations. PI-related mutations were absent. The SDRMs included L210W (1.5%), Y181C (0.8%), and G190A (0.8%). Conclusions In Anhui, CRF01_AE strains contributed to most of the HIV infections among MSM, and the prevalence of TDR was relatively low in this population. Further studies should be performed to evaluate the trend of TDR among MSM in Anhui and to inform first-line antiretroviral treatment. PMID:25035709

  12. Systematic Review of HIV Drug Resistance in the World Health Organization Southeast Asia Region

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Andrew B.; Hong, Steven Y.; Srikantiah, Padmini; Abeyewickreme, Iyanthi; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Jordan, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, 3.5 million people were living with HIV in the World Health Organization (WHO) Southeast Asia Region (SEAR), giving this region the greatest burden of HIV after Africa. Scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in over 717,000 benefitting from it at the end of 2010. A systematic review of studies of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) in SEAR published between 2000 and 2011 was performed. Of 10 studies of transmitted HIVDR in recently infected patients, all but two reported low levels (<5%) of transmitted HIVDR. Of 23 studies of HIVDR in pre-treatment populations initiating ART, three reported moderate levels (5–15%) of HIVDR and 20 reported low levels. Amongst 17 studies of acquired HIVDR, levels of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance ranged from 52%–92% and 43%–100%, respectively amongst those with virological failure. Overall, data included in this review suggest that currently recommended first- and second-line regimens are appropriate for the cohorts studied. However, data were only available from two of 11 SEAR countries and studies largely examined urban populations. Results are unlikely to be representative of the region. Studies lacked standardized methods which greatly limit comparability of data and their use for public health and ART program planning. Routine, standardized and nationally representative HIVDR surveillance should be strongly encouraged in SEAR to best characterize population-level HIVDR. National-level HIVDR surveillance data may be used to optimize delivery of HIV care and treatment and minimize emergence of population-level HIVDR, thus promoting the long-term efficacy and durability of available first- and second-line ART regimens. PMID:24002200

  13. High prevalence of HIV drug resistance among newly diagnosed infants aged <18 months: results from a nationwide surveillance in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Inzaule, Seth Chekata; Osi, Samuels Jay; Akinbiyi, Gbenga; Emeka, Asadu; Khamofu, Hadiza; Mpazanje, Rex; Ilesanmi, Oluwafunke; Ndembi, Nicaise; Odafe, Solomon; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2017-09-25

    The world-health organization recommends protease-inhibitor-based first-line regimen in infants due to risk of drug resistance from failed prophylaxis used in prevention-of-mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). However cost and logistics impede implementation in sub-Saharan Africa and >75% of children still receive non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen (NNRTI) used in PMTCT. We assessed the national pre-treatment drug resistance prevalence of HIV-infected children <18 months in Nigeria, using the WHO recommended HIV drug resistance surveillance protocol. We used remnant-dried blood spots collected between June 2014 and July 2015 from15 early-infant diagnosis facilities spread across all the six geopolitical regions of Nigeria. Sampling was through a probability-proportional to size approach. HIV drug resistance was determined by population-based sequencing. Overall, in 48% of infants (205 of 430) drug resistance mutations (DRM) were detected, conferring resistance to predominantly NNRTIs (45%). NRTI and multi-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance were present at 22% and 20% respectively, while resistance to protease inhibitors was at 2%. Among 204 infants with exposure to drugs for PMTCT, 57% had DRMs, conferring NNRTI resistance in 54% and multi-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance in 29%. DRMs were also detected in 34% of 132 PMTCT unexposed infants. A high frequency of PDR, mainly NNRTI-associated, was observed in a nationwide surveillance among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children in Nigeria. PDR prevalence was equally high in PMTCT-unexposed infants. Our results support the use of protease inhibitor-based first-line regimens in HIV-infected young children regardless of PMTCT history and underscore the need to accelerate implementation of the newly disseminated guideline in Nigeria.

  14. The demise of multidrug-resistant HIV-1: the national time trend in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Vercauteren, Jurgen; Theys, Kristof; Carvalho, Ana Patricia; Valadas, Emília; Duque, Luis Miguel; Teófilo, Eugénio; Faria, Telo; Faria, Domitília; Vera, José; Águas, Maria João; Peres, Susana; Mansinho, Kamal; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge; Mansinho, Kamal; Cláudia Miranda, Ana; Aldir, Isabel; Ventura, Fernando; Nina, Jaime; Borges, Fernando; Valadas, Emília; Doroana, Manuela; Antunes, Francisco; João Aleixo, Maria; João Águas, Maria; Botas, Júlio; Branco, Teresa; Vera, José; Vaz Pinto, Inês; Poças, José; Sá, Joana; Duque, Luis; Diniz, António; Mineiro, Ana; Gomes, Flora; Santos, Carlos; Faria, Domitília; Fonseca, Paula; Proença, Paula; Tavares, Luís; Guerreiro, Cristina; Narciso, Jorge; Faria, Telo; Teófilo, Eugénio; Pinheiro, Sofia; Germano, Isabel; Caixas, Umbelina; Faria, Nancy; Paula Reis, Ana; Bentes Jesus, Margarida; Amaro, Graça; Roxo, Fausto; Abreu, Ricardo; Neves, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Despite a decreasing mortality and morbidity in treated HIV-1 patients, highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) can still fail due to the development of drug resistance. Especially, multidrug-resistant viruses pose a threat to efficient therapy. We studied the changing prevalence of multidrug resistance (MDR) over time in a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients in Portugal. Patients and methods We used data of 8065 HIV-1-infected patients followed from July 2001 up to April 2012 in 22 hospitals located in Portugal. MDR at a specific date of sampling was defined as no more than one fully active drug (excluding integrase and entry inhibitors) at that time authorized by the Portuguese National Authority of Medicines and Health Products (INFARMED), as interpreted with the Rega algorithm version 8.0.2. A generalized linear mixed model was used to study the time trend of the prevalence of MDR. Results We observed a statistically significant decrease in the prevalence of MDR over the last decade, from 6.9% (95% CI: 5.7–8.4) in 2001–03, 6.0% (95% CI: 4.9–7.2) in 2003–05, 3.7% (95% CI: 2.8–4.8) in 2005–07 and 1.6% (95% CI: 1.1–2.2) in 2007–09 down to 0.6% (95% CI: 0.3–0.9) in 2009–12 [OR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.75–0.86); P < 0.001]. In July 2011 the last new case of MDR was seen. Conclusions The prevalence of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 is decreasing over time in Portugal, reflecting the increasing efficiency of HAART and the availability of new drugs. Therefore, in designing a new drug, safety and practical aspects, e.g. less toxicity and ease of use, may need more attention than focusing mainly on efficacy against resistant strains. PMID:23228933

  15. A fission yeast cell-based system for multidrug resistant HIV-1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Benko, Zsigmond; Liang, Dong; Li, Ge; Elder, Robert T; Sarkar, Anindya; Takayama, Jun; Ghosh, Arun K; Zhao, Richard Y

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an essential enzyme for viral production. Thus, PR inhibitors (PIs) are the most effective class of anti-HIV drugs. However, the main challenge to the successful use of PI drugs in patient treatment is the emergence of multidrug resistant PRs (mdrPRs). This study aimed to develop a fission yeast cell-based system for rapid testing of new PIs that combat mdrPRs. Three mdrPRs were isolated from HIV-infected patients that carried seven (M7PR), ten (M10PR) and eleven (M11PR) PR gene mutations, respectively. They were cloned and expressed in fission yeast under an inducible promoter to allow the measurement of PR-specific proteolysis and drug resistance. The results showed that all three mdrPRs maintained their abilities to proteolyze HIV viral substrates (MA↓CA and p6) and to confer drug resistance. Production of these proteins in the fission yeast caused cell growth inhibition, oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial morphologies that led to cell death. Five investigational PIs were used to test the utility of the established yeast system with an FDA-approved PI drug Darunavir (DRV) as control. All six compounds suppressed the wildtype PR (wtPR) and the M7PR-mediated activities. However, none of them were able to suppress the M10PR or the M11PR. The three clinically isolated mdrPRs maintained their viral proteolytic activities and drug resistance in the fission yeast. Furthermore, those viral mdrPR activities were coupled with the induction of growth inhibition and cell death, which could be used to test the PI activities. Indeed, the five investigational PIs and DRV suppressed the wtPR in fission yeast as they did in mammalian cells. Significantly, two of the high level mdrPRs (M10PR and M11PR) were resistant to all of the existing PI drugs including DRV. This observation underscores the importance of continued searching for new PIs against mdrPRs.

  16. Relative Resistance of HLA-B to Downregulation by Naturally Occurring HIV-1 Nef Sequences.

    PubMed

    Mahiti, Macdonald; Toyoda, Mako; Jia, Xiaofei; Kuang, Xiaomei T; Mwimanzi, Francis; Mwimanzi, Philip; Walker, Bruce D; Xiong, Yong; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brockman, Mark A; Ueno, Takamasa

    2016-01-19

    HIV-1 Nef binds to the cytoplasmic region of HLA-A and HLA-B and downregulates these molecules from the surface of virus-infected cells, thus evading immune detection by CD8(+) T cells. Polymorphic residues within the HLA cytoplasmic region may affect Nef's downregulation activity. However, the effects of HLA polymorphisms on recognition by primary Nef isolates remain elusive, as do the specific Nef regions responsible for downregulation of HLA-A versus HLA-B. Here, we examined 46 Nef clones isolated from chronically HIV-1 subtype B-infected subjects for their ability to downregulate various HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C molecules on the surface of virus-infected cells. Overall, HLA-B exhibited greater resistance to Nef-mediated downregulation than HLA-A, regardless of the cell type examined. As expected, no Nef clone downregulated HLA-C. Importantly, the differential abilities of patient-derived Nef clones to downregulate HLA-A and HLA-B correlated inversely with the sensitivities of HIV-infected target cells to recognition by effector cells expressing an HIV-1 Gag-specific T cell receptor. Nef codon function analysis implicated amino acid variation at position 202 (Nef-202) in differentially affecting the ability to downregulate HLA-A and HLA-B, an observation that was subsequently confirmed by experiments using Nef mutants constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The in silico and mutagenesis analyses further suggested that Nef-202 may interact with the C-terminal Cys-Lys-Val residues of HLA-A, which are absent in HLA-B. Taken together, the results show that natural polymorphisms within Nef modulate its interaction with natural polymorphisms in the HLA cytoplasmic tails, thereby affecting the efficiency of HLA downregulation and consequent recognition by HIV-specific T cells. These results thus extend our understanding of this complex pathway of retroviral immune evasion. Recognition of genetically diverse pathogens by the adaptive immune system represents a primary

  17. A uniquely prevalent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutation in Russian subtype A HIV-1 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeets, Anna N.; Varghese, Vici; Lemey, Philippe; Bobkova, Marina R.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The subtype A variant in the Former Soviet Union (AFSU) causes most of Russia’s HIV-1 infections. However, the spectrum of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in antiretroviral experienced patients with this variant has not been studied. Methods Between 2010 and 2013, genotypic resistance testing was performed on plasma samples from 366 antiretroviral-experienced patients in Siberia. Results Three-hundred patients (82%) had subtype AFSU and 55 (15%) had CRF02_AG viruses. The pattern of DRMs was consistent with patient antiretroviral history with one exception. G190S was the most common nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutation, occurring in 55 (33%) subtype AFSU viruses from 167 NNRTI-experienced patients compared with none of 37 CRF02_AG viruses from NNRTI-experienced patients (P < 0.001). The next most common subtype AFSU NNRTI-resistance mutation, K103N, occurred in 25 (15%) viruses. Wild-type glycine (G) at position 190 is encoded by GGC in more than 99% of published AFSU strains. By contrast, G190 is encoded by GGA or GGG in 97% of other subtypes and in subtype A strains outside of the FSU. Therefore, G190S results from a single G→A transition: G (GGC) → S (AGC) almost exclusively in subtype AFSU viruses. Conclusion The predisposition of subtype AFSU to G190S is concerning because G→A is the most common HIV-1 mutation and because G190S causes higher levels of nevirapine and efavirenz resistance than K103N. This study exemplifies the need for characterizing the genetic mechanisms of resistance in diverse populations and warrants studies to verify that NRTI/NNRTI regimens are as efficacious in treating subtype AFSU as viruses belonging to other subtypes. PMID:25259833

  18. Structural basis and distal effects of Gag substrate coevolution in drug resistance to HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Ayşegül; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance mutations in response to HIV-1 protease inhibitors are selected not only in the drug target but elsewhere in the viral genome, especially at the protease cleavage sites in the precursor protein Gag. To understand the molecular basis of this protease–substrate coevolution, we solved the crystal structures of drug resistant I50V/A71V HIV-1 protease with p1-p6 substrates bearing coevolved mutations. Analyses of the protease–substrate interactions reveal that compensatory coevolved mutations in the substrate do not restore interactions lost due to protease mutations, but instead establish other interactions that are not restricted to the site of mutation. Mutation of a substrate residue has distal effects on other residues’ interactions as well, including through the induction of a conformational change in the protease. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that restoration of active site dynamics is an additional constraint in the selection of coevolved mutations. Hence, protease–substrate coevolution permits mutational, structural, and dynamic changes via molecular mechanisms that involve distal effects contributing to drug resistance. PMID:25355911

  19. Structural basis and distal effects of Gag substrate coevolution in drug resistance to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Özen, Ayşegül; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-11-11

    Drug resistance mutations in response to HIV-1 protease inhibitors are selected not only in the drug target but elsewhere in the viral genome, especially at the protease cleavage sites in the precursor protein Gag. To understand the molecular basis of this protease-substrate coevolution, we solved the crystal structures of drug resistant I50V/A71V HIV-1 protease with p1-p6 substrates bearing coevolved mutations. Analyses of the protease-substrate interactions reveal that compensatory coevolved mutations in the substrate do not restore interactions lost due to protease mutations, but instead establish other interactions that are not restricted to the site of mutation. Mutation of a substrate residue has distal effects on other residues' interactions as well, including through the induction of a conformational change in the protease. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that restoration of active site dynamics is an additional constraint in the selection of coevolved mutations. Hence, protease-substrate coevolution permits mutational, structural, and dynamic changes via molecular mechanisms that involve distal effects contributing to drug resistance.

  20. Extreme Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation in a Drug Resistant Variant of HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    King, Nancy M.; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloglu, Türkan; Yılmaz, Neşe Kurt; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been the historic paradigm of rational structure-based drug design, where structural and thermodynamic analyses have assisted in the discovery of novel inhibitors. While the total enthalpy and entropy change upon binding determine the affinity, often the thermodynamics are considered in terms of inhibitor properties only. In the current study, profound changes are observed in the binding thermodynamics of a drug resistant variant compared to wild-type HIV-1 protease, irrespective of the inhibitor bound. This variant (Flap+) has a combination of flap and active site mutations and exhibits extremely large entropy-enthalpy compensation compared to wild-type protease, 5–15 kcal/mol, while losing only 1–3 kcal/mol in total binding free energy for any of six FDA approved inhibitors. Although entropy-enthalpy compensation has been previously observed for a variety of systems, never have changes of this magnitude been reported. The co-crystal structures of Flap+ protease with four of the inhibitors were determined and compared with complexes of both the wildtype protease and another drug resistant variant that does not exhibit this energetic compensation. Structural changes conserved across the Flap+ complexes, which are more pronounced for the flaps covering the active site, likely contribute to the thermodynamic compensation. The finding that drug resistant mutations can profoundly modulate the relative thermodynamic properties of a therapeutic target independent of the inhibitor presents a new challenge for rational drug design. PMID:22712830

  1. Extreme entropy-enthalpy compensation in a drug-resistant variant of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    King, Nancy M; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Bandaranayake, Rajintha M; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Nalivaika, Ellen A; Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloğlu, Türkan; Yilmaz, Neşe Kurt; Schiffer, Celia A

    2012-09-21

    The development of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been the historic paradigm of rational structure-based drug design, where structural and thermodynamic analyses have assisted in the discovery of novel inhibitors. While the total enthalpy and entropy change upon binding determine the affinity, often the thermodynamics are considered in terms of inhibitor properties only. In the current study, profound changes are observed in the binding thermodynamics of a drug-resistant variant compared to wild-type HIV-1 protease, irrespective of the inhibitor bound. This variant (Flap+) has a combination of flap and active site mutations and exhibits extremely large entropy-enthalpy compensation compared to wild-type protease, 5-15 kcal/mol, while losing only 1-3 kcal/mol in total binding free energy for any of six FDA-approved inhibitors. Although entropy-enthalpy compensation has been previously observed for a variety of systems, never have changes of this magnitude been reported. The co-crystal structures of Flap+ protease with four of the inhibitors were determined and compared with complexes of both the wild-type protease and another drug-resistant variant that does not exhibit this energetic compensation. Structural changes conserved across the Flap+ complexes, which are more pronounced for the flaps covering the active site, likely contribute to the thermodynamic compensation. The finding that drug-resistant mutations can profoundly modulate the relative thermodynamic properties of a therapeutic target independent of the inhibitor presents a new challenge for rational drug design.

