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Sample records for subsp tularensis clades

  1. Multiple Francisella tularensis subspecies and clades, tularemia outbreak, Utah.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jeannine M; Carlson, Jennifer K; Dietrich, Gabrielle; Eisen, Rebecca J; Coombs, Jana; Janusz, Aimee M; Summers, Jodee; Beard, C Ben; Mead, Paul S

    2008-12-01

    In July 2007, a deer fly-associated outbreak of tularemia occurred in Utah. Human infections were caused by 2 clades (A1 and A2) of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis. Lagomorph carcasses from the area yielded evidence of infection with A1 and A2, as well as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica. These findings indicate that multiple subspecies and clades can cause disease in a localized outbreak of tularemia. PMID:19046524

  2. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Group A.I, United States

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Johansson, Anders; Öhrman, Caroline; Kaufman, Emily; Molins, Claudia; Pearson, Talima; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Naumann, Amber; Vogler, Amy J.; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Larsson, Pär; Forsman, Mats; Sjödin, Andreas; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James; Petersen, Jeannine M.; Keim, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We used whole-genome analysis and subsequent characterization of geographically diverse strains using new genetic signatures to identify distinct subgroups within Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I: A.I.3, A.I.8, and A.I.12. These subgroups exhibit complex phylogeographic patterns within North America. The widest distribution was observed for A.I.12, which suggests an adaptive advantage. PMID:24755401

  3. Septic pneumonic tularaemia caused by Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica biovar II.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, Joerg; Splettstoesser, Wolf D

    2010-09-01

    This case of pneumonic tularaemia elucidates two aspects: it is believed to be the first documented case of bacteraemia caused by Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica biovar II; furthermore, it illustrates the remission of septic pneumonic tularaemia without appropriate anti-infective therapy. A blood culture from a patient with community-acquired pneumonia was found to be positive for F. tularensis subsp. holarctica biovar II after 10 days of cultivation. Meanwhile, the patient had been treated with ceftriaxone, followed by sultamicillin and clindamycin. The patient continued suffering from fever of up to 40.7 degrees C and rising C-reactive protein (CRP) for 4 days before the fever and CRP declined. The isolated strain was later tested and found to be resistant to the antibiotics used. The present case underlines that F. tularensis subsp. holarctica infections may cause severe symptoms but mostly have a favourable outcome.

  4. Glycosylation of DsbA in Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rebecca M.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Tessier, Luc; Kilmury, Sara L. N.; Ding, Wen; Harmer, Nicholas; Michell, Stephen L.; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Titball, Richard W.; Prior, Joann L.

    2011-01-01

    In Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, DsbA has been shown to be an essential virulence factor and has been observed to migrate to multiple protein spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. In this work, we show that the protein is modified with a 1,156-Da glycan moiety in O-linkage. The results of mass spectrometry studies suggest that the glycan is a hexasaccharide, comprised of N-acetylhexosamines, hexoses, and an unknown monosaccharide. Disruption of two genes within the FTT0789-FTT0800 putative polysaccharide locus, including a galE homologue (FTT0791) and a putative glycosyltransferase (FTT0798), resulted in loss of glycan modification of DsbA. The F. tularensis subsp. tularensis ΔFTT0798 and ΔFTT0791::Cm mutants remained virulent in the murine model of subcutaneous tularemia. This indicates that glycosylation of DsbA does not play a major role in virulence under these conditions. This is the first report of the detailed characterization of the DsbA glycan and putative role of the FTT0789-FTT0800 gene cluster in glycan biosynthesis. PMID:21803994

  5. Hare-to-Human Transmission of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Peter; Kohlmann, Rebekka; Müller, Wolfgang; Julich, Sandra; Geis, Gabriele; Gatermann, Sören G.; Peters, Martin; Wolf, Peter Johannes; Karlsson, Edvin; Forsman, Mats; Myrtennäs, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    In November 2012, a group of 7 persons who participated in a hare hunt in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, acquired tularemia. Two F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates were cultivated from human and hare biopsy material. Both isolates belonged to the FTN002–00 genetic subclade (derived for single nucleotide polymorphisms B.10 and B.18), thus indicating likely hare-to-human transmission. PMID:25531286

  6. Comparison of bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard; Runge, Martin; Eisenberg, Tobias; Braune, Silke; Müller, Wolfgang; Otto, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Detection of the zoonotic pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica (EF tularensis) in wild animals with culture techniques as well as polymerase chain reaction were compared and discussed on the basis of the investigation of 60 animals. The samples originated from 55 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus), two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and one each from a wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a European beaver (Castor fiber), and a lemur (Lemur catta). When comparing the growth of 28 F. tularensis isolates on the cysteine blood agar and the modified Martin-Lewis-agar used in this study, cultivation was successful for 26 isolates on both media, but for two isolates only on the cysteine blood agar. Out of 43 carcasses 19 tested positive in bacteriological culture and PCR. Two culture positive samples of tonsils originating from foxes could not be confirmed by PCR, although PCR was positive in 22 samples that missed growth of F. tularensis. Comparative studies on cultural detection of E. tularensis were performed on samples of 16 hares from lung, spleen, liver and gut and in one case with a peritoneal swab. In at least one of these localizations cultivation of the pathogen was successful. Detection rate was reduced to 94% (15 of 16 hares) considering only the results of the cultures of the lungs and spleens. For a sensitive and rapid detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, the PCR is a suitable method thereby avoiding hazardous multiplying of the pathogen. However, cultivation of F. tularensis is often a prerequisite for further studies on antibiotic resistance patterns of the pathogen, molecular epidemiological and pathological analyses of tularaemia.

  7. Deletion of IglH in virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200 strain results in attenuation and provides protection against the challenge with the parental strain.

    PubMed

    Straskova, Adela; Cerveny, Lukas; Spidlova, Petra; Dankova, Vera; Belcic, Davor; Santic, Marina; Stulik, Jiri

    2012-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen with no licensed vaccine available today. The recent search for genome sequences involved in F. tularensis virulence mechanisms led to the identification of the 30-kb region defined as a Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI). In our previous iTRAQ study we described the concerted upregulation of some FPI proteins in different F. tularensis strains cultivated under stress conditions. Among them we identified the IglH protein whose role in Francisella virulence has not been characterized yet. In this work we deleted the iglH gene in a European clinical isolate of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200. We showed that the iglH gene is necessary for intracellular growth and escape of F. tularensis from phagosomes. We also showed that the iglH mutant is avirulent in a mouse model of infection and persists in the organs for about three weeks after infection. Importantly, mice vaccinated by infection with the iglH mutant were protected against subcutaneous challenge with the fully virulent parental FSC200 strain. This is the first report of a defined subsp. holarctica FPI deletion strain that provides protective immunity against subsequent subcutaneous challenge with a virulent isolate of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica.

  8. FipB, an Essential Virulence Factor of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, Has Dual Roles in Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Aiping; Zhang, Yan; Clark, Melinda E.; Rabideau, Meaghan M.; Millan Barea, Luis R.

    2014-01-01

    FipB, an essential virulence factor of Francisella tularensis, is a lipoprotein with two conserved domains that have similarity to disulfide bond formation A (DsbA) proteins and the amino-terminal dimerization domain of macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) proteins, which are proteins with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. This combination of conserved domains is unusual, so we further characterized the enzymatic activity and the importance of the Mip domain and lipid modification in virulence. Unlike typical DsbA proteins, which are oxidases, FipB exhibited both oxidase and isomerase activities. FipA, which also shares similarity with Mip proteins, potentiated the isomerase activity of FipB in an in vitro assay and within the bacteria, as measured by increased copper sensitivity. To determine the importance of the Mip domain and lipid modification of FipB, mutants producing FipB proteins that lacked either the Mip domain or the critical cysteine necessary for lipid modification were constructed. Both strains replicated within host cells and retained virulence in mice, though there was some attenuation. FipB formed surface-exposed dimers that were sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT), dependent on the Mip domain and on at least one cysteine in the active site of the DsbA-like domain. However, these dimers were not essential for virulence, because the Mip deletion mutant, which failed to form dimers, was still able to replicate intracellularly and retained virulence in mice. Thus, the Mip domains of FipB and FipA impart additional isomerase functionality to FipB, but only the DsbA-like domain and oxidase activity are essential for its critical virulence functions. PMID:25092026

  9. Phylogeographical pattern of Francisella tularensis in a nationwide outbreak of tularaemia in Norway, 2011.

    PubMed

    Afset, J E; Larssen, K W; Bergh, K; Larkeryd, A; Sjodin, A; Johansson, A; Forsman, M

    2015-05-14

    In 2011, a nationwide outbreak of tularaemia occurred in Norway with 180 recorded cases. It was associated with the largest peak in lemming density seen in 40 years. Francisella tularensis was isolated from 18 patients. To study the geographical distribution of F.tularensis genotypes in Norway and correlate genotype with epidemiology and clinical presentation,we performed whole genome sequencing of patient isolates. All 18 genomes from the outbreak carried genetic signatures of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica and were assigned to genetic clades using canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms. Ten isolates were assigned to major genetic clade B.6 (subclade B.7),seven to clade B.12, and one to clade B.4. The B.6 subclade B.7 was most common in southern and central Norway, while clade B.12 was evenly distributed between the southern, central and northern parts of the country. There was no association between genotype and clinical presentation of tularaemia, time of year or specimen type. We found extensive sequence similarity with F. tularensis subsp. holarctica genomes from high-endemic tularaemia areas in Sweden.Finding nearly identical genomes across large geographical distances in Norway and Sweden imply a life cycle of the bacterium without replication between the outbreaks and raise new questions about long-range migration mechanisms.

  10. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Induces a Unique Pulmonary Inflammatory Response: Role of Bacterial Gene Expression in Temporal Regulation of Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Olsufka, Rachael; Kuestner, Rolf E.; Cho, Ji Hoon; Li, Hong; Zornetzer, Gregory A.; Wang, Kai; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Ozinsky, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4). Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis) and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways. PMID:23690939

  11. Perforin- and Granzyme-Mediated Cytotoxic Effector Functions Are Essential for Protection against Francisella tularensis following Vaccination by the Defined F. tularensis subsp. novicida ΔfopC Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Li, Weidang; Guentzel, M. Neal; Chambers, James P.; Klose, Karl E.

    2012-01-01

    A licensed vaccine against Francisella tularensis is currently not available. Two Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida (herein referred to by its earlier name, Francisella novicida) attenuated strains, the ΔiglB and ΔfopC strains, have previously been evaluated as potential vaccine candidates against pneumonic tularemia in experimental animals. F. novicida ΔiglB, a Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) mutant, is deficient in phagosomal escape and intracellular growth, whereas F. novicida ΔfopC, lacking the outer membrane lipoprotein FopC, which is required for evasion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-mediated signaling, is able to escape and replicate in the cytosol. To dissect the difference in protective immune mechanisms conferred by these two vaccine strains, we examined the efficacy of the F. novicida ΔiglB and ΔfopC mutants against pulmonary live-vaccine-strain (LVS) challenge and found that both strains provided comparable protection in wild-type, major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) knockout, and MHC II knockout mice. However, F. novicida ΔfopC-vaccinated but not F. novicida ΔiglB-vaccinated perforin-deficient mice were more susceptible and exhibited greater bacterial burdens than similarly vaccinated wild-type mice. Moreover, perforin produced by natural killer (NK) cells and release of granzyme contributed to inhibition of LVS replication within macrophages. This NK cell-mediated LVS inhibition was enhanced with anti-F. novicida ΔfopC immune serum, suggesting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in F. novicida ΔfopC-mediated protection. Overall, this study provides additional immunological insight into the basis for protection conferred by live attenuated F. novicida strains with different phenotypes and supports further investigation of this organism as a vaccine platform for tularemia. PMID:22493083

  12. Genomic analyses of Francisella tularensis strains confirm disease transmission from drinking water sources, Turkey, 2008, 2009 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Karadenizli, A; Forsman, M; Şimşek, H; Taner, M; Öhrman, C; Myrtennäs, K; Lärkeryd, A; Johansson, A; Özdemir, L; Sjödin, A

    2015-05-28

    Waterborne epidemics of tularaemia caused by Francisella tularensis are increasingly reported in Turkey. We have used whole genome sequencing to investigate if F. tularensis isolated from patients could be traced back to drinking water sources. Tonsil swabs from 33 patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal tularaemia in three outbreaks and 140 water specimens were analysed. F. tularensis subsp. holarctica was confirmed by microagglutination and PCR in 12 patients and five water specimens. Genomic analysis of three pairs of patient and water isolates from outbreaks in Sivas, Çorum, and Kocaeli showed the isolates to belong to two new clusters of the F. tularensis B.12 genetic clade. The clusters were defined by 19 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a multiple alignment based on 507 F. tularensis genomes. One synonymous SNP was chosen as a new canonical SNP (canSNP) for each cluster for future use in diagnostic assays. No SNP was identified between the genomes from the patient–water pair of isolates from Kocaeli, one SNP between the pair of isolates from Sivas, whereas the pair from Çorum differed at seven SNPs. These results illustrate the power of whole genome sequencing for tracing F. tularensis patient isolates back to their environmental source.

  13. The phylogeographic pattern of Francisella tularensis in Sweden indicates a Scandinavian origin of Eurosiberian tularaemia.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Edvin; Svensson, Kerstin; Lindgren, Petter; Byström, Mona; Sjödin, Andreas; Forsman, Mats; Johansson, Anders

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies of the causative agent of tularaemia, Francisella tularensis have identified phylogeographic patterns suggestive of environmental maintenance reservoirs. To investigate the phylogeography of tularaemia in Sweden, we selected 163 clinical isolates obtained during 1995-2009 in 10 counties and sequenced one isolate's genome to identify new genetic markers. An improved typing scheme based on two indels and nine SNPs was developed using hydrolysis or TaqMan MGB probe assays. The results showed that much of the known global genetic diversity of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica is present in Sweden. Thirteen of the 163 isolates belonged to a new genetic group that is basal to all other known members of the major genetic clade B.I, which is spread across the Eurosiberian region. One hundred and twenty-five of the 163 Swedish isolates belonged to B.I, but individual clades' frequencies differed from county to county (P < 0.001). Subsequent analyses revealed a correlation between genotype variation over time and recurrent outbreaks at specific places, supporting the 'maintenance reservoir' environmental maintenance hypothesis. Most importantly, the findings reveal the presence of diverse source populations of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in Sweden and suggest a historical spread of the disease from Scandinavia to other parts of Eurosiberia.

  14. Francisella tularensis Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Haristoy, X.; Lozniewski, A.; Tram, C.; Simeon, D.; Bevanger, L.; Lion, C.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteremia caused by Francisella tularensis is rare and has been reported mainly in the United States and infrequently in Europe. We report herein the first case of bacteremic F. tularensis pneumonia in an immunocompetent individual in southern Europe. PMID:12791928

  15. Rapid dissemination of Francisella tularensis and the effect of route of infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Sandra S; Wang, Zheng J; Mares, Chris A; Chang, Tingtung A; Li, Qun; Morris, Elizabeth G; Jerabek, Paul A; Teale, Judy M

    2008-01-01

    Background Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis is classified as a Category A bioweapon that is capable of establishing a lethal infection in humans upon inhalation of very few organisms. However, the virulence mechanisms of this organism are not well characterized. Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida, which is an equally virulent subspecies in mice, was used in concert with a microPET scanner to better understand its temporal dissemination in vivo upon intranasal infection and how such dissemination compares with other routes of infection. Adult mice were inoculated intranasally with F. tularensis subsp. novicida radiolabeled with 64Cu and imaged by microPET at 0.25, 2 and 20 hours post-infection. Results 64Cu labeled F. tularensis subsp. novicida administered intranasally or intratracheally were visualized in the respiratory tract and stomach at 0.25 hours post infection. By 20 hours, there was significant tropism to the lung compared with other tissues. In contrast, the images of radiolabeled F. tularensis subsp. novicida when administered intragastrically, intradermally, intraperitoneally and intravenouslly were more generally limited to the gastrointestinal system, site of inoculation, liver and spleen respectively. MicroPET images correlated with the biodistribution of isotope and bacterial burdens in analyzed tissues. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Francisella has a differential tissue tropism depending on the route of entry and that the virulence of Francisella by the pulmonary route is associated with a rapid bacteremia and an early preferential tropism to the lung. In addition, the use of the microPET device allowed us to identify the cecum as a novel site of colonization of Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida in mice. PMID:19068128

  16. Comparative Transcriptional Analyses of Francisella tularensis and Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Waldo, Robert H.; Belland, Robert J.; Klose, Karl E.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is composed of a number of subspecies with varied geographic distribution, host ranges, and virulence. In view of these marked differences, comparative functional genomics may elucidate some of the molecular mechanism(s) behind these differences. In this study a shared probe microarray was designed that could be used to compare the transcriptomes of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 (Ftt), Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OR960246 (Fth), Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS (LVS), and Francisella novicida U112 (Fn). To gain insight into expression differences that may be related to the differences in virulence of these subspecies, transcriptomes were measured from each strain grown in vitro under identical conditions, utilizing a shared probe microarray. The human avirulent Fn strain exhibited high levels of transcription of genes involved in general metabolism, which are pseudogenes in the human virulent Ftt and Fth strains, consistent with the process of genome decay in the virulent strains. Genes encoding an efflux system (emrA2 cluster of genes), siderophore (fsl operon), acid phosphatase, LPS synthesis, polyamine synthesis, and citrulline ureidase were all highly expressed in Ftt when compared to Fn, suggesting that some of these may contribute to the relative high virulence of Ftt. Genes expressed at a higher level in Ftt when compared to the relatively less virulent Fth included genes encoding isochorismatases, cholylglycine hydrolase, polyamine synthesis, citrulline ureidase, Type IV pilus subunit, and the Francisella Pathogenicity Island protein PdpD. Fth and LVS had very few expression differences, consistent with the derivation of LVS from Fth. This study demonstrated that a shared probe microarray designed to detect transcripts in multiple species/subspecies of Francisella enabled comparative transcriptional analyses that may highlight critical differences that underlie the relative pathogenesis of

  17. Comparative Transcriptional Analyses of Francisella tularensis and Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    Sarva, Siva T; Waldo, Robert H; Belland, Robert J; Klose, Karl E

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is composed of a number of subspecies with varied geographic distribution, host ranges, and virulence. In view of these marked differences, comparative functional genomics may elucidate some of the molecular mechanism(s) behind these differences. In this study a shared probe microarray was designed that could be used to compare the transcriptomes of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 (Ftt), Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OR960246 (Fth), Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS (LVS), and Francisella novicida U112 (Fn). To gain insight into expression differences that may be related to the differences in virulence of these subspecies, transcriptomes were measured from each strain grown in vitro under identical conditions, utilizing a shared probe microarray. The human avirulent Fn strain exhibited high levels of transcription of genes involved in general metabolism, which are pseudogenes in the human virulent Ftt and Fth strains, consistent with the process of genome decay in the virulent strains. Genes encoding an efflux system (emrA2 cluster of genes), siderophore (fsl operon), acid phosphatase, LPS synthesis, polyamine synthesis, and citrulline ureidase were all highly expressed in Ftt when compared to Fn, suggesting that some of these may contribute to the relative high virulence of Ftt. Genes expressed at a higher level in Ftt when compared to the relatively less virulent Fth included genes encoding isochorismatases, cholylglycine hydrolase, polyamine synthesis, citrulline ureidase, Type IV pilus subunit, and the Francisella Pathogenicity Island protein PdpD. Fth and LVS had very few expression differences, consistent with the derivation of LVS from Fth. This study demonstrated that a shared probe microarray designed to detect transcripts in multiple species/subspecies of Francisella enabled comparative transcriptional analyses that may highlight critical differences that underlie the relative pathogenesis of

  18. Case Report of Low Virulence Francisella tularensis Presented as Severe Bacteremic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Yi; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tularemia is a zoonotic infection seen primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. It is caused by the bacteria Francisella tularensis. Although the ulceroglandular form of the disease is the more common manifestation of infection, F tularensis is known to cause pneumonia. F tularensis has two predominant subspecies, namely subsp. tularensis (type A) and subsp. holarctica (type B). Type B tularemia is considered to be much less virulent than type A and barely caused lethal disease and pneumonia. We reported a case with a 68-year-old man immune-compromised patient diagnosed with bacteremic pneumonia engendered by type B tularemia with initial presentation of high fever, pneumonia with pleural effusion; the diagnosis was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The patient's fever, pneumonia, and pleural effusion were resolved with appropriate antibiotics for tularemia. This case involving severe bacteremic pneumonia in an immune-compromised patient is rare. This case suggests that low virulence F tularensis should be included in the differential diagnoses of bacteremic pneumonia for endemic tularemia. PMID:27175638

  19. Enhancement of Vaccine Efficacy by Expression of a TLR5 Ligand in the Defined Live Attenuated Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida Strain U112▲iglB::fljB

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Aimee L.; Dang, Kim Minh; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M. Neal; Heidner, Hans; Klose, Karl E.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2014-01-01

    Oral vaccination with the defined live attenuated Francisella novicida vaccine strain U112▲iglB has been demonstrated to induce protective immunity against pulmonary challenge with the highly human virulent F. tularensis strain SCHU S4. However, this vaccination regimen requires a booster dose in mice and exhibits 50% protective efficacy in the Fischer 344 rat model. To enhance the efficacy of this vaccine strain, we engineered U112▲iglB to express the Salmonella typhimurium FljB flagellin D1 domain, a TLR5 agonist. The U112▲iglB::fljB strain was highly attenuated for intracellular macrophage replication, and although the FljB protein was expressed within the cytosol, it exhibited TLR5 activation in a TLR5-expressing HEK cell line. Additionally, infection of splenocytes and lymphocytes with U112▲iglB::fljB induced significantly greater TNF-α production than infection with U112▲iglB. Oral vaccination with U112▲iglB::fljB also induced significantly greater protection than U112ΔiglB against pulmonary SCHU S4 challenge in rats. The enhanced protection was accompanied by higher IgG2a production and serum-mediated reduction of Francisella infectivity. Thus, the U112▲iglB::fljB strain may serve as a potential vaccine candidate against pneumonic tularemia. PMID:25050972

  20. Identification of Francisella tularensis by whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry: fast, reliable, robust, and cost-effective differentiation on species and subspecies levels.

    PubMed

    Seibold, E; Maier, T; Kostrzewa, M; Zeman, E; Splettstoesser, W

    2010-04-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a potential agent of bioterrorism. The phenotypic discrimination of closely related, but differently virulent, Francisella tularensis subspecies with phenotyping methods is difficult and time-consuming, often producing ambiguous results. As a fast and simple alternative, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was applied to 50 different strains of the genus Francisella to assess its ability to identify and discriminate between strains according to their designated species and subspecies. Reference spectra from five representative strains of Francisella philomiragia, Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, Francisella tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, and Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida were established and evaluated for their capability to correctly identify Francisella species and subspecies by matching a collection of spectra from 45 blind-coded Francisella strains against a database containing the five reference spectra and 3,287 spectra from other microorganisms. As a reference method for identification of strains from the genus Francisella, 23S rRNA gene sequencing was used. All strains were correctly identified, with both methods showing perfect agreement at the species level as well as at the subspecies level. The identification of Francisella strains by MALDI-TOF MS and subsequent database matching was reproducible using biological replicates, different culture media, different cultivation times, different serial in vitro passages of the same strain, different preparation protocols, and different mass spectrometers.

  1. Towards Development of Improved Serodiagnostics for Tularemia by Use of Francisella tularensis Proteome Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Rie; Escudero, Raquel; Molina, Douglas M; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Randall, Arlo; Jasinskas, Algis; Pablo, Jozelyn; Felgner, Philip L; AuCoin, David P; Anda, Pedro; Davies, D Huw

    2016-07-01

    Tularemia in humans is caused mainly by two subspecies of the Gram-negative facultative anaerobe Francisella tularensis: F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B). The current serological test for tularemia is based on agglutination of whole organisms, and the reactive antigens are not well understood. Previously, we profiled the antibody responses in type A and B tularemia cases in the United States using a proteome microarray of 1,741 different proteins derived from the type A strain Schu S4. Fifteen dominant antigens able to detect antibodies to both types of infection were identified, although these were not validated in a different immunoassay format. Since type A and B subspecies are closely related, we hypothesized that Schu S4 antigens would also have utility for diagnosing type B tularemia caused by strains from other geographic locations. To test this, we probed the Schu S4 array with sera from 241 type B tularemia cases in Spain. Despite there being no type A strains in Spain, we confirmed the responses against some of the same potential serodiagnostic antigens reported previously, as well as determined the responses against additional potential serodiagnostic antigens. Five potential serodiagnostic antigens were evaluated on immunostrips, and two of these (FTT1696/GroEL and FTT0975/conserved hypothetical protein) discriminated between the Spanish tularemia cases and healthy controls. We conclude that antigens from the type A strain Schu S4 are suitable for detection of antibodies from patients with type B F. tularensis infections and that these can be used for the diagnosis of tularemia in a deployable format, such as the immunostrip.

  2. Rapid diagnosis and quantification of Francisella tularensis in organs of naturally infected common squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Abril, Carlos; Nimmervoll, Helena; Pilo, Paola; Brodard, Isabelle; Korczak, Bozena; Markus, Seiler; Miserez, Raymond; Frey, Joachim

    2008-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, a small Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of tularaemia, a severe zoonotic disease transmitted to humans mostly by vectors such as ticks, flies and mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in many parts of the northern hemisphere. Among animals, the most affected species belong to rodents and lagomorphs, in particular hares. However, in the recent years, many cases of tularaemia among small monkeys in zoos were reported. We have developed a real-time PCR that allows to quantify F. tularensis in tissue samples. Using this method, we identified the spleen and the kidney as the most heavily infected organ containing up to 400 F. tularensis bacteria per simian host cell in two common squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) from a zoo that died of tularaemia. In other organs such as the brain, F. tularensis was detected at much lower titres. The strain that caused the infection was identified as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica biovar I, which is susceptible to erythromycin. The high number of F. tularensis present in soft organs such as spleen, liver and kidney represents a high risk for persons handling such carcasses and explains the transmission of the disease to a pathologist during post-mortem analysis. Herein, we show that real-time PCR allows a reliable and rapid diagnosis of F. tularensis directly from tissue samples of infected animals, which is crucial in order to attempt accurate prophylactic measures, especially in cases where humans or other animals have been exposed to this highly contagious pathogen. PMID:17875369

  3. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is markedly decreased following pulmonary F. tularensis challenge.

    PubMed

    Chambers, James P; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Jupelli, Madhulika; Weintraub, Susan T; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Valdes, James J; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense during infection and are indispensable in this function. The neutrophil elastase is a key effector molecule of the innate immune system with potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria, spirochaetes, and fungi. However, the release of neutrophil elastase during bacterial infection must be checked otherwise its release in the extracellular milieu will result in damage to surrounding tissues. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a small glycoprotein clade A serpine serine protease inhibitor and has been shown to increase in humans following bacterial and viral infection. Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Type A strains are the most virulent with an infectious dose as low as 10 colony forming units and a mortality rate of 30-60% among untreated cases of pneumonic tularemia. We report here significant reduction of this major inhibitor of the neutrophil elastase in plasma of F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 infected animals following pulmonary challenge. Associated with an imbalance of protease-antiprotease function at the alveolar level in lungs of infected animals, increased elastase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids accompanied by decrease lung function, i.e., loss of lung elastance with concomitant increase of pulmonary hysteresivity. Consistent with a competent acute phase response following F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 pulmonary challenge and proposed up-regulation of plasma haptoglobin during the course of the acute phase reaction, haptoglobin was observed significantly increased. These data suggest that unchecked neutrophil serine protease activity may arise from F. tularensis targeted reduction of plasma α(1)-antitrysin promoting lung tissue damage facilitating increased dissemination of this bacterium in infected animals. PMID:22919586

  4. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin is Markedly Decreased Following Pulmonary F. tularensis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, James P.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Jupelli, Madhulika; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Valdes, James J.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense during infection and are indispensable in this function. The neutrophil elastase is a key effector molecule of the innate immune system with potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria, spirochaetes, and fungi. However, the release of neutrophil elastase during bacterial infection must be checked otherwise its release in the extracellular milieu will result in damage to surrounding tissues. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a small glycoprotein clade A serpine serine protease inhibitor and has been shown to increase in humans following bacterial and viral infection. Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Type A strains are the most virulent with an infectious dose as low as 10 colony forming units and a mortality rate of 30–60% among untreated cases of pneumonic tularemia. We report here significant reduction of this major inhibitor of the neutrophil elastase in plasma of F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 infected animals following pulmonary challenge. Associated with an imbalance of protease–antiprotease function at the alveolar level in lungs of infected animals, increased elastase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids accompanied by decrease lung function, i.e., loss of lung elastance with concomitant increase of pulmonary hysteresivity. Consistent with a competent acute phase response following F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 pulmonary challenge and proposed up-regulation of plasma haptoglobin during the course of the acute phase reaction, haptoglobin was observed significantly increased. These data suggest that unchecked neutrophil serine protease activity may arise from F. tularensis targeted reduction of plasma α1-antitrysin promoting lung tissue damage facilitating increased dissemination of this bacterium in infected animals. PMID:22919586

  5. Substructure within Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolates from Australian Wildlife▿

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sandra K.; Bull, C. Michael; Gordon, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing of 56 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica strains isolated from Australian wildlife hosts was performed. The results of population assignment algorithms revealed that the 56 strains could be subdivided into two distinct clades. Strains belonging to the two clades were further distinguished phenotypically, genotypically, and with respect to host distribution. PMID:21378038

  6. Metapopulation structure for perpetuation of Francisella tularensis tularensis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of Type A tularemia due to Francisella tularensis tularensis are typically sporadic and unstable, greatly hindering identification of the determinants of perpetuation and human risk. Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts has experienced an outbreak of Type A tularemia which has persisted for 9 years. This unique situation has allowed us to conduct long-term eco-epidemiologic studies there. Our hypothesis is that the agent of Type A tularemia is perpetuated as a metapopulation, with many small isolated natural foci of transmission. During times of increased transmission, the foci would merge and a larger scale epizootic would occur, with greater likelihood that humans become exposed. Methods We sampled questing dog ticks from two natural foci on the island and tested them for tularemia DNA. We determined whether the force of transmission differed between the two foci. In addition, we examined the population structure of F. tularensis from ticks by variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis, which allowed estimates of diversity, linkage disequilibrium, and eBURST analysis. Results The prevalence of tularemia DNA in ticks from our two field sites was markedly different: one site was stable over the course of the study yielding as many as 5.6% positive ticks. In contrast, infected ticks from the comparison site markedly increased in prevalence, from 0.4% in 2003 to 3.9% in 2006. Using 4 VNTR loci, we documented 75 different haplotypes (diversity = 0.91). eBURST analysis indicates that the stable site was essentially clonal, but the comparison site contained multiple unrelated lineages. The general bacterial population is evolving clonally (multilocus disequilibrium) and the bacteria in the two sites are reproductively isolated. Conclusion Even within an isolated island, tularemia natural foci that are no more than 15 km apart are uniquely segregated. One of our sites has stable transmission and the other is emergent. The population structure at the

  7. Biochemical responses and oxidative stress in Francisella tularensis infection: a European brown hare model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate biochemical and oxidative stress responses to experimental F. tularensis infection in European brown hares, an important source of human tularemia infections. Methods For these purposes we compared the development of an array of biochemical parameters measured in blood plasma using standard procedures of dry chemistry as well as electrochemical devices following a subcutaneous infection with a wild Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain (a single dose of 2.6 × 109 CFU pro toto). Results Subcutaneous inoculation of a single dose with 2.6 × 109 colony forming units of a wild F. tularensis strain pro toto resulted in the death of two out of five hares. Plasma chemistry profiles were examined on days 2 to 35 post-infection. When compared to controls, the total protein, urea, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were increased, while albumin, glucose and amylase were decreased. Both uric and ascorbic acids and glutathione dropped on day 2 and then increased significantly on days 6 to 12 and 6 to 14 post-inoculation, respectively. There was a two-fold increase in lipid peroxidation on days 4 to 8 post-inoculation. Conclusions Contrary to all expectations, the present study demonstrates that the European brown hare shows relatively low susceptibility to tularemia. Therefore, the circumstances of tularemia in hares under natural conditions should be further studied. PMID:21232117

  8. Francisella tularensis: No Evidence for Transovarial Transmission in the Tularemia Tick Vectors Dermacentor reticulatus and Ixodes ricinus

    PubMed Central

    Genchi, Marco; Prati, Paola; Vicari, Nadia; Manfredini, Andrea; Sacchi, Luciano; Clementi, Emanuela; Bandi, Claudio; Epis, Sara; Fabbi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the Francisella tularensis, a highly infectious Gram-negative coccobacillus. Due to easy dissemination, multiple routes of infection, high environmental contamination and morbidity and mortality rates, Francisella is considered a potential bioterrorism threat and classified as a category A select agent by the CDC. Tick bites are among the most prevalent modes of transmission, and ticks have been indicated as a possible reservoir, although their reservoir competence has yet to be defined. Tick-borne transmission of F. tularensis was recognized in 1923, and transstadial transmission has been demonstrated in several tick species. Studies on transovarial transmission, however, have reported conflicting results. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ticks as reservoirs for Francisella, assessing the transovarial transmission of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in ticks, using experimentally-infected females of Dermacentor reticulatus and Ixodes ricinus. Results Transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed F. tularensis within oocytes. However, cultures and bioassays of eggs and larvae were negative; in addition, microscopy techniques revealed bacterial degeneration/death in the oocytes. Conclusions These results suggest that bacterial death might occur in oocytes, preventing the transovarial transmission of Francisella. We can speculate that Francisella does not have a defined reservoir, but that rather various biological niches (e.g. ticks, rodents), that allow the bacterium to persist in the environment. Our results, suggesting that ticks are not competent for the bacterium vertical transmission, are congruent with this view. PMID:26244842

  9. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Like Proteins in Francisella tularensis and Identification of a Novel Locus Required for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dankova, Vera; Balonova, Lucie; Straskova, Adela; Spidlova, Petra; Putzova, Daniela; Kijek, Todd; Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher; Mou, Sherry; Worsham, Patricia; Szotakova, Barbora; Stulik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium that causes the potentially lethal disease tularemia. This extremely virulent bacterium is able to replicate in the cytosolic compartments of infected macrophages. To invade macrophages and to cope with their intracellular environment, Francisella requires multiple virulence factors, which are still being identified. Proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domains seem to be promising targets to investigate, since these proteins have been reported to be directly involved in virulence-associated functions of bacterial pathogens. Here, we studied the role of the FTS_0201, FTS_0778, and FTS_1680 genes, which encode putative TPR-like proteins in Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200. Mutants defective in protein expression were prepared by TargeTron insertion mutagenesis. We found that the locus FTS_1680 and its ortholog FTT_0166c in the highly virulent Francisella tularensis type A strain SchuS4 are required for proper intracellular replication, full virulence in mice, and heat stress tolerance. Additionally, the FTS_1680-encoded protein was identified as a membrane-associated protein required for full cytopathogenicity in macrophages. Our study thus identifies FTS_1680/FTT_0166c as a new virulence factor in Francisella tularensis. PMID:25245806

  10. Complete genome sequence of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica FTNF002-00.

    PubMed

    Barabote, Ravi D; Xie, Gary; Brettin, Thomas S; Hinrichs, Steven H; Fey, Paul D; Jay, Justin J; Engle, Jennifer L; Godbole, Shubhada D; Noronha, Jyothi M; Scheuermann, Richard H; Zhou, Liwei W; Lion, Christine; Dempsey, Michael P

    2009-09-16

    Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica FTNF002-00 strain was originally obtained from the first known clinical case of bacteremic F. tularensis pneumonia in Southern Europe isolated from an immunocompetent individual. The FTNF002-00 complete genome contains the RD(23) deletion and represents a type strain for a clonal population from the first epidemic tularemia outbreak in Spain between 1997-1998. Here, we present the complete sequence analysis of the FTNF002-00 genome. The complete genome sequence of FTNF002-00 revealed several large as well as small genomic differences with respect to two other published complete genome sequences of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains, LVS and OSU18. The FTNF002-00 genome shares >99.9% sequence similarity with LVS and OSU18, and is also approximately 5 MB smaller by comparison. The overall organization of the FTNF002-00 genome is remarkably identical to those of LVS and OSU18, except for a single 3.9 kb inversion in FTNF002-00. Twelve regions of difference ranging from 0.1-1.5 kb and forty-two small insertions and deletions were identified in a comparative analysis of FTNF002-00, LVS, and OSU18 genomes. Two small deletions appear to inactivate two genes in FTNF002-00 causing them to become pseudogenes; the intact genes encode a protein of unknown function and a drug:H(+) antiporter. In addition, we identified ninety-nine proteins in FTNF002-00 containing amino acid mutations compared to LVS and OSU18. Several non-conserved amino acid replacements were identified, one of which occurs in the virulence-associated intracellular growth locus subunit D protein. Many of these changes in FTNF002-00 are likely the consequence of direct selection that increases the fitness of this subsp. holarctica clone within its endemic population. Our complete genome sequence analyses lay the foundation for experimental testing of these possibilities.

  11. Development of a real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Bowles, Kimberly; Fernandez, Denise; Hawke, John P

    2010-04-01

    Members of the genus Francisella are small Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacteria that cause francisellosis in a wide variety of fish species worldwide. F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis has been recently described as a warm-water pathogen of tilapia Oreochromis spp. In this study, a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) TaqMan probe assay was developed to rapidly and accurately detect and quantify F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis from fish tissue. The target region of the assay was the F. tularensis iglC gene homologue previously found in F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. Probe specificity was confirmed by the lack of signal and cross-reactivity with 12 common fish pathogens, 2 subspecies of F. tularensis, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis, and tilapia tissue. The range of linearity was determined to be 50 fg to 1.4 mg, and the lower limit of detection was 50 fg of DNA (equivalent to approximately 25 genome equivalents) per reaction. A similar sensitivity was observed with DNA extracted from a mixture of F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis and fish tissue. The assay was also able to detect and quantify F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis from the spleens of experimentally infected tilapia. No signal was observed in the control groups. In conclusion, we have developed a highly sensitive and specific assay that can be used for the specific identification and quantification of F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. PMID:20481087

  12. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    SciTech Connect

    Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  13. Construction of a bioluminescence reporter plasmid for Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Bina, Xiaowen R; Miller, Mark A; Bina, James E

    2010-11-01

    A Francisella tularensis shuttle vector that constitutively expresses the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon in type A and type B strains of F. tularensis was constructed. The bioluminescence reporter plasmid was introduced into the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis and used to follow F. tularensis growth in a murine intranasal challenge model in real-time by bioluminescence imaging. The results show that the new bioluminescence reporter plasmid represents a useful tool for tularemia research that is suitable for following F. tularensis growth in both in vitro and in vivo model systems. PMID:20620161

  14. Comparative review of Francisella tularensis and Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    Kingry, Luke C; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the acute disease tularemia. Due to its extreme infectivity and ability to cause disease upon inhalation, F. tularensis has been classified as a biothreat agent. Two subspecies of F. tularensis, tularensis and holarctica, are responsible for tularemia in humans. In comparison, the closely related species F. novicida very rarely causes human illness and cases that do occur are associated with patients who are immune compromised or have other underlying health problems. Virulence between F. tularensis and F. novicida also differs in laboratory animals. Despite this varying capacity to cause disease, the two species share ~97% nucleotide identity, with F. novicida commonly used as a laboratory surrogate for F. tularensis. As the F. novicida U112 strain is exempt from U.S. select agent regulations, research studies can be carried out in non-registered laboratories lacking specialized containment facilities required for work with virulent F. tularensis strains. This review is designed to highlight phenotypic (clinical, ecological, virulence, and pathogenic) and genomic differences between F. tularensis and F. novicida that warrant maintaining F. novicida and F. tularensis as separate species. Standardized nomenclature for F. novicida is critical for accurate interpretation of experimental results, limiting clinical confusion between F. novicida and F. tularensis and ensuring treatment efficacy studies utilize virulent F. tularensis strains. PMID:24660164

  15. Mechanisms of Heme Utilization by Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Helena; Lindgren, Lena; Golovliov, Igor; Sjöstedt, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen causing the severe disease tularemia in mammals. As for other bacteria, iron is essential for its growth but very few mechanisms for iron acquisition have been identified. Here, we analyzed if and how F. tularensis can utilize heme, a major source of iron in vivo. This is by no means obvious since the bacterium lacks components of traditional heme-uptake systems. We show that SCHU S4, the prototypic strain of subspecies tularensis, grew in vitro with heme as the sole iron source. By screening a SCHU S4 transposon insertion library, 16 genes were identified as important to efficiently utilize heme, two of which were required to avoid heme toxicity. None of the identified genes appeared to encode components of a potential heme-uptake apparatus. Analysis of SCHU S4 deletion mutants revealed that each of the components FeoB, the siderophore system, and FupA, contributed to the heme-dependent growth. In the case of the former two systems, iron acquisition was impaired, whereas the absence of FupA did not affect iron uptake but led to abnormally high binding of iron to macromolecules. Overall, the present study demonstrates that heme supports growth of F. tularensis and that the requirements for the utilization are highly complex and to some extent novel. PMID:25756756

  16. Live Attenuated Francisella novicida Vaccine Protects against Francisella tularensis Pulmonary Challenge in Rats and Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ping; Cunningham, Aimee L.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Nguyen, Jesse Q.; Barker, Jeffrey R.; Lyons, C. Rick; Wilder, Julie; Valderas, Michelle; Sherwood, Robert L.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Klose, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia. Human pulmonary exposure to the most virulent form, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (Ftt), leads to high morbidity and mortality, resulting in this bacterium being classified as a potential biothreat agent. However, a closely-related species, F. novicida, is avirulent in healthy humans. No tularemia vaccine is currently approved for human use. We demonstrate that a single dose vaccine of a live attenuated F. novicida strain (Fn iglD) protects against subsequent pulmonary challenge with Ftt using two different animal models, Fischer 344 rats and cynomolgus macaques (NHP). The Fn iglD vaccine showed protective efficacy in rats, as did a Ftt iglD vaccine, suggesting no disadvantage to utilizing the low human virulent Francisella species to induce protective immunity. Comparison of specific antibody profiles in vaccinated rat and NHP sera by proteome array identified a core set of immunodominant antigens in vaccinated animals. This is the first report of a defined live attenuated vaccine that demonstrates efficacy against pulmonary tularemia in a NHP, and indicates that the low human virulence F. novicida functions as an effective tularemia vaccine platform. PMID:25340543

  17. [An oropharyngeal tularemia case diagnosed by the isolation of Francisella tularensis on human blood agar].

    PubMed

    Ozel, Gönül; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2010-10-01

    subsp. holarctica by polymerase chain reaction. Microagglutination test performed on patient's serum yielded positive with an antibody titer of 1/5120. Gentamicin (5 mg/kg/day) was initiated, and the therapy was completed for two weeks. The patient recovered completely without sequela. This case was presented in order to call attention to the strain of F.tularensis which failed to demonstrate a requirement for cysteine and enriched medium on primary isolation, but grew well on conventional laboratory medium. Tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of related infectious diseases since cases of tularemia have been reported from several parts of Turkey after the year 2004.

  18. [A water-borne tularemia outbreak caused by Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica in Central Anatolia region].

    PubMed

    Ulu Kılıç, Ayşegül; Kılıç, Selçuk; Sencan, Irfan; Ciçek Şentürk, Gönül; Gürbüz, Yunus; Tütüncü, Emin Ediz; Celebi, Bekir; Kıcıman, Özlem; Ergönül, Önder

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we investigated a waterborne tularemia outbreak occured in Kadiozu, a village of Cerkes county of Cankiri province (located in North-west part of central Anatolia, Turkey) between 18 November 2009-24 December 2009. Active surveillance was conducted to determine clinical characteristics and risk factors of cases after two patients from the same village had been diagnosed as oropharyngeal tularemia. All villagers were examined, and clinical specimens from cases and water samples which may be the source of outbreak in the field investigations were taken. Cases were in the form of oropharyngeal, glandular and pneumonic. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cultures were conducted from lymph node aspirates, throat swabs taken from cases and samples from water sources of epidemic zone. All serum samples taken from the villagers were screened for F.tularensis antibodies with microagglutination test (MAT). Oropharyngeal tularemia was diagnosed in 11 patients, glandular form in 3 patients and pneumonic form in one patient according to clinical and laboratory results. Age of the patients ranged between 6-75 years old (mean age: 52.5 years) and thirty one of them (54.7%) were female. MAT titers ranged between 1/160 and 1/5120 in cases of tularemia. Causative agent was grown in the cultures of two patients (including a throat swab and a lymph node aspirate). F.tularensis DNA was shown by PCR in a throat swab and four lymph node aspirates. F.tularensis was also detected by PCR in the water sample obtained from one of the spring water commonly used by villagers. Only one of the lymph node samples obtained from two different patients, was positive by direct fluorescent antibody method. Causative agent was defined as F.tularensis subsp. holarctica by conventional and also molecular methods. Patients were treated with aminoglycoside (streptomycin, gentamicin, amikacin) or quinolone (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin) antibiotics. Treatment failure was observed in five

  19. [An oropharyngeal tularemia case diagnosed by the isolation of Francisella tularensis on human blood agar].

    PubMed

    Ozel, Gönül; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2010-10-01

    subsp. holarctica by polymerase chain reaction. Microagglutination test performed on patient's serum yielded positive with an antibody titer of 1/5120. Gentamicin (5 mg/kg/day) was initiated, and the therapy was completed for two weeks. The patient recovered completely without sequela. This case was presented in order to call attention to the strain of F.tularensis which failed to demonstrate a requirement for cysteine and enriched medium on primary isolation, but grew well on conventional laboratory medium. Tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of related infectious diseases since cases of tularemia have been reported from several parts of Turkey after the year 2004. PMID:21063979

  20. Identifying Francisella tularensis genes required for growth in host cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cel...

  1. Nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis and methods for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    DOEpatents

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A

    2007-02-06

    Described herein is the identification of nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  2. Nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis and methods for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    DOEpatents

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A

    2009-02-24

    Described herein is the identification of nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  3. Formulation and Stabilization of Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    OHTAKE, SATOSHI; MARTIN, RUSSELL A.; SAXENA, ATUL; LECHUGA-BALLESTEROS, DAVID; SANTIAGO, ARACELI E; BARRY, EILEEN M.; TRUONG-LE, VU

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (F. tularensis LVS), a promising vaccine candidate for protection against F. tularensis exposure, is a particularly thermolabile vaccine and difficult to stabilize sufficiently for storage under refrigerated conditions. Our preliminary data show that F. tularensis LVS can be stabilized in the dried state using foam drying, a modified freeze drying method, with sugar-based formulations. The process was conducted under mild drying conditions, which resulted in a good titer retention following processing. The inclusion of osmolytes in the growth media resulted in an acceleration of growth kinetics, although no change in osmotolerance was observed. The optimized F. tularensis formulation, which contained trehalose, gelatin, and Pluronic F68 demonstrated stability for approximately 1.5 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1 log10 colony forming unit) and for 12 weeks at 25°C. At refrigerator storage condition (4°C), stabilized F. tularensis LVS vaccine exhibited no activity loss for at least 12 weeks. This stabilization method utilizes conventional freeze dryers and pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, and thus can be readily implemented at many manufacturing sites for large-scale production of stabilized vaccines. The improved heat stability of the F. tularensis LVS could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long-term storage, shipping, and distribution. PMID:21491457

  4. Detection of Francisella tularensis by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Junhui, Z; Ruifu, Y; Jianchun, L; Songle, Z; Meiling, C; Fengxiang, C; Hong, C

    1996-12-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularaemia. Effective antibiotic treatment of tularaemia is now available, but the early diagnosis of tularaemia remains a problem. Four primers (three pairs) were designed to detect F. tularensis by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), based on the previously published nucleotide sequence of T-cell epitopes of a F. tularensis membrane protein. Amplification of purified F. tularensis chromosomal DNA with the three pairs of primers resulted in three different products with sizes consistent with those predicted from sequence data (211 bp, 347 bp and 568 bp). The specificity of the PCR was confirmed as no amplification was detected with a range of other bacteria. The sensitivity of the PCR was determined with limiting dilution PCR and viable counts. The preliminary application of the PCR to the detection of F. tularensis in aerosols and experimentally infected mice was investigated. Comparison of the results with those from traditional culture indicated that PCR was more sensitive. The animal challenge test showed that, 24 h after inoculation with 15 cfu of F. tularensis, 38 (82.6%) of 46 blood samples were positive by PCR, whereas only 22 (47.8%) were positive by culture. The results showed that PCR is a helpful tool for the detection of F. tularensis in blood, liver and spleen which should enable the rapid confirmation of clinical diagnoses of tularaemia. PMID:8958253

  5. Francisella tularensis as a potential agent of bioterrorism?

    PubMed

    Maurin, Max

    2015-02-01

    Francisella tularensis is a category A bioterrorism agent. It is the etiological agent of tularemia, a zoonotic disease found throughout the northern hemisphere. The intentional spread of F. tularensis aerosols would probably lead to severe and often fatal pneumonia cases, but also secondary cases from contaminated animals and environments. We are not ready to face such a situation. No vaccine is currently available. A few antibiotics are active against F. tularensis, but strains resistant to these antibiotics could be used in the context of bioterrorism. We need new therapeutic strategies to fight against category A bioterrorism agents, including development of new drugs inhibiting F. tularensis growth and/or virulence, or enhancing the host response to infection by this pathogen.

  6. Identification of Mechanisms for Attenuation of the FSC043 Mutant of Francisella tularensis SCHU S4

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Marie; Tancred, Linda; Golovliov, Igor; Conlan, Wayne; Twine, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we identified a spontaneous, essentially avirulent mutant, FSC043, of the highly virulent strain SCHU S4 of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis. We have now characterized the phenotype of the mutant and the mechanisms of its attenuation in more detail. Genetic and proteomic analyses revealed that the pdpE gene and most of the pdpC gene were very markedly downregulated and, as previously demonstrated, that the strain expressed partially deleted and fused fupA and fupB genes. FSC043 showed minimal intracellular replication and induced no cell cytotoxicity. The mutant showed delayed phagosomal escape; at 18 h, colocalization with LAMP-1 was 80%, indicating phagosomal localization, whereas the corresponding percentages for SCHU S4 and the ΔfupA mutant were <10%. However, a small subset of the FSC043-infected cells contained up to 100 bacteria with LAMP-1 colocalization of around 30%. The unusual intracellular phenotype was similar to that of the ΔpdpC and ΔpdpC ΔpdpE mutants. Complementation of FSC043 with the intact fupA and fupB genes did not affect the phenotype, whereas complementation with the pdpC and pdpE genes restored intracellular replication and led to marked virulence. Even higher virulence was observed after complementation with both double-gene constructs. After immunization with the FSC043 strain, moderate protection against respiratory challenge with the SCHU S4 strain was observed. In summary, FSC043 showed a highly unusual intracellular phenotype, and based on our findings, we hypothesize that the mutation in the pdpC gene makes an essential contribution to the phenotype. PMID:24935978

  7. Purification and Biophysical Characterization of the CapA Membrane Protein FTT0807 from Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The capA gene (FTT0807) from Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis SCHU S4 encodes a 44.4 kDa integral membrane protein composed of 403 amino acid residues that is part of an apparent operon that encodes at least two other membrane proteins, CapB, and CapC, which together play a critical role in the virulence and pathogenesis of this bacterium. The capA gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal His6-tagged fusion with a folding reporter green fluorescent protein (frGFP). Purification procedures using several detergents were developed for the fluorescing and membrane-bound product, yielding approximately 30 mg of pure protein per liter of bacterial culture. Dynamic light scattering indicated that CapA-frGFP was highly monodisperse, with a size that was dependent upon both the concentration and choice of detergent. Circular dichroism showed that CapA-frGFP was stable over the range of 3–9 for the pH, with approximately half of the protein having well-defined α-helical and β-sheet secondary structure. The addition of either sodium chloride or calcium chloride at concentrations producing ionic strengths above 0.1 M resulted in a small increase of the α-helical content and a corresponding decrease in the random-coil content. Secondary-structure predictions on the basis of the analysis of the sequence indicate that the CapA membrane protein has two transmembrane helices with a substantial hydrophilic domain. The hydrophilic domain is predicted to contain a long disordered region of 50–60 residues, suggesting that the increase of α-helical content at high ionic strength could arise because of electrostatic interactions involving the disordered region. CapA is shown to be an inner-membrane protein and is predicted to play a key cellular role in the assembly of polysaccharides. PMID:24593131

  8. Identification of a Small Molecule That Modifies MglA/SspA Interaction and Impairs Intramacrophage Survival of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Wrench, Algevis P.; Gardner, Christopher L.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) genes. These genes are essential for this pathogen’s virulence and survival within host cells. In this study, we used a small molecule screening to identify quinacrine as a thermal stabilizing compound for F. tularensis SCHU S4 MglA and SspA. A bacterial two-hybrid system was used to analyze the in vivo effect of quinacrine on the heterodimer complex. The results show that quinacrine affects the interaction between MglA and SspA, indicated by decreased β-galactosidase activity. Further in vitro analyses, using size exclusion chromatography, indicated that quinacrine does not disrupt the heterodimer formation, however, changes in the alpha helix content were confirmed by circular dichroism. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that quinacrine makes contact with amino acid residues Y63 in MglA, and K97 in SspA, both located in the “cleft” of the interacting surfaces. In F. tularensis subsp. novicida, quinacrine decreased the transcription of the FPI genes, iglA, iglD, pdpD and pdpA. As a consequence, the intramacrophage survival capabilities of the bacteria were affected. These results support use of the MglA/SspA interacting surface, and quinacrine’s chemical scaffold, for the design of high affinity molecules that will function as therapeutics for the treatment of Tularemia. PMID:23372736

  9. Long-Lasting Fever and Lymphadenitis: Think about F. tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Maria Vittoria; Jaton, Katia; Pilo, Paola; Chabanel, David; Erard, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of glandular tularemia that developed in a man supposedly infected by a tick bite in Western Switzerland. Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) was identified. In Europe tularemia most commonly manifests itself as ulcero-glandular or glandular disease; the diagnosis of tularemia may be delayed in glandular form where skin or mucous lesion is absent, particularly in areas which are assumed to have a low incidence of the disease. PMID:26612988

  10. Survey of Francisella tularensis in Wild Animals in Japan in Areas Where Tularemia is Endemic.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Akitoyo; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Shindo, Junji; Park, Chu-Ho; Kudo, Noboru; Hatai, Hitoshi; Oyamada, Toshifumi; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Sharma, Neekun; Uda, Akihiko; Yamada, Akio; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2016-09-21

    Samples taken from 428 wild animals and 126 ticks, collected from a tularemia-endemic area in Japan between 2005 and 2013, were analyzed for the presence of Francisella tularensis. F. tularensis was isolated from a Japanese hare carcass whereas the samples from live animals and ticks were negative for F. tularensis by real-time PCR. Our results suggest that F. tularensis is still present in Japan although its prevalence is considerably low even in areas where tularemia is endemic.

  11. Deletion of the Bacillus anthracis capB homologue in Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis generates an attenuated strain that protects mice against virulent tularaemia.

    PubMed

    Michell, Stephen L; Dean, Rachel E; Eyles, Jim E; Hartley, Margaret Gill; Waters, Emma; Prior, Joann L; Titball, Richard W; Oyston, Petra C F

    2010-11-01

    As there is currently no licensed vaccine against Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularaemia, the bacterium is an agent of concern as a potential bioweapon. Although F. tularensis has a low infectious dose and high associated mortality, it possesses few classical virulence factors. An analysis of the F. tularensis subspecies tularensis genome sequence has revealed the presence of a region containing genes with low sequence homology to part of the capBCADE operon of Bacillus anthracis. We have generated an isogenic capB mutant of F. tularensis subspecies tularensis SchuS4 and shown it to be attenuated. Furthermore, using BALB/c mice, we have demonstrated that this capB strain affords protection against significant homologous challenge with the wild-type strain. These data have important implications for the development of a defined and efficacious tularaemia vaccine.

  12. Modeling early events in Francisella tularensis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Joseph J.; Laws, Thomas R.; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of infection and be used as investigative tools to support development of medical treatments. We develop a stochastic, within-host, computational model of the infection process in the BALB/c mouse, following inhalational exposure to Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. The model is mechanistic and governed by a small number of experimentally verifiable parameters. Given an initial dose, the model generates bacterial load profiles corresponding to those produced experimentally, with a doubling time of approximately 5 h during the first 48 h of infection. Analytical approximations for the mean number of bacteria in phagosomes and cytosols for the first 24 h post-infection are derived and used to verify the stochastic model. In our description of the dynamics of macrophage infection, the number of bacteria released per rupturing macrophage is a geometrically-distributed random variable. When combined with doubling time, this provides a distribution for the time taken for infected macrophages to rupture and release their intracellular bacteria. The mean and variance of these distributions are determined by model parameters with a precise biological interpretation, providing new mechanistic insights into the determinants of immune and bacterial kinetics. Insights into the dynamics of macrophage suppression and activation gained by the model can be used to explore the potential benefits of interventions that stimulate macrophage activation. PMID:25566509

  13. Symbiosis with Francisella tularensis provides resistance to pathogens in the silkworm.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jin; Uda, Akihiko; Watanabe, Kenta; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen found in a wide range of animals, including arthropods, and environments. This bacterium has been known for over 100 years, but the lifestyle of F. tularensis in natural reservoirs remains largely unknown. Thus, we established a novel natural host model for F. tularensis using the silkworm (Bombyx mori), which is an insect model for infection by pathogens. F. tularensis established a symbiosis with silkworms, and bacteria were observed in the hemolymph. After infection with F. tularensis, the induction of melanization and nodulation, which are immune responses to bacterial infection, were inhibited in silkworms. Pre-inoculation of silkworms with F. tularensis enhanced the expression of antimicrobial peptides and resistance to infection by pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that silkworms acquire host resistance via their symbiosis with F. tularensis, which may have important fitness benefits in natural reservoirs. PMID:27507264

  14. Symbiosis with Francisella tularensis provides resistance to pathogens in the silkworm

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jin; Uda, Akihiko; Watanabe, Kenta; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen found in a wide range of animals, including arthropods, and environments. This bacterium has been known for over 100 years, but the lifestyle of F. tularensis in natural reservoirs remains largely unknown. Thus, we established a novel natural host model for F. tularensis using the silkworm (Bombyx mori), which is an insect model for infection by pathogens. F. tularensis established a symbiosis with silkworms, and bacteria were observed in the hemolymph. After infection with F. tularensis, the induction of melanization and nodulation, which are immune responses to bacterial infection, were inhibited in silkworms. Pre-inoculation of silkworms with F. tularensis enhanced the expression of antimicrobial peptides and resistance to infection by pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that silkworms acquire host resistance via their symbiosis with F. tularensis, which may have important fitness benefits in natural reservoirs. PMID:27507264

  15. Xylella fastidiosa subspecies: X. fastidiosa subsp. [correction] fastidiosa [correction] subsp. nov., X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex subsp. nov., and X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Schaad, Norman W; Postnikova, Elena; Lacy, George; Fatmi, M'Barek; Chang, Chung-Jan

    2004-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a fastidious bacterium causing disease in over 100 plant species, is classified as a single species, although genetic studies support multiple taxons. To determine the taxonomic relatedness among strains of X. fastidiosa, we conducted DNA-DNA relatedness assays and sequenced the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) region using 26 strains from 10 hosts. Under stringent conditions (Tm -15 degrees C), the DNA relatedness for most X. fastidiosa strains was *70%. However, at high stringency (Tm -8 degrees C), three distinct genotypes (A, B, and C) were revealed. Taxon A included strains from cultivated grape, alfalfa, almond (two), and maple, interrelated by 85% (mean); taxon B included strains from peach, elm, plum, pigeon grape, sycamore, and almond (one), interrelated by 84%; and taxon C included only strains from citrus, interrelated by 87%. The mean reciprocal relatedness between taxons A and B, A and C, and B and C, were 58, 41, and 45%, respectively. ITS results also indicated the same grouping; taxons A and B, A and C, and B and C had identities of 98.7, 97.9, and 99.2%, respectively. Previous and present phenotypic data supports the molecular data. Taxon A strains grow faster on Pierce's disease agar medium whereas B and C strains grow more slowly. Taxon B and C strains are susceptible to penicillin and resistant to carbenicillin whereas A strains are opposite. Each taxon can be differentiated serologically as well as by structural proteins. We propose taxons A, B, and C be named X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa [correction] subsp. nov, subsp. multiplex, subsp. nov., and subsp. pauca, subsp. nov., respectively. The type strains of the subspecies are subsp. fastidiosa [correction] ICPB 50025 (= ATTC 35879T and ICMP 15197), subsp. multiplex ICPB 50039 (= ATTC 35871 and ICMP 15199), and subsp. pauca ICPB 50031 (= ICMP 15198).

  16. Toward an integrated system of clade names.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Kevin

    2007-12-01

    Although the proposition that higher taxa should correspond to clades is widely accepted, current nomenclature does not distinguish clearly between different clades in nested series. In particular, the same name is often applied to a total clade, its crown clade, and clades originating with various nodes, branches, and apomorphies in between. An integrated system of clade names is described based on categories of clades defined with respect to lineages that have survived to the present time. In this system, the most widely known names are applied to crown clades, the names of total clades are formed by adding a standard prefix to the names of the corresponding crowns, and the names of apomorphy clades describe the specific apomorphies with which they originated. Relative to traditional approaches, this integrated approach to naming clades is both more precise concerning the associations of names with particular clades and more efficient with regard to the cognitive effort required to recognize the names of corresponding crown and total clades. It also seems preferable to five alternatives that could be used to make the same distinctions. The integrated system of clade names has several advantages, including the facilitation of communication among biologists who study distantly related clades, promoting a broader conceptualization of the origins of distinctive clades of extant organisms and emphasizing the continuous nature of evolution. PMID:18066930

  17. Preservation of viable Francisella tularensis for forensic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Straub, Tim M.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    As a preservation solution, (1%) ammonium chloride may be preferred over other conventionally used storage solutions because of its compatibility with analytical techniques such as Mass Spectrometry. In this study, ammonium chloride performed as well or better than phosphate buffered saline with Tween or Butterfields/Tween for preserving Francisella tularensis novicida.

  18. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. Water as Source of Francisella tularensis Infection in Humans, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Selcuk; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Karagöz, Alper; Çelebi, Bekir; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Arikan, Muzaffer; Sahl, Jason W.; Mitchell, Cedar; Rivera, Andrew; Maltinsky, Sara; Keim, Paul; Üstek, Duran; Durmaz, Rıza

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis DNA extractions and isolates from the environment and humans were genetically characterized to elucidate environmental sources that cause human tularemia in Turkey. Extensive genetic diversity consistent with genotypes from human outbreaks was identified in environmental samples and confirmed water as a source of human tularemia in Turkey. PMID:26583383

  4. Water as Source of Francisella tularensis Infection in Humans, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Selcuk; Birdsell, Dawn N; Karagöz, Alper; Çelebi, Bekir; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Arikan, Muzaffer; Sahl, Jason W; Mitchell, Cedar; Rivera, Andrew; Maltinsky, Sara; Keim, Paul; Üstek, Duran; Durmaz, Rıza; Wagner, David M

    2015-12-01

    Francisella tularensis DNA extractions and isolates from the environment and humans were genetically characterized to elucidate environmental sources that cause human tularemia in Turkey. Extensive genetic diversity consistent with genotypes from human outbreaks was identified in environmental samples and confirmed water as a source of human tularemia in Turkey.