  2. Antiretroviral drug resistance and phylogenetic diversity of HIV-1 in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Maritza; Delgado, Elena; Pérez-Alvarez, Lucía; Fernández, Jorge; Gálvez, Paula; de Parga, Elena Vázquez; Yung, Verónica; Thomson, Michael M; Nájera, Rafael

    2007-06-01

    This study reports the analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) coding sequences from 136 HIV-1-infected subjects from Chile, 66 (49%) of them under antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. The prevalence of mutations conferring high or intermediate resistance levels to ARVs was 77% among treated patients and 2.5% among drug-naïve subjects. The distribution of resistance prevalence in treated patients by drug class was 61% to nucleoside RT inhibitors, 84% to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors, and 46% to PR inhibitors. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 115 (85%) subjects were infected with subtype B viruses, 1 with a subtype F1 virus, and 20 (15%) carried BF intersubtype recombinants. Most BF recombinants grouped into two clusters, one related to CRF12_BF, while the other could represent a new circulating recombinant form (CRF). In conclusion, this is the first report analysing the prevalence of ARV resistance which includes patients under HAART from Chile. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of the PR-RT coding sequences reveals the presence of BF intersubtype recombinants.

  3. Impaired lipid profile and insulin resistance in a cohort of Austrian HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Hermann, Kathrin; Schalk, Horst; Haider, Bernhard; Hutterer, Judith; Gmeinhart, Bernd; Pichler, Karlheinz; Brath, Helmut; Dorner, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    Traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases have been shown to have an even higher impact in the HIV infected population. Cardiovascular risk factors amongst people living with HIV treated in doctor's offices in Austria have not been documented before. Our study aimed to close this gap, focusing on dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk. After ethics approval, consecutive patients who visited their treating physicians for routine checks were enrolled. The lipid profile was assessed by measuring total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and apolipoprotein B and calculating LDL and non-HDL-cholesterol. The diabetes risk was calculated by measuring insulin and blood glucose levels and assessing insulin resistance and beta cell function using the HOMA-IR model. 522 patients were included in the analysis. 90.2% of the participants were on antiretroviral therapy. Two third had an impaired lipid profile, but dyslipidemia had been diagnosed only in 46.3% of the patients. There was a clear correlation between protease inhibitor use and pathologic blood lipids. Of the persons with dyslipidemia, 18.4% received lipid lowering drugs. 8 persons (1.6%) fulfilled the criteria for diabetes mellitus. Of those, 4 patients already had a diagnosed diabetes mellitus. 50.1% of the study participants showed an increased insulin resistance. Patients on nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors had significantly higher markers for impaired glucose metabolism. We found a high percentage of increased insulin resistance, of impaired lipid profile and in contrast to this a low treatment rate with lipid lowering drugs in this cohort of people living with HIV. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Inzaule, Seth C; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Stevens, Wendy S; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Hamers, Raph L

    2016-11-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load monitoring, feasible and affordable technologies to detect drug-resistant HIV could help maximise the durability and rational use of available drug regimens. Potential low-cost technologies include in-house Sanger and next-generation sequencing in centralised laboratories, and point mutation assays and genotype-free systems that predict response to antiretroviral therapy at point-of-care. Strengthening of centralised high-throughput laboratories, including efficient systems for sample referral and results delivery, will increase economies-of-scale while reducing costs. Access barriers can be mitigated by standardisation of in-house assays into commercial kits, use of polyvalent instruments, and adopting price-reducing strategies. A stepwise rollout approach should improve feasibility, prioritising WHO-recommended population-based surveillance and management of complex patient categories, such as patients failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. Implementation research, adaptations of existing WHO guidance, and political commitment, will be key to support the appropriate investments and policy changes. In this Personal View, we discuss the potential role of HIV drug resistance testing for population-based surveillance and individual patient management in sub-Saharan Africa. We review the strengths and challenges of promising low-cost technologies and how they can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multimethod Longitudinal HIV Drug Resistance Analysis in Antiretroviral-Therapy-Naive Patients.

    PubMed

    Nanfack, Aubin J; Redd, Andrew D; Bimela, Jude S; Ncham, Genesis; Achem, Emmanuel; Banin, Andrew N; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Porcella, Stephen F; Agyingi, Lucy A; Meli, Josephine; Colizzi, Vittorio; Nádas, Arthur; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Nyambi, Phillipe N; Quinn, Thomas C; Duerr, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    The global intensification of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can lead to increased rates of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations in treated and also in ART-naive patients. ART-naive HIV-1-infected patients from Cameroon were subjected to a multimethod HIVDR analysis using amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR, Sanger sequencing, and longitudinal next-generation sequencing (NGS) to determine their profiles for the mutations K103N, Y181C, K65R, M184V, and T215F/Y. We processed 66 ART-naive HIV-1-positive patients with highly diverse subtypes that underlined the predominance of CRF02_AG and the increasing rate of F2 and other recombinant forms in Cameroon. We compared three resistance testing methods for 5 major mutation sites. Using Sanger sequencing, the overall prevalence of HIVDR mutations was 7.6% (5/66) and included all studied mutations except K65R. Comparing ARMS-PCR with Sanger sequencing as a reference, we obtained a sensitivity of 100% (5/5) and a specificity of 95% (58/61), caused by three false-positive calls with ARMS-PCR. For 32/66 samples, we obtained NGS data and we observed two additional mismatches made up of minority variants (7% and 18%) that might not be clinically relevant. Longitudinal NGS analyses revealed changes in HIVDR mutations in all five positive subjects that could not be attributed to treatment. In one of these cases, superinfection led to the temporary masking of a resistant virus. HIVDR mutations can be sensitively detected by ARMS-PCR and sequencing methods with comparable performances. Longitudinal changes in HIVDR mutations have to be considered even in the absence of treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Correlation between resistance profile and immunosuppression in heavily treated HIV-1 infected Romanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Manolescu, Loredana; Temereanca, Aura; Diaconu, Carmen Cristina; Ruta, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective As available data on HIV-1 strains from Romania indicate the prevalence of a particular subtype- F, not found in other European countries, we aimed at investigating the impact on drug susceptibility of mutations associated with drug resistance and their correlation with the virological and immune response to therapy. Methods 38 long term survivors, HIV-1 parenterally infected in childhood, with repeated virological failures, were genotyped for drug resistance and subtype determination. A phylogenetic tree of aligned reversetranscriptase sequences was built. Results 94.7% of all the patients’strains were subtype F1, clustering together with other Romanian and Angolan F1 strains. Despite the long and complex treatments, 15.8% of patients had wild type virus, 68.4% were fully susceptible to protease inhibitors, 47.3% to non-nucleoside reverstranscriptase inhibitors, 28.9% to nucleoside reverstranscriptase inhibitors. Only 13.2% were resistant to all antiretroviral drug classes. A significantly higher total number of mutations were encountered in severely immunosuppressed patients, who presented also major mutations in the protease gene (V82A, I54V, G48V) and the major M184V mutation associated with type 2 thymidine analogs mutations in reverstranscriptase gene. Conclusion A good immune status seems to be associated with a low range of mutations, indicating the impact of immune restoration or preservation on the therapeutic success rate. The slower post-HAART progression of mutational pattern of HIV- 1 subtype F1 in long term survivors may also influence the viral replicative fitness, a fact that can explain its steady prevalence in Romania. PMID:22180722

  7. Estimating the individualized HIV-1 genetic barrier to resistance using a nelfinavir fitness landscape.

    PubMed

    Theys, Kristof; Deforche, Koen; Beheydt, Gertjan; Moreau, Yves; van Laethem, Kristel; Lemey, Philippe; Camacho, Ricardo J; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Shafer, Robert W; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2010-08-03

    Failure on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Treatment is often accompanied with development of antiviral resistance to one or more drugs included in the treatment. In general, the virus is more likely to develop resistance to drugs with a lower genetic barrier. Previously, we developed a method to reverse engineer, from clinical sequence data, a fitness landscape experienced by HIV-1 under nelfinavir (NFV) treatment. By simulation of evolution over this landscape, the individualized genetic barrier to NFV resistance may be estimated for an isolate. We investigated the association of estimated genetic barrier with risk of development of NFV resistance at virological failure, in 201 patients that were predicted fully susceptible to NFV at baseline, and found that a higher estimated genetic barrier was indeed associated with lower odds for development of resistance at failure (OR 0.62 (0.45 - 0.94), per additional mutation needed, p = .02). Thus, variation in individualized genetic barrier to NFV resistance may impact effective treatment options available after treatment failure. If similar results apply for other drugs, then estimated genetic barrier may be a new clinical tool for choice of treatment regimen, which allows consideration of available treatment options after virological failure.

  8. Resistance mutations against dolutegravir in HIV integrase impair the emergence of resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Moïsi, Daniela; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-03-27

    Among 1222 antiretroviral-naive patients who received dolutegravir (DTG) as part of first-line therapy, none has developed resistance against this compound after 48-96 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, only four occurrences of virological failure with resistance mutations have been documented in previously drug-experienced patients who received DTG as a first time integrase inhibitor as a component of a second-line regimen. The R263K integrase resistance mutation was observed in two of these individuals who received suboptimal background regimens. We have previously selected mutations at position R263K, G118R, H51Y, and E138K as being associated with low-level resistance to DTG. Now, we sought to investigate the facility with which resistance on the part of R263K-containing viruses might develop. We tested the ability of DTG-resistant viruses containing either the R263K or G118R and/or H51Y mutations to develop further resistance against several reverse transcriptase inhibitors during in-vitro selection experiments. Our results show that DTG-resistant viruses are impaired in their ability to acquire further resistance to each of nevirapine and lamivudine as a consequence of their relative inability to develop resistance mutations associated with these two compounds. Our findings provide an explanation for the fact that no individual has yet progressed to virological failure with resistance mutations associated with dolutegravir in clinical trials in which patients received dolutegravir together with an optimized background regimen.

  9. Use of deep sequencing data for routine analysis of HIV resistance in newly diagnosed patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Caballero, Jose-Angel; Chueca, Natalia; Alvarez, Marta; Gonzalez, Dimitri; García, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Use of deep sequencing is becoming a critical tool in clinical virology, with an important impact in the HIV field for routine diagnostic purposes. Here, we present the comparison of deep and Sanger sequencing in newly diagnosed HIV patients, and the use of DeepChek v1.3 & VisibleChek for their interpretation and integration with virological and clinical data. Patients and Methods Plasma samples from 88 newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected patients were included in the study. Median age (IQR) was 37 (27–47), median CD4 count (IQR) was 387 (220–554), and 85% were males. Median Viral Load (Log, IQR) was 5.03 (4.51–5.53). Deep sequencing was obtained using a GS-Junior (Roche). Sequences were preprocessed with the 454 AVA software; aligned reads were uploaded into the DeepChek v1.3 system (ABL SA). Sanger sequences (Trugene), were uploaded in parallel. Stanford algorithm (version 7.0) resistance interpretation to first line drugs and all the mutations (score≥5) were analyzed. For deep sequencing, 1%, 5% and 10% thresholds were chosen for resistance interpretation. Results Using VisibleChek for analysis, we were able to describe the detection of any mutation using Sanger in 37/88 patients, with a total number of 50 Stanford ≥5 mutations, K103N and E138A being the most prevalent (n=4). Using UDS-1%, we found 72/88 patients with at least one mutation (total of 206 Stanford ≥5 mutations). Using Sanger data, 9/88 patients (10.22%) showed any resistance to NNRTIs, while none showed resistance to NRTIs or PIs. Using UDS-10% increased resistance to NRTIs [3/88 (3.40%)], to NNRTIs 12/88 (13.63%), and to a lesser extent to PIs [1/88 (1.13%)]. Using UDS-5% increased resistance to NRTIs [4/88 (4.54%)] and to NNRTIs [12/88 (13.63%)], but not to PIs. Using UDS-1% increased resistance to all classes: NRTIs [14/88 (15.90%)], NNRTIs [26/88 (30.68%)], and PIs [6/88 (6.81]. Conclusions DeepChek and VisibleChek allow for an easy, reliable and rapid analysis of UDS data

  10. Use of deep sequencing data for routine analysis of HIV resistance in newly diagnosed patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Jose-Angel; Chueca, Natalia; Alvarez, Marta; Gonzalez, Dimitri; García, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Use of deep sequencing is becoming a critical tool in clinical virology, with an important impact in the HIV field for routine diagnostic purposes. Here, we present the comparison of deep and Sanger sequencing in newly diagnosed HIV patients, and the use of DeepChek v1.3 & VisibleChek for their interpretation and integration with virological and clinical data. Plasma samples from 88 newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected patients were included in the study. Median age (IQR) was 37 (27-47), median CD4 count (IQR) was 387 (220-554), and 85% were males. Median Viral Load (Log, IQR) was 5.03 (4.51-5.53). Deep sequencing was obtained using a GS-Junior (Roche). Sequences were preprocessed with the 454 AVA software; aligned reads were uploaded into the DeepChek v1.3 system (ABL SA). Sanger sequences (Trugene), were uploaded in parallel. Stanford algorithm (version 7.0) resistance interpretation to first line drugs and all the mutations (score≥5) were analyzed. For deep sequencing, 1%, 5% and 10% thresholds were chosen for resistance interpretation. Using VisibleChek for analysis, we were able to describe the detection of any mutation using Sanger in 37/88 patients, with a total number of 50 Stanford ≥5 mutations, K103N and E138A being the most prevalent (n=4). Using UDS-1%, we found 72/88 patients with at least one mutation (total of 206 Stanford ≥5 mutations). Using Sanger data, 9/88 patients (10.22%) showed any resistance to NNRTIs, while none showed resistance to NRTIs or PIs. Using UDS-10% increased resistance to NRTIs [3/88 (3.40%)], to NNRTIs 12/88 (13.63%), and to a lesser extent to PIs [1/88 (1.13%)]. Using UDS-5% increased resistance to NRTIs [4/88 (4.54%)] and to NNRTIs [12/88 (13.63%)], but not to PIs. Using UDS-1% increased resistance to all classes: NRTIs [14/88 (15.90%)], NNRTIs [26/88 (30.68%)], and PIs [6/88 (6.81]. DeepChek and VisibleChek allow for an easy, reliable and rapid analysis of UDS data from HIV-1. Compared to Sanger data, UDS detected a higher

  11. Nucleic acid amplification of HIV-1 integrase sequence subtypes CRF01_AE and B for development of HIV anti-integrase drug resistance genotyping assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlar, F. R.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    To anticipate the potential use of anti-integrase drugs in Indonesia for treatment of HIV-1 infection, the development of a drug resistance genotyping assay for anti-integrase is crucial in identifying the genetic drug resistance profile of Indonesian HIV-1 strains. This experiment aimed to amplify a target region in the integrase gene of Indonesian HIV-1 subtypes CRF01_AE and B that contain genetic mutations known to confer resistance to anti-integrase drug. Eleven archived plasma samples from individuals living with HIV-1 were obtained from the Virology and Cancer Pathobiology Research Center for Health Service (VCPRC FKUI-RSCM) laboratory. One of the plasma samples contained HIV-1 subtype B, and the remaining plasma samples contained subtype CRF01_AE. The target regions for all samples were amplified through RT-PCR, with an annealing temperature of 55 °C, using the primer pair AE_POL 4086F and AE_POL 5232R that were designed by VCPRC FKUI-RSCM. The results of this experiment show that 18.2% (2/11) of the samples were successfully amplified using the one-step RT-PCR. While the primer pair was effective in amplifying the target region in the integrase gene sequence for subtype B (100%; 1/1), it had a low efficacy (10%, 1/10) for subtype CRF01_AE. In conclusion, the primer pair can be used to amplify the target region in Indonesian HIV-1 strain subtypes CRF01_AE and B. However, optimization of the PCR condition and an increased number of samples would help to determine an accurate representation of the efficacy of the primer pair.

  12. Implementing early-warning indicators of HIV drug resistance in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Jack, Noreen; Ravasi, Giovanni; Schrooten, Ward; Sutherland, Donald; Ghidinelli, Massimo; Del Riego, Amalia

    2012-05-01

    A key component of the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global HIV Drug Resistance (HIVDR) prevention and assessment strategy is to monitor HIVDR early-warning indicators (EWIs), which provide strategic information for HIVDR containment. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/WHO supported implementation of HIVDR EWI monitoring in 16 Caribbean countries. Results from 15 countries were analyzed by year of patient initiation of antiretroviral therapy for the period 2005-2009. This report demonstrates the need for capacity-building to standardize prescribing practices and to strengthen adherence strategies and antiretroviral drug procurement management systems.

  13. Total training load may explain similar strength gains and muscle hypertrophy seen in aged rats submitted to resistance training and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Krause Neto, Walter; de Assis Silva, Wellington; Polican Ciena, Adriano; Bocalini, Danilo; Aparecido Baptista Nucci, Ricardo; Alberto Anaruma, Carlos; Florencio Gama, Eliane

    2017-08-17

    This study aimed to quantify training parameters and analyze the morphological response of aged muscles submitted to resistance training and anabolic steroids. Aged Wistar rats were divided into groups: C - initial control; CF - final control; CAS - control with anabolic steroid, RT - resistance training, and RTA - resistance training with anabolic steroid. Maximum carried load, absolute and relative loads increased significantly in RT and RTA. RTA demonstrated greater relative load than RT. Average total volume, total climbing volume, relative total volume, relative total climbing volume, and mean climbing volume were similar between groups RT and RTA. For soleus, CAS, RT, and RTA enlarged cross-sectional area of type I fibers and nuclear ratio. As for type II fibers, RTA was higher than C and CF. For plantaris, RT and RTA showed significant increases in myofibers type I compared to C and CF. For type II fibers, RTA showed a significant increase compared to C and CF. Regarding the nuclear ratio, RT and RTA showed a higher ratio than C, CF, and CAS. Our results demonstrated that both RT and RTA were not different among the analyzed morphological parameters. This fact can be explained by the absence of differences found in the training variables analyzed.

  14. Doubt, defiance, and identity: Understanding resistance to male circumcision for HIV prevention in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, Justin O; Chilongozi, David; Hutchinson, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Global policy recommendations to scale up of male circumcision (MC) for HIV prevention tend to frame the procedure as a simple and efficacious public health intervention. However, there has been variable uptake of MC in countries with significant HIV epidemics. Kenya, for example, has embraced MC and has been dubbed a 'leader' by the global health community, while Malawi has been branded a 'laggard' in its slow adoption of a national programme, with a strong political discourse of resistance forming around MC. Regardless of any epidemiological or technical evidence, the uptake of international recommendations will be shaped by how a policy, and the specific artefacts that constitute that policy, intersect with local concerns. MC holds particular significance within many ethnic and religious groups, serving as an important rite of passage, but also designating otherness or enabling the identification of the social and political self. Understanding how the artefact of MC intersects with local social, economic, and political contexts, is therefore essential to understand the acceptance or resistance of global policy recommendations. In this paper we present an in-depth analysis of Malawi's political resistance to MC, finding that ethnic and religious divisions dominating recent political movements aligned well with differing circumcision practices. Political resistance was further found to manifest through two key narratives: a 'narrative of defiance' around the need to resist donor manipulation, and a 'narrative of doubt' which seized on a piece of epidemiological evidence to refute global claims of efficacy. Further, we found that discussions over MC served as an additional arena through which ethnic identities and claims to power could themselves be negotiated, and therefore used to support claims of political legitimacy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Trends and predictors of HIV-1 acquired drug resistance in Minas Gerais, Brazil: 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Duani, Helena; Aleixo, Agdemir Waleria; Tupinambás, Unaí

    Several studies show that the prevalence of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 virus is declining over time. A retrospective cohort study was carried out to evaluate the trends of drug resistance in antiretroviral treatment-exposed individuals in a state of a middle-income country, Minas Gerais, southeast region of Brazil. We analyzed 2115 HIV-1 sequences from 2002 up to 2012, from 52 cities of Minas Gerais. The groups were analyzed according to the definitions: "IAS - 3 class mutations", if ≥1 drug resistance mutation from IAS 2015 list (DRM) was present in each class; "No fully susceptible drugs" as the absence of any fully susceptible drug in Stanford algorithm; and "GSS≥2″, when a maximum calculated GSS (genotypic susceptibility score) was ≥2 or ≥3, counting only drugs available in Brazil and USA at given calendar years. Time trends of resistance were analyzed by Cochran-Armitage test. We observed a decrease in the rate resistance mutations for PI, NRTI, "IAS - 3 class mutations", and "No fully susceptible drugs" over these 11 years, from 69.2% to 20.7%, 92.3% to 90.2%, 46.2% to 22.5%, and 12.8% to 5.7%, respectively (p<0.05). Resistance to NNRTI increased from 74.4% to 81.6%, mainly because of K103N mutation. The GSS score ≥2 increased during the years from 35.9% to 87.3% (p<0.001). We demonstrate that resistance to PI and to the three main classes simultaneously are declining, although the number of patients on of antiretroviral therapy has doubled in the last ten years in Brazil (125,000 in 2002 to 400,000 in 2014). Broader resistance testing and the availability of more therapeutic options might have influenced this decline. The increase in NNRTI resistance can limit this class as first line treatment in Brazil in the future. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms of resistance to fluconazole in Candida albicans clinical isolates from Iranian HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Salari, S; Khosravi, A R; Mousavi, S A A; Nikbakht-Brojeni, G H

    2016-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans is the major agent of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in HIV/AIDS patients. The increased use of fluconazole can lead to the emergence of azole-resistant strains and treatment failures in PLWH (people living with HIV) receiving long-term therapy for OPC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and ERG11 gene expression in C. albicans clinically isolated from HIV-infected patients in Iran. In this study, we evaluated the molecular mechanisms of azole resistance in 20 fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates obtained from Iranian HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction. The overexpression of drug efflux pump CDR1 gene was found to be the major resistance mechanism observed in these isolates. The overexpression of the CDR1 gene correlated strongly with increasing resistance to fluconazole (P<0.05). Additionally, an increased level of mRNA in ERG11 was not observed in any of the tested isolates. Our findings suggested that the CDR1 gene expression to fluconazole resistance in C. albicans is greater than other known genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Affordable in-house antiretroviral drug resistance assay with good performance in non-subtype B HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Carole L.; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Kamali, Anatoli; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Sanders, Eduard; Anzala, Omu; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Stevens, Gwynn; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Stevens, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy in resource-poor settings is effective in suppressing HIV-1 replication and prolonging life of infected individuals. This has led to a demand for affordable HIV-1 drug resistance assays, since treatment failure due to development of drug resistance is common. This study developed and evaluated an affordable “in–house” genotyping assay to monitor HIV-1 drug resistance in Africa, particularly South Africa. An “in-house” assay using automated RNA extraction, and subtype C specific PCR and sequencing primers was developed and successfully evaluated 396 patient samples (viral load ranges 1,000->1.6million RNA copies/ml). The “in-house” assay was validated by comparing sequence data and drug resistance profiles from 90 patient and 10 external quality control samples to data from the ViroSeqTM HIV-1 Genotyping kit. The “in-house” assay was more efficient, amplifying all 100 samples, compared to 91 samples using Viroseq. The “in house” sequences were 99.2%) homologous to the ViroSeq sequences, and identical drug resistance mutation profiles were observed in 96 samples. Furthermore, the “in-house” assay genotyped 260 of 295 samples from seven African sites, where 47% were non-subtype C. Overall, the newly validated “in-house” drug resistance assay is suited for use in Africa as it overcomes the obstacle of subtype diversity. PMID:19917318

  18. Mechanisms of human natural resistance to HIV: a summary of ten years of research in the Colombian population.

    PubMed

    Rugeles, María T; Velilla, Paula A; Montoya, Carlos J

    2011-06-01

    The natural history of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is a complex and variable process that, similarly to other infections, has clearly demonstrated the existence of mechanisms of human natural resistance. The resistance either inhibits the establishment of infection or delays disease progression. When there is continuous exposure to infectious viral particles, several genetic and immunological mechanisms are essential to lead to resistance to HIV-1 infection/progression. The objective of this manuscript was to review the different mechanisms so far proposed to be responsible for HIV-1 resistance and to present the main results derived from 10 years of research in this area among Colombian subjects. In particular, this review focuses on determining the mechanisms involved in the protection of a group of individuals repeatedly exposed to the virus but who remained exempt of serological and clinical evidence of HIV-1 infection. Although the studies carried out in our research group corroborated the protective role of some of the previously proposed mechanisms of protection, ongoing research worldwide has made it clear that the phenomenon of human natural resistance depends on multiple factors with an important genetic influence, and only multicenter studies involving individuals with different genetic backgrounds may determine more universal mechanisms of resistance. Increasing our knowledge in this field will contribute to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic measures.

  19. Comparison of antiretroviral drug resistance among treatment-naive and treated HIV-infected individuals in Shiraz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Motazedian, Nasrin; Joulaei, Hassan; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Faramarzi, Hossein; Aghah, Ehsan

    2017-10-06

    The use of anti-retroviral therapy has been effective in controlling the spread of HIV-1, and has prolonged life expectancy, but this success can be affected by the emergence of drug resistance. The main goal of this study was to investigate drug resistance in the reverse transcriptase (RT), and protease (PR) genes among HIV-1 infected individuals. We systematically selected 59 HIV-1 infected individuals from Shiraz Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center (29 treatment- naïve and 30 treated). In this study intravenous drug users older than 18 were included in this study. Using specific primers, nested RT-PCR was performed on RNA extracted from patient samples. The genes targeted for RT and PCR were successfully amplified and sequenced. The sequences of these two genes were compared with mutations related to drug resistance against nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) using the latest database from the International AIDS society - USA, Stanford University, and the patterns were recorded. Among treatment-naïve, the detected NRTI and NNRTI resistance mutations were V179T, V75 M and E138A. V179T causes high level resistance to Efavirenze and Nevirapin. V75 M causes intermediate resistance to Stavudine. Regarding NRTI and NNRTI resistance mutations among treated patients, the most frequent mutation (7%) was M184 V, which causes high level resistance to zidovudin and emtricitabine. The interesting result from this study was the detection of NRTI and NNRTI resistance mutations before the initiation of treatment, which signifies the transmission of resistant strains of virus between individuals. This mutation highlights the importance of drug resistance HIV-1 genotyping before commencing treatment.

  20. Simultaneous and Sensitive Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV) Drug Resistant Genotypes by Multiplex Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Giovanina M.; Marushchak, Tatyana A.; Koth, Andrew; Vaz, Louise E.; Dross, Sandra E.; Beck, Ingrid A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a highly specific and relatively simple method to detect point mutations encoding HIV-1 drug-resistance, which can detect mutants comprising ≥2–5% of the viral population. Nevirapine (NVP), tenofovir (TDF) and lamivudine (3TC) are antiretroviral drugs (ARV) used worldwide for treatment of HIV infection and prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Adapting the OLA to detect multiple mutations associated with HIV resistance to these ARV simultaneously would provide an efficient tool to monitor drug resistance in resource-limited settings. Known proportions of mutant and wild-type plasmids were used to optimize a multiplex OLA for detection of K103N, Y181C, K65R, and M184V in HIV subtypes B and C, and V106M and G190A in subtype C. Simultaneous detection of two mutations was impaired if probes annealed to overlapping regions of the viral template, but was sensitive to ≥2–5% when testing codons using non-overlapping probes. PCR products from HIV-subtype B and C-infected individuals were tested by multiplex-OLA and compared to results of single-codon OLA. Multiplex-OLA detected mutations at codon pairs 103/181, 106/190 and 65/184 reliably when compared to singleplex-OLA in clinical specimens. The multiplex-OLA is sensitive and specific and reduces the cost of screening for NVP, TDF and/or 3TC resistance. PMID:23660583

  1. Maraviroc (Celsentri) for multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1.

    PubMed

    Ndegwa, S

    2007-12-01

    (1) Maraviroc belongs to a new class of antiretroviral drugs designed to block entry of HIV-1 into CD4+ T-cells via the CCR5 coreceptor. It is indicated for combination therapy in treatment-experienced adults infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 that is resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. (2) Results from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that in treatment experienced patients, maraviroc, combined with optimized background therapy (OBT), significantly decreases the level of HIV-1 RNA in the blood (viral load) when compared with OBT alone. The number of patients achieving undetectable viral loads and CD4+ cell count increases were also significantly higher in those receiving maraviroc. (3) Most patients experiencing treatment failure with maraviroc exhibit tropism changes from CCR5-tropic to CXCR4-using virus, but there is no evidence of disease progression. (4) Adverse effects reported with maraviroc include cough, fever, upper respiratory tract infections, rash, muscle and joint pain, abdominal pain, and postural hypotension (dizziness). No significant increases in cardiovascular events, hepatotoxicity, infections or malignancies have been reported with short-term maraviroc therapy. Several post-marketing studies will assess maraviroc's long-term safety for immune function, liver function, malignancy, cardiac events, and risks associated with changes in tropism. (5) Results from an ongoing trial in treatment naive patients suggest that maraviroc may not be superior in terms of viral suppression to standard therapy, but may significantly increase the number of CD4+ T-cells.

  2. Design, Synthesis, Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, in particular inhibitors containing 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp-29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies. PMID:22708897

  3. Insulin Resistance Change and Antiretroviral Therapy Exposure in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Rwandan Women: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dusingize, Jean Claude; Sinayobye, Jean D’Amour; Cohen, Mardge

    2015-01-01

    Background We longitudinally assessed predictors of insulin resistance (IR) change among HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected (ART-initiators and ART-non-initiators) Rwandan women. Methodology HIV-infected (HIV+) and uninfected (HIV-) women provided demographic and clinical measures: age, body mass index (BMI) in Kg/(height in meters)2, Fat-Mass (FMI) and Fat-Free-Mass (FFMI) index, fasting serum glucose and insulin. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) was calculated to estimate IR change over time in log10 transformed HOMA measured at study enrollment or prior to ART initiation in 3 groups: HIV- (n = 194), HIV+ ART-non-initiators (n=95) and HIV+ ART-initiators (n=371). ANCOVA linear regression models of change in log10-HOMA were fit with all models included the first log10 HOMA as a predictor. Results Mean±SD log10-HOMA was -0.18±0.39 at the 1st and -0.21±0.41 at the 2nd measure, with mean change of 0.03±0.44. In the final model (all women) BMI at 1st HOMA measure (0.014; 95% CI=0.006-0.021 per kg/m2; p<0.001) and change in BMI from 1st to 2nd measure (0.024; 95% CI=0.013-0.035 per kg/m2; p<0.001) predicted HOMA change. When restricted to subjects with FMI measures, FMI at 1st HOMA measure (0.020; 95% CI=0.010-0.030 per kg/m2; p<0.001) and change in FMI from 1st to 2nd measure (0.032; 95% CI=0.020-0.043 per kg/m2; p<0.0001) predicted change in HOMA. While ART use did not predict change in log10-HOMA, untreated HIV+ women had a significant decline in IR over time. Use or duration of AZT, d4T and EFV was not associated with HOMA change in HIV+ women. Conclusions Baseline BMI and change in BMI, and in particular fat mass and change in fat mass predicted insulin resistance change over ~3 years in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women. Exposure to specific ART (d4T, AZT, EFV) did not predict insulin resistance change in ART-treated HIV-infected Rwandan women. PMID:25880634

  4. Insulin resistance change and antiretroviral therapy exposure in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women: a longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutimura, Eugene; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Sinayobye, Jean D'Amour; Cohen, Mardge; Anastos, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    We longitudinally assessed predictors of insulin resistance (IR) change among HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected (ART-initiators and ART-non-initiators) Rwandan women. HIV-infected (HIV+) and uninfected (HIV-) women provided demographic and clinical measures: age, body mass index (BMI) in Kg/(height in meters)2, Fat-Mass (FMI) and Fat-Free-Mass (FFMI) index, fasting serum glucose and insulin. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) was calculated to estimate IR change over time in log10 transformed HOMA measured at study enrollment or prior to ART initiation in 3 groups: HIV- (n = 194), HIV+ ART-non-initiators (n=95) and HIV+ ART-initiators (n=371). ANCOVA linear regression models of change in log10-HOMA were fit with all models included the first log10 HOMA as a predictor. Mean±SD log10-HOMA was -0.18±0.39 at the 1st and -0.21±0.41 at the 2nd measure, with mean change of 0.03±0.44. In the final model (all women) BMI at 1st HOMA measure (0.014; 95% CI=0.006-0.021 per kg/m2; p<0.001) and change in BMI from 1st to 2nd measure (0.024; 95% CI=0.013-0.035 per kg/m2; p<0.001) predicted HOMA change. When restricted to subjects with FMI measures, FMI at 1st HOMA measure (0.020; 95% CI=0.010-0.030 per kg/m2; p<0.001) and change in FMI from 1st to 2nd measure (0.032; 95% CI=0.020-0.043 per kg/m2; p<0.0001) predicted change in HOMA. While ART use did not predict change in log10-HOMA, untreated HIV+ women had a significant decline in IR over time. Use or duration of AZT, d4T and EFV was not associated with HOMA change in HIV+ women. Baseline BMI and change in BMI, and in particular fat mass and change in fat mass predicted insulin resistance change over ~3 years in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women. Exposure to specific ART (d4T, AZT, EFV) did not predict insulin resistance change in ART-treated HIV-infected Rwandan women.