  5. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in the identification of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Karatuna, Onur; Çelebi, Bekir; Can, Simge; Akyar, Işın; Kiliç, Selçuk

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the cause of the zoonotic disease tularemia and is classified among highly pathogenic bacteria (HPB) due to its low infection dose and potential for airborne transmission. In the case of HBP, there is a pressing need for rapid, accurate and reliable identification. Phenotypic identification of Francisella species is inappropriate for clinical microbiology laboratories because it is time-consuming, hazardous and subject to variable interpretation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was recently evaluated as a useful tool for the rapid identification of a variety of microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid identification of Francisella tularensis and differentiation of its subspecies. Using national collection of Francisella isolates from the National Tularemia Reference Laboratory (Public Health Institution of Turkey, Ankara), a total of 75 clinical isolates were investigated by species and subspecies-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and MALDI-TOF MS. All isolates were originally identified as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica according to region of difference 1 (RD1) subspecies-specific PCR results. For all isolates MALDI-TOF MS provided results in concordance with subspecies-specific PCR analysis. Although PCR-based methods are effective in identifying Francisella species, they are labor-intensive and take longer periods of time to obtain the results when compared with MALDI-TOF MS. MALDI-TOF MS appeared to be a rapid, reliable and cost-effective identification technique for Francisella spp. Shorter analysis time and low cost make this an appealing new option in microbiology laboratories. PMID:26773181

  6. A Combined Enrichment and Aptamer Pulldown Assay for Francisella tularensis Detection in Food and Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Shinichiro; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Abdallah, Ahmed; Isaacson, Richard E.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of tularemia, is categorized as a Class A select agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention due to its ease of dissemination and ability to cause disease. Oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal tularemia may occur due to ingestion of contaminated food and water. Despite the concern to public health, little research is focused on F. tularensis detection in food and environmental matrices. Current diagnostics rely on host responses and amplification of F. tularensis genetic elements via Polymerase Chain Reaction; however, both tools are limited by development of an antibody response and limit of detection, respectively. During our investigation to develop an improved culture medium to aid F. tularensis diagnostics, we found enhanced F. tularensis growth using the spent culture filtrate. Addition of the spent culture filtrate allowed for increased detection of F. tularensis in mixed cultures of food and environmental matrices. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS analysis identified several unique chemicals within the spent culture supernatant of which carnosine had a matching m/z ratio. Addition of 0.625 mg/mL of carnosine to conventional F. tularensis medium increased the growth of F. tularensis at low inoculums. In order to further enrich F. tularensis cells, we developed a DNA aptamer cocktail to physically separate F. tularensis from other bacteria present in food and environmental matrices. The combined enrichment steps resulted in a detection range of 1–106 CFU/mL (starting inoculums) in both soil and lettuce backgrounds. We propose that the two-step enrichment process may be utilized for easy field diagnostics and subtyping of suspected F. tularensis contamination as well as a tool to aid in basic research of F. tularensis ecology. PMID:25536105

  7. [Multilocus VNTR-typing of Francisella tularensis strains].

    PubMed

    Vodop'ianov, A S; Vodop'ianov, S O; Pavlovich, N V; Mishan'kin, B N

    2004-01-01

    In the analysis of F. tularensis genome with the use of the specially developed program "DNA" a great number of loci containing tandem repeats were found. For analysis, 3 of them were selected and designated as FtA, FtB, FtC. The study of DNA of 40 F. tularensis strains in the polymerase chain reaction with specific primers to these loci a great variability in the number of repeats was established, the presence of 17 alleles being found in locus FtA, 5 alleles in locus FtB and 5 alleles in locus FtC. The strains under study formed 24 variants of genotypes, whose occurrence varied from 0.025 to 0.125. Taking into account the variability of the detected loci and a great number of potential loci VNTR in the genome, further development of this method will facilitate the creation of local and general data bases of the strains, thus ensuring more effective genetic typing of F. tularensis. PMID:15188553

  8. Pathology of inhalational Francisella tularensis spp. tularensis SCHU S4 infection in African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops).

    PubMed

    Twenhafel, N A; Alves, D A; Purcell, B K

    2009-07-01

    Tularemia, caused by Francisella tularensis, is a sporadic zoonotic disease with the potential to be an agent of biowarfare or bioterrorism. We describe here the gross, histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in a group of 5 African green monkeys (AGMs) that received an average inhaled dose of 729 colony-forming units of F. tularensis and died or were euthanatized between days 7 and 11 post infection. Clinical changes were evident by 48 hours post infection, and key physiologic abnormalities included increases in body temperature, heart rate, peak cardiac pressure, and mean blood pressure. Prominent gross changes in all cases included numerous pinpoint to 1-cm, well-demarcated, necrotic foci present consistently in the lungs, mediastinal lymph nodes, and spleen but also seen in the heart, mediastinum, diaphragm, liver, urinary bladder, urethra, and mesentery. The lungs, mediastinal lymph nodes, and spleen were most severely affected, with as much as 50% of the tissue replaced by necrotic foci. Histologic changes in all tissues consisted of well-delineated foci of necrosis and neutrophilic and histiocytic inflammation, with varying amounts of hemorrhage, edema, fibrin, and vasculitis. Some lesions were immature pyogranulomas. Strong immunoreactivity was identified primarily within macrophages. Ultrastructurally, bacteria were present within cytoplasmic vacuoles of alveolar macrophages, many of which were degenerate. In summary, AGMs infected with F. tularensis by aerosol develop lethal multisystemic disease that particularly targets the lungs and lymphoid tissues. Thus, AGMs should serve as a suitable and reliable animal model for further studies of tularemia.

  9. UV-C Inactivation of Francisella tularensis Utah-112 on agar surfaces, stainless steel, and foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Francisella tularensis has been identified as a microorganism of concern in the field of food security. There is currently very little information on the ability to inactivate F. tularensis on foods using non-thermal processing technologies. The ability of ultraviolet light (UV-C) to inactivate F....

  10. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Euler, Milena; Wang, Yongjie; Otto, Peter; Tomaso, Herbert; Escudero, Raquel; Anda, Pedro; Hufert, Frank T.

    2012-01-01

    Several real-time PCR approaches to develop field detection for Francisella tularensis, the infectious agent causing tularemia, have been explored. We report the development of a novel qualitative real-time isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay for use on a small ESEQuant Tube Scanner device. The analytical sensitivity and specificity were tested using a plasmid standard and DNA extracts from infected rabbit tissues. The assay showed a performance comparable to real-time PCR but reduced the assay time to 10 min. The rapid RPA method has great application potential for field use or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:22518861

  11. Recombinase polymerase amplification assay for rapid detection of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Euler, Milena; Wang, Yongjie; Otto, Peter; Tomaso, Herbert; Escudero, Raquel; Anda, Pedro; Hufert, Frank T; Weidmann, Manfred

    2012-07-01

    Several real-time PCR approaches to develop field detection for Francisella tularensis, the infectious agent causing tularemia, have been explored. We report the development of a novel qualitative real-time isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay for use on a small ESEQuant Tube Scanner device. The analytical sensitivity and specificity were tested using a plasmid standard and DNA extracts from infected rabbit tissues. The assay showed a performance comparable to real-time PCR but reduced the assay time to 10 min. The rapid RPA method has great application potential for field use or point-of-care diagnostics.

  12. Interaction of Francisella tularensis bacterial cells with dynamic speckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, Onega V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Sazanova, Elena V.; Zudina, Irina; Zhang, Zhihong; Sibo, Zhou; Luo, Qingming

    2006-08-01

    Influence of low-coherent speckles on the colonies grows is investigated. It has been demonstrated that effects of light on the inhibition of cells (Francisella Tularensis) are caused by speckle dynamics. The regimes of illumination of cell suspension with purpose of devitalization of hazard bacteria, caused very dangerous infections, such as tularemia, are found. Mathematical model of interaction of low-coherent laser radiation with bacteria suspension has been proposed. Computer simulations of the processes of laser-cells interaction have been carried out. Role of coherence of light in the processes of laser-cell interaction is analyzed.

  13. Bacillus velezensis is not a later heterotypic synonym of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Bacillus methylotrophicus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp plantarum and ‘Bacillus oryzicola’ are later heterotypic synonyms of Bacillus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rhizosphere isolated bacteria belonging to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum and Bacillus methylotrophicus clades are an important group of strains that are used as plant growth promoters and antagonists of plant pathogens. These properties have made these strains the focus of comm...

  14. Francisella tularensis harvests nutrients derived via ATG5-independent autophagy to support intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Steele, Shaun; Brunton, Jason; Ziehr, Benjamin; Taft-Benz, Sharon; Moorman, Nathaniel; Kawula, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes and pneumocytes. By 24 hours post invasion, F. tularensis replicates up to 1000-fold in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To achieve such rapid intracellular proliferation, F. tularensis must scavenge large quantities of essential carbon and energy sources from the host cell while evading anti-microbial immune responses. We found that macroautophagy, a eukaryotic cell process that primarily degrades host cell proteins and organelles as well as intracellular pathogens, was induced in F. tularensis infected cells. F. tularensis not only survived macroautophagy, but optimal intracellular bacterial growth was found to require macroautophagy. Intracellular growth upon macroautophagy inhibition was rescued by supplying excess nonessential amino acids or pyruvate, demonstrating that autophagy derived nutrients provide carbon and energy sources that support F. tularensis proliferation. Furthermore, F. tularensis did not require canonical, ATG5-dependent autophagy pathway induction but instead induced an ATG5-independent autophagy pathway. ATG5-independent autophagy induction caused the degradation of cellular constituents resulting in the release of nutrients that the bacteria harvested to support bacterial replication. Canonical macroautophagy limits the growth of several different bacterial species. However, our data demonstrate that ATG5-independent macroautophagy may be beneficial to some cytoplasmic bacteria by supplying nutrients to support bacterial growth.

  15. The use of resazurin as a novel antimicrobial agent against Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Deanna M; O'Dee, Dawn M; Cowan, Brianna N; Birch, James W-M; Mazzella, Leanne K; Nau, Gerard J; Horzempa, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The highly infectious and deadly pathogen, Francisella tularensis, is classified by the CDC as a Category A bioterrorism agent. Inhalation of a single bacterium results in an acute pneumonia with a 30-60% mortality rate without treatment. Due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need for new types of antibacterial drugs. Resazurin is commonly used to measure bacterial and eukaryotic cell viability through its reduction to the fluorescent product resorufin. When tested on various bacterial taxa at the recommended concentration of 44 μM, a potent bactericidal effect was observed against various Francisella and Neisseria species, including the human pathogens type A F. tularensis (Schu S4) and N. gonorrhoeae. As low as 4.4 μM resazurin was sufficient for a 10-fold reduction in F. tularensis growth. In broth culture, resazurin was reduced to resorufin by F. tularensis. Resorufin also suppressed the growth of F. tularensis suggesting that this compound is the biologically active form responsible for decreasing the viability of F. tularensis LVS bacteria. Replication of F. tularensis in primary human macrophages and non-phagocytic cells was abolished following treatment with 44 μM resazurin indicating this compound could be an effective therapy for tularemia in vivo. PMID:24367766

  16. Francisella tularensis Harvests Nutrients Derived via ATG5-Independent Autophagy to Support Intracellular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ziehr, Benjamin; Taft-Benz, Sharon; Moorman, Nathaniel; Kawula, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes and pneumocytes. By 24 hours post invasion, F. tularensis replicates up to 1000-fold in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To achieve such rapid intracellular proliferation, F. tularensis must scavenge large quantities of essential carbon and energy sources from the host cell while evading anti-microbial immune responses. We found that macroautophagy, a eukaryotic cell process that primarily degrades host cell proteins and organelles as well as intracellular pathogens, was induced in F. tularensis infected cells. F. tularensis not only survived macroautophagy, but optimal intracellular bacterial growth was found to require macroautophagy. Intracellular growth upon macroautophagy inhibition was rescued by supplying excess nonessential amino acids or pyruvate, demonstrating that autophagy derived nutrients provide carbon and energy sources that support F. tularensis proliferation. Furthermore, F. tularensis did not require canonical, ATG5-dependent autophagy pathway induction but instead induced an ATG5-independent autophagy pathway. ATG5-independent autophagy induction caused the degradation of cellular constituents resulting in the release of nutrients that the bacteria harvested to support bacterial replication. Canonical macroautophagy limits the growth of several different bacterial species. However, our data demonstrate that ATG5-independent macroautophagy may be beneficial to some cytoplasmic bacteria by supplying nutrients to support bacterial growth. PMID:23966861

  17. Francisella tularensis infection in a stone marten (Martes foina) without classic pathological lesions consistent with tularemia.

    PubMed

    Origgi, Francesco C; Wu, Natacha; Pilo, Paola

    2013-07-01

    The current report describes the isolation and typing of a strain of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, from the spleen of a stone marten (Martes foina) showing no classic lesions consistent with the disease. The identification of this bacterium, belonging to the World Health Organization risk 3 category and considered to have a low infectious dose, could be performed only because of an ongoing project screening F. tularensis in the environment sensu lato. The findings described herein should alert diagnostic laboratories of the possible presence of F. tularensis in clinical samples in countries where tularemia is endemic even in cases with no consistent anamnesis and from unsuspected animal species.

  18. Evidence that clade A and clade B head lice live in sympatry and recombine in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Boutellis, A; Bitam, I; Fekir, K; Mana, N; Raoult, D

    2015-03-01

    Pediculus humanus L. (Psocodea: Pediculidae) can be characterized into three deeply divergent lineages (clades) based on mitochondrial DNA. Clade A consists of both head lice and clothing lice and is distributed worldwide. Clade B consists of head lice only and is mainly found in North and Central America, and in western Europe and Australia. Clade C, which consists only of head lice, is found in Ethiopia, Nepal and Senegal. Twenty-six head lice collected from pupils at different elementary schools in two localities in Algiers (Algeria) were analysed using molecular methods for genotyping lice (cytochrome b and the multi-spacer typing (MST) method. For the first time, we found clade B head lice in Africa living in sympatry with clade A head lice. The phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated sequences of these populations of head lice showed that clade A and clade B head lice had recombined, suggesting that interbreeding occurs when lice live in sympatry. PMID:25346378

  19. What limits the morphological disparity of clades?

    PubMed

    Oyston, Jack W; Hughes, Martin; Wagner, Peter J; Gerber, Sylvain; Wills, Matthew A

    2015-12-01

    The morphological disparity of species within major clades shows a variety of trajectory patterns through evolutionary time. However, there is a significant tendency for groups to reach their maximum disparity relatively early in their histories, even while their species richness or diversity is comparatively low. This pattern of early high-disparity suggests that there are internal constraints (e.g. developmental pleiotropy) or external restrictions (e.g. ecological competition) upon the variety of morphologies that can subsequently evolve. It has also been demonstrated that the rate of evolution of new character states decreases in most clades through time (character saturation), as does the rate of origination of novel bodyplans and higher taxa. Here, we tested whether there was a simple relationship between the level or rate of character state exhaustion and the shape of a clade's disparity profile: specifically, its centre of gravity (CG). In a sample of 93 extinct major clades, most showed some degree of exhaustion, but all continued to evolve new states up until their extinction. Projection of states/steps curves suggested that clades realized an average of 60% of their inferred maximum numbers of states. Despite a weak but significant correlation between overall levels of homoplasy and the CG of clade disparity profiles, there were no significant relationships between any of our indices of exhaustion curve shape and the clade disparity CG. Clades showing early high-disparity were no more likely to have early character saturation than those with maximum disparity late in their evolution. PMID:26640649

  20. Cranial base evolution within the hominin clade

    PubMed Central

    Nevell, L; Wood, B

    2008-01-01

    The base of the cranium (i.e. the basioccipital, the sphenoid and the temporal bones) is of particular interest because it undergoes significant morphological change within the hominin clade, and because basicranial morphology features in several hominin species diagnoses. We use a parsimony analysis of published cranial and dental data to predict the cranial base morphology expected in the hypothetical last common ancestor of the Pan–Homo clade. We also predict the primitive condition of the cranial base for the hominin clade, and document the evolution of the cranial base within the major subclades within the hominin clade. This analysis suggests that cranial base morphology has continued to evolve in the hominin clade, both before and after the emergence of the genus Homo. PMID:18380865

  1. Identification of immunoreactive antigens in membrane proteins enriched fraction from Francisella tularensis LVS.

    PubMed

    Janovská, Sylva; Pávková, Ivona; Hubálek, Martin; Lenco, Juraj; Macela, Ales; Stulík, Jirí

    2007-02-15

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium causing disease in many mammalian species. The low infectious dose of F. tularensis and the ease of air-borne transmission are the main features responsible for the classification of this bacterium as a potential biological weapon. The live attenuated strain of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is currently only effective vaccine against tularemia, however, this type of vaccine has not been approved for human use. In the presented study, sub-immunoproteome analysis was performed to search for new immunogenic proteins of Francisella tularensis LVS grown under different conditions. By this approach 35 immunoreactive antigens were identified, 19 of them showed to be novel immunogens. In conclusion, sub-immunoproteome analysis resulted in successful identification of novel immunoreactive proteins. PMID:17241671

  2. Bioclimatic characteristic of oak species Quercus macranthera subsp. syspirensis and Quercus petraea subsp. pinnatiloba in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kargioglu, Mustafa; Serteser, Ahmet; Senkul, Cetin; Konuk, Muhsin

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine some bioclimatic characteristics such as humidity category (Q2), winter variant (m), the length of the dry season (LDS) and the dry season water deficit (DSWD) of naturally growing two endemic oak taxa, Quercus macranthera subsp. syspirensis and Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba, living in Turkey. Our findings showed that bioclimatic tolerance range of Q. macranthera subsp. syspirensis possess 7 different types of Mediterranean bioclimate while Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba had 8 of them. Although Q. macranthera subsp. syspirensis was ranging among the semiarid, freezing and very cold, Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba was among sub-humid, freezing and very cold ambient. It was briefly established that Q. macranthera subsp. syspirensis prefers semi-arid and very cold/freezing conditions and Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba prefers sub-humid and cold/very cold climatic conditions.

  3. ECO-EPIZOOTIOLOGIC STUDY OF FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS, THE AGENT OF TULAREMIA, IN QUÉBEC WILDLIFE.

    PubMed

    Gabriele-Rivet, Vanessa; Ogden, Nicholas; Massé, Ariane; Antonation, Kym; Corbett, Cindi; Dibernardo, Antonia; Lindsay, L Robbin; Leighton, Patrick A; Arsenault, Julie

    2016-04-28

    In Canada, Francisella tularensis , the zoonotic bacterial agent of tularemia, affects mostly snowshoe hares ( Lepus americanus ), muskrats ( Ondatra zibethicus ), and beavers ( Castor canadensis ). Despite numerous studies, the ecologic cycle and natural reservoirs of F. tularensis are not clearly defined. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of F. tularensis in snowshoe hares, muskrats, and coyotes ( Canis latrans ) in four regions of Québec, Canada, and to describe the risk of infection in relation to host and environmental characteristics at three spatial scales. Between October 2012 and April 2013, trappers captured 345 snowshoe hares, 411 muskrats, and 385 coyotes. Blood samples were tested by microagglutination tests, and DNA extracts of liver, kidney, lung, and spleen of snowshoe hares and muskrats were tested by real-time PCR to detect past and active infection to F. tularensis , respectively. Individual host characteristics, including body condition, age, and sex, were evaluated as risk factors of infection, along with ecologic characteristics of the location of capture extracted from geographic databases. Prevalences of antibody to F. tularensis and 95% confidence intervals were 2.9% (1.4-5.1%) in coyotes, 0.6% (0.1-2.1%) in hares, and 0% (0.0-0.9%) in muskrats. Francisella tularensis DNA was not detected by real-time PCR in the pools of four organs from muskrats and hares, but F. tularensis type AI was detected during testing of the individual organs of two antibody-positive hares. Exact logistic regression analyses showed that age was a significant predictor of antibody detection in coyotes, as were the proportion of forest and the proportion of area considered as suitable habitat for hares in the environment around the location of capture of the coyotes. Our results suggest a terrestrial cycle of F. tularensis in the regions studied.

  4. ECO-EPIZOOTIOLOGIC STUDY OF FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS, THE AGENT OF TULAREMIA, IN QUÉBEC WILDLIFE.

    PubMed

    Gabriele-Rivet, Vanessa; Ogden, Nicholas; Massé, Ariane; Antonation, Kym; Corbett, Cindi; Dibernardo, Antonia; Lindsay, L Robbin; Leighton, Patrick A; Arsenault, Julie

    2016-04-28

    In Canada, Francisella tularensis , the zoonotic bacterial agent of tularemia, affects mostly snowshoe hares ( Lepus americanus ), muskrats ( Ondatra zibethicus ), and beavers ( Castor canadensis ). Despite numerous studies, the ecologic cycle and natural reservoirs of F. tularensis are not clearly defined. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of F. tularensis in snowshoe hares, muskrats, and coyotes ( Canis latrans ) in four regions of Québec, Canada, and to describe the risk of infection in relation to host and environmental characteristics at three spatial scales. Between October 2012 and April 2013, trappers captured 345 snowshoe hares, 411 muskrats, and 385 coyotes. Blood samples were tested by microagglutination tests, and DNA extracts of liver, kidney, lung, and spleen of snowshoe hares and muskrats were tested by real-time PCR to detect past and active infection to F. tularensis , respectively. Individual host characteristics, including body condition, age, and sex, were evaluated as risk factors of infection, along with ecologic characteristics of the location of capture extracted from geographic databases. Prevalences of antibody to F. tularensis and 95% confidence intervals were 2.9% (1.4-5.1%) in coyotes, 0.6% (0.1-2.1%) in hares, and 0% (0.0-0.9%) in muskrats. Francisella tularensis DNA was not detected by real-time PCR in the pools of four organs from muskrats and hares, but F. tularensis type AI was detected during testing of the individual organs of two antibody-positive hares. Exact logistic regression analyses showed that age was a significant predictor of antibody detection in coyotes, as were the proportion of forest and the proportion of area considered as suitable habitat for hares in the environment around the location of capture of the coyotes. Our results suggest a terrestrial cycle of F. tularensis in the regions studied. PMID:26967133

  5. From the Outside-In: The Francisella tularensis Envelope and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Hannah M.; Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly-infectious bacterium that causes the rapid, and often lethal disease, tularemia. Many studies have been performed to identify and characterize the virulence factors that F. tularensis uses to infect a wide variety of hosts and host cell types, evade immune defenses, and induce severe disease and death. This review focuses on the virulence factors that are present in the F. tularensis envelope, including capsule, LPS, outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, secretion systems, and various molecules in each of aforementioned sub-compartments. Whereas, no single bacterial molecule or molecular complex single-handedly controls F. tularensis virulence, we review here how diverse bacterial systems work in conjunction to subvert the immune system, attach to and invade host cells, alter phagosome/lysosome maturation pathways, replicate in host cells without being detected, inhibit apoptosis, and induce host cell death for bacterial release and infection of adjacent cells. Given that the F. tularensis envelope is the outermost layer of the bacterium, we highlight herein how many of these molecules directly interact with the host to promote infection and disease. These and future envelope studies are important to advance our collective understanding of F. tularensis virulence mechanisms and offer targets for future vaccine development efforts. PMID:26779445

  6. Role of primary human alveolar epithelial cells in host defense against Francisella tularensis infection.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-08-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-kappaB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-kappaB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  7. Role of Primary Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells in Host Defense against Francisella tularensis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B.; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-κB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-κB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  8. Temperature-Dependent Gentamicin Resistance of Francisella tularensis is Mediated by Uptake Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Kathleen; Hall, Jesse; Knowlton, Samantha; Sindeldecker, Devin; Gilson, Tricia; Schmitt, Deanna M.; Birch, James W.-M.; Gajtka, Tara; Kobe, Brianna N.; Florjanczyk, Aleksandr; Ingram, Jenna; Bakshi, Chandra S.; Horzempa, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Gentamicin (Gm) is an aminoglycoside commonly used to treat bacterial infections such as tularemia – the disease caused by Francisella tularensis. In addition to being pathogenic, F. tularensis is found in environmental niches such as soil where this bacterium likely encounters Gm producers (Micromonospora sp.). Here we show that F. tularensis exhibits increased resistance to Gm at ambient temperature (26°C) compared to mammalian body temperature (37°C). To evaluate whether F. tularensis was less permeable to Gm at 26°C, a fluorescent marker [Texas Red (Tr)] was conjugated with Gm, yielding Tr-Gm. Bacteria incubated at 26°C showed reduced fluorescence compared to those at 37°C when exposed to Tr-Gm suggesting that uptake of Gm was reduced at 26°C. Unconjugated Gm competitively inhibited uptake of Tr-Gm, demonstrating that this fluorescent compound was taken up similarly to unconjugated Gm. Lysates of F. tularensis bacteria incubated with Gm at 37°C inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli significantly more than lysates from bacteria incubated at 26°C, further indicating reduced uptake at this lower temperature. Other facultative pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae) exhibited increased resistance to Gm at 26°C suggesting that the results generated using F. tularensis may be generalizable to diverse bacteria. Regulation of the uptake of antibiotics provides a mechanism by which facultative pathogens survive alongside antibiotic-producing microbes in nature. PMID:26858709

  9. Cooperation of both, the FKBP_N-like and the DSBA-like, domains is necessary for the correct function of FTS_1067 protein involved in Francisella tularensis virulence and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Senitkova, Iva; Spidlova, Petra; Stulik, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis the etiological agent of tularaemia is one of the most infectious human pathogen known. Our knowledge about its key virulence factors has increased recently but it still remains a lot to explore. One of the described essential virulence factors is membrane lipoprotein FTS_1067 (nomenclature of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strain FSC200) with homology to the protein family of disulphide oxidoreductases DsbA. Lipoprotein consists of two different domains: the C-terminal DsbA_Com1-like domain (DSBA-like) and the N-terminal FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (FKBP_N-like). To uncover the biological role of these domains, we created bacterial strain with deletion of the DSBA-like domain. This defect in gene coding for lipoprotein FTS_1067 led to high in vivo attenuation associated with the ability to induce host protective immunity. Analyses performed with the truncated recombinant protein showed that the absence of DSBA-like domain revealed the loss of thiol/disulphide oxidoreductase activity and, additionally, confirmed the role of the FKBP_N-like domain in the FTS_1067 oligomerization and chaperone-like function. Finally, we verified that only full-length form of FTS_1067 recombinant protein possesses the isomerase activity. Based on our results, we proposed that for the correct FTS_1067 protein function both domains are needed.

  10. Genetic recombination events between sympatric Clade A and Clade C lice in Africa.

    PubMed

    Veracx, Aurélie; Boutellis, Amina; Raoult, Didier

    2013-09-01

    Human head and body lice have been classified into three phylogenetic clades (Clades A, B, and C) based on mitochondrial DNA. Based on nuclear markers (the 18S rRNA gene and the PM2 spacer), two genotypes of Clade A head and body lice, including one that is specifically African (Clade A2), have been described. In this study, we sequenced the PM2 spacer of Clade C head lice from Ethiopia and compared these sequences with sequences from previous works. Trees were drawn, and an analysis of genetic diversity based on the cytochrome b gene and the PM2 spacer was performed for African and non-African lice. In the tree drawn based on the PM2 spacer, the African and non-African lice formed separate clusters. However, Clade C lice from Ethiopia were placed within the African Clade A subcluster (Clade A2). This result suggests that recombination events have occurred between Clade A2 lice and Clade C lice, reflecting the sympatric nature of African lice. Finally, the PM2 spacer and cytochrome b gene sequences of human lice revealed a higher level of genetic diversity in Africa than in other regions.

  11. Gallium Potentiates the Antibacterial Effect of Gentamicin against Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The reasons why aminoglycosides are bactericidal have not been not fully elucidated, and evidence indicates that the cidal effects are at least partly dependent on iron. We demonstrate that availability of iron markedly affects the susceptibility of the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 to the aminoglycoside gentamicin. Specifically, the intracellular depots of iron were inversely correlated to gentamicin susceptibility, whereas the extracellular iron concentrations were directly correlated to the susceptibility. Further proof of the intimate link between iron availability and antibiotic susceptibility were the findings that a ΔfslA mutant, which is defective for siderophore-dependent uptake of ferric iron, showed enhanced gentamicin susceptibility and that a ΔfeoB mutant, which is defective for uptake of ferrous iron, displayed complete growth arrest in the presence of gentamicin. Based on the aforementioned findings, it was hypothesized that gallium could potentiate the effect of gentamicin, since gallium is sequestered by iron uptake systems. The ferrozine assay demonstrated that the presence of gallium inhibited >70% of the iron uptake. Addition of gentamicin and/or gallium to infected bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that both 100 μM gallium and 10 μg/ml of gentamicin inhibited intracellular growth of SCHU S4 and that the combined treatment acted synergistically. Moreover, treatment of F. tularensis-infected mice with gentamicin and gallium showed an additive effect. Collectively, the data demonstrate that SCHU S4 is dependent on iron to minimize the effects of gentamicin and that gallium, by inhibiting the iron uptake, potentiates the bactericidal effect of gentamicin in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26503658

  12. Gallium Potentiates the Antibacterial Effect of Gentamicin against Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Helena; Sjöstedt, Anders

    2015-10-26

    The reasons why aminoglycosides are bactericidal have not been not fully elucidated, and evidence indicates that the cidal effects are at least partly dependent on iron. We demonstrate that availability of iron markedly affects the susceptibility of the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 to the aminoglycoside gentamicin. Specifically, the intracellular depots of iron were inversely correlated to gentamicin susceptibility, whereas the extracellular iron concentrations were directly correlated to the susceptibility. Further proof of the intimate link between iron availability and antibiotic susceptibility were the findings that a ΔfslA mutant, which is defective for siderophore-dependent uptake of ferric iron, showed enhanced gentamicin susceptibility and that a ΔfeoB mutant, which is defective for uptake of ferrous iron, displayed complete growth arrest in the presence of gentamicin. Based on the aforementioned findings, it was hypothesized that gallium could potentiate the effect of gentamicin, since gallium is sequestered by iron uptake systems. The ferrozine assay demonstrated that the presence of gallium inhibited >70% of the iron uptake. Addition of gentamicin and/or gallium to infected bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that both 100 μM gallium and 10 μg/ml of gentamicin inhibited intracellular growth of SCHU S4 and that the combined treatment acted synergistically. Moreover, treatment of F. tularensis-infected mice with gentamicin and gallium showed an additive effect. Collectively, the data demonstrate that SCHU S4 is dependent on iron to minimize the effects of gentamicin and that gallium, by inhibiting the iron uptake, potentiates the bactericidal effect of gentamicin in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Small Molecule Control of Virulence Gene Expression in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Charity, James C.; Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Costante-Hamm, Michelle M.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Dove, Simon L.

    2009-01-01

    In Francisella tularensis, the SspA protein family members MglA and SspA form a complex that associates with RNA polymerase (RNAP) to positively control the expression of virulence genes critical for the intramacrophage growth and survival of the organism. Although the association of the MglA-SspA complex with RNAP is evidently central to its role in controlling gene expression, the molecular details of how MglA and SspA exert their effects are not known. Here we show that in the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis (LVS), the MglA-SspA complex works in concert with a putative DNA-binding protein we have called PigR, together with the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), to regulate the expression of target genes. In particular, we present evidence that MglA, SspA, PigR and ppGpp regulate expression of the same set of genes, and show that mglA, sspA, pigR and ppGpp null mutants exhibit similar intramacrophage growth defects and are strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. We show further that PigR interacts directly with the MglA-SspA complex, suggesting that the central role of the MglA and SspA proteins in the control of virulence gene expression is to serve as a target for a transcription activator. Finally, we present evidence that ppGpp exerts its effects by promoting the interaction between PigR and the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex. Through its responsiveness to ppGpp, the contact between PigR and the MglA-SspA complex allows the integration of nutritional cues into the regulatory network governing virulence gene expression. PMID:19876386

  14. Francisella tularensis Subtype A.II Genomic Plasticity in Comparison with Subtype A.I

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Marilynn A.; Nalbantoglu, Ufuk; Sayood, Khalid; Zentz, Emily B.; Bartling, Amanda M.; Francesconi, Stephen C.; Fey, Paul D.; Dempsey, Michael P.; Hinrichs, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Although Francisella tularensis is considered a monomorphic intracellular pathogen, molecular genotyping and virulence studies have demonstrated important differences within the tularensis subspecies (type A). To evaluate genetic variation within type A strains, sequencing and assembly of a new subtype A.II genome was achieved for comparison to other completed F. tularensis type A genomes. In contrast with the F. tularensis A.I strains (SCHU S4, FSC198, NE061598, and TI0902), substantial genomic variation was observed between the newly sequenced F. tularensis A.II strain (WY-00W4114) and the only other publically available A.II strain (WY96-3418). Genome differences between WY-00W4114 and WY96-3418 included three major chromosomal translocations, 1580 indels, and 286 nucleotide substitutions of which 159 were observed in predicted open reading frames and 127 were located in intergenic regions. The majority of WY-00W4114 nucleotide deletions occurred in intergenic regions, whereas most of the insertions and substitutions occurred in predicted genes. Of the nucleotide substitutions, 48 (30%) were synonymous and 111 (70%) were nonsynonymous. WY-00W4114 and WY96-3418 nucleotide polymorphisms were predominantly G/C to A/T allelic mutations, with WY-00W4114 having more A+T enrichment. In addition, the A.II genomes contained a considerably higher number of intact genes and longer repetitive sequences, including transposon remnants than the A.I genomes. Together these findings support the premise that F. tularensis A.II may have a fitness advantage compared to the A.I subtype due to the higher abundance of functional genes and repeated chromosomal sequences. A better understanding of the selective forces driving F. tularensis genetic diversity and plasticity is needed. PMID:25918839

  15. Dissecting the taxonomic heterogeneity within Propionibacterium acnes: proposal for Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Dekio, Itaru; Culak, Renata; Misra, Raju; Gaulton, Tom; Fang, Min; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Rajendram, Dunstan; Gharbia, Saheer E; Shah, Haroun N

    2015-12-01

    Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. are described. These emanate from the three known phylotypes of P. acnes, designated types I, II and III. Electron microscopy confirmed the filamentous cell shape of type III, showing a striking difference from types I/II, which were short rods. Biochemical tests indicated that, in types I/II, either the pyruvate, l-pyrrolidonyl arylamidase or d-ribose 2 test was positive, whereas all of these were negative among type III strains. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) spectra, which profile mainly their ribosomal proteins, were different between these two groups. Surface-enhanced laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) spectra of all phylotypes revealed a specific protein biomarker that was overexpressed in type III strains compared with types I/II only when grown aerobically. Reference strains had high whole-genome similarity between types I (>91 %) and II (>75 %), but a considerably lower level of 72 % similarity with type III. recA and gyrB sequence dendrograms confirmed the distant relatedness of type III, indicating the presence of two distinct centres of variation within the species P. acnes. On the other hand, cellular fatty acid profiles and 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness (>99.3 %) circumscribed the species. Thus, we propose two subspecies, Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. for types I/II and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. for type III. The type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes is NCTC 737T ( = ATCC 6919T = JCM 6425T = DSM 1897T = CCUG 1794T), while the type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum is K124T ( = NCTC 13655T = JCM 18919T). PMID:26432704

  16. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  17. The Protease Locus of Francisella tularensis LVS Is Required for Stress Tolerance and Infection in the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    He, Lihong; Nair, Manoj Kumar Mohan; Chen, Yuling; Liu, Xue; Zhang, Mengyun; Hazlett, Karsten R. O.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia and a category A potential agent of bioterrorism, but the pathogenic mechanisms of F. tularensis are largely unknown. Our previous transposon mutagenesis screen identified 95 lung infectivity-associated F. tularensis genes, including those encoding the Lon and ClpP proteases. The present study validates the importance of Lon and ClpP in intramacrophage growth and infection of the mammalian host by using unmarked deletion mutants of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS). Further experiments revealed that lon and clpP are also required for F. tularensis tolerance to stressful conditions. A quantitative proteomic comparison between heat-stressed LVS and the isogenic Lon-deficient mutant identified 29 putative Lon substrate proteins. The follow-up protein degradation experiments identified five substrates of the F. tularensis Lon protease (FTL578, FTL663, FTL1217, FTL1228, and FTL1957). FTL578 (ornithine cyclodeaminase), FTL663 (heat shock protein), and FTL1228 (iron-sulfur activator complex subunit SufD) have been previously described as virulence-associated factors in F. tularensis. Identification of these Lon substrates has thus provided important clues for further understanding of the F. tularensis stress response and pathogenesis. The high-throughput approach developed in this study can be used for systematic identification of the Lon substrates in other prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26902724

  18. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles W.; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22663564

  19. Francisella tularensis Strain Typing Using Multiple-Locus, Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Jason; Smith, Kimothy L.; Wong, Jane; Abrams, Michelle; Lytle, Michael; Keim, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is found throughout the Northern hemisphere. After analyzing the F. tularensis genomic sequence for potential variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs), we developed a multilocus VNTR analysis (MLVA) typing system for this pathogen. Variation was detected at six VNTR loci in a set of 56 isolates from California, Oklahoma, Arizona, and Oregon and the F. tularensis live vaccine strain. PCR assays revealed diversity at these loci with total allele numbers ranging from 2 to 20, and Nei's diversity index values ranging from 0.36 to 0.93. Cluster analysis identified two genetically distinct groups consistent with the current biovar classification system of F. tularensis. These findings suggest that these VNTR markers are useful for identifying F. tularensis isolates at this taxonomic level. In this study, biovar B isolates were less diverse than those in biovar A, possibly reflecting the history of tularemia in North America. Seven isolates from a recent epizootic in Maricopa County, Ariz., were identical at all VNTR marker loci. Their identity, even at a hypervariable VNTR locus, indicates a common source of infection. This demonstrates the applicability of MLVA for rapid characterization and identification of outbreak isolates. Future construction of reference databases will allow faster outbreak tracking as well as providing a foundation for deciphering global genetic relationships. PMID:11526148

  20. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-07-06

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

  1. The Francisella Tularensis Proteome and its Recognition by Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kilmury, Sara L. N.; Twine, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. The extreme virulence of the pathogen in humans, combined with the low infectious dose and the ease of dissemination by aerosol have led to concerns about its abuse as a bioweapon. Until recently, nothing was known about the virulence mechanisms and even now, there is still a relatively poor understanding of pathogen virulence. Completion of increasing numbers of Francisella genome sequences, combined with comparative genomics and proteomics studies, are contributing to the knowledge in this area. Tularemia may be treated with antibiotics, but there is currently no licensed vaccine. An attenuated strain, the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) has been used to vaccinate military and at risk laboratory personnel, but safety concerns mean that it is unlikely to be licensed by the FDA for general use. Little is known about the protective immunity induced by vaccination with LVS, in humans or animal models. Immunoproteomics studies with sera from infected humans or vaccinated mouse strains, are being used in gel-based or proteome microarray approaches to give insight into the humoral immune response. In addition, these data have the potential to be exploited in the identification of new diagnostic or protective antigens, the design of next generation live vaccine strains, and the development of subunit vaccines. Herein, we briefly review the current knowledge from Francisella comparative proteomics studies and then focus upon the findings from immunoproteomics approaches. PMID:21687770

  2. Early Interactions of Murine Macrophages with Francisella tularensis Map to Mouse Chromosome 19

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Avner; Hassan, Musa A.; Okan, Nihal A.; Sheffer, Michal; Camejo, Ana; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Differences among individuals in susceptibility to infectious diseases can be modulated by host genetics. Much of the research in this field has aimed to identify loci within the host genome that are associated with these differences. In mice, A/J (AJ) and C57BL/6J (B6) mice show differential susceptibilities to various pathogens, including the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis. Because macrophages are the main initial target during F. tularensis infection, we explored early interactions of macrophages from these two mouse strains with F. tularensis as well as the genetic factors underlying these interactions. Our results indicate that bacterial interactions with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) during early stages of infection are different in the AJ and B6 strains. During these early stages, bacteria are more numerous in B6 than in AJ macrophages and display differences in trafficking and early transcriptional response within these macrophages. To determine the genetic basis for these differences, we infected BMDMs isolated from recombinant inbred (RI) mice derived from reciprocal crosses between AJ and B6, and we followed early bacterial counts within these macrophages. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis revealed a locus on chromosome 19 that is associated with early differences in bacterial counts in AJ versus B6 macrophages. QTL analysis of published data that measured the differential susceptibilities of the same RI mice to an in vivo challenge with F. tularensis confirmed the F. tularensis susceptibility QTL on chromosome 19. Overall, our results show that early interactions of macrophages with F. tularensis are dependent on the macrophage genetic background. PMID:26980837

  3. Antioxidant Defenses of Francisella tularensis Modulate Macrophage Function and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, Seham M; Sanchez, Belkys C; Varanat, Mrudula; Ma, Zhuo; Catlett, Sally V; Melendez, Juan Andres; Malik, Meenakshi; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-03-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia, has been used in the bioweapon programs of several countries in the past, and now it is considered a potential bioterror agent. Extreme infectivity and virulence of F. tularensis is due to its ability to evade immune detection and to suppress the host's innate immune responses. However, Francisella-encoded factors and mechanisms responsible for causing immune suppression are not completely understood. Macrophages and neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species as a defense mechanism for the clearance of phagocytosed microorganisms. ROS serve a dual role; at high concentrations they act as microbicidal effector molecules that destroy intracellular pathogens, and at low concentrations they serve as secondary signaling messengers that regulate the expression of various inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that the antioxidant defenses of F. tularensis maintain redox homeostasis in infected macrophages to prevent activation of redox-sensitive signaling components that ultimately result in suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and macrophage microbicidal activity. We demonstrate that antioxidant enzymes of F. tularensis prevent the activation of redox-sensitive MAPK signaling components, NF-κB signaling, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the accumulation of ROS in infected macrophages. We also report that F. tularensis inhibits ROS-dependent autophagy to promote its intramacrophage survival. Collectively, this study reveals novel pathogenic mechanisms adopted by F. tularensis to modulate macrophage innate immune functions to create an environment permissive for its intracellular survival and growth. PMID:26644475

  4. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  5. Testing the hypothesis that a clade has adaptively radiated: iguanid lizard clades as a case study.

    PubMed

    Losos, Jonathan B; Miles, Donald B

    2002-08-01

    The study of adaptive radiations has played a fundamental role in understanding mechanisms of evolution. A recent resurgence in the study of adaptive radiations highlights a gap in our knowledge about determining whether a clade constitutes adaptive diversification. Specifically, no objective criteria exist to judge whether a clade constitutes an adaptive radiation. Most clades, given enough time, will diversify adaptively to some extent; therefore, we argue that the term "adaptive radiation" should be reserved for those clades that are exceptionally diverse in terms of the range of habitats occupied and attendant morphological adaptations. Making such a definition operational, however, requires a comparative analysis of many clades. Only by comparing clades can one distinguish those that are exceptionally diverse (or nondiverse) from those exhibiting a normal degree of adaptive disparity. We propose such a test, focusing on disparity in the ecological morphology of monophyletic groups within the lizard family Iguanidae. We find that two clades, the Polychrotinae and Phrynosomatinae, are exceptionally diverse and that two others, the Crotaphytinae and Oplurinae, are exceptionally nondiverse. Potential explanations for differences in diversity are discussed, as are caveats and future extensions of our approach. PMID:18707482

  6. Francisella tularensis detection using magnetic labels and a magnetic biosensor based on frequency mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Martin H. F.; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Hartmann, Markus; Miethe, Peter; Oster, Jürgen; Keusgen, Michael

    2007-04-01

    A biosensor that uses resonant coils with a special frequency-mixing technique and magnetic beads as detectable labels has been established for the detection of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent for tularemia. The detection principle is based on a sandwich immunoassay using an anti-Ft antibody for immunofiltration immobilized to ABICAP ® polyethylene filters, and biotinylated with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads as labels. The linear detection range of this biosensor was found to be 10 4-10 6 cfu F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) per ml. Tested sample matrices were physiological PBS buffer and rabbit serum.

  7. Keep an Ear Out for Francisella tularensis: Otomastoiditis Cases after Canyoneering

    PubMed Central

    Guerpillon, Brice; Boibieux, Andre; Guenne, Clemence; Ploton, Christine; Ferry, Tristan; Maurin, Max; Forestier, Emmanuel; Dauwalder, Olivier; Manipoud, Patrick; Ltaïef-Boudrigua, Aicha; Gürkov, Robert; Vandenesch, Francois; Bouchiat, Coralie

    2016-01-01

    We report here three unusual cases of otomastoiditis due to Francisella tularensis, complicated by cervical abscesses and persistent hearing loss, plus facial paralysis for one patient. Intriguingly, the three patients had practiced canyoneering independently in the same French river, between 2009 and 2014, several days before clinical symptoms onset. The results point out that fresh water exposure may be a potential contamination route for tularemia. Besides, due to the frequent complications and sequelae, we believe that F. tularensis should be considered as a possible etiology in case of otitis media, failure of the conventional antibiotic treatment, and suspicious exposure of the bacteria. PMID:26973838

  8. Symbiodinium Clade Affects Coral Skeletal Isotopic Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, J.; Charles, C. D.; Garren, M.; McField, M.; Norris, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of different physiologies of Symbiodinium dinoflagellate symbiont clades on the skeletal chemistry of associated coral hosts has not previously been investigated. This is an important issue because coral skeletons are routinely used for tropical paleoclimatic reconstructions. We analyzed coral skeletal samples collected simultaneously from neighboring colonies off Belize and found that those harboring different clades of Symbiodinium displayed significantly different skeletal oxygen isotopic compositions. We also found evidence for mean shifts in skeletal oxygen isotopic composition after coral bleaching (the loss and potential exchange of symbionts) in two of four longer coral cores from the Mesoamerican Reef, though all experienced similar climatic conditions. Thus, we suggest that symbiont clade identity leaves a signature in the coral skeletal archive and that this influence must be considered for quantitative environmental reconstruction. In addition, we suggest that the skeletal isotopic signature may be used to identify changes in the dominant symbiont clade that have occurred in the past, to identify how common and widespread this phenomenon is--a potential adaptation to climate change.

  9. TaqMan Real-Time PCR Assays for Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Which Identify Francisella tularensis and Its Subspecies and Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Vogler, Amy J.; Buchhagen, Jordan; Clare, Ashley; Kaufman, Emily; Naumann, Amber; Driebe, Elizabeth; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiologic agent of tularemia and a Class A Select Agent, is divided into three subspecies and multiple subpopulations that differ in virulence and geographic distribution. Given these differences, there is a need to rapidly and accurately determine if a strain is F. tularensis and, if it is, assign it to subspecies and subpopulation. We designed TaqMan real-time PCR genotyping assays using eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were potentially specific to closely related groups within the genus Francisella, including numerous subpopulations within F. tularensis species. We performed extensive validation studies to test the specificity of these SNPs to particular populations by screening the assays across a set of 565 genetically and geographically diverse F. tularensis isolates and an additional 21 genetic near-neighbor (outgroup) isolates. All eleven assays correctly determined the genetic groups of all 565 F. tularensis isolates. One assay differentiates F. tularensis, F. novicida, and F. hispaniensis from the more genetically distant F. philomiragia and Francisella-like endosymbionts. Another assay differentiates F. tularensis isolates from near neighbors. The remaining nine assays classify F. tularensis-confirmed isolates into F. tularensis subspecies and subpopulations. The genotyping accuracy of these nine assays diminished when tested on outgroup isolates (i.e. non F. tularensis), therefore a hierarchical approach of assay usage is recommended wherein the F. tularensis-specific assay is used before the nine downstream assays. Among F. tularensis isolates, all eleven assays were highly sensitive, consistently amplifying very low concentrations of DNA. Altogether, these eleven TaqMan real-time PCR assays represent a highly accurate, rapid, and sensitive means of identifying the species, subspecies, and subpopulation of any F. tularensis isolate if used in a step-wise hierarchical scheme. These assays would be very

  10. Optimal swab processing recovery method for detection of bioterrorism-related Francisella tularensis by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Walker, Roblena E; Petersen, Jeannine M; Stephens, Kenyatta W; Dauphin, Leslie A

    2010-10-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is regarded as a potential bioterrorism agent. The advent of bioterrorism has heightened awareness of the need for validated methods for processing environmental samples. In this study we determined the optimal method for processing environmental swabs for the recovery and subsequent detection of F. tularensis by the use of real-time PCR assays. Four swab processing recovery methods were compared: heat, sonication, vortexing, and the Swab Extraction Tube System (SETS). These methods were evaluated using cotton, foam, polyester and rayon swabs spiked with six pathogenic strains of F. tularensis. Real-time PCR analysis using a multi-target 5'nuclease assay for F. tularensis showed that the use of the SETS method resulted in the best limit of detection when evaluated using multiple strains of F. tularensis. We demonstrated also that the efficiency of F. tularensis recovery from swab specimens was not equivalent for all swab processing methodologies and, thus, that this variable can affect real-time PCR assay sensitivity. The effectiveness of the SETS method was independent of the automated DNA extraction method and real-time PCR platforms used. In conclusion, diagnostic laboratories can now potentially incorporate the SETS method into specimen processing protocols for the rapid and efficient detection of F. tularensis by real-time PCR during laboratory bioterrorism-related investigations.

  11. Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain folate metabolism and pseudouridine synthase gene mutants modulate macrophage caspase-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Ulland, Tyler K; Janowski, Ann M; Buchan, Blake W; Faron, Matthew; Cassel, Suzanne L; Jones, Bradley D; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of the disease tularemia. Escape of F. tularensis from the phagosome into the cytosol of the macrophage triggers the activation of the AIM2 inflammasome through a mechanism that is not well understood. Activation of the AIM2 inflammasome results in autocatalytic cleavage of caspase-1, resulting in the processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, which play a crucial role in innate immune responses to F. tularensis. We have identified the 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cycloligase gene (FTL_0724) as being important for F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) virulence. Infection of mice in vivo with a F. tularensis LVS FTL_0724 mutant resulted in diminished mortality compared to infection of mice with wild-type LVS. The FTL_0724 mutant also induced increased inflammasome-dependent IL-1β and IL-18 secretion and cytotoxicity in macrophages in vitro. In contrast, infection of macrophages with a F. tularensis LVS rluD pseudouridine synthase (FTL_0699) mutant resulted in diminished IL-1β and IL-18 secretion from macrophages in vitro compared to infection of macrophages with wild-type LVS. In addition, the FTL_0699 mutant was not attenuated in vivo. These findings further illustrate that F. tularensis LVS possesses numerous genes that influence its ability to activate the inflammasome, which is a key host strategy to control infection with this pathogen in vivo.

  12. Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Folate Metabolism and Pseudouridine Synthase Gene Mutants Modulate Macrophage Caspase-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ulland, Tyler K.; Janowski, Ann M.; Buchan, Blake W.; Faron, Matthew; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of the disease tularemia. Escape of F. tularensis from the phagosome into the cytosol of the macrophage triggers the activation of the AIM2 inflammasome through a mechanism that is not well understood. Activation of the AIM2 inflammasome results in autocatalytic cleavage of caspase-1, resulting in the processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, which play a crucial role in innate immune responses to F. tularensis. We have identified the 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cycloligase gene (FTL_0724) as being important for F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) virulence. Infection of mice in vivo with a F. tularensis LVS FTL_0724 mutant resulted in diminished mortality compared to infection of mice with wild-type LVS. The FTL_0724 mutant also induced increased inflammasome-dependent IL-1β and IL-18 secretion and cytotoxicity in macrophages in vitro. In contrast, infection of macrophages with a F. tularensis LVS rluD pseudouridine synthase (FTL_0699) mutant resulted in diminished IL-1β and IL-18 secretion from macrophages in vitro compared to infection of macrophages with wild-type LVS. In addition, the FTL_0699 mutant was not attenuated in vivo. These findings further illustrate that F. tularensis LVS possesses numerous genes that influence its ability to activate the inflammasome, which is a key host strategy to control infection with this pathogen in vivo. PMID:23115038

  13. Members of the Francisella tularensis Phagosomal Transporter Subfamily of Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporters Are Critical for Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marohn, Mark E.; Santiago, Araceli E.; Shirey, Kari Ann; Lipsky, Michael; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Due to its aerosolizable nature and low infectious dose, F. tularensis is classified as a category A select agent and, therefore, is a priority for vaccine development. Survival and replication in macrophages and other cell types are critical to F. tularensis pathogenesis, and impaired intracellular survival has been linked to a reduction in virulence. The F. tularensis genome is predicted to encode 31 major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters, and the nine-member Francisella phagosomal transporter (Fpt) subfamily possesses homology with virulence factors in other intracellular pathogens. We hypothesized that these MFS transporters may play an important role in F. tularensis pathogenesis and serve as good targets for attenuation and vaccine development. Here we show altered intracellular replication kinetics and attenuation of virulence in mice infected with three of the nine Fpt mutant strains compared with wild-type (WT) F. tularensis LVS. The vaccination of mice with these mutant strains was protective against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge. Additionally, we observed pronounced differences in cytokine profiles in the livers of mutant-infected mice, suggesting that alterations in in vivo cytokine responses are a major contributor to the attenuation observed for these mutant strains. These results confirm that this subset of MFS transporters plays an important role in the pathogenesis of F. tularensis and suggest that a focus on the development of attenuated Fpt subfamily MFS transporter mutants is a viable strategy toward the development of an efficacious vaccine. PMID:22508856

  14. Herbivory increases diversification across insect clades.

    PubMed

    Wiens, John J; Lapoint, Richard T; Whiteman, Noah K

    2015-09-24

    Insects contain more than half of all living species, but the causes of their remarkable diversity remain poorly understood. Many authors have suggested that herbivory has accelerated diversification in many insect clades. However, others have questioned the role of herbivory in insect diversification. Here, we test the relationships between herbivory and insect diversification across multiple scales. We find a strong, positive relationship between herbivory and diversification among insect orders. However, herbivory explains less variation in diversification within some orders (Diptera, Hemiptera) or shows no significant relationship with diversification in others (Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera). Thus, we support the overall importance of herbivory for insect diversification, but also show that its impacts can vary across scales and clades. In summary, our results illuminate the causes of species richness patterns in a group containing most living species, and show the importance of ecological impacts on diversification in explaining the diversity of life.

  15. Herbivory increases diversification across insect clades

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, John J.; Lapoint, Richard T.; Whiteman, Noah K.

    2015-01-01

    Insects contain more than half of all living species, but the causes of their remarkable diversity remain poorly understood. Many authors have suggested that herbivory has accelerated diversification in many insect clades. However, others have questioned the role of herbivory in insect diversification. Here, we test the relationships between herbivory and insect diversification across multiple scales. We find a strong, positive relationship between herbivory and diversification among insect orders. However, herbivory explains less variation in diversification within some orders (Diptera, Hemiptera) or shows no significant relationship with diversification in others (Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera). Thus, we support the overall importance of herbivory for insect diversification, but also show that its impacts can vary across scales and clades. In summary, our results illuminate the causes of species richness patterns in a group containing most living species, and show the importance of ecological impacts on diversification in explaining the diversity of life. PMID:26399434

  16. A response regulator promotes Francisella tularensis intramacrophage growth by repressing an anti-virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn M; Dove, Simon L

    2016-08-01

    The orphan response regulator PmrA is essential for the intramacrophage growth and survival of Francisella tularensis. PmrA was thought to promote intramacrophage growth by binding directly to promoters on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) and positively regulating the expression of FPI genes, which encode a Type VI secretion system required for intramacrophage growth. Using both ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq we identify those regions of the F. tularensis chromosome occupied by PmrA and those genes that are regulated by PmrA. We find that PmrA associates with 252 distinct regions of the F. tularensis chromosome, but exerts regulatory effects at only a few of these locations. Rather than by functioning directly as an activator of FPI gene expression we present evidence that PmrA promotes intramacrophage growth by repressing the expression of a single target gene we refer to as priM (PmrA-repressed inhibitor of intramacrophage growth). Our findings thus indicate that the role of PmrA in facilitating intracellular growth is to repress a previously unknown anti-virulence factor. PriM is the first bacterially encoded factor to be described that can interfere with the intramacrophage growth and survival of F. tularensis. PMID:27169554

  17. Inactivation of F.tularensis Utah-112 on food and food contact surfaces by ultraviolet light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia, a plague-like illness that affects animals and humans, and has caused large illness pandemics in the last century. It has also been used as a biological warfare agent, and tularemia can be contracted through consumption of contaminated food...

  18. Chemical Synthesis and Immunological Evaluation of the Inner-Core Oligosaccharide of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Boltje, Thomas J.; Zhong, Wei; Park, Jin; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Chen, Wangxue

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, which is a gram negative bacterium that causes tularemia, has been classified by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a category A bioweapon. The development of vaccines, immunotherapeutics and diagnostics for F. tularensis requires a detailed knowledge of the saccharide structures that can be recognized by protective antibodies. We have synthesized the inner core region of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of F. tularensis to probe antigenic responses elicited by a live and subunit vaccine. The successful preparation of the target compound relied on the use of a disaccharide which was modified by the orthogonal protecting groups diethylisopropylsilyl (DEIPS), 2-naphthylmethyl (Nap), allyl ether (All) and levulinoyl (Lev) ester. The ability to remove the protecting groups in different orders made it possible to establish the optimal glycosylations sequence to prepare a highly crowded 1,2,3-cis configured branching point. A variety of different methods were exploited to control anomeric selectivities of the glycosylations. A comparison of the 1H NMR spectra of isolated material and the synthetic derivative confirmed the reported structural assignment of the inner core oligosaccharide of F. tularensis. The observation that immunizations with LPS lead to antibody responses to the inner core saccharides provides an impetus to further explore this compound as a vaccine candidate. PMID:22867268

  19. Multifaceted effects of Francisella tularensis on human neutrophil function and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Kinkead, Lauren C; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2016-09-01

    Francisella tularensis in an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes a potentially lethal disease called tularemia. Studies performed nearly 100 years ago revealed that neutrophil accumulation in infected tissues correlates directly with the extent of necrotic damage during F. tularensis infection. However, the dynamics and details of bacteria-neutrophil interactions have only recently been studied in detail. Herein, we review current understanding regarding the mechanisms that recruit neutrophils to F. tularensis-infected lungs, opsonization and phagocytosis, evasion and inhibition of neutrophil defense mechanisms, as well as the ability of F. tularensis to prolong neutrophil lifespan. In addition, we discuss distinctive features of the bacterium, including its ability to act at a distance to alter overall neutrophil responsiveness to exogenous stimuli, and the evidence which suggests that macrophages and neutrophils play distinct roles in tularemia pathogenesis, such that macrophages are major vehicles for intracellular growth and dissemination, whereas neutrophils drive tissue destruction by dysregulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27558340

  20. Activities of Murine Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Provide Immune Correlates That Predict Francisella tularensis Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mittereder, Lara; Kennett, Nikki J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified potential correlates of vaccine-induced protection against Francisella tularensis using murine splenocytes and further demonstrated that the relative levels of gene expression varied significantly between tissues. In contrast to splenocytes, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) represent a means to bridge vaccine efficacy in animal models to that in humans. Here we take advantage of this easily accessible source of immune cells to investigate cell-mediated immune responses against tularemia, whose sporadic incidence makes clinical trials of vaccines difficult. Using PBLs from mice vaccinated with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and related attenuated strains, we combined the control of in vitro Francisella replication within macrophages with gene expression analyses. The in vitro functions of PBLs, particularly the control of intramacrophage LVS replication, reflected the hierarchy of in vivo protection conferred by LVS-derived vaccines. Moreover, several genes previously identified by the evaluation of splenocytes were also found to be differentially expressed in immune PBLs. In addition, more extensive screening identified additional potential correlates of protection. Finally, expression of selected genes in mouse PBLs obtained shortly after vaccination, without ex vivo restimulation, was different among vaccine groups, suggesting a potential tool to monitor efficacious vaccine-induced immune responses against F. tularensis. Our studies demonstrate that murine PBLs can be used productively to identify potential correlates of protection against F. tularensis and to expand and refine a comprehensive set of protective correlates. PMID:26810039

  1. Comparative genomics in the Amoebozoa clade.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Gernot; Noegel, Angelika A

    2013-02-01

    Amoeboid life forms can be found throughout the evolutionary tree. The greatest proportion of these life forms is found in the Amoebozoa clade, one of the six major eukaryote evolutionary branches. Despite its common origin this clade exhibits a wide diversity of lifestyles including free-living and parasitic species and species with multicellular and multinucleate life stages. In this group, development, cooperation, and social behaviour can be studied in addition to traits common to unicellular organisms. To date, only a few Amoebozoa genomes have been sequenced completely, however a number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and complete and draft genomes have become available recently for several species that represent some of the major evolutionary lineages in this clade. This resource allows us to compare and analyse the evolutionary history and fate of branch-specific genes if properly exploited. Despite the large evolutionary time scale since the emergence of the major groups the genomic organization in Amoebozoa has retained common features. The number of Amoebozoa-specific genetic inventions seems to be rather small. The emergence of subgroups is accompanied by gene and domain losses and acquisitions of bacterial gene material. The sophisticated developmental cycles of Myxogastria and Dictyosteliida likely have a common origin and are deeply rooted in amoebozoan evolution. In this review we describe initial approaches to comparative genomics in Amoebozoa, summarize recent findings, and identify goals for further studies.

  2. Thermal resistance of Francisella tularensis in infant formula and fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Trujillo, S; Hao, Y Y D; Whiting, R C

    2008-11-01

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause gastrointestinal or oropharyngeal tularemia from ingestion of contaminated food or water. Despite the potential for accidental or intentional contamination of foods with F. tularensis, little information exists on the thermal stability of this organism in food matrices. In the present study, the thermal resistance of the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis in four food products (liquid infant formula, apple juice, mango juice, and orange juice) was investigated. D-values ranged from 12 s (57.5 degrees C) to 580 s (50 degrees C) in infant formula with a z-value of 4.37 degrees C. D-values in apple juice ranged from 8 s (57.5 degrees C) to 59 s (50 degrees C) with a z-value of 9.17 degrees C. The live vaccine strain did not survive at temperatures above 55 degrees C in mango juice and orange juice (>6-log inactivation). D-values at 55 to 47.5 degrees C were 15 to 59 s in mango juice and 16 to 105 s in orange juice with z-values of 9.28 and 12.30 degrees C, respectively. These results indicate that current pasteurization parameters used for destroying common foodborne bacterial pathogens are adequate for eliminating F. tularensis in the four foods tested. This study is the first to determine thermal inactivation of F. tularensis in specific foods and will permit comparisons with the thermal inactivation data of other more traditional foodborne pathogens.