  5. HIV-1 genetic diversity and transmitted drug resistance frequency among Iranian treatment-naive, sexually infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Kalantari, Saeed; Garshasbi, Saba; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Memarnejadian, Arash; Fakhim, Atousa; Keyvani, Hossein

    2017-02-08

    In recent years, the patterns of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) transmission in Iran have been changing gradually from drug injection to unprotected sexual contact. This study sought to investigate the phylogenetic trends and characteristics of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations of HIV-1 in a population that is mainly infected through homo/heterosexual contacts. Sixty newly diagnosed antiretroviral-naive individuals with HIV infection living in Tehran were recruited to this survey, and among them, 42 subjects were established to be infected through sexual intercourse. Following amplification and sequencing of the main part of the HIV-1 pol region, phylogenetic and drug-resistance mutation (DRM) analysis was successfully performed on these 42 patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the majority of the subjects were infected with subtype CRF35_AD (88%), followed by subtype B, with 7.1%, and subtype CRF01_AE, with 4.7%. A total of 7.1% of the subjects were found to be infected with HIV-1 variants with surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) according to the last world health organisation (WHO) algorithm. All of the identified SDRMs belonged to the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) class, including K103 N and V106A, which were found in three patients. Two minor HIV protease-inhibitor-related mutations (L10I and G73S) were detected in two patients, but these mutations are not included in the WHO SDRMs list. The dominance of HIV-1 subtype CRF35_AD was observed among subjects of this study who were infected through sexual contact. The moderate prevalence of SDRMs (7.1%) in this population emphasises the fact that the risk of treatment failure in HIV-infected individuals might increase in the future, and preventive measures should be considered by health authorities.

  6. Prevalence of Drug Resistance Associated Mutations Among the Anti Retroviral Therapy Exposed HIV-1 Infected Individuals in Manipur, Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Lakhikumar Sharma, Adhikarimayum; Ramsing Singh, Thiyam; Ranjana Devi, Khuraijam; Shanjukumar Singh, Lisam

    2016-01-01

    Manipur is one of the highest HIV prevalence states of India because of its geographical location at the international border near the golden triangle of South-East Asia, but no study on drug resistance associated mutations (DRAMs) has been reported yet. A population-based study on DRAMs of HIV-1 among the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) exposed HIV-1 infected individuals of Manipur was conducted. 110 HIV-1 positive individuals who had initially exposed to first line anti-HIV drugs were recruited for the surveillance of DRAMs. Reverse transcriptase and protease genes of HIV-1 were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Significant prevalence of DRAMs of HIV-1 was found among the ART exposed HIV-1 infected individuals of Manipur. The results revealed that 37%, 29% and 7% individuals harbor HIV-1 strains mutated at the target sites of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors respectively. Predominant DRAMs at RT genes were M184V, T215Y, M41L and V108I and H221Y while at PR genes were M46I and I47V. Among the high risk groups, intravenous drug users have the highest number of DRAMs followed by heterosexual individuals. Analysis of viral subtype based on pol gene revealed 83% subtype C, 11.8% recombinant forms and 5.2% subtype B. DRAMs at the target sites of reverse transcriptase inhibitors are high and these were found to have developed resistance to the primary ART drugs that are used in Manipur. The findings of this study will help the clinicians to guide patients during the course of ART treatment regimes.

  7. High prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in acute HIV-infected Thai men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Crowell, Trevor A; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Weerayingyong, Jessica; Chomchey, Nitiya; Fletcher, James L K; van Griensven, Frits; Phanuphak, Praphan; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Phanuphak, Nittaya

    2015-04-01

    : As use of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand increases, so does the potential for transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We describe the prevalence of WHO surveillance drug resistance mutations among 120 subjects who underwent genotypic testing during acute HIV infection in Bangkok, Thailand. In this cohort of predominantly men who have sex with men, we observed an overall transmitted drug resistance prevalence of 9.2%, including nucleoside/nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor 5.0%, nonnucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3.4%, and protease inhibitor 3.4%. These prevalence estimates are higher than previous reports of transmitted drug resistance in Thailand. Baseline drug resistance testing may be warranted, particularly among men who have sex with men.

  8. Improved prediction of salvage antiretroviral therapy outcomes using ultrasensitive HIV-1 drug resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Pou, Christian; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Pérez-Álvarez, Susana; García, Federico; Delgado, Rafael; Dalmau, David; Álvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Gonzalez, Dimitri; Sayada, Chalom; Chueca, Natalia; Pulido, Federico; Ibáñez, Laura; Rodríguez, Cristina; Casadellà, Maria; Santos, José R; Ruiz, Lidia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2014-08-15

    The clinical relevance of ultrasensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genotypic resistance testing in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-experienced individuals remains unknown. This was a retrospective, multicentre, cohort study in ART-experienced, HIV-1-infected adults who initiated salvage ART including, at least 1 ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor, raltegravir or etravirine. Presalvage ART Sanger and 454 sequencing of plasma HIV-1 were used to generate separate genotypic sensitivity scores (GSS) using the HIVdb, ANRS, and REGA algorithms. Virological failure (VF) was defined as 2 consecutive HIV-1 RNA levels ≥200 copies/mL at least 12 weeks after salvage ART initiation, whereas subjects remained on the same ART. The ability of Sanger and 454-GSS to predict VF was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and survival analyses. The study included 132 evaluable subjects; 28 (21%) developed VF. Using HIVdb, 454 predicted VF better than Sanger sequencing in the ROC curve analysis (area under the curve: 0.69 vs 0.60, Delong test P = .029). Time to VF was shorter for subjects with 454-GSS < 3 vs 454-GSS ≥ 3 (Log-rank P = .003) but not significantly different between Sanger-GSS < 3 and ≥3. Factors independently associated with increased risk of VF in multivariate Cox regression were a 454-GSS < 3 (HR = 4.6, 95 CI, [1.5, 14.0], P = .007), and the number of previous antiretrovirals received (HR = 1.2 per additional drug, 95 CI, [1.1, 1.3], P = .001). Equivalent findings were obtained with the ANRS and REGA algorithms. Ultrasensitive HIV-1 genotyping improves GSS-based predictions of virological outcomes of salvage ART relative to Sanger sequencing. This may improve the clinical management of ART-experienced subjects living with HIV-1. NCT01346878. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Resistance detected by pyrosequencing following zidovudine monotherapy for prevention of HIV-1 mother-to-child-transmission.

    PubMed

    Olson, Scott C; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Beck, Ingrid; Deng, Wenjie; Britto, Paula; Shapiro, David E; Bumgarner, Roger E; Mullins, James I; Van Dyke, Russell B; Jourdain, Gonzague; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2015-07-31

    To prevent mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1, the 2010 WHO guidelines recommended prenatal zidovudine (ZDV) monotherapy (option A). To determine if ZDV monotherapy selects for HIV resistance in antiretroviral-naive women during pregnancy, specimens from 50 individuals were examined using pyrosequencing. ZDV-resistance mutations were detected at delivery in seven women (14%, 95% confidence interval 6.6-26.5%). These data raise the question whether women administered ZDV monotherapy for prevention of mother-to-child-transmission could have higher risk of virologic failure when later started on combination antiretroviral therapy, as has been demonstrated following single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis.

  10. Resistance detected by pyrosequencing following zidovudine-monotherapy for prevention of HIV-1 mother-to-child-transmission

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Scott C.; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Beck, Ingrid; Deng, Wenjie; Britto, Paula; Shapiro, David E.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Mullins, James I.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Jourdain, Gonzague; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    To prevent mother-to-child-transmission-of-HIV-1, the 2010 WHO guidelines recommended prenatal zidovudine monotherapy (Option A). To determine if ZDV-monotherapy selects for HIV-resistance in antiretroviral-naïve women during pregnancy, specimens from 50 were examined using pyrosequencing. ZDV-resistance mutations were detected at delivery in 7 (14%, 95% confidence interval 6.6-26.5%). These data raise the question whether women administered zidovudine monotherapy for PMTCT could have higher risk of virologic failure when later started on combination ARV therapy, as has been demonstrated following single-dose-nevirapine prophylaxis. PMID:26244386

  11. Insulin resistance in HIV-infected youth is associated with decreased mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Jody K.; Miller, Tracie L.; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial respiration in perinatally HIV-infected youth. Design: Case–control study. Methods: Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in perinatally HIV-infected youth in Tanner stages 2–5, 25 youth with IR (IR+) and 50 without IR (IR−) who were enrolled in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. IR was defined as a homeostatic model of assessment for IR value at least 4.0. A novel, high-throughput oximetry method was used to evaluate cellular respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in mitochondrial respiration markers between IR+ and IR− were evaluated, as were correlations between mitochondrial respiration markers and biochemical measurements. Results: IR+ and IR− youth were similar on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mean age was 16.5 and 15.6 years in IR+ and IR−, respectively. The IR+ group had significantly higher mean BMI and metabolic analytes (fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and venous lactate and pyruvate) compared with the IR−. Mitochondrial respiration markers were, on average, lower in the IR+ compared with IR−, including basal respiration (417.5 vs. 597.5 pmol, P = 0.074), ATP production (11 513 vs. 15 202 pmol, P = 0.078), proton leak (584.6 vs. 790.0 pmol, P = 0.033), maximal respiration (1815 vs. 2399 pmol, P = 0.025), and spare respiration capacity (1162 vs. 2017 pmol, P = 0.032). Nonmitochondrial respiration did not differ by IR status. The results did not change when adjusted for age. Conclusion: HIV-infected youth with IR have lower mitochondrial respiration markers when compared to youth without IR. Disordered mitochondrial respiration may be a potential mechanism for IR in this population. PMID:27755108

  12. Undertreated HIV and drug-resistant tuberculosis at a referral hospital in Irkutsk, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Heysell, S K; Ogarkov, O B; Zhdanova, S; Zorkaltseva, E; Shugaeva, S; Gratz, J; Vitko, S; Savilov, E D; Koshcheyev, M E; Houpt, E R

    2016-02-01

    A referral hospital for tuberculosis (TB) in Irkutsk, the Russian Federation. To describe disease characteristics, treatment and hospital outcomes of TB-HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). Observational cohort of HIV-infected patients admitted for anti-tuberculosis treatment over 6 months. A total of 98 patients were enrolled with a median CD4 count of 147 cells/mm(3) and viral load of 205 943 copies/ml. Among patients with drug susceptibility testing (DST) results, 29 (64%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR), including 12 without previous anti-tuberculosis treatment. Nineteen patients were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at admission, and 10 (13% ART-naïve) were started during hospitalization. Barriers to timely ART initiation included death, in-patient treatment interruption, and patient refusal. Of 96 evaluable patients, 21 (22%) died, 14 (15%) interrupted treatment, and 10 (10%) showed no microbiological or radiographic improvement. Patients with a cavitary chest X-ray (aOR 7.4, 95%CI 2.3-23.7, P = 0.001) or central nervous system disease (aOR 6.5, 95%CI 1.2-36.1, P = 0.03) were more likely to have one of these poor outcomes. High rates of MDR-TB, treatment interruption and death were found in an HIV-infected population hospitalized in Irkutsk. There are opportunities for integration of HIV and TB services to overcome barriers to timely ART initiation, increase the use of anti-tuberculosis regimens informed by second-line DST, and strengthen out-patient diagnosis and treatment networks.

  13. Insulin resistance in HIV-infected youth is associated with decreased mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Jody K; Miller, Tracie L; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L; Geffner, Mitchell E; Van Dyke, Russell B; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2017-01-02

    To identify relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial respiration in perinatally HIV-infected youth. Case-control study. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in perinatally HIV-infected youth in Tanner stages 2-5, 25 youth with IR (IR+) and 50 without IR (IR-) who were enrolled in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. IR was defined as a homeostatic model of assessment for IR value at least 4.0. A novel, high-throughput oximetry method was used to evaluate cellular respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in mitochondrial respiration markers between IR+ and IR- were evaluated, as were correlations between mitochondrial respiration markers and biochemical measurements. IR+ and IR- youth were similar on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mean age was 16.5 and 15.6 years in IR+ and IR-, respectively. The IR+ group had significantly higher mean BMI and metabolic analytes (fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and venous lactate and pyruvate) compared with the IR-. Mitochondrial respiration markers were, on average, lower in the IR+ compared with IR-, including basal respiration (417.5 vs. 597.5 pmol, P = 0.074), ATP production (11 513 vs. 15 202 pmol, P = 0.078), proton leak (584.6 vs. 790.0 pmol, P = 0.033), maximal respiration (1815 vs. 2399 pmol, P = 0.025), and spare respiration capacity (1162 vs. 2017 pmol, P = 0.032). Nonmitochondrial respiration did not differ by IR status. The results did not change when adjusted for age. HIV-infected youth with IR have lower mitochondrial respiration markers when compared to youth without IR. Disordered mitochondrial respiration may be a potential mechanism for IR in this population.

  14. An assessment of the relationship between the World Health Organization HIV drug resistance early warning indicators and HIV drug resistance acquisition.

    PubMed

    St-Jean, M; Harrigan, P R; Sereda, P; Montaner, Jsg; Lima, V D

    2017-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO)'s HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) early warning indicators (EWIs) measure antiretroviral therapy (ART)-site factors associated with HIVDR prevention, without HIVDR laboratory testing. We assessed the relationship between EWIs and HIVDR acquisition using data from British Columbia, Canada. Eligible patients were ART-naïve, were ≥ 19 years old, had initiated ART between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012, had ≥ 15 months of follow-up, and were without transmitted HIVDR. Patients were followed for acquired HIVDR until 31 March 2014, the last contact date, or death. We built logistic regression models to assess the associations and predictive ability of individual indicators and of the EWI Score (the number of indicators for which a patient did not meet the criteria) on HIVDR acquisition (to any class of HIVDR, lamivudine (3TC)/emtricitabine (FTC), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs)]). All explored EWIs were associated with at least one class of HIVDR, with the exception of 'ART prescribing practices'. We observed a dose-response relationship between acquiring HIVDR to any antiretroviral class and an increasing EWI score in our predictive logistic regression model. The area under the curve was 0.848 (excellent discrimination). The adjusted odds ratios for acquiring any class of HIVDR for an EWI score of 1, 2 and ≥ 3 versus 0 were 2.30 [95% confidence Interval (CI) 1.21-4.38], 3.35 (95% CI: 1.86-6.03) and 7.26 (95% CI: 4.18-12.61), respectively. Several EWIs were associated with and predictive of HIVDR, supporting the WHO EWIs as a component of the HIVDR prevention method in settings where HIVDR testing is not routinely or widely available. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  15. Characteristics of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Recently Infected Treatment-Naive Patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Junko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Mori, Haruyo; Minami, Rumi; Uchida, Kazue; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kondo, Makiko; Sugiura, Wataru

    2016-04-01

    Progress in antiretroviral treatment has led to fewer virological failure cases, but 10%-20% of treatment-naive HIV/AIDS cases are reported to harbor drug-resistant strains, suggesting transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We aimed to determine the trend in prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant (TDR) HIV in Japan, particularly in recently infected patients. Drug-resistance test was performed on 3904 HIV-1-infected cases newly diagnosed between 2007 and 2012. The number of cases infected within 6 months [recent seroconverters (RS)] was estimated by BED assay of 2700 plasma samples. Characteristics of RS cases were further analyzed. The overall prevalence of TDR was 9.1%, ranging from 7.3% in 2008% to 12.5% in 2010. Among 1403 subtype B/E/D cases with >50 CD4 T cell counts and >1000 HIV copies per milliliter, 468 (33.4%) were estimated to be RS. The prevalence of RS was significantly higher among cases who were male, Japanese, and men who have sex with men. The prevalence of TDR did not differ significantly between recent and long-term seroconverters (8.5% vs. 9.2%, respectively, P = 0.68). Common mutations in both groups were M46I/L and T215 revertants. Furthermore, sequences with these mutations, K103N and D30N/N88D formed clusters on phylogenetic trees. Our study clarified an increase in prevalence of TDR in Japan from 2007 to 2012. The phylogenetic clustering of cases with M46I/L or T215 revertants suggests that HIV with these mutations have become circulating strains. Furthermore, detailed analyses showed that Japanese men who have sex with men are more aware of their risk of HIV infection.