  3. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Rachael C.; Batten, Laura E.; Wells, Neil J.; Oyston, Petra C.F.; Roach, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the ‘alarmones’ (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5′,3′-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia. PMID:26450927

  4. PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNE RESPONSES OF FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS STRAINS IN WILD-CAUGHT COTTONTAIL RABBITS (SYLVILAGUS SPP.).

    PubMed

    Brown, Vienna R; Adney, Danielle R; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Gordy, Paul W; Felix, Todd A; Olea-Popelka, Francisco J; Bowen, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, zoonotic bacterium that causes significant natural disease and is of concern as an organism for bioterrorism. Serologic testing of wildlife is frequently used to monitor spatial patterns of infection and to quantify exposure. Cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp.) are a natural reservoir for F. tularensis in the US, although very little work has been done experimentally to determine how these animals respond to infection; thus, information gathered from field samples can be difficult to interpret. We characterized clinical disease, bacteremia, pathology, and antibody kinetics of North American cottontail rabbits experimentally infected with five strains of F. tularensis. Rabbits were infected with four field strains, including MA00-2987 (type A1b), WY96-3418 (type A2), KY99-3387, and OR96-0246 (type B), and with SchuS4 (type A1a), a widely used, virulent laboratory strain. Infection with the different strains of the bacterium resulted in varied patterns of clinical disease, gross pathology, and histopathology. Each of the type A strains were highly virulent, with rabbits succumbing to infection 3-13 d after infection. At necropsy, numerous microabscesses were observed in the livers and spleens of most rabbits, associated with high bacterial organ burdens. In contrast, most rabbits infected with type B strains developed mild fever and became lethargic, but the disease was infrequently lethal. Those rabbits infected with type B strains that survived past 14 d developed a robust humoral immune response, and F. tularensis was not isolated from liver, spleen, or lung of those animals. Understanding F. tularensis infection in a natural reservoir species can guide serosurveillance and generate new insights into environmental maintenance of this pathogen.

  5. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Rachael C; Batten, Laura E; Wells, Neil J; Oyston, Petra C F; Roach, Peter L

    2015-10-08

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the 'alarmones' (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5',3'-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia.

  6. Leucobacter musarum subsp. musarum sp. nov., subsp. nov., Leucobacter musarum subsp. japonicus subsp. nov., and Leucobacter celer subsp. astrifaciens subsp. nov., three nematopathogenic bacteria isolated from Caenorhabditis, with an emended description of Leucobacter celer

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Three Gram-stain-positive, irregular-rod-shaped, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from nematodes collected from Santa Antao, Cabo Verde (CBX151T, CBX152T) and Kakegawa, Japan (CBX130T). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strains CBX130T, CBX151T and CBX152T were shown to belong to the genus Leucobacter. This affiliation was supported by chemotaxonomic data (2,4-diaminobutyric acid in the cell wall; major respiratory quinones MK-10 and MK-11; major polar lipids phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; major fatty acids anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0). Strains CBX130T and CBX152T were found to share salient characteristics. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical analysis, strain CBX152T represents a novel species of the genus Leucobacter, for which the name Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. (type strain CBX152T = DSM 27160T = CIP 110721T) is proposed. Two subspecies of Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. are proposed: Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. subsp. musarum subsp. nov. (type strain CBX152T = DSM 27160T = CIP 110721T) and Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. subsp. japonicus subsp. nov. (type strain CBX130T = DSM 27158T = CIP 110719T). The third novel strain, CBX151T, showed genetic similarities with Leucobacter celer NAL101T indicating that these strains belong to the same species. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical differences it is proposed to split the species Leucobacter celer into two novel subspecies, Leucobacter celer subsp. celer subsp. nov. (type strain NAL101T = KACC 14220T = JCM 16465T) and Leucobacter celer subsp. astrifaciens subsp. nov. (type strain CBX151T = DSM 27159T = CIP 110720T), and to emend the description of Leucobacter celer Shin et al. 2011. PMID:26275616

  7. Re-emergence of tularemia in Germany: Presence of Francisella tularensis in different rodent species in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Kaysser, Philipp; Seibold, Erik; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Pfeffer, Martin; Essbauer, Sandra; Splettstoesser, Wolf D

    2008-01-01

    Background Tularemia re-emerged in Germany starting in 2004 (with 39 human cases from 2004 to 2007) after over 40 years of only sporadic human infections. The reasons for this rise in case numbers are unknown as is the possible reservoir of the etiologic agent Francisella (F.) tularensis. No systematic study on the reservoir situation of F. tularensis has been published for Germany so far. Methods We investigated three areas six to ten months after the initial tularemia outbreaks for the presence of F. tularensis among small mammals, ticks/fleas and water. The investigations consisted of animal live-trapping, serologic testing, screening by real-time-PCR and cultivation. Results A total of 386 small mammals were trapped. F. tularensis was detected in five different rodent species with carrier rates of 2.04, 6.94 and 10.87% per trapping area. None of the ticks or fleas (n = 432) tested positive for F. tularensis. We were able to demonstrate F. tularensis-specific DNA in one of 28 water samples taken in one of the outbreak areas. Conclusion The findings of our study stress the need for long-term surveillance of natural foci in order to get a better understanding of the reasons for the temporal and spatial patterns of tularemia in Germany. PMID:19014635

  8. Francisella tularensis LVS surface and membrane proteins as targets of effective post-exposure immunization for tularemia.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jeffrey C; Sutherland, Marjorie D; Harton, Marisa R; Molins, Claudia R; Anderson, Rebecca V; Heaslip, Darragh G; Bosio, Catharine M; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Francisella tularensis causes disease (tularemia) in a large number of mammals, including man. We previously demonstrated enhanced efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy for tularemia by postexposure passive transfer of immune sera developed against a F. tularensis LVS membrane protein fraction (MPF). However, the protein composition of this immunogenic fraction was not defined. Proteomic approaches were applied to define the protein composition and identify the immunogens of MPF. MPF consisted of at least 299 proteins and 2-D Western blot analyses using sera from MPF-immunized and F. tularensis LVS-vaccinated mice coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified 24 immunoreactive protein spots containing 45 proteins. A reverse vaccinology approach that applied labeling of F. tularensis LVS surface proteins and bioinformatics was used to reduce the complexity of potential target immunogens. Bioinformatics analyses of the immunoreactive proteins reduced the number of immunogen targets to 32. Direct surface labeling of F. tularensis LVS resulted in the identification of 31 surface proteins. However, only 13 of these were reactive with MPF and/or F. tularensis LVS immune sera. Collectively, this use of orthogonal proteomic approaches reduced the complexity of potential immunogens in MPF by 96% and allowed for prioritization of target immunogens for antibody-based immunotherapies against tularemia.

  9. Protective B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide in a mouse model of respiratory tularaemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaohua; Madico, Guillermo; Roche, Marly I; Wang, Qi; Hui, Julia H; Perkins, Hillary M; Zaia, Joseph; Costello, Catherine E; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2012-07-01

    Antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Francisella tularensis have been shown to be protective against respiratory tularaemia in mouse models, and we have previously described mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to non-overlapping terminal and internal epitopes of the F. tularensis LPS O-polysaccharide (OAg). In the current study, we used F. tularensis LPS oligosaccharides of defined OAg repeat length as molecular rulers in competition ELISA to demonstrate that the epitope targeted by the terminal OAg-binding mAb FB11 is contained within one tetrasaccharide repeat whereas the epitope targeted by the internal OAg-binding mAb Ab52 spans two tetrasaccharide repeats. Both mAbs conferred survival to BALB/c mice infected intranasally with the F. tularensis type B live vaccine strain and prolonged survival of BALB/c mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis type A strain SchuS4. The protective effects correlated with reduced bacterial burden in mAb-treated infected mice. These results indicate that an oligosaccharide with two OAg tetrasaccharide repeats covers both terminal and internal protective OAg epitopes, which may inform the design of vaccines for tularaemia. Furthermore, the FB11 and Ab52 mAbs could serve as reporters to monitor the response of vaccine recipients to protective B-cell epitopes of F. tularensis OAg.

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis Strain LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii Strain LMG 15993

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Emma; Chapman, Mary H.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies, C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis isolate LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii isolate LMG 15993. PMID:27417840

  11. Characterization of pathogenic vibrios isolated from bivalve hatcheries in Galicia, NW Atlantic coast of Spain. Description of Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus [corrected] subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Prado, Susana; Dubert, Javier; Barja, Juan L

    2015-02-01

    The taxonomic position of the bivalve pathogen PP-638 was studied together with five similar isolates. The strains were isolated from flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum) cultures during outbreaks of disease in two shellfish hatcheries (Galicia, NW Spain). The pathogenicity, previously established for PP-638, was demonstrated with all isolates and for several bivalve species, including the original hosts. On the basis of phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequences, a tight group was defined within the genus Vibrio. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on concatenated sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and the five housekeeping genes recA, rpoA, pyrH, gyrB and ftsZ revealed that these strains form a cluster within the Orientalis clade, close to the species Vibrio tubiashii. The results of MLSA, the DDH rate and the phenotypic differences with the type strain of V. tubiashii supported the differentiation of the Galician isolates as a new subspecies within V. tubiashii, for which the name V. tubiashii subsp. europaeus [corrected] subsp. nov. is proposed (type strain PP-638(T)=CECT 8136(T)=DSM 7349(T)) The emended description of V. tubiashii is included. The pathogenicity assays widen the host range of V. tubiashii to add two unreported species, Venerupis decussata and Donax trunculus, and the described as relatively resistant species V. philippinarum.

  12. Francisella tularensis type A Strains Cause the Rapid Encystment of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Survive in Amoebal Cysts for Three Weeks post Infection

    SciTech Connect

    El-Etr, S H; Margolis, J; Monack, D; Robison, R; Cohen, M; Moore, E; Rasley, A

    2009-07-28

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia, has recently gained increased attention due to the emergence of tularemia in geographical areas where the disease has been previously unknown, and the organism's potential as a bioterrorism agent. Although F. tularensis has an extremely broad host range, the bacterial reservoir in nature has not been conclusively identified. In this study, the ability of virulent F. tularensis strains to survive and replicate in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was explored. We observe that A. castellanii trophozoites rapidly encyst in response to F. tularensis infection and that this rapid encystment phenotype (REP) is caused by factor(s) secreted by amoebae and/or F. tularensis into the co-culture media. Further, our results indicate that in contrast to LVS, virulent strains of F. tularensis can survive in A. castellanii cysts for at least 3 weeks post infection and that induction of rapid amoeba encystment is essential for survival. In addition, our data indicate that pathogenic F. tularensis strains block lysosomal fusion in A. castellanii. Taken together, these data suggest that the interactions between F. tularensis strains and amoeba may play a role in the environmental persistence of F. tularensis.

  13. Pullulanase Is Necessary for the Efficient Intracellular Growth of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Deyu, Tian; Koyama, Yuuki; Park, Eun-sil; Fujita, Osamu; Hotta, Akitoyo; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Pullulanase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of polysaccharides, has been identified in a broad range of organisms, including bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and animals. The pullulanase (pulB; FTT_0412c) of F. tularensis subspecies tularensis Schu S4 is considered to be a homologue of the type I pullulanase (pulA) of the other Francisella subspecies. The significance of Francisella pullulanase has been obscure until now. In the present study, we characterized a recombinant PulB of F. tularensis SCHU P9, which was expressed as a his-tagged protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PulB was confirmed to be a type I pullulanase by its enzymatic activity in vitro. A pulB gene knockout mutant of F. tularensis SCHU P9 (ΔpulB) was constructed using the TargeTron Knockout system and plasmid pKEK1140 to clarify the function of PulB during the growth of F. tularensis in macrophages. The intracellular growth of the ΔpulB mutant in murine macrophage J774.1 cells was significantly reduced compared with that of the parental strain SCHU P9. Expression of PulB in ΔpulB, using an expression plasmid, resulted in the complementation of the reduced growth in macrophages, suggesting that PulB is necessary for the efficient growth of F. tularensis in macrophages. To assess the role of PulB in virulence, the knockout and parent bacterial strains were used to infect C57BL/6J mice. Histopathological analyses showed that tissues from ΔpulB-infected mice showed milder lesions compared to those from SCHU P9-infected mice. However, all mice infected with SCHU P9 and ΔpulB showed the similar levels of bacterial loads in their tissues. The results suggest that PulB plays a significant role in bacterial growth within murine macrophage but does not contribute to bacterial virulence in vivo. PMID:27448164

  14. Mucosal Immunization with Live Attenuated Francisella novicida U112ΔiglB Protects against Pulmonary F. tularensis SCHU S4 in the Fischer 344 Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Signarovitz, Aimee L.; Ray, Heather J.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M. N.; Chambers, James P.; Klose, Karl E.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2012-01-01

    The need for an efficacious vaccine against Francisella tularensis is a consequence of its low infectious dose and high mortality rate if left untreated. This study sought to characterize a live attenuated subspecies novicida-based vaccine strain (U112ΔiglB) in an established second rodent model of pulmonary tularemia, namely the Fischer 344 rat using two distinct routes of vaccination (intratracheal [i.t.] and oral). Attenuation was verified by comparing replication of U112ΔiglB with wild type parental strain U112 in F344 primary alveolar macrophages. U112ΔiglB exhibited an LD50>107 CFU compared to the wild type (LD50 = 5×106 CFU i.t.). Immunization with 107 CFU U112ΔiglB by i.t. and oral routes induced antigen-specific IFN-γ and potent humoral responses both systemically (IgG2a>IgG1 in serum) and at the site of mucosal vaccination (respiratory/intestinal compartment). Importantly, vaccination with U112ΔiglB by either i.t. or oral routes provided equivalent levels of protection (50% survival) in F344 rats against a subsequent pulmonary challenge with ∼25 LD50 (1.25×104 CFU) of the highly human virulent strain SCHU S4. Collectively, these results provide further evidence on the utility of a mucosal vaccination platform with a defined subsp. novicida U112ΔiglB vaccine strain in conferring protective immunity against pulmonary tularemia. PMID:23118885

  15. Effect of Aerosol Age on the Infectivity of Airborne Pasteurella tularensis for Macaca mulatta and Man

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, William D.; Jemski, Joseph V.; Hogge, Arthur L.; Eigelsbach, Henry T.; Wolfe, Elwood K.; Dangerfield, Harry G.; Gochenour, William S.; Crozier, Dan

    1966-01-01

    Sawyer, William D. (U.S. Army Medical Unit, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Joseph V. Jemski, Arthur L. Hogge, Jr., Henry T. Eigelsbach, Elwood K. Wolfe, Harry G. Dangerfield, William S. Gochenour, Jr., and Dan Crozier. Effect of aerosol age on the infectivity of airborne Pasteurella tularensis for Macaca mulatta and man. J. Bacteriol. 91:2180–2184. 1966.—In aging aerosols of Pasteurella tularensis SCHU-S4, the respiratory infectivity for man and Macaca mulatta decreased more rapidly than the viability of the organisms. Infectivity was diminished after 120 min, and was reduced 10-fold after 180 min. These findings confirmed previous observations made in mice and guinea pigs, and also revealed that smaller losses of infectivity were detectable in the primate hosts. PMID:4957611

  16. Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov., isolated from humans and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Collette; Tu, Zheng Chao; Patrick, Mary; Stiles, Tracy; Lawson, Andy J; Santovenia, Monica; Gilbert, Maarten J; van Bergen, Marcel; Joyce, Kevin; Pruckler, Janet; Stroika, Steven; Duim, Birgitta; Miller, William G; Loparev, Vladimir; Sinnige, Jan C; Fields, Patricia I; Tauxe, Robert V; Blaser, Martin J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2014-09-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of 13 Campylobacter fetus-like strains from humans (n = 8) and reptiles (n = 5). The results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS and genomic data from sap analysis, 16S rRNA gene and hsp60 sequence comparison, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and whole genome sequencing demonstrated that these strains are closely related to C. fetus but clearly differentiated from recognized subspecies of C. fetus. Therefore, this unique cluster of 13 strains represents a novel subspecies within the species C. fetus, for which the name Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov. is proposed, with strain 03-427(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2539(T) = LMG 27499(T)) as the type strain. Although this novel taxon could not be differentiated from C. fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis using conventional phenotypic tests, MALDI-TOF MS revealed the presence of multiple phenotypic biomarkers which distinguish Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov. from recognized subspecies of C. fetus.

  17. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function. PMID:26679996

  18. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function.

  19. Francisella tularensis bacteria associated with feline tularemia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Larson, Marilynn A; Fey, Paul D; Hinrichs, Steven H; Iwen, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Tularemia in the United States was examined by reviewing 106 Francisella tularensis isolates, mostly from Nebraska, collected during 1998-2012: 48% of Nebraska cases were cat-associated; 7/8 human cases were caused by subtype A.I. A vaccine is needed to reduce feline-associated tularemia, and cat owners should protect against bites/scratches and limit their pet's outdoor access.

  20. Staphylococcus petrasii sp. nov. including S. petrasii subsp. petrasii subsp. nov. and S. petrasii subsp. croceilyticus subsp. nov., isolated from human clinical specimens and human ear infections.

    PubMed

    Pantůček, Roman; Švec, Pavel; Dajcs, Joseph J; Machová, Ivana; Černohlávková, Jitka; Šedo, Ondrej; Gelbíčová, Tereza; Mašlaňová, Ivana; Doškař, Jiří; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Růžičková, Vladislava; Sedláček, Ivo

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen coagulase-negative, oxidase-negative, and novobiocin-susceptible staphylococci were isolated from human clinical specimens. The isolates were differentiated from known staphylococcal species on the basis of 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, tuf, and gap gene sequencing, automated ribotyping, (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting, and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated phylogenetic relatedness of the analyzed strains to Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus devriesei, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between representative strains CCM 8418(T), CCM 8421(T), and the closest phylogenetic neighbors confirmed that the isolates represent novel Staphylococcus species, for which the name Staphylococcus petrasii sp. nov. is proposed. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses unambiguously split the strains into two closely related subclusters. Based on the results, two novel subspecies S. petrasii subsp. petrasii subsp. nov. and S. petrasii subsp. croceilyticus subsp. nov. are proposed, with type strains CCM 8418(T) (=CCUG 62727(T)) and CCM 8421(T) (=CCUG 62728(T)), respectively.

  1. Chinchona alkaloid from Dendrosenecio kilimanjari subsp. cottonii.

    PubMed

    Were, O; Benn, M; Munavu, R

    1997-02-01

    Investigation of the Tanzanian Dendrosenecio kilimanjari subsp. cottonii resulted in the isolation of the cinchona alkaloid, cinchonidine. Conversion of cinchonidine to deoxy-cinchonidine was achieved in high yield using zinc dust in aqueous sulphuric acid. This illustrates the first reduction of a quinoline system using these reagents.

  2. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nicanor; Guevara, Jose M; Tilley, Drake H; Briceno, Jesus A; Zunt, Joseph R; Montano, Silvia M

    2013-02-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats' cheese from an uncertain source.

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of class C acid phosphatases from Francisella tularensis and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Ma, Li; Malinski, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Class C nonspecific acid phosphatases are bacterial enzymes that are secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and hydrolyze a variety of phosphomono­esters at acidic pH. These enzymes are of interest for the development of improved vaccines and clinical diagnostic methods. In one case, the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis, the class C phosphatase plays a role in bacterial fitness. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization methods for the class C acid phosphatases from F. tularensis and Pasteurella multocida are reported. Crystals of the F. tularensis enzyme diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with one enzyme molecule in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of the P. multocida enzyme diffracted to 1.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with three molecules in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction patterns from crystals of the P. multocida enzyme exhibited multiple interpenetrating reciprocal-space lattices, indicating epitaxial twinning. Despite this aberrance, autoindexing was robust and the data could be satisfactorily processed to 1.85 Å resolution using MOSFLM and SCALA. PMID:19255471

  4. Deletion of ripA Alleviates Suppression of the Inflammasome and MAPK by Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Max Tze-Han; Mortensen, Brittany L.; Taxman, Debra J.; Craven, Robin R.; Taft-Benz, Sharon; Kijek, Todd M.; Fuller, James R.; Davis, Beckley K.; Allen, Irving Coy; Brickey, Willie June; Gris, Denis; Wen, Haitao; Kawula, Thomas H.; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen and potential biothreat agent. Evasion of the immune response contributes to the extraordinary virulence of this organism although the mechanism is unclear. Whereas wild-type strains induced low levels of cytokines, an F. tularensis ripA deletion mutant (LVSΔripA) provoked significant release of IL-1β, IL-18, and TNF-α by resting macrophages. IL-1β and IL-18 secretion was dependent on inflammasome components pyrin-caspase recruitment domain/apoptotic speck-containing protein with a caspase recruitment domain and caspase-1, and the TLR/IL-1R signaling molecule MyD88 was required for inflammatory cytokine synthesis. Complementation of LVSΔripA with a plasmid encoding ripA restored immune evasion. Similar findings were observed in a human monocytic line. The presence of ripA nearly eliminated activation of MAPKs including ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, and pharmacologic inhibitors of these three MAPKs reduced cytokine induction by LVSΔripA. Animals infected with LVSΔripA mounted a stronger IL-1β and TNF-α response than that of mice infected with wild-type live vaccine strain. This analysis revealed novel immune evasive mechanisms of F. tularensis. PMID:20921527

  5. Francisella tularensis - Immune Cell Activator, Suppressor, or Stealthy Evader: The Evolving View from the Petri Dish

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Kristen M.; Rosa, Sarah J.; Hazlett, Karsten R.O.

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of pulmonary tularemia, which results from inhalation of Francisella tularensis - a significant bioterrorism concern, is the lack of an acute TH1-biased inflammatory response in the early phase of disease (days 1–3) despite significant bacterial loads. In an effort to understand this apparent hypo-responsiveness, many laboratories have utilized in vitro cell-based models as tools to probe the nature and consequences of host cell interactions with F. tularensis. The first uses of this model suggested that mammalian host cells recognize this bacterium principally through TLR2 to evoke a robust, classical TH1-biased cytokine response including TNF, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Others used this model in concert with a variety of non-genetic perturbations of the bacterial-host cell interaction and suggested that F. tularensis actively-suppressed the cellular response. Consistent with this notion, others engaged this model to assess isogenic mutants and, in many cases, found the mutant bacteria to be more pro-inflammatory than their WT counter-parts. Frequently, these observations were interpreted as evidence for the immunosuppressive function of the gene of interest. However, recently appreciated roles of the health of the bacterium and the impact of host factors have refined this model to suggest a “stealthy” mode of bacterial-host cell interaction (rather than one involving active suppression) consistent with the observations during early phase disease.

  6. Francisella tularensis 2-C-Methyl-D-Erythritol 4-Phosphate Cytidylyltransferase: Kinetic Characterization and Phosphoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Arthur; Seidle, Heather; Jawaid, Safdar; Zhou, Weidong; Smith, Clint; Couch, Robin D.

    2011-01-01

    Deliberate and natural outbreaks of infectious disease, the prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains, and the ease by which antibiotic resistant bacteria can be intentionally engineered all underscore the necessity of effective vaccines and continued development of novel antimicrobial/antiviral therapeutics. Isoprenes, a group of molecules fundamentally involved in a variety of crucial biological functions, are derived from either the mevalonic acid (MVA) or methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. While mammals utilize the MVA pathway, many bacteria utilize the MEP pathway, highlighting the latter as an attractive target for antibiotic development. In this report we describe the cloning and characterization of Francisella tularensis MEP cytidylyltransferase, a MEP pathway enzyme and potential target for antibiotic development. Size exclusion chromatography indicates the protein exists as a dimer in solution. Enzyme assays produced an apparent , , , , and a . The enzyme exhibits a strict preference for Mg+2 as a divalent cation and CTP as the nucleotide. Titanium dioxide chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified Thr141 as a site of phosphorylation. T141D and T141E site-directed mutants are catalytically inactive, suggesting a mechanism for post-translational control of metabolic flux through the F. tularensis MEP pathway. Overall, our study suggests that MEP cytidylyltransferase is an excellent target for the development of novel antibiotics against F. tularensis. PMID:21694781

  7. Francisella tularensis alters human neutrophil gene expression: insights into the molecular basis of delayed neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Justin T; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; Kobayashi, Scott D; McCracken, Jenna; Whitney, Adeline R; Deleo, Frank R; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that Francisella tularensis profoundly impairs human neutrophil apoptosis, but how this is achieved is largely unknown. Herein we used human oligonucleotide microarrays to test the hypothesis that changes in neutrophil gene expression contribute to this phenotype, and now demonstrate that F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) caused significant changes in neutrophil gene expression over a 24-hour time period relative to the uninfected controls. Of approximately 47,000 genes analyzed, 3,435 were significantly up- or downregulated by LVS, including 365 unique genes associated with apoptosis and cell survival. Specific targets in this category included genes asso-ciated with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (CFLAR, TNFAIP3, TNFRSF10D, SOD2, BCL2A1, BIRC4, PIM2, TNFSF10, TNFRSF10C, CASP2 and CASP8) and genes that act via the NFĸB pathway and other mechanisms to prolong cell viability (NFKB1, NFKB2 and RELA, IL1B, CAST, CDK2,GADD45B, BCL3, BIRC3, CDK2, IL1A, PBEF1, IL6, CXCL1, CCL4 and VEGF). The microarray data were confirmed by qPCR and pathway analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein remained abundant in polymorphonuclear leukocytes over 48 h of LVS infection, whereas BAX mRNA and protein were progressively downregulated. These data strongly suggest that antiapoptotic and prosurvival mechanisms collaborate to sustain the viability of F. tularensis--infected neutrophils. PMID:22986450

  8. Francisella tularensis - Immune Cell Activator, Suppressor, or Stealthy Evader: The Evolving View from the Petri Dish

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Kristen M.; Rosa, Sarah J.; Hazlett, Karsten R.O.

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of pulmonary tularemia, which results from inhalation of Francisella tularensis - a significant bioterrorism concern, is the lack of an acute TH1-biased inflammatory response in the early phase of disease (days 1–3) despite significant bacterial loads. In an effort to understand this apparent hypo-responsiveness, many laboratories have utilized in vitro cell-based models as tools to probe the nature and consequences of host cell interactions with F. tularensis. The first uses of this model suggested that mammalian host cells recognize this bacterium principally through TLR2 to evoke a robust, classical TH1-biased cytokine response including TNF, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Others used this model in concert with a variety of non-genetic perturbations of the bacterial-host cell interaction and suggested that F. tularensis actively-suppressed the cellular response. Consistent with this notion, others engaged this model to assess isogenic mutants and, in many cases, found the mutant bacteria to be more pro-inflammatory than their WT counter-parts. Frequently, these observations were interpreted as evidence for the immunosuppressive function of the gene of interest. However, recently appreciated roles of the health of the bacterium and the impact of host factors have refined this model to suggest a “stealthy” mode of bacterial-host cell interaction (rather than one involving active suppression) consistent with the observations during early phase disease. PMID:27695643

  9. Natural History of Francisella tularensis in Aerosol-Challenged BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chuvala, Lara; Riggins, Renaldo; Cirz, Ryan; Cass, Robert; Louie, Arnold; Drusano, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the natural history and pathogenesis of Francisella tularensis in a murine model of inhalational tularemia with the SchuS4 strain. Before the efficacy of antimicrobials could be assessed in this model, further model development was required to determine the optimal time to start therapy. This study helped define the time course of infection after aerosol challenge by quantifying the presence of bacteria in lung, blood, and spleen at multiple harvest points. In this study, mice were infected via a targeted inhaled dose of 100 50% lethal doses (LD50s) (LD50 = 300 CFU) of F. tularensis by whole-body aerosol. At 1, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 75, 78, 81, 84, 87, and 90 h postchallenge, groups of 15 animals were sacrificed and blood, lung, and splenic tissue samples were harvested, homogenized, plated, and incubated to evaluate the bacterial load in those tissues. It was determined that of the 3 sample types harvested, splenic tissue provided the most consistent bacterial counts, which steadily increased with the progressing infection. Further, it was determined that lung samples from all (15/15) animals were positive for infection at 75 h postaerosolization and that 14/15 animals had positive splenic tissue counts. Bacterial levels in blood were not predictive of treatment initiation. For future therapeutic evaluation studies in this model using F. tularensis (SchuS4), it was determined that therapy should be initiated at 75 h postchallenge and validated by spleen involvement. PMID:26824958

  10. Legionella pneumophila serogroup Lansing 3 isolated from a patient with fatal pneumonia, and descriptions of L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila subsp. nov., L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri subsp. nov., and L. pneumophila subsp. pascullei subsp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; Epple, P; Bibb, W F; McKinney, R M; Starnes, R W; Colville, J M; Selander, R K; Edelstein, P H; Moss, C W

    1988-01-01

    Previous DNA relatedness and enzyme electrophoretic mobility studies indicated heterogeneity among strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 4, 5, and Lansing 3 (a new, as yet unnumbered serogroup). In this study 60 L. pneumophila strains were studied by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method) to assess their genomic relatedness. These strains were also studied biochemically and serologically to determine whether they formed one or more phenotypic groups. DNA relatedness studies identified three groups. DNA group 1 contained the type strain Philadelphia 1 and strains from serogroups 1 through 14 of L. pneumophila. The average relatedness of DNA group 1 strains was 88% at 60 degrees C with 1.1% divergence in related sequences and 85% at 75 degrees C. DNA group 2 contained strain Los Angeles 1, the reference strain of serogroup 4, and strains of serogroups 1, 4, 5, and Lansing 3, an unnumbered serogroup. Average relatedness of DNA group 2 strains was 84% at 60 degrees C with 0.7% divergence and 87% at 75 degrees C. Reciprocal relatedness of DNA groups 1 and 2 was approximately 67% at 60 degrees C with 6.0% divergence and 48% at 75 degrees C. DNA group 3 strains were in serogroup 5. They were 98% related at 60 degrees C with 0.5% divergence and 97% related at 75 degrees C. Reciprocal relatedness of DNA group 3 and DNA group 1 was approximately 74% at 60 degrees C with 5.3% divergence and 43% at 75 degrees C, and reciprocal relatedness of DNA groups 3 and 2 was 66% at 60 degrees C with 5.7% divergence and 55% at 75 degrees C. The DNA groups could not be separated biochemically or serologically or by cell wall fatty acid and isoprenoid quinone composition. Three subspecies of L. pneumophila are proposed to accommodate the three DNA groups: L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila subsp. nov. for DNA group 1, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri subsp. nov. for DNA group 2, and pneumophila subsp. pascullei subsp. nov. for DNA group 3. PMID:3053773

  11. [Development of a novel Francisella tularensis antigen stained with tetrazolium-blue for tularemia microagglutination test].

    PubMed

    Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2013-07-01

    The isolation of Francisella tularensis in cultures is the reference method for the laboratory diagnosis of tularemia. However, due to the limitations such as the low sensitivity and need for high safety level and equipped laboratories, serologic methods are frequently used as diagnostic tools. F.tularensis-specific antibodies may be demonstrated by several methods, however microagglutination test (MA) remains the most common method with its high sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a novel MA test antigen prepared from whole F.tularensis cells and stained with tetrazolium-blue for more clear and easier evaluation. F.tularensis NCTC 10857 strain was cultured on the cysteine heart agar supplemented with 9% sheep blood and bacterial cells were harvested by scraping, collected in physiological saline (PS) and centrifuged at 1500 rpm for 10 minutes. For preparing stock antigen suspension cell concentration was adjusted to OD600=1.5, spectrophotometrically. Tetrazolium-blue solution (BTC [3,3'-(3,3'-Dimethoxy[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-diyl) bis [2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium dichloride], T4375 Sigma-Aldrich) at the final concentration of 1% was added to cell suspension and incubated at 37°C for 5 hours for absorption. Then, the living cells were chemically inactivated by formaldehyde. Repeating centrifugations were performed to discard excess dye and formaline, then 0.4% formaline saline was added on the sediment. Optimum concentration of this novel antigen (BTC-Ag) for MA test was determined by plate titration method by using standard serum sample with a known MA titer (1/128). The performance of BTC-Ag in MA test was evaluated by using 100 patient sera positive for F.tularensis antibodies, and 100 tularemia negative patient sera (of them 50 were seropositive for brucellosis). All of the results were compared with standard MA test in which safranin-O stained antigen (SO-Ag) was used. There was 100% agreement between the two tests performed with

  12. Generating Isogenic Deletions (Knockouts) in Francisella tularensis, a Highly-infectious and Fastidious Gram-negative Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    Generating bacterial gene deletion mutants, also known as knockouts (KOs), is a powerful tool to investigate individual gene functions. However, fastidious bacteria such as Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) often are difficult to genetically manipulate. Indeed, many different approaches have been tested to generate F. tularensis mutants. First, Tn5-based EZ::TN transposons have been successfully used to generate transposon libraries in F. tularensis (Qin and Mann, 2006; Weiss et al., 2007). However, creating a comprehensive transposon library with saturating mutations can be laborious, screening for gene disruption requires high-throughput assays where known phenotypes can be measured, and transposons may not completely inactivate the gene of interest or may alter downstream gene expression. Second, group II introns (also referred to as Targetron) have been used to inactivate F. tularensis genes of interest (Rodriguez et al., 2008; Rodriguez et al., 2009). Targetron functions by forming a complex between plasmid-encoded RNA and chromosomal DNA, followed by group II intron insertion into the gene of interest. The main advantage of Targetron is that it does not require an antibiotic resistance marker. However, as noted for transposons, targetron gene insertions may not eliminate all gene functions or may affect downstream gene expression. Third, homologous recombination can be used to completely replace the chromosomal target gene with a selectable marker, such as an antibiotic resistance marker. This classical genetic technique has been used in many F. tularensis studies (Ramakrishnan et al., 2008; Ren et al., 2014; Mohapatra et al., 2008; Robertson et al., 2013). To accomplish this, a suicide plasmid is engineered to include a selectable marker flanked by regions upstream and downstream of the gene of interest. This KO plasmid can be delivered into host bacteria by many methods, including electroporation, chemical transformation, or conjugation. Here, we

  13. Molecular Investigation of Francisella-Like Endosymbiont in Ticks and Francisella tularensis in Ixodid Ticks and Mosquitoes in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Duzlu, Onder; Yildirim, Alparslan; Inci, Abdullah; Gumussoy, Kadir Semih; Ciloglu, Arif; Onder, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the molecular prevalence of Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) and Francisella tularensis in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and mosquitoes in Turkey. Genomic DNA pools were constructed from a total of 1477 adult hard ticks of Rhipicephalus (Rh.) annulatus, Rh. turanicus, Rh. sanguineus, Rh. bursa, Haemaphysalis (Hae.) parva, Hae. sulcata, Hyalomma marginatum marginatum, H. anatolicum anatolicum, H. anatolicum excavatum, H. detritum detritum, H. dromedarii, Dermacentor marginatus, and Ixodes ricinus species, which were collected from several barns, cattle, and people. Genomic DNA was also extracted from pools consisting of 6203 adult female mosquito species belonging to Aedes vexans, Culex (Cx.) pipiens, Cx. hortensis, Cx. theileri, Culiseta annulata, and Anopheles maculipennis species. Conventional PCR and TaqMan probe-based real- time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene for FLEs and the lpnA gene for F. tularensis, respectively, were performed on the DNA isolates obtained. FLEs and F. tularensis were not found in any genomic DNA pools constructed from ixodid ticks and mosquitos. This study represents the first investigation of F. tularensis and FLEs in potential vector ticks and mosquitoes by molecular methods in Turkey. The present study provides useful insights into the molecular epidemiology of F. tularensis and FLEs. One of the major conclusions of the study is that tularemia outbreaks may be essentially due to direct transmission from the environment (especially from water) in Turkey and not to vector-borne transmission. PMID:26741324

  14. Mast cell toll-like receptor 2 signaling is crucial for effective killing of Francisella tularensis1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M. N.; Navara, Christopher S.; Klose, Karl E.; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Chambers, James P.; Berton, Michael T.; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is critical for early host defense against pathogens, but the contribution of mast cell TLR-mediated mechanisms and subsequent effector functions during pulmonary infection is largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that mast cells, through the production of IL-4, effectively control Francisella tularensis replication. In this study, the highly human virulent strain of F. tularensis SCHU S4 and the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) were utilized to investigate the contribution of mast cell-TLR regulation of Francisella. Mast cells required TLR2 for effective bacterial killing, regulation of the hydrolytic enzyme cathepsin L, and for coordination and trafficking of MHCII and lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). Infected TLR2−/− mast cells, in contrast to WT and TLR4−/−, lacked detectable IL-4 and displayed increased cell death with a 2–3 log increase of F. tularensis replication, but could be rescued with recombinant IL-4 treatment. Importantly, MHCII and LAMP2 localization with labeled F. tularensis in the lungs was greater in WT than in TLR2−/− mice. These results provide evidence for the important effector contribution of mast cells and TLR2-mediated signaling on early innate processes in the lung following pulmonary F. tularensis infection and provide additional insight into possible mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens modulate respiratory immune defenses. PMID:22529298

  15. Detection of Francisella tularensis-specific antibodies in patients with tularemia by a novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  16. Detection of Francisella tularensis-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Tularemia by a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R2 = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  17. Molecular Investigation of Francisella-Like Endosymbiont in Ticks and Francisella tularensis in Ixodid Ticks and Mosquitoes in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Duzlu, Onder; Yildirim, Alparslan; Inci, Abdullah; Gumussoy, Kadir Semih; Ciloglu, Arif; Onder, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the molecular prevalence of Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) and Francisella tularensis in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and mosquitoes in Turkey. Genomic DNA pools were constructed from a total of 1477 adult hard ticks of Rhipicephalus (Rh.) annulatus, Rh. turanicus, Rh. sanguineus, Rh. bursa, Haemaphysalis (Hae.) parva, Hae. sulcata, Hyalomma marginatum marginatum, H. anatolicum anatolicum, H. anatolicum excavatum, H. detritum detritum, H. dromedarii, Dermacentor marginatus, and Ixodes ricinus species, which were collected from several barns, cattle, and people. Genomic DNA was also extracted from pools consisting of 6203 adult female mosquito species belonging to Aedes vexans, Culex (Cx.) pipiens, Cx. hortensis, Cx. theileri, Culiseta annulata, and Anopheles maculipennis species. Conventional PCR and TaqMan probe-based real- time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene for FLEs and the lpnA gene for F. tularensis, respectively, were performed on the DNA isolates obtained. FLEs and F. tularensis were not found in any genomic DNA pools constructed from ixodid ticks and mosquitos. This study represents the first investigation of F. tularensis and FLEs in potential vector ticks and mosquitoes by molecular methods in Turkey. The present study provides useful insights into the molecular epidemiology of F. tularensis and FLEs. One of the major conclusions of the study is that tularemia outbreaks may be essentially due to direct transmission from the environment (especially from water) in Turkey and not to vector-borne transmission.

  18. Detection of Francisella tularensis-specific antibodies in patients with tularemia by a novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species.

  19. The first closed genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis biovar intermedius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter fetus venerealis biovar intermedius is a variant of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, the causative agent of Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis. In contrast to Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis which is restricted to the genital tract of cattle, Campylobacter fetus subsp. vener...

  20. Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov., occurring in human clinical material.

    PubMed

    Švec, Pavel; De Bel, Annelies; Sedláček, Ivo; Petráš, Petr; Gelbíčová, Tereza; Černohlávková, Jitka; Mašlanˇová, Ivana; Cnockaert, Margo; Varbanovová, Ivana; Echahidi, Fedoua; Vandamme, Peter; Pantuček, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Seven coagulase-negative, oxidase-negative and novobiocin-susceptible staphylococci assigned tentatively as Staphylococcus petrasii were investigated in this study in order to elucidate their taxonomic position. All strains were initially shown to form a genetically homogeneous group separated from remaining species of the genus Staphylococcus by using a repetitive sequence-based PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)5 primer. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, gap and tuf sequences showed that the group is closely related to Staphylococcus petrasii but separated from the three hitherto known subspecies, S. petrasii subsp. petrasii, S. petrasii subsp. croceilyticus and S. petrasii subsp. jettensis. Further investigation using automated ribotyping, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, fatty acid methyl ester analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and extensive biotyping confirmed that the analysed group represents a novel subspecies within S. petrasii, for which the name Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRL/St 12/356(T) ( = CCM 8529(T) = LMG 28327(T)).

  1. The Longibrachiatum Clade of Trichoderma: a revision with new species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Longibrachiatum Clade of Trichoderma is revised. Eight new species are described (T. aethiopicum, T. capillare, T. flagellatum, T. gillesii, T. gracile, T. pinnatum, T. saturnisporopsis, T. solani). The twenty-one species known to belong to the Longibrachiatum Clade are included in a synoptic ke...

  2. Phylogeny of Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus based on universally conserved protein-coding sequences and implications for the taxonomy of these two genera. Proposal of new taxa: X. vietnamensis sp. nov., P. luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis subsp. nov., P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis subsp. nov., P. temperata subsp. khanii subsp. nov., P. temperata subsp. tasmaniensis subsp. nov., and the reclassification of P. luminescens subsp. thracensis as P. temperata subsp. thracensis comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Tailliez, Patrick; Laroui, Christine; Ginibre, Nadège; Paule, Armelle; Pagès, Sylvie; Boemare, Noël

    2010-08-01

    We used the information from a set of concatenated sequences from four genes (recA, gyrB, dnaN and gltX) to investigate the phylogeny of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus (entomopathogenic bacteria associated with nematodes of the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema, respectively). The robustness of the phylogenetic tree obtained by this multigene approach was significantly better than that of the tree obtained by a single gene approach. The comparison of the topologies of single gene phylogenetic trees highlighted discrepancies which have implications for the classification of strains and new isolates; in particular, we propose the transfer of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. thracensis to Photorhabdus temperata subsp. thracensis comb. nov. (type strain CIP 108426T =DSM 15199T). We found that, within the genus Xenorhabdus, strains or isolates that shared less than 97 % nucleotide identity (NI), calculated on the concatenated sequences of the four gene fragments (recA, gyrB, dnaN and gltX) encompassing 3395 nucleotides, did not belong to the same species. Thus, at the 97% NI cutoff, we confirm the current 20 species of the genus Xenorhabdus and propose the description of a novel species, Xenorhabdus vietnamensis sp. nov. (type strain VN01T =CIP 109945T =DSM 22392T). Within each of the three current species of the genus Photorhabdus, P. asymbiotica, P. luminescens and P. temperata, strains or isolates which shared less than 97% NI did not belong to the same subspecies. Comparisons of the four gene fragments plus the rplB gene fragment analysed separately led us to propose four novel subspecies: Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis subsp. nov. (type strain HG29T =CIP 109949T =DSM 22391T), P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis subsp. nov. (type strain C8404T = CIP 109946T =DSM 22397T), P. temperata subsp. khanii subsp. nov. (type strain C1T =NC19(T) =CIP 109947T =DSM 3369T), and P. temperata subsp. tasmaniensis subsp. nov. (type strain T327T =CIP 109948T

  3. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  4. Use of a zwitterionic detergent for the restoration of the antibody binding capacity of immunoblotted Francisella tularensis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Fulop, M J; Webber, T; Manchee, R J

    1992-05-15

    A method for the partial restoration of the antibody binding capacity of Francisella tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following denaturation (dissociation) in boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is described. The method relies on the presence of a zwitterionic detergent in the matrix of an SDS-polyacrylamide gel and in the transfer buffer during an immunoblot. F. tularensis LPS, which had lost its earlier capacity to bind to a particular monoclonal antibody in the normal blot procedure, did bind following the addition of the zwitterionic detergent to the polyacrylamide gel and transfer buffer. A number of detergents were tested but most success in restoring antibody binding was achieved with Zwittergent 3-08. This simple modification to the immunoblot procedure proved helpful in identifying a monoclonal antibody specific to hot phenol-extracted F. tularensis LPS.

  5. Rapid High Resolution Genotyping of Francisella tularensis by Whole Genome Sequence Comparison of Annotated Genes (“MLST+”)

    PubMed Central

    Mellmann, Alexander; Höppner, Sebastian; Splettstoesser, Wolf D.; Harmsen, Dag

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism’s highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks. PMID:25856198

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Alkyl Gallates against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Silva, I. C.; Regasini, L. O.; Petrônio, M. S.; Silva, D. H. S.; Bolzani, V. S.; Belasque, J.; Sacramento, L. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, a serious disease that affects all the cultivars of citrus in subtropical citrus-producing areas worldwide. There is no curative treatment for citrus canker; thus, the eradication of infected plants constitutes the only effective control of the spread of X. citri subsp. citri. Since the eradication program in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is under threat, there is a clear risk of X. citri subsp. citri becoming endemic in the main orange-producing area in the world. Here we evaluated the potential use of alkyl gallates to prevent X. citri subsp. citri growth. These esters displayed a potent anti-X. citri subsp. citri activity similar to that of kanamycin (positive control), as evaluated by the resazurin microtiter assay (REMA). The treatment of X. citri subsp. citri cells with these compounds induced altered cell morphology, and investigations of the possible intracellular targets using X. citri subsp. citri strains labeled for the septum and centromere pointed to a common target involved in chromosome segregation and cell division. Finally, the artificial inoculation of citrus with X. citri subsp. citri cells pretreated with alkyl gallates showed that the bacterium loses the ability to colonize its host, which indicates the potential of these esters to protect citrus plants against X. citri subsp. citri infection. PMID:23104804

  7. Comparative genomics of unintrogressed Campylobacter coli clades 2 and 3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli share a multitude of risk factors associated with human gastrointestinal disease, yet their phylogeny differs significantly. C. jejuni is scattered into several lineages, with no apparent linkage, whereas C. coli clusters into three distinct phylogenetic groups (clades) of which clade 1 has shown extensive genome-wide introgression with C. jejuni, yet the other two clades (2 and 3) have less than 2% of C. jejuni ancestry. We characterized a C. coli strain (76339) with four novel multilocus sequence type alleles (ST-5088) and having the capability to express gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT); an accessory feature in C. jejuni. Our aim was to further characterize unintrogressed C. coli clades 2 and 3, using comparative genomics and with additional genome sequences available, to investigate the impact of horizontal gene transfer in shaping the accessory and core gene pools in unintrogressed C. coli. Results Here, we present the first fully closed C. coli clade 3 genome (76339). The phylogenomic analysis of strain 76339, revealed that it belonged to clade 3 of unintrogressed C. coli. A more extensive respiratory metabolism among unintrogressed C. coli strains was found compared to introgressed C. coli (clade 1). We also identified other genes, such as serine proteases and an active sialyltransferase in the lipooligosaccharide locus, not present in C. coli clade 1 and we further propose a unique scenario for the evolution of Campylobacter ggt. Conclusions We propose new insights into the evolution of the accessory genome of C. coli clade 3 and C. jejuni. Also, in silico analysis of the gene content revealed that C. coli clades 2 and 3 have genes associated with infection, suggesting they are a potent human pathogen, and may currently be underreported in human infections due to niche separation. PMID:24524824

  8. B1a cells enhance susceptibility to infection with virulent Francisella tularensis via modulation of NK/NKT cell responses*

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah D.; Griffin, Amanda J.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2013-01-01

    B1a cells are an important source of natural antibodies, antibodies directed against T-independent antigens, and are a primary source of IL-10. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (btk) is a cytoplasmic kinase that is essential for mediating signals from the B cell receptor and is critical for development of B1a cells. Consequentially, animals lacking btk have few B1a cells, minimal antibody responses, and can preferentially generate Th1 type immune responses following infection. B1a cells have been shown to aid in protection against infection with attenuated Francisella tularensis but their role in infection mediated by fully virulent F. tularensis is not known. Therefore, we utilized mice with defective btk (XID mice) to determine the contribution of B1a cells in defense against the virulent, F. tularensis ssp. tularensis strain SchuS4. Surprisingly, XID mice displayed increased resistance to pulmonary infection with F. tularensis. Specifically, XID mice had enhanced clearance of bacteria from the lung and spleen and significantly greater survival of infection compared to wild type controls. We revealed that resistance to infection in XID mice was associated with decreased numbers of IL-10 producing B1a cells and concomitant increased numbers of IL-12 producing macrophages and IFN-γ producing NK/NKT cells. Adoptive transfer of wild type B1a cells into XID mice reversed the control of bacterial replication. Similarly, depletion of NK/NKT cells also increased bacterial burdens in XID mice. Together, our data suggest B cell-NK/NKT cell crosstalk is a critical pivot controlling survival of infection with virulent F. tularensis. PMID:23378429

  9. Needle-Free Delivery of Acetalated Dextran-Encapsulated AR-12 Protects Mice from Francisella tularensis Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ky V.; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A.; Borteh, Hassan; Bachelder, Eric M.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Gunn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes tularemia and is a potential biothreat. Given the limited antibiotics for treating tularemia and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains as a biowarfare agent, new antibacterial agents are needed. AR-12 is an FDA-approved investigational new drug (IND) compound that induces autophagy and has shown host-directed, broad-spectrum activity in vitro against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and F. tularensis. We have shown that AR-12 encapsulated within acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) microparticles (AR-12/MPs) significantly reduces host cell cytotoxicity compared to that with free AR-12, while retaining the ability to control S. Typhimurium within infected human macrophages. In the present study, the toxicity and efficacy of AR-12/MPs in controlling virulent type A F. tularensis SchuS4 infection were examined in vitro and in vivo. No significant toxicity of blank MPs or AR-12/MPs was observed in lung histology sections when the formulations were given intranasally to uninfected mice. In histology sections from the lungs of intranasally infected mice treated with the formulations, increased macrophage infiltration was observed for AR-12/MPs, with or without suboptimal gentamicin treatment, but not for blank MPs, soluble AR-12, or suboptimal gentamicin alone. AR-12/MPs dramatically reduced the burden of F. tularensis in infected human macrophages, in a manner similar to that of free AR-12. However, in vivo, AR-12/MPs significantly enhanced the survival of F. tularensis SchuS4-infected mice compared to that seen with free AR-12. In combination with suboptimal gentamicin treatment, AR-12/MPs further improved the survival of F. tularensis SchuS4-infected mice. These studies provide support for Ace-DEX-encapsulated AR-12 as a promising new therapeutic agent for tularemia. PMID:26787696

  10. Automated microfluidically controlled electrochemical biosensor for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Dulay, Samuel B; Gransee, Rainer; Julich, Sandra; Tomaso, Herbert; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2014-09-15

    Tularemia is a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by a Gram-negative coccoid rod bacterium, Francisella tularensis. Tularemia is considered as a life-threatening potential biological warfare agent due to its high virulence, transmission, mortality and simplicity of cultivation. In the work reported here, different electrochemical immunosensor formats for the detection of whole F. tularensis bacteria were developed and their performance compared. An anti-Francisella antibody (FB11) was used for the detection that recognises the lipopolysaccharide found in the outer membrane of the bacteria. In the first approach, gold-supported self-assembled monolayers of a carboxyl terminated bipodal alkanethiol were used to covalently cross-link with the FB11 antibody. In an alternative second approach F(ab) fragments of the FB11 antibody were generated and directly chemisorbed onto the gold electrode surface. The second approach resulted in an increased capture efficiency and higher sensitivity. Detection limits of 4.5 ng/mL for the lipopolysaccharide antigen and 31 bacteria/mL for the F. tularensis bacteria were achieved. Having demonstrated the functionality of the immunosensor, an electrode array was functionalised with the antibody fragment and integrated with microfluidics and housed in a tester set-up that facilitated complete automation of the assay. The only end-user intervention is sample addition, requiring less than one-minute hands-on time. The use of the automated microfluidic set-up not only required much lower reagent volumes but also the required incubation time was considerably reduced and a notable increase of 3-fold in assay sensitivity was achieved with a total assay time from sample addition to read-out of less than 20 min. PMID:24747573

  11. Mouse Models of Aerosol-Acquired Tularemia Caused by Francisella tularensis Types A and B

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, David L; England, Marilyn J; Miller, Lynda; Waag, David M

    2014-01-01

    After preliminary assessment of virulence in AKR/J, DBA/1, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice, we investigated histopathologic changes in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice infected with type A (strain SCHU S4) or type B (strain 425) Francisella tularensis by aerosol exposure. In mice exposed to type A infection, changes in histologic presentation were not apparent until day 3 after infection, when pyogranulomatous inflammation was detected in spleens and livers of BALB/c mice, and in lungs and spleens of C57BL/6 mice. Histopathologic changes were most severe and widespread in both mouse strains on day 5 after infection and seemed to completely resolve within 22 d of challenge. BALB/c mice were more resistant than C57BL/6 mice in lethal-dose calculations, but C57BL/6 mice cleared the infection more rapidly. Mice similarly challenged with type B F. tularensis also developed histopathologic signs of infection beginning on day 3. The most severe changes were noted on day 8 and were characterized by granulomatous or pyogranulomatous infiltrations of the lungs. Unlike type A infection, lesions due to type B did not resolve over time and remained 3 wk after infection. In type B, but not type A, infection we noted extensive inflammation of the heart muscle. Although no microorganisms were found in tissues of type A survivors beyond 9 d after infection, mice surviving strain 425 infection had a low level of residual infection at 3 wk after challenge. The histopathologic presentation of tularemia caused by F. tularensis types A and B in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bears distinct similarities to tularemia in humans. PMID:25402174

  12. Mouse models of aerosol-acquired tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis types A and B.

    PubMed

    Fritz, David L; England, Marilyn J; Miller, Lynda; Waag, David M

    2014-10-01

    After preliminary assessment of virulence in AKR/J, DBA/1, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice, we investigated histopathologic changes in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice infected with type A (strain SCHU S4) or type B (strain 425) Francisella tularensis by aerosol exposure. In mice exposed to type A infection, changes in histologic presentation were not apparent until day 3 after infection, when pyogranulomatous inflammation was detected in spleens and livers of BALB/c mice, and in lungs and spleens of C57BL/6 mice. Histopathologic changes were most severe and widespread in both mouse strains on day 5 after infection and seemed to completely resolve within 22 d of challenge. BALB/c mice were more resistant than C57BL/6 mice in lethal-dose calculations, but C57BL/6 mice cleared the infection more rapidly. Mice similarly challenged with type B F. tularensis also developed histopathologic signs of infection beginning on day 3. The most severe changes were noted on day 8 and were characterized by granulomatous or pyogranulomatous infiltrations of the lungs. Unlike type A infection, lesions due to type B did not resolve over time and remained 3 wk after infection. In type B, but not type A, infection we noted extensive inflammation of the heart muscle. Although no microorganisms were found in tissues of type A survivors beyond 9 d after infection, mice surviving strain 425 infection had a low level of residual infection at 3 wk after challenge. The histopathologic presentation of tularemia caused by F. tularensis types A and B in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bears distinct similarities to tularemia in humans.

  13. Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. The most important bacterial warfare agents - review.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, M; Skládal, P

    2009-01-01

    There are three most important bacterial causative agents of serious infections that could be misused for warfare purposes: Bacillus anthracis (the causative agent of anthrax) is the most frequently mentioned one; however, Fracisella tularensis (causing tularemia) and Yersinia pestis (the causative agent of plague) are further bacterial agents enlisted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention into the category A of potential biological weapons. This review intends to summarize basic information about these bacterial agents. Military aspects of their pathogenesis and the detection techniques suitable for field use are discussed.

  14. Ubiquitous Promoter-Localization of Essential Virulence Regulators in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Osborne, Melisa L.; Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Su, Cathy; Nickels, Bryce E.; Dove, Simon L.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium whose ability to replicate within macrophages and cause disease is strictly dependent upon the coordinate activities of three transcription regulators called MglA, SspA, and PigR. MglA and SspA form a complex that associates with RNA polymerase (RNAP), whereas PigR is a putative DNA-binding protein that functions by contacting the MglA-SspA complex. Most transcription activators that bind the DNA are thought to occupy only those promoters whose activities they regulate. Here we show using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq) that PigR, MglA, and SspA are found at virtually all promoters in F. tularensis and not just those of regulated genes. Furthermore, we find that the ability of PigR to associate with promoters is dependent upon the presence of MglA, suggesting that interaction with the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex is what directs PigR to promoters in F. tularensis. Finally, we present evidence that the ability of PigR (and thus MglA and SspA) to positively control the expression of genes is dictated by a specific 7 base pair sequence element that is present in the promoters of regulated genes. The three principal regulators of virulence gene expression in F. tularensis therefore function in a non-classical manner with PigR interacting with the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex at the majority of promoters but only activating transcription from those that contain a specific sequence element. Our findings reveal how transcription factors can exert regulatory effects at a restricted set of promoters despite being associated with most or all. This distinction between occupancy and regulatory effect uncovered by our data may be relevant to the study of RNAP-associated transcription regulators in other pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25830507

  15. Interactions of Francisella tularensis with Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and the Murine Respiratory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Apicella, Michael A.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC due to its low infectious dose and the possibility that the organism can be used as a bioweapon. The low dose of infection suggests that Francisella is unusually efficient at evading host defenses. Although ~50 cfu are necessary to cause human respiratory infection, the early interactions of virulent Francisella with the lung environment are not well understood. To provide additional insights into these interactions during early Francisella infection of mice, we performed TEM analysis on mouse lungs infected with F. tularensis strains Schu S4, LVS and the O-antigen mutant Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn. For all three strains, the majority of the bacteria that we could detect were observed within alveolar type II epithelial cells at 16 hours post infection. Although there were no detectable differences in the amount of bacteria within an infected cell between the three strains, there was a significant increase in the amount of cellular debris observed in the air spaces of the lungs in the Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant compared to either the Schu S4 or LVS strain. We also studied the interactions of Francisella strains with human AT-II cells in vitro by characterizing the ability of these three strains to invade and replicate within these cells. Gentamicin assay and confocal microscopy both confirmed that F. tularensis Schu S4 replicated robustly within these cells while F. tularensis LVS displayed significantly lower levels of growth over 24 hours, although the strain was able to enter these cells at about the same level as Schu S4 (1 organism per cell), as determined by confocal imaging. The Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant that we have previously described as attenuated for growth in macrophages and mouse virulence displayed interesting properties as well. This mutant induced significant airway inflammation (cell debris) and had an attenuated growth phenotype in the human AT-II cells. These data extend our

  16. Proposal that Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium bolletii be united and reclassified as Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov., designation of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus subsp. nov. and emended description of Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Leao, Sylvia Cardoso; Tortoli, Enrico; Euzéby, Jean Paul; Garcia, Maria Jesus

    2011-09-01

    The names 'Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus' and 'Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense', proposed by Leao et al. (2009, J Clin Microbiol 47, 2691-2698), cannot be validly published. The purpose of this report is to provide a description in accordance with the Rules of the Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision). Moreover, the proposal of the name 'Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense' is contrary to Rule 38 and the correct name of this taxon, at the rank of subspecies, is Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov. A description of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus subsp. nov. and an emended description of Mycobacterium abscessus are also given. PMID:21037035

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii INCQS 00594.

    PubMed

    Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Viana-Niero, Cristina; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Barbosa, Maria Silvanira; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic of surgical-site infections by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii affected >1,700 patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2008. The genome of the epidemic prototype strain M. abscessus subsp. bolletii INCQS 00594, deposited in the collection of the National Institute for Health Quality Control (INCQS), was sequenced. PMID:24201191

  20. New protein fold revealed by a 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island protein IglC

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Schubot, Florian D.; Waugh, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes the fulminating disease tularemia and is considered to be a potential bioweapon. F. tularensis pathogenicity island proteins play a key role in modulating phagosome biogenesis and subsequent bacterial escape into the cytoplasm of macrophages. The 23 kDa pathogenicity island protein IglC is essential for the survival and proliferation of F. tularensis in macrophages. Seeking to gain some insight into its function, we determined the crystal structure of IglC at 1.65 Å resolution. IglC adopts a β-sandwich conformation that exhibits no similarity with any known protein structure. PMID:17905833

  1. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50% killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections. PMID:26673248

  2. Complement sensitivity and factor H binding of European Francisella tularensis ssp. holarctica strains in selected animal species.

    PubMed

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Bhide, Mangesh; Bencurova, Elena; Dolinska, Saskia; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2015-09-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularaemia. The bacterium has developed several extracellular and intracellular strategies to evade the hosts' innate and adaptive immune responses. The aims of the study were to examine complement sensitivity of wild and attenuated F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains in animal hosts of distinct sensitivity to the bacterium, to compare the complement-evading ability of wild strains of different phylogeographic background, and to examine the role of factor H in the host-pathogen interactions. Complement sensitivity assays were carried out on various F. tularensis ssp. holarctica wild strains and on the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) with sera of the highly sensitive house mouse (Mus musculus), the moderately sensitive European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and the relatively resistant cattle (Bos taurus). Specific binding of complement regulator factor H to bacterial membrane proteins was examined by Western blot assays. All wild strains interacted with the hosts' complement system and showed no significant differences in their survivability. The attenuated LVS was resistant to serum killing in mouse, but was lysed in the sera of hare and cattle. Direct binding of factor H to F. tularensis membrane proteins was not detected.

  3. Recovery of Francisella tularensis from soil samples by filtration and detection by real-time PCR and cELISA.

    PubMed

    Sellek, Ricela; Jimenez, Oscar; Aizpurua, Carmen; Fernandez-Frutos, Begoña; De Leon, Patricia; Camacho, Maite; Fernandez-Moreira, Daniel; Ybarra, Carmen; Carlos Cabria, Juan

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a specific and highly sensitive method able to detect very low concentrations of Francisella tularensis in soil samples by real-time PCR (qPCR) with SYBR Green I. tul4 gene, which encodes the 17-kDa protein (TUL4) in F. tularensis strains, was amplified using a LightCycler (LC) device. We achieved a detection limit of 0.69 fg of genomic DNA from F. tularensis subp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS), corresponding to a value less than 3.4 genome equivalents per reaction. The qPCR was shown to be specific, highly sensitive and reproducible. In addition, we evaluated 2 new methods for recovering bacteria from soil based on 1-step filtration using glass fiber filters and PVDF filters. These filtration methods enabled us to recover F. tularensis efficiently from soil samples. As few as 50 CFU per 0.5 g of soil were detected by qPCR. Capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) allowed us to detect and quantify the amount of bacteria recovered from soil by an immunological method. Although qPCR was more sensitive than cELISA, we did not observe substantial differences in the amount of bacteria quantified by both methods.

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp abscessus lung disease: 'trouble ahead, trouble behind…'.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David E

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus subsp abscessus is the most common respiratory pathogen among the rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and is also the most feared due to its well-deserved reputation for being refractory to antibiotic therapy. M. abscessus subsp abscessus has multiple innate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, but the most important one described so far is an inducible erythromycin methylase (erm) gene. M. abscessus subsp abscessus isolates may appear macrolide susceptible on initial in vitro testing but become macrolide resistant after exposure to macrolide. It is therefore very important to test clinically significant M. abscessus subsp abscessus isolates for erm gene activity. Remarkably, controversy still exists about the taxonomy and nomenclature of M. abscessus subspecies including subsp abscessus, subsp massiliense and subsp bolletii. Identification of these subspecies is not moot as M. abscessus subsp massiliense does not have an active erm gene resulting in both in vitro and in vivo susceptibility to macrolide. It is imperative from the clinician's perspective that mycobacterial laboratories correctly and rapidly identify M. abscessus to the subspecies level. Unfortunately, there are no reliably or predictably effective treatment regimens for M. abscessus subsp abscessus and better, more effective antimicrobial agents are badly needed. Surgical resection of involved lung tissue as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy is beneficial in selected patients but cannot be broadly applied. Overall, M. abscessus subsp abscessus remains a formidable respiratory mycobacterial pathogen, one that we are only beginning to understand microbiologically and one that as yet consistently evades our best efforts at successful therapeutic outcomes. 'trouble ahead, trouble behind, and you know that notion just crossed my mind'.Casey Jones, Grateful Dead (1970). PMID:25580261

  5. Discrimination of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense from Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus in clinical isolates by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Nakanaga, Kazue; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Fukano, Hanako; Sakakibara, Yumi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wada, Shinpei; Ishii, Norihisa; Makino, Masahiko; Kuroda, Makoto; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly growing mycobacterium M. abscessus sensu lato is the causative agent of emerging pulmonary and skin diseases and of infections following cosmetic surgery and postsurgical procedures. M. abscessus sensu lato can be divided into at least three subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. Clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria were previously identified as M. abscessus by DNA-DNA hybridization. More than 30% of these 117 clinical isolates were differentiated as M. abscessus subsp. massiliense using combinations of multilocus genotyping analyses. A much more cost-effective technique to distinguish M. abscessus subsp. massiliense from M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, a multiplex PCR assay, was developed using the whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense JCM15300 as a reference. Several primer sets were designed for single PCR to discriminate between the strains based on amplicons of different sizes. Two of these single-PCR target sites were chosen for development of the multiplex PCR assay. Multiplex PCR was successful in distinguishing clinical isolates of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense from samples previously identified as M. abscessus. This approach, which spans whole-genome sequencing and clinical diagnosis, will facilitate the acquisition of more-precise information about bacterial genomes, aid in the choice of more relevant therapies, and promote the advancement of novel discrimination and differential diagnostic assays. PMID:24197885

  6. Complete genome sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis strain LMG9260 and Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strain LMG15993

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies: subsps. hyointestinalis and lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of the subsp. h...

  7. Simultaneous real-time PCR detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Skottman, T; Piiparinen, H; Hyytiäinen, H; Myllys, V; Skurnik, M; Nikkari, S

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the development of in-house real-time PCR assays using minor groove binding probes for simultaneous detection of the Bacillus anthracis pag and cap genes, the Francisella tularensis 23 KDa gene, as well as the Yersinia pestis pla gene. The sensitivities of these assays were at least 1 fg, except for the assay targeting the Bacillus anthracis cap gene, which showed a sensitivity of 10 fg when total DNA was used as a template in a serial dilution. The clinical value of the Bacillus anthracis- and Francisella tularensis-specific assays was demonstrated by successful amplification of DNA from cases of cow anthrax and hare tularemia, respectively. No cross-reactivity between these species-specific assays or with 39 other bacterial species was noted. These assays may provide a rapid tool for the simultaneous detection and identification of the three category A bacterial species listed as biological threats by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PMID:17294160

  8. Comparison of bone marrow-derived and mucosal mast cells in controlling intramacrophage Francisella tularensis replication

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Colleen; Rodriguez, Annette; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Chambers, James; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Although the importance of mast cells (MCs) in response to allergens has been characterized extensively, the contribution of these cells in host defense against bacterial pathogens is not well understood. Previously, we have demonstrated that the release of interleukin-4 by bone marrow-derived MCs inhibits intramacrophage replication of Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS). Because pneumonic tularemia is one of the several manifestations of infection by Francisella, it is important to determine whether MCs present in mucosal tissues, i.e. the lung, exhibit similar effects on LVS replication. On the basis of this rationale, we phenotypically compared mucosal mast cells (MMCs) to traditional bone marrow-derived MCs. Both cell types exhibited similar levels of cell surface expression of fragment crystal epsilon receptor I (FcεRI), mast/ stem cell growth factor receptor (c-Kit) and major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI), as well as patterns of granulation. MMCs exhibited a comparable, but somewhat greater uptake of fluorescent-labeled beads compared with MCs, suggesting an increased phagocytic ability. MCs and MMCs co-cultured with primary macrophages exhibited comparable significant decreases in LVS replication compared with macrophages cultured alone. Collectively, these results suggest that MMCs are phenotypically similar to MCs and appear equally effective in the control of intramacrophage F. tularensis LVS replication. PMID:22688822

  9. NMR Structure of Francisella tularensis Virulence Determinant Reveals Structural Homology to Bet v1 Allergen Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zook, James; Mo, Gina; Sisco, Nicholas J; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Hansen, Debra T; Baravati, Bobby; Cherry, Brian R; Sykes, Kathryn; Wachter, Rebekka; Van Horn, Wade D; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-01

    Tularemia is a potentially fatal bacterial infection caused by Francisella tularensis, and is endemic to North America and many parts of northern Europe and Asia. The outer membrane lipoprotein, Flpp3, has been identified as a virulence determinant as well as a potential subunit template for vaccine development. Here we present the first structure for the soluble domain of Flpp3 from the highly infectious Type A SCHU S4 strain, derived through high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the first structure of a lipoprotein from the genus Francisella. The Flpp3 structure demonstrates a globular protein with an electrostatically polarized surface containing an internal cavity-a putative binding site based on the structurally homologous Bet v1 protein family of allergens. NMR-based relaxation studies suggest loop regions that potentially modulate access to the internal cavity. The Flpp3 structure may add to the understanding of F. tularensis virulence and contribute to the development of effective vaccines.

  10. Immunodetection of inactivated Francisella tularensis bacteria by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kleo, K; Schäfer, D; Klar, S; Jacob, D; Grunow, R; Lisdat, F

    2012-08-01

    Francisella tularensis are very small, gram-negative bacteria which are capable of infecting a number of mammals. As a highly pathogenic species, it is a potential bioterrorism agent. In this work we demonstrate a fast immunological detection system for whole F. tularensis bacteria. The technique is based on a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCMD), which uses sensor chips modified by a specific antibody. This antibody is useful as a capture molecule to capture the lipopolysaccharide structure on the surface of the bacterial cell wall. The QCMD technique is combined with a microfluidic system and allows the label-free online detection of the binding of whole bacteria to the sensor surface in a wide dynamic concentration range. A detection limit of about 4 × 10(3) colony-forming units per milliliter can be obtained. Furthermore, a rather short analysis time and a clear discrimination against other bacteria can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate two possibilities for specific and significant signal enhancement by using antibody-functionalized gold nanoparticles or an enzymatic precipitation reaction. These additional steps can be seen as further proof of the specificity and validity. PMID:22722745

  11. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L; Cole, Leah E; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 10(5) CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development.

  12. Border Patrol Gone Awry: Lung NKT Cell Activation by Francisella tularensis Exacerbates Tularemia-Like Disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Timothy M; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Cicek, Basak B; Osina, Maria A; Boyd, Kelli L; Durrant, Douglas M; Metzger, Dennis W; Khanna, Kamal M; Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    The respiratory mucosa is a major site for pathogen invasion and, hence, a site requiring constant immune surveillance. The type I, semi-invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells are enriched within the lung vasculature. Despite optimal positioning, the role of NKT cells in respiratory infectious diseases remains poorly understood. Hence, we assessed their function in a murine model of pulmonary tularemia--because tularemia is a sepsis-like proinflammatory disease and NKT cells are known to control the cellular and humoral responses underlying sepsis. Here we show for the first time that respiratory infection with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain resulted in rapid accumulation of NKT cells within the lung interstitium. Activated NKT cells produced interferon-γ and promoted both local and systemic proinflammatory responses. Consistent with these results, NKT cell-deficient mice showed reduced inflammatory cytokine and chemokine response yet they survived the infection better than their wild type counterparts. Strikingly, NKT cell-deficient mice had increased lymphocytic infiltration in the lungs that organized into tertiary lymphoid structures resembling induced bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) at the peak of infection. Thus, NKT cell activation by F. tularensis infection hampers iBALT formation and promotes a systemic proinflammatory response, which exacerbates severe pulmonary tularemia-like disease in mice.

  13. The hominin fossil record: taxa, grades and clades.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bernard; Lonergan, Nicholas

    2008-04-01

    This paper begins by reviewing the fossil evidence for human evolution. It presents summaries of each of the taxa recognized in a relatively speciose hominin taxonomy. These taxa are grouped in grades, namely possible and probable hominins, archaic hominins, megadont archaic hominins, transitional hominins, pre-modern Homo and anatomically modern Homo. The second part of this contribution considers some of the controversies that surround hominin taxonomy and systematics. The first is the vexed question of how you tell an early hominin from an early panin, or from taxa belonging to an extinct clade closely related to the Pan-Homo clade. Secondly, we consider how many species should be recognized within the hominin fossil record, and review the philosophies and methods used to identify taxa within the hominin fossil record. Thirdly, we examine how relationships within the hominin clade are investigated, including descriptions of the methods used to break down an integrated structure into tractable analytical units, and then how cladograms are generated and compared. We then review the internal structure of the hominin clade, including the problem of how many subclades should be recognized within the hominin clade, and we examine the reliability of hominin cladistic hypotheses. The last part of the paper reviews the concepts of a genus, including the criteria that should be used for recognizing genera within the hominin clade.

  14. The hominin fossil record: taxa, grades and clades

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bernard; Lonergan, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    This paper begins by reviewing the fossil evidence for human evolution. It presents summaries of each of the taxa recognized in a relatively speciose hominin taxonomy. These taxa are grouped in grades, namely possible and probable hominins, archaic hominins, megadont archaic hominins, transitional hominins, pre-modern Homo and anatomically modern Homo. The second part of this contribution considers some of the controversies that surround hominin taxonomy and systematics. The first is the vexed question of how you tell an early hominin from an early panin, or from taxa belonging to an extinct clade closely related to the Pan-Homo clade. Secondly, we consider how many species should be recognized within the hominin fossil record, and review the philosophies and methods used to identify taxa within the hominin fossil record. Thirdly, we examine how relationships within the hominin clade are investigated, including descriptions of the methods used to break down an integrated structure into tractable analytical units, and then how cladograms are generated and compared. We then review the internal structure of the hominin clade, including the problem of how many subclades should be recognized within the hominin clade, and we examine the reliability of hominin cladistic hypotheses. The last part of the paper reviews the concepts of a genus, including the criteria that should be used for recognizing genera within the hominin clade. PMID:18380861

  15. Update on Streptococcus equi subsp equi infections.

    PubMed

    Mallicote, Martha

    2015-04-01

    There are few diseases that ignite as much fervor among horse owners as strangles. Streptococcus equi subsp equi (strangles) infections frequently require the treating veterinarian to manage not only the clinical cases but also the biosecurity and provision of information to all involved parties. Although the disease is typically characterized by low mortality and high morbidity, restrictions of horse movement that result from appropriate quarantine procedures often frustrate the involved parties. The aims of this article are to provide clinically relevant information for diagnosis, treatment, and biosecurity management of strangles infection.

  16. Use of PCR-based methods for rapid differentiation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Torriani, S; Zapparoli, G; Dellaglio, F

    1999-10-01

    Two PCR-based methods, specific PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR), were used for rapid and reliable differentiation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. PCR with a single combination of primers which targeted the proline iminopeptidase (pepIP) gene of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus allowed amplification of genomic fragments specific for the two subspecies when either DNA from a single colony or cells extracted from dairy products were used. A numerical analysis of the RAPD-PCR patterns obtained with primer M13 gave results that were consistent with the results of specific PCR for all strains except L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii LMG 6412(T), which clustered with L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis strains. In addition, RAPD-PCR performed with primer 1254 provided highly polymorphic profiles and thus was superior for distinguishing individual L. delbrueckii strains.

  17. Serosurveillance for Francisella tularensis among wild animals in Japan using a newly developed competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Uda, Akihiko; Fujita, Osamu; Mizoguchi, Toshio; Shindo, Junji; Park, Chun-Ho; Kudo, Noboru; Hatai, Hitoshi; Oyamada, Toshifumi; Yamada, Akio; Morikawa, Shigeru; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia, a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, occurs sporadically in Japan. However, little is known about the prevalence of the disease in wild animals. A total of 632 samples obtained from 150 Japanese black bears, 142 Japanese hares, 120 small rodents, 97 rats, 53 raptors, 26 Japanese monkeys, 21 Japanese raccoon dogs, 20 masked palm civets, and three Japanese red foxes between 2002 and 2010 were investigated for the presence of antibodies to F. tularensis by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination (MA) test. Seropositive cELISA and MA results were obtained in 23 and 18 Japanese black bears, three and two Japanese raccoon dogs, and two and one small rodents, respectively. All MA-positive samples (n=21) were also positive by cELISA. Six of seven samples that were only positive by cELISA were confirmed to be antibody-positive by western blot analysis. These findings suggest that cELISA is a highly sensitive and useful test for serosurveillance of tularemia among various species of wild animals. Because this is the first study to detect F. tularensis-seropositive Japanese raccoon dogs, these could join Japanese black bears as sentinel animals for tularemia in the wild in Japan. Further continuous serosurveillance for F. tularensis in various species of wild animals using appropriate methods such as cELISA is important to assess the risks of human exposure and to improve our understanding of the ecology of F. tularensis in the wild. PMID:24689989

  18. Kinetic Characterization and Phosphoregulation of the Francisella tularensis 1-Deoxy-D-Xylulose 5-Phosphate Reductoisomerase (MEP Synthase)

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Safdar; Seidle, Heather; Zhou, Weidong; Abdirahman, Hafsa; Abadeer, Maher; Hix, Joseph H.; van Hoek, Monique L.; Couch, Robin D.

    2009-01-01

    Deliberate and natural outbreaks of infectious disease underscore the necessity of effective vaccines and antimicrobial/antiviral therapeutics. The prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains and the ease by which antibiotic resistant bacteria can be intentionally engineered further highlights the need for continued development of novel antibiotics against new bacterial targets. Isoprenes are a class of molecules fundamentally involved in a variety of crucial biological functions. Mammalian cells utilize the mevalonic acid pathway for isoprene biosynthesis, whereas many bacteria utilize the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, making the latter an attractive target for antibiotic development. In this report we describe the cloning and characterization of Francisella tularensis MEP synthase, a MEP pathway enzyme and potential target for antibiotic development. In vitro growth-inhibition assays using fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of MEP synthase, illustrates the effectiveness of MEP pathway inhibition with F. tularensis. To facilitate drug development, F. tularensis MEP synthase was cloned, expressed, purified, and characterized. Enzyme assays produced apparent kinetic constants (KMDXP = 104 µM, KMNADPH = 13 µM, kcatDXP = 2 s−1, kcatNADPH = 1.3 s−1), an IC50 for fosmidomycin of 247 nM, and a Ki for fosmidomycin of 99 nM. The enzyme exhibits a preference for Mg+2 as a divalent cation. Titanium dioxide chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified Ser177 as a site of phosphorylation. S177D and S177E site-directed mutants are inactive, suggesting a mechanism for post-translational control of metabolic flux through the F. tularensis MEP pathway. Overall, our study suggests that MEP synthase is an excellent target for the development of novel antibiotics against F. tularensis. PMID:20011597

  19. Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. noenieputensis subsp. nov., a symbiotic bacterium associated with a novel Heterorhabditis species related to Heterorhabditis indica.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tiarin; van Reenen, Carol; Pagès, Sylvie; Tailliez, Patrick; Malan, Antoinette P; Dicks, Leon M T

    2013-05-01

    The bacterial symbiont AM7(T), isolated from a novel entomopathogenic nematode species of the genus Heterorhabditis, displays the main phenotypic traits of the genus Photorhabdus and is highly pathogenic to Galleria mellonella. Phylogenetic analysis based on a multigene approach (16S rRNA, recA, gyrB, dnaN, gltX and infB) confirmed the classification of isolate AM7(T) within the species Photorhabdus luminescens and revealed its close relatedness to Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis, P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii and P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis. The five concatenated protein-encoding sequences (4197 nt) of strain AM7(T) revealed 95.8, 95.4 and 94.9 % nucleotide identity to sequences of P. luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis HG29(T), P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii FRG04(T) and P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis C8404(T), respectively. These identity values are less than the threshold of 97 % proposed for classification within one of the existing subspecies of P. luminescens. Unlike other strains described for P. luminescens, strain AM7(T) produces acid from adonitol, sorbitol and xylitol, assimilates xylitol and has no lipase activity on medium containing Tween 20 or 60. Strain AM7(T) is differentiated from P. luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis by the assimilation of N-acetylglucosamine and the absence of haemolytic activity. Unlike P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii, strain AM7(T) does not assimilate mannitol, and it is distinguished from P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis by the assimilation of trehalose and citrate, the inability to produce indole from tryptophan and the presence of acetoin production and urease activity. Strain AM7(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2407(T)  = DSM 25462(T)) belongs to a novel subspecies, and is proposed as the type strain of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. noenieputensis sp. nov. PMID:22984141

  20. Genome sequencing identifies Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov., isolated from a ranch.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, Henk C; Manuel, Clyde S; Fortes, Esther D; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra K

    2013-09-01

    Twenty Listeria-like isolates were obtained from environmental samples collected on a cattle ranch in northern Colorado; all of these isolates were found to share an identical partial sigB sequence, suggesting close relatedness. The isolates were similar to members of the genus Listeria in that they were Gram-stain-positive, short rods, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive; the isolates were similar to Listeria fleischmannii because they were non-motile at 25 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequencing for representative isolates and whole genome sequencing for one isolate was performed. The genome of the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii (strain LU2006-1(T)) was also sequenced. The draft genomes were very similar in size and the average MUMmer nucleotide identity across 91% of the genomes was 95.16%. Genome sequence data were used to design primers for a six-gene multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Phylogenies based on (i) the near-complete 16S rRNA gene, (ii) 31 core genes and (iii) six housekeeping genes illustrated the close relationship of these Listeria-like isolates to Listeria fleischmannii LU2006-1(T). Sufficient genetic divergence of the Listeria-like isolates from the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii and differing phenotypic characteristics warrant these isolates to be classified as members of a distinct infraspecific taxon, for which the name Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TTU M1-001(T) ( =BAA-2414(T) =DSM 25391(T)). The isolates of Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. differ from the nominate subspecies by the inability to utilize melezitose, turanose and sucrose, and the ability to utilize inositol. The results also demonstrate the utility of whole genome sequencing to facilitate identification of novel taxa within a well-described genus. The genomes of both subspecies of Listeria fleischmannii contained putative enhancin genes; the Listeria fleischmannii subsp

  1. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Albion Wills, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the "big five" mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing.

  2. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Wills, Matthew Albion

    2013-01-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the “big five” mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing. PMID:23884651

  3. Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain deficient in capB and overexpressing the fusion protein of IglA, IglB, and IglC from the bfr promoter induces improved protection against F. tularensis respiratory challenge.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Lee, Bai-Yu; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2016-09-22

    A safer and more effective vaccine than the unlicensed Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) is needed to protect against the biowarfare agent F. tularensis. Previously, we developed an LVS ΔcapB mutant that is significantly safer than LVS and provides potent protective immunity against F. tularensis respiratory challenge when administered intranasally but limited protection when administered intradermally unless as part of a prime-boost vaccination strategy. To improve the immunogenicity and efficacy of LVS ΔcapB, we developed recombinant LVS ΔcapB (rLVS ΔcapB) strains overexpressing various F. tularensis Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) proteins - IglA, IglB and IglC, and a fusion protein (IglABC) comprising immunodominant epitopes of IglA, IglB, and IglC downstream of different Francisella promoters, including the bacterioferritin (bfr) promoter. We show that rLVS ΔcapB/bfr-iglA, iglB, iglC, and iglABC express more IglA, IglB, IglC or IglABC than parental LVS ΔcapB in broth and in human macrophages, and stably express FPI proteins in macrophages and mice absent antibiotic selection. In response to IglC and heat-inactivated LVS, spleen cells from mice immunized intradermally with rLVS ΔcapB/bfr-iglC or bfr-iglABC secrete greater amounts of interferon-gamma and/or interleukin-17 than those from mice immunized with LVS ΔcapB, comparable to those from LVS-immunized mice. Mice immunized with rLVS ΔcapB/bfr-iglA, iglB, iglC or iglABC produce serum antibodies at levels similar to LVS-immunized mice. Mice immunized intradermally with rLVS ΔcapB/bfr-iglABC and challenged intranasally with virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 survive longer than sham- and LVS ΔcapB-immunized mice. Mice immunized intranasally with rLVS ΔcapB/bfr-iglABC - but not with LVS - just before or after respiratory challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 are partially protected; protection is correlated with induction of a strong innate immune response. Thus, rLVS

  4. FmvB: A Francisella tularensis Magnesium-Responsive Outer Membrane Protein that Plays a Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ren, Guoping; Gunning, William T.; Weaver, David A.; Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Huntley, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. Despite decades of research, little is understood about why F. tularensis is so virulent. Bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are involved in various virulence processes, including protein secretion, host cell attachment, and intracellular survival. Many pathogenic bacteria require metals for intracellular survival and OMPs often play important roles in metal uptake. Previous studies identified three F. tularensis OMPs that play roles in iron acquisition. In this study, we examined two previously uncharacterized proteins, FTT0267 (named fmvA, for Francisella metal and virulence) and FTT0602c (fmvB), which are homologs of the previously studied F. tularensis iron acquisition genes and are predicted OMPs. To study the potential roles of FmvA and FmvB in metal acquisition and virulence, we first examined fmvA and fmvB expression following pulmonary infection of mice, finding that fmvB was upregulated up to 5-fold during F. tularensis infection of mice. Despite sequence homology to previously-characterized iron-acquisition genes, FmvA and FmvB do not appear to be involved iron uptake, as neither fmvA nor fmvB were upregulated in iron-limiting media and neither ΔfmvA nor ΔfmvB exhibited growth defects in iron limitation. However, when other metals were examined in this study, magnesium-limitation significantly induced fmvB expression, ΔfmvB was found to express significantly higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in magnesium-limiting medium, and increased numbers of surface protrusions were observed on ΔfmvB in magnesium-limiting medium, compared to wild-type F. tularensis grown in magnesium-limiting medium. RNA sequencing analysis of ΔfmvB revealed the potential mechanism for increased LPS expression, as LPS synthesis genes kdtA and wbtA were significantly upregulated in ΔfmvB, compared with wild-type F. tularensis. To provide further evidence for the potential role of FmvB in

  5. FmvB: A Francisella tularensis Magnesium-Responsive Outer Membrane Protein that Plays a Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ren, Guoping; Gunning, William T; Weaver, David A; Kalinoski, Andrea L; Khuder, Sadik A; Huntley, Jason F

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. Despite decades of research, little is understood about why F. tularensis is so virulent. Bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are involved in various virulence processes, including protein secretion, host cell attachment, and intracellular survival. Many pathogenic bacteria require metals for intracellular survival and OMPs often play important roles in metal uptake. Previous studies identified three F. tularensis OMPs that play roles in iron acquisition. In this study, we examined two previously uncharacterized proteins, FTT0267 (named fmvA, for Francisella metal and virulence) and FTT0602c (fmvB), which are homologs of the previously studied F. tularensis iron acquisition genes and are predicted OMPs. To study the potential roles of FmvA and FmvB in metal acquisition and virulence, we first examined fmvA and fmvB expression following pulmonary infection of mice, finding that fmvB was upregulated up to 5-fold during F. tularensis infection of mice. Despite sequence homology to previously-characterized iron-acquisition genes, FmvA and FmvB do not appear to be involved iron uptake, as neither fmvA nor fmvB were upregulated in iron-limiting media and neither ΔfmvA nor ΔfmvB exhibited growth defects in iron limitation. However, when other metals were examined in this study, magnesium-limitation significantly induced fmvB expression, ΔfmvB was found to express significantly higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in magnesium-limiting medium, and increased numbers of surface protrusions were observed on ΔfmvB in magnesium-limiting medium, compared to wild-type F. tularensis grown in magnesium-limiting medium. RNA sequencing analysis of ΔfmvB revealed the potential mechanism for increased LPS expression, as LPS synthesis genes kdtA and wbtA were significantly upregulated in ΔfmvB, compared with wild-type F. tularensis. To provide further evidence for the potential role of FmvB in

  6. Molecular characterization of virulence genes of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in equines

    PubMed Central

    Javed, R.; Taku, A. K.; Gangil, Rakhi; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of streptococci in equines in Jammu (R. S. Pura, Katra), characterization of Streptococci equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus with respect to their virulence traits and to determine antibiotic sensitivity pattern of virulent Streptococcus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 samples were collected from both clinically affected animals (exhibiting signs of respiratory tract disease) and apparently healthy animals and were sent to laboratory. The organisms were isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of Streptococcus was done directly from cultures using sodA and seM gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics such as amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During this study, a total 40 streptococcal isolates were obtained out of which 2 isolates were of S. equi subsp. equi, 12 isolates were from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the PCR-based detection, we revealed amplicons of 235 bp and 679 bp for confirmation of sodA and seM gene, respectively. In antibiogram, two isolates of S. equi subsp. equi were found resistant to penicillin G, and all other isolates were found sensitive to amoxicillin and streptomycin. Conclusion: The majority of streptococcal infections was due to S. equi subsp. Zooepidemicus, and thus was recognized as a potential pathogen of diseases of equines besides S. equi subsp. equi.

  7. EmrA1 Membrane Fusion Protein of Francisella tularensis LVS is required for Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Intramacrophage Survival and Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo; Banik, Sukalyani; Rane, Harshita; Mora, Vanessa T.; Rabadi, Seham M.; Doyle, Christopher R.; Thanassi, David G.; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar; Malik, Meenakshi

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Category A Biodefense agent that causes a fatal human disease known as tularemia. The pathogenicity of F. tularensis depends on its ability to persist inside host immune cells primarily by resisting an attack from host-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Based on the ability of F. tularensis to resist high ROS/RNS levels, we have hypothesized that additional unknown factors act in conjunction with known antioxidant defenses to render ROS resistance. By screening a transposon insertion library of F. tularensis LVS in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we have identified an oxidant sensitive mutant in putative EmrA1 (FTL_0687) secretion protein. The results demonstrate that the emrA1 mutant is highly sensitive to oxidants and several antimicrobial agents, and exhibits diminished intramacrophage growth that can be restored to wild type F. tularensis LVS levels either by transcomplementation, inhibition of ROS generation, or infection in NADPH oxidase deficient (gp91Phox−/−) macrophages. The emrA1 mutant is attenuated for virulence, which is restored by infection in gp91Phox−/− mice. Further, EmrA1 contributes to oxidative stress resistance by affecting secretion of Francisella antioxidant enzymes SodB and KatG. This study exposes unique links between transporter activity and the antioxidant defense mechanisms of F. tularensis. PMID:24397487

  8. Seroprevalence for Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Austrian adults: a cross-sectional survey among military personnel and civilians.

    PubMed

    Tobudic, Selma; Nedomansky, Klara; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Müller, Maria; Faas, Angelus; Mooseder, Gerhard; Allerberger, Franz; Stanek, Gerold; Burgmann, Heinz

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis infections in Austria and the exposure risk of military personnel were assessed in an exploratory nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence survey in 526 healthy adult individuals, 222 of which were soldiers and 304 were civilians. Screening for IgA/IgG antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase I) and IgG/IgM antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase II), and to F. tularensis was done with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. melitensis, an in-house complement fixation test was used. Overall, 11 individuals (2.0%) showed antibodies to C. burnetii, 3 individuals (0.5%) were seropositive for F. tularensis, and one (0.3%) individual was borderline positive. All individuals positive or borderline for F. tularensis tested negative for antibodies against C. burnetii. All individuals tested negative for antibodies against B. melitensis/B. abortus. There were no significant differences between the seroprevalence of C. burnetii and F. tularensis among military personnel and civilians. Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a low rate of exposure to C. burnetii and F. tularensis among the Austrian adult population and military personnel.

  9. Alahopcin, a new dipeptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Higashide, E; Horii, S; Ono, H; Mizokami, N; Yamazaki, T; Shibata, M; Yoneda, M

    1985-03-01

    An actinomycete strain No. B-52653 was found to produce an antibiotic selectively active against the in vitro antibiotic resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. Based on taxonomic studies, the name Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov. is proposed for the strain. The microorganism produced two kinds of antibiotics; one identical with gougerotin, the other an amphoteric water soluble dipeptide containing L-alanine. The latter has the molecular formula C9H15N3O6 and is named alahopcin. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum and a synergistic effect with some other antibiotics against some antibiotic resistant staphylococci. Alahopcin has a low toxicity and was effective against experimental infections in mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:3839222

  10. Antioxidant activity of supercritical extract of Melissa officinalis subsp. officinalis and Melissa officinalis subsp. inodora.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Bruno; Porcedda, Silvia; Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Deiana, Monica; Dessì, Maria Assunta

    2004-10-01

    The antioxidant activity of Melissa officinalis subsp. officinalis and of Melissa officinalis subsp. inodora extracts, obtained by using carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions was investigated. The samples were prepared in two steps. A preliminary extraction at 90 bar and 50 degrees C eliminated the essential oil, then a further extraction at 300 bar and 50 degrees C obtained the high molecular mass extract. These samples were tested for autoxidation and the iron or EDTA-mediated oxidation of linoleic acid at 37 degrees C in the absence of solvent, in in vitro systems. During linoleic acid autoxidation and its EDTA-mediated oxidation both M. officinalis and M. inodora extracts showed an antioxidant activity, and no significant differences in their efficacy were observed. None showed any prooxidant activity.

  11. Data supporting phylogenetic reconstructions of the Neotropical clade Gymnotiformes

    PubMed Central

    Tagliacollo, Victor A.; Bernt, Maxwell J.; Craig, Jack M.; Oliveira, Claudio; Albert, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Data is presented in support of model-based total evidence (MBTE) phylogenetic reconstructions of the Neotropical clade of Gymnotiformes “Model-based total evidence phylogeny of Neotropical electric knifefishes (Teleostei, Gymnotiformes)” (Tagliacollo et al., 2016) [1]). The MBTE phylogenies were inferred using a comprehensive dataset comprised of six genes (5277 bp) and 223 morphological characters for an ingroup taxon sample of 120 of 218 valid species and 33 of the 34 extant genera. The data in this article include primer sequences for gene amplification and sequencing, voucher information and GenBank accession numbers, descriptions of morphological characters, morphological synapomorphies for the recognized clades of Gymnotiformes, a supermatrix comprised of concatenated molecular and morphological data, and computer scripts to replicate MBTE inferences. We also included here Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian topologies, which support two main gymnotiform clades: Gymnotidae and Sternopygoidei, the latter comprised of Rhamphichthyoidea (Rhamphichthyidae+Hypopomidae) and Sinusoidea (Sternopygidae+Apteronotidae). PMID:26955648

  12. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for detection of Francisella tularensis on screen-printed gold electrode array.

    PubMed

    Spehar-Délèze, Anna-Maria; Julich, Sandra; Gransee, Rainer; Tomaso, Herbert; Dulay, Samuel B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-10-01

    An electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for the rapid detection of the Francisella tularensis pathogen using whole antibodies or antibody fragments as capture biomolecule is described. A sandwich immunoassay was used with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the whole inactivated bacterial cell (LVS) as a target, while Ru(bpy)3 (2+)-encapsulated silicate nanoparticles were linked to the secondary antibody and used as ECL labels. The assay was performed in a fluidic chip housed in a custom-built black box incorporating electronics, optics and fluidics. The obtained limit of detection for LPS was 0.4 ng/mL, while for the LVS it was 70 and 45 bacteria/mL when the capturing molecule was the whole antibody and the antibody F(ab) fragment, respectively. PMID:27255102

  13. Target discrimination by surface-immobilized molecular beacons designed to detect Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Akhilesh; Flinchbaugh, James; Ayoubi, Patricia; Olah, Glenn A; Malayer, Jerry R

    2004-02-15

    A molecular beacon (MB) array was designed based on unique regions of the 16S rRNA of the bacterium Francisella tularensis. Nucleic acid molecular beacons undergo a spontaneous fluorogenic conformational change when they hybridize to specific complementary targets. The array was printed on aldehyde glass or hydrogel slides and evaluated for functioning in presence of complementary oligonucleotide sequences, single-nucleotide mismatch sequences and multiple nucleotide mismatch sequences. Discriminating true target from mismatched targets was found to be dependent on type, number, and location of mismatches within the beacon (i.e. located in the stem or loop regions). Optimal conditions for molecular beacon deposition, and target hybridization were determined for oligonucleotide target mismatch discrimination. The beacon array was stable upon recharging by exposure to an alkaline solution, and repeatedly used. In addition, performance of the beacon array biosensor was compared with molecular beacons in homogeneous solution.

  14. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  15. Activation of macrophages for destruction of Francisella tularensis: identification of cytokines, effector cells, and effector molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, A H; Polsinelli, T; Green, S J; Nacy, C A

    1992-01-01

    Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) was grown in culture with nonadherent resident, starch-elicited, or Proteose Peptone-elicited peritoneal cells. Numbers of bacteria increased 4 logs over the input inoculum in 48 to 72 h. Growth rates were faster in inflammatory cells than in resident cells: generation times for the bacterium were 3 h in inflammatory cells and 6 h in resident macrophages. LVS-infected macrophage cultures treated with lymphokines did not support growth of the bacterium, although lymphokines alone had no inhibitory effects on replication of LVS in culture medium devoid of cells. Removal of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) by immunoaffinity precipitation rendered lymphokines ineffective for induction of macrophage anti-LVS activity, and recombinant IFN-gamma stimulated both resident and inflammatory macrophage populations to inhibit LVS growth in vitro. Inflammatory macrophages were more sensitive to effects of IFN-gamma: half-maximal activity was achieved at 5 U/ml for inflammatory macrophages and 20 U/ml for resident macrophages. IFN-gamma-induced anti-LVS activity correlated with the production of nitrite (NO2-), an oxidative end product of L-arginine-derived nitric oxide (NO). Anti-LVS activity and nitrite production were both completely inhibited by the addition of either the L-arginine analog NG-monomethyl-L-arginine or anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies to activated macrophage cultures. Thus, macrophages can be activated by IFN-gamma to suppress the growth of F. tularensis by generation of toxic levels of NO, and inflammatory macrophages are substantially more sensitive to activation activities of IFN-gamma for this effector reaction than are more differentiated resident cells. PMID:1541555

  16. Biochemical and structural characterization of polyphosphate kinase 2 from the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Batten, Laura E.; Parnell, Alice E.; Wells, Neil J.; Murch, Amber L.; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Roach, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of polyphosphate is important for the virulence of a wide range of pathogenic bacteria and the enzymes of polyphosphate metabolism have been proposed as an anti-bacterial target. In the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis, the product of the gene FTT1564 has been identified as a polyphosphate kinase from the polyphosphate kinase 2 (PPK2) family. The isogenic deletion mutant was defective for intracellular growth in macrophages and was attenuated in mice, indicating an important role for polyphosphate in the virulence of Francisella. Herein, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of F. tularensis polyphosphate kinase (FtPPK2) with a view to characterizing the enzyme as a novel target for inhibitors. Using an HPLC-based activity assay, the substrate specificity of FtPPK2 was found to include purine but not pyrimidine nts. The activity was also measured using 31P-NMR. FtPPK2 has been crystallized and the structure determined to 2.23 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution. The structure consists of a six-stranded parallel β-sheet surrounded by 12 α-helices, with a high degree of similarity to other members of the PPK2 family and the thymidylate kinase superfamily. Residues proposed to be important for substrate binding and catalysis have been identified in the structure, including a lid-loop and the conserved Walker A and B motifs. The ΔFTT1564 strain showed significantly increased sensitivity to a range of antibiotics in a manner independent of the mode of action of the antibiotic. This combination of biochemical, structural and microbiological data provide a sound foundation for future studies targeting the development of PPK2 small molecule inhibitors. PMID:26582818

  17. rely.py, a python script to detect reliable clades.

    PubMed

    Li, Blaise; Dettai, Agnès; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    rely.py is a program implementing the method to detect independently repeated clades by comparing phylogenies as described in Li and Lecointre (2009) and adapted to incompletely overlapping datasets in Li et al. (2009). The comparison can be performed on trees obtained by any inference method (maximum parsimony, Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood). The program computes repetition indices, provides greedy summary trees for each validity domain and a nexus matrix representation of the clades weighted by their repetition indices. The additional script concatnexus.py assists the user in preparing the primary analyses, but it can also be used separately to concatenate nexus datasets.

  18. Expanding the World of Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Clades.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Yarza, Pablo; Rapp, Josephine Z; Glöckner, Frank O

    2015-01-01

    Determining which microbial taxa are out there, where they live, and what they are doing is a driving approach in marine microbial ecology. The importance of these questions is underlined by concerted, large-scale, and global ocean sampling initiatives, for example the International Census of Marine Microbes, Ocean Sampling Day, or Tara Oceans. Given decades of effort, we know that the large majority of marine Bacteria and Archaea belong to about a dozen phyla. In addition to the classically culturable Bacteria and Archaea, at least 50 "clades," at different taxonomic depths, exist. These account for the majority of marine microbial diversity, but there is still an underexplored and less abundant portion remaining. We refer to these hitherto unrecognized clades as unknown, as their boundaries, names, and classifications are not available. In this work, we were able to characterize up to 92 of these unknown clades found within the bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity currently reported for marine water column environments. We mined the SILVA 16S rRNA gene datasets for sequences originating from the marine water column. Instead of the usual subjective taxa delineation and nomenclature methods, we applied the candidate taxonomic unit (CTU) circumscription system, along with a standardized nomenclature to the sequences in newly constructed phylogenetic trees. With this new phylogenetic and taxonomic framework, we performed an analysis of ICoMM rRNA gene amplicon datasets to gain insights into the global distribution of the new marine clades, their ecology, biogeography, and interaction with oceanographic variables. Most of the new clades we identified were interspersed by known taxa with cultivated members, whose genome sequences are available. This result encouraged us to perform metabolic predictions for the novel marine clades using the PICRUSt approach. Our work also provides an update on the taxonomy of several phyla and widely known marine clades as our

  19. Expanding the World of Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Clades

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Yarza, Pablo; Rapp, Josephine Z.; Glöckner, Frank O.

    2016-01-01

    Determining which microbial taxa are out there, where they live, and what they are doing is a driving approach in marine microbial ecology. The importance of these questions is underlined by concerted, large-scale, and global ocean sampling initiatives, for example the International Census of Marine Microbes, Ocean Sampling Day, or Tara Oceans. Given decades of effort, we know that the large majority of marine Bacteria and Archaea belong to about a dozen phyla. In addition to the classically culturable Bacteria and Archaea, at least 50 “clades,” at different taxonomic depths, exist. These account for the majority of marine microbial diversity, but there is still an underexplored and less abundant portion remaining. We refer to these hitherto unrecognized clades as unknown, as their boundaries, names, and classifications are not available. In this work, we were able to characterize up to 92 of these unknown clades found within the bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity currently reported for marine water column environments. We mined the SILVA 16S rRNA gene datasets for sequences originating from the marine water column. Instead of the usual subjective taxa delineation and nomenclature methods, we applied the candidate taxonomic unit (CTU) circumscription system, along with a standardized nomenclature to the sequences in newly constructed phylogenetic trees. With this new phylogenetic and taxonomic framework, we performed an analysis of ICoMM rRNA gene amplicon datasets to gain insights into the global distribution of the new marine clades, their ecology, biogeography, and interaction with oceanographic variables. Most of the new clades we identified were interspersed by known taxa with cultivated members, whose genome sequences are available. This result encouraged us to perform metabolic predictions for the novel marine clades using the PICRUSt approach. Our work also provides an update on the taxonomy of several phyla and widely known marine clades as

  20. Description of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae sp. nov., isolated from human infections, with two subspecies, Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov., and demonstration that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella variicola.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Grimont, Patrick A D

    2014-09-01

    Strains previously classified as members of Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogroups KpI, KpII-A, KpII-B and KpIII were characterized by 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequencing, multilocus sequence analysis based on rpoB, fusA, gapA, gyrA and leuS genes, average nucleotide identity and biochemical characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that KpI and KpIII corresponded to K. pneumoniae and Klebsiella variicola, respectively, whereas KpII-A and KpII-B formed two well-demarcated sequence clusters distinct from other members of the genus Klebsiella. Average nucleotide identity between KpII-A and KpII-B was 96.4 %, whereas values lower than 94 % were obtained for both groups when compared with K. pneumoniae and K. variicola. Biochemical properties differentiated KpII-A, KpII-B, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola, with acid production from adonitol and l-sorbose and ability to use 3-phenylproprionate, 5-keto-d-gluconate and tricarballylic acid as sole carbon sources being particularly useful. Based on their genetic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the names Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. for strains of KpII-A and KpII-B, respectively. The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae sp. nov. and of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 01A030(T) ( = SB11(T) = CIP 110771(T) = DSM 28211(T)). The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 07A044(T) ( = SB30(T) = CIP 110770(T) = DSM 28212(T)). Both strains were isolated from human blood cultures. This work also showed that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of K. variicola.

  1. About three cases of ulceroglandular tularemia, is this the re-emergence of Francisella tularensis in Belgium?

    PubMed

    Dupont, E; Van Eeckhoudt, S; Thissen, X; Ausselet, N; Fretin, D; Stefanescu, I; Glupczynski, Y; Delaere, B

    2015-10-01

    Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by Francisella tularensis that can be transmitted by several ways to human being and cause different clinical manifestations. We report three clinical cases of tularemia with ulceroglandular presentation in young males acquired during outdoor activities in Southern Belgium. Confirmation of the diagnosis was established by serology. Only three cases of tularemia have been reported in Belgium between 1950 and 2012 by the National Reference Laboratory CODA-CERVA (Ref Lab CODA-CERVA) but re-emergence of tularemia is established in several European countries and F. tularensis is also well known to be present in animal reservoirs and vectors in Belgium. The diagnosis of tularemia has to be considered in case of suggestive clinical presentation associated with epidemiological risk factors.

  2. Adaptation of Francisella tularensis to the Mammalian Environment Is Governed by Cues Which Can Be Mimicked In Vitro▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Caldon, Seth D.; McArthur, Debbie G.; Cirillo, Kerry A.; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S.; Magguilli, Micheal L.; Malik, Meenakshi; Shah, Aaloki; Broderick, Scott; Golovliov, Igor; Metzger, Dennis W.; Rajan, Krishna; Sellati, Timothy J.; Loegering, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis survives in mammals, arthropods, and freshwater amoeba. It was previously established that the conventional media used for in vitro propagation of this microbe do not yield bacteria that mimic those harvested from infected mammals; whether these in vitro-cultivated bacteria resemble arthropod- or amoeba-adapted Francisella is unknown. As a foundation for our goal of identifying F. tularensis outer membrane proteins which are expressed during mammalian infection, we first sought to identify in vitro cultivation conditions that induce the bacterium's infection-derived phenotype. We compared Francisella LVS grown in brain heart infusion broth (BHI; a standard microbiological medium rarely used in Francisella research) to that grown in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB; the most widely used F. tularensis medium, used here as a negative control) and macrophages (a natural host cell, used here as a positive control). BHI- and macrophage-grown F. tularensis cells showed similar expression of MglA-dependent and MglA-independent proteins; expression of the MglA-dependent proteins was repressed by the supraphysiological levels of free amino acids present in MHB. We observed that during macrophage infection, protein expression by intracellular bacteria differed from that by extracellular bacteria; BHI-grown bacteria mirrored the latter, while MHB-grown bacteria resembled neither. Naïve macrophages responding to BHI- and macrophage-grown bacteria produced markedly lower levels of proinflammatory mediators than those in cells exposed to MHB-grown bacteria. In contrast to MHB-grown bacteria, BHI-grown bacteria showed minimal delay during intracellular replication. Cumulatively, our findings provide compelling evidence that growth in BHI yields bacteria which recapitulate the phenotype of Francisella organisms that have emerged from macrophages. PMID:18644878

  3. Serosurveillance for Francisella tularensis Among Wild Animals in Japan Using a Newly Developed Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Uda, Akihiko; Fujita, Osamu; Mizoguchi, Toshio; Shindo, Junji; Park, Chun-Ho; Kudo, Noboru; Hatai, Hitoshi; Oyamada, Toshifumi; Yamada, Akio; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tularemia, a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, occurs sporadically in Japan. However, little is known about the prevalence of the disease in wild animals. A total of 632 samples obtained from 150 Japanese black bears, 142 Japanese hares, 120 small rodents, 97 rats, 53 raptors, 26 Japanese monkeys, 21 Japanese raccoon dogs, 20 masked palm civets, and three Japanese red foxes between 2002 and 2010 were investigated for the presence of antibodies to F. tularensis by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination (MA) test. Seropositive cELISA and MA results were obtained in 23 and 18 Japanese black bears, three and two Japanese raccoon dogs, and two and one small rodents, respectively. All MA-positive samples (n=21) were also positive by cELISA. Six of seven samples that were only positive by cELISA were confirmed to be antibody-positive by western blot analysis. These findings suggest that cELISA is a highly sensitive and useful test for serosurveillance of tularemia among various species of wild animals. Because this is the first study to detect F. tularensis–seropositive Japanese raccoon dogs, these could join Japanese black bears as sentinel animals for tularemia in the wild in Japan. Further continuous serosurveillance for F. tularensis in various species of wild animals using appropriate methods such as cELISA is important to assess the risks of human exposure and to improve our understanding of the ecology of F. tularensis in the wild. PMID:24689989

  4. Needle-Free Delivery of Acetalated Dextran-Encapsulated AR-12 Protects Mice from Francisella tularensis Lethal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ky V; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A; Borteh, Hassan; Bachelder, Eric M; Schlesinger, Larry S; Gunn, John S; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2016-04-01

    Francisella tularensiscauses tularemia and is a potential biothreat. Given the limited antibiotics for treating tularemia and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains as a biowarfare agent, new antibacterial agents are needed. AR-12 is an FDA-approved investigational new drug (IND) compound that induces autophagy and has shown host-directed, broad-spectrum activityin vitroagainstSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium andF. tularensis We have shown that AR-12 encapsulated within acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) microparticles (AR-12/MPs) significantly reduces host cell cytotoxicity compared to that with free AR-12, while retaining the ability to controlS.Typhimurium within infected human macrophages. In the present study, the toxicity and efficacy of AR-12/MPs in controlling virulent type AF. tularensisSchuS4 infection were examinedin vitroandin vivo No significant toxicity of blank MPs or AR-12/MPs was observed in lung histology sections when the formulations were given intranasally to uninfected mice. In histology sections from the lungs of intranasally infected mice treated with the formulations, increased macrophage infiltration was observed for AR-12/MPs, with or without suboptimal gentamicin treatment, but not for blank MPs, soluble AR-12, or suboptimal gentamicin alone. AR-12/MPs dramatically reduced the burden ofF. tularensisin infected human macrophages, in a manner similar to that of free AR-12. However,in vivo, AR-12/MPs significantly enhanced the survival ofF. tularensisSchuS4-infected mice compared to that seen with free AR-12. In combination with suboptimal gentamicin treatment, AR-12/MPs further improved the survival ofF. tularensisSchuS4-infected mice. These studies provide support for Ace-DEX-encapsulated AR-12 as a promising new therapeutic agent for tularemia.

  5. Mitochondrial data support an odd-nosed colobine clade.

    PubMed

    Sterner, Kirstin N; Raaum, Ryan L; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Stewart, Caro-Beth; Disotell, Todd R

    2006-07-01

    To obtain a more complete understanding of the evolutionary history of the leaf-eating monkeys we have examined the mitochondrial genome sequence of two African and six Asian colobines. Although taxonomists have proposed grouping the "odd-nosed" colobines (proboscis monkey, douc langur, and the snub-nosed monkey) together, phylogenetic support for such a clade has not been tested using molecular data. Phylogenetic analyses using parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods support a monophyletic clade of odd-nosed colobines consisting of Nasalis, Pygathrix, and Rhinopithecus, with tentative support for Nasalis occupying a basal position within this clade. The African and Asian colobine lineages are inferred to have diverged by 10.8 million years ago (mya or Ma). Within the Asian colobines the odd-nosed clade began to diversify by 6.7 Ma. These results augment our understanding of colobine evolution, particularly the nature and timing of the colobine expansion into Asia. This phylogenetic information will aid those developing conservation strategies for these highly endangered, diverse, and unique primates. PMID:16500120

  6. Identification of potent maturation inhibitors against HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Timalsina, Bivek; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.; Freed, Eric O.; Gaur, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to a profound improvement in the clinical care of HIV-infected patients. However, drug tolerability and the evolution of drug resistance have limited treatment options for many patients. Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral agents for treatment of HIV-1. They act by interfering with the maturation of the virus by blocking the last step in Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA by the viral protease (PR). The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) failed against a subset of HIV-1 isolates in clinical trials due to polymorphisms present in the CA-SP1 region of the Gag protein. Sequence analysis indicated that these polymorphisms are more common in non-clade B strains of HIV-1 such as HIV-1 clade C. Indeed, BVM was found to be ineffective against HIV-1 clade C molecular clones tested in this study. A number of BVM analogs were synthesized by chemical modifications at the C-28 position to improve its activity. The new BVM analogs displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B and C and also reduced infectivity of the virus. This study identifies novel and broadly active BVM analogs that may ultimately demonstrate efficacy in the clinic. PMID:27264714

  7. Phylogeny and biogeography of an uncultured clade of snow chytrids.

    PubMed

    Naff, C S; Darcy, J L; Schmidt, S K

    2013-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that snow can contain a diverse array of algae known as 'snow algae'. Some reports also indicate that parasites of algae (e.g. chytrids) are also found in snow, but efforts to phylogenetically identify 'snow chytrids' have not been successful. We used culture-independent molecular approaches to phylogenetically identify chytrids that are common in long-lived snowpacks of Colorado and Europe. The most remarkable finding of the present study was the discovery of a new clade of chytrids that has representatives in snowpacks of Colorado and Switzerland and cold sites in Nepal and France, but no representatives from warmer ecosystems. This new clade ('Snow Clade 1' or SC1) is as deeply divergent as its sister clade, the Lobulomycetales, and phylotypes of SC1 show significant (P < 0.003) genetic-isolation by geographic distance patterns, perhaps indicating a long evolutionary history in the cryosphere. In addition to SC1, other snow chytrids were phylogenetically shown to be in the order Rhizophydiales, a group with known algal parasites and saprotrophs. We suggest that these newly discovered snow chytrids are important components of snow ecosystems where they contribute to snow food-web dynamics and the release of nutrients due to their parasitic and saprotrophic activities.

  8. Collecting reliable clades using the Greedy Strict Consensus Merger

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Supertree methods combine a set of phylogenetic trees into a single supertree. Similar to supermatrix methods, these methods provide a way to reconstruct larger parts of the Tree of Life, potentially evading the computational complexity of phylogenetic inference methods such as maximum likelihood. The supertree problem can be formalized in different ways, to cope with contradictory information in the input. Many supertree methods have been developed. Some of them solve NP-hard optimization problems like the well-known Matrix Representation with Parsimony, while others have polynomial worst-case running time but work in a greedy fashion (FlipCut). Both can profit from a set of clades that are already known to be part of the supertree. The Superfine approach shows how the Greedy Strict Consensus Merger (GSCM) can be used as preprocessing to find these clades. We introduce different scoring functions for the GSCM, a randomization, as well as a combination thereof to improve the GSCM to find more clades. This helps, in turn, to improve the resolution of the GSCM supertree. We find this modifications to increase the number of true positive clades by 18% compared to the currently used Overlap scoring. PMID:27375971

  9. Bacteriological and Molecular Detection of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in Equines of Northern India

    PubMed Central

    MIR, Irfan Ahmad; KUMAR, Bablu; TAKU, Anil; FARIDI, Farah; BHAT, Mohd. Altaf; BABA, Naseer Ahmad; MAQBOOL, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    Present study was undertaken to study the prevalence of β-haemolytic streptococci in equine of northern temperate region of Jammu and Kashmir, India. One hundred and forty one samples were collected in duplicate from nasopharyngeal tract of diseased (53) and apparently healthy equine (88) for isolation and direct PCR. A total of 77 isolates of streptococci were recovered from 141 samples with an overall prevalence rate of 54.60%. Out of these 77 isolates, 52 were from diseased and 25 from apparently healthy animals. Of the 77 isolates, 4 were identified as Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, 56 as S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus and 17 as S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Thus the overall prevalence of S. equi subsp. equi, S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus and S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis was 2.83, 39.71 and 12.05% respectively. The sensitivity of the PCR for the detection of S. equi species was found higher when attempted from direct swab samples. PMID:24834002

  10. 3-substituted indole inhibitors against Francisella tularensis FabI identified by structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Compton, Jaimee R; Abdulhameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Marchand, Charles L; Robertson, Kelly L; Leary, Dagmar H; Jadhav, Ajit; Hershfield, Jeremy R; Wallqvist, Anders; Friedlander, Arthur M; Legler, Patricia M

    2013-07-11

    In this study, we describe novel inhibitors against Francisella tularensis SchuS4 FabI identified from structure-based in silico screening with integrated molecular dynamics simulations to account for induced fit of a flexible loop crucial for inhibitor binding. Two 3-substituted indoles, 54 and 57, preferentially bound the NAD(+) form of the enzyme and inhibited growth of F. tularensis SchuS4 at concentrations near that of their measured Ki. While 57 was species-specific, 54 showed a broader spectrum of growth inhibition against F. tularensis , Bacillus anthracis , and Staphylococcus aureus . Binding interaction analysis in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis revealed key residues and elements that contribute to inhibitor binding and species specificity. Mutation of Arg-96, a poorly conserved residue opposite the loop, was unexpectedly found to enhance inhibitor binding in the R96G and R96M variants. This residue may affect the stability and closure of the flexible loop to enhance inhibitor (or substrate) binding. PMID:23815100

  11. Prior Inoculation with Type B Strains of Francisella tularensis Provides Partial Protection against Virulent Type A Strains in Cottontail Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Brown, Vienna R; Adney, Danielle R; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Bowen, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterium that is capable of causing severe disease (tularemia) in a wide range of species. This organism is characterized into two distinct subspecies: tularensis (type A) and holarctica (type B) which vary in several crucial ways, with some type A strains having been found to be considerably more virulent in humans and laboratory animals. Cottontail rabbits have been widely implicated as a reservoir species for this subspecies; however, experimental inoculation in our laboratory revealed type A organisms to be highly virulent, resulting in 100% mortality following challenge with 50-100 organisms. Inoculation of cottontail rabbits with the same number of organisms from type B strains of bacteria was found to be rarely lethal and to result in a robust humoral immune response. The objective of this study was to characterize the protection afforded by a prior challenge with type B strains against a later inoculation with a type A strain in North American cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp). Previous infection with a type B strain of organism was found to lengthen survival time and in some cases prevent death following inoculation with a type A2 strain of F. tularensis. In contrast, inoculation of a type A1b strain was uniformly lethal in cottontail rabbits irrespective of a prior type B inoculation. These findings provide important insight about the role cottontail rabbits may play in environmental maintenance and transmission of this organism.

  12. Francisella tularensis Modulates a Distinct Subset of Regulatory Factors and Sustains Mitochondrial Integrity to Impair Human Neutrophil Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Jenna M; Kinkead, Lauren C; McCaffrey, Ramona L; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2016-01-01

    Tularemia is a disease characterized by profound neutrophil accumulation and tissue destruction. The causative organism, Francisella tularensis, is a facultative intracellular bacterium that replicates in neutrophil cytosol, inhibits caspase activation and profoundly prolongs cell lifespan. Here, we identify unique features of this infection and provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms of apoptosis inhibition. Mitochondria are critical regulators of neutrophil apoptosis. We demonstrate that F. tularensis significantly inhibits Bax translocation and Bid processing during 24-48 h of infection, and in this manner sustains mitochondrial integrity. Downstream of mitochondria, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) inhibit caspase-9 and caspase-3 by direct binding. Notably, we find that PCNA disappeared rapidly and selectively from infected cells, thereby demonstrating that it is not essential for neutrophil survival, whereas upregulation of calpastatin correlated with diminished calpain activity and reduced XIAP degradation. In addition, R-roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor developed for the treatment of cancer; it also induces neutrophil apoptosis and can promote the resolution of several infectious and inflammatory disorders. We confirm the ability of R-roscovitine to induce neutrophil apoptosis, but also demonstrate that its efficacy is significantly impaired by F. tularensis. Collectively, our findings advance the understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and its capacity to be manipulated by pathogenic bacteria.

  13. Electrotransformation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis with various plasmids.

    PubMed

    Serror, Pascale; Sasaki, Takashi; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    We describe, for the first time, a detailed electroporation procedure for Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Three L. delbrueckii strains were successfully transformed. Under optimal conditions, the transformation efficiency was 10(4) transformants per microg of DNA. Using this procedure, we identified several plasmids able to replicate in L. delbrueckii and integrated an integrative vector based on phage integrative elements into the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus chromosome. These vectors provide a good basis for developing molecular tools for L. delbrueckii and open the field of genetic studies in L. delbrueckii.

  14. Genome-Wide Diversity and Phylogeography of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Canadian Dairy Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Christina; Barkema, Herman W; Stevenson, Karen; Zadoks, Ruth N; Biek, Roman; Kao, Rowland; Trewby, Hannah; Haupstein, Deb; Kelton, David F; Fecteau, Gilles; Labrecque, Olivia; Keefe, Greg P; McKenna, Shawn L B; Tahlan, Kapil; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative bacterium of Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. The control of JD in the dairy industry is challenging, but can be improved with a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of MAP subtypes. Previously established molecular typing techniques used to differentiate MAP have not been sufficiently discriminatory and/or reliable to accurately assess the population structure. In this study, the genetic diversity of 182 MAP isolates representing all Canadian provinces was compared to the known global diversity, using single nucleotide polymorphisms identified through whole genome sequencing. MAP isolates from Canada represented a subset of the known global diversity, as there were global isolates intermingled with Canadian isolates, as well as multiple global subtypes that were not found in Canada. One Type III and six "Bison type" isolates were found in Canada as well as one Type II subtype that represented 86% of all Canadian isolates. Rarefaction estimated larger subtype richness in Québec than in other Canadian provinces using a strict definition of MAP subtypes and lower subtype richness in the Atlantic region using a relaxed definition. Significant phylogeographic clustering was observed at the inter-provincial but not at the intra-provincial level, although most major clades were found in all provinces. The large number of shared subtypes among provinces suggests that cattle movement is a major driver of MAP transmission at the herd level, which is further supported by the lack of spatial clustering on an intra-provincial scale. PMID:26871723

  15. Neonatal Mortality in Puppies Due to Bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Ana I.; Falsen, Enevold; Simarro, Isabel; Rollan, Eduardo; Collins, Matthew D.; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernandez-Garayzabal, Jose F.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of bacteremia in puppies caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. Identification was achieved by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. This is the first report of the recovery of S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae from dogs. PMID:16455943

  16. Development of a multitarget real-time TaqMan PCR assay for enhanced detection of Francisella tularensis in complex specimens.

    PubMed

    Versage, Jessica L; Severin, Darlena D M; Chu, May C; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2003-12-01

    Tularemia is the zoonotic disease caused by the gram-negative coccobacillus Francisella tularensis. Its wide distribution in the environment poses a challenge for understanding the transmission, ecology, and epidemiology of the disease. F. tularensis is also considered a potential biological weapon due to its extreme infectivity. We have developed a multitarget real-time TaqMan PCR assay capable of rapidly and accurately detecting F. tularensis in complex specimens. Targeted regions included the ISFtu2 element and the 23kDa, fopA, and tul4 genes. Analysis of the four TaqMan assays demonstrated that three (ISFtu2, 23kDa, and tul4) performed within our established criterion of a detection limit of one organism. The combined use of the three assays was highly specific, displaying no cross-reactivity with the non-Francisella bacteria tested and capable of differentially diagnosing both F. tularensis and Francisella philomiragia. When the multitarget TaqMan assay (ISFtu2, 23kDa, and tul4) was compared to culturing, using environmentally contaminated specimens, the TaqMan PCR assay was significantly more sensitive than culturing (P tularensis. PMID:14662930

  17. Use of a Capture-Based Pathogen Transcript Enrichment Strategy for RNA-Seq Analysis of the Francisella Tularensis LVS Transcriptome during Infection of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Zachary W.; Brazel, David M.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Hamblin, Rachelle Y.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Branda, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic intracellular pathogen that is capable of causing potentially fatal human infections. Like all successful bacterial pathogens, F. tularensis rapidly responds to changes in its environment during infection of host cells, and upon encountering different microenvironments within those cells. This ability to appropriately respond to the challenges of infection requires rapid and global shifts in gene expression patterns. In this study, we use a novel pathogen transcript enrichment strategy and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to perform a detailed characterization of the rapid and global shifts in F. tularensis LVS gene expression during infection of murine macrophages. We performed differential gene expression analysis on all bacterial genes at two key stages of infection: phagosomal escape, and cytosolic replication. By comparing the F. tularensis transcriptome at these two stages of infection to that of the bacteria grown in culture, we were able to identify sets of genes that are differentially expressed over the course of infection. This analysis revealed the temporally dynamic expression of a number of known and putative transcriptional regulators and virulence factors, providing insight into their role during infection. In addition, we identified several F. tularensis genes that are significantly up-regulated during infection but had not been previously identified as virulence factors. These unknown genes may make attractive therapeutic or vaccine targets. PMID:24155975

  18. Bacteraemia caused by Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii: clinical features and susceptibilities of the isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Ko, Jen-Chung; Liang, Sheng-Kai; Lee, Shih-Wei; Yen, David Hung-Tsang; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex (M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii) is an emerging pathogen causing various human infections. However, few studies have focused on M. abscessus complex bacteraemia with detailed species differentiation. The clinical characteristics of patients with bacteraemia due to M. abscessus complex treated at National Taiwan University Hospital from 2005-2012 were evaluated. Species identification was performed by molecular methods, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using a Sensititre RAPMYCO Panel Test for preserved M. abscessus complex isolates. During the study period, 15 patients with M. abscessus complex bacteraemia were found but only 14 isolates from 13 patients were preserved for analysis. One patient had two episodes of bacteraemia (one caused by M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and one by M .abscessus subsp. abscessus with a 9-month interval). Of the remaining 12 patients, 9 patients had M. abscessus subsp. bolletii bacteraemia and 3 had M .abscessus subsp. abscessus bacteraemia. Patients were mainly middle-aged adults with various co-morbidities. Steroid usage and malignancy (5/15) were the most common immunocompromised statuses, followed by diabetes mellitus (4/15). Surgical wound infection was the most common infection foci in all patients (5/15), particularly in M. abscessus subsp. bolletii bacteraemia patients. Clarithromycin and tigecycline exhibited good in vitro activities. Overall, the 14-day mortality was 20% (3/15). M. abscessus complex bacteraemia should be considered an emerging opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts. Clarithromycin and tigecycline have potent in vitro activities and are promising agents for treating infections due to M. abscessus complex. PMID:24718088

  19. Molecular characterization of virulence genes of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in equines

    PubMed Central

    Javed, R.; Taku, A. K.; Gangil, Rakhi; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of streptococci in equines in Jammu (R. S. Pura, Katra), characterization of Streptococci equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus with respect to their virulence traits and to determine antibiotic sensitivity pattern of virulent Streptococcus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 samples were collected from both clinically affected animals (exhibiting signs of respiratory tract disease) and apparently healthy animals and were sent to laboratory. The organisms were isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of Streptococcus was done directly from cultures using sodA and seM gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics such as amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During this study, a total 40 streptococcal isolates were obtained out of which 2 isolates were of S. equi subsp. equi, 12 isolates were from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the PCR-based detection, we revealed amplicons of 235 bp and 679 bp for confirmation of sodA and seM gene, respectively. In antibiogram, two isolates of S. equi subsp. equi were found resistant to penicillin G, and all other isolates were found sensitive to amoxicillin and streptomycin. Conclusion: The majority of streptococcal infections was due to S. equi subsp. Zooepidemicus, and thus was recognized as a potential pathogen of diseases of equines besides S. equi subsp. equi. PMID:27651677

  20. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  1. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  2. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums. PMID:26507830

  3. Potential Transmission Pathways of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Jessika; Hinse, Dennis; Vollmer, Tanja; Schulz, Jochen; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus), a member of group D streptococci, is an inhabitant of the animal and human gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, it is a facultative pathogen which causes e.g. endocarditis, septicemia and mastitis. S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus may be transmitted either directly or indirectly between animals and humans. However, the transmission routes are an unsolved issue. In this study, we present systematic analyses of an S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolate of an infective endocarditis patient in relation to isolates of his laying hen flock. Isolates from pooled droppings of laying hens, pooled dust samples and human blood culture were characterized by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and DNA fingerprinting. MLST revealed the same allelic profile of isolates from the human blood culture and from the droppings of laying hens. In addition, these isolates showed clonal identity regarding a similar DNA fingerprinting pattern. For the first time, we received a hint that transmission of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus between poultry and humans may occur. This raises the question about the zoonotic potential of isolates from poultry and should be considered in future studies. PMID:25978355

  4. Novel Campylobacter lari-like bacteria from humans and molluscs: description of Campylobacter peloridis sp. nov., Campylobacter lari subsp. concheus subsp. nov. and Campylobacter lari subsp. lari subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, Lies; On, Stephen L W; De Brandt, Evie; Vandamme, Peter

    2009-05-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to clarify the taxonomic position of Campylobacter lari-like strains isolated from shellfish and humans. The diversity within the strain collection was initially screened by means of fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis and whole-cell protein electrophoresis, revealing the existence of two clusters distinct from C. lari and other Campylobacter species. The divergence of these clusters was confirmed by phenotypic analysis and by 16S rRNA and hsp60 gene sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis identified C. lari, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter insulaenigrae as the closest phylogenetic neighbours of both taxa. DNA-DNA hybridizations revealed that one cluster, comprising 10 strains, represented a novel Campylobacter species, for which the name Campylobacter peloridis sp. nov. is proposed, with 2314BVA(T) (=LMG 23910(T) =CCUG 55787(T)) as the type strain. The second cluster, comprising six strains, represents a novel subspecies within the species C. lari, for which the name Campylobacter lari subsp. concheus subsp. nov. is proposed, with 2897R(T) (=LMG 21009(T) =CCUG 55786(T)) as the type strain. The description of C. lari subsp. concheus has the effect of automatically creating the subspecies Campylobacter lari subsp. lari subsp. nov. (type strain LMG 8846(T)=NCTC 11352(T)).