  16. Successful Prevention of Transmission of Integrase Resistance in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Alexandra U; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger D; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Cavassini, Matthias; Battegay, Manuel; Hauser, Christoph; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-transmitted drug resistance (TDR) may increase with the increasing use of INSTIs. We analyzed the prevalence of INSTI TDR in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (2008-2014). In 1 of 1316 drug-naive samples (0.1%), a major INSTI TDR mutation was detected. Prevalence was stable, although INSTIs were increasingly used. We showed that this is in contrast to the introduction of previous drug classes, in which more treatment failures with resistant strains occurred and TDR was observed more rapidly. We demonstrated on a population-level that it is possible to avoid TDR to a new drug class for years. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Longitudinal trends of HIV drug resistance in a large Canadian cohort, 1996-2016.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, G; Brumme, C J; Shoveller, J; Lima, V D; Harrigan, P R

    2017-06-23

    We aim to identify long-term trends in HIV drug resistance before and after combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation. IAS-USA (2015) mutations were identified in 23 271 HIV protease-reverse transcriptase sequences from 6543 treatment naïve adults in British Columbia. Participants who started cART between 1996 and 2014 were followed until April 2016. Equality of proportions test was used to compare the percentage of participants with acquired drug resistance (ADR) or transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in 1996, to those in 2014. Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate time to ADR in four drug resistance categories. Multivariable regression odds ratios (OR) of ADR for select clinical variables were determined by 5-year eras of cART initiation. The proportion of individuals with ADR declined from 39% (51/132) to 3% (8/322) in 1996-2014 (p <0.0001), while the proportion with TDR increased from 12% (16/132) to 18% (59/322) (p 0.14). The estimated proportions of individuals with ADR rose to 29% (NNRTI), 28% (3TC/FTC), 14% (other nRTI), and 7% (PI) after >16 years of therapy. After 5 years on therapy, participants initiating cART in 1996-2000 had 5.5-times more 3TC/FTC ADR, 5.3-times more other nRTI ADR, 4.7-times more NNRTI ADR, and 24-times more PI ADR than those starting in 2011-2014. The individuals with highest odds of developing ADR in 1996-2010 were adherent to regimens at levels between 60% and 80%, which shifted to <40% adherent in 2011-2014. HIV drug resistance transitioned from being primarily selected de-novo to being driven by TDR. Among those who started treatment in the past 5 years, ADR is rare and observed mostly in the lowest adherence strata. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sequence and structure based models of HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful management of chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with a cocktail of antiretroviral medications can be negatively affected by the presence of drug resistant mutations in the viral targets. These targets include the HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) proteins, for which a number of inhibitors are available on the market and routinely prescribed. Protein mutational patterns are associated with varying degrees of resistance to their respective inhibitors, with extremes that can range from continued susceptibility to cross-resistance across all drugs. Results Here we implement statistical learning algorithms to develop structure- and sequence-based models for systematically predicting the effects of mutations in the PR and RT proteins on resistance to each of eight and eleven inhibitors, respectively. Employing a four-body statistical potential, mutant proteins are represented as feature vectors whose components quantify relative environmental perturbations at amino acid residue positions in the respective target structures upon mutation. Two approaches are implemented in developing sequence-based models, based on use of either relative frequencies or counts of n-grams, to generate vectors for representing mutant proteins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported study on structure- and sequence-based predictive models of HIV-1 PR and RT drug resistance developed by implementing a four-body statistical potential and n-grams, respectively, to generate mutant attribute vectors. Performance of the learning methods is evaluated on the basis of tenfold cross-validation, using previously assayed and publicly available in vitro data relating mutational patterns in the targets to quantified inhibitor susceptibility changes. Conclusion Overall performance results are competitive with those of a previously published study utilizing a sequence-based strategy, while our structure- and sequence

  19. Influence of antituberculosis drug resistance and Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage on outcome in HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tho, Dau Quang; Török, M Estée; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Kiet, Vo Sy; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Day, Jeremy; Farrar, Jeremy; Wolbers, Marcel; Caws, Maxine

    2012-06-01

    HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis (TBM) has high mortality. Aside from the devastating impact of multidrug resistance (MDR) on survival, little is understood about the influence of other bacterial factors on outcome. This study examined the influence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance, bacterial lineage, and host vaccination status on outcome in patients with HIV-associated TBM. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the cerebrospinal fluid of 186 patients enrolled in two studies of HIV-associated TBM in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, were tested for resistance to first-line antituberculosis drugs. Lineage genotyping was available for 122 patients. The influence of antituberculosis drug resistance and M. tuberculosis lineage on 9-month mortality was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox multiple regression models. Isoniazid (INH) resistance without rifampin resistance was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 2.66; P = 0.005), and multidrug resistance was uniformly fatal (n = 8/8; adjusted HR, 5.21, 95% CI, 2.38 to 11.42; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio for INH-resistant cases was greatest during the continuation phase of treatment (after 3 months; HR, 5.05 [95% CI, 2.23 to 11.44]; P = 0.0001). Among drug-susceptible cases, patients infected with the "modern" Beijing lineage strains had lower mortality than patients infected with the "ancient" Indo-Oceanic lineage (HR, 0.29 [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.61]; P = 0.001). Isoniazid resistance, multidrug resistance, and M. tuberculosis lineage are important determinants of mortality in patients with HIV-associated TBM. Interventions which target these factors may help reduce the unacceptably high mortality in patients with TBM.

  20. Transition states of native and drug-resistant HIV-1 protease are the same

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, D. Randal; Hirschi, Jennifer S.; Wakata, Aya; Goldstein, Harris; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is an important target for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. However, drug resistance is a persistent problem and new inhibitors are needed. An approach toward understanding enzyme chemistry, the basis of drug resistance, and the design of powerful inhibitors is to establish the structure of enzymatic transition states. Enzymatic transition structures can be established by matching experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with theoretical predictions. However, the HIV-1 protease transition state has not been previously resolved using these methods. We have measured primary 14C and 15N KIEs and secondary 3H and 18O KIEs for native and multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease (I84V). We observed 14C KIEs (14V/K) of 1.029 ± 0.003 and 1.025 ± 0.005, 15N KIEs (15V/K) of 0.987 ± 0.004 and 0.989 ± 0.003, 18O KIEs (18V/K) of 0.999 ± 0.003 and 0.993 ± 0.003, and 3H KIEs (3V/K) KIEs of 0.968 ± 0.001 and 0.976 ± 0.001 for the native and I84V enzyme, respectively. The chemical reaction involves nucleophilic water attack at the carbonyl carbon, proton transfer to the amide nitrogen leaving group, and C-N bond cleavage. A transition structure consistent with the KIE values involves proton transfer from the active site Asp-125 (1.32 Å) with partial hydrogen bond formation to the accepting nitrogen (1.20 Å) and partial bond loss from the carbonyl carbon to the amide leaving group (1.52 Å). The KIEs measured for the native and I84V enzyme indicate nearly identical transition states, implying that a true transition-state analogue should be effective against both enzymes. PMID:22493227

  1. Antigenicity-defined conformations of an extremely neutralization-resistant HIV-1 envelope spike.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongfei; Karaca-Griffin, Selen; Chen, Jia; Tian, Sai; Fredette, Nicholas; Linton, Christine E; Rits-Volloch, Sophia; Lu, Jianming; Wagh, Kshitij; Theiler, James; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S; Harrison, Stephen C; Carfi, Andrea; Chen, Bing

    2017-04-10

    The extraordinary genetic diversity of the HIV-1 envelope spike [Env; trimeric (gp160)3, cleaved to (gp120/gp41)3] poses challenges for vaccine development. Envs of different clinical isolates exhibit different sensitivities to antibody-mediated neutralization. Envs of difficult-to-neutralize viruses are thought to be more stable and conformationally homogeneous trimers than those of easy-to-neutralize viruses, thereby providing more effective concealment of conserved, functionally critical sites. In this study we have characterized the antigenic properties of an Env derived from one of the most neutralization-resistant HIV-1 isolates, CH120.6. Sequence variation at neutralizing epitopes does not fully account for its exceptional resistance to antibodies. The full-length, membrane-bound CH120.6 Env is indeed stable and conformationally homogeneous. Its antigenicity correlates closely with its neutralization sensitivity, and major changes in antigenicity upon CD4 engagement appear to be restricted to the coreceptor site. The CH120.6 gp140 trimer, the soluble and uncleaved ectodomain of (gp160)3, retains many antigenic properties of the intact Env, consistent with a conformation close to that of Env spikes on a virion, whereas its monomeric gp120 exposes many nonneutralizing or strain-specific epitopes. Thus, trimer organization and stability are important determinants not only for occluding many epitopes but also for conferring resistance to neutralization by all but a small set of antibodies. Env preparations derived from neutralization-resistant viruses may induce irrelevant antibody responses less frequently than do other Envs and may be excellent templates for developing soluble immunogens.

  2. Antigenicity-defined conformations of an extremely neutralization-resistant HIV-1 envelope spike

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Yongfei; Karaca-Griffin, Selen; Chen, Jia; ...

    2017-04-10

    Here, the extraordinary genetic diversity of the HIV-1 envelope spike [Env; trimeric (gp160)3, cleaved to (gp120/gp41)3] poses challenges for vaccine development. Envs of different clinical isolates exhibit different sensitivities to antibody-mediated neutralization. Envs of difficult-to-neutralize viruses are thought to be more stable and conformationally homogeneous trimers than those of easy-to-neutralize viruses, thereby providing more effective concealment of conserved, functionally critical sites. In this study we have characterized the antigenic properties of an Env derived from one of the most neutralization-resistant HIV-1 isolates, CH120.6. Sequence variation at neutralizing epitopes does not fully account for its exceptional resistance to antibodies. The full-length,more » membrane-bound CH120.6 Env is indeed stable and conformationally homogeneous. Its antigenicity correlates closely with its neutralization sensitivity, and major changes in antigenicity upon CD4 engagement appear to be restricted to the coreceptor site. The CH120.6 gp140 trimer, the soluble and uncleaved ectodomain of (gp160)3, retains many antigenic properties of the intact Env, consistent with a conformation close to that of Env spikes on a virion, whereas its monomeric gp120 exposes many nonneutralizing or strain-specific epitopes. Thus, trimer organization and stability are important determinants not only for occluding many epitopes but also for conferring resistance to neutralization by all but a small set of antibodies. Env preparations derived from neutralization-resistant viruses may induce irrelevant antibody responses less frequently than do other Envs and may be excellent templates for developing soluble immunogens.« less

  3. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  4. Stability of dried blood spots for HIV-1 drug resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Hearps, Anna C; Ryan, Claire E; Morris, Lisa M; Plate, Megan M; Greengrass, Vicki; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2010-03-01

    The wide scale application of dried blood spots (DBS) as a collection tool for low-cost HIV drug resistance testing requires a greater understanding of the accuracy of DBS for genotype analysis and the stability of DBS under various environmental conditions. Analysis of a 50microl DBS via a single amplicon, nested PCR-based in-house assay (the Burnet genotyping assay) showed an average nucleotide concordance of 98.9% with plasma samples, although only 65% of nucleotide mixtures detected in plasma were also detected within DBS. The analysis of three DBS resulted in the detection of a greater number of nucleotide mixtures (72 and 109 mixtures detected within one and three DBS, respectively, n=10). Two DBS extraction protocols (silica particle; NucliSENS, bioMerieux and spin column extraction; High Pure, Roche) were assessed and found to be equivalent (79% and 84% recovery success respectively, n=19). FTA Elute paper (Whatman) was an inferior DBS collection medium compared to Whatman 903 paper. DBS appeared relatively tolerant to multiple freeze/thaw cycles, with 79% of DBS subjected to ten freeze/thaw cycles successfully amplified compared to 93% of DBS defrosted once (n=14). High temperature (37 degrees C) and high humidity (>90%) substantially impaired DBS recovery within two weeks of storage (38%, n=8), whilst storage at -20 degrees C or 4 degrees C adequately preserved DBS for this period (100% recovery, n=8). Therefore, whilst DBS are suitable for HIV drug resistance surveillance, the use of multiple DBS may be required to ensure accurate detection of minor HIV quasispecies and short-term storage of samples at either 4 degrees C or -20 degrees C is recommended.

  5. [Genotypic resistance in HIV-1-infected patients with persistent low-level viremia].

    PubMed

    Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Peña, Alejandro; Pasquau, Juan; López-Ruz, Miguel Angel; Maroto, María Del Carmen; Hernández-Quero, José; García, Federico

    2009-02-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV patients is considered successful when plasma viral load (VL) reaches < 50 copies/ml. However, many patients have a persistent VL of 50 to 1000 copies/ml, and treatment guidelines do not recommend genotypic resistance testing at these levels because of poor performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a concentration technique for HIV-1 sequencing in samples with < 1000 copies/ml, and determine the virological consequences of HAART treatment changes guided by resistance testing in this scenario. Observational study performed in 51 patients with plasma VL between 50 and 1000 copies/m; 27 patients had these levels for at least 12 consecutive months. Prior to RNA extraction, virions were concentrated from 3-ml plasma samples and then genotyped following standard procedures. Forty-seven of the 51 samples were successfully sequenced, resulting in a sensitivity of 92%. Among these 47 patients, 27 showed a persistent viral load of 50-1000 copies/ml for 12 months, and 20 patients achieved undetectable viral load following the genotype-guided HAART change (intention-to-treat analysis: NC = F; 20 of 27 [74.1%]; on-treatment analysis: 20 of 23 [86.9%]). We report a simple method for genotype sequencing in patients with persistent low-level viremia that allowed a modification of the HAART regimen leading to undetectable plasma viremia.

  6. Distribution of the HIV resistance CCR5-Delta32 allele among Egyptians and Syrians.

    PubMed

    Salem, Abdel-Halim; Batzer, Mark A

    2007-03-01

    A mutant allele of the beta-chemokine receptor gene CCR5 bearing a 32-basepair (bp) deletion that prevents cell invasion by the primary transmitting strain of HIV-1 has recently been characterized. Individuals homozygous for the mutation are resistant to infection, even after repeated high-risk exposure, but this resistance appears not absolute, as isolated cases of HIV-positive deletion homozygotes are emerging. The consequence of the heterozygous state is not clear, but it may delay the progression to AIDS in infected individuals. In order to evaluate the frequency distribution of CCR5-Delta32 polymorphism among Egyptians, a total of 200 individuals (154 from Ismailia and 46 from Sinai) were tested. Only two heterozygous individuals from Ismailia carried the CCR5-Delta32 allele (0.6%), and no homozygous (Delta32/Delta32) individuals were detected among the tested samples. The presence of the CCR5-Delta32 allele among Egyptians may be attributed to the admixture with people of European descent. Thus we conclude that the protective deletion CCR5-Delta32 is largely absent in the Egyptian population.