  5. Sugar Utilization and Acid Production by Free and Entrapped Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in a Whey Permeate Medium

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Pascal; Paquin, Celine; Lacroix, Christophe

    1989-01-01

    Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis entrapped in k-carrageenan-locust bean gum gel performed similarly to free cells in the conversion of lactose to lactic acid. Bead diameter influenced the fermentation rate. Cells entrapped in smaller beads (0.5 to 1.0 mm) showed higher release rates, higher lactose, glucose, and formic acid utilization, higher galactose accumulation, and higher lactic acid production than did cells entrapped in larger beads (1.0 to 2.0 mm). Values for smaller beads were comparable with those for free cells. Immobilization affected the fermentation rate of lactic acid bacteria, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Entrapped cells of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus demonstrated a lower lactic acid production than did free cells in batch fermentation. The kinetics of the production of formic and pyruvic acids by L. lactis subsp. lactis and S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus are presented. PMID:16347822

  6. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis subsp. asaccharedens subsp. nov., a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring in Batman.

    PubMed

    Gul-Guven, Reyhan; Guven, Kemal; Poli, Annarita; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2008-12-01

    A new thermophilic spore-forming strain KG8(T) was isolated from the mud of Taslidere hot spring in Batman. Strain KG8(T) was aerobe, Gram-positive, rod-shaped, motile, occurring in pairs or filamentous. Growth was observed from 35-65 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C) and at pH 5.5-9.5 (optimum pH 7.5). It was capable of utilizing starch, growth was observed until 3% NaCl (w/v) and it was positive for nitrate reduction. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain KG8(T) was shown to be related most closely to Anoxybacillus species. Chemotaxonomic data (major isoprenoid quinone-menaquinone-7; major fatty acid-iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0) supported the affiliation of strain KG8(T) to the genus Anoxybacillus. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization, physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain KG8(T). Based on these results we propose assigning a novel subspecies of Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis, to be named Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis subsp. asaccharedens subsp. nov. with the type strain KG8(T) (DSM 18475(T)=CIP 109280(T)).

  7. Outer membrane proteins of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Peterson, Greg; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, classified into subsp. necrophorum (Fnn) and subsp. funduliforme (Fnf), is frequently associated with necrotic infections of animals and humans. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of many Gram negative bacteria play an important role in bacterial adhesion and establishment of infection. The OMP profile of F. necrophorum has not been well characterized. We analyzed OMP of bovine strains of Fnn and Fnf and human strains of F. necrophorum. Electrophoretic separations of extracted OMP of Fnn and Fnf strains of cattle showed a total of 19 and 20 protein bands, respectively. The most prominent protein band was 40 kDa in Fnn and 37.5 kDa in Fnf. The four human clinical strains examined had more heterogeneous banding patterns and had different profiles than those of bovine Fnf strains. A total of 11 protein bands in Fnn and 13 protein bands in Fnf were recognized by sera from cattle with liver abscesses. The intensities of many of the bands in Fnn were higher than that of Fnf. We conclude that the two subspecies of F. necrophorum differ in their OMP profiles and the difference may account for differences in their virulence and involvement in the pathogenesis of necrotic infections.

  8. Tulipa cinnabarina subsp. toprakii (Liliaceae), a new subspecies from southwestern Anatolia

    PubMed Central

    Eker, İsmail; Yıldırım, Hasan; Altıoğlu, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new subpecies, Tulipa cinnabarina subsp. toprakii subsp. nov. (Liliaceae) from Turkey is described. Diagnostic characters, descriptions, detailed illustrations, geographical distribution, conservation status and ecological observations on the new taxon are provided. It is also compared with the closely related Tulipa cinnabarina subsp. cinnabarina.

  9. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Chitwood, M Colter; Maggi, Ricardo G; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne; Toliver, Marcée; DePerno, Christopher S

    2013-04-01

    Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii has not been detected previously in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We tested whole blood from 60 white-tailed deer for Bartonella spp. DNA; three (5%) were positive for Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. This is the first detection of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in white-tailed deer.

  10. Tulipa cinnabarina subsp. toprakii (Liliaceae), a new subspecies from southwestern Anatolia

    PubMed Central

    Eker, İsmail; Yıldırım, Hasan; Altıoğlu, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new subpecies, Tulipa cinnabarina subsp. toprakii subsp. nov. (Liliaceae) from Turkey is described. Diagnostic characters, descriptions, detailed illustrations, geographical distribution, conservation status and ecological observations on the new taxon are provided. It is also compared with the closely related Tulipa cinnabarina subsp. cinnabarina. PMID:27698585

  11. Distinct Processes Drive Diversification in Different Clades of Gesneriaceae.

    PubMed

    Roalson, Eric H; Roberts, Wade R

    2016-07-01

    Using a time-calibrated phylogenetic hypothesis including 768 Gesneriaceae species (out of [Formula: see text]3300 species) and more than 29,000 aligned bases from 26 gene regions, we test Gesneriaceae for diversification rate shifts and the possible proximal drivers of these shifts: geographic distributions, growth forms, and pollination syndromes. Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixtures analyses found five significant rate shifts in Beslerieae, core Nematanthus, core Columneinae, core Streptocarpus, and Pacific Cyrtandra These rate shifts correspond with shifts in diversification rates, as inferred by Binary State Speciation and Extinction Model and Geographic State Speciation and Extinction model, associated with hummingbird pollination, epiphytism, unifoliate growth, and geographic area. Our results suggest that diversification processes are extremely variable across Gesneriaceae clades with different combinations of characters influencing diversification rates in different clades. Diversification patterns between New and Old World lineages show dramatic differences, suggesting that the processes of diversification in Gesneriaceae are very different in these two geographic regions.

  12. Quantifying variation in speciation and extinction rates with clade data.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Emmanuel; Tedesco, Pablo A; Hugueny, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    High-level phylogenies are very common in evolutionary analyses, although they are often treated as incomplete data. Here, we provide statistical tools to analyze what we name "clade data," which are the ages of clades together with their numbers of species. We develop a general approach for the statistical modeling of variation in speciation and extinction rates, including temporal variation, unknown variation, and linear and nonlinear modeling. We show how this approach can be generalized to a wide range of situations, including testing the effects of life-history traits and environmental variables on diversification rates. We report the results of an extensive simulation study to assess the performance of some statistical tests presented here as well as of the estimators of speciation and extinction rates. These latter results suggest the possibility to estimate correctly extinction rate in the absence of fossils. An example with data on fish is presented.

  13. Distinct Processes Drive Diversification in Different Clades of Gesneriaceae.

    PubMed

    Roalson, Eric H; Roberts, Wade R

    2016-07-01

    Using a time-calibrated phylogenetic hypothesis including 768 Gesneriaceae species (out of [Formula: see text]3300 species) and more than 29,000 aligned bases from 26 gene regions, we test Gesneriaceae for diversification rate shifts and the possible proximal drivers of these shifts: geographic distributions, growth forms, and pollination syndromes. Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixtures analyses found five significant rate shifts in Beslerieae, core Nematanthus, core Columneinae, core Streptocarpus, and Pacific Cyrtandra These rate shifts correspond with shifts in diversification rates, as inferred by Binary State Speciation and Extinction Model and Geographic State Speciation and Extinction model, associated with hummingbird pollination, epiphytism, unifoliate growth, and geographic area. Our results suggest that diversification processes are extremely variable across Gesneriaceae clades with different combinations of characters influencing diversification rates in different clades. Diversification patterns between New and Old World lineages show dramatic differences, suggesting that the processes of diversification in Gesneriaceae are very different in these two geographic regions. PMID:26880147

  14. Revision of the Maddenia clade of Prunus (Rosaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jun; Shi, Wenting

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Maddenia clade of Prunus L. is monographed based on herbarium and field studies. Four species are currently accepted in this group: Prunus himalayana J.Wen, Prunus hypoleuca (Koehne) J.Wen, Prunus hypoxantha (Koehne) J.Wen, and Prunus gongshanensis J.Wen, with the last described herein as a new species. Maddenia fujianensis Y.T.Chang and Maddenia incisoserrata T.T.Yü & T.C.Ku are treated as synonyms of Prunus hypoleuca. PMID:22577333

  15. Three novel canine papillomaviruses support taxonomic clade formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian E; Tobler, Kurt; Ackermann, Mathias; Panakova, Lucia; Thoday, Keith L; Favrot, Claude

    2009-11-01

    More than 100 human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been identified and had their whole genomes sequenced. Most of these HPVs can be classified into three distinct genera, the alpha-, beta- and gamma-papillomaviruses (PVs). Of note, only one or a small number of PVs have been identified for each individual animal species. However, four canine PVs (CPVs) (COPV, CPV2, CPV3 and CPV4) have been described and their entire genomic sequences have been published. Based on their sequence similarities, they belong to three distinct clades. In the present study, circular viral DNA was amplified from three dogs showing signs of pigmented plaques, endophytic papilloma or in situ squamous cell carcinoma. Analysis of the DNA sequences suggested that these are three novel viruses (CPV5, CPV6 and CPV7) whose genomes comprise all the conserved sequence elements of known PVs. The genomes of these seven CPVs were compared in order properly classify them. Interestingly, phylogenetic analyses, as well as pairwise sequence alignments of the putative amino acid sequences, revealed that CPV5 grouped well with CPV3 and CPV4, whereas CPV7 grouped with CPV2 but neither group fitted with other classified PVs. However, CPV6 grouped with COPV, a lambda-PV. Based on this evidence, allocation of CPVs into three distinct clades could therefore be supported. Thus, similar to HPVs, it might be that the known and currently unknown CPVs are related and form just a few clades or genera. PMID:19656968

  16. The historical biogeography of groupers: Clade diversification patterns and processes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ka Yan; Craig, Matthew Thomas; Choat, John Howard; van Herwerden, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    Groupers (family Epinephelidae) are a clade of species-rich, biologically diverse reef fishes. Given their ecological variability and widespread distribution across ocean basins, it is important to scrutinize their evolutionary history that underlies present day distributions. This study investigated the patterns and processes by which grouper biodiversity has been generated and what factors have influenced their present day distributions. We reconstructed a robust, time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of Epinephelidae with comprehensive (∼87%) species sampling, whereby diversification rates were estimated and ancestral ranges were reconstructed. Our results indicate that groupers originated in what is now the East Atlantic during the mid-Eocene and diverged successively to form six strongly supported main clades. These clades differ in age (late Oligocene to mid-Miocene), geographic origin (West Atlantic to West Indo-Pacific) and temporal-spatial diversification pattern, ranging from constant rates of diversification to episodes of rapid radiation. Overall, divergence within certain biogeographic regions was most prevalent in groupers, while vicariant divergences were more common in Tropical Atlantic and East Pacific groupers. Our findings reveal that both biological and geographical factors have driven grouper diversification. They also underscore the importance of scrutinizing group-specific patterns to better understand reef fish evolution.

  17. The historical biogeography of groupers: Clade diversification patterns and processes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ka Yan; Craig, Matthew Thomas; Choat, John Howard; van Herwerden, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    Groupers (family Epinephelidae) are a clade of species-rich, biologically diverse reef fishes. Given their ecological variability and widespread distribution across ocean basins, it is important to scrutinize their evolutionary history that underlies present day distributions. This study investigated the patterns and processes by which grouper biodiversity has been generated and what factors have influenced their present day distributions. We reconstructed a robust, time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of Epinephelidae with comprehensive (∼87%) species sampling, whereby diversification rates were estimated and ancestral ranges were reconstructed. Our results indicate that groupers originated in what is now the East Atlantic during the mid-Eocene and diverged successively to form six strongly supported main clades. These clades differ in age (late Oligocene to mid-Miocene), geographic origin (West Atlantic to West Indo-Pacific) and temporal-spatial diversification pattern, ranging from constant rates of diversification to episodes of rapid radiation. Overall, divergence within certain biogeographic regions was most prevalent in groupers, while vicariant divergences were more common in Tropical Atlantic and East Pacific groupers. Our findings reveal that both biological and geographical factors have driven grouper diversification. They also underscore the importance of scrutinizing group-specific patterns to better understand reef fish evolution. PMID:26908372

  18. Anuran trypanosomes: phylogenetic evidence for new clades in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da S Ferreira, Juliana I G; da Costa, Andrea P; Ramirez, Diego; Roldan, Jairo A M; Saraiva, Danilo; da S Founier, Gislene F R; Sue, Ana; Zambelli, Erick R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Verdade, Vanessa K; Gennari, Solange M; Marcili, Arlei

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosomes of anurans and fish are grouped into the Aquatic Clade which includes species isolated from fish, amphibians, turtles and platypus, usually transmitted by leeches and phlebotomine sand flies. Trypanosomes from Brazilian frogs are grouped within the Aquatic Clade with other anuran trypanosome species, where there seems to be coevolutionary patterns with vertebrate hosts and association to Brazilian biomes (Atlantic Forest, Pantanal and Amazonia Rainforest). We characterised the anuran trypanosomes from two different areas of the Cerrado biome and examined their phylogenetic relationships based on the SSU rRNA gene. A total of 112 anurans of six species was analysed and trypanosome prevalence evaluated through haemoculture was found to be 7% (8 positive frogs). However, only three isolates (2.7%) from two anuran species were recovered and cryopreserved. Analysis including SSU rDNA sequences from previous studies segregated the anuran trypanosomes into six groups, the previously reported An01 to An04, and An05 and An06 reported herein. Clade An05 comprises the isolates from Leptodactylus latrans (Steffen) and Pristimantis sp. captured in the Cerrado biome and Trypanosoma chattoni Mathis & Leger, 1911. The inclusion of new isolates in the phylogenetic analyses provided evidence for a new group (An06) of parasites from phlebotomine hosts. Our results indicate that the diversity of trypanosome species is underestimated since studies conducted in Brazil and other regions of the world are still few. PMID:25862033

  19. Genetic and Serological Analysis of Lipoprotein LppA in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri

    PubMed Central

    Monnerat, Marie-Pierre; Thiaucourt, François; Poveda, Jose B.; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    The genes encoding the 62-kDa lipoproteins from the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large-colony type (LC) strain Y-goat and the M. mycoides subsp. capri strain PG3 were cloned and analyzed by sequencing. These two lipoproteins have been named LppA[MmymyLC] and LppA[Mmyca], and their corresponding genes have been named lppA[MmymyLC] and lppA[Mmyca], respectively. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of these two lipoproteins showed a very high degree of similarity between these two mycoplasmas. Given the sequence data, LppA seems to fulfill the same structural functions as the previously described major lipoproteins P72 of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides small-colony type and P67 of the Mycoplasma species bovine group 7. Based on lppA gene sequences of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and M. mycoides subsp. capri type strains, a specific PCR assay was developed so that it amplified this gene in all field strains of the two species analyzed in this study but not in the other members of the M. mycoides cluster. Analysis of the PCR-amplified lppA genes with frequently cutting restriction enzymes showed a certain degree of genetic variability which, however, did not cluster the two subspecies. This PCR therefore allows a rapid identification of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and M. mycoides subsp. capri but does not distinguish between these two closely related subspecies. LppA was expressed in Escherichia coli K-12 and used for the production of polyclonal mouse antiserum. Antibodies against recombinant LppA[MmymyLC] reacted with a 62-kDa protein in all M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and M. mycoides subsp. capri type strains and field strains tested but not with the other members of the M. mycoides cluster, thus showing the antigenic specificity of LppA and further supporting the concept that a close relationship exists between these two mycoplasmas. PMID:10066658

  20. Francisella tularensis RipA Protein Topology and Identification of Functional Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Brittany L.; Fuller, James R.; Taft-Benz, Sharon; Collins, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative coccobacillus and is the etiological agent of the disease tularemia. Expression of the cytoplasmic membrane protein RipA is required for Francisella replication within macrophages and other cell types; however, the function of this protein remains unknown. RipA is conserved among all sequenced Francisella species, and RipA-like proteins are present in a number of individual strains of a wide variety of species scattered throughout the prokaryotic kingdom. Cross-linking studies revealed that RipA forms homoligomers. Using a panel of RipA-green fluorescent protein and RipA-PhoA fusion constructs, we determined that RipA has a unique topology within the cytoplasmic membrane, with the N and C termini in the cytoplasm and periplasm, respectively. RipA has two significant cytoplasmic domains, one composed roughly of amino acids 1 to 50 and the second flanked by the second and third transmembrane domains and comprising amino acids 104 to 152. RipA functional domains were identified by measuring the effects of deletion mutations, amino acid substitution mutations, and spontaneously arising intragenic suppressor mutations on intracellular replication, induction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by infected macrophages, and oligomer formation. Results from these experiments demonstrated that each of the cytoplasmic domains and specific amino acids within these domains are required for RipA function. PMID:22267515

  1. Electrochemical detection of Francisella tularensis genomic DNA using solid-phase recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    del Río, Jonathan Sabaté; Yehia Adly, Nouran; Acero-Sánchez, Josep Lluis; Henry, Olivier Y F; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2014-04-15

    Solid-phase isothermal DNA amplification was performed exploiting the homology protein recombinase A (recA). The system was primarily tested on maleimide activated microtitre plates as a proof-of-concept and later translated to an electrochemical platform. In both cases, forward primer for Francisella tularensis holarctica genomic DNA was surface immobilised via a thiol or an amino moiety and then elongated during the recA mediated amplification, carried out in the presence of specific target sequence and reverse primers. The formation of the subsequent surface tethered amplicons was either colorimetrically or electrochemically monitored using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labelled DNA secondary probe complementary to the elongated strand. The amplification time was optimised to amplify even low amounts of DNA copies in less than an hour at a constant temperature of 37°C, achieving a limit of detection of 1.3×10(-13) M (4×10(6) copies in 50 μL) for the colorimetric assay and 3.3×10(-14) M (2×10(5) copies in 10 μL) for the chronoamperometric assay. The system was demonstrated to be highly specific with negligible cross-reactivity with non-complementary targets or primers.

  2. Establishment of lethal inhalational infection with Francisella tularensis (tularaemia) in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michelle; Lever, Mark S; Savage, Victoria L; Salguero, Francisco Javier; Pearce, Peter C; Stevens, Daniel J; Simpson, Andrew J H

    2009-04-01

    Susceptibility and lethality studies of inhalational tularaemia were undertaken using the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) to determine its suitability as a non-human primate model. Pairs of marmosets were exposed to varying challenge doses of Francisella tularensis by the airborne route and monitored for up to 14 days postchallenge (p.c.). Lethal infection was achieved following a retained dose of less than 10 bacterial colony-forming units (CFU). However, precise LD(50) determination was not possible. The model was characterized using a target challenge dose of approximately 100 CFU. Increased core body temperature was the first indicator of disease, at approximately 2.5 days p.c. Overt clinical signs were first observed 12-18 h after the temperature increase. Significantly decreased activity was observed after approximately 3 days. All animals succumbed to infection between 4.5 and 7 days p.c. At postmortem examination, gross pathology was evident in the liver, spleen and lungs of all animals and high bacterial numbers were detected in all the organs assessed. Bacteraemia was demonstrated in all animals postmortem. Histopathological observations included severe suppurative bronchopneumonia, severe multifocal pyogranulomatous hepatitis, splenitis and lymphadenitis. Tularaemia disease progression in the common marmoset therefore appears to be consistent with the disease seen in humans and other animal models. The common marmoset may therefore be considered a suitable model for further studies of inhalational tularaemia.

  3. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from Francisella tularensis

    SciTech Connect

    Subburaman, P.; Austin, B.P.; Shaw, G.X.; Waugh, D.S.; Ji, X.

    2010-11-03

    Francisella tularensis, a potential bioweapon, causes a rare infectious disease called tularemia in humans and animals. The macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from F. tularensis associates with RNA polymerase to positively regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors that are required for its survival and replication within macrophages. The MglA protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 7.5 {angstrom} resolution at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125, c = 54 {angstrom}.

  4. Spore-forming Serratia marcescens subsp. sakuensis subsp. nov., isolated from a domestic wastewater treatment tank.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Bindu; Ajithkumar, Vasudevan P; Iriye, Ryozo; Doi, Yukio; Sakai, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    A strain (KREDT) that formed endospores and produced the pigment prodigiosin was isolated from activated sludge. The presence of spores in cells of strain KREDT was evident upon electron microscopy examination, heat treatment and the detection of dipicolinic acid in the cells. Biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence and DNA-DNA homology data identified strain KREDT as Serratia marcescens. The major respiratory quinone of strain KREDT was found to be ubiquinone Q-8. The formation of endospores by Gram-negative bacteria has not been observed previously, and has never been reported in any species of Serratia. Here, it is shown that strain KREDT (JCM 11315T = CIP 107489T) represents a novel subspecies of S. marcescens, for which the name Serratia marcescens subsp. sakuensis is proposed.

  5. Live attenuated mutants of Francisella tularensis protect rabbits against aerosol challenge with a virulent type A strain.

    PubMed

    Reed, Douglas S; Smith, Le'kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Barry, Eileen M

    2014-05-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection.

  6. [Investigation of the presence of Francisella tularensis by culture, serology and molecular methods in mice of Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unal Yilmaz, Gülizar; Gurcan, Saban; Ozkan, Beytullah; Karadenizli, Aynur

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia is a disease that has been reported in Turkey since 1936. Although mice are considered to have a role in the transmission of Francisella tularensis to man, this has not been exactly confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of F. tularensis in mice by using culture, serology and molecular methods. For this purpose, four villages (Edirne-Demirkoy, Kirklareli-Kaynarca, Tekirdag-Muzruplu, Tekirdag-Sinanli) were selected in Thrace Region of Turkey where tularemia cases had been reported previously. A total of 126 live-catch mouse traps were established in warehouses, barns, areas near wells, water tanks and creeks in the villages in December 2012. Traps were kept overnight and the next day the animals collected were identified at species-level. The live-captured mice were anesthetized and their heart blood samples were obtained. Subsequently, liver and spleen tissues were removed from every mouse under aseptic conditions in the class-2 safety cabinet. These tissues were cultivated in Francis medium containing 5% sheep blood, 0.1% cystein, 1% glucose and incubated for seven days in both normal atmosphere and 5% carbondioxide incubator at 37°C. Tularemia microagglutination test was performed by using the sera which were obtained from live-captured mice. Finally, DNAs were isolated from both liver and spleen tissues of mice, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Tularemia RT-PCR; Public Health Agency of Turkey, Ankara) were performed. In our study, a total of 19 mice were captured and of these 11 were alive. Ten mice were identified as Apodemus flavicollis, seven were Mus macedonicus and two were Mus musculus. There were no Francisella tularensis isolation in the cultures of mice liver and spleen tissues. Serological tests yielded negative results for 10 mice whose serum samples could be obtained. In RT-PCR, positivity were detected in spleen tissues of two mice which were captured from Kaynarca where first tularemia cases in

  7. [Investigation of the presence of Francisella tularensis by culture, serology and molecular methods in mice of Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unal Yilmaz, Gülizar; Gurcan, Saban; Ozkan, Beytullah; Karadenizli, Aynur

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia is a disease that has been reported in Turkey since 1936. Although mice are considered to have a role in the transmission of Francisella tularensis to man, this has not been exactly confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of F. tularensis in mice by using culture, serology and molecular methods. For this purpose, four villages (Edirne-Demirkoy, Kirklareli-Kaynarca, Tekirdag-Muzruplu, Tekirdag-Sinanli) were selected in Thrace Region of Turkey where tularemia cases had been reported previously. A total of 126 live-catch mouse traps were established in warehouses, barns, areas near wells, water tanks and creeks in the villages in December 2012. Traps were kept overnight and the next day the animals collected were identified at species-level. The live-captured mice were anesthetized and their heart blood samples were obtained. Subsequently, liver and spleen tissues were removed from every mouse under aseptic conditions in the class-2 safety cabinet. These tissues were cultivated in Francis medium containing 5% sheep blood, 0.1% cystein, 1% glucose and incubated for seven days in both normal atmosphere and 5% carbondioxide incubator at 37°C. Tularemia microagglutination test was performed by using the sera which were obtained from live-captured mice. Finally, DNAs were isolated from both liver and spleen tissues of mice, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Tularemia RT-PCR; Public Health Agency of Turkey, Ankara) were performed. In our study, a total of 19 mice were captured and of these 11 were alive. Ten mice were identified as Apodemus flavicollis, seven were Mus macedonicus and two were Mus musculus. There were no Francisella tularensis isolation in the cultures of mice liver and spleen tissues. Serological tests yielded negative results for 10 mice whose serum samples could be obtained. In RT-PCR, positivity were detected in spleen tissues of two mice which were captured from Kaynarca where first tularemia cases in

  8. Denitrification capabilities of two biological phosphorus removal sludges dominated by different "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clades.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Jason J; He, Shaomei; Yilmaz, Safak; Noguera, Daniel R; McMahon, Katherine D

    2009-12-01

    The capability of "Candidatus Accumulibacter" to use nitrate as an electron acceptor for phosphorus uptake was investigated using two activated sludge communities. The two communities were enriched in Accumulibacter clade IA and clade IIA, respectively. By performing a series of batch experiments, we found that clade IA was able to couple nitrate reduction with phosphorus uptake, but clade IIA could not. These results agree with a previously proposed hypothesis that different populations of Accumulibacter have different nitrate reduction capabilities, and they will help to understand the ecological roles that these two clades provide. PMID:20808723

  9. Metamorphosis and neoteny: alternative pathways in an extinct amphibian clade.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Rainer R; Fröbisch, Nadia B

    2006-07-01

    The Branchiosauridae was a clade of small amphibians from the Permo-Carboniferous with an overall salamander-like appearance. The clade is distinguished by an extraordinary fossil record that comprises hundreds of well-preserved specimens, representing a wide range of ontogenetic stages. Branchiosaurids had external gills and weakly ossified skeletons, and due to this larval appearance their status as neotenic (perennibranchiate) forms has long been accepted. Despite their extensive fossil record large specimens with an adult morphology appeared to be lacking altogether, but recently two adult specimens were identified in a rich sample of Apateon gracilis collected in the 19th century from a locality near Dresden, Saxony. These specimens are unique among branchiosaurids in showing a high level of ossification, including bones that have never been reported in a branchiosaur. These highlight the successive formation of features believed to indicate terrestrial locomotion, as well as feeding on larger prey items. Moreover, these transformations occurred in a small time window (whereas the degree of size increase is used as a proxy of time) and the degree of concentration of developmental events in branchiosaurids is unique among tetrapods outside the lissamphibians. These specimens are compared with large adults of the neotenic branchiosaurid Apateon caducus from the Saar-Nahe Basin, which despite their larger body size lack the features found in the adult A. gracilis specimens. These specimens give new insight into patterns of metamorphosis (morphological transformation) in branchiosaurids that are believed to be correlated to a change of habitat, and clearly show that different life-history pathways comparable to those of modern salamanders were already established in this Paleozoic clade.

  10. Comparative Physiology of Oleaginous Species from the Yarrowia Clade

    PubMed Central

    Michely, Stéphanie; Gaillardin, Claude; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a genetically tractable yeast species that has become an attractive model for analyses of lipid metabolism, due to its oleaginous nature. We investigated the regulation and evolution of lipid metabolism in non-Saccharomycetaceae yeasts, by carrying out a comparative physiological analysis of eight species recently assigned to the Yarrowia clade: Candida alimentaria, Y. deformans, C. galli, C. hispaniensis, C. hollandica, C. oslonensis, C. phangngensis and Y. yakushimensis. We compared the abilities of type strains of these species to grow on 31 non hydrophobic (sugars and other carbohydrate compounds) and 13 hydrophobic (triglycerides, alkanes and free fatty acids) carbon sources. Limited phenotypic diversity was observed in terms of the range of substrates used and, in the case of short-chain fatty acids, their toxicity. We assessed the oleaginous nature of these species, by evaluating their ability to store and to synthesize lipids. The mean lipid content of cells grown on oleic acid differed considerably between species, ranging from 30% of cell dry weight in C. oslonensis to 67% in C. hispaniensis. Lipid synthesis in cells grown on glucose resulted in the accumulation of C18:1 (n-9) as the major compound in most species, except for C. alimentaria and Y. yakushimensis, which accumulated principally C18:2(n-6), and C. hispaniensis, which accumulated both C16:0 and C18:1(n-9). Thus, all species of the clade were oleaginous, but they presented specific patterns of growth, lipid synthesis and storage, and therefore constitute good models for the comparative analysis of lipid metabolism in this basal yeast clade. PMID:23667605

  11. Comparative physiology of oleaginous species from the Yarrowia clade.

    PubMed

    Michely, Stéphanie; Gaillardin, Claude; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a genetically tractable yeast species that has become an attractive model for analyses of lipid metabolism, due to its oleaginous nature. We investigated the regulation and evolution of lipid metabolism in non-Saccharomycetaceae yeasts, by carrying out a comparative physiological analysis of eight species recently assigned to the Yarrowia clade: Candida alimentaria, Y. deformans, C. galli, C. hispaniensis, C. hollandica, C. oslonensis, C. phangngensis and Y. yakushimensis. We compared the abilities of type strains of these species to grow on 31 non hydrophobic (sugars and other carbohydrate compounds) and 13 hydrophobic (triglycerides, alkanes and free fatty acids) carbon sources. Limited phenotypic diversity was observed in terms of the range of substrates used and, in the case of short-chain fatty acids, their toxicity. We assessed the oleaginous nature of these species, by evaluating their ability to store and to synthesize lipids. The mean lipid content of cells grown on oleic acid differed considerably between species, ranging from 30% of cell dry weight in C. oslonensis to 67% in C. hispaniensis. Lipid synthesis in cells grown on glucose resulted in the accumulation of C18:1 (n-9) as the major compound in most species, except for C. alimentaria and Y. yakushimensis, which accumulated principally C18:2(n-6), and C. hispaniensis, which accumulated both C16:0 and C18:1(n-9). Thus, all species of the clade were oleaginous, but they presented specific patterns of growth, lipid synthesis and storage, and therefore constitute good models for the comparative analysis of lipid metabolism in this basal yeast clade.

  12. Dengue virus type 1 clade replacement in recurring homotypic outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurring dengue outbreaks occur in cyclical pattern in most endemic countries. The recurrences of dengue virus (DENV) infection predispose the population to increased risk of contracting the severe forms of dengue. Understanding the DENV evolutionary mechanism underlying the recurring dengue outbreaks has important implications for epidemic prediction and disease control. Results We used a set of viral envelope (E) gene to reconstruct the phylogeny of DENV-1 isolated between the periods of 1987–2011 in Malaysia. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 E gene revealed that genotype I virus clade replacements were associated with the cyclical pattern of major DENV-1 outbreaks in Malaysia. A total of 9 non-conservative amino acid substitutions in the DENV-1 E gene consensus were identified; 4 in domain I, 3 in domain II and 2 in domain III. Selection pressure analyses did not reveal any positively selected codon site within the full length E gene sequences (1485 nt, 495 codons). A total of 183 (mean dN/dS = 0.0413) negatively selected sites were found within the Malaysian isolates; neither positive nor negative selection was noted for the remaining 312 codons. All the viruses were cross-neutralized by the respective patient sera suggesting no strong support for immunological advantage of any of the amino acid substitutions. Conclusion DENV-1 clade replacement is associated with recurrences of major DENV-1 outbreaks in Malaysia. Our findings are consistent with those of other studies that the DENV-1 clade replacement is a stochastic event independent of positive selection. PMID:24073945

  13. Juvenile skeletogenesis in anciently diverged sea urchin clades.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Thompson, Jeffrey R; Petsios, Elizabeth; Erkenbrack, Eric; Moats, Rex A; Bottjer, David J; Davidson, Eric H

    2015-04-01

    Mechanistic understanding of evolutionary divergence in animal body plans devolves from analysis of those developmental processes that, in forms descendant from a common ancestor, are responsible for their morphological differences. The last common ancestor of the two extant subclasses of sea urchins, i.e., euechinoids and cidaroids, existed well before the Permian/Triassic extinction (252 mya). Subsequent evolutionary divergence of these clades offers in principle a rare opportunity to solve the developmental regulatory events underlying a defined evolutionary divergence process. Thus (i) there is an excellent and fairly dense (if yet incompletely analyzed) fossil record; (ii) cladistically confined features of the skeletal structures of modern euechinoid and cidaroid sea urchins are preserved in fossils of ancestral forms; (iii) euechinoids and cidaroids are among current laboratory model systems in molecular developmental biology (here Strongylocentrotus purpuratus [Sp] and Eucidaris tribuloides [Et]); (iv) skeletogenic specification in sea urchins is uncommonly well understood at the causal level of interactions of regulatory genes with one another, and with known skeletogenic effector genes, providing a ready arsenal of available molecular tools. Here we focus on differences in test and perignathic girdle skeletal morphology that distinguish all modern euechinoid from all modern cidaroid sea urchins. We demonstrate distinct canonical test and girdle morphologies in juveniles of both species by use of SEM and X-ray microtomography. Among the sharply distinct morphological features of these clades are the internal skeletal structures of the perignathic girdle to which attach homologous muscles utilized for retraction and protraction of Aristotles׳ lantern and its teeth. We demonstrate that these structures develop de novo between one and four weeks after metamorphosis. In order to study the underlying developmental processes, a method of section whole mount in

  14. Genome characterisation of the genus Francisella reveals insight into similar evolutionary paths in pathogens of mammals and fish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior to this study, relatively few strains of Francisella had been genome-sequenced. Previously published Francisella genome sequences were largely restricted to the zoonotic agent F. tularensis. Only limited data were available for other members of the Francisella genus, including F. philomiragia, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, F. noatunensis, a serious pathogen of farmed fish, and other less well described endosymbiotic species. Results We determined the phylogenetic relationships of all known Francisella species, including some for which the phylogenetic positions were previously uncertain. The genus Francisella could be divided into two main genetic clades: one included F. tularensis, F. novicida, F. hispaniensis and Wolbachia persica, and another included F. philomiragia and F. noatunensis. Some Francisella species were found to have significant recombination frequencies. However, the fish pathogen F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis was an exception due to it exhibiting a highly clonal population structure similar to the human pathogen F. tularensis. Conclusions The genus Francisella can be divided into two main genetic clades occupying both terrestrial and marine habitats. However, our analyses suggest that the ancestral Francisella species originated in a marine habitat. The observed genome to genome variation in gene content and IS elements of different species supports the view that similar evolutionary paths of host adaptation developed independently in F. tularensis (infecting mammals) and F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis (infecting fish). PMID:22727144

  15. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  16. Novel cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvorsen, K; Højer-Pedersen, B; Godtfredsen, S E

    1991-01-01

    A cyanide-metabolizing bacterium, strain DF3, isolated from soil was identified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. Whole cells and cell extracts of strain DF3 catalyzed hydrolysis of cyanide to formate and ammonia (HCN + 2H2O----HCOOH + NH3) without forming formamide as a free intermediate. The cyanide-hydrolyzing activity was inducibly produced in cells during growth in cyanide-containing media. Cyanate (OCN-) and a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles were not hydrolyzed by intact cells of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3. Strain DF3 hydrolyzed cyanide with great efficacy. Thus, by using resting induced cells at a concentration of 11.3 mg (dry weight) per ml, the cyanide concentration could be reduced from 0.97 M (approximately 25,220 ppm) to less than 77 nM (approximately 0.002 ppm) in 55 h. Enzyme purification established that cyanide hydrolysis by A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was due to a single intracellular enzyme. The soluble enzyme was purified approximately 160-fold, and the first 25 NH2-terminal amino acids were determined by automated Edman degradation. The molecular mass of the active enzyme (purity, greater than 97% as determined by amino acid sequencing) was estimated to be greater than 300,000 Da. The cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was tentatively named cyanidase to distinguish it from known nitrilases (EC 3.5.5.1) which act on organic nitriles. Images PMID:1872607

  17. A new flavan-3-ol from Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis.

    PubMed

    Ti, Hui-Hui; Lin, Li-Dong; Ding, Wen-Bing; Wei, Xiao-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Further investigation on the stems of Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis led to the isolation and characterization of a new flavan-3-ol, named artoflavanocoumarin, along with three known compounds (+)-catechin, (+)-afzelechin 3-O-α-L-rhamnoside, and (+)-catechin 3-O-α-L-rhamnoside. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data.

  18. Laminaria japonica Extract, an Inhibitor of Clavibater michiganense Subsp. Sepedonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jin; Feng, Jia; Xie, Shulian; Wang, Feipeng; Xu, Qiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial ring rot of potato is one of the most serious potato plant and tuber diseases. Laminaria japonica extract was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against Clavibater michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (Spieckermann & Kotthoff) Davis et al., the causative agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions of antimicrobial substances from L. japonica were an extraction temperature of 80°C, an extraction time of 12 h, and a solid to liquid ratio of 1∶25. Active compounds of L. japonica were isolated by solvent partition, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography. All nineteen fractionations had antimicrobial activities against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum, while Fractionation three (Fr.3) had the highest (P<0.05) antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition analysis identified a total of 26 components in Fr.3. The main constituents of Fr.3 were alkanes (80.97%), esters (5.24%), acids (4.87%) and alcohols (2.21%). Antimicrobial activity of Fr.3 against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum could be attributed to its ability to damage the cell wall and cell membrane, induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, inhibit the glycolytic pathway (EMP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and disrupt the normal cycle of DNA replication. These findings indicate that L. japonica extracts have potential for inhibiting C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. PMID:24714388

  19. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strain M1601

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yuefeng; Gao, Pengchen; Zhao, Ping; He, Ying; Liao, Nancy; Jackman, Shaun; Zhao, Yongjun; Birol, Inanc; Duan, Xiaobo; Lu, Zhongxin

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is the causative agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, a devastating disease of goats listed by the World Organization for Animal Health. Here we report the first complete genome sequence of this organism (strain M1601, a clinically isolated strain from China). PMID:21994928

  20. Recurrent Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Bacteremia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joshua R.; Leber, Amy; Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of an infant with recurrent bacteremia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, likely transmitted from mother to infant. Our case highlights the importance of an epidemiological history and molecular diagnostics in ascertaining insights into transmission, pathogenesis, and optimal management. PMID:26179301

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mitsunori; Nakanaga, Kazue; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Kazumi, Yuko; Mitarai, Satoshi; Ishii, Norihisa; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense produces mycolactone and causes Buruli ulcer. Here, we report the complete sequence of its genome, which comprises a 5.9-Mb chromosome and a 166-kb plasmid (pShT-P). The sequence will represent the essential data for future phylogenetic and comparative genome studies of mycolactone-producing mycobacteria. PMID:27688344

  2. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  3. Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius strain ST1464 genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Robert, Catherine; Nguyen, Ti Thien; Gimenez, Grégory; El Sanousi, Sulieman M.; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is responsible for Morel's disease in animals and a cause of abscess in humans. It is characterized by a microaerophilic growth, contrary to the other strains of S. aureus. The 2,604,446-bp genome (32.7% GC content) of S. anaerobius ST1464 comprises one chromosome and no plasmids. The chromosome contains 2,660 open reading frames (ORFs), 49 tRNAs and three complete rRNAs, forming one complete operon. The size of ORFs ranges between 100 to 4,600 bp except for two ORFs of 6,417 and 7,173 bp encoding segregation ATPase and non-ribosomal peptide synthase, respectively. The chromosome harbors Staphylococcus phage 2638A genome and incomplete Staphylococcus phage genome PT1028, but no detectable CRISPRS. The antibiotic resistance gene for tetracycline was found although Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is susceptible to tetracycline in-vitro. Intact oxygen detoxification genes encode superoxide dismutase and cytochrome quinol oxidase whereas the catalase gene is impaired by a stop codon. Based on the genome, in-silico multilocus sequence typing indicates that S. aureus subsp. anaerobius emerged as a clone separated from all other S. aureus strains, illustrating host-adaptation linked to missing functions. Availability of S. aureus subsp. anaerobius genome could prompt the development of post-genomic tools for its rapid discrimination from S. aureus. PMID:24501641

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mitsunori; Nakanaga, Kazue; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Kazumi, Yuko; Mitarai, Satoshi; Ishii, Norihisa; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense produces mycolactone and causes Buruli ulcer. Here, we report the complete sequence of its genome, which comprises a 5.9-Mb chromosome and a 166-kb plasmid (pShT-P). The sequence will represent the essential data for future phylogenetic and comparative genome studies of mycolactone-producing mycobacteria. PMID:27688344

  5. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  6. Description of Teunomyces gen. nov. for the Candida kruisii clade, Suhomyces gen. nov. for the Candida tanzawaensis clade and Suhomyces kilbournensis sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence analysis has shown that species of the Candida kruisii clade and species of the C. tanzawaensis clade represent phylogenetically circumscribed genera, which are described as Teunomyces gen. nov., type species T. kruisii, and Suhomyces gen. nov., type species S. tanzawaensis. Many of the...

  7. Francisella tularensis novicida proteomic and transcriptomic data integration and annotation based on semantic web technologies

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Nadia; Hunt, Ela

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper summarises the lessons and experiences gained from a case study of the application of semantic web technologies to the integration of data from the bacterial species Francisella tularensis novicida (Fn). Fn data sources are disparate and heterogeneous, as multiple laboratories across the world, using multiple technologies, perform experiments to understand the mechanism of virulence. It is hard to integrate these data sources in a flexible manner that allows new experimental data to be added and compared when required. Results Public domain data sources were combined in RDF. Using this connected graph of database cross references, we extended the annotations of an experimental data set by superimposing onto it the annotation graph. Identifiers used in the experimental data automatically resolved and the data acquired annotations in the rest of the RDF graph. This happened without the expensive manual annotation that would normally be required to produce these links. This graph of resolved identifiers was then used to combine two experimental data sets, a proteomics experiment and a transcriptomic experiment studying the mechanism of virulence through the comparison of wildtype Fn with an avirulent mutant strain. Conclusion We produced a graph of Fn cross references which enabled the combination of two experimental datasets. Through combination of these data we are able to perform queries that compare the results of the two experiments. We found that data are easily combined in RDF and that experimental results are easily compared when the data are integrated. We conclude that semantic data integration offers a convenient, simple and flexible solution to the integration of published and unpublished experimental data. PMID:19796400

  8. Characterization of the O-antigen Polymerase (Wzy) of Francisella tularensis*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Sebastian, Shite; Pinkham, Jessica T.; Ross, Robin A.; Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    The O-antigen polymerase of Gram-negative bacteria has been difficult to characterize. Herein we report the biochemical and functional characterization of the protein product (Wzy) of the gene annotated as the putative O-antigen polymerase, which is located in the O-antigen biosynthetic locus of Francisella tularensis. In silico analysis (homology searching, hydropathy plotting, and codon usage assessment) strongly suggested that Wzy is an O-antigen polymerase whose function is to catalyze the addition of newly synthesized O-antigen repeating units to a glycolipid consisting of lipid A, inner core polysaccharide, and one repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide (O-PS). To characterize the function of the Wzy protein, a non-polar deletion mutant of wzy was generated by allelic replacement, and the banding pattern of O-PS was observed by immunoblot analysis of whole-cell lysates obtained by SDS-PAGE and stained with an O-PS-specific monoclonal antibody. These immunoblot analyses showed that O-PS of the wzy mutant expresses only one repeating unit of O-antigen. Further biochemical characterization of the subcellular fractions of the wzy mutant demonstrated that (as is characteristic of O-antigen polymerase mutants) the low molecular weight O-antigen accumulates in the periplasm of the mutant. Site-directed mutagenesis based on protein homology and topology, which was carried out to locate a catalytic residue of the protein, showed that modification of specific residues (Gly176, Asp177, Gly323, and Tyr324) leads to a loss of O-PS polymerization. Topology models indicate that these amino acids most likely lie in close proximity on the bacterial surface. PMID:20605777

  9. B-Cell Epitopes in GroEL of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Madico, Guillermo; Li, Sheng; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Perkins, Hillary M.; Sompuram, Seshi R.; Kodela, Vani; Liu, Tong; Morris, Timothy; Wang, Daphne; Roche, Marly I.; Seaton, Barbara A.; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The chaperonin protein GroEL, also known as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is a prominent antigen in the human and mouse antibody response to the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft), the causative agent of tularemia. In addition to its presumed cytoplasmic location, FtGroEL has been reported to be a potential component of the bacterial surface and to be released from the bacteria. In the current study, 13 IgG2a and one IgG3 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for FtGroEL were classified into eleven unique groups based on shared VH-VL germline genes, and seven crossblocking profiles revealing at least three non-overlapping epitope areas in competition ELISA. In a mouse model of respiratory tularemia with the highly pathogenic Ft type A strain SchuS4, the Ab64 and N200 IgG2a mAbs, which block each other’s binding to and are sensitive to the same two point mutations in FtGroEL, reduced bacterial burden indicating that they target protective GroEL B-cell epitopes. The Ab64 and N200 epitopes, as well as those of three other mAbs with different crossblocking profiles, Ab53, N3, and N30, were mapped by hydrogen/deuterium exchange–mass spectrometry (DXMS) and visualized on a homology model of FtGroEL. This model was further supported by its experimentally-validated computational docking to the X-ray crystal structures of Ab64 and Ab53 Fabs. The structural analysis and DXMS profiles of the Ab64 and N200 mAbs suggest that their protective effects may be due to induction or stabilization of a conformational change in FtGroEL. PMID:24968190

  10. Decoupled form and function in disparate herbivorous dinosaur clades.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Brassey, Charlotte A; Button, David J; Barrett, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution, the acquisition of morphologically similar traits in unrelated taxa due to similar functional demands or environmental factors, is a common phenomenon in the animal kingdom. Consequently, the occurrence of similar form is used routinely to address fundamental questions in morphofunctional research and to infer function in fossils. However, such qualitative assessments can be misleading and it is essential to test form/function relationships quantitatively. The parallel occurrence of a suite of morphologically convergent craniodental characteristics in three herbivorous, phylogenetically disparate dinosaur clades (Sauropodomorpha, Ornithischia, Theropoda) provides an ideal test case. A combination of computational biomechanical models (Finite Element Analysis, Multibody Dynamics Analysis) demonstrate that despite a high degree of morphological similarity between representative taxa (Plateosaurus engelhardti, Stegosaurus stenops, Erlikosaurus andrewsi) from these clades, their biomechanical behaviours are notably different and difficult to predict on the basis of form alone. These functional differences likely reflect dietary specialisations, demonstrating the value of quantitative biomechanical approaches when evaluating form/function relationships in extinct taxa. PMID:27199098

  11. Decoupled form and function in disparate herbivorous dinosaur clades

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Brassey, Charlotte A.; Button, David J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution, the acquisition of morphologically similar traits in unrelated taxa due to similar functional demands or environmental factors, is a common phenomenon in the animal kingdom. Consequently, the occurrence of similar form is used routinely to address fundamental questions in morphofunctional research and to infer function in fossils. However, such qualitative assessments can be misleading and it is essential to test form/function relationships quantitatively. The parallel occurrence of a suite of morphologically convergent craniodental characteristics in three herbivorous, phylogenetically disparate dinosaur clades (Sauropodomorpha, Ornithischia, Theropoda) provides an ideal test case. A combination of computational biomechanical models (Finite Element Analysis, Multibody Dynamics Analysis) demonstrate that despite a high degree of morphological similarity between representative taxa (Plateosaurus engelhardti, Stegosaurus stenops, Erlikosaurus andrewsi) from these clades, their biomechanical behaviours are notably different and difficult to predict on the basis of form alone. These functional differences likely reflect dietary specialisations, demonstrating the value of quantitative biomechanical approaches when evaluating form/function relationships in extinct taxa. PMID:27199098

  12. Decoupled form and function in disparate herbivorous dinosaur clades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Brassey, Charlotte A.; Button, David J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    Convergent evolution, the acquisition of morphologically similar traits in unrelated taxa due to similar functional demands or environmental factors, is a common phenomenon in the animal kingdom. Consequently, the occurrence of similar form is used routinely to address fundamental questions in morphofunctional research and to infer function in fossils. However, such qualitative assessments can be misleading and it is essential to test form/function relationships quantitatively. The parallel occurrence of a suite of morphologically convergent craniodental characteristics in three herbivorous, phylogenetically disparate dinosaur clades (Sauropodomorpha, Ornithischia, Theropoda) provides an ideal test case. A combination of computational biomechanical models (Finite Element Analysis, Multibody Dynamics Analysis) demonstrate that despite a high degree of morphological similarity between representative taxa (Plateosaurus engelhardti, Stegosaurus stenops, Erlikosaurus andrewsi) from these clades, their biomechanical behaviours are notably different and difficult to predict on the basis of form alone. These functional differences likely reflect dietary specialisations, demonstrating the value of quantitative biomechanical approaches when evaluating form/function relationships in extinct taxa.

  13. Identification of Bartonella Species Isolated from Rodents from Yucatan, Mexico, and Isolation of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. yucatanensis subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Schulte Fischedick, Frederique B; Stuckey, Matthew J; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro; Moreno-Sandoval, Hayde; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Salas-Rojas, Mónica; Arechiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Overgaauw, Paul A M; Kasten, Rickie W; Chomel, Bruno B

    2016-10-01

    Bartonella species are highly endemic among wild rodents in many parts of the world. Blood and/or blood clot cultures from 38 rodents, including 27 Yucatan deer mouse (Peromyscus yucatanicus), 7 Gaumer's spiny pocket mouse (Heteromys gaumeri), 2 black rats (Rattus rattus) and 2 big-eared climbing rats (Ototylomys phyllotis) captured near Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, led to the isolation in 3-4 days of small gram-negative bacilli, which were identified as Bartonella spp. based on colony morphology. DNA extraction and PCR testing were also performed from heart samples of 35 of these 38 rodents. Overall, Bartonella spp. were isolated from the blood/blood clots of 22 (58%) rodents. All Bartonella-positive rodents were Yucatán deer mice from San José Pituch. Sequencing of a fragment of the gltA gene showed that all but one rodent isolates were closest to B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii and one isolate was intermediate between B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis. Further analysis of concatenated housekeeping genes (gltA, ftsZ, rpoB, and 16S rRNA) suggests that this outlier isolate is a new subspecies within the B. vinsonii genogroup, for which we proposed the name B. vinsonii subsp. yucatanensis. PMID:27626126

  14. Identification of Bartonella Species Isolated from Rodents from Yucatan, Mexico, and Isolation of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. yucatanensis subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Schulte Fischedick, Frederique B; Stuckey, Matthew J; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro; Moreno-Sandoval, Hayde; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Salas-Rojas, Mónica; Arechiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Overgaauw, Paul A M; Kasten, Rickie W; Chomel, Bruno B

    2016-10-01

    Bartonella species are highly endemic among wild rodents in many parts of the world. Blood and/or blood clot cultures from 38 rodents, including 27 Yucatan deer mouse (Peromyscus yucatanicus), 7 Gaumer's spiny pocket mouse (Heteromys gaumeri), 2 black rats (Rattus rattus) and 2 big-eared climbing rats (Ototylomys phyllotis) captured near Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, led to the isolation in 3-4 days of small gram-negative bacilli, which were identified as Bartonella spp. based on colony morphology. DNA extraction and PCR testing were also performed from heart samples of 35 of these 38 rodents. Overall, Bartonella spp. were isolated from the blood/blood clots of 22 (58%) rodents. All Bartonella-positive rodents were Yucatán deer mice from San José Pituch. Sequencing of a fragment of the gltA gene showed that all but one rodent isolates were closest to B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii and one isolate was intermediate between B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis. Further analysis of concatenated housekeeping genes (gltA, ftsZ, rpoB, and 16S rRNA) suggests that this outlier isolate is a new subspecies within the B. vinsonii genogroup, for which we proposed the name B. vinsonii subsp. yucatanensis.

  15. Lymphotoxin-α Plays Only a Minor Role in Host Resistance to Respiratory Infection with Virulent Type A Francisella tularensis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deng; KuoLee, Rhonda; Harris, Greg; Zhang, Qinxian; Conlan, J. Wayne; Chen, Wangxue

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of lymphotoxin (LT)-α in host defense against airborne infection with Francisella tularensis, a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Following a low-dose aerosol infection with the highly virulent type A strain of F. tularensis, mice deficient in LTα (LTα−/−) consistently harbored approximately 10-fold fewer bacteria in their spleens at day 2 and 10-fold more bacteria in their lungs at day 4 than LTα+/+ mice. However, the mortality and median time to death were indistinguishable between the two mouse strains. In addition, the inflammatory responses to the infection, as reflected by the cytokine levels and leukocyte influx in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histopathological analysis, were generally similar between LTα−/− and LTα+/+ mice. These data suggest that although LTα does not contribute significantly to the resistance and host responses of mice to airborne type A F. tularensis infection, it does play a subtle role in the multiplication/dissemination of F. tularensis. PMID:18769490

  16. A rapid real-time quantitative PCR assay to determine the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration of antibiotics against an intracellular Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Shifman, Ohad; Lazar, Shlomi; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular bacterium. The lack of a safe and efficient vaccine makes antibiotics the preferred treatment. F. tularensis antibiotic susceptibility tests are based on the in vitro standard CLSI-approved microdilution method for determining the MIC. However, limited data are available regarding the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration (MIEC) needed to eradicate intracellular bacteria. Here, we evaluated the MIEC values of various WHO-recommended antibiotics and compared the MIEC values to the established MICs. We describe a rapid 3-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) intracellular antibiogram assay, which yields comparable MIEC values to those obtained by the classical 72-h cfu assay. This rapid qPCR assay is highly advantageous in light of the slow growth rates of F. tularensis. Our results showed that the MIECs obtained for doxycycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin were indicative of intracellular activity. Gentamicin was not effective against intracellular bacteria for at least 32 h post treatment, raising the question of whether slow-penetrating gentamicin should be used for certain stages of the disease. We suggest that the qPCR intracellular antibiogram assay may be used to screen for potentially active antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis as well as to detect strains with acquired resistance to recommended antibiotics. PMID:26579112

  17. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD+ has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 Å. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD+ reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD+ cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors. PMID:21045289

  18. Protection Afforded by Fluoroquinolones in Animal Models of Respiratory Infections with Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Johnny W; Moen, Scott T; Healy, Daniel; Pawlik, Jennifer E; Taormina, Joanna; Hardcastle, Jason; Thomas, John M; Lawrence, William S; Ponce, Cindy; Chatuev, Bagram M; Gnade, Bryan T; Foltz, Sheri M; Agar, Stacy L; Sha, Jian; Klimpel, Gary R; Kirtley, Michelle L; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Successful treatment of inhalation anthrax, pneumonic plague and tularemia can be achieved with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and initiation of treatment is most effective when administered as soon as possible following exposure. Bacillus anthracis Ames, Yersinia pestis CO92, and Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 have equivalent susceptibility in vitro to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin (minimal inhibitory concentration is 0.03 μg/ml); however, limited information is available regarding in vivo susceptibility of these infectious agents to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in small animal models. Mice, guinea pig, and rabbit models have been developed to evaluate the protective efficacy of antibiotic therapy against these life-threatening infections. Our results indicated that doses of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin required to protect mice against inhalation anthrax were approximately 18-fold higher than the doses of levofloxacin required to protect against pneumonic plague and tularemia. Further, the critical period following aerosol exposure of mice to either B. anthracis spores or Y. pestis was 24 h, while mice challenged with F. tularensis could be effectively protected when treatment was delayed for as long as 72 h postchallenge. In addition, it was apparent that prolonged antibiotic treatment was important in the effective treatment of inhalation anthrax in mice, but short-term treatment of mice with pneumonic plague or tularemia infections were usually successful. These results provide effective antibiotic dosages in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits and lay the foundation for the development and evaluation of combinational treatment modalities. PMID:21127743

  19. Protection Afforded by Fluoroquinolones in Animal Models of Respiratory Infections with Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Johnny W; Moen, Scott T; Healy, Daniel; Pawlik, Jennifer E; Taormina, Joanna; Hardcastle, Jason; Thomas, John M; Lawrence, William S; Ponce, Cindy; Chatuev, Bagram M; Gnade, Bryan T; Foltz, Sheri M; Agar, Stacy L; Sha, Jian; Klimpel, Gary R; Kirtley, Michelle L; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Successful treatment of inhalation anthrax, pneumonic plague and tularemia can be achieved with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and initiation of treatment is most effective when administered as soon as possible following exposure. Bacillus anthracis Ames, Yersinia pestis CO92, and Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 have equivalent susceptibility in vitro to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin (minimal inhibitory concentration is 0.03 μg/ml); however, limited information is available regarding in vivo susceptibility of these infectious agents to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in small animal models. Mice, guinea pig, and rabbit models have been developed to evaluate the protective efficacy of antibiotic therapy against these life-threatening infections. Our results indicated that doses of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin required to protect mice against inhalation anthrax were approximately 18-fold higher than the doses of levofloxacin required to protect against pneumonic plague and tularemia. Further, the critical period following aerosol exposure of mice to either B. anthracis spores or Y. pestis was 24 h, while mice challenged with F. tularensis could be effectively protected when treatment was delayed for as long as 72 h postchallenge. In addition, it was apparent that prolonged antibiotic treatment was important in the effective treatment of inhalation anthrax in mice, but short-term treatment of mice with pneumonic plague or tularemia infections were usually successful. These results provide effective antibiotic dosages in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits and lay the foundation for the development and evaluation of combinational treatment modalities. PMID:21127743

  20. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 mutants identified from a transposon library screened for O-antigen and capsule deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Jed A.; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Long, Matthew E.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and O-antigen polysaccharide capsule structures of Francisella tularensis play significant roles in helping these highly virulent bacteria avoid detection within a host. We previously created pools of F. tularensis mutants that we screened to identify strains that were not reactive to a monoclonal antibody to the O-antigen capsule. To follow up previously published work, we characterize further seven of the F. tularensis Schu S4 mutant strains identified by our screen. These F. tularensis strains carry the following transposon mutations: FTT0846::Tn5, hemH::Tn5, wbtA::Tn5, wzy::Tn5, FTT0673p/prsA::Tn5, manB::Tn5, or dnaJ::Tn5. Each of these strains displayed sensitivity to human serum, to varying degrees, when compared to wild-type F. tularensis Schu S4. By Western blot, only FTT0846::Tn5, wbtA::Tn5, wzy::Tn5, and manB::Tn5 strains did not react to the capsule and LPS O-antigen antibody 11B7, although the wzy::Tn5 strain did have a single O-antigen reactive band that was detected by the FB11 monoclonal antibody. Of these strains, manB::Tn5 and FTT0846 appear to have LPS core truncations, whereas wbtA::Tn5 and wzy::Tn5 had LPS core structures that are similar to the parent F. tularensis Schu S4. These strains were also shown to have poor growth within human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs) and bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs). We examined the virulence of these strains in mice, following intranasal challenge, and found that each was attenuated compared to wild type Schu S4. Our results provide additional strong evidence that LPS and/or capsule are F. tularensis virulence factors that most likely function by providing a stealth shield that prevents the host immune system from detecting this potent pathogen. PMID:25999917

  1. Staphylococcus hominis subsp. novobiosepticus subsp. nov., a novel trehalose- and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-negative, novobiocin- and multiple-antibiotic-resistant subspecies isolated from human blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Kloos, W E; George, C G; Olgiate, J S; Van Pelt, L; McKinnon, M L; Zimmer, B L; Muller, E; Weinstein, M P; Mirrett, S

    1998-07-01

    A new subspecies, Staphylococcus hominis subsp. novobiosepticus, isolated from human blood cultures, a wound, a breast abscess and a catheter tip, is described on the basis of a study of 26 strains isolated between 1989 and 1996. DNA-DNA reassociation reactions, conducted under stringent conditions, and macrorestriction pattern analysis demonstrated that these strains are closely related to previously characterized S. hominis strains isolated from human skin and clinical specimens, but are significantly divergent. S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus can be distinguished from S. hominis (now named S. hominis subsp. hominis) by its combined characteristics of novobiocin resistance and failure to produce acid aerobically from D-trehalose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Furthermore, all 26 strains of the new subspecies are resistant to nalidixic acid, penicillin G, oxacillin, kanamycin and streptomycin, and were either resistant or had intermediate resistance to methicillin and gentamicin. Most strains were also resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. Based on a comparison of the sequences of a 1001 bp mecA amplification product from reference methicillin-resistant staphylococci, the mecA gene present in S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus was identified as homologue A, commonly found in S. aureus and many coagulase-negative staphylococcal species. The type strain of S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus is ATCC 700236T. Descriptions of S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus subsp. nov and S. hominis subsp. hominis are given and the description of S. hominis is emended.