  7. Function-based mutation-resistant synthetic signaling device activated by HIV-1 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Majerle, Andreja; Gaber, Rok; Benčina, Mojca; Jerala, Roman

    2015-06-19

    The high mutation rate of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus is a major problem since it evades the function of antibodies and chemical inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a viral detection strategy based on synthetic biology principles to detect a specific viral function rather than a particular viral protein. The resistance caused by mutations can be circumvented since the mutations that cause the loss of function also incapacitate the virus. Many pathogens encode proteases that are essential for their replication and that have a defined substrate specificity. A genetically encoded sensor composed of a fused membrane anchor, viral protease target site, and an orthogonal transcriptional activator was engineered into a human cell line. The HIV-1 protease released the transcriptional activator from the membrane, thereby inducing transcription of the selected genes. The device was still strongly activated by clinically relevant protease mutants that are resistant to protease inhibitors. In the future, a similar principle could be applied to detect also other pathogens and functions.

  8. High prevalence of unique recombinant forms of HIV-1 in Ghana: molecular epidemiology from an antiretroviral resistance study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Elena; Ampofo, William Kwabena; Sierra, María; Torpey, Kwasi; Pérez-Alvarez, Lucía; Bonney, Evelyn Yayra; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Lartey, Margaret; Nyarko, Charles; Amenyah, Richard Noamesi; Thomson, Michael; Nájera, Rafael

    2008-08-15

    In Ghana, programs to expand antiretroviral access are being implemented. In this context, the dynamic genetic evolution of HIV-1 requires continuous surveillance, particularly when diverse genetic forms co-circulate. Phylogenetic and antiretroviral resistance analyses of HIV-1 partial pol sequences from plasma RNA samples from 207 Ghanaian individuals were performed. 66% of infections were CRF02_AG, whereas 25% were unique recombinant forms (URFs). All 52 URFs were characterized by bootscanning. CRF02_AG was parental strain in 87% of URFs, forming recombinants with genetic forms circulating in minor proportions: CRF06_cpx, sub-subtype A3, CRF09_cpx and subtypes G and D. Two triple recombinants (CRF02_AG/A3/CRF06_cpx and CRF02_AG/A3/CRF09_cpx) were identified. Antiretroviral resistance analyses revealed that six individuals, five of which were antiretroviral drug-experienced, harbored mutations conferring high level of resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. No major resistance mutations were identified in the protease, although insertions of one and three amino acids were detected. The high frequency of URFs detected probably reflects a significant incidence of coinfections or superinfections with diverse viral strains, which increases the genetic complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic in West Africa. Monitoring of HIV-1 drug resistance might provide data on the implications of intersubtype recombination in response to antiretrovirals.

  9. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  10. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO 140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo. PMID:18519143

  11. Improved Virological Outcomes in British Columbia Concomitant with Decreasing Incidence of HIV Type 1 Drug Resistance Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Vikram S.; Lima, Viviane D.; Zhang, Wen; Wynhoven, Brian; Yip, Benita; Hogg, Robert S.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Harrigan, P. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background There have been limited studies evaluating temporal changes in the incidence of detection of drug resistance among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates and concomitant changes in plasma HIV load for treated individuals in a population-wide setting. Methods Longitudinal plasma viral load and genotypic resistance data were obtained from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy from the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program from July 1996 through December 2008. A total of 24,652 resistance tests were available from 5422 individuals. The incidence of successful plasma viral load suppression and of resistance to each of 3 antiretroviral categories (nucleoside/nucleotide reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors) was calculated for the population receiving therapy. Results There has been a drastic decrease in the incidence of new cases of HIV-1 drug resistance in individuals followed during 1996–2008. In 1997, the incidence rate of any newly detected resistance was 1.73 cases per 100 person-months of therapy, and by 2008, the incidence rate had decreased >12-fold, to 0.13 cases per 100 person-months of therapy. This decrease in the incidence of resistance has occurred at an exponential rate, with half-times on the order of 2–3 years. Concomitantly, the proportion of individuals with plasma viral load suppression has increased linearly over time (from 64.7% with HIV RNA levels <50 copies/mL in 2000 to 87.0% in 2008; R2 = 0.97; P <.001). Conclusions Our results suggest an increasing effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy at the populational level. The vast majority of treated patients in British Columbia now have either suppressed plasma viral load or drug-susceptible HIV-1, according to their most recent test results. PMID:19951169

  12. Resistance-associated epitopes of HIV-1C-highly probable candidates for a multi-epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Earlier studies have identified a large number of immunogenic epitopes in HIV-1. Efforts are required to prioritize these epitopes in order to identify the best candidates for formulating an effective multi-epitope vaccine for HIV. We modeled 155 known cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes of HIV-1 subtype C on the 3D structure of HLA-A*0201, HLA-B*2705, and HLA-B*5101 using MODPROPEP, as these alleles are known to be associated with resistance to HIV/slow progression to AIDS. Thirty-six epitopes were identified to bind to all the three HLA alleles with better binding affinity than the control peptides complexed with each HLA allele but not to any of the HLA alleles reported to be associated with susceptibility to HIV infection/rapid progression to disease. As increase in stability of the epitope-HLA complex results in increased immunogenicity, the short-listed epitopes could be suitable candidates for vaccine development. Twenty of the 36 epitopes were polyfunctional in nature adding to their immunological relevance for vaccine design. Further, 9 of the 20 polyfunctional epitopes were found to bind to all three resistance-associated HLA alleles using an additional method, adding worth to their potential as candidates for a vaccine formulation for HIV-1C.

  13. Emergence of Lamivudine-Resistant HBV during Antiretroviral Therapy Including Lamivudine for Patients Coinfected with HIV and HBV in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Zhu, Ting; Song, Xiaojing; Huang, Ying; Yang, Feifei; Guan, Shuo; Xie, Jing; Gohda, Jin; Hosoya, Noriaki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Liu, Wenjun; Gao, George Fu; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Ishida, Takaomi

    2015-01-01

    In China, HIV-1-infected patients typically receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) that includes lamivudine (3TC) as a reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) (ART-3TC). Previous studies from certain developed countries have shown that, in ART-3TC, 3TC-resistant HBV progressively emerges at an annual rate of 15–20% in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. This scenario in China warrants investigation because >10% of all HIV-infected patients in China are HBV carriers. We measured the occurrence of 3TC-resistant HBV during ART-3TC for HIV-HBV coinfection and also tested the effect of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) used as an additional RTI (ART-3TC/TDF) in a cohort study in China. We obtained 200 plasma samples collected from 50 Chinese patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV (positive for hepatitis B surface antigen) and examined them for the prevalence of 3TC-resistant HBV by directly sequencing PCR products that covered the HBV reverse-transcriptase gene. We divided the patients into ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups and compared the efficacy of treatment and incidence of drug-resistance mutation between the groups. HIV RNA and HBV DNA loads drastically decreased in both ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups. In the ART-3TC group, HBV breakthrough or insufficient suppression of HBV DNA loads was observed in 20% (10/50) of the patients after 96-week treatment, and 8 of these patients harbored 3TC-resistant mutants. By contrast, neither HBV breakthrough nor treatment failure was recorded in the ART-3TC/TDF group. All of the 3TC-resistant HBV mutants emerged from the cases in which HBV DNA loads were high at baseline. Our results clearly demonstrated that ART-3TC is associated with the emergence of 3TC-resistant HBV in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and that ART-3TC/TDF reduces HBV DNA loads to an undetectable level. These findings support the use of TDF-based treatment regimens for patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. PMID:26288093

  14. Transmitted HIV drug resistance among drug-naive subjects recently infected with HIV in Mexico City: a World Health Organization survey to classify resistance and to field test two alternative patient enrollment methods.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolio, Silvia; Rodriguez-Diaz, Roberto A; Fuentes-Romero, Luis L; Bennett, Diane E; Viveros-Rogel, Monica; Hart, Stephen; Pilon, Richard; Sandstrom, Paul; Soto-Ramirez, Luis E

    2012-05-01

    In 2004, the World Health Organization performed a survey to assess transmitted drug resistance in Mexico City among drug-naive persons with newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and likely to be recently infected who were attending 3 voluntary counseling and testing sites. A parallel study comparing 2 alternative methods of enrolling survey participant was conducted in 9 voluntary counseling and testing sites in central Mexico. In study arm 1, subject information, consent and blood specimens were obtained during the HIV diagnostic testing visit. In study arm 2, consent and blood specimens were obtained at the return visit, only from those who were HIV infected. This survey classified nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor and nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor transmitted drug resistance as <5% and 5%-15%, respectively. Arm 2 yielded major advantages in cost and workload, with no evidence of increased sampling bias.

  15. Rilpivirine resistance mutations in HIV patients failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Anta, Lourdes; Llibre, Josep M; Poveda, Eva; Blanco, José L; Alvarez, Marta; Pérez-Elías, María J; Aguilera, Antonio; Caballero, Estrella; Soriano, Vicente; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2013-01-02

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is the latest approved nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). It displays in-vitro activity extending over other NNRTI-resistant HIV strains. There is scarce information about the rate of RPV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) in patients failing other NNRTIs. RPV RAMs were examined in plasma samples collected from HIV patients that had recently failed NNRTI-based regimens at 22 clinics in Spain. Resistance tests from a total of 1064 patients failing efavirenz (EFV) (54.5%), nevirapine (NVP) (40%) or etravirine (ETR) (5.5%) were examined. The prevalence of RPV RAMs was K101E (9.1%), K101P (1.4%), E138A (3.9%), E138G (0.3%), E138K (0.3%), E138Q (0.8%), V179L (0.2%), Y181C (21.8%), Y181I (0.5%), Y181V (0.2%), H221Y (8.3%), F227C (0.1%) and M230L (1.5%). K101E/M184I was seen in 1%. E138K/M184I were absent. Mutations L100I and V108I were significantly more frequent in patients failing EFV than NVP (7.9 vs. 0.2 and 12.2 vs. 7.3%, respectively). Conversely, Y181C, Y181I, V106A, H221Y and F227L were more prevalent following NVP than EFV failures. Using the Spanish resistance interpretation algorithm, 206 genotypes (19.3%) from patients failing NNRTI (NVP 52%, EFV 40.8% and ETR 7.8%) were considered as RPV resistant. In patients with ETR failure, cross-resistance to RPV was seen in 27.6%, mainly as result of Y181C (81.3%), V179I (43.8%), V90I (31.3%) and V108I (18.8%). RPV resistance is overall recognized in nearly 20% of patients failing other NNRTIs. It is more common following ETR (27.6%) or NVP (25%) failures than EFV (14.5%). E138 mutants are rarely seen in this context.

  16. Adherence to protease inhibitors, HIV-1 viral load, and development of drug resistance in an indigent population.

    PubMed

    Bangsberg, D R; Hecht, F M; Charlebois, E D; Zolopa, A R; Holodniy, M; Sheiner, L; Bamberger, J D; Chesney, M A; Moss, A

    2000-03-10

    To examine the relationship between adherence, viral suppression and antiretroviral resistance in HIV-infected homeless and marginally housed people on protease inhibitor (PI) therapy. A cross-sectional analysis of subjects in an observational prospective cohort systematically sampled from free meal lines, homeless shelters and low-income, single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels. Thirty-four HIV-infected people with a median of 12 months of PI therapy. Adherence measured by periodic unannounced pill counts, electronic medication monitoring, and self-report; HIV RNA viral load; and HIV-1 genotypic changes associated with drug resistance. Median adherence was 89, 73, and 67% by self-report, pill count, and electronic medication monitor, respectively. Thirty-eight per cent of the population had over 90% adherence by pill count. Depending on the measure, adherence explained 36-65% of the variation in concurrent HIV RNA levels. The three adherence measures were closely related. Of 20 genotyped patients who received a new reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) when starting a PI, three had primary protease gene substitutions. Of 12 genotyped patients who received a PI without a new RTI, six had primary protease gene substitutions (P < 0.03). A substantial proportion of homeless and marginally housed individuals had good adherence to PI therapy. A strong relationship was found between independent methods of measuring adherence and concurrent viral suppression. PI resistance was more closely related to the failure to change RTI when starting a PI than to the level of adherence.

  17. Computational study of the resistance shown by the Subtype B / HIV-1 Protease to currently known inhibitors †

    PubMed Central

    Genoni, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Merz, Kenneth M.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 Protease (HIV-1 PR) is an essential enzyme in the HIV-1 life cycle. As such, this protein represents a major drug target in AIDS therapy, but emerging resistance to anti-retroviral inhibitor cocktails, due to high viral mutation rates, represents a significant challenge in AIDS treatment. Many mutations are not located within the active site or binding pocket, nor they do significantly modify the 3D structural organization of the enzyme; hence, the mechanism(s) by which they alter inhibitor affinity for the Protease remains uncertain. In this article, we present an all-atom computational analysis of the dynamic residue-residue coordination between the active site residues and the rest of the protein and of the energetic properties of different HIV-1 PR complexes. We analyze both the wild type form and mutated forms that induce drug resistance. In particular, the results show differences between the wild type and the mutants in their mechanism of dynamic coordination, in the signal propagation between the active site residues and the rest of the protein and in the energy-networks responsible for the stabilization of the bound inhibitor conformation. Finally, we propose a dynamic and energetic explanation for HIV-1 Protease drug resistance and, through this model, we identify a possible new site that could be helpful in the design of a new family of HIV-1 PR allosteric inhibitors. PMID:20415450

  18. The First Characterization of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance Mutations among Antiretrovirally Treated Patients in Kermanshah, Iran.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Reza; Baesi, Kazem; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Farrokhi, Molood; McFarland, Willi; Parsamajd, Shahryar

    2017-08-10

    Insufficient therapy during HIV-1 replication can promote the emergence of drug-resistant strains, reduce the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and increase the likelihood of the onward transmission of drug-resistant viruses. We characterized, for the first time, the prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance mutations in a western region of Iran. This study was conducted among 122 patients on ART at a major referral center in Kermanshah, Iran. Nested PCR was performed using RT gene-specific primers from the pol gene. Sequencing was followed by amplification and purification of the desired sequence. Subtypes and mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database. Most patients (92.6%) had subtype CRF 35-AD; 7.4% had subtype B. In total, 36.1% of the patients had at least 1 mutation associated with resistance RT inhibitors. The greatest rates of high-level resistance were observed for nevirapine (21.3%) and efavirenz (19.7%). Our results showed a high prevalence of drug resistance mutations in strains isolated from patients on treatment. At our center, we therefore recommend that genotyping be performed. This would allow the physician to prescribe appropriate drugs, reduce treatment costs, and increase the longevity and quality of life of patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. High HIV-1 Diversity and Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Antiretroviral-Naive HIV-Infected Pregnant Women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Delatorre, Edson; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Pilotto, Jose H; Morgado, Mariza G

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may reduce the efficacy of prophylactic therapy to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and future treatment options. This study evaluated the diversity and the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions of HIV-1 pol gene among 87 ARV-naive HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2012 and 2015. The viral diversity comprised HIV-1 subtypes B (67.8%), F1 (17.2%), and C (4.6%); the circulating recombinant forms 12_BF (2.3%), 28/29_BF, 39_BF, 02_AG (1.1% each) and unique recombinants forms (4.5%). The overall prevalence of any TDR was 17.2%, of which 5.7% for nucleoside RT inhibitors, 5.7% for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors, and 8% for PR inhibitors. The TDR prevalence found in this population may affect the virological outcome of the standard PMTCT ARV-regimens, reinforcing the importance of continuous monitoring.

  20. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-09-06

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79-Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3-4.8 {angstrom} in the C{alpha} atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a 'flipped-out' conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1' binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallographic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency.