  2. Genome-Wide Diversity and Phylogeography of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Canadian Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrom, Christina; Barkema, Herman W.; Stevenson, Karen; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Biek, Roman; Kao, Rowland; Trewby, Hannah; Haupstein, Deb; Kelton, David F.; Fecteau, Gilles; Labrecque, Olivia; Keefe, Greg P.; McKenna, Shawn L. B.; Tahlan, Kapil; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative bacterium of Johne’s disease (JD) in ruminants. The control of JD in the dairy industry is challenging, but can be improved with a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of MAP subtypes. Previously established molecular typing techniques used to differentiate MAP have not been sufficiently discriminatory and/or reliable to accurately assess the population structure. In this study, the genetic diversity of 182 MAP isolates representing all Canadian provinces was compared to the known global diversity, using single nucleotide polymorphisms identified through whole genome sequencing. MAP isolates from Canada represented a subset of the known global diversity, as there were global isolates intermingled with Canadian isolates, as well as multiple global subtypes that were not found in Canada. One Type III and six “Bison type” isolates were found in Canada as well as one Type II subtype that represented 86% of all Canadian isolates. Rarefaction estimated larger subtype richness in Québec than in other Canadian provinces using a strict definition of MAP subtypes and lower subtype richness in the Atlantic region using a relaxed definition. Significant phylogeographic clustering was observed at the inter-provincial but not at the intra-provincial level, although most major clades were found in all provinces. The large number of shared subtypes among provinces suggests that cattle movement is a major driver of MAP transmission at the herd level, which is further supported by the lack of spatial clustering on an intra-provincial scale. PMID:26871723

  3. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Jindong; Liu, Yue; Fuqua, Clay; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS) may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments. PMID:24402124

  4. Differential niche dynamics among major marine invertebrate clades

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Melanie J; Simpson, Carl; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which organisms retain their environmental preferences is of utmost importance in predicting their fate in a world of rapid climate change. Notably, marine invertebrates frequently show strong affinities for either carbonate or terrigenous clastic environments. This affinity is due to characteristics of the sediments as well as correlated environmental factors. We assessed the conservatism of substrate affinities of marine invertebrates over geological timescales, and found that niche conservatism is prevalent in the oceans, and largely determined by the strength of initial habitat preference. There is substantial variation in niche conservatism among major clades with corals and sponges being among the most conservative. Time-series analysis suggests that niche conservatism is enhanced during times of elevated nutrient flux, whereas niche evolution tends to occur after mass extinctions. Niche evolution is not necessarily elevated in genera exhibiting higher turnover in species composition. PMID:24313951

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  6. Crystal Structures of the Histidine Acid Phosphatase from Francisella tularensis Provide Insight into Substrate Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-12-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water at acidic pH using an active-site histidine. The histidine acid phosphatase from the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis (FtHAP) has been implicated in intramacrophage survival and virulence, motivating interest in understanding the structure and mechanism of this enzyme. Here, we report a structure-based study of ligand recognition by FtHAP. The 1.70-{angstrom}-resolution structure of FtHAP complexed with the competitive inhibitor L(+)-tartrate was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Structures of the ligand-free enzyme and the complex with inorganic phosphate were determined at resolutions of 1.85 and 1.70 {angstrom}, respectively. The structure of the Asp261Ala mutant enzyme complexed with the substrate 3'-AMP was determined at 1.50 {angstrom} resolution to gain insight into substrate recognition. FtHAP exhibits a two-domain fold similar to that of human prostatic acid phosphatase, consisting of an {alpha}/{beta} core domain and a smaller domain that caps the core domain. The structures show that the core domain supplies the phosphoryl binding site, catalytic histidine (His17), and an aspartic acid residue (Asp261) that protonates the leaving group, while the cap domain contributes residues that enforce substrate preference. FtHAP and human prostatic acid phosphatase differ in the orientation of the crucial first helix of the cap domain, implying differences in the substrate preferences of the two enzymes. 3'-AMP binds in one end of a 15-{angstrom}-long tunnel, with the adenine clamped between Phe23 and Tyr135, and the ribose 2'-hydroxyl interacting with Gln132. The importance of the clamp is confirmed with site-directed mutagenesis; mutation of Phe23 and Tyr135 individually to Ala increases K{sub m} by factors of 7 and 10, respectively. The structural data are consistent with a role for FtHAP in scavenging phosphate from small

  7. Isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni from zoo animals.

    PubMed

    Luechtefeld, N W; Cambre, R C; Wang, W L

    1981-12-01

    Over a 1-year period, 619 fecal specimens from animals at the Denver Zoo were cultured for Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni. The organism was isolated from 35 animals, including 12 primates, 2 felids, a red panda, 13 hooved animals, 6 birds, and 1 reptile. Of 44 cultured fecal specimens from diarrheal animals, 31.8% were positive for Campylobacter, whereas only 5.6% of 575 specimens from animals without diarrhea were positive (P less than 0.001). Among 25 isolates tested, 12 serotypes were represented; several of these serotypes are commonly associated with Campylobacter enteritis in human beings. Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni was isolated from 8% of 75 wild pigeons trapped on the zoo premises during winter months and from 26% of 75 trapped during March and April (P less than 0.01).

  8. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection

    PubMed Central

    Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105°C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. IMPORTANCE M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula

  9. Cross-clade protective immunity of H5N1 influenza vaccines in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shin; Iwasa, Ayaka; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Ito, Mutsumi; Kiso, Maki; Kida, Hiroshi; Takada, Ayato; Nidom, Chairul A.; Mai, Le Quynh; Yamada, Shinya; Imai, Hirotaka; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Horimoto, Taisuke

    2008-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses evolved into several clades, leading to appreciably distinct antigenicities of their hemagglutinins. As such, candidate H5N1 pre-pandemic vaccines for human use should be sought. Here, to evaluate fundamental immunogenic variations between H5N1 vaccines, we prepared four inactivated H5N1 test vaccines from different phylogenetic clades (clade 1, 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3.4) in accordance with the WHO recommendation, and tested their cross-clade immunity in a mouse model by vaccination followed by challenge with heterologous virulent viruses. All H5N1 vaccines tested provided full or partial cross-clade protective immunity, except one clade 2.2-based vaccine, which did not protect mice from clade 2.3.4 virus challenge. Among the test vaccines, a clade 2.1-based vaccine possessed the broadest-spectrum cross-immunity. These results suggest that currently stockpiled pre-pandemic vaccines, especially clade 2.1-based vaccines, will likely be useful as backup vaccines in a pandemic situation, even one involving antigenic-drifted viruses. PMID:18804131

  10. Clade extinction appears to balance species diversification in sister lineages of Afro-Oriental passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; Jønsson, Knud A

    2014-08-12

    Recent analyses suggest that the number of species in a clade often increases rapidly at first, but that diversification subsequently slows, apparently as species fill ecological space. Support for diversity dependence comes largely from the failure of species richness to increase with clade age in some analyses of contemporary diversity. However, clades chosen for analysis generally are named taxa and thus are not selected at random. To avoid this potential bias, we analyzed the numbers of species and estimated ages of 150 pairs of sister clades established by dispersal of ancestral species between the Oriental and African biogeographic regions. The observed positive exponential relationship between clade size and age suggests that species diversify within clades without apparent limit. If this were true, the pattern of accumulation of sister-clade pairs with increasing age would be consistent with the random decline and extinction of entire clades, maintaining an overall balance in species richness. This "pulse" model of diversification is consistent with the fossil record of most groups and reconciles conflicting evidence concerning diversity dependence of clade growth.

  11. Clade extinction appears to balance species diversification in sister lineages of Afro-Oriental passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; Jønsson, Knud A

    2014-08-12

    Recent analyses suggest that the number of species in a clade often increases rapidly at first, but that diversification subsequently slows, apparently as species fill ecological space. Support for diversity dependence comes largely from the failure of species richness to increase with clade age in some analyses of contemporary diversity. However, clades chosen for analysis generally are named taxa and thus are not selected at random. To avoid this potential bias, we analyzed the numbers of species and estimated ages of 150 pairs of sister clades established by dispersal of ancestral species between the Oriental and African biogeographic regions. The observed positive exponential relationship between clade size and age suggests that species diversify within clades without apparent limit. If this were true, the pattern of accumulation of sister-clade pairs with increasing age would be consistent with the random decline and extinction of entire clades, maintaining an overall balance in species richness. This "pulse" model of diversification is consistent with the fossil record of most groups and reconciles conflicting evidence concerning diversity dependence of clade growth. PMID:25071202

  12. New World arenavirus clade C, but not clade A and B viruses, utilizes alpha-dystroglycan as its major receptor.

    PubMed

    Spiropoulou, Christina F; Kunz, Stefan; Rollin, Pierre E; Campbell, Kevin P; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) has been identified as a major receptor for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa virus, two Old World arenaviruses. The situation with New World arenaviruses is less clear: previous studies demonstrated that Oliveros virus also exhibited high-affinity binding to alpha-DG but that Guanarito virus did not. To extend these initial studies, several additional Old and New World arenaviruses were screened for entry into mouse embryonic stem cells possessing or lacking alpha-DG. In addition, representative viruses were further analyzed for direct binding to alpha-DG by means of a virus overlay protein blot assay technique. These studies indicate that Old World arenaviruses use alpha-DG as a major receptor, whereas, of the New World arenaviruses, only clade C viruses (i.e., Oliveros and Latino viruses) use alpha-DG as a major receptor. New World clade A and B arenaviruses, which include the highly pathogenic Machupo, Guanarito, Junin, and Sabia viruses, appear to use a different receptor or coreceptor for binding. Previous studies with LCMV have suggested the need for a small aliphatic amino acid at LCMV GP1 glycoprotein amino acid position 260 to allow high-affinity binding to alpha-DG. As reported herein, this requirement appears to be broadly applicable to the arenaviruses as determined by more extensive analysis of alpha-DG receptor usage and GP1 sequences of Old and New World arenaviruses. In addition, GP1 amino acid position 259 also appears to be important, since all arenaviruses showing high-affinity alpha-DG binding possess a bulky aromatic amino acid (tyrosine or phenylalanine) at this position.

  13. [Evaluation of a newly-developed ready-to-use commercial PCR kit for the molecular diagnosis of Francisella tularensis].

    PubMed

    Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Acar, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia is a rare zoonotic infection, however, considerations of tularemia as a biological weapon and several recent major epidemics have caused renewed interest in this disease. Laboratory diagnosis of tularemia is done in the presence of appropriate epidemiological data, by the demonstration of specific antibodies in the serum samples obtained with 1-2 week intervals following the development of symptoms. It is an a posteriori analysis with limited use for prompt diagnosis of the patient during the early symptomatic phase and deliberate release of biological agents. Limitations in both culture and serology have led to substantial research in the development of new diagnostic techniques. Several PCR methods for tularemia have been developed, both for conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR). However, PCR methods are hard to be deployed in remote endemic areas that lack sufficient infrastructure. Recently a "Toolbox" which includes all instruments, equipments and solutions [DNA4U® Bacteria Genomic DNA Isolation Kit, CubeCycler® (Personal Thermal Cycler), PCR4U® Bioterrorism Agents Detection Kit, electrophoresis tank, power supply, ready-agarose gel and electrophoresis buffer] necessary for conventional PCR, was developed for the identification of bioterrorism agents in the field. In this study we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a ready-to-use commercial PCR kit (Nanobiz, Ankara, Turkey) targeting the tul4 gene, for the diagnosis of tularemia and to compare the results with an in-house conventional PCR and a rtPCR test. We applied the assay to a collection of four F.tularensis standard strains, 15 field isolates (from humans, animals, water), 13 non-Francisella strains which are phylogenetically related to F.tularensis and a total of 60 lymph node aspirates obtained from suspected tularemia cases. Compared to the in-house PCR method used in our laboratory, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of Nanobiz PCR

  14. Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans subsp. nov., isolated from the external auditory meatus of dogs with external ear otitis.

    PubMed

    Igimi, S; Takahashi, E; Mitsuoka, T

    1990-10-01

    A new subspecies, Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans, was isolated from the external auditory meatus of dogs suffering from external ear otitis and is described on the basis of studies of 21 strains. Phenotypic studies showed that these strains are more closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius than to other staphylococci, but DNA hybridization studies indicated that they are closely related to Staphylococcus schleiferi N850274T. On the basis of biochemical distinctiveness (positive test tube coagulase test and different carbohydrate reactions) and the etiological importance (frequent isolation from otitis specimens from dogs) of these strains, we propose to classify them as a subspecies of S. schleiferi. The strains of this new subspecies are coagulase tube test, beta-hemolysin, and heat-stable nuclease positive but clumping factor negative. A simple scheme for the differentiation of S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans from the other coagulase-positive staphylococci is presented. The type strain is GA211 (= JCM 7470).

  15. PEDIOCIN PRODUCTION IN MILK BY PEDIOCOCCUS ACIDILACTICI IN CO-CULTURE WITH STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS AND LACTOBACILLUS DELBRUECKII SUBSP. BULGARICUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of pediocin in milk by Pediococcus acidilactici was evaluated in co-culture with the dairy fermentation cultures Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The cultures were tested singly or in different combinations...

  16. Fibronectin Attachment Protein Homologue Mediates Fibronectin Binding by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Secott, T. E.; Lin, T. L.; Wu, C. C.

    2001-01-01

    Attachment of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis to host tissue and penetration of mucosal surfaces are pivotal events in the pathogenesis of Johne's disease. Fibronectin (FN) binding is required for attachment and internalization of several mycobacteria by epithelial cells in vitro. The objective of this study was to further characterize the FN binding activity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although the bacteria bound FN poorly at pH above 7, brief acid pretreatment greatly enhanced FN binding within the pH range (3 to 10) studied. A 4.6-kbp fragment from an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic library was found to contain a 1,107-bp open reading frame that shows very high nucleotide sequence identity with that of the FN attachment protein (FAP) gene of M. avium subsp. avium. Pretreatment of FN with an FN-binding peptide from M. avium subsp. avium FAP abolished FN binding, indicating that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis binds FN in a FAP-dependent manner. Pretreatment of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis with anti-FAP immunoglobulin G did not abrogate FN binding; blocking occurred only when anti-FAP was added together with FN. FAP was detected by immunofluorescence only in lipid-extracted M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Western blotting and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that FAP is located near the interior of the cell envelope of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The results indicate that a FAP homologue mediates the attachment of FN to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Further, given the subcellular location of FAP, it is considered that this protein operates at the terminus of a coordinated FN binding system in the cell envelope of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:11254560

  17. The Role of the Francisella Tularensis Pathogenicity Island in Type VI Secretion, Intracellular Survival, and Modulation of Host Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bröms, Jeanette E.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Lavander, Moa

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Essential for its virulence is the ability to multiply within host cells, in particular monocytic cells. The bacterium has developed intricate means to subvert host immune mechanisms and thereby facilitate its intracellular survival by preventing phagolysosomal fusion followed by escape into the cytosol, where it multiplies. Moreover, it targets and manipulates numerous host cell signaling pathways, thereby ameliorating the otherwise bactericidal capacity. Many of the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unknown but key elements, directly or indirectly responsible for many of the aforementioned mechanisms, rely on the expression of proteins encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI), suggested to constitute a type VI secretion system. We here describe the current knowledge regarding the components of the FPI and the roles that have been ascribed to them. PMID:21687753

  18. Evaluation of the FilmArray® system for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Seiner, Derrick R.; Colburn, Heather A.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Straub, Tim M.; Victry, Kristin D.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-04-29

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the Idaho Technologies FilmArray® Biothreat Panel for the detection of Bacillus anthracis (Ba), Francisella tularensis (Ft), and Yersinia pestis (Yp) DNA, and demonstrate the detection of Ba spores. Methods and Results: DNA samples from Ba, Ft and Yp strains and near-neighbors, and live Ba spores were analyzed using the Biothreat Panel, a multiplexed PCR-based assay for 17 pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity studies with DNA suggest a limit of detection of 250 genome equivalents (GEs) per sample. Furthermore, the correct call of Ft, Yp or Bacillus species was made in 63 of 72 samples tested at 25 GE or less. With samples containing 25 Ba Sterne spores, at least one of the two possible Ba markers were identified in all samples tested. We observed no cross-reactivity with near-neighbor DNAs.

  19. Rapid Focused Sequencing: A Multiplexed Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Strain Typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Zolotova, Anna; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed “Rapid Focused Sequencing,” allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. Conclusions/Significance The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental background strains. The

  20. Nicotinamide mononucleotide synthetase is the key enzyme for an alternative route of NAD biosynthesis in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Leonardo; Martynowski, Dariusz; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Eyobo, Yvonne; Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E.; Nikolaev, Evgeni V.; Magni, Giulio; Zhang, Hong; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes involved in the last 2 steps of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactor biosynthesis, which catalyze the adenylylation of the nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) precursor to nicotinic acid dinucleotide (NaAD) followed by its amidation to NAD, constitute promising drug targets for the development of new antibiotics. These enzymes, NaMN adenylyltransferase (gene nadD) and NAD synthetase (gene nadE), respectively, are indispensable and conserved in nearly all bacterial pathogens. However, a comparative genome analysis of Francisella tularensis allowed us to predict the existence of an alternative route of NAD synthesis in this category A priority pathogen, the causative agent of tularaemia. In this route, the amidation of NaMN to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) occurs before the adenylylation reaction, which converts this alternative intermediate to the NAD cofactor. The first step is catalyzed by NMN synthetase, which was identified and characterized in this study. A crystal structure of this enzyme, a divergent member of the NadE family, was solved at 1.9-Å resolution in complex with reaction products, providing a rationale for its unusual substrate preference for NaMN over NaAD. The second step is performed by NMN adenylyltransferase of the NadM family. Here, we report validation of the predicted route (NaMN → NMN → NAD) in F. tularensis including mathematical modeling, in vitro reconstitution, and in vivo metabolite analysis in comparison with a canonical route (NaMN → NaAD → NAD) of NAD biosynthesis as represented by another deadly bacterial pathogen, Bacillus anthracis. PMID:19204287

  1. Plasmodium falciparum dolichol phosphate mannose synthase represents a novel clade

    SciTech Connect

    Shams-Eldin, Hosam Santos de Macedo, Cristiana; Niehus, Sebastian; Dorn, Caroline; Kimmel, Juergen; Azzouz, Nahid; Schwarz, Ralph T.

    2008-06-06

    Dolichol phosphate mannose synthase (DPM) catalyzes the reaction between dolichol phosphate (Dol-P) and guanosine diphosphate mannose (GDP-Man) to form dolichol-phosphate-mannose (Dol-P-Man). This molecule acts as mannose donor for N-glycosylation and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. The Plasmodium falciparum DPM1 (Pfdpm1) possesses a single predicted transmembrane region near the N-, but not the C-terminus. Here we show that the cloned Pfdpm1 gene failed to complement a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant indicating that the parasite gene does not belong to the baker's yeast group, as was previously assumed. Furthermore, Pfdpm1 was unable to complement a mouse mutant deficient in DPM but efficiently complements the Schizosaccharomyces pombe fission yeast mutant, indicating a difference between fission yeast and mammalian DPM genes. Therefore, we reanalyzed the hydrophobicity scales of all known DPMs and consequently reclassify the DPM clade into six major novel subgroups. Furthermore, we show that Pfdpm1 represents a unique enzyme among these subgroups.

  2. Genome size increases in recently diverged hornwort clades.

    PubMed

    Bainard, Jillian D; Villarreal, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    As our knowledge of plant genome size estimates continues to grow, one group has continually been neglected: the hornworts. Hornworts (Anthocerotophyta) have been traditionally grouped with liverworts and mosses because they share a haploid dominant life cycle; however, recent molecular studies place hornworts as the sister lineage to extant tracheophytes. Given the scarcity of information regarding the DNA content of hornworts, our objective was to estimate the 1C-value for a range of hornwort species within a phylogenetic context. Using flow cytometry, we estimated genome size for 36 samples representing 24 species. This accounts for roughly 10% of known hornwort species. Haploid genome sizes (1C-value) ranged from 160 Mbp or 0.16 pg (Leiosporoceros dussii) to 719 Mbp or 0.73 pg (Nothoceros endiviifolius). The average 1C-value was 261 ± 104 Mbp (0.27 ± 0.11 pg). Ancestral reconstruction of genome size on a hornwort phylogeny suggests a small ancestral genome size and revealed increases in genome size in the most recently divergent clades. Much more work is needed to understand DNA content variation in this phylogenetically important group, but this work has significantly increased our knowledge of genome size variation in hornworts.

  3. Evolution of pollination niches in a generalist plant clade.

    PubMed

    Gómez, José María; Perfectti, Francisco; Abdelaziz, Mohamed; Lorite, Juan; Muñoz-Pajares, Antonio Jesús; Valverde, Javier

    2015-01-01

    It is widely assumed that floral diversification occurs by adaptive shifts between pollination niches. In contrast to specialized flowers, identifying pollination niches of generalist flowers is a challenge. Consequently, how generalist pollination niches evolve is largely unknown. We apply tools from network theory and comparative methods to investigate the evolution of pollination niches among generalist species belonging to the genus Erysimum. These species have similar flowers. We found that the studied species may be grouped in several multidimensional niches separated not by a shift of pollinators, but instead by quantitative variation in the relative abundance of pollinator functional groups. These pollination niches did not vary in generalization degree; we did not find any evolutionary trend toward specialization within the studied clade. Furthermore, the evolution of pollination niche fitted to a Brownian motion model without phylogenetic signal, and was characterized by frequent events of niche convergences and divergences. We presume that the evolution of Erysimum pollination niches has occurred mostly by recurrent shifts between slightly different generalized pollinator assemblages varying spatially as a mosaic and without any change in specialization degree. Most changes in pollination niches do not prompt floral divergence, a reason why adaptation to pollinators is uncommon in generalist plants.

  4. A functional genomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana PP2C clade D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the reference dicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the PP2C family of P-protein phosphatases includes the products of 80 genes that have been separated into 10 multi-protein clades plus six singletons. Clade D includes the products of nine genes distributed among 3 chromosomes (PPD1, At3g12620; PPD2...

  5. Bioinformatics of varicella-zoster virus: Single nucleotide polymorphisms define clades and attenuated vaccine genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vincent T.; Tipples, Graham A.; Grose, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is one of the human herpesviruses. To date, over 40 complete VZV genomes have been sequenced and analyzed. The VZV genome contains around 125,000 base pairs including 70 open reading frames (ORFs). Enumeration of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has determined that the following ORFs are the most variable (in descending order): 62, 22, 29, 28, 37, 21, 54, 31, 1 and 55. ORF 62 is the major immediate early regulatory VZV gene. Further SNP analysis across the entire genome has led to the observation that VZV strains can be broadly grouped into clades within a phylogenetic tree. VZV strains collected in Singapore provided important sequence data for construction of the phylogenetic tree. Currently 5 VZV clades are recognized; they have been designated clades 1 through 5. Clades 1 and 3 include European/North American strains; clade 2 includes Asian strains, especially from Japan; and clade 5 includes strains from India. Clade 4 includes some strains from Europe, but its geographic origins need further documentation.. Within clade 1, five variant viruses have been isolated with a missense mutation in the gE (ORF 68) glycoprotein; these strains have an altered increased cell spread phenotype. Bioinformatics analyses of the attenuated vaccine strains have also been performed, with a subsequent discovery of a stop-codon SNP in ORFO as a likely attenuation determinant. Taken together, these VZV bioinformatics analyses have provided enormous insights into VZV phylogenetics as well as VZV SNPs associated with attenuation. PMID:23183312

  6. Clade age and species richness are decoupled across the eukaryotic tree of life.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Slater, Graham J; Alfaro, Michael E

    2012-08-01

    Explaining the dramatic variation in species richness across the tree of life remains a key challenge in evolutionary biology. At the largest phylogenetic scales, the extreme heterogeneity in species richness observed among different groups of organisms is almost certainly a function of many complex and interdependent factors. However, the most fundamental expectation in macroevolutionary studies is simply that species richness in extant clades should be correlated with clade age: all things being equal, older clades will have had more time for diversity to accumulate than younger clades. Here, we test the relationship between stem clade age and species richness across 1,397 major clades of multicellular eukaryotes that collectively account for more than 1.2 million described species. We find no evidence that clade age predicts species richness at this scale. We demonstrate that this decoupling of age and richness is unlikely to result from variation in net diversification rates among clades. At the largest phylogenetic scales, contemporary patterns of species richness are inconsistent with unbounded diversity increase through time. These results imply that a fundamentally different interpretative paradigm may be needed in the study of phylogenetic diversity patterns in many groups of organisms. PMID:22969411

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Environmental Bacterium Vibrio vulnificus CladeA-yb158

    PubMed Central

    Danin-Poleg, Yael; Raz, Nili; Roig, Francisco J.; Amaro, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of the environmental Vibrio vulnificus biotype 1_cladeA. This draft genome of the CladeA-yb158 strain, isolated in Israel, represents this newly emerged clonal group that contains both clinical and environmental strains. PMID:26205875

  8. Clade Age and Species Richness Are Decoupled Across the Eukaryotic Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Explaining the dramatic variation in species richness across the tree of life remains a key challenge in evolutionary biology. At the largest phylogenetic scales, the extreme heterogeneity in species richness observed among different groups of organisms is almost certainly a function of many complex and interdependent factors. However, the most fundamental expectation in macroevolutionary studies is simply that species richness in extant clades should be correlated with clade age: all things being equal, older clades will have had more time for diversity to accumulate than younger clades. Here, we test the relationship between stem clade age and species richness across 1,397 major clades of multicellular eukaryotes that collectively account for more than 1.2 million described species. We find no evidence that clade age predicts species richness at this scale. We demonstrate that this decoupling of age and richness is unlikely to result from variation in net diversification rates among clades. At the largest phylogenetic scales, contemporary patterns of species richness are inconsistent with unbounded diversity increase through time. These results imply that a fundamentally different interpretative paradigm may be needed in the study of phylogenetic diversity patterns in many groups of organisms. PMID:22969411

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Tannistha; Holden, Matthew T G; Holden, Mathew T G; Didelot, Xavier; Mehershahi, Kurosh; Boddey, Justin A; Beacham, Ifor; Peak, Ian; Harting, John; Baybayan, Primo; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; How, Lee Chee; Sim, Bernice; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Nelson, Michelle; Smither, Sophie; Ong, Catherine; Aw, Lay Tin; Hoon, Chua Hui; Michell, Stephen; Studholme, David J; Titball, Richard; Chen, Swaine L; Parkhill, Julian; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. PMID:25236617

  10. Complete Genomic Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 Strain RM1285 Isolated from Packaged Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Steven; Heikema, Astrid P.

    2016-01-01

    Poultry products serve as the main source of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni infections in humans. C. jejuni subsp. jejuni infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and are a prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome. This study describes the genome of C. jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 strain RM1285, isolated from packaged chicken in California. PMID:27795263

  11. Progress to extinction: increased specialisation causes the demise of animal clades.

    PubMed

    Raia, P; Carotenuto, F; Mondanaro, A; Castiglione, S; Passaro, F; Saggese, F; Melchionna, M; Serio, C; Alessio, L; Silvestro, D; Fortelius, M

    2016-01-01

    Animal clades tend to follow a predictable path of waxing and waning during their existence, regardless of their total species richness or geographic coverage. Clades begin small and undifferentiated, then expand to a peak in diversity and range, only to shift into a rarely broken decline towards extinction. While this trajectory is now well documented and broadly recognised, the reasons underlying it remain obscure. In particular, it is unknown why clade extinction is universal and occurs with such surprising regularity. Current explanations for paleontological extinctions call on the growing costs of biological interactions, geological accidents, evolutionary traps, and mass extinctions. While these are effective causes of extinction, they mainly apply to species, not clades. Although mass extinctions is the undeniable cause for the demise of a sizeable number of major taxa, we show here that clades escaping them go extinct because of the widespread tendency of evolution to produce increasingly specialised, sympatric, and geographically restricted species over time. PMID:27507121

  12. Progress to extinction: increased specialisation causes the demise of animal clades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raia, P.; Carotenuto, F.; Mondanaro, A.; Castiglione, S.; Passaro, F.; Saggese, F.; Melchionna, M.; Serio, C.; Alessio, L.; Silvestro, D.; Fortelius, M.

    2016-08-01

    Animal clades tend to follow a predictable path of waxing and waning during their existence, regardless of their total species richness or geographic coverage. Clades begin small and undifferentiated, then expand to a peak in diversity and range, only to shift into a rarely broken decline towards extinction. While this trajectory is now well documented and broadly recognised, the reasons underlying it remain obscure. In particular, it is unknown why clade extinction is universal and occurs with such surprising regularity. Current explanations for paleontological extinctions call on the growing costs of biological interactions, geological accidents, evolutionary traps, and mass extinctions. While these are effective causes of extinction, they mainly apply to species, not clades. Although mass extinctions is the undeniable cause for the demise of a sizeable number of major taxa, we show here that clades escaping them go extinct because of the widespread tendency of evolution to produce increasingly specialised, sympatric, and geographically restricted species over time.

  13. Progress to extinction: increased specialisation causes the demise of animal clades

    PubMed Central

    Raia, P.; Carotenuto, F.; Mondanaro, A.; Castiglione, S.; Passaro, F.; Saggese, F.; Melchionna, M.; Serio, C.; Alessio, L.; Silvestro, D.; Fortelius, M.

    2016-01-01

    Animal clades tend to follow a predictable path of waxing and waning during their existence, regardless of their total species richness or geographic coverage. Clades begin small and undifferentiated, then expand to a peak in diversity and range, only to shift into a rarely broken decline towards extinction. While this trajectory is now well documented and broadly recognised, the reasons underlying it remain obscure. In particular, it is unknown why clade extinction is universal and occurs with such surprising regularity. Current explanations for paleontological extinctions call on the growing costs of biological interactions, geological accidents, evolutionary traps, and mass extinctions. While these are effective causes of extinction, they mainly apply to species, not clades. Although mass extinctions is the undeniable cause for the demise of a sizeable number of major taxa, we show here that clades escaping them go extinct because of the widespread tendency of evolution to produce increasingly specialised, sympatric, and geographically restricted species over time. PMID:27507121

  14. Genome Sequence of an Epidemic Isolate of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Reynolds, Paul R; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, collectively called BRA100, were associated with outbreaks of postsurgical skin infections across various regions of Brazil from 2003 to 2009. We announce the draft genome sequence of a newly sequenced BRA100 strain, M. abscessus subsp. bolletii CRM-0020, isolated from a patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:23950125

  15. Draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii BD(T).

    PubMed

    Choi, Go-Eun; Cho, Yong-Joon; Koh, Won-Jung; Chun, Jongsik; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii is an increasing cause of human pulmonary disease and infections of the skin and soft tissues. Consistent reports of human infections indicate that M. bolletii is a highly pathogenic, emerging species of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). Here we report the first whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii BD(T). PMID:22535937

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  17. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae MB373, an Effective Bioremediator.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Fozia; Yasmin, Azra; Thomas, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae MB373 was isolated from effluent of the Hattar Industrial Estate, Haripur, Pakistan. K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae has few cultivated/characterized members so far. Whole-genome sequencing revealed its potential for metal and toxin resistance, which further elucidated various enzymatic processes for the degradation of xenobiotics, illuminating its bioremediation applications. PMID:27688323

  18. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strain ND02.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Chen, Xia; Wang, Jicheng; Zhao, Wenjing; Shao, Yuyu; Guo, Zhuang; Zhang, Xingchang; Zhou, Zhemin; Sun, Tiansong; Wang, Lei; Meng, He; Zhang, Heping; Chen, Wei

    2011-07-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strain ND02 is a Chinese commercial dairy starter used for the manufacture of yoghurt. It was isolated from naturally fermented yak milk in Qinghai, China. Here, we report the main genome features of ND02 and several differences with two other published genomes of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, isolated from human breast milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease. We report the draft genome sequences of six M. avium subsp paratuberculosis isolates obtained from diverse hosts including bison, cattle and sheep. These sequences will deepen our understanding of host association ...

  20. A Gene Specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, But Only at the Transcription-translation Level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is no known antibody that detects M. avium subsp paratuberculosis and does not cross react with other M. avium subspecies. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody was identified from mice immunized with a cell membrane fraction of M. avium subsp paratuberculosis strain K-10. This antibod...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W. Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  3. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers Against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne’s disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced fr...

  4. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae MB373, an Effective Bioremediator

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Fozia; Thomas, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae MB373 was isolated from effluent of the Hattar Industrial Estate, Haripur, Pakistan. K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae has few cultivated/characterized members so far. Whole-genome sequencing revealed its potential for metal and toxin resistance, which further elucidated various enzymatic processes for the degradation of xenobiotics, illuminating its bioremediation applications. PMID:27688323

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Human Isolate of the Ruminant Pathogen Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anne; Heller, Martin; Jores, Joerg; Sachse, Konrad; Mourier, Tobias; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is a well-known pathogen of small ruminants. A recent human case of septicemia involving this agent raised the question of its potential pathogenicity to humans. We present the first draft genome sequence of a human Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolate. PMID:26089408

  6. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia.

  7. Clade 8 and Clade 6 Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Cattle in Argentina have Hypervirulent-Like Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Amigo, Natalia; Mercado, Elsa; Bentancor, Adriana; Singh, Pallavi; Vilte, Daniel; Gerhardt, Elisabeth; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina; Manning, Shannon D; Larzábal, Mariano; Cataldi, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) whose main causative agent is enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a disease that mainly affects children under 5 years of age. Argentina is the country with the highest incidence of HUS in the world. Cattle are a major reservoir and source of infection with E. coli O157:H7. To date, the epidemiological factors that contribute to its prevalence are poorly understood. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing has helped to define nine E. coli O157:H7 clades and the clade 8 strains were associated with most of the cases of severe disease. In this study, eight randomly selected isolates of EHEC O157:H7 from cattle in Argentina were studied as well as two human isolates. Four of them were classified as clade 8 through the screening for 23 SNPs; the two human isolates grouped in this clade as well, while two strains were closely related to strains representing clade 6. To assess the pathogenicity of these strains, we assayed correlates of virulence. Shiga toxin production was determined by an ELISA kit. Four strains were high producers and one of these strains that belonged to a novel genotype showed high verocytotoxic activity in cultured cells. Also, these clade 8 and 6 strains showed high RBC lysis and adherence to epithelial cells. One of the clade 6 strains showed stronger inhibition of normal water absorption than E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 in human colonic explants. In addition, two of the strains showing high levels of Stx2 production and RBC lysis activity were associated with lethality and uremia in a mouse model. Consequently, circulation of such strains in cattle may partially contribute to the high incidence of HUS in Argentina.

  8. Clade 8 and Clade 6 Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Cattle in Argentina have Hypervirulent-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Amigo, Natalia; Mercado, Elsa; Bentancor, Adriana; Singh, Pallavi; Vilte, Daniel; Gerhardt, Elisabeth; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina; Manning, Shannon D.; Larzábal, Mariano; Cataldi, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) whose main causative agent is enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a disease that mainly affects children under 5 years of age. Argentina is the country with the highest incidence of HUS in the world. Cattle are a major reservoir and source of infection with E. coli O157:H7. To date, the epidemiological factors that contribute to its prevalence are poorly understood. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing has helped to define nine E. coli O157:H7 clades and the clade 8 strains were associated with most of the cases of severe disease. In this study, eight randomly selected isolates of EHEC O157:H7 from cattle in Argentina were studied as well as two human isolates. Four of them were classified as clade 8 through the screening for 23 SNPs; the two human isolates grouped in this clade as well, while two strains were closely related to strains representing clade 6. To assess the pathogenicity of these strains, we assayed correlates of virulence. Shiga toxin production was determined by an ELISA kit. Four strains were high producers and one of these strains that belonged to a novel genotype showed high verocytotoxic activity in cultured cells. Also, these clade 8 and 6 strains showed high RBC lysis and adherence to epithelial cells. One of the clade 6 strains showed stronger inhibition of normal water absorption than E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 in human colonic explants. In addition, two of the strains showing high levels of Stx2 production and RBC lysis activity were associated with lethality and uremia in a mouse model. Consequently, circulation of such strains in cattle may partially contribute to the high incidence of HUS in Argentina. PMID:26030198

  9. Clade 8 and Clade 6 Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Cattle in Argentina have Hypervirulent-Like Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Amigo, Natalia; Mercado, Elsa; Bentancor, Adriana; Singh, Pallavi; Vilte, Daniel; Gerhardt, Elisabeth; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina; Manning, Shannon D; Larzábal, Mariano; Cataldi, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) whose main causative agent is enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a disease that mainly affects children under 5 years of age. Argentina is the country with the highest incidence of HUS in the world. Cattle are a major reservoir and source of infection with E. coli O157:H7. To date, the epidemiological factors that contribute to its prevalence are poorly understood. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing has helped to define nine E. coli O157:H7 clades and the clade 8 strains were associated with most of the cases of severe disease. In this study, eight randomly selected isolates of EHEC O157:H7 from cattle in Argentina were studied as well as two human isolates. Four of them were classified as clade 8 through the screening for 23 SNPs; the two human isolates grouped in this clade as well, while two strains were closely related to strains representing clade 6. To assess the pathogenicity of these strains, we assayed correlates of virulence. Shiga toxin production was determined by an ELISA kit. Four strains were high producers and one of these strains that belonged to a novel genotype showed high verocytotoxic activity in cultured cells. Also, these clade 8 and 6 strains showed high RBC lysis and adherence to epithelial cells. One of the clade 6 strains showed stronger inhibition of normal water absorption than E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 in human colonic explants. In addition, two of the strains showing high levels of Stx2 production and RBC lysis activity were associated with lethality and uremia in a mouse model. Consequently, circulation of such strains in cattle may partially contribute to the high incidence of HUS in Argentina. PMID:26030198

  10. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-13

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the third quarter of the third year, F344 rats vaccinated with adjuvanted NLP formulations were challenged with F. tularensis SCHU S4 at Battelle. Preliminary data indicate that up to 65% of females vaccinated intranasally with an NLP-based formulation survived this challenge, compared to only 20% survival of naïve animals. In addition, NLPs were successfully formulated with Burkholderia protein antigens. IACUC approval for immunological assessments in BALB/c mice was received and we anticipate that these assessments will begin by March 2015, pending ACURO approval.

  11. Structural and Enzymatic Analyses Reveal the Binding Mode of a Novel Series of Francisella tularensis Enoyl Reductase (FabI) Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Hevener, Kirk E.; Truong, Kent; Boci, Teuta; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2012-10-10

    Because of structural and mechanistic differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic fatty acid synthesis enzymes, the bacterial pathway, FAS-II, is an attractive target for the design of antimicrobial agents. We have previously reported the identification of a novel series of benzimidazole compounds with particularly good antibacterial effect against Francisella tularensis, a Category A biowarfare pathogen. Herein we report the crystal structure of the F. tularensis FabI enzyme in complex with our most active benzimidazole compound bound with NADH. The structure reveals that the benzimidazole compounds bind to the substrate site in a unique conformation that is distinct from the binding motif of other known FabI inhibitors. Detailed inhibition kinetics have confirmed that the compounds possess a novel inhibitory mechanism that is unique among known FabI inhibitors. These studies could have a strong impact on future antimicrobial design efforts and may reveal new avenues for the design of FAS-II active antibacterial compounds.

  12. Serological Investigation of Wild Boars (Sus scrofa) and Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) As Indicator Animals for Circulation of Francisella tularensis in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chaignat, Valerie; Klimpel, Diana; Diller, Roland; Melzer, Falk; Müller, Wolfgang; Tomaso, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tularemia outbreaks in humans have recently been reported in many European countries, but data on the occurrence in the animal population are scarce. In North America, seroconversion of omnivores and carnivores was used as indicator for the presence of tularemia, for the European fauna, however, data are barely available. Therefore, the suitability of wild boars (Sus scrofa) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as indicators for the circulation of F. tularensis in Germany was evaluated. Serum samples from 566 wild boars and 457 red foxes were collected between 1995 and 2012 in three federal states in Central Germany (Hesse, Saxony-Anhalt, and Thuringia). The overall rate of seropositive animals was 1.1% in wild boars and 7.4% in red foxes. In conclusion, serological examination of red foxes is recommended, because they can be reliably used as indicator animals for the presence of F. tularensis in the environment. PMID:24359418

  13. Structural and enzymatic analyses reveal the binding mode of a novel series of Francisella tularensis enoyl reductase (FabI) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Shahila; Hevener, Kirk E; Truong, Kent; Boci, Teuta; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Johnson, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Due to structural and mechanistic differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic fatty acid synthesis enzymes, the bacterial pathway, FAS-II, is an attractive target for the design of antimicrobial agents. We have previously reported the identification of a novel series of benzimidazole compounds with particularly good antibacterial effect against Francisella tularensis, a Category A biowarfare pathogen. Herein we report the crystal structure of the F. tularensis FabI enzyme in complex with our most active benzimidazole compound bound with NADH. The structure reveals that the benzimidazole compounds bind to the substrate site in a unique conformation that is distinct from the binding motif of other known FabI inhibitors. Detailed inhibition kinetics have confirmed that the compounds possess a novel inhibitory mechanism that is unique among known FabI inhibitors. These studies could have a strong impact on future antimicrobial design efforts and may reveal new avenues for the design of FAS-II active antibacterial compounds. PMID:22642319

  14. Structural and Biological Evaluation of a Novel Series of Benzimidazole Inhibitors of Francisella tularensis Enoyl-ACP Reductase (FabI)

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Jinhua; Hevener, Kirk E; Su, Pin-Chih; Boci, Teuta; Brubaker, Libby; Truong, Lena; Mistry, Tina; Deng, Jiangping; Cook, James L; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Ghosh, Arun K; Johnson, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, presents a significant biological threat and is a Category A priority pathogen due to its potential for weaponization. The bacterial FASII pathway is a viable target for the development of novel antibacterial agents treating Gram-negative infections. Here we report the advancement of a promising series of benzimidazole FabI (enoyl-ACP reductase) inhibitors to a second-generation using a systematic, structure-guided lead optimization strategy, and the determination of several co-crystal structures that confirm the binding mode of designed inhibitors. These compounds display an improved low nanomolar enzymatic activity as well as promising low microgram/mL antibacterial activity against both F. tularensis and S. aureus and its methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA). The improvements in activity accompanying structural modifications lead to a better understanding of the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity that encompasses both enzymatic and whole-cell activity. PMID:25677657

  15. Serological investigation of wild boars (Sus scrofa) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as indicator animals for circulation of Francisella tularensis in Germany.

    PubMed

    Otto, Peter; Chaignat, Valerie; Klimpel, Diana; Diller, Roland; Melzer, Falk; Müller, Wolfgang; Tomaso, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia outbreaks in humans have recently been reported in many European countries, but data on the occurrence in the animal population are scarce. In North America, seroconversion of omnivores and carnivores was used as indicator for the presence of tularemia, for the European fauna, however, data are barely available. Therefore, the suitability of wild boars (Sus scrofa) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as indicators for the circulation of F. tularensis in Germany was evaluated. Serum samples from 566 wild boars and 457 red foxes were collected between 1995 and 2012 in three federal states in Central Germany (Hesse, Saxony-Anhalt, and Thuringia). The overall rate of seropositive animals was 1.1% in wild boars and 7.4% in red foxes. In conclusion, serological examination of red foxes is recommended, because they can be reliably used as indicator animals for the presence of F. tularensis in the environment.

  16. Biosystematic studies on Enicostema axillare (Lam.) A. Raynal subsp. Axillare (Gentianaceae) in peninsular India.

    PubMed

    Shahina, P M; Nampy, Santhosh

    2014-05-01

    The pantropical genus Enicostema (Gentianaceae) has three species and two sub species world over, namely, E. verticillatum (L.) Engl. (America), E. elizabethae Veldkamp (Madagascar) and E. axillare having 3 subsp. viz., subsp. axillare (Lam.) A. Raynal (India), subsp. latilobum (N.E. Br.) A. Raynal (East Africa) and subsp. littorale (Blume) A. Raynal (Indonesia). The present study aims to delimit the Indian taxa based on field and herbarium studies. Comparative morphology is studied using live as well as consulting wide range of specimens housed at various herbaria. The anatomy of leaf, stem, and root is studied using free hand sections and from epidermal peelings. The seed and pollen morphology are studied under SEM. Information on anatomy, palynology and seed micromorphology of E. axillare subsp. axillare is provided for the first time.

  17. Francisella tularensis Schu S4 Lipopolysaccharide Core Sugar and O-Antigen Mutants Are Attenuated in a Mouse Model of Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Jed A.; Post, Deborah M. B.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Apicella, Michael A.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The virulence factors mediating Francisella pathogenesis are being investigated, with an emphasis on understanding how the organism evades innate immunity mechanisms. Francisella tularensis produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is essentially inert and a polysaccharide capsule that helps the organism to evade detection by components of innate immunity. Using an F. tularensis Schu S4 mutant library, we identified strains that are disrupted for capsule and O-antigen production. These serum-sensitive strains lack both capsule production and O-antigen laddering. Analysis of the predicted protein sequences for the disrupted genes (FTT1236 and FTT1238c) revealed similarity to those for waa (rfa) biosynthetic genes in other bacteria. Mass spectrometry further revealed that these proteins are involved in LPS core sugar biosynthesis and the ligation of O antigen to the LPS core sugars. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) values of these strains are increased 100- to 1,000-fold for mice. Histopathology revealed that the immune response to the F. tularensis mutant strains was significantly different from that observed with wild-type-infected mice. The lung tissue from mutant-infected mice had widespread necrotic debris, but the spleens lacked necrosis and displayed neutrophilia. In contrast, the lungs of wild-type-infected mice had nominal necrosis, but the spleens had widespread necrosis. These data indicate that murine death caused by wild-type strains occurs by a mechanism different from that by which the mutant strains kill mice. Mice immunized with these mutant strains displayed >10-fold protective effects against virulent type A F. tularensis challenge. PMID:24452684

  18. Polyphasic study of Zymomonas mobilis strains revealing the existence of a novel subspecies Z. mobilis subsp. francensis subsp. nov., isolated from French cider.

    PubMed

    Coton, Monika; Laplace, Jean-Marie; Auffray, Yanick; Coton, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis strains recently isolated from French 'framboisé' ciders were compared with collection strains of the two defined subspecies, Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis and Z. mobilis subsp. pomaceae, using a polyphasic approach. Six strains isolated from six different regions of France were compared with three strains of Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis, including the type strain LMG 404T, and four strains of Z. mobilis subsp. pomaceae, including the type strain LMG 448T, using phenotypic and genotypic methods. For phenotypic characterization, both physiological tests and SDS-PAGE protein profiles revealed significant differences between the two known subspecies and the French isolates; three distinct groups were observed. These findings were further confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA and repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR genotyping methods in which the French isolates were clearly distinguished from the other two subspecies. Sequence analysis of a fragment ranging from 604 to 617 nucleotides corresponding to the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR), a 592 nucleotide HSP60 gene fragment and a 1044 nucleotide gyrB gene fragment confirmed the presence of three distinct groups. The French strains exhibited almost 94 % similarity to the ISR, 90 % to HSP60 and 86 % to gyrB sequences of the three collection strains of Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis and 87, 84 and 80 % sequence similarity, respectively, was observed with the four Z. mobilis subsp. pomaceae strains. Based on both the phenotypic and genotypic results, the French strains are proposed to represent a novel subspecies, Zymomonas mobilis subsp. francensis subsp. nov. Strain AN0101T (= LMG 22974T = CIP 108684T) was designated as the type strain. PMID:16403876

  19. Hylid frog phylogeny and sampling strategies for speciose clades.

    PubMed

    Wiens, John J; Fetzner, James W; Parkinson, Christopher L; Reeder, Tod W

    2005-10-01

    How should characters and taxa be sampled to resolve efficiently the phylogeny of ancient and highly speciose groups? We addressed this question empirically in the treefrog family Hylidae, which contains > 800 species and may be nonmonophyletic with respect to other anuran families. We sampled 81 species (54 hylids and 27 outgroups) for two mitochondrial genes (12S, ND1), two nuclear genes (POMC, c-myc), and morphology (144 characters) in an attempt to resolve higher-level relationships. We then added 117 taxa to the combined data set, many of which were sampled for only one gene (12S). Despite the relative incompleteness of the majority of taxa, the resulting trees placed all taxa in the expected higher-level clades with strong support, despite some taxa being > 90% incomplete. Furthermore, we found no relationship between the completeness of a taxon and the support (parsimony bootstrap or Bayesian posterior probabilities) for its localized placement on the tree. Separate analysis of the data set with the most taxa (12S) gives a somewhat problematic estimate of higher-level relationships, suggesting that data sets scored only for some taxa (ND1, nuclear genes, morphology) are important in determining the outcome of the combined analysis. The results show that hemiphractine hylids are not closely related to other hylids and should be recognized as a distinct family. They also show that the speciose genus Hyla is polyphyletic, but that its species can be arranged into three monophyletic genera. A new classification of hylid frogs is proposed. Several potentially misleading signals in the morphological data are discussed.

  20. Spurious 99% bootstrap and jackknife support for unsupported clades.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Mark P; Freudenstein, John V

    2011-10-01

    Quantifying branch support using the bootstrap and/or jackknife is generally considered to be an essential component of rigorous parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses. Previous authors have described how application of the frequency-within-replicates approach to treating multiple equally optimal trees found in a given bootstrap pseudoreplicate can provide apparent support for otherwise unsupported clades. We demonstrate how a similar problem may occur when a non-representative subset of equally optimal trees are held per pseudoreplicate, which we term the undersampling-within-replicates artifact. We illustrate the frequency-within-replicates and undersampling-within-replicates bootstrap and jackknife artifacts using both contrived and empirical examples, demonstrate that the artifacts can occur in both parsimony and likelihood analyses, and show that the artifacts occur in outputs from multiple different phylogenetic-inference programs. Based on our results, we make the following five recommendations, which are particularly relevant to supermatrix analyses, but apply to all phylogenetic analyses. First, when two or more optimal trees are found in a given pseudoreplicate they should be summarized using the strict-consensus rather than frequency-within-replicates approach. Second jackknife resampling should be used rather than bootstrap resampling. Third, multiple tree searches while holding multiple trees per search should be conducted in each pseudoreplicate rather than conducting only a single search and holding only a single tree. Fourth, branches with a minimum possible optimized length of zero should be collapsed within each tree search rather than collapsing branches only if their maximum possible optimized length is zero. Fifth, resampling values should be mapped onto the strict consensus of all optimal trees found rather than simply presenting the ≥ 50% bootstrap or jackknife tree or mapping the resampling values onto a single optimal tree.

  1. Modulation of Human Airway Barrier Functions during Burkholderia thailandensis and Francisella tularensis Infection Running Title: Airway Barrier Functions during Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E; Laver, Jay R; Read, Robert C; Clark, Graeme C; Davies, Donna E; Swindle, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial epithelium provides protection against pathogens from the inhaled environment through the formation of a highly-regulated barrier. In order to understand the pulmonary diseases melioidosis and tularemia caused by Burkholderia thailandensis and Fransicella tularensis, respectively, the barrier function of the human bronchial epithelium were analysed. Polarised 16HBE14o- or differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were exposed to increasing multiplicities of infection (MOI) of B. thailandensis or F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain and barrier responses monitored over 24-72 h. Challenge of polarized BECs with either bacterial species caused an MOI- and time-dependent increase in ionic permeability, disruption of tight junctions, and bacterial passage from the apical to the basolateral compartment. B. thailandensis was found to be more invasive than F. tularensis. Both bacterial species induced an MOI-dependent increase in TNF-α release. An increase in ionic permeability and TNF-α release was induced by B. thailandensis in differentiated BECs. Pretreatment of polarised BECs with the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate reduced bacterial-dependent increases in ionic permeability, bacterial passage, and TNF-α release. TNF blocking antibody Enbrel(®) reduced bacterial passage only. BEC barrier properties are disrupted during respiratory bacterial infections and targeting with corticosteroids or anti-TNF compounds may represent a therapeutic option. PMID:27527221

  2. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  3. Modulation of Human Airway Barrier Functions during Burkholderia thailandensis and Francisella tularensis Infection Running Title: Airway Barrier Functions during Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E.; Laver, Jay R.; Read, Robert C.; Clark, Graeme C.; Davies, Donna E.; Swindle, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial epithelium provides protection against pathogens from the inhaled environment through the formation of a highly-regulated barrier. In order to understand the pulmonary diseases melioidosis and tularemia caused by Burkholderia thailandensis and Fransicella tularensis, respectively, the barrier function of the human bronchial epithelium were analysed. Polarised 16HBE14o- or differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were exposed to increasing multiplicities of infection (MOI) of B. thailandensis or F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain and barrier responses monitored over 24–72 h. Challenge of polarized BECs with either bacterial species caused an MOI- and time-dependent increase in ionic permeability, disruption of tight junctions, and bacterial passage from the apical to the basolateral compartment. B. thailandensis was found to be more invasive than F. tularensis. Both bacterial species induced an MOI-dependent increase in TNF-α release. An increase in ionic permeability and TNF-α release was induced by B. thailandensis in differentiated BECs. Pretreatment of polarised BECs with the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate reduced bacterial-dependent increases in ionic permeability, bacterial passage, and TNF-α release. TNF blocking antibody Enbrel® reduced bacterial passage only. BEC barrier properties are disrupted during respiratory bacterial infections and targeting with corticosteroids or anti-TNF compounds may represent a therapeutic option. PMID:27527221

  4. Identification of Genome-Wide Mutations in Ciprofloxacin-Resistant F. tularensis LVS Using Whole Genome Tiling Arrays and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jaing, Crystal J.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Thissen, James B.; Zemla, Adam; Vergez, Lisa M.; Bourguet, Feliza; Mabery, Shalini; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y.; Koshinsky, Heather; Jackson, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Class A bioterrorism agent by the U.S. government due to its high virulence and the ease with which it can be spread as an aerosol. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) is a broad spectrum antibiotic effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Increased Cipro resistance in pathogenic microbes is of serious concern when considering options for medical treatment of bacterial infections. Identification of genes and loci that are associated with Ciprofloxacin resistance will help advance the understanding of resistance mechanisms and may, in the future, provide better treatment options for patients. It may also provide information for development of assays that can rapidly identify Cipro-resistant isolates of this pathogen. In this study, we selected a large number of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) isolates that survived in progressively higher Ciprofloxacin concentrations, screened the isolates using a whole genome F. tularensis LVS tiling microarray and Illumina sequencing, and identified both known and novel mutations associated with resistance. Genes containing mutations encode DNA gyrase subunit A, a hypothetical protein, an asparagine synthase, a sugar transamine/perosamine synthetase and others. Structural modeling performed on these proteins provides insights into the potential function of these proteins and how they might contribute to Cipro resistance mechanisms. PMID:27668749

  5. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  6. Development and evaluation of an up-converting phosphor technology-based lateral flow assay for rapid detection of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fei; Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Fuli; Zhao, Yong; Li, Chunfeng; Sun, Chongyun; Wang, Xiaochen; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Chengbin; Yu, Ailian; Zhou, Lei

    2015-11-26

    Francisella tularensis is a potential biowarfare/bioterrorism agent and zoonotic pathogen that causes tularemia; thus, surveillance of F. tularensis and first-level emergency response using point-of-care testing (POCT) are essential. The UPT-LF POCT assay was established to quantitatively detect F. tularensis within 15 min, and the sensitivity of the assay was 10(4) CFU · mL(-1) (100 CFU/test). The linear quantitative range covered five orders of magnitude, and the coefficients of variation were less than 10%. Except Shigella dysenteriae, UPT-LF showed excellent specificity to four strains that are also potential biowarfare/bioterrorism agents and 13 food-borne pathogenic strains. Samples with pH 2-13, high ion strengths (≥ 2 mol · L(-1) solution of KCl and NaCl), high viscosities (≤ 50 mg · mL(-1) PEG20000 or ≥ 20% glycerol), and high concentrations of biomacromolecules (≥ 400 mg · mL(-1) bovine serum albumin or ≥ 80 mg · mL(-1) casein) showed little influence on the assay. For practical utilization, the tolerance limits for seven powders and eight viscera were determined, and operation errors of liquid measurement demonstrated a minor influence on the strip. Ftu-UPT-LF is a candidate POCT method because of its excellent sensitivity, specificity, and stability in complex samples, as well as low operation error.

  7. Development and evaluation of an up-converting phosphor technology-based lateral flow assay for rapid detection of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Fei; Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Fuli; Zhao, Yong; Li, Chunfeng; Sun, Chongyun; Wang, Xiaochen; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Chengbin; Yu, Ailian; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a potential biowarfare/bioterrorism agent and zoonotic pathogen that causes tularemia; thus, surveillance of F. tularensis and first-level emergency response using point-of-care testing (POCT) are essential. The UPT-LF POCT assay was established to quantitatively detect F. tularensis within 15 min, and the sensitivity of the assay was 104 CFU · mL−1 (100 CFU/test). The linear quantitative range covered five orders of magnitude, and the coefficients of variation were less than 10%. Except Shigella dysenteriae, UPT-LF showed excellent specificity to four strains that are also potential biowarfare/bioterrorism agents and 13 food-borne pathogenic strains. Samples with pH 2–13, high ion strengths (≥2 mol · L−1 solution of KCl and NaCl), high viscosities (≤50 mg · mL−1 PEG20000 or ≥20% glycerol), and high concentrations of biomacromolecules (≥400 mg · mL−1 bovine serum albumin or ≥80 mg · mL−1 casein) showed little influence on the assay. For practical utilization, the tolerance limits for seven powders and eight viscera were determined, and operation errors of liquid measurement demonstrated a minor influence on the strip. Ftu-UPT-LF is a candidate POCT method because of its excellent sensitivity, specificity, and stability in complex samples, as well as low operation error. PMID:26608358

  8. Levofloxacin Rescues Mice from Lethal Intra-nasal Infections with Virulent Francisella tularensis and Induces Immunity and Production of Protective Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Klimpel, Gary R.; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Moen, Scott T.; Taormina, Joanna; Peterson, Johnny W.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Niesel, David W.; Carness, Paige; Haithcoat, Judith L.; Kirtley, Michelle; Ben Nasr, Abdelhakim

    2009-01-01

    The ability to protect mice against respiratory infections with virulent Francisella tularensis has been problematic and the role of antibody-versus-cell-mediated immunity controversial. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that protective immunity can develop in mice that were given antibiotic therapy following infection via the respiratory tract with Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. We show that mice infected with a lethal dose of SCHU S4, via an intra-nasal challenge, could be protected with levofloxacin treatment. This protection was evident even when levofloxacin treatment was delayed 72 hours post-infection. At early time points after levofloxacin treatment, significant numbers of bacteria could be recovered from the lungs and spleens of mice, which was followed by a dramatic disappearance of bacteria from these tissues. Mice successfully treated with levofloxacin were later shown to be almost completely resistant to rechallenge with SCHU S4 by the intra-nasal route. Serum antibody appeared to play an important role in this immunity. Normal mice, when given sera from animals protected by levofloxacin treatment, were solidly protected from a lethal intra-nasal challenge with SCHU S4. The protective antiserum contained high titers of SCHU S4 specific IgG2a, indicating that a strong Th1 response was induced following levofloxacin treatment. Thus, this study describes a potentially valuable animal model for furthering our understanding of respiratory tularemia and provides suggestive evidence that antibody can protect against respiratory infections with virulent F. tularensis. PMID:18930100

  9. Levofloxacin rescues mice from lethal intra-nasal infections with virulent Francisella tularensis and induces immunity and production of protective antibody.

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Gary R; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Moen, Scott T; Taormina, Joanna; Peterson, Johnny W; Chopra, Ashok K; Niesel, David W; Carness, Paige; Haithcoat, Judith L; Kirtley, Michelle; Nasr, Abdelhakim Ben

    2008-12-01

    The ability to protect mice against respiratory infections with virulent Francisella tularensis has been problematic and the role of antibody-versus-cell-mediated immunity controversial. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that protective immunity can develop in mice that were given antibiotic therapy following infection via the respiratory tract with F. tularensis SCHU S4. We show that mice infected with a lethal dose of SCHU S4, via an intra-nasal challenge, could be protected with levofloxacin treatment. This protection was evident even when levofloxacin treatment was delayed 72h post-infection. At early time points after levofloxacin treatment, significant numbers of bacteria could be recovered from the lungs and spleens of mice, which was followed by a dramatic disappearance of bacteria from these tissues. Mice successfully treated with levofloxacin were later shown to be almost completely resistant to re-challenge with SCHU S4 by the intra-nasal route. Serum antibody appeared to play an important role in this immunity. Normal mice, when given sera from animals protected by levofloxacin treatment, were solidly protected from a lethal intra-nasal challenge with SCHU S4. The protective antiserum contained high titers of SCHU S4-specific IgG2a, indicating that a strong Th1 response was induced following levofloxacin treatment. Thus, this study describes a potentially valuable animal model for furthering our understanding of respiratory tularemia and provides suggestive evidence that antibody can protect against respiratory infections with virulent F. tularensis. PMID:18930100

  10. Comparing the effects of symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium) clades C1 and D on early growth stages of Acropora tenuis.

    PubMed

    Yuyama, Ikuko; Higuchi, Tomihiko

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals switch endosymbiotic algae of the genus Symbiodinium during their early growth stages and during bleaching events. Clade C Symbiodinium algae are dominant in corals, although other clades - including A and D - have also been commonly detected in juvenile Acroporid corals. Previous studies have been reported that only molecular data of Symbiodinium clade were identified within field corals. In this study, we inoculated aposymbiotic juvenile polyps with cultures of clades C1 and D Symbiodinium algae, and investigated the different effect of these two clades of Symbiodinium on juvenile polyps. Our results showed that clade C1 algae did not grow, while clade D algae grew rapidly during the first 2 months after inoculation. Polyps associated with clade C1 algae exhibited bright green fluorescence across the body and tentacles after inoculation. The growth rate of polyp skeletons was lower in polyps associated with clade C1 algae than those associated with clade D algae. On the other hand, antioxidant activity (catalase) of corals was not significantly different between corals with clade C1 and clade D algae. Our results suggested that clade D Symbiodinium algae easily form symbiotic relationships with corals and that these algae could contribute to coral growth in early symbiosis stages.