  1. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    PubMed Central

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-01-01

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79–Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3–4.8 Å in the Cα atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a ‘flipped-out’ conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1′ binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallo­graphic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency. PMID:21636892

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase: resistance to diketo acid integrase inhibitors impairs HIV-1 replication and integration and confers cross-resistance to L-chicoric acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deborah J; Robinson, W E

    2004-06-01

    The diketo acids are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN). Mutations in IN, T66I, S153Y, and M154I, as well as T66I-S153Y and T66I-M154I double mutations, confer resistance to diketo acids (D. J. Hazuda et al., Science 287:646-650, 2000). The effects of these IN mutations on viral replication, enzymatic activity, and susceptibility to other HIV inhibitors are reported herein. By immunofluorescence assay and real-time PCR, all mutant viruses demonstrated a modest delay in viral spread compared to that of reference HIV. These viruses also showed a statistically significant defect in integration without defects in reverse transcription. Recombinant IN containing S153Y, T66I, and M154I-T66I mutations had an approximately twofold decrease in both disintegration and 3'-end-processing-strand transfer activities in vitro. In contrast, IN containing M154I demonstrated a greater than twofold increase in specific activity in both reactions. All mutant HIVs were resistant to l-chicoric acid, a dicaffeoyltartaric acid IN inhibitor, both in tissue culture and in biochemical assays, yet remained susceptible to the reverse transcriptase inhibitors zidovudine and nevirapine. Thus, IN mutations conferring resistance to the diketo acids can yield integration defects, attenuated catalysis in vitro, and cross-resistance to l-chicoric acid.

  3. Antiviral Activity of Bictegravir (GS-9883), a Novel Potent HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor with an Improved Resistance Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S.; Goldsmith, Joshua; Mulato, Andrew; Hansen, Derek; Kan, Elaine; Tsai, Luong; Bam, Rujuta A.; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Yant, Stephen R.; Yu, Helen; Kukolj, George; Cihlar, Tomas; Lazerwith, Scott E.; Jin, Haolun

    2016-01-01

    Bictegravir (BIC; GS-9883), a novel, potent, once-daily, unboosted inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN), specifically targets IN strand transfer activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 7.5 ± 0.3 nM) and HIV-1 integration in cells. BIC exhibits potent and selective in vitro antiretroviral activity in both T-cell lines and primary human T lymphocytes, with 50% effective concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 2.4 nM and selectivity indices up to 8,700 relative to cytotoxicity. BIC exhibits synergistic in vitro antiviral effects in pairwise combinations with tenofovir alafenamide, emtricitabine, or darunavir and maintains potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 variants resistant to other classes of antiretrovirals. BIC displayed an in vitro resistance profile that was markedly improved compared to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG), and comparable to that of dolutegravir (DTG), against nine INSTI-resistant site-directed HIV-1 mutants. BIC displayed statistically improved antiviral activity relative to EVG, RAL, and DTG against a panel of 47 patient-derived HIV-1 isolates with high-level INSTI resistance; 13 of 47 tested isolates exhibited >2-fold lower resistance to BIC than DTG. In dose-escalation experiments conducted in vitro, BIC and DTG exhibited higher barriers to resistance than EVG, selecting for HIV-1 variants with reduced phenotypic susceptibility at days 71, 87, and 20, respectively. A recombinant virus with the BIC-selected M50I/R263K dual mutations in IN exhibited only 2.8-fold reduced susceptibility to BIC compared to wild-type virus. All BIC-selected variants exhibited low to intermediate levels of cross-resistance to RAL, DTG, and EVG (<8-fold) but remained susceptible to other classes of antiretrovirals. A high barrier to in vitro resistance emergence for both BIC and DTG was also observed in viral breakthrough studies in the presence of constant clinically relevant drug concentrations. The

  4. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation.

  5. Taking a break from chemotherapy to fight drug-resistance: The cases of cancer and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hadjiandreou, Marios M; Mitsis, Georgios D

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present how optimized treatment interruptions during chemotherapy may be used to control drug-resistance, a major challenge for clinicians worldwide. Specifically, we examine resistance in cancer and HIV/AIDS. For each disease, we use mathematical models alongside real data to represent the respective complex biological phenomena and optimal control algorithms to design optimized treatment schedules aiming at controlling disease progression and patient death. In both diseases, it is shown that the key to controlling resistance is the optimal management of the frequency and magnitude of treatment interruptions as a way to facilitate the interplay between the competitive resistant/sensitive strains.

  6. The M184I/V and K65R nucleoside resistance mutations in HIV-1 prevent the emergence of resistance mutations against dolutegravir.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maureen; Ibanescu, Ruxandra I; Pham, Hanh Thi; Brenner, Bluma; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2016-09-24

    Recommended treatments for newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals now focus on the integrase strand transfer inhibitors, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG). In treatment-naive individuals, cases of RAL-based and EVG-based virological failure, although rare, are associated with the occurrence of resistance mutations in integrase and/or reverse transcriptase coding sequences. In such cases, common resistance substitutions in reverse transcriptase that were associated with nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors included M184I/V and K65R and these occurred together with various mutations in integrase. In some instances, these mutations in reverse transcriptase preceded the emergence of mutations in integrase. In contrast, no resistance substitutions in either integrase or reverse transcriptase have been observed to date in viruses isolated from treatment-naive individuals who experienced treatment failure with DTG-based regimens. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the M184I/V and K65R substitutions in reverse transcriptase on the ability of HIV-1 to become resistant against RAL, EVG or DTG. We performed tissue culture selection experiments using reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant viruses containing resistance substitutions at positions K65R, M184I or M184V in the presence of increasing concentrations of RAL, EVG or DTG and monitored changes in integrase sequences by genotyping. Selections using EVG and RAL led to the emergence of resistance mutations in integrase. In contrast, only the wild-type virus was able to acquire resistance mutations for DTG. Resistance mutations against nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors antagonized the development of HIV-1 resistance against DTG but not RAL or EVG.

  7. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance patterns in patients failing NNRTI-based treatment: results from a national survey in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Steegen, K; Bronze, M; Papathanasopoulos, M A; van Zyl, G; Goedhals, D; Variava, E; MacLeod, W; Sanne, I; Stevens, W S; Carmona, S

    2017-01-01

    Routine HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance testing for patients failing NNRTI-based regimens is not recommended in resource-limited settings. Therefore, surveys are required to monitor resistance profiles in patients failing ART. A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst patients failing NNRTI-based regimens in the public sector throughout South Africa. Virological failure was defined as two consecutive HIV-1 viral load results >1000 RNA copies/mL. Pol sequences were obtained using RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing and submitted to Stanford HIVdb v7.0.1. A total of 788 sequences were available for analysis. Most patients failed a tenofovir-based NRTI backbone (74.4%) in combination with efavirenz (82.1%) after median treatment duration of 36 months. K103N (48.9%) and V106M (34.9%) were the most common NNRTI mutations. Only one-third of patients retained full susceptibility to second-generation NNRTIs such as etravirine (36.5%) and rilpivirine (27.3%). After M184V/I (82.7%), K65R was the most common NRTI mutation (45.8%). The prevalence of K65R increased to 57.5% in patients failing a tenofovir regimen without prior stavudine exposure. Cross-resistance to NRTIs was often observed, but did not seem to affect the predicted activity of zidovudine as 82.9% of patients remained fully susceptible to this drug. The introduction of tenofovir-based first-line regimens has dramatically increased the prevalence of K65R mutations in the HIV-1-infected South African population. However, most patients failing tenofovir-based regimens remained fully susceptible to zidovudine. Based on these data, there is currently no need to change either the recommended first- or second-line ART regimens in South Africa. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus associated with antiretroviral use in HIV-infected patients: pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo

    2008-09-01

    The contribution of current antiretroviral treatment regimens to the long-term survival of HIV-infected individuals is accompanied by increased risk of glucose metabolism abnormalities in this patient population. The risk of insulin resistance and diabetes in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment stems from 2 sources: exposure to the same environmental factors that have led to an increased incidence of these conditions in the general population and the negative effects on glucose metabolism inherent to components of antiretroviral treatment regimens. This article reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of insulin resistance and diabetes and the contribution of components of antiretroviral therapy regimens to increased risk for these conditions. Optimization of antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV-infected patients with or at increased risk for development of abnormalities in glucose metabolism is discussed.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pharmacogenomics in clinical practice: relevance of HIV-1 drug resistance testing (Part 1).

    PubMed

    Patarca, Roberto; Isava, Alejandro; Campo, Rafael; Rodriguez, Nelson J; Nunez, Enriqueta; Alter, Michael; Marchette, Margaret; Sanabia, Mirtha M; Mitchell, Charles; Rivera, Delia; Scott, Gwendolyn; Jayaweera, Dushyantha; Moreno, Jose; Boulanger, Catherine; Kolber, Michael; Mask, Cindy W; Sierra, Eduardo Meneses; Vallejo, Ricardo; Page, J Brian; Klimas, Nancy G; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    Throughout most of the past century, physicians could offer patients no treatments for infections caused by viruses. The experience with treatment of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has changed the way healthcare workers deal with viral infections and has triggered a growing rate of discovery and use of antiviral agents, the first fruits of the expanding genomics revolution. HIV treatment also provides an informative paradigm for pharmacogenomics because control of infection and its consequences is limited by the development of viral drug resistance and by host factors. This report summarizes studies published to date on the significance of testing of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The only Food and Drug Administration-approved kit for HIV drug resistance testing by genotypic sequencing is commercially available through Visible Genetics, Inc. Genotyping sequencing alone is most likely an adequate test to assist in the therapeutic decision-making process for previous regimen failure, for treatment-naïve patients in areas of high prevalence of transmitted resistant virus, and for pregnant women. However, in exceptional cases of highly complex mutation patterns and extensive cross-resistance, it may be useful to obtain a phenotype test, because that result may more easily identify drugs to which virus is least resistant. There are no published clinical trials results on the usefulness of the so-called virtual phenotype over genotypic sequencing alone. Not only has the paradigm of viral pharmacogenomics in the form of HIV genotypic sequencing been useful in treating other viral diseases, but it is also important to the real-life implementation of the growing discipline ofgenomics or molecular medicine. The application of this paradigm to the thousands of potential therapeutic targets that have become available through the various human genome projects will certainly gradually change the landscape of diagnosis and management of many diseases

  10. Temporal Patterns and Drug Resistance in CSF Viral Escape Among ART-Experienced HIV-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Misra, Vikas; Lorenz, David; Cervantes-Arslanian, Anna M.; Lyons, Jennifer; Chalkias, Spyridon; Wurcel, Alysse; Burke, Deirdre; Venna, Nagagopal; Morgello, Susan; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral escape is an increasingly recognized clinical event among HIV-1-infected adults. We analyzed longitudinal data and drug-resistance mutations to characterize profiles of HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy with discordant CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: Forty-one cases of CSF escape defined as detectable CSF HIV-1 RNA when plasma levels were undetectable, or HIV-1 RNA >0.5-log higher in CSF than plasma were identified from Boston Hospitals and National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium (NNTC) from 2005 to 2016. Results: Estimated prevalence of CSF escape in Boston and NNTC cohorts was 6.0% and 6.8%, respectively; median age was 50, duration of HIV-1 infection 17 years, CD4 count 329 cells/mm3 and CD4 nadir 21 cells/mm3. Neurological symptoms were present in 30 cases; 4 had repeat episodes of CSF escape. Cases were classified into subtypes based plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in the preceding 24 months: high-level viremia (1000 copies/mL), low-level viremia (LLV: 51–999 copies/mL), and plasma suppression with CSF blip or escape (CSF RNA <200 or ≥200 copies/mL). High-level viremia cases reported more substance abuse, whereas LLV or plasma suppression cases were more neurosymptomatic (81% vs. 53%); 75% of repeat CSF escape cases were classified LLV. M184V/I mutations were identified in 74% of CSF samples when plasma levels were ≤50 copies per milliliter. Conclusions: Characteristics frequently observed in CSF escape include HIV-1 infection >15 years, previous LLV, and M184V/I mutations in CSF. Classification based on preceding plasma HIV RNA levels provides a useful conceptual framework to identify causal factors and test therapeutics. PMID:28328546

  11. A genome-wide association study of resistance to HIV infection in highly exposed uninfected individuals with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; McLaren, Paul J.; Dorrell, Lucy; Shianna, Kevin V.; Stemke, Amanda; Pelak, Kimberly; Moore, Stephen; Oldenburg, Johannes; Alvarez-Roman, Maria Teresa; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Boehlen, Francoise; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H.B.; Brand, Brigit; Brown, Deborah; Chiang, Elaine; Cid-Haro, Ana Rosa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Collins, Peter; Colombo, Sara; Dalmau, Judith; Fogarty, Patrick; Giangrande, Paul; Gringeri, Alessandro; Iyer, Rathi; Katsarou, Olga; Kempton, Christine; Kuriakose, Philip; Lin, Judith; Makris, Mike; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Tsakiris, Dimitrios A.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Neff, Anne; Oka, Shinichi; Oyesiku, Lara; Parra, Rafael; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Powell, Jerry; Recht, Michael; Shapiro, Amy; Stine, Kimo; Talks, Katherine; Telenti, Amalio; Wilde, Jonathan; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Martinson, Jeremy; Hussain, Shehnaz K.; Bream, Jay H.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Carrington, Mary; Goedert, James J.; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Goldstein, David B.; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic variation contributes to differences in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To search for novel host resistance factors, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in hemophilia patients highly exposed to potentially contaminated factor VIII infusions. Individuals with hemophilia A and a documented history of factor VIII infusions before the introduction of viral inactivation procedures (1979–1984) were recruited from 36 hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and their genome-wide genetic variants were compared with those from matched HIV-infected individuals. Homozygous carriers of known CCR5 resistance mutations were excluded. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inferred copy number variants (CNVs) were tested using logistic regression. In addition, we performed a pathway enrichment analysis, a heritability analysis, and a search for epistatic interactions with CCR5 Δ32 heterozygosity. A total of 560 HIV-uninfected cases were recruited: 36 (6.4%) were homozygous for CCR5 Δ32 or m303. After quality control and SNP imputation, we tested 1 081 435 SNPs and 3686 CNVs for association with HIV-1 serostatus in 431 cases and 765 HIV-infected controls. No SNP or CNV reached genome-wide significance. The additional analyses did not reveal any strong genetic effect. Highly exposed, yet uninfected hemophiliacs form an ideal study group to investigate host resistance factors. Using a genome-wide approach, we did not detect any significant associations between SNPs and HIV-1 susceptibility, indicating that common genetic variants of major effect are unlikely to explain the observed resistance phenotype in this population. PMID:23372042

  12. HIV drug resistance testing among patients failing second line antiretroviral therapy. Comparison of in-house and commercial sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chimukangara, Benjamin; Varyani, Bhavini; Shamu, Tinei; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Manasa, Justen; White, Elizabeth; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Luethy, Ruedi; Katzenstein, David

    2017-05-01

    HIV genotyping is often unavailable in low and middle-income countries due to infrastructure requirements and cost. We compared genotype resistance testing in patients with virologic failure, by amplification of HIV pol gene, followed by "in-house" sequencing and commercial sequencing. Remnant plasma samples from adults and children failing second-line ART were amplified and sequenced using in-house and commercial di-deoxysequencing, and analyzed in Harare, Zimbabwe and at Stanford, U.S.A, respectively. HIV drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV drug resistance database. Twenty-six of 28 samples were amplified and 25 were successfully genotyped. Comparison of average percent nucleotide and amino acid identities between 23 pairs sequenced in both laboratories were 99.51 (±0.56) and 99.11 (±0.95), respectively. All pairs clustered together in phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing analysis identified 6/23 pairs with mutation discordances resulting in differences in phenotype, but these did not impact future regimens. The results demonstrate our ability to produce good quality drug resistance data in-house. Despite discordant mutations in some sequence pairs, the phenotypic predictions were not clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Incompatible Natures of the HIV-1 Envelope in Resistance to the CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc and to Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Enomoto, Ikumi; Baba, Masanori; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2015-11-02

    Cenicriviroc is a CCR5 antagonist which prevents human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from cellular entry. The CCR5-binding regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are important targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), and mutations conferring cenicriviroc resistance may therefore affect sensitivity to NAbs. Here, we used the in vitro induction of HIV-1 variants resistant to cenicriviroc or NAbs to examine the relationship between resistance to cenicriviroc and resistance to NAbs. The cenicriviroc-resistant variant KK652-67 (strain KK passaged 67 times in the presence of increasing concentrations of cenicriviroc) was sensitive to neutralization by NAbs against the V3 loop, the CD4-induced (CD4i) region, and the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), whereas the wild-type (WT) parental HIV-1 strain KKWT from which cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 was obtained was resistant to these NAbs. The V3 region of KK652-67 was important for cenicriviroc resistance and critical to the high sensitivity of the V3, CD4i, and CD4bs epitopes to NAbs. Moreover, induction of variants resistant to anti-V3 NAb 0.5γ and anti-CD4i NAb 4E9C from cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 resulted in reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype comparable to that of the parental strain, KKWT. Resistance to 0.5γ and 4E9C was caused by the novel substitutions R315K, G324R, and E381K in the V3 and C3 regions near the substitutions conferring cenicriviroc resistance. Importantly, these amino acid changes in the CCR5-binding region were also responsible for reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype. These results suggest the presence of key amino acid residues where resistance to cenicriviroc is incompatible with resistance to NAbs. This implies that cenicriviroc and neutralizing antibodies may restrict the emergence of variants resistant to each other.