  11. Stilbenes and flavonoids from Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis.

    PubMed

    Ti, Huihui; Wu, Ping; Lin, Lidong; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2011-06-01

    The first stilbene possessing a γ-aminobutyric acid lactam function, artocarpene (1), and a new flavanone, 2-hydroxynaringenin 4'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), were isolated from the stems of Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis along with four known compounds, 2-hydroxynaringenin (3), oxyresveratrol (4), 3,4',5-trihydroxy-3'-prenylstilbene (5) and norartocarpetin (6). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1 exhibited weak antioxidant activity and 2 displayed weak cytotoxicity against human lung cancer A549 cell line.

  12. Quantitative and cytotoxic activity determinations on Galanthus nivalis subsp. cilicicus.

    PubMed

    Kaya, G I; Gözler, B

    2005-06-01

    Aerial and underground parts of Galanthus nivalis subsp. cilicicus, a wild-growing species in Turkey, were collected during two different vegetation periods in flowering and fruiting seasons. Herba and bulbus Galanthi were prepared from each specimen. With the aim of collecting data for prospective monographs on this drug, contents of humidity, ash, sulphated ash and total alkaloids were determined according to DAB 10. The specimens were also analyzed quantitatively for two of the principal alkaloids of the genus, galanthamine and lycorine, by using a method based on spectrophotometry complemented with TLC. LC50 values were determined for the ethanolic and alkaloidal extracts of each of the specimens using brine shrimp lethality bioassay.

  13. Reticulate evolution, cryptic species, and character convergence in the core East Asian clade of Gaultheria (Ericaceae).

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Fritsch, Peter W; Cruz, Boni C; Wang, Hong; Li, De-Zhu

    2010-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of 84 samples representing 30 species in the core East Asian clade of the wintergreen group of Gaultheria (Angiospermae: Ericaceae: Gaultherieae) were estimated from separate and combined DNA sequence data from five genic regions (ITS, matK, rpl16, trnL-trnF, and trnS-trnG) with parsimony, likelihood and Bayesian analyses. Two major clades were recovered, one comprising several sections and series with leaves generally more than 1 cm long [the ser. Leucothoides sensu lato (s.l.) clade] and another comprising the species of ser. Trichophyllae, with leaves generally less than 1 cm long. The ITS region yielded little phylogenetic resolution, whereas in the combined chloroplast analysis the samples from individual morphospecies in both clades were often nonmonophyletic. This was postulated to result from reticulate evolution in the ser. Leucothoides s.l. clade, particularly in two specific cases of hybridization and a crown clade with likely chloroplast capture following localized introgression. In the ser. Trichophyllae clade, such nonmonophyly was largely attributed to cryptic species and character convergence resulting at least partly from extreme morphological reduction. The relatively low-elevation habitats in which the species of the ser. Leucothoides s.l. clade generally grow are thought to have promoted opportunities for sympatry and reticulation, whereas the high-alpine habitats of ser. Trichophyllae are more likely to have spawned isolated populations and narrow endemism. As in other Sino-Himalayan plant groups, overall low sequence divergence and reticulate evolution suggest rapid radiation in the core East Asian clade of Gaultheria.

  14. Phylogeny, evolutionary trends and classification of the Spathelia–Ptaeroxylon clade: morphological and molecular insights

    PubMed Central

    Appelhans, M. S.; Smets, E.; Razafimandimbison, S. G.; Haevermans, T.; van Marle, E. J.; Couloux, A.; Rabarison, H.; Randrianarivelojosia, M.; Keßler, P. J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The Spathelia–Ptaeroxylon clade is a group of morphologically diverse plants that have been classified together as a result of molecular phylogenetic studies. The clade is currently included in Rutaceae and recognized at a subfamilial level (Spathelioideae) despite the fact that most of its genera have traditionally been associated with other families and that there are no obvious morphological synapomorphies for the clade. The aim of the present study is to construct phylogenetic trees for the Spathelia–Ptaeroxylon clade and to investigate anatomical characters in order to decide whether it should be kept in Rutaceae or recognized at the familial level. Anatomical characters were plotted on a cladogram to help explain character evolution within the group. Moreover, phylogenetic relationships and generic limits within the clade are also addressed. Methods A species-level phylogenetic analysis of the Spathelia–Ptaeroxylon clade based on five plastid DNA regions (rbcL, atpB, trnL–trnF, rps16 and psbA–trnH) was conducted using Bayesian, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. Leaf and seed anatomical characters of all genera were (re)investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Key Results With the exception of Spathelia, all genera of the Spathelila–Ptaeroxylon clade are monophyletic. The typical leaf and seed anatomical characters of Rutaceae were found. Further, the presence of oil cells in the leaves provides a possible synapomorphy for the clade. Conclusions The Spathelia–Ptaeroxylon clade is well placed in Rutaceae and it is reasonable to unite the genera into one subfamily (Spathelioideae). We propose a new tribal classification of Spathelioideae. A narrow circumscription of Spathelia is established to make the genus monophyletic, and Sohnreyia is resurrected to accommodate the South American species of Spathelia. The most recent common ancestor of Spathelioideae probably had leaves with secretory cavities

  15. Updating the Vibrio clades defined by multilocus sequence phylogeny: proposal of eight new clades, and the description of Vibrio tritonius sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Sawabe, Tomoo; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Matsumura, Yuta; Feng, Gao; Amin, AKM Rohul; Mino, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sawabe, Toko; Kumar, Ramesh; Fukui, Yohei; Satomi, Masataka; Matsushima, Ryoji; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Christen, Richard; Maruyama, Fumito; Kurokawa, Ken; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    To date 142 species have been described in the Vibrionaceae family of bacteria, classified into seven genera; Aliivibrio, Echinimonas, Enterovibrio, Grimontia, Photobacterium, Salinivibrio and Vibrio. As vibrios are widespread in marine environments and show versatile metabolisms and ecologies, these bacteria are recognized as one of the most diverse and important marine heterotrophic bacterial groups for elucidating the correlation between genome evolution and ecological adaptation. However, on the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, we could not find any robust monophyletic lineages in any of the known genera. We needed further attempts to reconstruct their evolutionary history based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and/or genome wide taxonomy of all the recognized species groups. In our previous report in 2007, we conducted the first broad multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) to infer the evolutionary history of vibrios using nine housekeeping genes (the 16S rRNA gene, gapA, gyrB, ftsZ, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA), and we proposed 14 distinct clades in 58 species of Vibrionaceae. Due to the difficulty of designing universal primers that can amplify the genes for MLSA in every Vibrionaceae species, some clades had yet to be defined. In this study, we present a better picture of an updated molecular phylogeny for 86 described vibrio species and 10 genome sequenced Vibrionaceae strains, using 8 housekeeping gene sequences. This new study places special emphasis on (1) eight newly identified clades (Damselae, Mediterranei, Pectenicida, Phosphoreum, Profundum, Porteresiae, Rosenbergii, and Rumoiensis); (2) clades amended since the 2007 proposal with recently described new species; (3) orphan clades of genomospecies F6 and F10; (4) phylogenetic positions defined in 3 genome-sequenced strains (N418, EX25, and EJY3); and (5) description of V. tritonius sp. nov., which is a member of the “Porteresiae” clade. PMID:24409173

  16. Description of Teunomyces gen. nov. for the Candida kruisii clade, Suhomyces gen. nov. for the Candida tanzawaensis clade and Suhomyces kilbournensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P; Robnett, Christie J; Blackwell, Meredith

    2016-08-01

    DNA sequence analysis has shown that species of the Candida kruisii clade and species of the C. tanzawaensis clade represent phylogenetically circumscribed genera, which are described as Teunomyces gen. nov., type species T kruisii, and Suhomyces gen. nov., type species S tanzawaensis Many of the species are distributed worldwide and they are often isolated from fungus-feeding insects and their habitats. Included is the description of S. kilbournensis (type strain NRRL Y-17864, CBS 14276), a species found almost exclusively on maize kernels (Zea mays) in IL, USA. PMID:27188882

  17. Strong genetic differentiation between North American and European populations of Phytophthora alni subsp. uniformis.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Jaime; Adams, Gerard C; Halkett, Fabien; Catal, Mursel; Husson, Claude; Nagy, Zoltán Á; Hansen, Everett M; Marçais, Benoît; Frey, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Alder decline caused by Phytophthora alni has been one of the most important diseases of natural ecosystems in Europe during the last 20 years. The emergence of P. alni subsp. alni -the pathogen responsible for the epidemic-is linked to an interspecific hybridization event between two parental species: P. alni subsp. multiformis and P. alni subsp. uniformis. One of the parental species, P. alni subsp. uniformis, has been isolated in several European countries and, recently, in North America. The objective of this work was to assess the level of genetic diversity, the population genetic structure, and the putative reproduction mode and mating system of P. alni subsp. uniformis. Five new polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to contrast both geographical populations. The study comprised 71 isolates of P. alni subsp. uniformis collected from eight European countries and 10 locations in North America. Our results revealed strong differences between continental populations (Fst = 0.88; Rst = 0.74), with no evidence for gene flow. European isolates showed extremely low genetic diversity compared with the North American collection. Selfing appears to be the predominant mating system in both continental collections. The results suggest that the European P. alni subsp. uniformis population is most likely alien and derives from the introduction of a few individuals, whereas the North American population probably is an indigenous population. PMID:23095465

  18. Strong genetic differentiation between North American and European populations of Phytophthora alni subsp. uniformis.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Jaime; Adams, Gerard C; Halkett, Fabien; Catal, Mursel; Husson, Claude; Nagy, Zoltán Á; Hansen, Everett M; Marçais, Benoît; Frey, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Alder decline caused by Phytophthora alni has been one of the most important diseases of natural ecosystems in Europe during the last 20 years. The emergence of P. alni subsp. alni -the pathogen responsible for the epidemic-is linked to an interspecific hybridization event between two parental species: P. alni subsp. multiformis and P. alni subsp. uniformis. One of the parental species, P. alni subsp. uniformis, has been isolated in several European countries and, recently, in North America. The objective of this work was to assess the level of genetic diversity, the population genetic structure, and the putative reproduction mode and mating system of P. alni subsp. uniformis. Five new polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to contrast both geographical populations. The study comprised 71 isolates of P. alni subsp. uniformis collected from eight European countries and 10 locations in North America. Our results revealed strong differences between continental populations (Fst = 0.88; Rst = 0.74), with no evidence for gene flow. European isolates showed extremely low genetic diversity compared with the North American collection. Selfing appears to be the predominant mating system in both continental collections. The results suggest that the European P. alni subsp. uniformis population is most likely alien and derives from the introduction of a few individuals, whereas the North American population probably is an indigenous population.

  19. The Streptomyces violaceusniger clade: a home for streptomycetes with rugose ornamented spores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The taxonomic status of 16 strains received as Streptomyces hygroscopicus, Streptomyces melanosporofaciens, Streptomyces sparsogenes, Streptomyces sporoclivatus and Streptomyces violaceusniger was evaluated in a polyphasic study. Eleven of the organisms formed a distinct clade in the Streptomyces 1...

  20. Transmission of a heterologous clade C Symbiodinium in a model anemone infection system via asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Nan U; Hsiao, Ya-Ju; Mayfield, Anderson B; Young, Ryan; Hsu, Ling-Lan; Peng, Shao-En

    2016-01-01

    Anemones of genus Exaiptasia are used as model organisms for the study of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbiosis. However, while most reef-building corals harbor Symbiodinium of clade C, Exaiptasia spp. anemones mainly harbor clade B Symbiodinium (ITS2 type B1) populations. In this study, we reveal for the first time that bleached Exaiptasia pallida anemones can establish a symbiotic relationship with a clade C Symbiodinium (ITS2 type C1). We further found that anemones can transmit the exogenously supplied clade C Symbiodinium cells to their offspring by asexual reproduction (pedal laceration). In order to corroborate the establishment of stable symbiosis, we used microscopic techniques and genetic analyses to examine several generations of anemones, and the results of these endeavors confirmed the sustainability of the system. These findings provide a framework for understanding the differences in infection dynamics between homologous and heterologous dinoflagellate types using a model anemone infection system. PMID:27635330

  1. Transmission of a heterologous clade C Symbiodinium in a model anemone infection system via asexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Hsiao, Ya-Ju; Mayfield, Anderson B.; Young, Ryan; Hsu, Ling-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Anemones of genus Exaiptasia are used as model organisms for the study of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbiosis. However, while most reef-building corals harbor Symbiodinium of clade C, Exaiptasia spp. anemones mainly harbor clade B Symbiodinium (ITS2 type B1) populations. In this study, we reveal for the first time that bleached Exaiptasia pallida anemones can establish a symbiotic relationship with a clade C Symbiodinium (ITS2 type C1). We further found that anemones can transmit the exogenously supplied clade C Symbiodinium cells to their offspring by asexual reproduction (pedal laceration). In order to corroborate the establishment of stable symbiosis, we used microscopic techniques and genetic analyses to examine several generations of anemones, and the results of these endeavors confirmed the sustainability of the system. These findings provide a framework for understanding the differences in infection dynamics between homologous and heterologous dinoflagellate types using a model anemone infection system. PMID:27635330

  2. Mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T.; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman; Hahn; Beatrice H.

    2011-05-31

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  3. Isolation of an aerobic sulfur oxidizer from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katharine T; Morris, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria from the uncultured SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade of gamma proteobacterial sulfur oxidizers (GSOs) have the genetic potential to oxidize reduced sulfur and fix carbon in the tissues of clams and mussels, in oxygen minimum zones and throughout the deep ocean (>200 m). Here, we report isolation of the first cultured representative from this GSO clade. Closely related cultures were obtained from surface waters in Puget Sound and from the deep chlorophyll maximum in the North Pacific gyre. Pure cultures grow aerobically on natural seawater media, oxidize sulfur, and reach higher final cell densities when glucose and thiosulfate are added to the media. This suggests that aerobic sulfur oxidation enhances organic carbon utilization in the oceans. The first isolate from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade was given the provisional taxonomic assignment 'Candidatus: Thioglobus singularis', alluding to the clade's known role in sulfur oxidation and the isolate's planktonic lifestyle. PMID:22875135

  4. Transmission of a heterologous clade C Symbiodinium in a model anemone infection system via asexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Hsiao, Ya-Ju; Mayfield, Anderson B.; Young, Ryan; Hsu, Ling-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Anemones of genus Exaiptasia are used as model organisms for the study of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbiosis. However, while most reef-building corals harbor Symbiodinium of clade C, Exaiptasia spp. anemones mainly harbor clade B Symbiodinium (ITS2 type B1) populations. In this study, we reveal for the first time that bleached Exaiptasia pallida anemones can establish a symbiotic relationship with a clade C Symbiodinium (ITS2 type C1). We further found that anemones can transmit the exogenously supplied clade C Symbiodinium cells to their offspring by asexual reproduction (pedal laceration). In order to corroborate the establishment of stable symbiosis, we used microscopic techniques and genetic analyses to examine several generations of anemones, and the results of these endeavors confirmed the sustainability of the system. These findings provide a framework for understanding the differences in infection dynamics between homologous and heterologous dinoflagellate types using a model anemone infection system.

  5. Transmission of a heterologous clade C Symbiodinium in a model anemone infection system via asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Nan U; Hsiao, Ya-Ju; Mayfield, Anderson B; Young, Ryan; Hsu, Ling-Lan; Peng, Shao-En

    2016-01-01

    Anemones of genus Exaiptasia are used as model organisms for the study of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbiosis. However, while most reef-building corals harbor Symbiodinium of clade C, Exaiptasia spp. anemones mainly harbor clade B Symbiodinium (ITS2 type B1) populations. In this study, we reveal for the first time that bleached Exaiptasia pallida anemones can establish a symbiotic relationship with a clade C Symbiodinium (ITS2 type C1). We further found that anemones can transmit the exogenously supplied clade C Symbiodinium cells to their offspring by asexual reproduction (pedal laceration). In order to corroborate the establishment of stable symbiosis, we used microscopic techniques and genetic analyses to examine several generations of anemones, and the results of these endeavors confirmed the sustainability of the system. These findings provide a framework for understanding the differences in infection dynamics between homologous and heterologous dinoflagellate types using a model anemone infection system.

  6. Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-1 Clade C versus B Infected Individuals in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Sergio Monteiro; Ribeiro, Clea Elisa; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Badiee, Jayraan; Cherner, Mariana; Smith, Davey; Maich, Ingrid; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Rotta, Indianara; Barbosa, Francisco Jaime; Heaton, Robert K.; Umlauf, Anya; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 clade C isolates show reduced Tat protein chemoattractant activity compared with clade B. This might influence neuropathogenesis by altering trafficking of monocytes into the CNS. A previous study suggested low rates of HIV-associated dementia in clade C infected individuals. The present study evaluated neurocognitive impairment rates in clade B- and C-infected individuals from the same local population. HIV+ and HIV- participants were recruited from the same geographic region in southern Brazil. We evaluated neuropsychological (NP) impairment using a screening instrument (the International HIV Dementia Scale; IHDS), as well as a Brazilian Portuguese adaptation of a comprehensive battery that has demonstrated sensitivity to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) internationally. NP performance in controls was used to generate T-scores and impairment ratings by the global deficit score (GDS) method. Clade assignments were ascertained by sequencing pol and env. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were collected from all HIV+ participants. HIV+ and HIV- participants were comparable on demographic characteristics. HIV+ participants overall were more likely to be impaired than HIV- by the IHDS and the GDS. Clade B and C infected individuals were demographically similar and did not differ significantly in rates of impairment. The prevalence of pleocytosis, a marker of intrathecal cellular chemotaxis, also did not differ between clade B and C infections. Clade B and C HIV-infected individuals from the same geographic region, when ascertained using comparable methods, did not differ in their rates of neurocognitive impairment, and there was no evidence of differences in CNS chemotaxis. PMID:24277437

  7. Global distribution patterns of distinct clades of the photosynthetic picoeukaryote Ostreococcus

    PubMed Central

    Demir-Hilton, Elif; Sudek, Sebastian; Cuvelier, Marie L; Gentemann, Chelle L; Zehr, Jonathan P; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2011-01-01

    Ostreococcus is a marine picophytoeukaryote for which culture studies indicate there are ‘high-light' and ‘low-light' adapted ecotypes. Representatives of these ecotypes fall within two to three 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clades for the former and one for the latter. However, clade distributions and relationships to this form of niche partitioning are unknown in nature. We developed two quantitative PCR primer-probe sets and enumerated the proposed ecotypes in the Pacific Ocean as well as the subtropical and tropical North Atlantic. Statistical differences in factors such as salinity, temperature and NO3 indicated the ecophysiological parameters behind clade distributions are more complex than irradiance alone. Clade OII, containing the putatively low-light adapted strains, was detected at warm oligotrophic sites. In contrast, Clade OI, containing high-light adapted strains, was present in cooler mesotrophic and coastal waters. Maximal OI abundance (19 555±37 18S rDNA copies per ml) was detected in mesotrophic waters at 40 m depth, approaching the nutricline. OII was often more abundant at the deep chlorophyll maximum, when nutrient concentrations were significantly higher than at the surface (stratified euphotic zone waters). However, in mixed euphotic-zone water columns, relatively high numbers (for example, 891±107 18S rDNA copies per ml, Sargasso Sea, springtime) were detected at the surface. Both Clades OI and OII were found at multiple euphotic zone depths, but co-occurrence at the same geographical location appeared rare and was detected only in continental slope waters. In situ growth rate estimates using these primer-probes and better comprehension of physiology will enhance ecological understanding of Ostreococcus Clades OII and OI which appear to be oceanic and coastal clades, respectively. PMID:21289652

  8. Global distribution patterns of distinct clades of the photosynthetic picoeukaryote Ostreococcus.

    PubMed

    Demir-Hilton, Elif; Sudek, Sebastian; Cuvelier, Marie L; Gentemann, Chelle L; Zehr, Jonathan P; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2011-07-01

    Ostreococcus is a marine picophytoeukaryote for which culture studies indicate there are 'high-light' and 'low-light' adapted ecotypes. Representatives of these ecotypes fall within two to three 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clades for the former and one for the latter. However, clade distributions and relationships to this form of niche partitioning are unknown in nature. We developed two quantitative PCR primer-probe sets and enumerated the proposed ecotypes in the Pacific Ocean as well as the subtropical and tropical North Atlantic. Statistical differences in factors such as salinity, temperature and NO(3) indicated the ecophysiological parameters behind clade distributions are more complex than irradiance alone. Clade OII, containing the putatively low-light adapted strains, was detected at warm oligotrophic sites. In contrast, Clade OI, containing high-light adapted strains, was present in cooler mesotrophic and coastal waters. Maximal OI abundance (19 555±37 18S rDNA copies per ml) was detected in mesotrophic waters at 40 m depth, approaching the nutricline. OII was often more abundant at the deep chlorophyll maximum, when nutrient concentrations were significantly higher than at the surface (stratified euphotic zone waters). However, in mixed euphotic-zone water columns, relatively high numbers (for example, 891±107 18S rDNA copies per ml, Sargasso Sea, springtime) were detected at the surface. Both Clades OI and OII were found at multiple euphotic zone depths, but co-occurrence at the same geographical location appeared rare and was detected only in continental slope waters. In situ growth rate estimates using these primer-probes and better comprehension of physiology will enhance ecological understanding of Ostreococcus Clades OII and OI which appear to be oceanic and coastal clades, respectively. PMID:21289652

  9. Comparative genomics of two 'Candidatus Accumulibacter' clades performing biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Jason J; He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; Hugenholtz, Philip; McMahon, Katherine D

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are important in many wastewater treatment systems performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). The Accumulibacter lineage can be subdivided phylogenetically into multiple clades, and previous work showed that these clades are ecologically distinct. The complete genome of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis strain UW-1, a member of Clade IIA, was previously sequenced. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Candidatus Accumulibacter spp. strain UW-2, a member of Clade IA, assembled following shotgun metagenomic sequencing of laboratory-scale bioreactor sludge. We estimate the genome to be 80-90% complete. Although the two clades share 16S rRNA sequence identity of >98.0%, we observed a remarkable lack of synteny between the two genomes. We identified 2317 genes shared between the two genomes, with an average nucleotide identity (ANI) of 78.3%, and accounting for 49% of genes in the UW-1 genome. Unlike UW-1, the UW-2 genome seemed to lack genes for nitrogen fixation and carbon fixation. Despite these differences, metabolic genes essential for denitrification and EBPR, including carbon storage polymer and polyphosphate metabolism, were conserved in both genomes. The ANI from genes associated with EBPR was statistically higher than that from genes not associated with EBPR, indicating a high selective pressure in EBPR systems. Further, we identified genomic islands of foreign origins including a near-complete lysogenic phage in the Clade IA genome. Interestingly, Clade IA appeared to be more phage susceptible based on it containing only a single Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus as compared with the two found in Clade IIA. Overall, the comparative analysis provided a genetic basis to understand physiological differences and ecological niches of Accumulibacter populations, and highlights the importance of diversity in maintaining system functional resilience.

  10. Are Clade Specific HIV Vaccines a Necessity? An Analysis Based on Mathematical Models.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Dobromir; Kublin, James G; Ramsey, Scott; Corey, Lawrence

    2015-12-01

    As HIV-1 envelope immune responses are critical to vaccine related protection, most candidate HIV vaccines entering efficacy trials are based upon a clade specific design. This need for clade specific vaccine prototypes markedly reduces the implementation of potentially effective HIV vaccines. We utilized a mathematical model to determine the effectiveness of immediate roll-out of a non-clade matched vaccine with reduced efficacy compared to constructing clade specific vaccines, which would take considerable time to manufacture and test in safety and efficacy trials. We simulated the HIV epidemic in San Francisco (SF) and South Africa (SA) and projected effectiveness of three vaccination strategies: i) immediate intervention with a 20-40% vaccine efficacy (VE) non-matched vaccine, ii) delayed intervention by developing a 50% VE clade-specific vaccine, and iii) immediate intervention with a non-matched vaccine replaced by a clade-specific vaccine when developed. Immediate vaccination with a non-clade matched vaccine, even with reduced efficacy, would prevent thousands of new infections in SF and millions in SA over 30 years. Vaccination with 50% VE delayed for five years needs six and 12 years in SA to break-even with immediate 20 and 30% VE vaccination, respectively, while not able to surpass the impact of immediate 40% VE vaccination over 30 years. Replacing a 30% VE with a 50% VE vaccine after 5 years reduces the HIV acquisition by 5% compared to delayed vaccination. The immediate use of an HIV vaccine with reduced VE in high risk communities appears desirable over a short time line but higher VE should be the pursued to achieve strong long-term impact. Our analysis illustrates the importance of developing surrogate markers (correlates of protection) to allow bridging types of immunogenicity studies to support more rapid assessment of clade specific vaccines. PMID:26844286

  11. Stability evaluation of freeze-dried Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in oral capsules.

    PubMed

    Jalali, M; Abedi, D; Varshosaz, J; Najjarzadeh, M; Mirlohi, M; Tavakoli, N

    2012-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a common preservation technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Various studies have investigated the effect of different cryoprotectants on probiotics during freeze-drying. However, information on the effect of cryoprotectants on the stability of some Lactobacillus strains during freeze-drying seems scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to establish production methods for preparation of oral capsule probiotics containing Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus. It was also of interest to examine the effect of various formulations of cryoprotectant media containing skim milk, trehalose and sodium ascorbate on the survival rate of probiotic bacteria during freeze-drying at various storage temperatures. Without any cryoprotectant, few numbers of microorganisms survived. However, microorganisms tested maintained higher viability after freeze-drying in media containing at least one of the cryoprotectants. Use of skim milk in water resulted in an increased viability after lyophilization. Media with a combination of trehalose and skim milk maintained a higher percentage of live microorganisms, up to 82%. In general, bacteria retained a higher number of viable cells in capsules containing freeze-dried bacteria with sodium ascorbate after three months of storage. After this period, a marked decline was observed in all samples stored at 23°C compared to those stored at 4°C. The maximum survival rate (about 72-76%) was observed with media containing 6% skim milk, 8% trehalose and 4% sodium ascorbate.

  12. A proposal to unify two subspecies of Staphylococcus equorum: Staphylococcus equorum subsp. equorum and Staphylococcus equorum subsp. linens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Do-Won; Kim, Hye-Rim; Han, Seulhwa; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Twelve isolates from jeotgal, a Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, identified as Staphylococcus equorum were compared by phenotypic and genotypic methods to determine their precise taxonomic identities at the subspecies level. Four strains and three strains had complete 16S rRNA gene sequence matches with S. equorum subsp. equorum DSM 20674(T) and S. equorum subsp. linens DSM 15097(T), respectively. Five strains showed 99.9 % identity with the sequences of both type strains. In our DNA-DNA hybridization analyses among two type strains and two isolates, the similarities were over 72 % and were higher than the similarities presented at the subspecies proposal. Physiological characteristics such as sugar utilization, β-galactosidase activity, novobiocin resistance and salt tolerance, which were adopted for subspecies separation, could not be applied to assign the isolates to a taxonomic unit. Antibiotic susceptibility, hemolytic activity, biofilm formation and protein profiles did not present markers to divide the isolates into either of the subspecies. Multilocus sequence typing of the sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and five housekeeping genes did not produce any coherent relationship among the isolates and type strains. Repetitive element-PCR fingerprinting using ERIC (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus) primers classified 12 isolates to three genotypes, and the genotypes of both type strains coincided with two isolates expressing different characteristics. Based on these phenotypic and genotypic analyses results, we propose to unify the present two subspecies of S. equorum into one species, S. equorum.

  13. Sequential and Simultaneous Immunization of Rabbits with HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein SOSIP.664 Trimers from Clades A, B and C.

    PubMed

    Klasse, P J; LaBranche, Celia C; Ketas, Thomas J; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Pugach, Pavel; Ringe, Rajesh P; Golabek, Michael; van Gils, Marit J; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Wilson, Ian A; Butera, Salvatore T; Ward, Andrew B; Montefiori, David C; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the immunogenicity in rabbits of native-like, soluble, recombinant SOSIP.664 trimers based on the env genes of four isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); specifically BG505 (clade A), B41 (clade B), CZA97 (clade C) and DU422 (clade C). The various trimers were delivered either simultaneously (as a mixture of clade A + B trimers) or sequentially over a 73-week period. Autologous, Tier-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses were generated to the clade A and clade B trimers in the bivalent mixture. When delivered as boosting immunogens to rabbits immunized with the clade A and/or clade B trimers, the clade C trimers also generated autologous Tier-2 NAb responses, the CZA97 trimers doing so more strongly and consistently than the DU422 trimers. The clade C trimers also cross-boosted the pre-existing NAb responses to clade A and B trimers. We observed heterologous Tier-2 NAb responses albeit inconsistently, and with limited overall breath. However, cross-neutralization of the clade A BG505.T332N virus was consistently observed in rabbits immunized only with clade B trimers and then boosted with clade C trimers. The autologous NAbs induced by the BG505, B41 and CZA97 trimers predominantly recognized specific holes in the glycan shields of the cognate virus. The shared location of some of these holes may account for the observed cross-boosting effects and the heterologous neutralization of the BG505.T332N virus. These findings will guide the design of further experiments to determine whether and how multiple Env trimers can together induce more broadly neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:27627672

  14. Sequential and Simultaneous Immunization of Rabbits with HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein SOSIP.664 Trimers from Clades A, B and C

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P. J.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Pugach, Pavel; Ringe, Rajesh P.; Golabek, Michael; van Gils, Marit J.; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K.; Wilson, Ian A.; Butera, Salvatore T.; Ward, Andrew B.; Montefiori, David C.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the immunogenicity in rabbits of native-like, soluble, recombinant SOSIP.664 trimers based on the env genes of four isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); specifically BG505 (clade A), B41 (clade B), CZA97 (clade C) and DU422 (clade C). The various trimers were delivered either simultaneously (as a mixture of clade A + B trimers) or sequentially over a 73-week period. Autologous, Tier-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses were generated to the clade A and clade B trimers in the bivalent mixture. When delivered as boosting immunogens to rabbits immunized with the clade A and/or clade B trimers, the clade C trimers also generated autologous Tier-2 NAb responses, the CZA97 trimers doing so more strongly and consistently than the DU422 trimers. The clade C trimers also cross-boosted the pre-existing NAb responses to clade A and B trimers. We observed heterologous Tier-2 NAb responses albeit inconsistently, and with limited overall breath. However, cross-neutralization of the clade A BG505.T332N virus was consistently observed in rabbits immunized only with clade B trimers and then boosted with clade C trimers. The autologous NAbs induced by the BG505, B41 and CZA97 trimers predominantly recognized specific holes in the glycan shields of the cognate virus. The shared location of some of these holes may account for the observed cross-boosting effects and the heterologous neutralization of the BG505.T332N virus. These findings will guide the design of further experiments to determine whether and how multiple Env trimers can together induce more broadly neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:27627672

  15. Systematics within Gyps vultures: a clade at risk

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeff A; Lerner, Heather RL; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Mindell, David P

    2006-01-01

    Background Populations of the Oriental White-backed Vulture (Gyps bengalensis) have declined by over 95% within the past decade. This decline is largely due to incidental consumption of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory veterinary pharmaceutical diclofenac, commonly used to treat domestic livestock. The conservation status of other Gyps vultures in southern Asia is also of immediate concern, given the lack of knowledge regarding status of their populations and the continuing existence of taxonomic uncertainties. In this study, we assess phylogenetic relationships for all recognized species and the majority of subspecies within the genus Gyps. The continuing veterinary use of diclofenac is an unknown but potential risk to related species with similar feeding habits to Gyps bengalensis. Therefore, an accurate assessment of the phylogenetic relationships among Gyps vultures should aid in their conservation by clarifying taxonomic uncertainties, and enabling inference of their respective relatedness to susceptible G. bengalensis. Results Phylogenetic results using mitochondrial cytB, ND2 and control region sequence data indicate a recent and rapid diversification within the genus Gyps. All recognized species formed monophyletic groups with high statistical support, with the exception of the Eurasian Vulture, for which specimens identified as subspecies G. fulvus fulvescens appear closely related to the Himalayan Vulture (G. himalayensis). In all analyses, the earliest divergence separated the Oriental White-backed Vulture from other Gyps taxa, with the next diverging taxon being either the African White-backed Vulture (G. africanus), or the Himalayan Vulture. All analyses supported a sister relationship between the Eurasian Vulture (G. f. fulvus), and Rüppell's Vulture (G. rueppellii), with this clade being sister to another consisting of the two taxa of "Long-billed" Vulture (G. indicus indicus and G. i. tenuirostris), and the Cape Vulture (G. coprotheres). These

  16. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  17. Clade Replacements in Dengue Virus Serotypes 1 and 3 Are Associated with Changing Serotype Prevalence†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunlin; Mammen, Mammen P.; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Klungthong, Chonticha; Rodpradit, Prinyada; Monkongdee, Patama; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Holmes, Edward C.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of dengue virus (DENV) is characterized by phylogenetic trees that have a strong temporal structure punctuated by dramatic changes in clade frequency. To determine the cause of these large-scale phylogenetic patterns, we examined the evolutionary history of DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and DENV-3 in Thailand, where gene sequence and epidemiological data are relatively abundant over a 30-year period. We found evidence for the turnover of viral clades in both serotypes, most notably in DENV-1, where a major clade replacement event took place in genotype I during the mid-1990s. Further, when this clade replacement event was placed in the context of changes in serotype prevalence in Thailand, a striking pattern emerged; an increase in DENV-1 clade diversity was associated with an increase in the abundance of this serotype and a concomitant decrease in DENV-4 prevalence, while clade replacement was associated with a decline in DENV-1 prevalence and a rise of DENV-4. We postulate that intraserotypic genetic diversification proceeds at times of relative serotype abundance and that replacement events can result from differential susceptibility to cross-reactive immune responses. PMID:16306584

  18. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27142574

  19. Onshore-offshore trends in benthic faunal change: drive by clade origination

    SciTech Connect

    Bottjer, D.J.; Jablonski, D.

    1985-01-01

    Higher taxa in Phanerozoic benthic communities appear to arise preferentially in nearshore habitats and expand outwards across the continental shelf. This pattern is demonstrably independent of sea-level fluctuations, and could be driven by a variety of evolutionary processes, including: 1) differential origination of novelties nearshore; and 2) equal occurrence of innovations across the shelf, but with offshore novelties more extinction-prone than onshore novelties in the early phases of diversification. To test these mechanism, it is necessary to analyze the pattern on a clade-by-clade basis, rather than leaving the clades embedded within their communities. Review and synthesis of the literature indicates that a number of clades have their first species originating onshore with a subsequent history that shows either (A) migration offshore while losing onshore components or (B) expansion offshore while persisting onshore. In a detailed study of pattern A the authors have compiled presence/absence data for the crinoid order Isocrinida in 70 post-Paleozoic benthic communities, which shows migration across the shelf in the mid-Mesozoic. These studies show that different, contemporaneous clades proceeded across the shelf at different times and rates; no evidence is found for cohesive community migration. The supposed pattern of community migration may be an epiphenomenon, underlain by individualistic clade histories that appear to act in concert when viewed on a coarse time scale.

  20. Ecology of uncultured Prochlorococcus clades revealed through single-cell genomics and biogeographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malmstrom, Rex R; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Huang, Katherine H; Kelly, Libusha; Kern, Suzanne E; Thompson, Anne; Roggensack, Sara; Berube, Paul M; Henn, Matthew R; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2013-01-01

    Prochlorococcus is the numerically dominant photosynthetic organism throughout much of the world's oceans, yet little is known about the ecology and genetic diversity of populations inhabiting tropical waters. To help close this gap, we examined natural Prochlorococcus communities in the tropical Pacific Ocean using a single-cell whole-genome amplification and sequencing. Analysis of the gene content of just 10 single cells from these waters added 394 new genes to the Prochlorococcus pan-genome—that is, genes never before seen in a Prochlorococcus cell. Analysis of marker genes, including the ribosomal internal transcribed sequence, from dozens of individual cells revealed several representatives from two uncultivated clades of Prochlorococcus previously identified as HNLC1 and HNLC2. While the HNLC clades can dominate Prochlorococcus communities under certain conditions, their overall geographic distribution was highly restricted compared with other clades of Prochlorococcus. In the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, these clades were only found in warm waters with low Fe and high inorganic P levels. Genomic analysis suggests that at least one of these clades thrives in low Fe environments by scavenging organic-bound Fe, a process previously unknown in Prochlorococcus. Furthermore, the capacity to utilize organic-bound Fe appears to have been acquired horizontally and may be exchanged among other clades of Prochlorococcus. Finally, one of the single Prochlorococcus cells sequenced contained a partial genome of what appears to be a prophage integrated into the genome. PMID:22895163

  1. Taxonomic evaluation of species in the Streptomyces hirsutus clade using multi-locus sequence analysis and proposals to reclassify several species in this clade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous phylogenetic analyses of species of Streptomyces based on 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in a statistically well-supported clade (100% bootstrap value) containing 8 species that exhibited very similar gross morphology in producing open looped (Retinaculum-Apertum) to spiral (Spira) chains...

  2. Identification of an outer membrane protein of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum that binds with high affinity to bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Menon, Sailesh; Nagaraja, T G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2015-03-23

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is the primary etiologic agent of liver abscesses in cattle. There are two subspecies; subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme, which differ in morphological, biochemical, molecular characteristics, and virulence. The subsp. necrophorum, which is more virulent, occurs more frequently in liver abscesses than the subsp. funduliforme. Bacterial adhesion to the host cell surface is critical to the pathogenesis of several bacterial infections, and in F. necrophorum, outer membrane proteins (OMP) have been shown to mediate adhesion to bovine endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to identify potential adhesins that are involved in adhesion of F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum to the host cells. An OMP of 42.4 kDa, which binds with high affinity to the bovine endothelial cells and is recognized by the sera from cattle with liver abscesses, was identified. N-terminal sequencing of the protein showed 96% homology to the FomA protein of F. nucleatum. The PCR analysis showed that this fomA gene was present in several strains of subsp. necrophorum, subsp. funduliforme of bovine and subsp. funduliforme of human origin. The purified native and recombinantly expressed protein when preincubated with the endothelial cells, prevented the attachment of subsp. necrophorum significantly. In addition, the polyclonal antibody produced against the protein prevented the binding of subsp. necrophorum to bovine endothelial cells.

  3. The in vitro effect of six antimicrobials against Mycoplasma putrefaciens, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolated from sheep and goats in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, W; Nicholas, R A J; Janakat, S; Abu-Basha, E; Ayling, R D

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory disease in sheep and goats is a major problem in Jordan and is often associated with Mycoplasma species. Without effective vaccines, control is mainly by chemotherapy, but the uncontrolled use of antimicrobials has led to concerns about the potential development of antimicrobial resistance. The in vitro effect of chloramphenicol, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, tylosin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline was determined against 32 isolates of Mycoplasma species-M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC (6), M. capricolum subsp. capricolum (8) and M. putrefaciens (18), all isolated from either nasal swabs or milk, from sheep and goats in different regions of Jordan. The antimicrobial susceptibility showed some Mycoplasma species-specific differences, with M. capricolum subsp. capricolum being more susceptible to tylosin and erythromycin. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were the least effective for all three Mycoplasma species. No trends or significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibilities were observed between sheep and goat isolates, between milk or nasal swab isolates, or between isolates from different regions of Jordan. Some isolates of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum and M. putrefaciens showed higher MIC levels with oxytetracycline, as did two isolates of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC with tylosin, possibly indicating signs of development of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17405622

  4. Development and characterization of recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSLs) using Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum as a source of donor alleles in a Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare background.

    PubMed

    Matus, I; Corey, A; Filichkin, T; Hayes, P M; Vales, M I; Kling, J; Riera-Lizarazu, O; Sato, K; Powell, W; Waugh, R

    2003-12-01

    The ancestor of barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum) may be a source of novel alleles for crop improvement. We developed a set of recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSLs) using an accession of H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum (Caesarea 26-24, from Israel) as the donor and Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare 'Harrington' (the North American malting quality standard) as the recurrent parent via two backcrosses to the recurrent parent, followed by six generations of selfing. Here we report (i) the genomic architecture of the RCSLs, as inferred by simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and (ii) the effects of H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum genome segment introgressions in terms of three classes of phenotypes: inflorescence yield components, malting quality traits, and domestication traits. Significant differences among the RCSLs were detected for all phenotypes measured. The phenotypic effects of the introgressions were assessed using association analysis, and these were referenced to quantitative trait loci (QTL) reported in the literature. Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum, despite its overall inferior phenotype, contributed some favorable alleles for agronomic and malting quality traits. In most cases, the introgression of the ancestral genome resulted in a loss of desirable phenotypes in the cultivated parent. Although disappointing from a plant breeding perspective, this finding may prove to be a useful tool for gene discovery.

  5. Szidat's rule re-tested: relationships between flea and host phylogenetic clade ranks in four biogeographic realms.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Boris R; Kiefer, Daniel; Warburton, Elizabeth M; Khokhlova, Irina S

    2016-05-01

    We tested Szidat's rule (the more primitive the host, the more primitive the parasites it harbours) by analysing the relationships between phylogenetic clade ranks of fleas and their small mammalian hosts in four biogeographic realms (Afrotropics, Neotropics, Nearctic and Palearctic). From the host perspective, we tested the association between host clade rank and the mean clade rank of all fleas collected from this host. From the flea perspective, we tested the relationships between flea clade rank and the mean clade rank of hosts on which this flea was recorded. First, we tested whether the analysis of the relationships between host and flea clade ranks should be controlled for phylogenetic dependence among either host or flea species. Then, we tested for the associations between host and flea clade ranks separately for each realm using either a phylogenetic general least-squares analysis or an ordinary least-squares analysis. In all realms, the mean clade rank of fleas parasitic on a given host increased with an increase of this host's clade rank, and the mean clade rank of hosts recorded on a given flea increased with an increase of this flea's clade rank, suggesting that Szidat's rule, at least to some extent, holds for fleas.

  6. Francisella tularensis Schu S4 O-antigen and capsule biosynthesis gene mutants induce early cell death in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Stephen R; Peng, Kaitian; Long, Matthew E; Hunt, Jason R; Apicella, Michael A; Monack, Denise M; Allen, Lee-Ann H; Jones, Bradley D

    2011-02-01

    Francisella tularensis is capable of rampant intracellular growth and causes a potentially fatal disease in humans. Whereas many mutational studies have been performed with avirulent strains of Francisella, relatively little has been done with strains that cause human disease. We generated a near-saturating transposon library in the virulent strain Schu S4, which was subjected to high-throughput screening by transposon site hybridization through primary human macrophages, negatively selecting 202 genes. Of special note were genes in a locus of the Francisella chromosome, FTT1236, FTT1237, and FTT1238. Mutants with mutations in these genes demonstrated significant sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis compared with wild-type Schu S4 and exhibited marked defects in O-antigen and capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. In the absence of complement, these mutants were phagocytosed more efficiently by macrophages than wild-type Schu S4 and were capable of phagosomal escape but exhibited reduced intracellular growth. Microscopic and quantitative analyses of macrophages infected with mutant bacteria revealed that these macrophages exhibited signs of cell death much earlier than those infected with Schu S4. These data suggest that FTT1236, FTT1237, and FTT1238 are important for polysaccharide biosynthesis and that the Francisella O antigen, capsule, or both are important for avoiding the early induction of macrophage death and the destruction of the replicative niche.

  7. Non FcεR-bearing Mast Cells Secrete Sufficient Interleukin-4 to Control Francisella tularensis Replication within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Thathiah, Prea; Sanapala, Shilpa; Rodriguez, Annette R.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Chambers, James P.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have classically been implicated in the triggering of allergic and anaphylactic reactions. However, recent findings have elucidated the ability of these cells to selectively release a variety of cytokines leading to bacterial clearance through neutrophil and dendritic cell mobilization, and suggest an important role in innate host defenses. Our laboratory has established a primary bone marrow derived mast cell-macrophage co-culture system and found that mast cells mediated a significant inhibition of Francisella tularensis LVS uptake and replication within macrophages through contact and the secreted product interleukin-4 (IL-4). In this study, we utilized P815 mast cells and J774 macrophages to further investigate whether mast cell activation by non-FcεR driven signals could produce IL-4 and control intramacrophage LVS replication. P815 supernatants collected upon activation by the mast cell activating peptide MP7, as well as P815 cells co-cultured with J774 macrophages, exhibited marked inhibition of bacterial uptake and replication, which correlated with the production of IL-4. The inhibition noted in vitro was titratable and preserved at ratios relevant to cellular infiltration events following pulmonary challenge. Collectively, our data suggest that both primary mast cell and P815 mast cell (lacking FcεR) secreted IL-4 can control intramacrophage Francisella replication. PMID:21565523

  8. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  9. Metabolism-Directed Structure Optimization of Benzimidazole-Based Francisella tularensis Enoyl-Reductase (FabI) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Yan; Liu, Yong; Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Jin-Hua; Boci, Teuta; Johnson, Michael E.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-01-01

    FabI is a potential antibiotic target against Francisella tularensis, which has been classified as a Category A biowarfare agent of high risk to public health. Our previous work demonstrated that N-benzyl benzimidazole compounds possess promising FabI inhibitory activity, but their druggability properties including metabolic stability are unknown. The objective of this study was to characterize structure-metabolism relationships of a series of N-benzyl benzimidazole compounds to guide chemical optimization for better metabolic stability. To this end, metabolic stability data were obtained for 22 initial lead compounds using mouse hepatic microsomes. Metabolic hotspots on the benzimidazole core structure as well as the benzyl ring were identified and verified by metabolite identification studies of 4 model compounds. Interestingly, the proposed structure-metabolism relationships did not apply to 9 newly synthesized cyclopentane or oxacyclopentane derivatives of N-benzyl benzimidazole. Subsequently, in silico quantitative structure-property relationship models were developed. Four molecular descriptors representing molecular polarity/polarisability, symmetry and size were identified to best explain variability in metabolic stability of different compounds. Multi-linear and nonlinear regression models based on the selected molecular descriptors were developed and validated. The structure-metabolism relationships for N-benzyl benzimidazole compounds should help optimization of N-benzyl benzimidazole compounds for better pharmacokinetic behavior. PMID:24171690

  10. Visualization of murine intranasal dosing efficiency using luminescent Francisella tularensis: effect of instillation volume and form of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark A; Stabenow, Jennifer M; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Wodowski, Andrew J; Fabrizio, Thomas P; Bina, Xiaowen R; Zalduondo, Lillian; Bina, James E

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal instillation is a widely used procedure for pneumonic delivery of drugs, vaccine candidates, or infectious agents into the respiratory tract of research mice. However, there is a paucity of published literature describing the efficiency of this delivery technique. In this report we have used the murine model of tularemia, with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (FTLVS) infection, to evaluate the efficiency of pneumonic delivery via intranasal dosing performed either with differing instillation volumes or different types of anesthesia. FTLVS was rendered luminescent via transformation with a reporter plasmid that constitutively expressed the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon from a Francisella promoter. We then used an IVIS Spectrum whole animal imaging system to visualize FT dissemination at various time points following intranasal instillation. We found that instillation of FT in a dose volume of 10 µl routinely resulted in infection of the upper airways but failed to initiate infection of the pulmonary compartment. Efficient delivery of FT into the lungs via intranasal instillation required a dose volume of 50 µl or more. These studies also demonstrated that intranasal instillation was significantly more efficient for pneumonic delivery of FTLVS in mice that had been anesthetized with inhaled (isoflurane) vs. parenteral (ketamine/xylazine) anesthesia. The collective results underscore the need for researchers to consider both the dose volume and the anesthesia type when either performing pneumonic delivery via intranasal instillation, or when comparing studies that employed this technique. PMID:22384012

  11. From microfluidic modules to an integrated Lab-on-a-chip system for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Krumbholz, Marco; Prüfer, Anna; Moche, Christian; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) systems translating the whole process of pathogen analysis to an integrated, miniaturized, and automatically functioning microfluidic platform are generally expected to be very promising future diagnostic approaches. The development of such a LoC system for the detection of bacterial pathogens applied to the example pathogen Francisella tularensis is described in this report. To allow functional testing of the whole process cascade before final device integration, various bio-analytical steps such as cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, continuous-flow PCR and analyte detection have been adapted to unique functional microfluidic modules. As a successive step, positively tested modules for pathogen detection have been successfully assembled to an integrated chip. Moreover, technical solutions for a smooth interaction between sample input from the outer world as well as microfluidic chip and chip driving instrument have been developed. In conclusion, a full repertoire of analytical tools have been developed and successfully tested in the concerted manner of a functionally integrated microfluidic device representing a tool for future diagnostic approaches.

  12. Evaluation of the FilmArray® system for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Seiner, DR; Colburn, HA; Baird, C; Bartholomew, RA; Straub, T; Victry, K; Hutchison, JR; Valentine, N; Bruckner-Lea, CJ

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the BioFire Diagnostics FilmArray® system in combination with their Biothreat Panel for the detection of Bacillus anthracis (Ba), Francisella tularensis (Ft) and Yersinia pestis (Yp) DNA, and demonstrate the detection of Ba spores. Methods and Results DNA samples from Ba, Ft and Yp strains and near-neighbours, and live Ba spores were analysed using the FilmArray® Biothreat Panel, a multiplexed PCR-based assay for 17 pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity studies with DNA indicate that the limit of detection is 250 genome equivalents (GEs) per sample or lower. Furthermore, the identification of Ft, Yp or Bacillus species was made in 63 of 72 samples tested at 25 GE or less. With samples containing 25 CFU of Ba Sterne spores, at least one of the two possible Ba markers was identified in all samples tested. We observed no cross-reactivity with near-neighbour DNAs. Conclusions Our results indicate that the FilmArray® Biothreat Panel is a sensitive and selective assay for detecting the genetic signatures of Ba, Ft and Yp. Significance and Impact of the Study The FilmArray® platform is a complete sample-to-answer system, combining sample preparation, PCR and data analysis. This system is particularly suited for biothreat testing where samples need to be analysed for multiple biothreats by operators with limited training. PMID:23279070

  13. Inactivation of Francisella tularensis Gene Encoding Putative ABC Transporter Has a Pleiotropic Effect upon Production of Various Glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Dankova, Vera; Balonova, Lucie; Link, Marek; Straskova, Adela; Sheshko, Valeria; Stulik, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen causing the disease tularemia, utilizes surface glycoconjugates such as lipopolysaccharide, capsule, and capsule-like complex for its protection against inhospitable conditions of the environment. Francisella species also possess a functional glycosylation apparatus by which specific proteins are O-glycosidically modified. We here created a mutant with a nonfunctional FTS_1402 gene encoding for a putative glycan flippase and studied the consequences of its disruption. The mutant strain expressed diminished glycosylation similarly to, but to a lesser extent than, that of the oligosaccharyltransferase-deficient ΔpglA mutant. In contrast to ΔpglA, inactivation of FTS_1402 had a pleiotropic effect, leading to alteration in glycosylation and, importantly, to decrease in lipopolysaccharide, capsule, and/or capsule-like complex production, which were reflected by distinct phenotypes in host-pathogen associated properties and virulence potential of the two mutant strains. Disruption of FTS_1402 resulted in enhanced sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis and reduced virulence in mice that was independent of diminished glycosylation. Importantly, the mutant strain induced a protective immune response against systemic challenge with homologous wild-type FSC200 strain. Targeted disruption of genes shared by multiple metabolic pathways may be considered a novel strategy for constructing effective live, attenuated vaccines. PMID:26815358

  14. Neutralization of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha blocks in vivo synthesis of nitrogen oxides from L-arginine and protection against Francisella tularensis infection in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-treated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Green, S J; Nacy, C A; Schreiber, R D; Granger, D L; Crawford, R M; Meltzer, M S; Fortier, A H

    1993-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from Mycobacterium bovis BCG-infected C3H/HeN mice produced nitrite (NO2-, an oxidative end product of nitric oxide [NO] synthesis) and inhibited the growth of Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium. Both NO2- production and inhibition of bacterial growth were suppressed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a substrate inhibitor of nitrogen oxidation of L-arginine, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal injection of mice with BCG increased urinary nitrate (NO3-) excretion coincident with development of activated macrophages capable of secreting nitrogen oxides and inhibiting F. tularensis growth in vitro. Eight days after BCG inoculation, mice survived a normally lethal intraperitoneal challenge with F. tularensis. Treatment of these BCG-infected mice with MAbs to IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha at the time of BCG inoculation reduced urinary NO3- levels to those found in normal uninfected mice for up to 14 days. The same anticytokine antibody treatment abolished BCG-mediated protection against F. tularensis: mice died within 4 to 6 days. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-IFN-gamma or anti-TNF-alpha antibody 8 days after BCG infection also reduced urinary NO3- and abolished protection against F. tularensis. Isotype control (immunoglobulin G) or anti-interleukin 4 MAbs had little effect on these parameters at any time of treatment. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were clearly involved in the regulation of macrophage activation by BCG in vivo. Protection against F. tularensis challenge by BCG depended upon the physiological generation of reactive nitrogen oxides induced by these cytokines. PMID:8423095

  15. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii produces an endoglucanase that is required for full virulence in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Burbank, Lindsey; Roper, M Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a xylem-dwelling bacterium, is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt and blight of sweet corn. The goal of this study was to characterize the only gene in the P. stewartii subsp. stewartii genome predicted to encode an endoglucanase (EGase); this gene was designated engY. Culture supernatants from P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and Escherichia coli expressing recombinant EngY protein possessed both EGase and xylanase activities. Deletion of engY abolished EGase and xylanase activity, demonstrating that EngY appears to be the major EGase or xylanase produced by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Most importantly, our results show that EngY contributes to movement in the xylem and disease severity during the wilting phase of Stewart's wilt but is not required for water-soaked lesion formation. PMID:22122328

  16. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum type strain 03-427T

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum has been isolated from reptiles and humans. This Campylobacter subspecies is genetically distinct from other C. fetus subspecies. Here we present the first whole genome sequence for this C. fetus subspecies....

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Bardo Strain CRJJGF_00099 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sushim K; McMillan, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Charlene R; Desai, Prerak T; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hiott, Lari M; Humayoun, Shaheen B; Frye, Jonathan G

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a 4.87-Mbp draft genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Bardo strain CRJJGF_00099, isolated from dairy cattle in 2005. PMID:27634995

  18. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  19. Comparative genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis reveals a strict monophyletic bifidobacterial taxon.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Bardo Strain CRJJGF_00099 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushim K.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Charlene R.; Desai, Prerak T.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hiott, Lari M.; Humayoun, Shaheen B.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a 4.87-Mbp draft genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Bardo strain CRJJGF_00099, isolated from dairy cattle in 2005. PMID:27634995

  1. Reassessment of Melittis melissophyllum L. subsp. melissophyllum iridoidic fraction.

    PubMed

    Venditti, A; Frezza, C; Guarcini, L; Maggi, F; Bianco, A; Serafini, M

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the polar fraction of Melittis melissophyllum L. subsp. melissophyllum led to the identification of several iridoid glycosides: monomelittoside (1), melittoside (2), harpagide (3), acetyl-harpagide (4) and ajugoside (5). Compounds 3 and 4 are considered marker compounds for the genus and, as well as compounds 1, 2 and 5, were already evidenced in a previous study on the nominal species. It was noteworthy of the presence of allobetonicoside (6) which was never reported for this genus. The isolation of 6 is very relevant because of its allose residue on the structure. Allose has been often found in the species of the subfamily Lamioideae even if it mostly regarded flavonoids considered of chemotaxonomical relevance for some correlated genera of Lamiaceae. Same as allosyl-glycosidic flavonoids, the presence of allosyl-glycosidic iridoids may also be an additional chemosystematic evidence of botanical relationships among Lamiaceae species and genera.

  2. Efficient production of nonactin by Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yulian; Zheng, Shaolun

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the production of the cyclic macrotetrolide nonactin from the fermentation culture of Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus. Nonactin is a member of a family of naturally occurring cyclic ionophores known as the macrotetrolide antibiotics. Our fermentation procedure of Streptomyces griseus was performed at 30 °C and 200 rev·min(-1) for 5 days on a rotary shaker. Diaion HP-20 and Amberlite XAD-16 were added to the fermentation medium. Isolated yield of nonactin was up to 80 mg·L(-1) using our methodology. Nonactin is commonly known as an ammonium ionophore and also exhibits antibacterial, antiviral, and antitumor activities. It is also widely used for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes and sensors. Chemical synthesis of nonactin has been achieved by some groups; however, overall yields are very low, making efficient biosynthesis an attractive means of production. PMID:27405846

  3. Observations on Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides infection in Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Bar-Moshe, B; Rapapport, E

    1981-07-01

    An epizootic in white Saanen goats, caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is described. Twenty-five flocks totalling approximately 4,500 animals were involved. The disease was characterized by a high, transient temperature, general malaise and mastitis in the lactating does, and a keratoconjunctivitis, arthritis, mycoplasmaemia and death among the kids. In one goat flock there was a precipitous change in the character of the disease, from a predominantly mastitis syndrome to a fulminating pleuropneumonia. In another goat flock, twin kids were born with an advanced purulent, proliferative arthritis, suggesting early congenital infection. In yet another infected flock there were cases of subcutaneous abscesses from which both M. mycoides and Corynebacterium pyogenes were cultured. M. mycoides was also isolated from synovial fluid and the parenchymal organs of an Ibex mountain goat that died of a purulent polyarthritis. Experimental infection in kids caused a diffuse cellulitis at the site of inoculation, a high fever, polyarthritis and death.

  4. Volatile Components Emitted from the Liverwort Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazutoshi; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Kawakami, Yukihiko; Ochiai, Nozomi; Yabe, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The volatile components from the thalloid liverwort, Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera were investigated by HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. The monocyclic monoterpene aldehyde, perillaldehyde was identified for the first time as the major component and its content was about 50% of the volatiles, along with β-pinene, limonene, β-caryophyllene, α-selinene and β-selinene as minor volatiles. Using MD (Multi-dimensional) GC-MS analysis equipped with a chiral column as the second column, the chirality was determined of both perillaldehyde and limonene, which was considered as the precursor of perillaldehyde. Both compounds were (S)-(-)-enantiomers (over 99.0 %) and (R)-enantiomers (less than 0.5 %). This is the first report of the existence of perillaldehyde in liverworts. PMID:27032216

  5. Neisseria elongata subsp elongata infective endocarditis following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Joanne May; Fife, Amanda; Baghai, Max; Dworakowski, Rafal

    2015-12-11

    A 31-year-old Argentinian woman presented with a 3-week history of fever, night sweats, myalgia and lethargy following a work trip to Uganda where she ran a marathon. Malarial screens were negative but C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil count were raised and she was anaemic. A new pansystolic murmur was heard over the mitral valve and the transthoracic echocardiogram showed a large vegetation (>1 cm) with at least moderate mitral regurgitation. Blood cultures grew Neisseria elongata, subsp elongata treated initially with ceftriaxone then oral ciprofloxacin to complete 4 weeks of treatment. CT scan revealed a wedge-shaped area of low attenuation in the spleen in keeping with a splenic infarct. Seven days postadmission, the patient underwent a successful mitral valve repair. Recovery was complicated by a likely embolic infarct in the right frontal lobe, but the patient was discharged 12 days postoperative with no neurological sequelae.

  6. Global detection and identification of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, M A P; Linnane, S; van Putten, J P M; Wagenaar, J A

    2005-12-01

    Bovine genital campylobacteriosis caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis (Cfv) is a genital infection that threatens the cattle industry. Detection and identification of Cfv are key factors in control programmes. Trade regulations should be based on scientifically and internationally accepted methods of detection and identification of Cfv. Such methods are described in the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals. A study was conducted to determine which methods are in use in OIE Member Countries and to get an overview of new or improved tests. A questionnaire was sent to OIE Member Countries, and 26 out of 166 were returned. Globally, a diversity of methods for the detection and identification of Cfv are in use. The authors conclude that there is a lack of harmonisation that may have consequences for the description of the health status of countries and may lead to disputes with respect to trade regulations.

  7. Volatile Components Emitted from the Liverwort Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazutoshi; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Kawakami, Yukihiko; Ochiai, Nozomi; Yabe, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The volatile components from the thalloid liverwort, Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera were investigated by HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. The monocyclic monoterpene aldehyde, perillaldehyde was identified for the first time as the major component and its content was about 50% of the volatiles, along with β-pinene, limonene, β-caryophyllene, α-selinene and β-selinene as minor volatiles. Using MD (Multi-dimensional) GC-MS analysis equipped with a chiral column as the second column, the chirality was determined of both perillaldehyde and limonene, which was considered as the precursor of perillaldehyde. Both compounds were (S)-(-)-enantiomers (over 99.0 %) and (R)-enantiomers (less than 0.5 %). This is the first report of the existence of perillaldehyde in liverworts.