  14. Incompatible Natures of the HIV-1 Envelope in Resistance to the CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc and to Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Ikumi; Baba, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cenicriviroc is a CCR5 antagonist which prevents human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from cellular entry. The CCR5-binding regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are important targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), and mutations conferring cenicriviroc resistance may therefore affect sensitivity to NAbs. Here, we used the in vitro induction of HIV-1 variants resistant to cenicriviroc or NAbs to examine the relationship between resistance to cenicriviroc and resistance to NAbs. The cenicriviroc-resistant variant KK652-67 (strain KK passaged 67 times in the presence of increasing concentrations of cenicriviroc) was sensitive to neutralization by NAbs against the V3 loop, the CD4-induced (CD4i) region, and the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), whereas the wild-type (WT) parental HIV-1 strain KKWT from which cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 was obtained was resistant to these NAbs. The V3 region of KK652-67 was important for cenicriviroc resistance and critical to the high sensitivity of the V3, CD4i, and CD4bs epitopes to NAbs. Moreover, induction of variants resistant to anti-V3 NAb 0.5γ and anti-CD4i NAb 4E9C from cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 resulted in reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype comparable to that of the parental strain, KKWT. Resistance to 0.5γ and 4E9C was caused by the novel substitutions R315K, G324R, and E381K in the V3 and C3 regions near the substitutions conferring cenicriviroc resistance. Importantly, these amino acid changes in the CCR5-binding region were also responsible for reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype. These results suggest the presence of key amino acid residues where resistance to cenicriviroc is incompatible with resistance to NAbs. This implies that cenicriviroc and neutralizing antibodies may restrict the emergence of variants resistant to each other. PMID:26525792

  15. Nevirapine-Resistant HIV-1 DNA in Breast Milk After Single-Dose Nevirapine With or Without Zidovudine for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Payant, Rachel; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Micek, Mark A.; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A.; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Matediana, Eduardo; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Among 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected women who received single-dose nevirapine (NVP), 17 (57%) had NVP-resistant HIV-1 detected in breast milk. NVP resistance in breast milk persisted for at least 8 months postpartum and was apparently transmitted to at least 1 infant. NVP resistance was detected less often in women who also received zidovudine. PMID:23687579

  16. Intrapartum tenofovir and emtricitabine reduces low-concentration drug resistance selected by single-dose nevirapine for perinatal HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Chi, Benjamin H; Ellis, Giovanina M; Chintu, Namwinga; Cantrell, Ronald A; Sinkala, Moses; Aldrovandi, Grace M; Warrier, Ranjit; Mbewe, Felistas; Nakamura, Kyle; Stringer, Elizabeth M; Frenkel, Lisa M; Stringer, Jeffrey S A

    2009-11-01

    A single dose of tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) during labor significantly reduces peripartum nevirapine-associated viral drug resistance when measured by consensus HIV sequencing. It is unknown whether this effect extends to HIV subpopulations of <25-50%. We conducted a randomized trial of single-dose TDF/FTC added to peripartum nevirapine to reduce drug resistance associated with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). To detect mutations for NNRTIs comprising > or = 2% of the viral population, we used an oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) at codons 103, 106, 181, and 190 of HIV reverse transcriptase. To assess development of drug resistance mutations to our study intervention, OLA was also performed at codons 65 and 184. Among the 328 women included in the 2-week analysis, those receiving TDF/FTC were less likely to have NNRTI resistance by OLA (RR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.77). A similar trend was observed among the 315 women included in the 6-week analysis (RR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.31-0.66). Only two (1%) specimens had detectable K65R by OLA. Both were at 6 weeks postpartum; one was detected in the intervention arm and one in the control arm (p = 0.96). M184V was not detected. The ability of single-dose TDF/FTC to protect against peripartum NVP-induced NNRTI resistance extends to minority populations. This efficacy is achieved without significant selection of TDF- or FTC-resistant viruses.

  17. Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Containing a Bicyclic P2 Functional Moiety, Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydrofuran, That Are Potent against Multi-PI-Resistant HIV-1 Variants▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Koh, Yasuhiro; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Das, Debananda; Leschenko, Sofiya; Chapsal, Bruno; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We identified GRL-1388 and -1398, potent nonpeptidic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) containing a bicyclic P2 functional moiety, tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF). GRL-1388 was as potent as darunavir (DRV) against various drug-resistant HIV-1 laboratory strains with 50% effective concentration (EC50s) of 2.6 to 32.6 nM. GRL-1398 was significantly more potent against such variants than DRV with EC50s of 0.1 to 5.7 nM. GRL-1388 and -1398 were also potent against multiple-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants (CLHIV-1MDR) with EC50s ranging from 2.7 to 21.3 nM and from 0.3 to 4.8 nM, respectively. A highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant selected in vitro remained susceptible to GRL-1398 with the EC50 of 21.9 nM, while the EC50 of DRV was 214.1 nM. When HIV-1NL4-3 was selected with GRL-1398, four amino acid substitutions—leucine to phenylalanine at a position 10 (L10F), A28S, L33F, and M46I—emerged, ultimately enabling the virus to replicate in the presence of >1.0 μM the compound beyond 57 weeks of selection. When a mixture of 10 different CLHIV-1MDR strains was selected, the emergence of resistant variants was more substantially delayed with GRL-1398 than with GRL-1388 and DRV. Modeling analyses revealed that GRL-1398 had greater overall hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions than GRL-1388 and DRV and that GRL-1388 and -1398 had hydrogen bonding interactions with the main chain of the active-site amino acids (Asp29 and Asp30) of protease. The present findings warrant that GRL-1398 be further developed as a potential drug for treating individuals with HIV-1 infection. PMID:21282450

  18. Combinations of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitors can be synergistic in vitro against drug-sensitive and RT inhibitor-resistant molecular clones of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Beale, K K; Robinson, W E

    2000-06-01

    Combinations of anti-HIV agents including one or two reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a protease inhibitor are potent and effective. However, toxicities, costs and the emergence of drug-resistant organisms have compromised their long-term efficacy in people. A next, likely, target for anti-HIV therapy is HIV-1 integrase. Viral integration, catalyzed by integrase, is absolutely required for HIV replication. L-chicoric acid is a potent and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase that also inhibits HIV-1 replication in cell culture. As a first step in understanding the potential role for integrase inhibitors in clinical medicine, the activities of L-chicoric acid alone and in combination with 2', 3'-dideoxycytidine, zidovudine, and a protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, were tested in vitro against molecular clones of HIV-1 resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. L-chicoric acid was equally effective against a wild-type clone of HIV-1, HIV(NL4-3), or against HIV-1 resistant to either zidovudine or dideoxycytidine. L-chicoric acid was largely synergistic with zidovudine and synergistic with both dideoxycytidine and nelfinavir.

  19. The Geographic Spread of the CCR5 Δ32 HIV-Resistance Allele

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Alison P; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2005-01-01

    The Δ32 mutation at the CCR5 locus is a well-studied example of natural selection acting in humans. The mutation is found principally in Europe and western Asia, with higher frequencies generally in the north. Homozygous carriers of the Δ32 mutation are resistant to HIV-1 infection because the mutation prevents functional expression of the CCR5 chemokine receptor normally used by HIV-1 to enter CD4+ T cells. HIV has emerged only recently, but population genetic data strongly suggest Δ32 has been under intense selection for much of its evolutionary history. To understand how selection and dispersal have interacted during the history of the Δ32 allele, we implemented a spatially explicit model of the spread of Δ32. The model includes the effects of sampling, which we show can give rise to local peaks in observed allele frequencies. In addition, we show that with modest gradients in selection intensity, the origin of the Δ32 allele may be relatively far from the current areas of highest allele frequency. The geographic distribution of the Δ32 allele is consistent with previous reports of a strong selective advantage (>10%) for Δ32 carriers and of dispersal over relatively long distances (>100 km/generation). When selection is assumed to be uniform across Europe and western Asia, we find support for a northern European origin and long-range dispersal consistent with the Viking-mediated dispersal of Δ32 proposed by G. Lucotte and G. Mercier. However, when we allow for gradients in selection intensity, we estimate the origin to be outside of northern Europe and selection intensities to be strongest in the northwest. Our results describe the evolutionary history of the Δ32 allele and establish a general methodology for studying the geographic distribution of selected alleles. PMID:16216086

  20. Performance of Celera RUO integrase resistance assay across multiple HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Carole L; Viana, Raquel V; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Silva de Jesus, Carlos; Zeh, Clement; Halvas, Elias K; Mellors, John W

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 sequence variation is a major obstacle to developing molecular based assays for multiple subtypes. This study sought to independently assess performance characteristics of the ViroSeq™ HIV-1 Integrase RUO Genotyping Kit (Celera, US) for samples of multiple different HIV-1 subtypes. 264 samples were tested in the validation, 106 from integrase inhibitor naïve patients' sent for routine HIV-1 drug resistance testing after failing a 1st- or 2nd-line regimen, and 158 samples from an external virology quality assurance program (VQA). For the latter, 53 unique VQA samples were tested in two to five different laboratories to assess assay reproducibility. For all assays, viral RNA was extracted using the ViroSeq extraction module, reverse transcribed, and amplified in a one-step reaction. Four sequencing primers were used to span codons 1-288 of integrase. The Rega subtyping tool was used for subtype assignment. Integrase polymorphisms and mutations were determined as differences from the HXB2 sequence and by the Stanford database, respectively. Sequences obtained from the different laboratories were aligned and sequence homology determined. HIV-1 RNA in the 264 samples ranged from 3.15 to 6.74logcopies/ml. Successful amplification was obtained for 97% of samples (n=256). The 8 samples that failed to amplify were subtype D (n=3), subtype C (n=1), CRF01_AE (n=1), subtype A1 (n=2), and an unassigned subtype (n=1). Of the 256 that successfully amplified samples, 203 (79%) were successfully sequenced with bidirectional coverage. Of the 53 unsuccessful samples, 13 (5%) failed sequencing and 40 (16%) did not have full bidirectional sequence, as a result of failure of sequencing primers: Primer A (n=1); Primer B (n=18); Primer C (n=1); Primer D (n=7) or short sequences (n=16). For the 135 VQA samples (30 unique samples) that were assayed by different laboratories, homology of the sequences obtained ranged from 92.1% to 100%. However, Laboratory 2 detected more mixtures

  1. HIV-1 Phenotypic Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Drug Resistance Test Interpretation Is Not Dependent on the Subtype of the Virus Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michelle; Steegen, Kim; Wallis, Carole L.; De Wolf, Hans; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Van Houtte, Margriet; Stevens, Wendy S.; de Wit, Tobias Rinke; Stuyver, Lieven J.

    2012-01-01

    To date, the majority of HIV-1 phenotypic resistance testing has been performed with subtype B virus backbones (e.g. HXB2). However, the relevance of using this backbone to determine resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1 viruses still needs to be assessed. From 114 HIV-1 subtype C clinical samples (36 ARV-naïve, 78 ARV-exposed), pol amplicons were produced and analyzed for phenotypic resistance using both a subtype B- and C-backbone in which the pol fragment was deleted. Phenotypic resistance was assessed in resulting recombinant virus stocks (RVS) for a series of antiretroviral drugs (ARV's) and expressed as fold change (FC), yielding 1660 FC comparisons. These Antivirogram® derived FC values were categorized as having resistant or sensitive susceptibility based on biological cut-off values (BCOs). The concordance between resistance calls obtained for the same clinical sample but derived from two different backbones (i.e. B and C) accounted for 86.1% (1429/1660) of the FC comparisons. However, when taking the assay variability into account, 95.8% (1590/1660) of the phenotypic data could be considered as being concordant with respect to their resistance call. No difference in the capacity to detect resistance associated with M184V, K103N and V106M mutations was noted between the two backbones. The following was concluded: (i) A high level of concordance was shown between the two backbone phenotypic resistance profiles; (ii) Assay variability is largely responsible for discordant results (i.e. for FC values close to BCO); (iii) Confidence intervals should be given around the BCO's, when assessing resistance in HIV-1 subtype C; (iv) No systematic resistance under- or overcalling of subtype C amplicons in the B-backbone was observed; (v) Virus backbone subtype sequence variability outside the pol region does not contribute to phenotypic FC values. In conclusion the HXB2 virus backbone remains an acceptable vector for phenotyping HIV-1 subtype C pol amplicons. PMID

  2. Prevalence of Drug-Resistant Minority Variants in Untreated HIV-1-Infected Individuals With and Those Without Transmitted Drug Resistance Detected by Sanger Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Dana S; Zhou, Shuntai; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Pinsky, Benjamin A; Jeffrey Fessel, W; Klein, Daniel B; Spielvogel, Ean; Holmes, Susan P; Hurley, Leo B; Silverberg, Michael J; Swanstrom, Ronald; Shafer, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    Minority variant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutations are associated with an increased risk of virological failure during treatment with NNRTI-containing regimens. To determine whether individuals to whom variants with isolated NNRTI-associated drug resistance were transmitted are at increased risk of virological failure during treatment with a non-NNRTI-containing regimen, we identified minority variant resistance mutations in 33 individuals with isolated NNRTI-associated transmitted drug resistance and 49 matched controls. We found similar proportions of overall and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated minority variant resistance mutations in both groups, suggesting that isolated NNRTI-associated transmitted drug resistance may not be a risk factor for virological failure during treatment with a non-NNRTI-containing regimen. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Prevalence of drug resistance among HIV-1 treatment-naive patients in Greece during 2003-2015: Transmitted drug resistance is due to onward transmissions.

    PubMed

    Paraskevis, D; Kostaki, E; Magiorkinis, G; Gargalianos, P; Xylomenos, G; Magiorkinis, E; Lazanas, M; Chini, M; Nikolopoulos, G; Skoutelis, A; Papastamopoulos, V; Antoniadou, A; Papadopoulos, A; Psichogiou, M; Daikos, G L; Oikonomopoulou, M; Zavitsanou, A; Chrysos, G; Paparizos, V; Kourkounti, S; Sambatakou, H; Sipsas, N V; Lada, M; Panagopoulos, P; Maltezos, E; Drimis, S; Hatzakis, A

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance among treatment-naïve patients ranges between 8.3% and 15% in Europe and North America. Previous studies showed that subtypes A and B were the most prevalent in the Greek HIV-1 epidemic. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of resistance among drug naïve patients in Greece and to investigate the levels of transmission networking among those carrying resistant strains. HIV-1 sequences were determined from 3428 drug naïve HIV-1 patients, in Greece sampled during 01/01/2003-30/6/2015. Transmission clusters were estimated by means of phylogenetic analysis including as references sequences from patients failing antiretroviral treatment in Greece and sequences sampled globally. The proportion of sequences with SDRMs was 5.98% (n=205). The most prevalent SDRMs were found for NNRTIs (3.76%), followed by N(t)RTIs (2.28%) and PIs (1.02%). The resistance prevalence was 22.2% based on all mutations associated with resistance estimated using the HIVdb resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (16.9%) followed by PIs (4.9%) and N(t)RTIs (2.8%). The most frequently observed NNRTI resistant mutations were E138A (7.7%), E138Q (4.0%), K103N (2.3%) and V179D (1.3%). The majority of subtype A sequences (89.7%; 245 out of 273) with the dominant NNRTI resistance mutations (E138A, K103N, E138Q, V179D) were found to belong to monophyletic clusters suggesting regional dispersal. For subtype B, 68.1% (139 out of 204) of resistant strains (E138A, K103N, E138Q V179D) belonged to clusters. For N(t)RTI-resistance, evidence for regional dispersal was found for 27.3% and 21.6% of subtype A and B sequences, respectively. The TDR rate based on the prevalence of SDRM is lower than the average rate in Europe. However, the prevalence of NNRTI resistance estimated using the HIVdb approach, is high in Greece and it is mostly due to onward transmissions among drug-naïve patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Between 22 November 2