  8. Cell membrane interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cytolytic toxins.

    PubMed

    Gill, S S; Singh, G J; Hornung, J M

    1987-05-01

    Two toxic polypeptides of 24 and 25 kilodaltons (kDa) were purified from parasporal proteinaceous crystals of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. Both of these polypeptides, which are antigenically similar and have identical N terminals, lysed human erythrocytes and cultured mosquito cells. Although the 24-kDa peptide was more toxic than the 25-kDa peptide, both were less toxic than the crude alkali-solubilized crystal toxin. However, a 1:1 mixture of these 24- and 25-kDa proteins was more toxic than either of these polypeptides individually, indicating a possible interaction between these proteins at the cell membrane. Both the 24- and the 25-kDa proteins were inactivated by aqueous suspensions of dioleolylphosphatidylcholine, indicating the involvement of phospholipids in the cytotoxic action of these toxins. Thus the role of cell membrane phospholipids in mediating the toxin action was studied by using phospholipases as probes. Treatment of erythrocytes with high levels of phospholipase D increased their susceptibility to the toxin; however, phospholipase A2-treated erythrocytes were less susceptible to the toxin. These erythrocytes also bound less 125I-labeled 25-kDa toxin. These results support the role of fatty acyl residues at the syn-2 position of membrane phospholipids in toxin action. The cytolytic toxin of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is thought to damage cell membranes in a detergentlike manner. However, there was a difference between the cytolytic action of this toxin and that of a nonionic detergent such as Triton X-100 because phospholipase A2-treated erythrocytes were more susceptible to Triton X-100, whereas such erythrocytes were less sensitive to the toxin. Thus, the cytolytic toxin apparently did not act as a nonspecific detergent, but rather interacted with phospholipid receptors on the cell membrane. Such an interaction of the toxin with phospholipid receptors probably results in the increased cell permeability, thereby causing

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli Strain gdw1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihua; Wang, Li; Cao, Gan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli strain gdw1, isolated from the stem of Badila sugarcane located at the Guangdong Key Laboratory for Crops Genetic Improvement (Guanzhou, China), that causes ratoon stunting disease of sugarcane. The de novo genome of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli was assembled with 48 scaffolds and a G+C content of 67.68%, and contained 2.6 Mb bp and 2,838 coding sequences. PMID:27795270

  10. Seed-associated subspecies of the genus Clavibacter are clearly distinguishable from Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Alvarez, Anne M

    2015-03-01

    The genus Clavibacter contains one recognized species, Clavibacter michiganensis. Clavibacter michiganensis is subdivided into subspecies based on host specificity and bacteriological characteristics, with Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis causing bacterial canker of tomato. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is often spread through contaminated seed leading to outbreaks of bacterial canker in tomato production areas worldwide. The frequent occurrence of non-pathogenic Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-like bacteria (CMB) is a concern for seed producers because Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a quarantine organism and detection of a non-pathogenic variant may result in destruction of an otherwise healthy seed lot. A thorough biological and genetic characterization of these seed-associated CMB strains was performed using standard biochemical tests, cell wall analyses, metabolic profiling using Biolog, and single-gene and multilocus sequence analyses. Combined, these tests revealed two distinct populations of seed-associated members of the genus Clavibacter that differed from each other, as well as from all other described subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis. DNA-DNA hybridization values are 70 % or higher, justifying placement into the single recognized species, C. michiganensis, but other analyses justify separate subspecies designations. Additionally, strains belonging to the genus Clavibacter isolated from pepper also represent a distinct population and warrant separate subspecies designation. On the basis of these data we propose subspecies designations for separate non-pathogenic subpopulations of Clavibacter michiganensis: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. californiensis subsp. nov. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. chilensis subsp. nov. for seed-associated strains represented by C55(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2691(T) = CFBP 8216(T)) and ZUM3936(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2690(T) = CFBP 8217(T

  11. Generation and Evaluation of Clade C Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Wen; Tartaglia, Lawrence J.; Whitney, James B.; Lim, So-Yon; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Lavine, Christy L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Williamson, Carolyn; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Kublin, James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a panel of mucosally transmissible simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge stocks from multiple virus clades would facilitate preclinical evaluation of candidate HIV-1 vaccines and therapeutics. The majority of SHIV stocks that have been generated to date have been derived from clade B HIV-1 env sequences from viruses isolated during chronic infection and typically required serial animal-to-animal adaptation for establishing mucosal transmissibility and pathogenicity. To capture essential features of mucosal transmission of clade C viruses, we produced a series of SHIVs with early clade C HIV-1 env sequences from acutely HIV-1-infected individuals from South Africa. SHIV-327c and SHIV-327cRM expressed env sequences that were 99.7 to 100% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging for mucosal infectivity. These challenge stocks infected rhesus monkeys efficiently by both intrarectal and intravaginal routes, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic setpoint viremia in 13 of 17 (76%) infected animals. The SHIV-327cRM challenge stock was also titrated for both single, high-dose intrarectal challenges and repetitive, low-dose intrarectal challenges in rhesus monkeys. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines and other interventions aimed at preventing clade C HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE We describe the development of two related clade C SHIV challenge stocks. These challenge stocks should prove useful for preclinical testing of vaccines and other interventions aimed at preventing clade C HIV-1 infection. PMID:25473043

  12. Expression library immunization confers protection against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J F; Stabel, J R; Paustian, M L; Reinhardt, T A; Bannantine, J P

    2005-10-01

    Currently, paratuberculosis vaccines are comprised of crude whole-cell preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although effective in reducing clinical disease and fecal shedding, these vaccines have severe disadvantages as well, including seroconversion of vaccinated animals and granulomatous lesions at the site of vaccination. DNA vaccines can offer an alternative approach that may be safer and elicit more protective responses. In an effort to identify protective M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sequences, a genomic DNA expression library was generated and subdivided into pools of clones (approximately 1,500 clones/pool). The clone pools were evaluated to determine DNA vaccine efficacy by immunizing mice via gene gun delivery and challenging them with live, virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Four clone pools resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from mouse tissues compared to mice immunized with other clone pools and nonvaccinated, infected control mice. One of the protective clone pools was further partitioned into 10 clone arrays of 108 clones each, and four clone arrays provided significant protection from both spleen and mesenteric lymph node colonization by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence of each clone present in the protective pools was determined, and coding region functions were predicted by computer analysis. Comparison of the protective clone array sequences implicated 26 antigens that may be responsible for protection in mice. This study is the first study to demonstrate protection against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with expression library immunization. PMID:16177367

  13. Pork meat as a potential source of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulou, Grammato; Kritas, Spyridon; Govaris, Alexander; Burriel, Angeliki R

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae was isolated from 13 of 123 slaughtered pigs in central Greece. The samples cultured were feces, ileum tissue, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gallbladder swabs. A total of 74 isolates from 492 samples were identified as Salmonella spp. by use of standard laboratory culture media and two commercial micromethods and by use of a polyvalent slide agglutination test for the detection of O and H antigens. Among them were 19 (25.68%) suspected to be S. enterica subsp. arizonae according to analysis with standard laboratory culture media. Of those, 14 were identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae by the API 20E (bioMérieux, France) and the Microgen GnA+B-ID (Microgen Bioproducts, Ltd., United Kingdom) identification systems. All the isolates were tested for resistance to 23 antimicrobials. Strains identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae were resistant to 17 (70.8%) antibiotics. The highest proportions of resistance were observed for sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (71.4%), tetracycline (71.4%), ampicillin (64.3%), and amoxicillin (57.1%). Two isolates were resistant to aztreonam (7.1%) and tigecycline (7.1%), used only for the treatment of humans. Thus, pork meat may play a role in the transmission of antibiotic-resistant S. enterica subsp. arizonae to human consumers. This is the first report of S. enterica subsp. arizonae isolation from pigs.

  14. Detection of Goss's Wilt Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis in Maize by Loop-Mediated Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; de Silva, Asoka; Heuchelin, Scott A; Chaky, Jennifer L; Alvarez, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The Goss's wilt pathogen, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, can cause considerable losses in maize (Zea mays) production. Diagnosis of Goss's wilt currently is based on symptomology and identification of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, following isolation on a semiselective medium and/or serological testing. In an effort to provide a more efficient identification method, a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) assay was developed to detect the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP)-type C4-dicarboxylate transport system large permease component and tested using strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, all other C. michiganensis subspecies and several genera of nontarget bacteria. Only strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis reacted positively with the LAMP assay. The LAMP assay was then used to identify bacterial isolates from diseased maize. 16S rDNA and dnaA sequence analyses were used to confirm the identity of the maize isolates and validate assay specificity. The Cmm ImmunoStrip assay was included as a presumptive identification test of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis at the species level. The Cmn-LAMP assay was further tested using symptomatic leaf tissue. The Cmn-LAMP assay was run in a hand-held real-time monitoring device (SMART-DART) and performed equally to in-lab quantitative polymerase chain reaction equipment. The Cmn-LAMP assay accurately identified C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and has potential as a field test. The targeted sequence also has potential application in other molecular detection platforms. PMID:26595113

  15. Decreased Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to Mosquito Larvae after Contact with Leaf Litter

    PubMed Central

    Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments. PMID:22610426

  16. Characterization of Pneumonia Due to Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in Dogs▿

    PubMed Central

    Priestnall, Simon L.; Erles, Kerstin; Brooks, Harriet W.; Cardwell, Jacqueline M.; Waller, Andrew S.; Paillot, Romain; Robinson, Carl; Darby, Alistair C.; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Schöniger, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus has been linked to cases of acute fatal pneumonia in dogs in several countries. Outbreaks can occur in kenneled dog populations and result in significant levels of morbidity and mortality. This highly contagious disease is characterized by the sudden onset of clinical signs, including pyrexia, dyspnea, and hemorrhagic nasal discharge. The pathogenesis of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus infection in dogs is poorly understood. This study systematically characterized the histopathological changes in the lungs of 39 dogs from a large rehoming shelter in London, United Kingdom; the dogs were infected with S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. An objective scoring system demonstrated that S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus caused pneumonia in 26/39 (66.7%) dogs, and most of these dogs (17/26 [65.4%]) were classified as severe fibrino-suppurative, necrotizing, and hemorrhagic. Three recently described superantigen genes (szeF, szeN, and szeP) were detected by PCR in 17/47 (36.2%) of the S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates; however, there was no association between the presence of these genes and the histopathological score. The lungs of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus-infected dogs with severe respiratory signs and lung pathology did however have significantly higher mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 8 (IL-8) than in uninfected controls, suggesting a role for an exuberant host immune response in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:20861329

  17. Tomato Fruit and Seed Colonization by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis through External and Internal Routes

    PubMed Central

    Tancos, Matthew A.; Chalupowicz, Laura; Barash, Isaac; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, causal agent of bacterial wilt and canker of tomato, is an economically devastating pathogen that inflicts considerable damage throughout all major tomato-producing regions. Annual outbreaks continue to occur in New York, where C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis spreads via infected transplants, trellising stakes, tools, and/or soil. Globally, new outbreaks can be accompanied by the introduction of contaminated seed stock; however, the route of seed infection, especially the role of fruit lesions, remains undefined. In order to investigate the modes of seed infection, New York C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis field strains were stably transformed with a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). A constitutively eGFP-expressing virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate, GCMM-22, was used to demonstrate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis could not only access seeds systemically through the xylem but also externally through tomato fruit lesions, which harbored high intra- and intercellular populations. Active movement and expansion of bacteria into the fruit mesocarp and nearby xylem vessels followed, once the fruits began to ripen. These results highlight the ability of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to invade tomato fruits and seeds through multiple entry routes. PMID:24014525

  18. Intraspecific diversity and distribution of the cosmopolitan species Pseudo-nitzschia pungens (Bacillariophyceae): morphology, genetics, and ecophysiology of the three clades.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Bum Soo; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Wang, Pengbin; Han, Myung-Soo

    2015-02-01

    Three clades of Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, determined by the internal transcribed space (ITS) region, are distributed throughout the world. We studied 15 P. pungens clones from various geographical locations and confirmed the existence of the three clades within P. pungens, based on ITS sequencing and described the three subgroups (IIIaa, IIIab, and IIIb) of clade III. Clade III (clade IIIaa) populations were reported for the first time in Korean coastal waters and the East China Sea. In morphometric analysis, we found the ultrastructural differences in the number of fibulae, striae, and poroids that separate the three clades. We carried out physiological tests on nine clones belonging to the three clades growing under various culture conditions. In temperature tests, only clade III clones could not grow at lower temperatures (10°C and 15°C), although clade I and II clones grew well. The estimated optimal growth range of clade I clones was wider than that of clades II and III. Clade II clones were considered to be adapted to lower temperatures and clade III to higher temperatures. In salinity tests, clade II and III clones did not grow well at a salinity of 40. Clade I clones were regarded as euryhaline and clade II and III clones were stenohaline. This supports the hypothesis that P. pungens clades have different ecophysiological characteristics based on their habitats. Our data show that physiological and morphological features are correlated with genetic intraspecific differentiation in P. pungens. PMID:26986266

  19. Intraspecific diversity and distribution of the cosmopolitan species Pseudo-nitzschia pungens (Bacillariophyceae): morphology, genetics, and ecophysiology of the three clades.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Bum Soo; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Wang, Pengbin; Han, Myung-Soo

    2015-02-01

    Three clades of Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, determined by the internal transcribed space (ITS) region, are distributed throughout the world. We studied 15 P. pungens clones from various geographical locations and confirmed the existence of the three clades within P. pungens, based on ITS sequencing and described the three subgroups (IIIaa, IIIab, and IIIb) of clade III. Clade III (clade IIIaa) populations were reported for the first time in Korean coastal waters and the East China Sea. In morphometric analysis, we found the ultrastructural differences in the number of fibulae, striae, and poroids that separate the three clades. We carried out physiological tests on nine clones belonging to the three clades growing under various culture conditions. In temperature tests, only clade III clones could not grow at lower temperatures (10°C and 15°C), although clade I and II clones grew well. The estimated optimal growth range of clade I clones was wider than that of clades II and III. Clade II clones were considered to be adapted to lower temperatures and clade III to higher temperatures. In salinity tests, clade II and III clones did not grow well at a salinity of 40. Clade I clones were regarded as euryhaline and clade II and III clones were stenohaline. This supports the hypothesis that P. pungens clades have different ecophysiological characteristics based on their habitats. Our data show that physiological and morphological features are correlated with genetic intraspecific differentiation in P. pungens.

  20. Models Derived from In Vitro Analyses of Spleen, Liver, and Lung Leukocyte Functions Predict Vaccine Efficacy against the Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS)

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Roberto; Chou, Alicia Y.; Ryden, Patrik; Kennett, Nikki J.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Elkins, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Currently, there are no licensed vaccines and no correlates of protection against Francisella tularensis, which causes tularemia. We recently demonstrated that measuring in vitro control of intramacrophage bacterial growth by murine F. tularensis-immune splenocytes, as well as transcriptional analyses, discriminated Francisella vaccines of different efficacies. Further, we identified potential correlates of protection against systemic challenge. Here, we extended this approach by studying leukocytes derived from lungs and livers of mice immunized by parenteral and respiratory routes with F. tularensis vaccines. Liver and lung leukocytes derived from intradermally and intranasally vaccinated mice controlled in vitro Francisella Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) intramacrophage replication in patterns similar to those of splenocytes. Gene expression analyses of potential correlates also revealed similar patterns in liver cells and splenocytes. In some cases (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin 22 [IL-22], and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]), liver cells exhibited even higher relative gene expression, whereas fewer genes exhibited differential expression in lung cells. In contrast with their strong ability to control LVS replication, splenocytes from intranasally vaccinated mice expressed few genes with a hierarchy of expression similar to that of splenocytes from intradermally vaccinated mice. Thus, the relative levels of gene expression vary between cell types from different organs and by vaccination route. Most importantly, because studies comparing cell sources and routes of vaccination supported the predictive validity of this coculture and gene quantification approach, we combined in vitro LVS replication with gene expression data to develop analytical models that discriminated between vaccine groups and successfully predicted the degree of vaccine efficacy. Thus, this strategy remains a promising means of

  1. The binding sites of monoclonal antibodies to the non-reducing end of Francisella tularensis O-antigen accommodate mainly the terminal saccharide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Zaia, Joseph; Seaton, Barbara A; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described two types of protective B-cell epitopes in the O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis: repeating internal epitopes targeted by the vast majority of anti-OAg monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and a non-overlapping epitope at the non-reducing end targeted by the previously unique IgG2a mAb FB11. We have now generated and characterized three mAbs specific for the non-reducing end of F. tularensis OAg, partially encoded by the same variable region germline genes, indicating that they target the same epitope. Like FB11, the new mAbs, Ab63 (IgG3), N213 (IgG3) and N62 (IgG2b), had higher antigen-binding bivalent avidity than internally binding anti-OAg mAbs, and an oligosaccharide containing a single OAg repeat was sufficient for optimal inhibition of their antigen-binding. The X-ray crystal structure of N62 Fab showed that the antigen-binding site is lined mainly by aromatic amino acids that form a small cavity, which can accommodate no more than one and a third sugar residues, indicating that N62 binds mainly to the terminal Qui4NFm residue at the nonreducing end of OAg. In efficacy studies with mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, N62, N213 and Ab63 prolonged survival and reduced blood bacterial burden. These results yield insights into how antibodies to non-reducing ends of microbial polysaccharides can contribute to immune protection despite the smaller size of their target epitopes compared with antibodies to internal polysaccharide regions. PMID:23844703

  2. The binding sites of monoclonal antibodies to the non-reducing end of Francisella tularensis O-antigen accommodate mainly the terminal saccharide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Zaia, Joseph; Seaton, Barbara A; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2013-11-01

    We have previously described two types of protective B-cell epitopes in the O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis: repeating internal epitopes targeted by the vast majority of anti-OAg monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and a non-overlapping epitope at the non-reducing end targeted by the previously unique IgG2a mAb FB11. We have now generated and characterized three mAbs specific for the non-reducing end of F. tularensis OAg, partially encoded by the same variable region germline genes, indicating that they target the same epitope. Like FB11, the new mAbs, Ab63 (IgG3), N213 (IgG3) and N62 (IgG2b), had higher antigen-binding bivalent avidity than internally binding anti-OAg mAbs, and an oligosaccharide containing a single OAg repeat was sufficient for optimal inhibition of their antigen-binding. The X-ray crystal structure of N62 Fab showed that the antigen-binding site is lined mainly by aromatic amino acids that form a small cavity, which can accommodate no more than one and a third sugar residues, indicating that N62 binds mainly to the terminal Qui4NFm residue at the nonreducing end of OAg. In efficacy studies with mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, N62, N213 and Ab63 prolonged survival and reduced blood bacterial burden. These results yield insights into how antibodies to non-reducing ends of microbial polysaccharides can contribute to immune protection despite the smaller size of their target epitopes compared with antibodies to internal polysaccharide regions. PMID:23844703

  3. Antibodies to both terminal and internal B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide produced by patients with tularemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaohua; Perkins, Hillary M; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, is considered a potential bioterrorism threat due to its low infectivity dose and the high morbidity and mortality from respiratory disease. We previously characterized two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the O-polysaccharide (O antigen [OAg]) of F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS): Ab63, which targets a terminal epitope at the nonreducing end of OAg, and Ab52, which targets a repeating internal OAg epitope. These two MAbs were protective in a mouse model of respiratory tularemia. To determine whether these epitope types are also targeted by humans, we tested the ability of each of 18 blood serum samples from 11 tularemia patients to inhibit the binding of Ab63 or Ab52 to F. tularensis LPS in a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Although all serum samples had Ab63- and Ab52-inhibitory activities, the ratios of Ab63 to Ab52 inhibitory potencies varied 75-fold. However, the variation was only 2.3-fold for sequential serum samples from the same patient, indicating different distributions of terminal- versus internal-binding antibodies in different individuals. Western blot analysis using class-specific anti-human Ig secondary antibodies showed that both terminal- and internal-binding OAg antibodies were of the IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes. These results support the use of a mouse model to discover protective B-cell epitopes for tularemia vaccines or prophylactic/therapeutic antibodies, and they present a general strategy for interrogating the antibody responses of patients and vaccinees to microbial carbohydrate epitopes that have been characterized in experimental animals.

  4. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D; Child, Robert; Crane, Deborah D; Celli, Jean; Bosio, Catharine M

    2012-01-01

    Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. <100 organisms, may address this concern. Herein we describe the ability of three defined, attenuated mutants of F. tularensis SchuS4, deleted for FTT0369c, FTT1676, or FTT0369c and FTT1676, respectively, to engender protective immunity against tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  5. Dickeya species relatedness and clade structure determined by comparison of recA sequences.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Neil; Stead, David; Bew, Janice; Heeney, John; Tsror Lahkim, Leah; Elphinstone, John

    2009-10-01

    Using sequences from the recA locus, we have produced a phylogeny of 188 Dickeya strains from culture collections and identified species relatedness and subspecies clade structure within the genus. Of the six recognized species, Dickeya paradisiaca, D. chrysanthemi and D. zeae were discriminated with long branch lengths. The clade containing the D. paradisiaca type strain included just one additional strain, isolated from banana in Colombia. Strains isolated from Chrysanthemum and Parthenium species made up most of the clade containing the D. chrysanthemi type strain, and the host range of this species was extended to include potato. The D. zeae clade had the largest number of sequevars and branched into two major sister clades that contained all of the Zea mays isolates, and were identified as phylotypes PI and PII. The host range was increased from six to 13 species, including potato. The recA sequence of an Australian sugar-cane strain was sufficiently distinct to rank as a new species-level branch. In contrast to these species, Dickeya dadantii, D. dianthicola and D. dieffenbachiae were distinguished with shorter branch lengths, indicating relatively closer relatedness. The recA sequence for the type strain of D. dadantii clustered separately from other strains of the species. However, sequence comparison of three additional loci revealed that the D. dadantii type strain grouped together with the six other D. dadantii strains that were sequenced. Analysis of all four loci indicated that the D. dadantii strains were most closely related to D. dieffenbachiae. Three further branches (DUC-1, -2 and -3) were associated with these three species, which all diverged from a common origin and can be considered as a species complex. The large clade containing the D. dianthicola type strain comprised 58 strains and had little sequence diversity. One sequevar accounted for the majority of these strains, which were isolated nearly exclusively from eight hosts from Europe

  6. Clade perseverance from Mesozoic to present: a multidisciplinary approach to interpretation of pattern and process.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2002-10-01

    Two clades of marine bryozoans, cyclostomes and cheilostomes, exemplify the benefits of applying a multidisciplinary approach to the interpretation of long-term evolutionary patterns. The cyclostome bryozoans were dominant in the Mesozoic; since that era, they have decreased in absolute terms and the cheilostomes have come to exceed them in both abundance and diversity. Many studies of living assemblages of the encrusting members of these two clades indicate that cheilostomes are superior space competitors, but paleontological studies suggest that competition between the two taxa has not been escalating over geological time. Both clades occur throughout the world's oceans and seas, and recent work in the geographical extremes has shown that the relative success of the clades varies markedly from place to place. In this study, the importance of differential patterns of recruitment and cumulative space occupation in the two clades was evaluated over four years and in two environments, one temperate and one polar. In both of these environments, peaks of recruitment and space occupation by the two clades were out of phase. The different strategies and outcomes of spatial competition are examined, largely using data from the literature. Only recently has it been realized that tied outcomes of competition are stable alternative results and not simply transitory phases. Many competitive encounters involving cyclostomes result in ties, implying that their strategy is based on persistence rather than dominance. When different indices and models are used to analyze competition data from the two clades, the interpretation varies markedly with methodology. The differences in patterns of recruitment, space occupation, and spatial competition have influenced both our understanding of how the two clades have persisted alongside each other and our perception of cheilostome superiority. Analysis of fluid dynamics has shown that small differences in the mechanical structure of

  7. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-06

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the second quarter of the third year, LLNL finalized all immunological assessments of NLP vaccine formulations in the F344 model. Battelle has immunized rats with three unique NLP formulations by either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All inoculations have been completed, and protective efficacy against an aerosolized challenge will begin at the end of October, 2014.

  8. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Neutralization Analysis of a Panel of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Binley, James M.; Wrin, Terri; Korber, Bette; Zwick, Michael B.; Wang, Meng; Chappey, Colombe; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Katinger, Hermann; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are potentially important tools in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine design. A few rare MAbs have been intensively studied, but we still have a limited appreciation of their neutralization breadth. Using a pseudovirus assay, we evaluated MAbs from clade B-infected donors and a clade B HIV+ plasma against 93 viruses from diverse backgrounds. Anti-gp120 MAbs exhibited greater activity against clade B than non-B viruses, whereas anti-gp41 MAbs exhibited broad interclade activity. Unexpectedly, MAb 4E10 (directed against the C terminus of the gp41 ectodomain) neutralized all 90 viruses with moderate potency. MAb 2F5 (directed against an epitope adjacent to that of 4E10) neutralized 67% of isolates, but none from clade C. Anti-gp120 MAb b12 (directed against an epitope overlapping the CD4 binding site) neutralized 50% of viruses, including some from almost every clade. 2G12 (directed against a high-mannose epitope on gp120) neutralized 41% of the viruses, but none from clades C or E. MAbs to the gp120 V3 loop, including 447-52D, neutralized a subset of clade B viruses (up to 45%) but infrequently neutralized other clades (≤7%). MAbs b6 (directed against the CD4 binding site) and X5 (directed against a CD4-induced epitope of gp120) neutralized only sensitive primary clade B viruses. The HIV+ plasma neutralized 70% of the viruses, including some from all major clades. Further analysis revealed five neutralizing immunotypes that were somewhat associated with clades. As well as the significance for vaccine design, our data have implications for passive-immunization studies in countries where clade C viruses are common, given that only MAbs b12 and 4E10 were effective against viruses from this clade. PMID:15542675

  9. [Comparative foliar anatomy and systematics of the Trichocentrum-clade with emphasis in Cohniella (Asparagales: Orchidaceae)].

    PubMed

    Cetzal-Ix, William; Noguera-Savelli, Eliana; Jáuregui, Damelis; Carnevali, Germáin

    2013-12-01

    The genera Cohniella, Lophiarella, Lophiaris, and Trichocentrum are included in the Trichocentrum-clade. These genera are distributed from Florida and Northern Mexico to Southern Brazil and Northern Argentina, growing in tropical deciduous forests or tropical rain forests and thorn scrub forests to pine-oak forest, from sea level to 1700 m. The leaf anatomical structure of 23 members of the Trichocentrum-clade was explored as a source of taxonomic and phylogenetic characters. A total of 11 species of Cohniella, three species of Lophiarella, seven species of Lophiaris, two species of Trichocentrum, and other four species were included as outgroup. Anatomical characters were studied by cross sections and paradermic observations of the middle portion of fresh leaves. Although anatomical characters were fairly homogeneous throughout the clade, twelve vegetative anatomical, phylogenetically informative characters were selected and coded for an analysis that was performed using an exhaustive search (implicit enumeration) implemented through TNT. The strict consensus of 2692 most parsimonious trees resulted in a poorly resolved polytomy, which however recovers the Trichocentrum-clade with a monophyletic, strongly supported Cohniella nested within it with unifacial leaves and the presence of cellular inclusions in the epidermis as synapomorphies. We concluded that the anatomy characters alone are insufficient to assess the relationships amongst the genera of the Trichocentrum-clade. However, the two synapomorphies recovered for Cohniella strongly support its monophyly when these are analyzed in conjunction with other data sources (e.g., molecular and morphological characters). PMID:24432538

  10. Mitochondrial DNA variation reveals recent evolutionary history of main Boa constrictor clades.

    PubMed

    Hynková, Ivana; Starostová, Zuzana; Frynta, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    We sequenced a 1114-bp fragment of cytochrome b gene in six subspecies (115 samples) of Boa constrictor and detected 67 haplotypes. Our analyses revealed the presence of two distinct clades, one from Central America (CA) including the neighboring part of South America west of the Andes, and the other covering the rest of South America (SA). Sequence divergence between CA and SA clades is about 5-7%, which roughly corresponds to a separation at the time of uplift of the Colombian Andes following formation of the Panama Isthmus before 3.5 Myr Sequence divergence within the SA and CA clades is only 2-3%, suggesting a fairly recent spread of these clades Into their current geographic ranges. Thus, we may not be dealing with taxa with a markedly old evolutionary history. Because juveniles of B. constrictor feed mostly on small rodents, we hypothesized that spread of this species was allowed by a new food source represented by murold rodents that appeared after closure of the Panama portal. With respect to the taxonomy, B. c. imperator may be elevated to full species rank. Within the SA clade, a haplotype of Argentinian B. c. occidentalis is markedly distinct, while the remaining haplotype groups analyzed are distributed throughout large ranges and may all belong to a single nominotypic subspecies.

  11. The expansion of Phytophthora clade 8b: three new species associated with winter grown vegetable crops.

    PubMed

    Bertier, L; Brouwer, H; de Cock, A W A M; Cooke, D E L; Olsson, C H B; Höfte, M

    2013-12-01

    Despite its association with important agricultural crops, Phytophthora clade 8b is a poorly studied group of species. The clade currently consists of three officially described species (Phytophthora porri, P. brassicae and P. primulae) that are host-specific pathogens of leek, cabbages and Primula spp., respectively. However, over the past few decades, several other clade 8b-like Phytophthoras have been found on a variety of different host plants that were all grown at low temperatures in winter seasons. In this study, a collection of 30 of these isolates was subjected to a phylogenetic study using two loci (the rDNA ITS region and the mitochondrial cox1 gene). This analysis revealed a clear clustering of isolates according to their host plants. To verify whether these isolates belong to separate species, a detailed morphological study was conducted. On the basis of genetic and morphological differences and host specificity, we now present the official description of three new species in clade 8b: Phytophthora cichorii sp. nov., P. dauci sp. nov. and P. lactucae sp. nov. Two other groups of isolates (Phytophthora taxon castitis and Phytophthora taxon parsley) might also represent new species but the data available at this time are insufficient for an official description. This brings Phytophthora clade 8b to a group of six species that are all host-specific, slow-growing and specifically infect herbaceous crops at low temperatures.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of New Zealand earthworms (Oligochaeta: Megascolecidae) reveals ancient clades and cryptic taxonomic diversity.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas R; James, Sam; Allwood, Julia; Bartlam, Scott; Howitt, Robyn; Prada, Diana

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed the first ever phylogeny for the New Zealand earthworm fauna (Megascolecinae and Acanthodrilinae) including representatives from other major continental regions. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees were constructed from 427 base pairs from the mitochondrial large subunit (16S) rRNA gene and 661 base pairs from the nuclear large subunit (28S) rRNA gene. Within the Acanthodrilinae we were able to identify a number of well-supported clades that were restricted to continental landmasses. Estimates of nodal support for these major clades were generally high, but relationships among clades were poorly resolved. The phylogenetic analyses revealed several independent lineages in New Zealand, some of which had a comparable phylogenetic depth to monophyletic groups sampled from Madagascar, Africa, North America and Australia. These results are consistent with at least some of these clades having inhabited New Zealand since rifting from Gondwana in the Late Cretaceous. Within the New Zealand Acanthodrilinae, major clades tended to be restricted to specific regions of New Zealand, with the central North Island and Cook Strait representing major biogeographic boundaries. Our field surveys of New Zealand and subsequent identification has also revealed extensive cryptic taxonomic diversity with approximately 48 new species sampled in addition to the 199 species recognized by previous authors. Our results indicate that further survey and taxonomic work is required to establish a foundation for future biogeographic and ecological research on this vitally important component of the New Zealand biota.

  13. Four New Vining Species of Solanum (Dulcamaroid Clade) from Montane Habitats in Tropical America

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Background Solanum (Solanaceae), with approximately 1500 species, is one of the largest genera of flowering plants, and has a centre of diversity in the New World tropics. The genus is divided into 13 major clades, of which two, the Dulcamaroid clade and the “African Non-Spiny” clade, exhibit vine morphology with twining petioles. I am currently preparing a worldwide monograph of these two groups, comprising some 70 species. Methods I formally describe here four new species of Solanum from montane Mexico and South America all belonging to the Dulcamaroid clade (including the traditionally recognised section Jasminosolanum Bitter). Descriptions, discussions of closely related species and preliminary conservation assessments are provided for all species; all species are illustrated. This paper is also a test case for the electronic publication of new names in flowering plants. Conclusions These new species are all relatively rare, but not currently of conservation concern. Solanum aspersum sp. nov. is distributed in Colombia and Ecuador, S. luculentum sp. nov. in Colombia and Venezuela, S. sanchez-vegae sp. nov. is endemic to northern Peru and S. sousae sp. nov. to southern Mexico. Solanum luculentum has the morphology of a dioecious species; this is the first report of this breeding system in the Dulcamaroid clade. PMID:20463921

  14. [Comparative foliar anatomy and systematics of the Trichocentrum-clade with emphasis in Cohniella (Asparagales: Orchidaceae)].

    PubMed

    Cetzal-Ix, William; Noguera-Savelli, Eliana; Jáuregui, Damelis; Carnevali, Germáin

    2013-12-01

    The genera Cohniella, Lophiarella, Lophiaris, and Trichocentrum are included in the Trichocentrum-clade. These genera are distributed from Florida and Northern Mexico to Southern Brazil and Northern Argentina, growing in tropical deciduous forests or tropical rain forests and thorn scrub forests to pine-oak forest, from sea level to 1700 m. The leaf anatomical structure of 23 members of the Trichocentrum-clade was explored as a source of taxonomic and phylogenetic characters. A total of 11 species of Cohniella, three species of Lophiarella, seven species of Lophiaris, two species of Trichocentrum, and other four species were included as outgroup. Anatomical characters were studied by cross sections and paradermic observations of the middle portion of fresh leaves. Although anatomical characters were fairly homogeneous throughout the clade, twelve vegetative anatomical, phylogenetically informative characters were selected and coded for an analysis that was performed using an exhaustive search (implicit enumeration) implemented through TNT. The strict consensus of 2692 most parsimonious trees resulted in a poorly resolved polytomy, which however recovers the Trichocentrum-clade with a monophyletic, strongly supported Cohniella nested within it with unifacial leaves and the presence of cellular inclusions in the epidermis as synapomorphies. We concluded that the anatomy characters alone are insufficient to assess the relationships amongst the genera of the Trichocentrum-clade. However, the two synapomorphies recovered for Cohniella strongly support its monophyly when these are analyzed in conjunction with other data sources (e.g., molecular and morphological characters).

  15. The role of clade competition in the diversification of North American canids

    PubMed Central

    Silvestro, Daniele; Antonelli, Alexandre; Salamin, Nicolas; Quental, Tiago B.

    2015-01-01

    The history of biodiversity is characterized by a continual replacement of branches in the tree of life. The rise and demise of these branches (clades) are ultimately determined by changes in speciation and extinction rates, often interpreted as a response to varying abiotic and biotic factors. However, understanding the relative importance of these factors remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Here we analyze the rich North American fossil record of the dog family Canidae and of other carnivores to tease apart the roles of competition, body size evolution, and climate change on the sequential replacement of three canid subfamilies (two of which have gone extinct). We develop a novel Bayesian analytic framework to show that competition from multiple carnivore clades successively drove the demise and replacement of the two extinct canid subfamilies by increasing their extinction rates and suppressing their speciation. Competitive effects have likely come from ecologically similar species from both canid and felid clades. These results imply that competition among entire clades, generally considered a rare process, can play a more substantial role than climate change and body size evolution in determining the sequential rise and decline of clades. PMID:26124128

  16. The Francisella tularensis migR, trmE, and cphA Genes Contribute to F. tularensis Pathogenicity Island Gene Regulation and Intracellular Growth by Modulation of the Stress Alarmone ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Long, Matthew E.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    The Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island (FPI) encodes many proteins that are required for virulence. Expression of these genes depends upon the FevR (PigR) regulator and its interactions with the MglA/SspA and RNA polymerase transcriptional complex. Experiments to identify how transcription of the FPI genes is activated have led to identification of mutations within the migR, trmE, and cphA genes that decrease FPI expression. Recent data demonstrated that the small alarmone ppGpp, produced by RelA and SpoT, is important for stabilizing MglA/SspA and FevR (PigR) interactions in Francisella. Production of ppGpp is commonly known to be activated by cellular and nutritional stress in bacteria, which indicates that cellular and nutritional stresses act as important signals for FPI activation. In this work, we demonstrate that mutations in migR, trmE, or cphA significantly reduce ppGpp accumulation. The reduction in ppGpp levels was similar for each of the mutants and correlated with a corresponding reduction in iglA reporter expression. In addition, we observed that there were differences in the ability of each of these mutants to replicate within various mammalian cells, indicating that the migR, trmE, and cphA genes are likely parts of different cellular stress response pathways in Francisella. These results also indicate that different nutritional and cellular stresses exist in different mammalian cells. This work provides new information to help understand how Francisella regulates its virulence genes in response to host cell environments, and it contributes to our growing knowledge of this highly successful bacterial pathogen. PMID:23716606

  17. The Francisella tularensis migR, trmE, and cphA genes contribute to F. tularensis pathogenicity island gene regulation and intracellular growth by modulation of the stress alarmone ppGpp.

    PubMed

    Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R; Rasmussen, Jed A; Long, Matthew E; Allen, Lee-Ann H; Jones, Bradley D

    2013-08-01

    The Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island (FPI) encodes many proteins that are required for virulence. Expression of these genes depends upon the FevR (PigR) regulator and its interactions with the MglA/SspA and RNA polymerase transcriptional complex. Experiments to identify how transcription of the FPI genes is activated have led to identification of mutations within the migR, trmE, and cphA genes that decrease FPI expression. Recent data demonstrated that the small alarmone ppGpp, produced by RelA and SpoT, is important for stabilizing MglA/SspA and FevR (PigR) interactions in Francisella. Production of ppGpp is commonly known to be activated by cellular and nutritional stress in bacteria, which indicates that cellular and nutritional stresses act as important signals for FPI activation. In this work, we demonstrate that mutations in migR, trmE, or cphA significantly reduce ppGpp accumulation. The reduction in ppGpp levels was similar for each of the mutants and correlated with a corresponding reduction in iglA reporter expression. In addition, we observed that there were differences in the ability of each of these mutants to replicate within various mammalian cells, indicating that the migR, trmE, and cphA genes are likely parts of different cellular stress response pathways in Francisella. These results also indicate that different nutritional and cellular stresses exist in different mammalian cells. This work provides new information to help understand how Francisella regulates its virulence genes in response to host cell environments, and it contributes to our growing knowledge of this highly successful bacterial pathogen.

  18. Clade-Specific 16S Ribosomal DNA Oligonucleotides Reveal the Predominance of a Single Marine Synechococcus Clade throughout a Stratified Water Column in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Nicholas J.; Marie, Dominique; Partensky, Frédéric; Vaulot, Daniel; Post, Anton F.; Scanlan, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among members of the marine Synechococcus genus were determined following sequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from 31 novel cultured isolates from the Red Sea and several other oceanic environments. This revealed a large genetic diversity within the marine Synechococcus cluster consistent with earlier work but also identified three novel clades not previously recognized. Phylogenetic analyses showed one clade, containing halotolerant isolates lacking phycoerythrin (PE) and including strains capable, or not, of utilizing nitrate as the sole N source, which clustered within the MC-A (Synechococcus subcluster 5.1) lineage. Two copies of the 16S rRNA gene are present in marine Synechococcus genomes, and cloning and sequencing of these copies from Synechococcus sp. strain WH 7803 and genomic information from Synechococcus sp. strain WH 8102 reveal these to be identical. Based on the 16S rDNA sequence information, clade-specific oligonucleotides for the marine Synechococcus genus were designed and their specificity was optimized. Using dot blot hybridization technology, these probes were used to determine the in situ community structure of marine Synechococcus populations in the Red Sea at the time of a Synechococcus maximum during April 1999. A predominance of genotypes representative of a single clade was found, and these genotypes were common among strains isolated into culture. Conversely, strains lacking PE, which were also relatively easily isolated into culture, represented only a minor component of the Synechococcus population. Genotypes corresponding to well-studied laboratory strains also appeared to be poorly represented in this stratified water column in the Red Sea. PMID:12732508

  19. Vibrio panuliri sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from spiny lobster, Panulirus penicillatus and transfer of Vibrio ponticus from Scophthalmi clade to the newly proposed Ponticus clade.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Prabla; Poddar, Abhijit; Schumann, Peter; Das, Subrata K

    2014-12-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain LBS2(T) was isolated from eggs carried on pleopods of the spiny lobster collected from Andaman Sea. Heterotrophic growth occurred at 1-7% NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed the strain LBS2(T) belonged to the genus Vibrio and showed above 97% similarity with eight type strains of the genus Vibrio. Multilocus analysis based on ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH recA, rpoA, and topA revealed LBS2(T) formed a separate cluster with Vibrio ponticus DSM 16217(T) with 89.8% multilocus gene sequence similarity. However, strain LBS2(T) is distantly related with other members of the Scophthalmi clade in terms of 16S rRNA signatures, phenotypic variations and multilocus gene sequence similarity, for which we propose LBS2(T) belongs to a new clade i.e. Ponticus clade with V. ponticus DSM 16217(T) as the representative type strain of the clade. DNA-DNA homologies between strain LBS2(T) and closely related strains were well below 70%. DNA G + C content was 45.3 mol%. On the basis of our polyphasic study, strain LBS2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio panuliri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LBS2(T) (= JCM 19500(T) = DSM 27724(T) = LMG 27902(T)).

  20. Vibrio panuliri sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from spiny lobster, Panulirus penicillatus and transfer of Vibrio ponticus from Scophthalmi clade to the newly proposed Ponticus clade.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Prabla; Poddar, Abhijit; Schumann, Peter; Das, Subrata K

    2014-12-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain LBS2(T) was isolated from eggs carried on pleopods of the spiny lobster collected from Andaman Sea. Heterotrophic growth occurred at 1-7% NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed the strain LBS2(T) belonged to the genus Vibrio and showed above 97% similarity with eight type strains of the genus Vibrio. Multilocus analysis based on ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH recA, rpoA, and topA revealed LBS2(T) formed a separate cluster with Vibrio ponticus DSM 16217(T) with 89.8% multilocus gene sequence similarity. However, strain LBS2(T) is distantly related with other members of the Scophthalmi clade in terms of 16S rRNA signatures, phenotypic variations and multilocus gene sequence similarity, for which we propose LBS2(T) belongs to a new clade i.e. Ponticus clade with V. ponticus DSM 16217(T) as the representative type strain of the clade. DNA-DNA homologies between strain LBS2(T) and closely related strains were well below 70%. DNA G + C content was 45.3 mol%. On the basis of our polyphasic study, strain LBS2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio panuliri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LBS2(T) (= JCM 19500(T) = DSM 27724(T) = LMG 27902(T)). PMID:25445014

  1. The Drosophila IR20a clade of Ionotropic Receptors are candidate taste and pheromone receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Tong-Wey; He, Zhe; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Menuz, Karen; Larter, Nikki K.; Stewart, Shannon; Carlson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Insects use taste to evaluate food, hosts, and mates. Drosophila has many “orphan” taste neurons that express no known taste receptors. The Ionotropic Receptor (IR) superfamily is best known for its role in olfaction, but virtually nothing is known about a clade of ~35 members, the IR20a clade. Here, a comprehensive analysis of this clade reveals expression in all taste organs of the fly. Some members are expressed in orphan taste neurons, whereas others are coexpressed with bitter- or sugar-sensing Gustatory receptor (Gr) genes. Analysis of the closely related IR52c and IR52d genes reveals signatures of adaptive evolution, roles in male mating behavior, and sexually dimorphic expression in neurons of the male foreleg, which contacts females during courtship. These neurons are activated by conspecific females and contact a neural circuit for sexual behavior. Together, these results greatly expand the repertoire of candidate taste and pheromone receptors in the fly. PMID:25123314

  2. Six genetically distinct clades of Palola (Eunicidae, Annelida) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja

    2015-01-01

    A total of 36 lots of Palola spp. (Eunicidae, Annelida) were collected during the Lizard Island Polychaete Workshop on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Of these, 21 specimens were sequenced for a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. These sequences were analysed in conjunction with existing sequences of Palola spp. from other geographic regions. The samples from Lizard Island form six distinct clades, although none of them can clearly be assigned to any of the nominal species. Four of the six Lizard Island clades fall into species group A and the remaining two into species group B (which also includes the type species, Palola viridis). All sequenced specimens were characterized morphologically as far as possible and a dichotomous key was assembled. Based on this key, the remaining samples were identified as belonging to one of the clades. PMID:26624083

  3. Six genetically distinct clades of Palola (Eunicidae, Annelida) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja

    2015-09-18

    A total of 36 lots of Palola spp. (Eunicidae, Annelida) were collected during the Lizard Island Polychaete Workshop on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Of these, 21 specimens were sequenced for a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. These sequences were analysed in conjunction with existing sequences of Palola spp. from other geographic regions. The samples from Lizard Island form six distinct clades, although none of them can clearly be assigned to any of the nominal species. Four of the six Lizard Island clades fall into species group A and the remaining two into species group B (which also includes the type species, Palola viridis). All sequenced specimens were characterized morphologically as far as possible and a dichotomous key was assembled. Based on this key, the remaining samples were identified as belonging to one of the clades.

  4. Postantifungal effect of caspofungin against the Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis clades.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Killing and postantifungal effects could be relevant for the selection of optimal dosing schedules. This study aims to compare time-kill and postantifungal effects with caspofungin on Candida albicans (C. albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida africana) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis) clades. In the postantifungal effect experiments, strains were exposed to caspofungin for 1 h at concentrations 0.12-8 μg/mL. Time-kill experiments were conducted at the same concentrations. Caspofungin exhibited a significant and prolonged postantifungal effect (>37 h) with 2 μg/mL against the most strains of C. albicans clade. Against the C. parapsilosis clade, the postantifungal effect was <12 h at 8 μg/mL, except for two strains. Caspofungin was fungicidal against C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. metapsilosis. PMID:27492134

  5. Phylogeny of the sea hares in the aplysia clade based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Timothy; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2004-02-20

    Sea hare species within the Aplysia clade are distributed worldwide. Their phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships are, however, still poorly known. New molecular evidence is presented from a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene (cox1) that improves our understanding of the phylogeny of the group. Based on these data a preliminary discussion of the present distribution of sea hares in a biogeographic context is put forward. Our findings are consistent with only some aspects of the current taxonomy and nomenclatural changes are proposed. The first, is the use of a rank free classification for the different Aplysia clades and subclades as opposed to previously used genus and subgenus affiliations. The second, is the suggestion that Aplysia brasiliana (Rang, 1828) is a junior synonym of Aplysia fasciata (Poiret, 1789). The third, is the elimination of Neaplysia since its only member is confirmed to be part of the large Varria clade.

  6. "Brachyspira hampsonii" clade I isolated from Belgian pigs imported to Germany.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Judith; Habighorst-Blome, Kerstin; Seehusen, Frauke

    2014-01-31

    This report describes the detection of "Brachyspira (B.) hampsonii" clade I in Belgian pigs imported to Germany. Two of seventeen pigs from one herd were reported positive for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae by culture in a Belgian diagnostic laboratory, but negative for this Brachyspira species by specific PCR. In this study, from 22 fecal samples and 2 colon contents of these animals various Brachyspira species were cultured and identified by nox-RFLP as Brachyspira murdochii, Brachyspira innocens and Brachyspira intermedia. Albeit the six B. intermedia isolates proved to be negative in a species specific PCR. Sequencing of the nox-gene of three of these isolates revealed that the sequences were 99% identical to published sequences of "B. hampsonii" clade I. From one pig which was positive for "B. hampsonii" clade I histopathology was done and showed moderate lesions consistent with brachyspiral disease.

  7. Postantifungal effect of caspofungin against the Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis clades.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Killing and postantifungal effects could be relevant for the selection of optimal dosing schedules. This study aims to compare time-kill and postantifungal effects with caspofungin on Candida albicans (C. albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida africana) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis) clades. In the postantifungal effect experiments, strains were exposed to caspofungin for 1 h at concentrations 0.12-8 μg/mL. Time-kill experiments were conducted at the same concentrations. Caspofungin exhibited a significant and prolonged postantifungal effect (>37 h) with 2 μg/mL against the most strains of C. albicans clade. Against the C. parapsilosis clade, the postantifungal effect was <12 h at 8 μg/mL, except for two strains. Caspofungin was fungicidal against C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. metapsilosis.

  8. Functional and Structural Characterization of Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Antibodies at the Low End of Antigen Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M.; Roche, Marly I.; Seaton, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft), which is both a capsular polysaccharide and a component of lipopolysaccharide, is comprised of tetrasaccharide repeats and induces antibodies mainly against repeating internal epitopes. We previously reported on several BALB/c mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that bind to internal Ft OAg epitopes and are protective in mouse models of respiratory tularemia. We now characterize three new internal Ft OAg IgG2a MAbs, N203, N77, and N24, with 10- to 100-fold lower binding potency than previously characterized internal-OAg IgG2a MAbs, despite sharing one or more variable region germline genes with some of them. In a mouse model of respiratory tularemia with the highly virulent Ft type A strain SchuS4, the three new MAbs reduced blood bacterial burden with potencies that mirror their antigen-binding strength; the best binder of the new MAbs, N203, prolonged survival in a dose-dependent manner, but was at least 10-fold less potent than the best previously characterized IgG2a MAb, Ab52. X-ray crystallographic studies of N203 Fab showed a flexible binding site in the form of a partitioned groove, which cannot provide as many contacts to OAg as does the Ab52 binding site. These results reveal structural features of antibodies at the low end of reactivity with multi-repeat microbial carbohydrates and demonstrate that such antibodies still have substantial protective effects against infection. PMID:25171003

  9. Neutralization activity in a geographically diverse East London cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients: clade C infection results in a stronger and broader humoral immune response than clade B infection.

    PubMed

    Dreja, Hanna; O'Sullivan, Eithne; Pade, Corinna; Greene, Kelli M; Gao, Hongmei; Aubin, Keith; Hand, James; Isaksen, Are; D'Souza, Carl; Leber, Werner; Montefiori, David; Seaman, Michael S; Anderson, Jane; Orkin, Chloe; McKnight, Aine

    2010-11-01

    The array of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) subtypes encountered in East London, an area long associated with migration, is unusually heterogeneous, reflecting the diverse geographical origins of the population. In this study it was shown that viral subtypes or clades infecting a sample of HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-positive individuals in East London reflect the global pandemic. The authors studied the humoral response in 210 treatment-naïve chronically HIV-1-infected (>1 year) adult subjects against a panel of 12 viruses from six different clades. Plasmas from individuals infected with clade C, but also plasmas from clade A, and to a lesser degree clade CRF02_AG and CRF01_AE, were significantly more potent at neutralizing the tested viruses compared with plasmas from individuals infected with clade B. The difference in humoral robustness between clade C- and B-infected patients was confirmed in titration studies with an extended panel of clade B and C viruses. These results support the approach to develop an HIV-1 vaccine that includes clade C or A envelope protein (Env) immunogens for the induction of a potent neutralizing humoral response.

  10. FISH-Flow: a quantitative molecular approach for describing mixed clade communities of Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, S. E.; Smith, G. J.; Geller, J. B.

    2014-03-01

    Our understanding of reef corals and their fate in a changing climate is limited by our ability to monitor the diversity and abundance of the dinoflagellate endosymbionts that sustain them. This study combined two well-known methods in tandem: fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for genotype-specific labeling of Symbiodinium and flow cytometry to quantify the abundance of each symbiont clade in a sample. This technique (FISH-Flow) was developed with cultured Symbiodinium representing four distinct clades (based on large subunit rDNA) and was used to distinguish and quantify these types with high efficiency and few false positives. This technique was also applied to freshly isolated symbionts of Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella annularis. Isolates from acutely bleached coral tissues had significantly lower labeling efficiency; however, isolates from healthy tissue had efficiencies comparable to cultured Symbiodinium trials. RNA degradation in bleaching samples may have interfered with labeling of cells. Nevertheless, we were able to determine that, with and without thermal stress, experimental columns of the coral O. annularis hosted a majority of clade B and B/C symbionts on the top and side of the coral column, respectively. We demonstrated that, for cultured Symbiodinium and Symbiodinium freshly isolated from healthy host tissues, the relative ratio of clades could be accurately determined for clades present at as low as 7 % relative abundance. While this method does not improve upon PCR-based techniques in identifying clades at background levels, FISH-Flow provides a high precision, flexible system for targeting, quantifying and isolating Symbiodinium genotypes of interest.

  11. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the North American clade of the Ceratocystis fimbriata complex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jason A; Harrington, Thomas C; Engelbrecht, C J B

    2005-01-01

    Ceratocystis fimbriata is a widely distributed, plant pathogenic fungus that causes wilts and cankers on many woody hosts. Earlier phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences revealed three geographic clades within the C. fimbriata complex that are centered respectively in North America, Latin America and Asia. This study looked for cryptic species within the North American clade. The internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the rDNA were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that most isolates from the North American clade group into four host-associated lineages, referred to as the aspen, hickory, oak and cherry lineages, which were isolated primarily from wounds or diseased trees of Populus, Carya, Quercus and Prunus, respectively. A single isolate collected from P. serotina in Wisconsin had a unique ITS sequence. Allozyme electromorphs also were highly polymorphic within the North American clade, and the inferred phylogenies from these data were congruent with the ITS-rDNA analyses. In pairing experiments isolates from the aspen, hickory, oak and cherry lineages were interfertile only with other isolates from their respective lineages. Inoculation experiments with isolates of the four host-associated groupings showed strong host specialization by isolates from the aspen and hickory lineages on Populus tremuloides and Carya illinoensis, respectively, but isolates from the oak and cherry lineages did not consistently reveal host specialization. Morphological features distinguish isolates in the North American clade from those of the Latin American clade (including C. fimbriata sensu stricto). Based on the phylogenetic evidence, interfertility, host specialization and morphology, the oak and cherry lineages are recognized as the earlier described C. variospora, the poplar lineage as C. populicola sp. nov., and the hickory lineage as C. caryae sp. nov. A new species associated with the bark beetle Scolytus quadrispinosus on Carya is closely related to C

  12. Biotechnological potential of the fungal CTG clade species in the synthetic biology era.

    PubMed

    Papon, Nicolas; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc

    2014-04-01

    Some of the fungal CTG clade species represent attractive yeast models in many aspects of biotechnology. Their particular codon usage has hindered the development of genetic approaches for exploring and exploiting their biotechnological potential. CTG clade yeast biotechnology now benefits from the establishment of versatile molecular toolboxes. In addition, a large range of rapidly evolving genomic and postgenomic approaches has recently enhanced the understanding of the architecture of CTG species metabolic networks. These represent essential prerequisites for further successful development of metabolic engineering in CTG yeasts by facilitating the design of synthetic pathways.

  13. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption.

  14. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. PMID:26310130

  15. Effects of Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica on Growth and Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Khodavaisy, Sadegh; Rezaie, Sassan; Noorbakhsh, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Elham; Sharifynia, Somayeh; Aala, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus parasiticus. This species can contaminate a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereals, peanuts, and crops in the field. In recent years, research on medicinal herbs, such as Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica, have led to reduced microbial growth, and these herbs also have a particular effect on the production of aflatoxins as carcinogenic compounds. Objectives In this study, we to examine P. atlantica subsp. kurdica as a natural compound used to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus and to act as an anti-mycotoxin. Materials and Methods In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica for A. parasiticus was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2. The rate of aflatoxin production was determined using the HPLC technique after exposure to different concentrations (62.5 - 125 mg/mL) of the gum. The changes in expression levels of the aflR gene were analyzed with a quantitative real-time PCR assay. Results The results showed that P. atlantica subsp. kurdica can inhibit A. parasiticus growth at a concentration of 125 mg/mL. HPLC results revealed a significant decrease in aflatoxin production with 125 mg/mL of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica, and AFL-B1 production was entirely inhibited. Based on quantitative real-time PCR results, the rate of aflR gene expression was significantly decreased after treatment with P. atlantica subsp. kurdica. Conclusions Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica has anti-toxic properties in addition to an inhibitory effect on A. parasiticus growth, and is able to decrease aflatoxin production effectively in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, this herbal extract maybe considered a potential anti-mycotoxin agent in medicine or industrial agriculture. PMID:27800127

  16. Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. solipictus subsp. nov., a pigmented bacterium isolated from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and emended description of L. chromiireducens.

    PubMed

    Muir, Rachel E; Tan, Man-Wah

    2007-12-01

    A yellow-pigmented, Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, irregular rod-shaped bacterium (strain TAN 31504(T)) was isolated from the bacteriophagous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, DNA G+C content of 69.5 mol%, 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan, major menaquinone MK-11, abundance of anteiso- and iso-fatty acids, polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol and a number of shared biochemical characteristics, strain TAN 31504(T) was placed in the genus Leucobacter. DNA-DNA hybridization comparisons demonstrated a 91 % DNA-DNA relatedness between strain TAN 31504(T) and Leucobacter chromiireducens LMG 22506(T) indicating that these two strains belong to the same species, when the recommended threshold value of 70 % DNA-DNA relatedness for the definition of a bacterial species by the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics is considered. Based on distinct differences in morphology, physiology, chemotaxonomic markers and various biochemical characteristics, it is proposed to split the species L. chromiireducens into two novel subspecies, Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. chromiireducens subsp. nov. (type strain L-1(T)=CIP 108389(T)=LMG 22506(T)) and Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. solipictus subsp. nov. (type strain TAN 31504(T)=DSM 18340(T)=ATCC BAA-1336(T)). PMID:18048723

  17. Lack of Cross-Resistance to Cry19A from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Resistant to Cry Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Margaret C.; Delécluse, Armelle; Walton, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with high levels of resistance to single or multiple toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were tested for cross-resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan polypeptide Cry19A. No cross-resistance was detected in mosquitoes that had been selected with the Cry11A, Cry4A and Cry4B, or Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry11A, and CytA toxins. A low but statistically significant level of cross-resistance, three to fourfold, was detected in the colony selected with Cry4A, Cry4B, and Cry11A. This cross-resistance was similar to that previously detected with B. thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan in the same colony. These data help explain the toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan against the resistant colonies and indicate that the Cry19A polypeptide might be useful in managing resistance and/or as a component of synthetic combinations of mosquitocidal toxins. PMID:11282656

  18. Demonstration of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. Capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, small colony type in outbreaks of caprine pleuropneumonia in eastern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kusiluka, L J; Semuguruka, W D; Kazwala, R R; Ojeniy, B; Friis, N F

    2000-01-01

    An outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia involving about 1200 goats in the Coast and Morogoro regions of eastern Tanzania is reported. The major clinical findings were severe respiratory distress, fever, mucopurulent nasal discharge and high mortality involving all age groups and both sexes of goats. The morbidity and mortality rates were 45%-90% and 14%-50%, respectively. The principal pathological lesions were confined to the thoracic cavity and comprised hydrothorax and serofibrinous pleuropneumonia. The histopathological features consisted of a necrotizing fibrinous pleuropneumonia characterized by different degrees of vasculitis, and fibrinocellular exudation into the alveolar septae and lumina, and into interlobular septae and pleura. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were isolated from some of the examined goats including a case with a sequestrum which yielded Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type. This work reports the first description of an outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia in Tanzania in which M. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type were concurrently isolated.

  19. Clade Age and Diversification Rate Variation Explain Disparity in Species Richness among Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilidae) Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Devin D.; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates. PMID:24887453

  20. Temporal Transcriptional Response during Infection of Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells with Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) Supports a General Host Suppression and Bacterial Uptake by Macropinocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bradburne, Christopher E.; Verhoeven, Anne B.; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Chaudhry, Saira A.; Chang, Eddie L.; Thach, Dzung C.; Bailey, Charles L.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonic tularemia is caused by inhalation of Francisella tularensis, one of the most infectious microbes known. We wanted to study the kinetics of the initial and early interactions between bacterium and host cells in the lung. To do this, we examined the infection of A549 airway epithelial cells with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of F. tularensis. A549 cells were infected and analyzed for global transcriptional response at multiple time points up to 16 h following infection. At 15 min and 2 h, a strong transcriptional response was observed including cytoskeletal rearrangement, intracellular transport, and interferon signaling. However, at later time points (6 and 16 h), very little differential gene expression was observed, indicating a general suppression of the host response consistent with other reported cell lines and murine tissues. Genes for macropinocytosis and actin/cytoskeleton rearrangement were highly up-regulated and common to the 15 min and 2 h time points, suggesting the use of this method for bacterial entry into cells. We demonstrate macropinocytosis through the uptake of FITC-dextran and amiloride inhibition of Francisella LVS uptake. Our results suggest that macropinocytosis is a potential mechanism of intracellular entry by LVS and that the host cell response is suppressed during the first 2–6 h of infection. These results suggest that the attenuated Francisella LVS induces significant host cell signaling at very early time points after the bacteria's interaction with the cell. PMID:23322778

  1. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  2. Successful protection against tularemia in C57BL/6 mice is correlated with expansion of Francisella tularensis-specific effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Amanda J; Crane, Deborah D; Wehrly, Tara D; Bosio, Catharine M

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is an intracellular, Gram-negative bacterium that causes the fatal disease tularemia. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and the requirements for protection against infection are poorly defined. To identify correlates of vaccine-induced immunity against tularemia, we compared different strains of the live vaccine strain (LVS) for their relative levels of virulence and ability to protect C57BL/6 mice against challenge with virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4. Successful vaccination, as defined by survival of C57BL/6 mice, was correlated with significantly greater numbers of effector T cells in the spleen and lung. Further, lung cells and splenocytes from fully protected animals were more effective than lung cells and splenocytes from vaccinated but nonimmune animals in limiting intracellular replication of SchuS4 in vitro. Together, our data provide a unique model to compare efficacious vaccines to nonefficacious vaccines, which will enable comprehensive identification of host and bacterial components required for immunization against tularemia.

  3. Inclusion of Epitopes That Expand High-Avidity CD4+ T Cells Transforms Subprotective Vaccines to Efficacious Immunogens against Virulent Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lydia M; Crane, Deborah D; Wehrly, Tara D; Fletcher, Joshua R; Jones, Bradley D; Bosio, Catharine M

    2016-10-01

    T cells are the immunological cornerstone in host defense against infections by intracellular bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Francisella tularensis spp. tularensis (Ftt). The general paucity of novel vaccines for Ftt during the past 60 y can, in part, be attributed to the poor understanding of immune parameters required to survive infection. Thus, we developed a strategy utilizing classical immunological tools to elucidate requirements for effective adaptive immune responses directed against Ftt. Following generation of various Francisella strains expressing well-characterized lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitopes, we found that survival correlated with persistence of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells. Function of these cells was confirmed in their ability to more effectively control Ftt replication in vitro. The importance of understanding the Ag-specific response was underscored by our observation that inclusion of an epitope that elicits high-avidity CD4(+) T cells converted a poorly protective vaccine to one that engenders 100% protection. Taken together, these data suggest that improved efficacy of current tularemia vaccine platforms will require targeting appropriate Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell responses and that elucidation of Francisella epitopes that elicit high-avidity CD4(+) T cell responses, specifically in humans, will be required for successful vaccine development. PMID:27543611

  4. Flow Cytometric Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibodies in Experimentally Infected and Naturally Exposed Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, P. S.; Bulun, H.; Fischer, M.; Akineden, Ö.; Seeger, T.; Barth, S.; Henrich, M.; Doll, K.; Bülte, M.; Menge, C.; Bauerfeind, R.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable test to diagnose infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis facilitates identification of infected cattle prior to the state of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. This study aimed at adjusting a flow cytometry (FC)-based assay, using intact M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria as the antigen, for diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in calves. Serum samples were collected from experimentally infected (n = 12) and naturally exposed (n = 32) calves. Samples from five calves from positive dams were analyzed to determine the dynamics of maternal antibodies. Samples from adult cattle with defined infection status served as the standard (18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedders, 22 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free). After preadsorption with Mycobacterium phlei, sera were incubated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium bacterial suspensions, respectively, followed by the separate detection of bovine IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgM attached to the bacterial surface. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific sample/positive (S/P) ratios were compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) S/P ratios. In adult cattle, the FC assay for IgG1 had a sensitivity of 78% at a specificity of 100%. Maternally acquired antibodies could be detected in calves up to 121 days of life. While all but two sera taken at day 100 ± 10 postnatum from naturally exposed calves tested negative, elevated S/P ratios (IgG and IgG1) became detectable from 44 and 46 weeks postinoculation onwards in two calves infected experimentally. Even with the optimized FC assay, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibodies can only occasionally be detected in infected calves less than 12 months of age. The failure to detect such antibodies apparently reflects the distinct immunobiology of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections rather than methodological constraints. PMID:23885032

  5. Quantification of the Sensitivity of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica to Low pH and High Organic Acids using Propidium Monoazide and Quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Map) and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica (S. enterica) are two pathogens that are a concern to food and animal safety due to their ability to withstand harsh conditions encountered in the natural environment and within the host during pathogenesis. Acid...

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come. PMID:24686769

  7. Description of a Novel Adhesin of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP