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Sample records for substorm growth phase

  1. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng

    2003-10-22

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

  2. Magnetotail and Ionospheric Evolution during the Substorm Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, M.; Otto, A.

    2013-12-01

    The growth phase of geomagnetic substorms is characterized by the equatorward motion of the growth phase arc close to or even into the region of diffuse aurora characteristic for a dipolar magnetic field. The presented results use a model of current sheet thinning based on midnight magnetic flux depletion (MMFD) in the near-Earth tail which is caused by sunward convection to replenish magnetic flux that is eroded on the dayside by magnetic reconnection during periods of southward IMF. The results use a three-dimensional mesocale MHD simulation of the near-Earth tail. This paper examines the changes of the near-Earth magnetotail region mapped into the ionopshere. Of specific interest are the changes in magnetic flux, flux tube entropy, field-aligned currents, convection, and the size and location of the respective ionospheric footprints of the magnetotail structure and properties. The mapping method is based on the Tsyganenko [1996] magnetic field model combined with magnetic flux conservation. It is found that the mapped magnetotail properties move equatorward by about 2 to 3 degrees during the growth phase. The removal of magnetic flux in the near-Earth tail causes a contraction of the ionospheric footprints of this tail region such that all of the mapped magnetotail structures move equatorward. The thin current is mapped into the region where magnetic flux is strongly depleted, and in close proximity with strong and narrow region 1 and 2 sense field-aligned currents. Our ionospheric maps also show a sharp transition between the dipole and stretched magnetic field and an evolution of thinning and convergent motion of field-aligned currents in the late growth phase.

  3. Increases in plasma sheet temperature with solar wind driving during substorm growth phases.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, C; Watt, C E J; Rae, I J; Fazakerley, A N; Kalmoni, N M E; Freeman, M P; Boakes, P D; Nakamura, R; Dandouras, I; Kistler, L M; Jackman, C M; Coxon, J C; Carr, C M

    2014-12-28

    During substorm growth phases, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause extracts ∼10(15) J from the solar wind which is then stored in the magnetotail lobes. Plasma sheet pressure increases to balance magnetic flux density increases in the lobes. Here we examine plasma sheet pressure, density, and temperature during substorm growth phases using 9 years of Cluster data (>316,000 data points). We show that plasma sheet pressure and temperature are higher during growth phases with higher solar wind driving, whereas the density is approximately constant. We also show a weak correlation between plasma sheet temperature before onset and the minimum SuperMAG AL (SML) auroral index in the subsequent substorm. We discuss how energization of the plasma sheet before onset may result from thermodynamically adiabatic processes; how hotter plasma sheets may result in magnetotail instabilities, and how this relates to the onset and size of the subsequent substorm expansion phase.

  4. Increases in plasma sheet temperature with solar wind driving during substorm growth phases

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, C; Watt, C E J; Rae, I J; Fazakerley, A N; Kalmoni, N M E; Freeman, M P; Boakes, P D; Nakamura, R; Dandouras, I; Kistler, L M; Jackman, C M; Coxon, J C; Carr, C M

    2014-01-01

    During substorm growth phases, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause extracts ∼1015 J from the solar wind which is then stored in the magnetotail lobes. Plasma sheet pressure increases to balance magnetic flux density increases in the lobes. Here we examine plasma sheet pressure, density, and temperature during substorm growth phases using 9 years of Cluster data (>316,000 data points). We show that plasma sheet pressure and temperature are higher during growth phases with higher solar wind driving, whereas the density is approximately constant. We also show a weak correlation between plasma sheet temperature before onset and the minimum SuperMAG AL (SML) auroral index in the subsequent substorm. We discuss how energization of the plasma sheet before onset may result from thermodynamically adiabatic processes; how hotter plasma sheets may result in magnetotail instabilities, and how this relates to the onset and size of the subsequent substorm expansion phase. PMID:26074645

  5. Particle scattering and current sheet stability in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Pellinen, R. J.; Buechner, J.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Lopez, R. E.; Dyson, R. L.; Frank, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    The particle scattering and current sheet stability features in the geomagnetic tail during the phase of substorm growth were investigated using Tsyganenko's (1989) magnetic field model. In a study of four substorm events which were observed both in the high-altitude nightside tail and in the auroral ionosphere, the model magnetic field was adjusted to each case so as to represent the global field development during the growth phase of the substorms. The model results suggest that the auroral brightenings are connected with processes taking place in the near-earth region inside about 15 earth radii. The results also suggest that there is a connection between the chaotization of the electrons and the auroral brightenings at substorm onset.

  6. What the Polar Cap Tells Us about the Substorm Growth Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D.; Wilber, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The polar cap region in the 30 to 60 minute period prior to the onset of the auroral substorm has been examined using global images from the Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) to look for observational evidence of processes related to the substorm growth phase. In particular, the area of the polar cap has been measured to determine changes in its size in relation to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). It was found that the size of the polar cap region increases during the growth phase even if the IMF has no southward component. Three phenomena have been observed to produce the increase in the size of the polar cap: (1) motion of the auroral oval to lower latitude, (2) thinning of the auroral oval, and (3) reduction of intense auroral precipitation in the polar cap region. The first phenomenon has been considered to be a result of the growth of the tail lobe magnetic field and the second is related to the thinning of the plasma sheet. Both of these have been supported by in situ observational evidence and are consistent with current models of substorm development. However, the third phenomenon appears to be unrelated to the first two and does not appear to be the result of opening of the polar cap flux tubes to the solar wind IMF. This reduction of auroral precipitation provides evidence of a growth phase process, or change in auroral precipitation processes, that is not explained by current substorm models.

  7. Current carriers in the near-earth cross-tail current sheet during substorm growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Throughout most of the growth phase of a substorm, the cross-tail current at x about -10 Re can be supplied by the curvature drift of a bi-directional field aligned distribution of 1 keV electrons. Just prior to its local disruption after substorm onset, the cross-tail current in the now thin (about 400 km) current sheet is carried by the cross-tail serpentine motion of non-adiabatic ions (Speiser, 1965). The instability of this latter current leads to the local disruption of the near-earth current sheet.

  8. Global Observation of Substorm Growth Phase Processes in the Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M.; OFillingim, M. O.; Chua, D.; Wilber, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Global images of the polar cap region during the substorm growth phase by the Polar Ultraviolet Imager reveals evidence of the processes which are not completely explained by current models. In particular, it was found that size of the polar cap region increases during the growth phase even if the interplanetary magnetic field has no southward component. Three phenomena were observed to produce an increase in the size of the polar cap: (1) motion of the auroral oval to lower latitude, (2) thinning of the auroral oval, and (3) reduction of intense aurora[ precipitation in the polar region. Correlation of image intensities with in situ particle measurements from the FAST satellite are being conducted to study the three growth phase phenomena; and to help identify the source regions of the particles, the mechanisms involved in producing the auroral structures and what may be reducing the polar cap precipitation during the substorm growth phase.

  9. A Double-Disruption Substorm Model - The Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    sufficiently that the NSh reaches the outer radiation belt at about t=85 min, the ionospheric conductivity has grown sufficiently that the XTJ disrupted by the DZs changes its dawn-to-dusk closure by travelling through the ionosphere. This second stage of disruption is the Substorm Current Wedge (SCW). Onset follows at about t=88 min.

  10. Growth-phase thinning of the near-Earth current sheet during the CDAW 6 substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanny, Jeff; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.; Baker, D. N.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Nishida, A.

    1994-01-01

    The thinning of the near-Earth current sheet during the growth phase of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 magnetospheric substorm is studied. The expansion onset of the substorm occurred at 1054 UT, March 22, 1979. During the growth phase, two spacecraft, International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 and ISEE 2, were within the current sheet approximately 13 R(sub E) from the Earth and obtained simultaneous high-resolution magnetic data at two points in the current sheet. Plasma data were also provided by the ISEE spacecraft and solar wind data by IMP 8. To facilitate the analysis, the GSM magnetic field data are transformed to a 'neutral sheet coordinate system' in which the new x axis is parallel to the average magnetic field above and below the neutral sheet and the new y axis lies in the GSM equatorial plane. A model based on the assumption that the current sheet is a time-invariant structure fails to predict neutral sheet crossing times. Consequently, the Harris sheet model, which allows one to remove the restriction of time invariancy, is used instead. It is found that during the growth phase, a model parameter corresponding to the thickness of the current sheet decreased exponentially from about 5 R(sub E) to 1 R(sub E) with a time constant of about 14 min. In addition, the ISEE 1 and ISEE 2 neutral sheet crossings after expansion onset indicate that the neutral sheet was moving upward at 7 km/s relative to the spacecraft. Since both crossings occurred in approximately 80 s, the current sheet thickness is estimated to be about 500 km. These results demonstrate that the near-Earth current sheet undergoes dramatic thinning during the substorm growth phase and expansion onset.

  11. Near-earth Thin Current Sheets and Birkeland Currents during Substorm Growth Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng

    2003-04-30

    Two important phenomena observed during the magnetospheric substorm growth phase are modeled: the formation of a near-Earth (|X| {approx} 9 R{sub E}) thin cross-tail current sheet, as well as the equatorward shift of the ionospheric Birkeland currents. Our study is performed by solving the 3-D force-balance equation with realistic boundary conditions and pressure distributions. The results show a cross-tail current sheet with large current (J{sub {phi}} {approx} 10 nA/m{sup 2}) and very high plasma {beta} ({beta} {approx} 40) between 7 and 10 R{sub E}. The obtained region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents, formed on closed field lines due to pressure gradients, move equatorward and become more intense (J{sub {parallel}max} {approx} 3 {micro}A/m{sup 2}) compared to quiet times. Both results are in agreement with substorm growth phase observations. Our results also predict that the cross-tail current sheet maps into the ionosphere in the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents.

  12. Formation of a very thin current sheet in the near-earth magnetotail and the explosive growth phase of substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Zhang, L.; Choe, G. S.; Cai, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetofricional method is used to construct two-dimensional MHD equilibria of the Earth's magnetosphere for a given distribution of entropy functions(S = pV(exp gamma), where p is the plasma pressure and V is the tube volume per unit magnetic flux. It is found that a very thin current sheet with B (sub zeta) is less than 0.5 nu T and thickness less than 1000 km can be formed in the near-earth magnetotail (x is approximately -8 to -20R(sub e) during the growth phase of substorm. The tail current sheets are found to become thinner as the entropy or the entropy gradient increases. It is suggested that the new entropy anti-diffusion instability associated with plasma transport across field lines leads to magnetic field dipolarization and accelerates the formation of thin current sheet, which may explain the observed explosive growth phase of substorms.

  13. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe-B spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0-5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. The observations strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via a local upward FAC.

  14. Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    This chapter deals with the essence of the magnetospheric substorm, the return of magnetic flux into the magnetosphere after disconnection from the solar wind magnetic field. There are three fundamental transport processes involved: (1) thinning of the tail plasma sheet and accompanying recession of the outer boundary of the dipolar magnetosphere during the growth phase, (2) flux transport along the tail toward that boundary after onset of tail reconnection, and (3) penetration of plasma and magnetic flux into the dipolar magnetosphere. The chapter then looks at corresponding processes in the Jupiter and Saturn magnetospheres and tails, which are strongly dominated by the fast planetary rotations. It elucidates some key aspects of the entry problem, albeit from a personal vantage point, and addresses the still open questions. Finally, the chapter addresses the correlation between solar wind ram pressure and auroral activity and brightness on Jupiter and Saturn.

  15. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    DOE PAGES

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; ...

    2015-10-27

    In this study, magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arcmore » location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2–5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.« less

  16. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    SciTech Connect

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2–5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.

  17. PC index and magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    PC index is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС index growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC index exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.

  18. Is energy storage and release part of the substorm process?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Models for magnetospheric substorms were considered. A modified model which includes the growth phase, a time interval prior to the onset of the expansion phase, during which energy was transferred from a solar wind to the magnetosphere and stored for subsequent release, is discussed. Evidence for energy storage in the tail prior to substorm expansion for both isolated and moderate substorm activity is reviewed.

  19. Poleward leaping auroras, the substorm expansive and recovery phases and the recovery of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W.

    1992-05-01

    The auroral motions and geomagnetic changes the characterize the substorm`s expansive phase, maximum epoch, and recovery phase are discussed in the context of their possible associations with the dropout and, especially, the recovery of the magnetotail plasma sheet. The evidence that there may be an inordinately sudden large poleward excursion or displacement (a poleward leap) of the electrojet and the auroras at the expansive phase-recovery phase transition is described. The close temporal association of these signatures with the recovery of the plasma sheet, observed on many occasions, suggests a causal relationship between substorm maximum epoch and recovery phase on the one hand and plasma sheet recovery on the other.

  20. Investigation of isolated substorms: Generation conditions and characteristics of different phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Zverev, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    Characteristics of isolated substorms selected by variations in the 1-min values of the AL index are analyzed. The substorms were divided into several types with respect to the behavior of the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the expansion phase. The probability of observations of substorms associated with the northward turn of the Bz component of IMF was 19%, while the substorms taking place at Bz < 0 were observed in 53% of cases. A substantial number of events in which no substorm magnetic activity was observed in the auroral zone after a long (>30 min) period of the southward IMF and a following sharp turn of the Bz component of IMF before the north was detected. The data suggest that a northward IMF turn is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition for generating substorms. It has been shown for substorms of the both types that the average duration of the southward IMF to moment T 0 and the average intensity of the magnetic perturbation in the maximum are approximately the same and amount to 80 min and-650 nT, respectively. However, for substorms at Bz < 0, their mean duration, including the expansive and recovery phases, is on average 30 min longer than that at a northward turn of IMF. Correlations between the loading-unloading processes in the magnetosphere in the periods of magnetospheric substorms were investigated with different functions that determine the efficiency of the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. It has been shown that the highest correlation coefficient ( r = 0.84) is observed when the function suggested by Newell et al. (2007) is used. It has been detected that a simple function VB S yields a high correlation coefficient ( r = 0.75).

  1. Contributions of substorm injections to SYM-H depressions in the main phase of storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohai; Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; Zhang, Lingqian; Chen, Tao; Roth, I.

    2016-12-01

    Substorm injections bring energetic particles to the inner magnetosphere. But the role of the injected population in building up the storm time ring current is not well understood. By surveying Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous data during 34 storm main phases, we show evidence that at least some substorm injections can contribute to substorm-time scale SYM-H/Dst depressions in the main phase of storms. For event studies, we analyze two typical events in which the main-phase SYM-H index exhibited stepwise depressions that are correlated with particle flux enhancement due to injections and with AL index. A statistical study is performed based on 95 storm time injection events. The flux increases of the injected population (50-400 keV) are found proportional to the sharp SYM-H depressions during the injection interval. By identifying dispersionless and dispersive injection signals, we estimate the azimuthal extent of the substorm injection. Statistical results show that the injection regions of these storm time substorms are characterized with an azimuthal extent larger than 06:00 magnetic local time. These results suggest that at least some substorm injections may mimic the large-scale enhanced convection and contribute to sharp decreases of Dst in the storm main phase.

  2. Traveling compression region observed in the mid-tail lobes near substorm expansion phase onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Nose, M.

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of traveling compression regions (TCRs) in the midtail lobes are examined. Through the use of the AL index, isolated substorm events with well developed expansion phases are selected. The TCR events which feature a field compression coincident with modified Bz variations are categorized into different types, and the magnetic variations are interpreted in terms of the relative location of the point of observation to the plasmoid at the time of release and the effects of tail flaring. In order to understand the relationship between the plasmoid release time and the substorm onset time, the time difference between the different types of TCR and the substorm onset determined by Pi 2 pulsations at mid-latitude ground stations, is examined. The results suggest that the downtail release of most of the plasmoids created earthwards of -38 earth radii occurs at almost the same distance as the substorm onset.

  3. Substorm evolution of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Juusola, L.; Whiter, D.; Kauristie, K.

    2015-07-01

    Auroral arcs are often associated with magnetically quiet time and substorm growth phases. We have studied the evolution of auroral structures during global and local magnetic activity to investigate the occurrence rate of auroral arcs during different levels of magnetic activity. The ground-magnetic and auroral conditions are described by the magnetometer and auroral camera data from five Magnetometers — Ionospheric radars — All-sky cameras Large Experiment stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland. We identified substorm growth, expansion, and recovery phases from the local electrojet index (IL) in 1996-2007 and analyzed the auroral structures during the different phases. Auroral structures were also analyzed during different global magnetic activity levels, as described by the planetary Kp index. The distribution of auroral structures for all substorm phases and Kp levels is of similar shape. About one third of all detected structures are auroral arcs. This suggests that auroral arcs occur in all conditions as the main element of the aurora. The most arc-dominated substorm phases occur in the premidnight sector, while the least arc-dominated substorm phases take place in the dawn sector. Arc event lifetimes and expectation times calculated for different substorm phases show that the longest arc-dominated periods are found during growth phases, while the longest arc waiting times occur during expansion phases. Most of the arc events end when arcs evolve to more complex structures. This is true for all substorm phases. Based on the number of images of auroral arcs and the durations of substorm phases, we conclude that a randomly selected auroral arc most likely belongs to a substorm expansion phase. A small time delay, of the order of a minute, is observed between the magnetic signature of the substorm onset (i.e., the beginning of the negative bay) and the auroral breakup (i.e., the growth phase arc changing into a dynamic display). The magnetic onset was

  4. Poleward leaping auroras, the substorm expansive and recovery phases and the recovery of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    The auroral motions and geomagnetic changes the characterize the substorm's expansive phase, maximum epoch, and recovery phase are discussed in the context of their possible associations with the dropout and, especially, the recovery of the magnetotail plasma sheet. The evidence that there may be an inordinately sudden large poleward excursion or displacement (a poleward leap) of the electrojet and the auroras at the expansive phase-recovery phase transition is described. The close temporal association of these signatures with the recovery of the plasma sheet, observed on many occasions, suggests a causal relationship between substorm maximum epoch and recovery phase on the one hand and plasma sheet recovery on the other.

  5. Identification of critical substorm-expansion-phase phenomena: Problems addressable with GEM observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Understanding the physics of the substorm process is currently a crucial topic in magnetospheric physics. Fundamental to this understanding is the determination of what phenomena occur in the magnetosphere during the expansion phase, where these phenomena occur, and how they propagate during the expansion phase. Satellite observations have given researchers important point measurements of what happens; however there is potential for enhancing the use of ground-based observations to study the substorm phenomena. Such enhanced use of ground-based measurements is already taking place as part of the GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) boundary-layer campaign and is planned to continue throughout the tail/substorm campaign. This report identifies expansion-phase phenomena observed locally within the nightside magnetosphere and from the ground, believed to be of fundamental importance for understanding large-scale substorm processes. The phenomena observed in situ are related to the phenomena observed from the ground. The primary goal is to identify outstanding questions that could be addressed during the GEM tail/substorm campaign using ground-based data from GEM observing periods in coordination with available satellite observations.

  6. Modeling substorm dynamics of the magnetosphere: from self-organization and self-organized criticality to nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Sitnov, M I; Sharma, A S; Papadopoulos, K; Vassiliadis, D

    2002-01-01

    Earth's magnetosphere during substorms exhibits a number of characteristic features such as the signatures of low effective dimension, hysteresis, and power-law spectra of fluctuations on different scales. The largest substorm phenomena are in reasonable agreement with low-dimensional magnetospheric models and in particular those of inverse bifurcation. However, deviations from the low-dimensional picture are also quite considerable, making the nonequilibrium phase transition more appropriate as a dynamical analog of the substorm activity. On the other hand, the multiscale magnetospheric dynamics cannot be limited to the features of self-organized criticality (SOC), which is based on a class of mathematical analogs of sandpiles. Like real sandpiles, during substorms the magnetosphere demonstrates features, that are distinct from SOC and are closer to those of conventional phase transitions. While the multiscale substorm activity resembles second-order phase transitions, the largest substorm avalanches are shown to reveal the features of first-order nonequilibrium transitions including hysteresis phenomena and a global structure of the type of a temperature-pressure-density diagram. Moreover, this diagram allows one to find a critical exponent, that reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from the power-law frequency and scale spectra of autonomous systems, although quite consistent with second-order phase transitions. In contrast to SOC exponents, this exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. Using an analogy to the dynamical Ising model in the mean-field approximation, we show the connection between the data-derived exponent of nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere and the standard critical exponent beta of equilibrium second-order phase transitions.

  7. Magnetospheric Substorm Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1998-01-01

    It was proposed that the expansion phase of substorms results from a reduction in the large-scale electric field imparted to the magnetosphere from the solar wind, following a greater than or equal to 30 min growth phase due to an enhancement in this electric field. The reduction in the electric field is assumed to propagate anti-sunward within the magnetosphere. Triggering by a reduction in the electric field is suggested by the observation that substorms are often triggered by northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). However, under the theory presented here, substorms may be triggered by anything that causes an electric field reduction such as a reduction in the magnitude of the y-component of the IMF. A reduction in the large-scale electric field disrupts both the inward motion and energization of plasma sheet particles that occurs during the growth phase. It is suggested here that this can lead to formation of the expansion-phase current wedge and active aurora. The current wedge results from the magnetic drift of ions, which has a speed proportional to particle energy, and a large azimuthal gradient in mean particle energy that is expected to develop in the vicinity of magnetic midnight during the growth phase. Current wedge formation will most likely be initiated near the radial distance (approx. 6- 10 R(sub E)) of the peak in the growth-phase plasma pressure distribution, and then propagate tailward from that region. Order-of-magnitude calculations show that the above proposal can account for the rapid development of the expansion phase relative to the growth phase, the magnitude of the reduction in the cross-tail current within the current wedge, the speeds of tailward and westward expansion of the current reduction region, the speeds of poleward and westward motion of active aurora in the ionosphere, and the magnitude of wedge field-aligned currents that connect the ionospheric region of active auroral to the divergent cross

  8. Statistical properties of substorm auroral onset beads/rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Yang, J.; Pritchett, P. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Donovan, E. F.; Lyons, L. R.; Wolf, R. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mende, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    Auroral substorms are often associated with optical ray or bead structures during initial brightening (substorm auroral onset waves). Occurrence probabilities and properties of substorm onset waves have been characterized using 112 substorm events identified in Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager data and compared to Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) and kinetic instability properties. All substorm onsets were found to be associated with optical waves, and thus, optical waves are a common feature of substorm onset. Eastward propagating wave events are more frequent than westward propagating wave events and tend to occur during lower-latitude substorms (stronger solar wind driving). The wave propagation directions are organized by orientation of initial brightening arcs. We also identified notable differences in wave propagation speed, wavelength (wave number), period, and duration between westward and eastward propagating waves. In contrast, the wave growth rate does not depend on the propagation direction or substorm strength but is inversely proportional to the wave duration. This suggests that the waves evolve to poleward expansion at a certain intensity threshold and that the wave properties do not directly relate to substorm strengths. However, waves are still important for mediating the transition between the substorm growth phase and poleward expansion. The relation to arc orientation can be explained by magnetotail structures in the RCM-E, indicating that substorm onset location relative to the pressure peak determines the wave propagation direction. The measured wave properties agree well with kinetic ballooning interchange instability, while cross-field current instability and electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability give much larger propagation speed and smaller wave period.

  9. Lower thermospheric wind variations in auroral patches during the substorm recovery phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Brenton J.; Kurihara, Junichi; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Fallen, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the lower thermospheric wind with a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Tromsø, Norway, found the largest wind variations in a night during the appearance of auroral patches at the substorm recovery phase. Taking into account magnetospheric substorm evolution of plasma energy accumulation and release, the largest wind amplitude at the recovery phase is a fascinating result. The results are the first detailed investigation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system at the substorm recovery phase using comprehensive data sets of solar wind, geomagnetic field, auroral pattern, and FPI-derived wind. This study used three events in November 2010 and January 2012, particularly focusing on the wind signatures associated with the auroral morphology, and found three specific features: (1) wind fluctuations that were isolated at the edge and/or in the darker area of an auroral patch with the largest vertical amplitude up to about 20 m/s and with the longest oscillation period about 10 min, (2) when the convection electric field was smaller than 15 mV/m, and (3) wind fluctuations that were accompanied by pulsating aurora. This approach suggests that the energy dissipation to produce the wind fluctuations is localized in the auroral pattern. Effects of the altitudinal variation in the volume emission rate were investigated to evaluate the instrumental artifact due to vertical wind shear. The small electric field values suggest weak contributions of the Joule heating and Lorentz force processes in wind fluctuations. Other unknown mechanisms may play a principal role at the recovery phase.

  10. Tests of Substorm Models' Predictions Using ISTP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Ennio R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides progress to test the predictions of substorm models using ISTP observations. During the first year, two investigations were initiated in collaboration with a number of ISTP researchers. Both investigations use a combination of simultaneous measurements from high-, low-, and ground-altitude instruments to: (1) explore the role of MHD resonances in the onset and evolution of substorms, and (2) establish the timing of events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere during the substorm evolution beginning with the growth phase and ending with the recovery phase.

  11. Theory of substorm onset and dipolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Zaharia, S.

    2003-04-01

    We present a theory of substorm onset and dipolarization. At the end of the substorm growth phase, the plasma pressure profile steepens and a thin current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet around the local midnight with a finite radial and azimuthal domain. In the current sheet the plasma beta becomes about 50 or larger and magnetic field curvature is enhanced, and the kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) is excited with amplitude localized at the maximum plasma beta region. The KBI explains the low frequency (about 1 min period) instability observed by AMPTE/CCE with period on the order of 1 min is observed about 2-3 minutes before the substorm onset [Cheng and Lui, GRL, 1998]. The KBI is responsible for substorm onset because as it grows to a large amplitude with Δ B/B > 01, it causes an enhanced westward ion drift during the explosive growth phase that lasts about 30 sec. The KBI then excites higher frequency instabilities, and the plasma and magnetic field become strongly turbulent. The plasma transport in both radial and azimuthal direction caused by the turbulence relaxes the steep plasma pressure profile during the expansion phase. As the plasma pressure profile relaxes, the magnetic field configuration dipolarizes and returns to the pre-substorm more dipole-like geometry. Theories of current sheet formation, KBI mechanism and dipolarization will be presented along with numerical solutions of 3D magnetospheric structure.

  12. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  13. Evolution of magnetic configurations in the plasma sheet during a substorm on March 19, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I. )

    1991-09-01

    Evolution of the magnetic field configuration in the plasma sheet is modeled for an intense substorm event on March 19, 1978. The model is based on the idea that the substorm enhanced field-aligned currents are initiated in the ionosphere in response to an enhanced magnetospheric convection. The field-aligned currents in the model are determined from the ground-based magnetometer data with a time resolution of 5 min. The substorm field-aligned currents are assumed to close in the plasma sheet to complete the substorm current circuit. It is shown that the magnetic field produced by the substorm current system in the model can reproduce several important substorm signatures observed in the plasma sheet. These signatures include the taillike reconfiguration in the plasma sheet during the growth phase, the dipolarization of the plasma sheet associated with the substorm expansion onset, and the formation of a new X line. A shortcoming of the model is that the plasma dynamics in the plasma sheet have been ignored. In spite of this shortcoming, however, the model demonstrates that the ionosphere, in response to an enhanced magnetospheric convection, can cause the plasma sheet to change its magnetic configuration to result in the substorm signatures observed in the plasma sheet. The present study shows that it is possible for the ionosphere to play an active role in causing the observed reconfigurations of the plasma sheet during substorms.

  14. Strong induction effects during the substorm on 27 August 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, V. V.; Mishin, V. M.; Lunyushkin, S. B.; Pu, Z.; Wang, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on strong induction effects notably contributing to the cross polar cap potential drop and the energy balance during the growth and active phases of the substorm on 27 August 2001. The inductance of the magnetosphere is found to be crucial for the energy balance and electrical features of the magnetosphere in the course of the substorm. The inductive response to the switching on and off of the solar wind-magnetosphere generator exceeds the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) variation. The induction effects are most apparent during the substorm expansion onset when the rapid growth of the ionospheric conductivity is accompanied by the fast release of the magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail during the growth phase. Using the magnetogram inversion technique, we estimated the magnetospheric inductance and effective ionospheric conductivity during the loading and unloading phases.

  15. Comparative study on dynamics associated with terrestrial and Jovian substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yasong

    Terrestrial substorms have been studied for over four decades and our understanding about this phenomenon has improved through those studies. However, many issues regarding substorms are still controversial, especially the initiation mechanism of substorm onset. To understand the initiation mechanism, we have to first answer some important questions. What is the substorm expansion onset? What is the physics behind its phenomenological definition? Where does the initiation start? What is the relation of tail reconnection with near-Earth onsets? Where does tail reconnection occur? While one way to understand better the physics of substorms is to increase the number of spacecraft and the resolution of ground observations, another way is to compare substorm phenomena between different planets. In this study, we investigate the different phases of substorms both on the Earth and Jupiter. For Jovian dynamic event, we need to know if they are substorms? How are they driven? How can we better understand terrestrial substorms through studying Jovian substorms? We used Polar, GOES, Cluster and ground-station observations to study terrestrial substorms and used the Galileo observations to study Jovian dynamic events. A 3-day growth phase of Jovian substorm is discovered, which is also found driven by the internal processes including mass-loading at Io instead of the solar wind. This discovery establishes the substorm nature of those dynamics events which have counterparts of key elements of terrestrial substorms, including the connection of those events with the Jupiter's polar auroral activity. Near-planet dipolarization caused by the mid-tail reconnection is also investigated. In the near-Earth tail region, dipolarizations appear to be associated with mid-tail reconnections, near-tail flow braking and formation of substorm current wedge. In both magnetospheres, major onsets of substorms are found to be due to the major tail reconnection which can globally release the loaded

  16. Coupling between pre-onset flows and substorm onset waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable pre-onset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well-instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multi-spectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields-of-view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These pre-onset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where pre-existing stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from further downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  17. Global and local current sheet thickness estimates during the late growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Mcpherron, Robert L.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    The thinning and intensification of the cross tail current sheet during the substorm growth phase are analyzed during the CDAW 6 substorm (22 Mar. 1979) using two complementary methods. The magnetic field and current sheet development are determined using data from two spacecraft and a global magnetic field model with several free parameters. These results are compared with the local calculation of the current sheet location and structure previously done by McPherron et al. Both methods lead to the conclusion that an extremely thin current sheet existed prior to the substorm onset, and the thicknesses estimated by the two methods at substorm onset agree relatively well. The plasma data from the ISEE 1 spacecraft at 13 R(sub E) show an anisotropy in the low energy electrons during the growth phase which disappears just before the substorm onset. The global magnetic model results suggest that the field is sufficiently stretched to scatter such low energy electrons. The strong stretching may improve the conditions for the growth of the ion tearing instability in the near Earth tail at substorm onset.

  18. ISEE 3 plasmoid and TCR observations during an extended interval of substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, M. F.; Mazur, E. L.; Baker, D. N.; Iyemori, T.; Singer, H. J.; Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    On April 9-11, 1983, the ISEE 3 spacecraft was continuously located within the earth's magnetotail for more than 36 hours at downstream distances of X = -76 to -80 R(e). During this span of time, 12 major intervals of substorm activity were observed in the AL index with good ISEE 3 telemetry coverage for 11 of them. In addition, there were two small substorms outside of these intervals, both with complete observations in the distant tail. This unusual ISEE 3 data set provides a unique opportunity to test the predictions of the near-earth neutral line model. In particular, the hypothesis that energy stored in the tail lobes during the growth phase is later dissipated, in part, through the release of one or more plasmoids following expansion phase onset is examined. Clear growth phase enhancements in the lobe magnetic field intensity preceded the onsets of nine of the substorms. Plasmoids, or their lobe signatures, traveling compression regions (TCRs), were observed at ISEE 3 in association with all 11 of the major substorm intervals for which there were ISEE observations, as well as for the two small substorms. No plasmoids or TCRs were observed in the absence of substorm activity. If these ISEE 3 observations are representative, then the release of plasmoids down the tail may be a feature common to all substorms.

  19. The recovery phase of the superstrong magnetic storm of July 15-17, 2000: Substorms and ULF pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.

    2009-06-01

    The geomagnetic observations, performed at the global network of ground-based observatories during the recovery phase of the superstrong magnetic storm of July 15-17, 2000 (Bastille Day Event, Dst = -301 nT), have been analyzed. It has been indicated that magnetic activity did not cease at the beginning of the storm recovery phase but abruptly shifted to polar latitudes. Polar cap substorms were accompanied by the development of intense geomagnetic pulsations in the morning sector of auroral latitudes. In this case oscillations at frequencies of 1-2 and 3-4 mHz were observed at geomagnetic latitudes higher and lower than ˜62°, respectively. It has been detected that the spectra of variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure and the amplitude spectra of geomagnetic pulsations on the Earth’s surface were similar. Wave activity unexpectedly appeared in the evening sector of auroral latitudes after the development of near-midnight polar substorms. It has been established that the generation of Pc5 pulsations (in this case at frequencies of 3-4 mHz) was spatially asymmetric about noon during the late stage of the recovery phase of the discussed storm as took place during the recovery phase of the superstrong storms of October and November 2003. Intense oscillations were generated in the morning sector at the auroral latitudes and in the postnoon sector at the subauroral and middle latitudes. The cause of such an asymmetry, typical of the recovery phase of superstrong magnetic storms, remains unknown.

  20. Investigation of triggering mechanism of substorm through the analysis of Geotail and Themis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Auster, H.

    2011-12-01

    In our previous study, we have adopted a superposed epoch analysis method to the Geotail data to understand the triggering mechanism of substorm. Further, we have proposed a new scheme of substorm called "Catapult Current Sheet Relaxation Model" to explain our results. As an extension of these works, we adopted the same method of analysis to the Themis spacecraft data, and found that there are both the same and different characteristics between the results of Themis and Geotail. It is of interest that clear differences are present even if we use the same data set of Themis but adopting different lists of auroral breakups, i.e., substorm onsets. These differences seem to be attributed to the intensity of substorm. Large substorms tend to have southward magnetic field variations related to the plasma sheet thinning which is known as a notable characteristic during a growth phase, near the Earth compared to small substorms. However, the convective earthward flows are weakened just for a few minutes prior to the onset, followed by notable enhancement of the earthward flows after the onset. On the other hand, the southward variations in the magnetic field for small substorms can be seen in the tailward side compared to large substorms. While, the northward magnetic field variations after the onset can be also seen in the tailward side. Furthermore, the earthward convective flows which are not produced by magnetic reconnection seem to develop for moderate class of substorms just prior to the onset. Those differences can be a crucial clue to solve the issue of substorm triggering.

  1. Polar Cap Area and Boundary Motion During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Spann, James F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The area of the polar cap as a function of local time and substorm phase was measured using images from the Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) for different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations during three substorms in January 1997. We measured changes in the polar cap area and motion of the poleward and equatorward boundary of the auroral oval as determined by UVI images. It was found that the polar cap boundary is strongly influenced by thinning of the oval, decrease in polar cap structures, the poleward expansion of the substorm at midnight and the fading of luminosity below the instrument sensitivity threshold. Generally these effects dominate over the latitudinal motion of the auroral oval at its equatorward edge. A new feature is that the polar cap region clears of precipitation during the substorm growth phase, which expands the size of the polar cap but may not necessarily be related to an expansion of the open flux. We present a new finding that the increase in polar cap area prior to onset and the decrease in the area following it are independent of the strength of the southward IMF component. For one case the polar cap area increased while the southward component of the IMF was no less than -0.5 nT. These observations have strong implications for models that use the polar cap area to estimate the magnitude of energy storage in the lobe magnetic field and loss during substorms.

  2. Relation of the auroral substorm to the substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Chu, Xiangning

    2016-12-01

    The auroral substorm is an organized sequence of events seen in the aurora near midnight. It is a manifestation of the magnetospheric substorm which is a disturbance of the magnetosphere brought about by the solar wind transfer of magnetic flux from the dayside to the tail lobes and its return through the plasma sheet to the dayside. The most dramatic feature of the auroral substorm is the sudden brightening and poleward expansion of the aurora. Intimately associated with this expansion is a westward electrical current flowing across the bulge of expanding aurora. This current is fed by a downward field-aligned current (FAC) at its eastern edge and an upward current at its western edge. This current system is called the substorm current wedge (SCW). The SCW forms within a minute of auroral expansion. FAC are created by pressure gradients and field line bending from shears in plasma flow. Both of these are the result of pileup and diversion of plasma flows in the near-earth plasma sheet. The origins of these flows are reconnection sites further back in the tail. The auroral expansion can be explained by a combination of a change in field line mapping caused by the substorm current wedge and a tailward growth of the outer edge of the pileup region. We illustrate this scenario with a complex substorm and discuss some of the problems associated with this interpretation.

  3. Small substorms: Solar wind input and magnetotail dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrukovich, A. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Mukai, T.; Troshichev, O. A.

    We investigated properties of 43 small magnetospheric substorms. Their general signatures were found to be consistent with the so-called contracted oval or northern Bz substorms. Small but clear pressure changes in the tail corresponding to growth and expansion phases detected in about a half of cases testify that these substorms follow the same loading-unloading scheme as the larger ones. However, rate of the solar wind energy accumulation in the magnetosphere was low due to azimuthal IMF orientation with dominating IMFBy and small fluctuating IMFBz. Plasma sheet signatures could be very strong and likely were localized in their cross-tail size. Negative bays in auroral X magnetograms were of order of 100-300 nT, with maxima at Bear Island station (71° geomagnetic latitude) and in few cases were delayed after magnetotail onsets by tens of minutes. Small substorms probably differ from their larger counterparts in a way that coherency of the magnetotail reconfiguration in the inner and middle-tail regions and across the tail is lost in smaller substorms.

  4. Variations of Substorm Electric-field Components Measured with the Poker-Flat Incoherent-Scatter Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudivada, K.; Watkins, B.

    2011-12-01

    North-South and East-West components of the auroral-zone electric field have been measured with the incoherent-scatter radar at Poker-Flat, Alaska. The phased-array technology incorporated with the radar system provides a new method to determine electric fields as a function of latitude with minimal spatial and temporal ambiguity. Successive radar pulses are transmitted in thirteen antenna directions. Doppler data are combined and integrated to determine electric field values from 66 to 68 degrees latitude in 0.25 degree steps. Data periods have been selected when substorm currents, as detected from the Alaskan magnetometer chain, are within range of the radar. Specific events near the onset of magnetic substorms have been examined to determine average variations of the electric field with respect to substorm onset time. The northward component of the field is typically about 20-30mV/m in the evening and transitions to values near zero about one hour before substorm onset (we identify this period as the substorm growth phase) and then adopts southward values about 20-30mV/m at the time of substorm onset. The east-west component values of the electric field are near zero in the evening, and then go to about 10mV/m directed westward during the growth phase and after substorm onset.

  5. Dynamics of the Auroral Luminosity Boundary of the Polar Cap During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Chua, D.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The area of the polar cap during substorms has been measured using images from the Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) for different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Changes in the poleward boundary of auroral luminosity have been analyzed in relation to substorm phase and IMF orientation. Reconnection models of flux transport into the polar cap during the substorm growth phase, and loss from the polar cap during the expansion phase, provide a framework by which these UVI observations can be analyzed. By comparison of the observations with the model predictions we can determine to what extent these models accurately predict the polar cap dynamics, and also where anomalous behavior calls for a new understanding of the dynamics beyond what these models provide. It was found that the polar cap boundary near noon and midnight usually shifted down in latitude by 1-2 degrees and 3-4 degrees respectively, increasing the area of the polar cap during the substorm growth phase as predicted. However, this growth phase phenomenon also unexpectedly occurs independently of the IMF Bz component, as shown for a substorm on January 9, 1997. The polar cap area also increased due to motion of the dawn and dusk aurora to lower latitudes, although the latitudinal shifts were asymmetric, not always concurrent, and continued well into the substorm expansion phase. The polar cap area decreased immediately following the expansion phase due to the poleward motion of the aurora on the nightside, consistent with the model prediction. What is not explained by the models is that the poleward auroral boundary in the nightside region sometimes reached very high latitudes (greater than 80 degrees MLat) greatly decreasing the polar cap area, independent of the magnitude of the substorm.

  6. The relationship between the magnetosphere and magnetospheric/auroral substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    2013-03-01

    On the basis of auroral and polar magnetic substorm studies, the relationship between the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo (the DD dynamo) current and the substorm dynamo (the UL dynamo) current is studied. The characteristics of both the DD and UL currents reveal why auroral substorms consist of the three distinct phases after the input power ɛ is increased above 1018 erg s-1. (a) The growth phase; the magnetosphere can accumulate magnetic energy for auroral substorms, when the ionosphere cannot dissipate the power before the expansion phase. (b) The expansion phase; the magnetosphere releases the accumulated magnetic energy during the growth phase in a pulse-like manner in a few hours, because it tries to stabilize itself when the accumulated energy reaches to about 1023 erg s-1. (c) The recovery phase; the magnetosphere becomes an ordinary dissipative system after the expansion phase, because the ionosphere becomes capable of dissipating the power with the rate of 1018 ~ 1019 erg s-1. On the basis of the above conclusion, it is suggested that the magnetosphere accomplishes the pulse-like release process (resulting in spectacular auroral activities) by producing plasma instabilities in the current sheet, thus reducing the current. The resulting contraction of the magnetic field lines (expending the accumulated magnetic energy), together with break down of the "frozen-in" field condition at distances of less than 10 RE, establishes the substorm dynamo that generates an earthward electric field (Lui and Kamide, 2003; Akasofu, 2011). It is this electric field which manifests as the expansion phase. A recent satellite observation at a distance of as close as 8.1 RE by Lui (2011) seems to support strongly the occurrence of the chain of processes suggested in the above. It is hoped that although the concept presented here is very crude, it will serve in providing one way of studying the three phases of auroral substorms. In turn, a better understanding of auroral

  7. Coordinated ionospheric observations indicating coupling between preonset flow bursts and waves that lead to substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Nicolls, M. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Michell, R. G.; Samara, M.; Bristow, W. A.; Donovan, E. F.; Spanswick, E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mende, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable preonset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multispectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields of view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI, and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These preonset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where preexisting stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from farther downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  8. ``Polar'' and ``high-latitude'' substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, Irina; Lubchich, Andris; Kleimenova, Natalia

    All substorms observed at high latitudes can be divided into 2 types - "polar" (observed only at > 70º latitudes in the absence of substorms at <70º latitudes during the day) and "high-latitude" substorms (propagating from auroral (<70º) to polar (> 70º) geomagnetic latitudes). The aim of this study was to compare solar wind conditions during these two types of substorms. For this purpose, we used the data of IMAGE magnetometers and OMNI solar wind data for 1995, 2000, 2006-2011 periods. There were selected 105 "polar" and 55 "high-latitude" substorms. It is shown that "polar" substorms observed during the late recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm, after passing of the high speed stream of the solar wind (when the velocity is reduced from high to low values). "High-latitude" substorms, on the contrary, are observed during passing of the recurrent high-speed stream of the solar wind, increased values of the southward B _{Z }component of the IMF and E _{Y} component of the electric field, increased temperature and pressure of the solar wind. Also, it is noted that variability of these solar wind parameters for the “high-latitude” substorms is stronger than for “polar” substorms.

  9. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  10. Substorm electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1990-01-01

    The present one-dimensional model analysis of substorm electrodynamics proceeds from the standard scenario in which the plasma sheet collapses into a neutral sheet, and magnetic merging occurs between the two tail lobes; plasma flows into the neutral sheet from the lobes and the sides, undergoing acceleration in the dawn-dusk direction. The process is modified by the tendency of the accelerated plasma to unbalance charge neutrality, leading to an exchange of electrons with the ionosphere in order to maintain neutrality. The cross-tail current is weakened by the diversion: this reduces the adjacent lobe-field intensity, but without notable effects apart from a slight expansion of the tail boundary.

  11. A superposed epoch analysis of auroral evolution during substorms: Local time of onset region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.; Hubert, B.

    2010-10-01

    Previous workers have shown that the magnetic local time (MLT) of substorm onset depends on the prevailing east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). To investigate the influence of the onset MLT on the subsequent auroral response we perform a superposed epoch analysis of the auroral evolution during approximately 2000 substorms using observations from the FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. We subdivide the substorms by onset latitude and onset local time before determining average auroral images before and after substorm onset, for both electron and proton aurorae. We find that during the growth phase there is preexisting auroral emission in the MLT sector of the subsequent onset. After onset the auroral bulge expands eastward and westward, but remains centered on the onset sector. Approximately 30 min after onset, during the substorm recovery phase, the peaks in electron and proton auroral emission move into the postnoon and prenoon sectors, respectively, reflecting the “average” auroral precipitation patterns determined by previous studies. Superposed epoch analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field for the substorms under study suggests that the BY component of the IMF must be biased toward positive or negative values for up to a day prior to onset for the onset MLT to be influenced.

  12. MESSENGER observations of substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Slavin, James; Fu, Suiyan; Raines, Jim; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Yao, Zhonghua; Pu, Zuyin; Shi, Quanqi; Poh, Gangkai; Boardsen, Scott; Imber, Suzanne; Sundberg, Torbjörn; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been examined for evidence of substorm activity. A total of 32 events were found during which an Earth-like growth phase was followed by clear near-tail expansion phase signatures. During the growth phase, the lobe of the tail loads with magnetic flux while the plasma sheet thins due to the increased lobe magnetic pressure. MESSENGER is often initially in the plasma sheet and then moves into the lobe during the growth phases. The averaged time scale of the loading is around 1 min, consistent with previous observations of Mercury's Dungey cycle. The dipolarization front that marks the initiation of the substorm expansion phase is only a few seconds in duration. The spacecraft then abruptly enters the plasma sheet due to the plasma sheet expansion as reconnection-driven flow from the near-Mercury neutral line encounters the stronger magnetic fields closer to the planet. Substorm activity in the near tail of Mercury is quantitatively very similar to the Earth despite the very compressed time scale.

  13. Substorm theories: United they stand, divided they fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    1995-01-01

    Consensus on the timing and mapping of substorm features has permitted a synthesis of substorm models. Within the synthesis model the mechanism for onset of substorm expansion is still unknown. Possible mechanisms are: growth of an ion tearing mode, current disruption by a cross-field current instability, and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. While the synthesis model is consistent with overall substorm morphology, including near-Earth onset, none of the onset theories, taken individually, appear to account for substorm expansion onset. A grand synthesis with unification of the underlying onset theories appears necessary.

  14. The detailed spatial structure of field-aligned currents comprising the substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Waters, Colin L.; Frey, Harald U.; Kale, Andy; Singer, Howard J.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive two-dimensional view of the field-aligned currents (FACs) during the late growth and expansion phases for three isolated substorms utilizing in situ observations from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment and from ground-based magnetometer and optical instrumentation from the Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms ground-based arrays. We demonstrate that the structure of FACs formed during the expansion phase and associated with the substorm current wedge is significantly more complex than a simple equivalent line current model comprising a downward FAC in the east and upward FAC in the west. This two-dimensional view demonstrates that azimuthal bands of upward and downward FACs with periodic structuring in latitude form across midnight and can span up to 8 h of magnetic local time. However, when averaged over latitude, the overall longitudinal structure of the net FACs resembles the simpler equivalent line current description of the substorm current wedge (SCW). In addition, we demonstrate that the upward FAC elements of the structured SCW are spatially very well correlated with discrete aurora during the substorm expansion phase and that discrete changes in the FAC topology are observed in the late growth phase prior to auroral substorm expansion phase onset. These observations have important implications for determining how the magnetosphere and ionosphere couple during the late growth phase and expansion phase, as well as providing important constraints on the magnetospheric generator of the FACs comprising the SCW.

  15. Midday auroras and magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S. I.

    1972-01-01

    Auroral activity in the midday sector is examined in some detail on the basis of all-sky photographs taken from Pyramida, Spitzbergen. The equatorward motion of the midday auroras observed during substorms and the subsequent poleward shift during the recovery phase are discussed.

  16. Changes in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and FACs Associated with Substorm Onset (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, I. J.; Waters, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Milling, D. K.; Singer, H. J.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    Field aligned currents (FACs) are crucial for the communication of information between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Utilising in-situ observations from the Iridium constellation and Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) we provide detailed observations of the FAC topology through the substorm growth and expansion phases. In particular, for an isolated substorm on 16 February 2010 we demonstrate a clear and localized reduction in the FACs at least 6 minutes prior to auroral onset. A new auroral arc forms in the region of reduced FAC on closed field lines and initially expands azimuthally in wave like fashion. This newly formed arc continues to brighten and expands poleward signifying the start of the substorm expansion phase. We argue that the change in FACs observed prior to onset is the result of a change in the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling in a region local to the subsequent auroral onset. Such a change implies an important role for M-I coupling in destabilising the near-Earth tail during magnetospheric substorms and perhaps more importantly in selecting the location in the ionosphere where auroral onset begins. Further, we provide, a comprehensive in-situ two-dimensional view of the FAC topology associated with the substorm current wedge and westward traveling surge during the substorm expansion phase. We demonstrate that these current structures, when integrated with latitude to produce a net FAC as a function of MLT, have the same structure as the equivalent line current system comprising the SCW. Moreover, regions of upward FAC are associated with discrete auroral forms during the substorm expansion phase.

  17. Relationship between the growth of the ring current and the interplanetary quantity. [solar wind energy-magnetospheric coupling parameter correlation with substorm AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    Akasofu (1979) has reported that the interplanetary parameter epsilon correlates reasonably well with the magnetospheric substorm index AE; in the first approximation, epsilon represents the solar wind coupled to the magnetosphere. The correlation between the interplanetary parameter, the auroral electrojet index and the ring current index is examined for three magnetic storms. It is shown that when the interplanetary parameter exceeds the amount that can be dissipated by the ionosphere in terms of the Joule heat production, the excess energy is absorbed by the ring current belt, producing an abnormal growth of the ring current index.

  18. Substorm onset: A switch on the sequence of transport from decreasing entropy to increasing entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. X.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we propose a scenario about the trigger for substorm onset. In a stable magnetosphere, entropy is an increasing function tailward. However, in the growth phase of a substorm, a later born bubble has lower entropy than earlier born bubbles. When a bubble arrives at its final destination in the near-Earth region, it will spread azimuthally because of its relatively uniform entropy. The magnetic flux tubes of a dying bubble, which cause the most equatorward aurora thin arc, would block the later coming bubble tailward of them, forming an unstable domain. Therefore, an interchange instability develops, which leads to the collapse of the unstable domain, followed by the collapse of the stretched plasma sheet. We regard the substorm onset as a switch on the sequence of transport, i.e., from a decreasing entropy process to an increasing entropy process. We calculated the most unstable growth rates and the wavelengths of instability, and both are in agreement with observations.

  19. Observational evidence for an inside-out substorm onset scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    We present observations which provide strong support for a substorm onset scenario in which a localized inner magnetospheric instability developed first and was later followed by the development of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL) farther down-tail. Specifically, we find that the onset began as a localized brightening of an intensified growth phase arc which developed as a periodic series of arc-aligned (i.e. azimuthally arrayed) bright spots. As the disturbance grew, it evolved into vortical structures that propagated poleward and eventually morphed into an east-west aligned arc system at the poleward edge of the auroral substorm bulge. The auroral intensification shows an exponential growth with an estimated e-folding time of around 188 seconds (linear growth rate, {gamma} of 5.33 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}). During the initial breakup, no obvious distortions of auroral forms to the north were observed. However, during the expansion phase, intensifications of the poleward boundary of the expanding bulge were observed together with the equatorward ejection of auroral streamers into the bulge. A strong particle injection was observed at geosynchronous orbit, but was delayed by several minutes relative to onsel. Ground magnetometer data also shows a two phase development of mid-latitude positive H-bays, with a quasi-linear increase in H between the onset and the injection. We conclude that this event provides strong evidence in favor of the so-called 'inside-out' substorm onset scenario in which the near Earth region activates first followed at a later time by the formation of a near-to-mid tail substorm X-line. The ballooning instability is discussed as a likely mechanism for the initial onset.

  20. Observations in the vicinity of substorm onset: Implications for the substrom process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphinstone, R. D.; Hearn, D. J.; Cogger, L. L.; Murphree, J. S.; Singer, H.; Sergeev, V.; Mursula, K.; Klumpar, D. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Johnson, M.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-instrument data sets from the ground and satellites at both low and high altitude have provided new results concerning substorm onset and its source region in the magnetosphere. Twenty-six out of 37 substorm onset events showed evidence of azimuthally spaced auroral forms (AAFs) prior to the explosive poleward motion associated with optical substorm onset. AAFs can span 8 hours of local time prior to onset and generally propagate eastward in the morning sector. Onset itself is, however, more localized spanning only about 1 hour local time. AAF onset occur during time periods when the solar wind pressure is relatively high. AAFs brighten in conjunction with substorm onset leading to the conclusion that they are a growth phase activity casually related to substorm onset. Precursor activity associated with these AAFs is also seen near geosynchronous orbit altitude and examples show the relationship between the various instrumental definitions of substorm onset. The implied mode number (30 to 135) derived from this work is inconsistent with cavity mode resonances but is consistent with a modified flute/ballooning instability which requires azimuthal pressure gradients. The extended source region and the distance to the open-closed field line region constrain reconnection theory and local mechanisms for substorm onset. It is demonstrated that multiple onset substorms can exist for which localized dipolarizations and the Pi 2 occur simultaneously with tail stretching existing elsewhere. These pseudobreakups can be initiated by auroral streamers which originate at the most poleward set of arc systems and drift to the more equatorward main UV oval. Observations are presented of these AAFs in conjunction with low- and high-altitutde particle and magnetic field data. These place the activations at the interface between dipolar and taillike field lines probably near the peak in the cross-tail current. These onsets are put in the context of a new scenario for substorm

  1. Origins and Transport of Ions during Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Peroomian, Vahe; Raeder, Joachim; Walker, Ray J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had alread@, entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft.

  2. ULF Waves above the Nightside Auroral Oval during Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, I. J.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews historical ground-based observations of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves tied to substorms, and highlights new research linking these ULF waves explicitly to substorm onset itself. There are several robust methods that can be used to determine the characteristics of a nonstationary time series such as the ULF magnetic field traces observed in the auroral zone during substorms. These include the pure state filter, the Hilbert-Huang transform, and wavelet analysis. The first indication of a substorm is a sudden brightening of one of the quiet arcs lying in the midnight sector of the oval. The chapter focuses on the properties of ULF waves that are seen in two-dimensional images of auroral intensity near substorm expansion phase onset. It also discusses a wider range of magnetotail instabilities that could be responsible for the azimuthally structured auroral forms at substorm onset.

  3. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  4. Substorm auroral onset triggering by flow-wave interaction detected with high-resolution radar and imager measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Zou, Y.; Bristow, W. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Nicolls, M. J.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2013-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm auroral onset. THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have revealed a repeatable pre-onset sequence that begins with a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) followed by a north-south oriented streamer moving equatorward. Substorm auroral onset occurs soon after the streamer reaches near the substorm onset location. Since fast magnetotail flows are linked to PBIs and streamers, this sequence indicates that onset is preceded by enhanced earthward plasma flows associated with a localized reconnection region near the pre-existing open-closed field line boundary. On the other hand, THEMIS satellite and ASIs also show that substorms are preceded by azimuthally propagating waves of ~1-2 min periodicity, indicating that a wave mode within the near-Earth plasma sheet is important for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast earthward flows and these near-Earth waves. We have found a substorm event for which there is excellent coverage from the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white light and multi-spectral ASIs, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR field of view near the zenith of the ASIs. The substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and one of the radar beams going through the PBI detected equatorward flows and reaching the growth phase arc. The flows appear to propagate from open magnetic field lines across the open-closed boundary, leading to the PBI and then to onset soon after they reach the near-Earth plasma sheet. We also identified oscillations of auroral luminosity along the growth phase arc with a ~1 min period. These waves were propagating westward with only small intensity variations. Soon after the equatorward flows reached the growth phase arc, the wave luminosity amplified abruptly, denoting the onset of a substorm. Based on this sequence, we suggest

  5. A mechanism for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. M.; Heinemann, M.

    1994-01-01

    Energy-principle analysis performed on two-dimensional, self-consistent solutions for magnetospheric convection indicates that the magnetosphere is unstable to isobaric (yet still frozen-in) fluctuations of plasma-sheet flux tubes. Normally, pdV work associated with compression maintains stability of the inward/outward oscillating normal mode. However, if Earth's ionosphere can provide sufficient mass flux, isobaric expansion of flux tubes can occur. The growth of a field-aligned potential drop in the near-Earth, midnight portion of the plasma sheet, associated with upward field-aligned currents responsible for the Harang discontinuity, redistributes plasma along field lines in a manner that destabilizes the normal mode. The growth of this unstable mode results in an out-of-equilibrium situation near the inner edge. When this occurs over a downtail extent comparable to the half-thickness of the plasma sheet, collapse ensues and forces thinning of the plasma sheet whereby conditions favorable to reconnection occur. This scenario for substorm onset is consistent with observed upward fluxes of ions, parallel potential drops, and observations of substorm onset. These observations include near Earth onset, pseudobreakups, the substorm current wedge, and local variations of plasma-sheet thickness.

  6. Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; McPherron, R. L.; Amm, O.; Apatenkov, S.; Baumjohann, W.; Birn, J.; Lester, M.; Nakamura, R.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Sergeev, V.

    2015-07-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. While the large-scale picture remains valid, the new details call for revision and an update of the original view. In this paper we briefly review the historical development of the substorm current wedge, review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work, and discuss the current active research areas. We conclude with a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery.

  7. Bursty reconnection modulating the substorm current wedge, a substorm case study re-analysed by ECLAT tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opgenoorth, Hermann; Palin, Laurianne; Ågren, Karin; Zivkovic, Tatjana; Facsko, Gabor; Sergeev, Victor; Kubyshkina, Marina; Nikolaev, Alexander; Milan, Steve; Imber, Suzanne; Kauristie, Kirsti; Palmroth, Minna; van de Kamp, Max; Nakamura, Rumi; Boakes, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Multi-instrumental data mining and interpretation can be tedious and complicated. In this context, the ECLAT (European Cluster Assimilation Technology) project was created to « provide a novel and unique data base and tools for space scientists, by providing an upgrade of the European Space Agency's Cluster Active Archive (CAA). » How can this new tool help the space plasma physics community? Here we demonstrate the power of coordinated global and meso-scale ground-based data to put satellite data into the proper context. We re-analyse a well-isolated substorm with a strong growth phase, which starts right overhead the Scandinavian network of instruments on 8 September 2002. This event was previously studied in detail by Sergeev et al (2005), based on a THEMIS-like configuration near-midnight using a unique radial constellation of LANL (~6.6Re), Geotail and Polar (~9Re), and Cluster (~16Re). In this new study we add detailed IMAGE spacecraft and ground-based network data. Magnetospheric models are specially adapted using solar wind conditions and in-situ observations. Simulation results are compared to the in-situ observations and discussed. We show how - both before and after substorm onset - bursty reconnection in the tail modulates the localised field aligned current flow associated with the substorm current wedge.

  8. Energy dissipation in substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Loretta A.; Reiff, P. H.; Moses, J. J.; Heelis, R. A.; Moore, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    The energy dissipated by substorms manifested in several ways is discussed: the Joule dissipation in the ionosphere; the energization of the ring current by the injection of plasma sheet particles; auroral election and ion acceleration; plasmoid ejection; and plasma sheet ion heating during the recovery phase. For each of these energy dissipation mechanisms, a 'rule of thumb' formula is given, and a typical dissipation rate and total energy expenditure is estimated. The total energy dissipated as Joule heat (approximately) 2 x 10(exp 15) is found about twice the ring current injection term, and may be even larger if small scale effects are included. The energy expended in auroral electron precipitation, on the other hand, is smaller than the Joule heating by a factor of five. The energy expended in refilling and heating the plasma sheets is estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(exp 14)J, while the energy lost due to plasmoid ejection is between (approximately) (10 exp 13)(exp 14)J.

  9. Integrated Observations of ICME - Driven Substorm - Storm Evolution on 7 August 1998: Traditional and Non-Traditional Aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.; Torbert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain an integrated view of substorm-storm evolution in relation to well-defined interplanetary (IP) conditions, and to identify traditional and non-traditional aspects of the DP1 and DP2 current systems during substorm activity. Specifically, we report a case study of substorm/storm evolution driven by an ICME from ground observations around the oval in relation to geoeffective IP parameters (Kan-Lee electric field, E-KL, and dynamic pressure, Pdyn), geomagnetic indices (AL, SYM-H and PCN) and satellite observations (from DMSP F13 and F14, Geotail, and GOES spacecraft). A sudden enhancement of E-KL at a southward turning of the IMF led to an initial transient phase (PCN-enhancement) followed by a persistent stage of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The persistent phase terminated abruptly at a steep E-KL reduction when the ICME magnetic field turned north after a 3-hour-long interval of enhanced E-KL. The persistent phase consisted of (i) a 45-min-long substorm growth phase (DP2 current) followed by (ii) a classical substorm onset (DP1 current) in the 0100 - 0300 MLT sector, (ii) a 30-min-long expansion phase, maximizing in the same sector, and (iii) a phase lasting for 1.5 hr of 10-15 min-long DP1 events in the 2100 - 2300 and 0400 - 0600 MLT sectors. In the morning sector the expansion phase was characterized by Ps6 pulsations and omega bands. The SYM-H evolution reached the level of a major storm after a 2.5-hour-long interval of E-KL ˜5 mV/m and elevated Pdyn in the substorm expansion phase. Magetosphere - Ionosphere (M - I) coupling during a localized electrojet event at 0500 MLT in the late stage of the substorm expansion is studied by ground - satellite conjunction data (Iceland - Geotail). The DP1 and DP2 components of geomagnetic activity are discussed in relation to M - I current systems and substorm current wedge morphology.

  10. Energy Coupling Between the Ionosphere and Inner Magnetosphere Related to Substorm Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    1999-01-01

    The investigation of substorm effects in the inner magnetosphere with CRRES data looked in detail at over 50 substorms relative to signatures of onset and early expansion phases. The accomplishments of the project are: Determined perpendicular Poynting flux at CRRES in the inner magnetosphere at substorm onset, including primary direction is azimuthal, not radial, indicating a local source, no obvious signal from the magnetotail to trigger onset, strongly supports substorm onset location near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and process is local and a strong function of Magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling. We also developed near geosynchronous onset (NGO) model for substorm onset and expansion.

  11. On the relationship between the energetic particle flux morphology and the change in the magnetic field magnitude during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Sibeck, D. G.; Takahashi, K.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the morphology of energetic particle substorm injections and the change in the magnetic field magnitude over the course of the event is examined. Using the statistical relationships between the magnetic field during the growth phase and the change in the field magnitude during substorms calculated by Lopez et al. (1988), a limited number of dispersionless ion injections observed by AMPTE CCE are selected. It is argued that this limited set is representative of a large set of events and that the conclusions drawn from examining those events are valid for substorms in general in the inner magnetosphere. It is demonstrated that in an event when CCE directly observed the disruption of the current sheet, the particle and field data show that the region of particle acceleration was highly turbulent and was temporally, and perhaps spatially, limited and that the high fluxes of energetic particles are qualitatively associated with intense inductive electric fields.

  12. Electron precipitation pattern and substorm morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Patterns of the precipitation of low energy electrons observed by polar satellites were examined as functions of substorm phase. Precipitation boundaries are generally identifiable at the low latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector. Both of these boundaries move equatorward when the interplanetary magnetic field turns southward.

  13. Ultra-low-frequency wave power in the magnetotail lobes. I - Relation to substorm onsets and the auroral electrojet index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.; Goertz, C. K.; Harrold, B. G.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Fitch, C. A.; Sands, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Time-series observations of the magnetotail-lobe magnetic field have been Fourier analyzed to compute the frequency-weighted energy density Pfz in the range 1-30 mHz. Pfz is generally observed in the range 0.0001-0.01 gamma-squared Hz with a mean value of 0.0012 during substorm growth phases and 0.001 in the comparison intervals. No strong correlation of Pfz is found with the auroral electrojet index in either set of intervals, but during substorm growth phases Pfz may vary by an order of magnitude over time scales of 30 min, with a tendency for higher power levels to occur later in the growth phase. Increases in Pfz precede by about 10 min localized expansive phase activity observed in individual magnetograms.

  14. Statistical visualization of the Earth's magnetotail and the implied mechanism of substorm triggering based on superposed-epoch analysis of THEMIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nosé, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the physical mechanism responsible for substorm triggering, we performed a superposed-epoch analysis using plasma and magnetic-field data from THEMIS probes. Substorm onset timing was determined based on auroral breakups detected by all-sky imagers at the THEMIS ground-based observatories. We found earthward flows associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (RE), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. Moreover, a northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17 RE. This variation indicates that local dipolarization occurs. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18 RE, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly approximately 3 min before substorm onset, which was followed by a weakening of dawn-/duskward plasma-sheet boundary-layer flows (subject to a 1 min time lag). Subsequently, approximately 1 min before substorm onset, earthward flows in the CPS were enhanced again and at the onset, tailward flows started at around X = -20 RE. Following substorm onset, an increase in the northward magnetic field caused by dipolarization was found in the near-Earth region. Synthesizing these results, we confirm our previous results based on GEOTAIL data, which implied that significant variations start earlier than both current disruption and magnetic reconnection, at approximately 4 min before substorm onset roughly halfway between the two regions of interest; i.e. in the catapult current sheet.

  15. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 1. Particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Winglee, R.M. ); Steinolfson, R.S. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a simulation study of the particle dynamics in the magnetotail during the development of substorms. They look at how energy flows into the magnetotail under external magnetospheric conditions, and study the energy storage and dissipation in the magnetic field, and the role of particle dynamics in this process. They consider two primary external influences in their model. First is the pressure exerted by the magnetospheric boundary layer, on the nightside magnetopause. This pressure is expected to grow in response to solar wind penetration into the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field becomes southward in the initial phases of substorm growth. Second is the dawn to dusk electric field. This field is expected to grow as the current sheet thins and energy stored in the magnetic field rises. The authors argue that the simultaneous increase in both the magnetic pressure and electric field can better model magnetotail response. One sees strong earthward flows in conjunction with increased energy storage in the tail, and at substorm onset one sees the ejection of plasmoids in a tailward direction with increased particle heating. The clumping of particles in the current sheet due to the opposing effects of the magnetic pressure and electric field could be responsible for substorm onset, rather than instabilities such as the tearing mode.

  16. Storm-Substorm Relations Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Joe

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic storms in the magnetosphere can cause damage to communication satellites and large-scale power outages. The concept that a magnetic storm is a compilation of a series of substorms was proposed by Akasofu [1968]. However, Kamide [1992] showed that substorms are not a necessary condition for the occurrence of a magnetic storm. This controversy initiated a new era of research on the storm-substorm relation, which was the subject of a recent workshop in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The main topics discussed during the meeting included a brief overview of what a substorm is, how quasiperiodic substorm events and steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events without substorms contribute to storms, and how plasma flows enhanced by magnetic reconnection in the plasma sheet contribute to substorms and storms.

  17. Current sheet thinning, reconnection onset, and auroral morphology during geomagnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, A.; Hsieh, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic substorms represent a fundamental energy release mechanism for the terrestrial magnetosphere. Specifically, the evolution of thin currents sheets during the substorm growth phase plays a key role for substorms because such current sheets present a much lower threshold for the onset of tearing modes and magnetic reconnection than the usually thick magnetotail current sheet. Here we examine and compare two basic processes for current sheet thinning in the Earth's magnetotail: Current sheet thinning (1) through closed magnetic flux depletion (MFD) in the near Earth magnetotail caused by divergent flux transport to replace closed flux on the dayside and (2) through accumulation of open flux magnetic flux in the tail lobes also caused by dayside reconnection. Both processes are expected to operate during any period of enhanced dayside reconnection. It is demonstrated that closed magnetic flux depletion (MFD) in the near Earth magnetotail and the increase of open lobe magnetic flux can lead to the evolution of two separate thin current sheets in the near Earth and the mid tail regions of the magnetosphere. While the auroral morphology associated with MFD and near Earth current sheet formation is well consistent with typical substorm growth observation, midtail current sheet formation through lobe flux increase shows only a minor influence on the auroral ionosphere. We discuss the physics of the dual current sheet formation and local and auroral properties of magnetic reconnection in either current sheet. It is suggested that only reconnection onset in the near Earth current sheet may be consistent with substorm expansion because the flux tube entropy depletion of mid tail reconnection appears insufficient to cause geosynchronous particle injection and dipolarization. Therefore reconnection in the mid tail current sheet is more likely associated with bursty bulk flows or dipolarization fronts which stop short of geosynchronous distances.

  18. Polar and high latitude substorms and solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I. V.; Lyubchich, A. A.; Kleimenova, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    All substorm disturbances observed in polar latitudes can be divided into two types: polar, which are observable at geomagnetic latitudes higher than 70° in the absence of substorms below 70°, and high latitude substorms, which travel from auroral (<70°) to polar (>70°) geomagnetic latitudes. The aim of this study is to compare conditions in the IMF and solar wind, under which these two types of substorms are observable on the basis of data from meridional chain of magnetometers IMAGE and OMNI database for 1995, 2000, and 2006-2011. In total, 105 polar and 55 high latitude substorms were studied. It is shown that polar substorms are observable at a low velocity of solar wind after propagation of a high-speed recurrent stream during the late recovery phase of a magnetic storm. High latitude substorms, in contrast, are observable with a high velocity of solar wind, increased values of the Bz component of the IMF, the Ey component of the electric field, and solar wind temperature and pressure, when a high-speed recurrent stream passes by the Earth.

  19. The Origin of the Near-Earth Plasma Population During a Substorm on November 24, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had already entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft. Distribution functions computed at the ion sources indicate that ionospheric ions reaching Geotail during the expansion phase were significantly heated. Plasma mantle source distributions indicated the presence of a high-latitude reconnection region that allowed ion entry into the magnetosphere when the IMF was northward. These ions reached Geotail during the expansion phase. Ions from the traditional plasma mantle had access to the spacecraft throughout the substorm.

  20. Substorms on Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Ness, N. F.; Yeates, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative similarities between some of the variations in the Mercury encounter data and variations in the corresponding regions of the earth's magnetosphere during substorms are pointed out. The Mariner 10 data on Mercury show a strong interaction between the solar wind and the plant similar to a scaled down version of that for the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in the night side Mercury magnetosphere suggest time dependent processes occurring there.

  1. Magnetic substorms and northward IMF turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    To determine the relation of the northward IMF turnings to substorm sudden onsets, we separated all events with sharp northward IMF turnings observed in years of solar maximum (1999-2002) and solar minimum (2007-2008). The events (N=261) have been classified in 5 groups in accordance with average magnetic activity in auroral zone (low, moderate or high levels of AL index) at unchanged or slightly changed PC index and with dynamics of PC (steady distinct growth or distinct decline) at arbitrary values of AL index. Statistical analysis of relationships between the IMF turning and changes of PC and AL indices has been fulfilled separately for each of 5 classes. Results of the analysis showed that, irrespective of geophysical conditions and solar activity epoch, the magnetic activity in the polar caps and in the auroral zone demonstrate no response to the sudden northward IMF turning, if the moment of northward turning is taken as a key date. Sharp increases of magnetic disturbance in the auroral zone are observed only under conditions of the growing PC index and statistically they are related to moment of the PC index exceeding the threshold level (~1.5 mV/m), not to northward turnings timed, as a rule, after the moment of sudden onset. Magnetic disturbances observed in these cases in the auroral zone (magnetic substorms) are guided by behavior of the PC index, like to ordinary magnetic substorms or substorms developed under conditions of the prolonged northward IMF impact on the magnetosphere. The evident inconsistency between the sharp IMF changes measured outside of the magnetosphere and behavior of the ground-based PC index, the latter determining the substorm development, provides an additional argument in favor of the PC index as a ground-based proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into magnetosphere.

  2. Communications Magnetospheric Substorms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-17

    increases with either an increase in solar wind velocity or a decrease in the angle of the interplanetary magnetic field with respect to the earth- sun ...symmetry produced by changes in the j orientation of the dipole with respect to the earth- sun line. Paper (46) showed very clearly that the synchronous field...57 (12), 993, 1976. - 36 - 34. Barfield, J.N. and R.1L. Mc:l’herron, MuItiple-synchrolous satellite observations of substorm-associ’ated field- aliged

  3. Onset of magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B.; Bogott, F.

    1972-01-01

    An examination of the onset of magnetospheric substorms is made by using ATS 5 energetic particles, conjugate balloon X rays and electric fields, all-sky camera photographs, and auroral-zone magnetograms. It is shown that plasma injection to ATS distances, conjugate 1- to 10-keV auroral particle precipitation, energetic electron precipitation, and enhancements of westward magnetospheric electric-field component all occur with the star of slowly developing negative magnetic bays. No trapped or precipitating energetic-particle features are seen at ATS 5 when later sharp negative magnetic-bay onsets occur at Churchill or Great Whale River.

  4. Effect of magnetic storms (substorms) on HF propagation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, D. V.

    2013-07-01

    The manifestations of the so-called main ionospheric effect during geomagnetic storms (substorms) in the character of decameter-wave propagation are analyzed. On HF radio paths, the main effect is observed as variations in the signal amplitude and the MOF-LOF working frequency band similarly to the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer. Specifically, these parameters increase before the disturbance active phase, decrease during the active phase, and increase again after this phase. The propagation outside the great circle arc, the change in the propagation processes, and the HF radio noise behavior were also considered on these paths during storms (substorms). It is assumed that the storm (substorm) development onset can be predicted.

  5. Thinning and expansion of the substorm plasma sheet: Cluster PEACE timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, J.; Owen, C.; Fazakerley, A.; Balogh, A.

    2004-12-01

    The storage and subsequent removal of magnetic flux in the magnetotail during a geomagnetic substorm has a dramatic effect on the thickness of the cross-tail plasma sheet. The near-Earth plasma sheet is thought to thin during the growth phase and then rapidly expand after onset of the substorm. The direction of propagation, whether earthward or tailward along the GSM-X direction in the near-Earth tail, may suggest the time ordering of current-disruption and near-Earth reconnection, both of which are key to the substorm process. Cluster's Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) allows 4-point observations of electrons at the plasma sheet - lobe boundary as this interface passes over the Cluster tetrahedron. The relative timings of the boundary passage at each spacecraft allow a determination of this boundary's speed and direction of motion, assuming this is planar on the scale of the Cluster separation scale. For those boundaries corresponding to the expansion of the plasma sheet, this direction is fundamental to determining the direction of expansion. We present an example of isolated thinning and expansion of the plasma sheet, as well as a multiple thinning-expansion event that occurs during a more active substorm. Data from the 2001 and 2002 tail passes have been analysed and the average plasma sheet - lobe boundary normal vectors and normal component velocities have been calculated. A total of 77 crossings, typically between 10 and 20 RE downtail, correspond to substorm associated expansion of the plasma sheet over the spacecraft. These had normal vectors predominantly in the GSM-YZ plane and provided no clear evidence for the formation of the near-Earth neutral line occurring before current disruption or vice versa. The expansions of the plasma sheet generally exhibit the appropriate GSM-Z direction expected for the given lobe, and tend to have GSM-Y components that support onset occurring near the origin of the GSM-YZ plane. This result is noteworthy in

  6. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm.

    PubMed

    Panov, E V; Baumjohann, W; Wolf, R A; Nakamura, R; Angelopoulos, V; Weygand, J M; Kubyshkina, M V

    2016-12-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth's magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1km/s. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy.

  7. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm

    PubMed Central

    Panov, E.V.; Baumjohann, W.; Wolf, R.A.; Nakamura, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Weygand, J. M.; Kubyshkina, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth’s magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1km/s. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy. PMID:27917231

  8. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Baumjohann, W.; Wolf, R. A.; Nakamura, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Weygand, J. M.; Kubyshkina, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth's magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1 km s-1. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy.

  9. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  10. A Bright Future for Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, J.; McPherron, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Tenth International Conference on Substorms; San Luis Obispo, California, 22-26 March 2010; Intense auroral displays are caused by substorms, events in the Earth's magnetosphere consisting of an abundance of plasma physics processes. More than 120 scientists gathered to discuss the latest findings on this phenomenon at a conference organized by Vassilis Angelopoulos, Larry R. Lyons, and Robert L. McPherron of the University of California, Los Angeles. Just as a thunderstorm cannot be properly analyzed with a single weather station, substorms cannot be properly studied with a single satellite in the vastness of space. Recent satellite missions now provide several simultaneous observations of key processes. Extensive networks of ionospheric radars, magnetometers, and all-sky imagers extend around the world. This has resulted in unprecedented coverage and conjunctions, brightening scientists' understanding of substorms.

  11. Propagating substorm injection fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Feynman, J.; Hardy, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a series of two-satellite observations leads to a clarification of substorm plasma injection, in which boundary motion plays a major role. Emphasis is put on a type of event characterized by abrupt, dispersionless changes in electron intensity and a coincident perturbation that consists of both a field magnitude increase and a small rotation toward more dipolar orientation. Comparing plasma observations at two points, it is found that in active, preinjection conditions the two most important features of the plasma sheet are: (1) the low-energy convection boundary for near-zero energy particles, determined by the magnitude of the large-scale convection electric field; and (2) the precipitation-flow boundary layer between the hot plasma sheet and the atmospherically contaminated inner plasma sheet.

  12. DR-current intensity variations during substorm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, S. A.; Drobinina, T. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.

    2003-04-01

    According to the concept dominated by the last time, the intensification of the DR-current takes place during the polar substorm development. In the recent papers Iyemori and Rao claim that geomagnetic storms and substorms are independent processes, and SYM-index (essentially the same as Dst-index) tends to decay after the onset of substorms. In this paper we tried to clear up the cause of this contradiction by studying the connection of ring current development with polar substorms basing on the new data: ASY-, SYM-indices describing asymmetric and symmetric parts of DR-current correspondingly and AL-index as a measure of polar disturbances. It is shown that the hourly-mean SYM- and ASY-indices correlate with AL-index (r=0.63 and 0.69 correspondingly), and the connection between these values becomes worse for strong storms. Besides, at the substorm expansive phase onset, the energy can put mainly to the asymmetric part rather than into symmetric part of DR-current. Empirical Q-index based on solar wind parameters describes the energy input into DR-current; Q correlates rather well with SYM, ASY and AL-indices. Thus the intensifications of polar disturbances and DR-current take place simultaneously and have the same source.At the same time, the proportion in which the solar wind energy is distributed between the DR-current, polar ionosphere and magnetotail depends on the Dst variation phase.

  13. The Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, Larry; McPherron, Robert; Apatenkov, Sergey; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Birn, Joachim; Lester, Mark; Nakamura, Rumi; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Sergeev, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. In this paper, we briefly review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work that have demonstrated a need for an update of the original picture. We present a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery, and conclude by identifying open questions.

  14. Magnetospheric substorms in the distant magnetotail observed by Imp 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C. I.; Akasofu, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Study of variations of the magnetic field and plasma sheet in the distant magnetotail (20 to 40 earth radii) during magnetospheric substorms on the basis of the Imp 3 magnetic-field and particle data. Depending on the locations of the satellite with respect to the boundary of the plasma sheet, the variations differ greatly. However, the present results and the results of other workers give a clear indication of an increase of the magnitude of the field outside the plasma sheet and of the simultaneous ?thinning' of the plasma sheet during an early phase of substorms. At about the maximum epoch or during the recovery phase of substorms, the plasma sheet expands and appears to be inflated to at least the presubstorm level. Furthermore, a large excessive flux of the magnetic (approximately equal to Z component) field, as compared with the flux of the original dipole field, appears across the neutral sheet.

  15. Is the Current Disruption Region the Genesis Region for the Substorm X-Line?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, G. M.; Maynard, N. C.; Wilson, G. R.

    2002-12-01

    The nominal location for the substorm near-Earth X-line (NEXL) has been found to be outside but near 20RE in the tail. The modified Near-Earth Neutral Line (NENL) model postulates that braking of fast, earthward flows and pile up of magnetic flux accounts for the initiation of the substorm current wedge and dipolarization within 10RE, and its tailward expansion. Current disruption (CD) and CD-like magnetic activity accompanies dipolarization in the 8--12RE range and commences in close temporal proximity to auroral onset. We report here, based on Geotail observations, that 70% of CD-like activity in the 9 (perigee) to 12 RE range of the pre-midnight and midnight plasma sheet begins in the absence of earthward flow. In only 20% of the cases does CD-like activity start coincident with arrival of earthward flow. Indeed, in a like number of cases, CD-like activity starts coincident with a clear signal (tailward Poynting flux) arriving from nearer Earth. When auroral coverage is adequate, we have shown that these substorms proceed in two stages, with reconnection occurring during the second stage. But this is not the entire story. We note three pieces of evidence that lead us to suggest that the CD region is the genesis region for the NEXL. (1) In 10% of CD-like events, magnetic fluctuations commence like typical CD events, but rather than dipolarizing, the magnetic field diminishes. Whereas the distribution for the typical CD signature shows a strong peak near 10RE, these hybrid events are more uniformly distributed between 9 and 19 RE, and from 13--19RE represent 30% of all CD-like activity. (2) Signatures of a substorm NEXL earthward of Geotail can be found as near Earth as 13RE on occasion. (3) A minimum in equatorial magnetic field strength is believed to evolve during the substorm growth phase near 10RE. Hau and Wolf [JGR, 92, 4745, 1987] discuss how, in the presence of resistivity, the B-minimum structure diffuses tailward, and the minimum deepens, until a NEXL

  16. Energy density of ionospheric and solar wind origin ions in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daglis, Loannis A.; Livi, Stefano; Sarris, Emmanuel T.; Wilken, Berend

    1994-01-01

    Comprehensive energy density studies provide an important measure of the participation of various sources in energization processes and have been relatively rare in the literature. We present a statistical study of the energy density of the near-Earth magnetotail major ions (H(+), O(+), He(++), He(+)) during substorm expansion phase and discuss its implications for the solar wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling. Our aim is to examine the relation between auroral activity and the particle energization during substorms through the correlation between the AE indices and the energy density of the major magnetospheric ions. The data we used here were collected by the charge-energy-mass (CHEM) spectrometer on board the Active Magnetospheric Particle Trace Explorer (AMPTE)/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) satellite in the near-equatorial nightside magnetosphere, at geocentric distances approximately 7 to 9 R(sub E). CHEM provided the opportunity to conduct the first statistical study of energy density in the near-Earth magnetotail with multispecies particle data extending into the higher energy range (greater than or equal to 20 keV/E). the use of 1-min AE indices in this study should be emphasized, as the use (in previous statistical studies) of the (3-hour) Kp index or of long-time averages of AE indices essentially smoothed out all the information on substorms. Most distinct feature of our study is the excellent correlation of O(+) energy density with the AE index, in contrast with the remarkably poor He(++) energy density - AE index correlation. Furthermore, we examined the relation of the ion energy density to the electrojet activity during substorm growth phase. The O(+) energy density is strongly correlated with the pre-onset AU index, that is the eastward electrojet intensity, which represents the growth phase current system. Our investigation shows that the near-Earth magnetotail is increasingly fed with energetic ionospheric ions during periods of enhanced

  17. Thin current sheets in the magnetotail during substorms: CDAW 6 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    The global magnetic field configuration during the growth phase of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 substorm (March 22, 1979, 1054 UT) is modeled using data from two suitably located spacecraft and temporally evolving variations of the Tsyganenko magnetic field model. These results are compared with a local calculation of the current sheet location and thickness carried out by McPherron et al. (1987) and Sanny et al. (this issue). Both models suggest that during the growth phase the current sheet rotated away from its nominal location, and simultaneously thinned strongly. The locations and thickness obtained from the two models are in good agreement. The global model suggests that the peak current density is approximately 120 nA/sq m and that the cross-tail current almost doubled its intensity during this very strong growth phase. The global model predicts a field configuration that is sufficiently stretched to scatter thermal electrons, which may be conducive to the onset of ion tearing in the tail. The electron plasma data further support this scenario, as the anisotropy present in the low-energy electrons disappears close to the substorm onset. The electron contribution to the intensifying current in this case is of the order of 10% before the isotropization of the distribution.

  18. Solar cycle dependence of substorm occurrence and duration: Implications for onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning; McPherron, Robert L.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-04-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent a major energy release process in Earth's magnetosphere. Their duration and intensity are coupled to solar wind input, but the precise way the solar wind energy is stored and then released is a matter of considerable debate. Part of the observational difficulty has been the gaps in the auroral electrojet index traditionally used to study substorm properties. In this study, we created a midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index to measure the strength of the substorm current wedge. Because this index is based on midlatitude magnetometer data that are available continuously over several decades, we can assemble a database of substorm onsets lasting 31 years (1982-2012). We confirmed that the MPB onsets have a good agreement (±2 min) with auroral onsets as determined by optical means on board the IMAGE mission and that the MPB signature of substorms is robust and independent of the stations' position relative to ionospheric currents. Using the MPB onset, expansion, and recovery as a proxy of the respective substorm quantities, we found that the solar cycle variation of substorm occurrence depends on solar wind conditions and has a most probable value of 80 min. In contrast, the durations of substorm expansion and recovery phases do not change with the solar cycle. This suggests that the frequency of energy unloading in the magnetosphere is controlled by solar wind conditions through dayside reconnection, but the unloading process related to flux pileup in the near-Earth region is controlled by the magnetosphere and independent of external driving.

  19. On the cause of thin current sheets in the near-Earth magnetotail and their possible significance for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of thin current sheets in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorm growth phases is addressed in terms of a simple model. An appropriate part of the unperturbed magnetotail is represented by a plane sheet model. Perturbations are applied to the upper and to the left boundaries, representing the magnetopause and the near-Earth tail boundary, where the perturbation at the latter models the interaction between the tail and the inner magnetosphere. Treating the perturbation as ideal (dissipation-free), we found that singular current sheets develop in the midplane of the tail. The analytical results are explored numerically. Using realistic dimensions of the domain considered, the influence of the earthward boundary on current sheet formation dominates. It is argued that current sheet formation of this type plays an important role in the processes associated with the onset of magnetospheric substorms.

  20. Substorm Evolution in the Near-Earth Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    This grant represented one-year, phase-out funding for the project of the same name (NAG5-9110 to Boston University) to determine precursors and signatures of local substorm onset and how they evolve in the plasma sheet using the Geotail near-Earth database. We report here on two accomplishments: (1) Completion of an examination of plasma velocity signature at times of local onsets in the current disruption (CD) region. (2) Initial investigation into quantification of near-Earth flux-tube contents of injected plasma at times of substorm injections.

  1. A comparison of substorms occurring during magnetic storms with those occurring during quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.-S.

    2002-09-01

    It has been suggested that there may be a fundamental difference between substorms that occur during magnetic storms and those that occur at other times. [1996] presented evidence that there is no obvious change in lobe field in "quiet time" substorms but that "storm time" substorms exhibit the classic pattern of storage and release of lobe field energy. This result led them to speculate that the former are caused by current sheet disruption, while the latter are caused by reconnection of lobe flux. In this paper we examine their hypothesis with a much larger data set using definitions of the two types of substorms similar to theirs, as well as additional more restrictive definitions of these classes of events. Our results show that the only differences between the various classes are the absolute value of the lobe field and the size of the changes. When the data are normalized to unit field amplitude, we find that the percent change during storm time and non-storm time substorms is nearly the same. The above conclusions are demonstrated with superposed epoch analysis of lobe field (Bt and Bz) for four classes of substorms: active times (Dst < -50 nT, mostly recovery phase), main phase substorms, non-storm times (Dst > -25 nT), and quiet time substorms (no evidence of storm in Dst). Epoch zero for the analysis was taken as the main substorm onset (Pi2 onset closest to sharp break in AL index). Our results suggest that there is no qualitative distinction between the various classes of substorms, and so they are all likely to be caused by the same mechanism.

  2. Substorms - Future of magnetospheric substorm-storm research

    SciTech Connect

    Akasofu, S.I. )

    1989-04-01

    Seven approaches and/or areas of magnetospheric substorm and storm science which should be emphasized in future research are briefly discussed. They are: the combining of groups of researchers who study magnetic storms and substorms in terms of magnetic reconnection with those that do not, the possible use of a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling model to merge the groups, the development of improved input-output relationships, the complementing of satellite and ground-based observations, the need for global imaging of the magnetosphere, the complementing of observations with computer simulations, and the need to study the causes of changes in the north-south component of the IMF. 36 refs.

  3. Substorm onset: Current sheet avalanche and stop layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    A new scenario is presented for the onset of a substorm and the nature of the breakup arc. There are two main components, current sheet avalanche and stop layer. The first refers to an earthward flow of plasma and magnetic flux from the central current sheet of the tail, triggered spontaneously or by some unknown interaction with an auroral streamer or a suddenly appearing eastward flow at the end of the growth phase. The second offers a mechanism to stop the flow abruptly at the interface between magnetosphere and tail and extract momentum and energy to be partially processed locally and partially transmitted as Poynting flux toward the ionosphere. The stop layer has a width of the order of the ion inertial length. The different dynamics of the ions entering freely and the magnetized electrons create an electric polarization field which stops the ion flow and drives a Hall current by which flow momentum is transferred to the magnetic field. A simple formalism is used to describe the operation of the process and to enable quantitative conclusions. An important conclusion is that by necessity the stop layer is also highly structured in longitude. This offers a natural explanation for the coarse ray structure of the breakup arc as manifestation of elementary paths of energy and momentum transport. The currents aligned with the rays are balanced between upward and downward directions. While the avalanche is invoked for explaining the spontaneous substorm onset at the inner edge of the tail, the expansion of the breakup arc for many minutes is taken as evidence for a continued formation of new stop layers by arrival of flow bursts from the near-Earth neutral line. This is in line with earlier conclusions about the nature of the breakup arc. Small-scale structure, propagation speed, and energy flux are quantitatively consistent with observations. However, the balanced small-scale currents cannot constitute the substorm current wedge. The source of the latter must be

  4. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  5. Multipoint measurements of substorm timing and activations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuyin, Pu; Cao, X.; Zhang, H.; Ma, Z. W.; Mishin, M. V.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Pulkkinen, T.; Reeves, G. D.; Escoubet, C. Philippe

    Substorm timing and activations are studied based on Double Star TC1, Cluster, Polar, IM- AGE, LANL satellites and ground-based Pi2 measurements. Substorm expansion onset is found to begin in the near-Earth tail around X= -(8-9) Re, then progresses both earthward and tailward. About 8-10 minutes before aurora breakup, Cluster measured an earthward flow associated with plasma sheet thinning. A couple of minutes after the breakup, TC1 first detects plasma sheet expansion and then LANL satellites near the midnight measure energetic electron injections, or vise versus. About 20 minutes (or more) later, Cluster and Polar observe plasma sheet expansion successively. Of interest are also the following findings. Auroral bulge is found to quickly broaden and expand poleward when the open magnetic flux of the polar cap is rapidly dissipated, indicating the role of tail lobe reconnection of open field lines in the development of the expansion phase. In addition, poleward expansion of auroral bulges and tailward progression of substorm expansion are shown to be closely related. An initial dipolarization in the near-Earth eventually evolve to enable disruption of the cross-tail current in a wide range of the magnetotail, until the open magnetic flux of the polar cap reaches its minimum. Acknowledgements This work is supported by the NSFC Grants 40390152 and 40536030 and Chinese Key Research Project Grant 2006CB806300. The authors acknowledge all PIs of instruments onboard Double Star and Cluster spacecraft. We also appreciate the useful discussions with R. L. McPherron and A. T. Y. Lui.

  6. Simultaneous observations of the near-earth and distant geomagnetic tail during a substorm by ISEE-1, ISEE-3 and geostationary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Scholer, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Daly, P. W.; Baker, D. N.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the geomagnetic tail during a substorm is investigated by combining plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft in the deep tail with similar near-earth observations from ISEE-1 and geostationary spacecraft. The observations can be interpreted in terms of the neutral-line model of substorms and indicate the formation of a closed-loop field region (plasmoid) following substorm onset, which is ejected down the tail. The plasmoid is observed to have a double-loop field strucure. This may be the result of a second substorm onset occurring about 25 min after the first, producing a further near-earth neutral line and closed field loop. During the substorm recovery phase, the substorm neutral line moves tailward to beyond 130 earth radii from earth by some 3 h after substorm onset.

  7. Features of the planetary distribution of auroral precipitation characteristics during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Starkov, G. V.; Feldstein, Ya. I.

    2007-04-01

    A planetary pattern of substorm development in auroral precipitation has been constructed on the basis of the F6 and F7 satellite observations. The behavior of the auroral injection boundaries and characteristics of precipitating electrons in various precipitation regions during all phases of a statistically mean magnetospheric substorm with an intensity of AL ˜ -400 nT at a maximum is considered in detail. It is shown that during a substorm, the zone of structured auroral oval precipitation AOP and the diffuse auroral zone DAZ are the widest in the nighttime and daytime sectors, respectively. In the daytime sector, all precipitation regions synchronously shift equatorward not only at the origination phase but during the substorm development phase. The strongest shift to low latitudes of the daytime AOP region is observed at a maximum of the development phase. As a result of this shift, the area of the polar cap increases during the phases of substorm origination and development. It is shown that the average position of the precipitation boundaries and the energy fluxes of precipitating electrons at each phase are linearly related to the intensity of a magnetic disturbance. This makes it possible to develop a model of auroral precipitation development during each phase of substorms of any intensity.

  8. In-situ measurement of the substorm onset instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Forsyth, C.; Mann, I. R.; Yao, Z.; Kalmoni, N.

    2015-12-01

    The substorm is arguably the major mode of variability in near-Earth Space which unpredictably dissipates a considerable and variable amount of energy into the near-Earth magnetosphere and ionosphere. What process or processes determine when this energy is released is uncertain, although it is evident that both near-Earth plasma instability and magnetotail reconnection play a role in this energy release. Much emphasis has recently been placed on the role of magnetic reconnection in substorms, we focus here on observations of the unmistakeable signs of a plasma instability acting at substorm onset. Using data from the THEMIS spacecraft, we show that electromagnetic waves grow in the magnetotail at the expense of the local electron and ion thermal energy. The wave growth in space is the direct counterpart to the wave growth seen at the substorm onset location at the ionosphere, as measured by the CARISMA and THEMIS magnetometers and THEMIS all-sky-imagers. We present evidence that the free energy source for the instability is associated with the electron and ion thermal energy, and not the local electron or ion flow energy.

  9. Magnetospheric Substorms and Tail Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded several studies of magnetospheric substorms and their effect on the dynamics of the earth's geomagnetic tail. We completed an extensive study of plasmoids, plasma/magnetic field structures that travel rapidly down the tail, using data from the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. This study formed the PhD thesis of Mark Moldwin. We found that magnetically plasmoids are better described as flux-ropes (twisted magnetic flux tubes) rather than plasma bubbles, as had been generally regarded up to that point (Moldwin and Hughes, 1990; 1991). We published several examples of plasmoids observed first in the near tail by IMP 8 and later in the distant tail by ISEE 3, confirming their velocities down tail. We showed how the passage of plasmoids distorts the plasma sheet. We completed the first extensive statistical survey of plasmoids that showed how plasmoids evolve as they move down tail from their formation around 30 RE to ISEE 3 apogee at 240 RE. We established a one-to-one correspondence between the observation of plasmoids in the distant tail and substorm onsets at earth or in the near tail. And we showed that there is a class of plasmoid-like structures that move slowly earthward, especially following weak substorms during northward IMF. Collectively this work constituted the most extensive study of plasmoids prior to the work that has now been done with the GEOTAIL spacecraft. Following our work on plasmoids, we turned our attention to signatures of substorm onset observed in the inner magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit, especially signatures observed by the CRRES satellite. Using data from the magnetometer, electric field probe, plasma wave instrument, and low energy plasma instrument on CRRES we were able to better document substorm onsets in the inner magnetosphere than had been possible previously. Detailed calculation of the Poynting flux showed energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and a short burst of tailward convective

  10. Method to locate the polar cap boundary in the nightside ionosphere and application to a substorm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A. T.; Pitkänen, T.; Kozlovsky, A.; Amm, O.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new method to be used for the polar cap boundary (PCB) determination in the nightside ionosphere by using the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) field-aligned measurements by the 42-m antenna and southward directed low-elevation measurements by the ESR 32 m antenna or northward directed low-elevation measurements by the EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø. The method is based on increased electron temperature (Te) caused by precipitating particles on closed field lines. Since the Svalbard field-aligned measurement provides the reference polar cap Te height profile, the method can be utilised only when the PCB is located between Svalbard and the mainland. Comparison with the Polar UVI images shows that the radar-based method is generally in agreement with the PAE (poleward auroral emission) boundary from Polar UVI.

    The new technique to map the polar cap boundary was applied to a substorm event on 6 November 2002. Simultaneous measurements by the MIRACLE magnetometers enabled us to put the PCB location in the framework of ionospheric electrojets. During the substorm growth phase, the polar cap expands and the region of the westward electrojet shifts gradually more apart from the PCB. The substorm onset takes place deep within the region of closed magnetic field region, separated by about 6-7° in latitude from the PCB in the ionosphere. We interpret the observations in the framework of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model of substorms. After the substorm onset, the reconnection at the NENL reaches within 3 min the open-closed field line boundary and then the PCB moves poleward together with the poleward boundary of the substorm current wedge. The poleward expansion occurs in the form of individual bursts, which are separated by 2-10 min, indicating that the reconnection in the magnetotail neutral line is impulsive. The poleward expansions of the PCB are followed by latitude dispersed intensifications in the westward

  11. Prompt enhancement of the Earth's outer radiation belt due to substorm electron injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhang, J.-C.; Reeves, G. D.; Su, Z. P.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present multipoint simultaneous observations of the near-Earth magnetotail and outer radiation belt during the substorm electron injection event on 16 August 2013. Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms A in the near-Earth magnetotail observed flux-enhanced electrons of 300 keV during the magnetic field dipolarization. Geosynchronous orbit satellites also observed the intensive electron injections. Located in the outer radiation belt, RBSP-A observed enhancements of MeV electrons accompanied by substorm dipolarization. The phase space density (PSD) of MeV electrons at L* 5.4 increased by 1 order of magnitude in 1 h, resulting in a local PSD peak of MeV electrons, which was caused by the direct effect of substorm injections. Enhanced MeV electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt were also detected within 2 h, which may be associated with intensive substorm electron injections and subsequent local acceleration by chorus waves. Multipoint observations have shown that substorm electron injections not only can be the external source of MeV electrons at the outer edge of the outer radiation belt (L* 5.4) but also can provide the intensive seed populations in the outer radiation belt. These initial higher-energy electrons from injection can reach relativistic energy much faster. The observations also provide evidence that enhanced substorm electron injections can explain rapid enhancements of MeV electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  12. Plasma sheet oscillations and their relation to substorm development: Cluster and double star TC1 case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, T.; Nakamura, R.; Asano, Y.; Baumjohann, W.; Runov, A.; Volwerk, M.; Zhang, T. L.; Vörös, Z.; Keika, K.; Klecker, B.; Rème, H.; Lucek, E. A.; Carr, C.; Frey, H. U.

    We examined two consecutive plasma sheet oscillation and dipolarization events observed by Cluster in the magnetotail, which are associated with a pseudo-breakup and a small substorm monitored by the IMAGE spacecraft. Energy input from the solar wind and an associated enhancement of the cross-tail current lead to current sheet thinning and plasma sheet oscillations of 3 5 min periods, while the pseudo-breakups occur during the loading phase within a spatially limited area, accompanied by a localized dipolarization observed by DSP TC1 or GOES 12. That is, the so-called “growth phase” is a preferable condition for both pseudo-breakup and plasma sheet oscillations in the near-Earth magnetotail. One of the plasma sheet oscillation events occurs before the pseudo-breakup, whereas the other takes place after pseudo-breakup. Thus there is no causal relationship between the plasma sheet oscillation events and pseudo-breakup. As for the contribution to the subsequent small substorm, the onset of the small substorm took place where the preceding plasma sheet oscillations can reach the region.

  13. Rapid control of phase growth by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yi; Xu, Jia-Quan; Choi, Hongseok; Konishi, Hiromi; Jin, Song; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Effective control of phase growth under harsh conditions (such as high temperature, highly conductive liquids or high growth rate), where surfactants are unstable or ineffective, is still a long-standing challenge. Here we show a general approach for rapid control of diffusional growth through nanoparticle self-assembly on the fast-growing phase during cooling. After phase nucleation, the nanoparticles spontaneously assemble, within a few milliseconds, as a thin coating on the growing phase to block/limit diffusion, resulting in a uniformly dispersed phase orders of magnitude smaller than samples without nanoparticles. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in both inorganic (immiscible alloy and eutectic alloy) and organic materials. Our approach overcomes the microstructure refinement limit set by the fast phase growth during cooling and breaks the inherent limitations of surfactants for growth control. Considering the growing availability of numerous types and sizes of nanoparticles, the nanoparticle-enabled growth control will find broad applications. PMID:24809454

  14. Computer simulation of a geomagnetic substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, J. G.; Brecht, S. H.; Huba, J. D.; Fedder, J. A.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    A global two-dimensional simulation of a substormlike process occurring in earth's magnetosphere is presented. The results are consistent with an empirical substorm model - the neutral-line model. Specifically, the introduction of a southward interplanetary magnetic field forms an open magnetosphere. Subsequently, a substorm neutral line forms at about 15 earth radii or closer in the magnetotail, and plasma sheet thinning and plasma acceleration occur. Eventually the substorm neutral line moves tailward toward its presubstorm position.

  15. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  16. Substorms observations over Apatity during geomagnetic storms in the period 2012 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Werner, Rolf; Despirak, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied substorms, generated during enhanced geomagnetic activity in the period 2012 - 2016. Observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity have been used. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters were judged by the 1-min sampled OMNI data base. Substorm onset and further development were verified by the 10-s sampled data of IMAGE magnetometers and by data of the all-sky camera at Apatity. Subject of the study were substorms occurred during geomagnetic storms. The so-called "St. Patrick's day 2015 event" (17-21 March 2015), the events on 17-18 March 2013 and 7-17 March 2012 (a chain of events generated four consecutive storms) which were among the events of strongest geomagnetic activity during the current solar cycle 24, were part of the storms under consideration. The behavior of the substorms developed during different phases of the geomagnetic storms was discussed.

  17. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event - CDAW 6. [Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Manka, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW 6) has the primary objective to trace the flow of energy from the solar wind through the magnetosphere to its ultimate dissipation in the ionosphere. An essential role in this energy transfer is played by magnetospheric substorms, however, details are not yet completely understood. The International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) has provided an ideal data base for the study conducted by CDAW 6. The present investigation is concerned with the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event, which had been selected for detailed examination in connection with the studies performed by the CDAW 6. The observations of this substorm are discussed, taking into account solar wind conditions, ground magnetic activity on March 22, 1979, observations at synchronous orbit, observations in the near geomagnetic tail, and the onset of the 1054 UT expansion phase. Substorm development and magnetospheric dynamics are discussed on the basis of a synthesis of the observations.

  18. On the relative importance of magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during substorm onset and expansion: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.

    1992-01-01

    The question of whether substorm onset is triggered in the magnetotail or the ionosphere is presented. The possible influence of the ionosphere in the subsequent development of a substorm is discussed. Theoretical considerations involved are reviewed and a case study to address this question is examined. The evidence indicates that magnetotail processes initiate the sequence of events called a substorm, while the ionosphere appears to play a critical role in the subsequent evolution of the substorm expansion phase. However, the necessary observations, in particular high time resolution coordinated observations in the ionosphere and magnetotail are relatively rare. Continued examination of existing ground and space based data sets, in particular underutilized observations such as the Scatha data, may provide a more solid foundation for clarifying this issue and determining the relative importance of magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during substorms.

  19. Time development of high-altitude auroral acceleration region plasma, potentials, and field-aligned current systems observed by Cluster during a substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Mozer, F.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral link in the chain of events that transpire during substorms, and the currents, plasma and electric fields undergo significant changes driven by complex dynamical processes deep in the magnetotail. These auroral acceleration processes in turn accelerate and heat the plasma that ultimately leads to some of the most intense global substorm auroral displays. The complex interplay between field-aligned current system formation, the development of parallel electric fields, and resultant changes in the plasma constituents that occur during substorms within or just above the auroral acceleration zone remain unclear. We present Cluster multi-point observations within the high-altitude acceleration region (> 3 Re altitude) at key instances during the development of a substorm. Of particular emphasis is on the time-development of the plasma, potentials and currents that occur therein with the aim of ascertaining high-altitude drivers of substorm active auroral acceleration processes and auroral emission consequences. Preliminary results show that the initial onset is dominated by Alfvenic activity as evidenced by the sudden occurrence of relatively intense, short-spatial scale Alfvenic currents and attendant energy dispersed, counterstreaming electrons poleward of the growth-phase arc. The Alfvenic currents are locally planar structures with characteristic thicknesses on the order of a few tens of kilometers. In subsequent passages by the other spacecraft, the plasma sheet region became hotter and thicker via the injection of new hot, dense plasma of magnetospheric origins poleward of the pre-existing growth phase arc. In association with the heating and/or thickening of the plasma sheet, the currents appeared to broaden to larger scales as Alfven dominated activity gave way to either inverted-V dominated or mixed inverted-V and Alfvenic behavior depending on location. The transition from Alfven dominated to inverted-V dominated

  20. Association of plasma sheet variations with auroral changes during substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W. Jr.; Craven, J.D.; Frank, L.A.; Parks, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Images of the southern auroral oval taken by the University of Iowa auroral imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite during an isolated substorm are correlated with plasma measurements made concurrently by the ISEE 1 satellite in the magnetotail. Qualitative magnetic field configuration changes necessary to relate the plasma sheet boundary location to the latitude of the auroras are discussed. Evidence is presented that the longitudinal advances of the auroras after expansive phase onset are mappings of a neutral line lengthening across the near-tail. We observe a rapid poleward auroral surge, occurring about 1 hour after expansive phase onset, to coincide with the peak of the AL index and argue that the total set of observations at that time is consistent with the picture of a /open quotes/poleward leap/close quotes/ of the electrojet marking the beginning of the substorm's recovery. 9 refs. 3 figs.

  1. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mursula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993-2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  3. A Unified Scenario of Near-Earth Substorm Onset: Analysis of THEMIS Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Raeder, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Hegna, C.

    2008-12-01

    We propose an alternative scenario for the substorm onset process, based on ideal ballooning stability analysis of the near-Earth plasma sheet during recent THEMIS substorm events. In this scenario, the ballooning instability is initiated by the magnetic reconnection in the near-Earth plasma sheet, which in turn directly contributes to the trigger of a full onset. Using the solar wind data from WIND satellite observation for the substorm event as an input at dayside, we reconstructed a sequence of global magnetospheric configurations around the substorm onset by means of OpenGGCM simulation. These simulations have reproduced most of the salient features, including the onset timing, observed in the THEMIS substorm events [Raeder et al, 2008]. The ballooning instability criterion and growth rate are evaluated for the near-Earth plasma sheet region where the configuration satisfies a quasi-static equilibrium condition. Our analysis of the evolution of the near-Earth magnetotail region during the substorm events reveals a correlation between the breaching of the ballooning stability condition and the substorm onset in both temporal and spatial domains. The analysis suggests that the Earthward bulk plasma flow induced by the reconnection event in the near- Earth plasma sheet, leads to the pressure build-up and creates a favorable condition for the initiation of the ballooning instability in that same region. This new alternative scenario further elaborates earlier conjectures on the roles of reconnection and ballooning instability [Bhattacharjee et al, 1998], and has the potential to integrate both the near-Earth neutral-line model [McPherron et al, 1973] and the near-Earth current-sheet- disruption model [Lui et al, 1988] into a unified model of the near-Earth substorm onset. Research supported by U.S. NSF Grant No. ATM-0542954.

  4. Predictions of Substorms and Intensifications Following Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, L. R.; Spann, J.

    1999-01-01

    Substorms are often observed to occur at the end of intervals of Southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), i.e. following the northward turning. Despite the significant correlation between northward turning and substorms, no direct causal relationship between northward turnings and substorms has been demonstrated. Assuming such a causal relationship, we predict that substorms will occur within a particular interval following the observation of a northward turning in the IMF. We observe 16 northward turnings following steady, southward IMF in data taken by the WIND spacecraft magnetic field instrument (MFI). To ensure that the northward turning was observed at the magnetosphere, we require that the northward turning also be observed by instruments on either one of Geotail or IMP-8 while the separation of the second spacecraft from WIND was more that 10 R(sub E). These two-spacecraft observations also allow us to predict more accurately the arrival time of the northward turning at the Earth. Of the predictions substorms, 10 predictions were clearly successful to within +/- 12 min. Five predictions failed, but the failures reveal clear shortcomings in the criteria for a northward turning that we correct. The failures were caused by an increase in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) simultaneous with the northward turning in 3 cases, and a weak southward IMF preceding the northward turning in 2 cases. The final northward turning arrived in the recovery phase of an ongoing substorm, and resulted in unusual auroral activity. The implication of the predictability of substorms following sharp northward turnings is that the postulated causal relationship between northward turnings and substorm onset exists. The effect of increases in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) to negate the triggering ability of northward turnings suggests that the triggering mechanism involves sharp reductions in the magnetospheric convection electric field.

  5. Extremely Intense Magnetospheric Substorms : External Triggering? Preconditioning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    We study particularly intense substorms using a variety of near-Earth spacecraft data and ground observations. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, determine whether the supersubstorms are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  6. Magnetic islands in the near geomagnetic tail and its implications for the mechanism of 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, N.; Walker, R. J.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm event, two ISEE spacecraft observed dynamic changes in the magnetic field and in the flux of energetic particles in the near-earth plasma sheet. In the substorm growth phase, the magnetic field at both ISEE spacecraft became tail-like. Following expansion phase onset, two small scale magnetic islands were observed moving tailward at a velocity of about 580 km/s. The passage of these two magnetic islands was coincident with bursts of tailward streaming energetic particles. The length of the magnetic loops was estimated to have been about 2 to 3 earth radii while the height of the loops was less than 0.5 earth radii. The magnetic islands were produced by multipoint reconnection processes in the near tail plasma sheet which may have been associated with the formation of the near-earth neutral line and the subsequent formation of a large scale plasmoid. The near-earth neutral line retreated tailward later in the expansion phase, as suggested by the reversal of the streaming of energetic particles.

  7. On the Predictability of Substorms Following Sharp Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, Larry R.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Reeves, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that there is an association between changes of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) that are expected to lead to a reduction in magnetospheric convection (northward turnings, reductions) and the onset of the expansion phase of substorms. This has been previously demonstrated by analyses of IMF data during time intervals associated with identified substorm onsets. Here we examine whether observations of northward turnings of the IMF can be used to predict the occurrence of substorms. We first identified sharp northward turnings that follow an interval of steady, southward IMF using measurements from the Wind spacecraft during the first 180 days of 1997. We also required that the northward turning be observed by either IMP-8 or GEOTAIL, in addition to Wind, and that one of the observing satellites be sufficiently close to the Earth-Sun line, or that the two observing satellites be sufficiently separated, that we are reasonably certain that the northward turning affected the magnetosphere. We also used the dual observations to estimate the arrival of the northward turning at the Earth. Using these criteria, we predicted 17 substorms. We then searched for the following signatures of substorm onset around the time of the predicted onset: auroral brightening followed by auroral bulge expansion observed by Polar UVI, geosynchronous particle injection, geosynchronous magnetic field dipolarization, and an appropriate magnetic disturbance at the surface of the Earth. Of the 17 predictions of substorms, 10 were successful in that a substorm onset was observed within 12 min of the predicted onset, 1 is indeterminate due to a lack of data at the Earth, 1 had unusual activity that we have not been able to identify, and 5 were unsuccessful. The failure of these last 5 predictions is explicable. Two of the northward turnings that failed to produce substorms were preceded by the lowest average of the set. The remaining 3 were the only cases in which the

  8. Substorm Current Wedge at Earth and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Slavin, J. A.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews magnetospheric substorms and dipolarizations observed at both Earth and Mercury. It briefly discusses new insights into the physics of the substorm current wedge (SCW) that have been revealed the past few years. The formation and evolution of the SCW are closely tied to the braking of flows convecting flux away from the reconnection site and the resultant near-planet flux pileup that creates the dipolarization. At Earth, the SCW plays a critical role in substorms, coupling magnetospheric to ionospheric motions, deflecting incoming plasma flows, and regulating the dissipation of pressure built up in the near-Earth magnetosphere during dipolarization. The lack of a conducting boundary at Mercury provides a natural experiment to examine the role of an ionosphere on regulating magnetospheric convection. Energetic particles may play a much greater role within substorms at Mercury than at Earth, providing another opportunity for comparative studies.

  9. Vapor phase diamond growth technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Ion beam deposition chambers used for carbon film generation were designed and constructed. Features of the developed equipment include: (1) carbon ion energies down to approx. 50 eV; (2) in suit surface monitoring with HEED; (3) provision for flooding the surface with ultraviolet radiation; (4) infrared laser heating of substrate; (5) residual gas monitoring; (6) provision for several source gases, including diborane for doping studies; and (7) growth from either hydrocarbon source gases or from carbon/argon arc sources. Various analytical techniques for characterization of from carbon/argon arc sources. Various analytical techniques for characterization of the ion deposited carbon films used to establish the nature of the chemical bonding and crystallographic structure of the films are discussed. These include: H2204/HN03 etch; resistance measurements; hardness tests; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; scanning auger microscopy; electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis; electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis; electron energy loss spectroscopy; density measurements; secondary ion mass spectroscopy; high energy electron diffraction; and electron spin resonance. Results of the tests are summarized.

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  11. Comment on "Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset".

    PubMed

    Lui, A T Y

    2009-06-12

    Angelopoulos et al. (Research Articles, 15 August 2008, p. 931) reported that magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetotail triggered the onset of a magnetospheric substorm. We provide evidence that (i) near-Earth current disruption, occurring before the conventional tail reconnection signatures, triggered the onset; (ii) the observed auroral intensification and tail reconnection are not causally linked; and (iii) the onset they identified is a continuation of earlier substorm activities.

  12. The three dimensional current system during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, Jesper; Hoffman, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and it's coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) is centered around 65 / 72 deg magnetic latitude post-midnight / pre-midnight. Thus, we find a distinct latitudinal shift between the locations of the westward electrojet at these local times. The spatiotemporal behavior of the WEJ differs at these two local times. Attempting to explain this significant finding we propose two possible simple current systems. 1) The classical substorm current wedge, which is a single 3D current system. The distinct poleward kink and the different spatiotemporal behavior, however, present considerable complications for this solution. 2) A new 3D current system that consists of 2 wedge type systems: the classical substorm current wedge in the pre-midnight region and another current wedge in the post-midnight region. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere. To support the empirical modeling we performed Biot and Savart integrations to simulate the ground perturbations. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from the simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  13. Modeling of substorm development with a kinematic effect by the global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, Mitsue; Fujita, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Recently, Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evoution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is used for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dessipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the substorm development though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetric reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Horiuchi et al. investigated the roles of microscopic plasma instabilities on the violation of the frozen-in condition by examining the force balance equation based on explicit electromagnetic particle simulation for an ion-scale current sheet, and concluded that the growth of drift kink instability can create anomalous resistivity leading to the excitation of collisionless reconnection. They estimated the effective resistivity based on the particle simulation data. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code with this anomalous resistivity obtained in their microscopic approach istead of the emprical resistivity model, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the anomalous resistivity model.

  14. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang’e 3

    PubMed Central

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M.; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-01-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang’e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth’s plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20–22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region. PMID:27576944

  15. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang’e 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M.; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-08-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang’e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth’s plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20–22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region.

  16. Substorm development as observed by Interball UV imager and 2-D magnetic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Cogger, L. L.; Jackel, B.; Hamza, A. M.; Hughes, W. J.; Murr, D.; Rasmussen, O.

    2001-10-01

    Results of the study of two substorms from Interball auroral UV measurements and two-dimensional patterns of equivalent ionospheric currents derived from the MACCS/CANOPUS and Greenland magnetometer arrays are presented. Substorm development in 2-D equivalent ionospheric current patterns may be described in terms of the formation of two vortices in the equivalent currents: a morning vortex related to downward field-aligned current and an evening vortex related to upward field-aligned current. Poleward propagation of the magnetic disturbances during substorm expansive phase was found to be associated mainly with a poleward displacement of the morning vortex, whereas the evening vortex remained approximately at the same position. As a result, the initial quasi-azimuthal separation of the vortices was replaced by their quasi-meridional separation at substorm maximum. Interball UV images during this period showed the formation of a bright auroral border at the poleward edge of substorm auroral bulge. The auroral UV images showed also that the auroral distribution in the region between the polar border and the main auroral oval tends to have a form of bubbles or petals growing from a bright protuberant region on the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval. However, the resolution of the UV imager was not sufficient for the reliable separation of such the structures, therefore, this result should be considered as preliminary. Overlapping of the auroral UV images onto equivalent current patterns shows that the bright substorm surge was well collocated with the evening vortex whereas the poleward auroral border did not coincide with any evident feature in equivalent ionospheric currents and was located several degrees equatorward of the morning current vortex center related to downward field-aligned current. The ground-based magnetic array allowing us to obtain instantaneous patterns of equivalent ionospheric currents gives a possibility to propose a new index for

  17. Magnetotail energy storage and release during the CDAW 6 substorm analysis intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Fritz, T. A.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Kamide, Y.; Baumjohann, W.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) grew out of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) program. According to this concept, data are to be pooled from a wide variety of spacecraft and ground-based sources for limited time intervals. These data are to provide the basis for the performance of very detailed correlative analyses, usually with fairly limited physical problems in mind. However, in the case of the CDAW 6 truly global goals are involved. The primary goal is to trace the flow of energy from the solar wind through the magnetosphere to its ultimate dissipation by substorm processes. The present investigation has the specific goal to examine the evidence for the storage of solar wind energy in the magnetotail prior to substorm expansion phase onsets. Of particular interest is the determination, in individual substorm cases, of the time delays between the loading of energy into the magnetospheric system and the subsequent unloading of this energy.

  18. The "Alfvénic surge" at substorm onset/expansion and the formation of "Inverted Vs": Cluster and IMAGE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Frey, H. U.; Fillingim, M. O.; Goldstein, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-05-01

    From multipoint, in situ observations and imaging, we reveal the injection-powered, Alfvénic nature of auroral acceleration during onset and expansion of a substorm. It is shown how Alfvénic variations over time dissipate to form large-scale, inverted-V structures characteristic of quasistatic aurora. This characterization is made possible through the fortuitous occurrence of a substorm onset and expansion phase on field lines traversed by Cluster in the high-altitude acceleration region. Substorm onset was preceded by the occurrence of multiple poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) and subsequent development/progression of a streamer toward the growth phase arc indicating that this is of the PBI-/streamer-triggered class of substorms. Onset on Cluster is marked by the injection of hot, dense magnetospheric plasma in a region tied to one of the preexisting PBI current systems. This was accompanied by a surge of Alfvénic activity and enhanced inverted-V acceleration, as the PBI current system intensified and striated to dispersive scale Alfvén waves. The growth of Alfvén wave activity was significant (up to a factor of 300 increase in magnetic field power spectral density at frequencies 20 mHz ≲f≲ few hertz) and coincided with moderate growth (factor 3-5) in the background PBI current. This sequence is indicative of a cascade process whereby small-scale/dispersive Alfvén waves are generated from large-scale Alfvén waves or current destabilization. It also demonstrates that the initial PBIs and their subsequent evolution are an intrinsic part of the global auroral substorm response to injection and accompanying wave energy input from the magnetotail. Alfvénic activity persisted poleward of the PBI currents composing a broad Alfvén wave-dominated region extending to the polar cap edge. These waves have transverse scales ranging from a few tens of kilometers to below the ion gyroradius and are associated with large electric fields (up to 200 mV/m) and

  19. Storm-Time Substorms and Sawtooth Events: Test for Substorm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Reeves, G. D.; Donovan, E.; Singer, H. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    A substorm search engine is used to identify substorm onsets that occur during magnetic storms in the period 2001-2004. Each substorm is analyzed in detail using several parameters to classify the events. Peak amplitude of the substorm is defined from the AL-index. Existence and type of energetic particle injections are determined from the LANL energetic ion and electron data. Tail magnetic field measurements (GOES, Cluster, Geotail) are used to infer whether a thin current sheet was formed prior to the substorm onset. Latitudinal magnetometer chains (CANOPUS, IMAGE) are used to determine whether the main expansion direction was poleward or equatorward. Possible triggers for the onset and intensity of the driving electric field are identified from the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements (ACE, WIND). The goal of the study is to statistically examine to what extent the stormtime substorms show signatures typically associated classical non-storm substorms and to what extent the activity is characteristic only of storm periods. Furthermore, the goal is to identify the "sawtooth events" from the data set, and examine whether the activation characteristics differ from the other stormtime activations.

  20. Convection and Substorms - Paradigms of Magnetospheric Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, Charles F.

    The magnetosphere is the region where cosmic rays and the solar wind interact with the Earth's magnetic field, creating such phenomena as the northern lights and other aurorae. The configuration and dynamics of the magnetosphere are of interest to planetary physicists, geophysicists, plasma astrophysicists, and to scientists planning space missions. The circulation of solar wind plasma in the magnetosphere and substorms have long been used as the principle paradigms for studying this vital region. Charles F. Kennel, a leading scientist in the field, here presents a synthesis of the convection and substorm literatures, and an analysis of convection and substorm interactions; he also suggests that the currently accepted steady reconnection model may be advantageously replaced by a model of multiple tail reconnection events, in which many mutually interdependent reconnections occur. Written in an accessible, non-mathematical style, this book introduces the reader to the exciting discoveries in this fast-growing field.

  1. Evidence for particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Baker, Daniel N.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent the episodic dissipation of energy stored in the geomagnetic tail that was previously extracted from the solar wind. This energy release produces activity throughout the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and it results in a wide variety of phenomena such as auroral intensifications and the generation of new current systems. All of these phenomena involve the acceleration of particles, sometimes up to several MeV. We present a brief overview of substorm phenomenology. We then review some of the evidence for particle acceleration in Earth's magnetosphere during substorms. Such in-situ observations in this most accessible of all cosmic plasma domains may hold important clues to understanding acceleration processes in more distant astrophysical systems.

  2. The Bursts Series of Long-period Irregular Ipcl-type Geomagnetic Pulsations As A Element of Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurazhkovskaya, N. A.; Klain, B. I.

    The investigation of simultaneous observations of bursts series of pulsations ipcl in a frequency band 2.1-5.5 mHz during moderate geomagnetic activity (Kp ~ 2-3), ob- served in the dayside polar cusp and of long-period irregular pulsations apparent in a nightside of an auroral oval was carried out. For the analysis the records of a magnetic field in observatories Mirny (invariant geomagnetic latitude -76,93; longitude 122,92) and Yellownife (invariant geomagnetic latitude 69,94; longitude 294,38), located ap- proximately on one meridian noon - midnight, were used. It was revealed, that regime burst of pulsations ipcl is observed on a substorm phase recovery. The beginning of bursts series of pulsations ipcl on the dayside of a magnetosphere corresponds to the moment of a final stage of substorm expansion phase in night sector. Besides regime burst ipcl begins in 60 minutes after change of a direction vertical component IMF with southward on northward. In dominant number of cases the excitation beginning of bursts series of pulsations ipcl lags from a oscillation beginning of pulsations of a type Pi3, accompanying development substorms, on 40-60 of minutes. Thus, the anal- ysed bursts series of pulsations ipcl are an essential element of substorm. The delay of bursts series ipcl in relation to time of pulsations Pi3-type occurrence and substorm expansion phase can be explained within the framework of magnetospheric substorm model, in which the current across a tail is made through plasma mantle of a magneto- sphere, which field lines are project in dayside polar cusp and entry layes. The release of energy in a tail of magnetosphere in a substorm phase recovery subsequently leads to intensification of long-period perturbations in dayside polar cusp.

  3. Substorm effects in auroral spectra. [electron spectrum hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eather, R. H.; Mende, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    A substorm time parameter is defined and used to order a large body of photometric data obtained on aircraft expeditions at high latitudes. The statistical analysis demonstrates hardening of the electron spectrum at the time of substorm, and it is consistent with the accepted picture of poleward expansion of aurora at the time of substorm and curvature drift of substorm-injected electrons. These features are not evident from a similar analysis in terms of magnetic time. We conclude that the substorm time concept is a useful ordering parameter for auroral data.

  4. Fast ionospheric feedback instability and substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Robert L.; Grieger, John; Song, Yan

    1992-01-01

    A study suggesting that the Alfven resonator can play an important role in modifying the ionosphere on the time and space scales required to play a significant role in substorm formation is presented. Although the effect of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on the onset of substorms has been studied, the effects due to gradients of the Alfven speed along auroral field line were neglected. The large increase of the Alfven speed with altitude above the ionosphere creates an effective resonant cavity, which can lead to fluctuations in the electric and magnetic fields as well as in particle fluxes in the range 0.1 to 1 Hz. Such fluctuations can be observed from the ground as PiB pulsations associated with substorm onset. These fluctuations can be excited by a fast feedback instability, which can grow on time scales much less than the Alfven travel time between the ionosphere and the plasma sheet. The instability enhances the value of both the Pedersen and Hall conductivity, and may play a role in preparing the ionosphere for substorm onset.

  5. Substorm occurrence during quiet solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Partamies, N.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2014-04-01

    We examine the OMNI database and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain records to study the substorm occurrence and characteristics during quiet solar driving periods, especially during the solar minimum period in 2009. We define substorm-like activations as periods where the hourly average AL is below -200 nT. Using the OMNI data set, we demonstrate that there are limiting solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field magnitude, and driving electric field values below which substorm-like activations (AL < 200 nT, intensification and decay of the electrojet) do not occur. These minimum parameter values are V < 266 km/s, B < 1.4 nT, and E < 0.025 mV/m such low values are observed less than 1% of the time. We also show that for the same level of driving solar wind electric field, the electrojet intensity is smaller (by few tens of nT), and the electrojet resides farther poleward (by over 1°) during extended quiet solar driving in 2009 than during average solar activity conditions. During the solar minimum period in 2009, we demonstrate that substorm-like activations can be identified from the IMAGE magnetometer chain observations during periods when the hourly average IL index is below -100 nT. When the hourly IL activity is smaller than that, which covers 87% of the nighttime observations, the electrojet does not show coherent behavior. We thus conclude that substorm recurrence time during very quiet solar wind driving conditions is about 5-8 h, which is almost double that of the average solar activity conditions.

  6. Nonadiabatic heating of the central plasma sheet at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Rostoker, G.; Fennell, J.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Heating events in the plasma sheet boundary layer and central plasma sheet are found to occur at the onset of expansive phase activity. The main effect is a dramatic increase in plasma temperature, coincident with a partial dipolarization of the magnetic field. Fluxes of energetic particles increase without dispersion during these events which occur at all radial distances up to 23 RE, the apogee of the ISEE spacecraft. A major difference between these heating events and those observed at geosynchronous distances lies in the heating mechanism which is nonadiabatic beyond 10 RE but may be adiabatic closer to earth. The energy required to account for the increase in plasma thermal energy is comparable with that required for Joule heating of the ionosphere. The plasma sheet must be considered as a major sink in the energy balance of a substorm. Lobe magnetic pressures during these events are estimated. Change in lobe pressure are generally not correlated with onsets or intensifications of expansive phase activity.

  7. Radial expansion of the tail current disruption during substorms - A new approach to the substorm onset region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Kokubun, S.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    A new method is used to examine the radial expansion of the tail current disruption and the substorm onset region. The expansion of the disruption region is specified by examining the time sequence (phase relationship) between the north-south component and the sun-earth component. This method is tested by applying it to the March 6, 1979, event. The phase relationship indicates that the current disruption started on the earthward side of the spacecraft, and expanded tailward past the spacecraft. The method was used for 13 events selected from the ISEE magnetometer data. The results indicate that the current disruption usually starts in the near-earth magnetotail and often within 15 RE from the earth.

  8. Solar and Interplanetary Causes of Extremely Intense Substorms During Superstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We have begun a study of particularly intense substorms that occur during superstorms. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, whether they are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  9. Suprathermal O(+) and H(+) ion behavior during the March 22, 1979 (CDAW 6), substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to report on the behavior of energetic (approximately 130 keV) O(+) ions in the earth's plasma sheet, taking into account observations by the ISEE 1 spacecraft during a magnetically active time interval encompassing two major substorms on March 22, 1979. Attention is also given to suprathermal H(+) and He(++) ions. ISEE 1 plasma sheet observations of the proton and alpha particle phase space densities as a function of energy per charge during the time interval 0933-1000 UT on March 22, 1979 are considered along with the proton phase space density versus energy in the energy interval approximately 10 to 70 keV for the selected time periods 0933-1000 UT (presubstorm) and 1230-1243 UT (recovery phase) during the 1055 substorm on March 22, 1979. A table listing the proton energy density for presubstorm and recovery periods is also provided.

  10. Formation of the stable auroral arc that intensifies at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Samson, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    In a companion paper, we present observational evidence that the stable, growth-phase auroral arc that intensifies at substorm expansion phase onset often forms on magnetic field lines that map to within approximately 1 to 2 R(sub e) of synchronous. The equatorial plasma pressure is 1 to 10 nPa in this region, which can give a cross-tail current greater than 0.1 A/m. In this paper, we propose that the arc is formed by a perpendicular magnetospheric-current divergence that results from a strong dawn-to-dusk directed pressure gradient in the vicinity of magnetic midnight. We estimate that the current divergence is sufficiently strong that a is greater than 1 kV field-aligned potential drop is required to maintain ionospheric-current continuity. We suggest that the azimuthal pressure gradient results from proton drifts in the vicinity of synchronous orbit that are directed nearly parallel to the cross-tail electric field.

  11. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Newell, P. T.; Mcentire, R. W.; Luehr, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred at about 0110 UT on April 25, 1985, carried out by AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7, as well as by ground auroral stations and midlatitude stations. These data yield information on the latitudinal extent of the polar cap and provide visual identification of substorm aurorae, magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath aurorae, and the situ magnetic field. In addition, they provide magnetic-particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region. Evidence is presented that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa.

  12. Observations of ion streaming during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    The ion beam phenomenon at the plasma sheet boundary is examined for individually identifiable substorms, and the substorm-associated particle phenomena are evaluated in terms of the energy-angle distributions of the plasma population and three-dimensional energetic ion distributions. In all seven cases studied it is found that ion beams streaming earthward and/or tailward are always present at the edge of the plasma sheet adjacent to the tail lobe. Ion beams penetrating into the plasma sheet region with no detectable density gradient are also observed. Beams at tens to hundreds of eV often stream tailward and are often long lasting, suggesting that they may be related to ionospheric sources. Both tailward and earthward streaming beams are detected for ion beams above 1 keV, consistent with an origin from the distant tail, propagation toward earth, and mirroring back under single particle motions.

  13. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  14. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  15. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts in relation to polar substorms and hot plasma injections at geostationary altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvaud, J. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary satellite and ground measurements of dynamic variations of the outer radiation belts and their relations with the development of auroral structures during magnetospheric substorms are analyzed. A comparison of measurements of the H or X geomagnetic field components made by seven auroral stations with ATS-6 low-energy and high-energy particle measurements during the multiple-onset substorm of Aug. 16, 1974 is presented which demonstrates that while the decrease in energetic particle fluxed ends only at the time of a strong substorm onset, rapid motions of the outer radiation belts may occur during the flux decrease. All-sky photographs of auroral phenomena taken at Fort Yukon and College, Alaska are then compared with ATS-1 energetic particle flux measurements in order to demonstrate the relation between flux decreases and increases and distinct substorm phases. Results support the hypothesis of a magnetospheric substorm precursor which appears to be an instability growing at the inner boundary of the plasma layer and approaching the earth, and underline the importance of current and magnetic field variations in charged particle dynamics.

  16. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event: CDAW 6

    SciTech Connect

    McPherron, R.L.; Manka, R.H.

    1985-02-01

    The physical processes involved in the transfer of energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and release associated with substorms, have been examined in a sequence of Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAW 6). Magnetic storms of March 22 and 31, 1979, were chosen to study the problem, using a data base from 13 spacecraft and about 130 ground-based magnetometers. This paper describes the March 22 storm, in particular the large, isolated substorm at 1054 UT which followed an interval of magnetic calm. We summarize the observations in the solar wind, in various regions of the magnetosphre, and at the ground, synthesizing these observations into a description of the substorn development. We then give our interpretation of these observations and test their consistency with the reconnection model. The substorm appears to have been generated by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field associated with a current sheet crossing. Models of ionospheric currents derived from ground data show the substorm had three phases of development. During the first phase, a two-celled convection current system developed in the polar cap as synchronous spacecraft on the nightside recorded an increasingly tailike field and the ISEE measurements show that the near-earth plasma sheet thinned. In the second phase, possibly triggered by sudden changes in the solar wind, a one-celled current system was added to the first, enhancing the westward electrojet. During this phase the synchronous orbit field became more dipolar, and the plasma sheet magnetic field turned strongly southward as rapid tailward flow developed soon after expansion onset, suggesting that a neutral line formed in the near-earth plasma sheet with subsequent plasmoid ejection.

  17. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S. ); Winglee, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models.

  18. A multi-instrumental case study of the substorm event occurring 2002-09-08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, Laurianne; Ågren, Karin; zivkovic, Tatjana; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Fasckó, Gabor; Sergeev, Victor; Kubyshkina, Marina; Nikolaev, Alexander; Milan, Steve; Imber, Suzanne; Kauristie, Kirsti; Palmroth, Minna; van de Kamp, Max; Nakamura, Rumi; Boakes, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Multi-instrumental data mining and interpretation can be tricky. In this context, the ECLAT (European Cluster Assimilation Technology) project was created to « provide a novel and unique data base and tools for space scientists, by providing an upgrade of the European Space Agency's Cluster Active Archive (CAA). » How can this new tool help the space plasma physics community? Here we demonstrate the power of coordinated global and meso-scale ground-based data to put satellite data into the proper context. We re-analyse a well-isolated substorm with a strong growth phase, which starts right overhead the Scandinavian network of instruments. This event was previously studied in detail by Sergeev et al (2005), based on a THEMIS-like configuration near-midnight using a unique radial constellation of LANL (~6.6Re), Geotail and Polar (~9Re), and Cluster (~16Re). In this new study we add detailed IMAGE spacecraft and ground-based network data. Several magnetospheric models are specially adapted using solar wind conditions and in-situ observations. Simulation results are compared to the in-situ observations and discussed.

  19. Auroral Acceleration, Solar Wind Driving, and Substorm Triggering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.

    2010-12-01

    We use a data base of 4861 substorms identified by global UV images to investigate the substorm cycle dependence of various types of aurora, and to obtain new results on substorm triggering by external driving. Although all types of aurora increase at substorm onset, broadband (Alfvénic) aurora shows a particular association with substorms, and, especially, substorm onset. While diffuse electron and monoenergetic auroral precipitating power rises by 79% and 90% respectively following an onset, broadband aurora rises by 182%. In the first 10-15 minutes following onset, the power associated with Alfvénic acceleration is comparable to monoenergetic acceleration (also called “inverted-V” events). In general, this is not the case prior to onset, or indeed, during recovery. The rise time of the electron diffuse aurora following onset is much slower, about 50 minutes, and thus presumably extends into recovery. We also re-investigate the issue of solar wind triggering of substorms by considering not just changes in the solar wind prior to onset, but how the pattern of changes differs from random and comparable epochs. We verify that a preonset reduction of solar wind driving (“northward turning” in the simplest case of IMF Bz) holds for the superposed epoch mean of the ensemble. Moreover, this reduction is not the result of a small number of substorms with large changes. The reduction starts about 20 min prior to substorm onset, which, although a longer delay than previously suggested, is appropriate given the various propagation time delays involved. Next, we compare the IMF to random solar wind conditions. Not surprisingly, solar wind driving prior to onset averages somewhat higher than random. Although about a quarter of substorms occur for steady northward IMF conditions, more general coupling functions such as the Kan-Lee electric field, the Borovosky function, or our dΦMP/dt, show very few substorms occur following weak dayside merging. We assembled a data

  20. Substorm probabilities are best predicted from solar wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Sotirelis, T.; Wing, S.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Most measures of magnetospheric activity - including auroral power (AP), magnetotail stretching, and ring current intensity - are best predicted by solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions which approximate the frontside magnetopause merging rate. However radiation belt fluxes are best predicted by a simpler function, namely the solar wind speed, v. Since most theories of how these high energy electrons arise are associated with repeated rapid dipolarizations such as associated with substorms, this apparent discrepancy could be reconciled under the hypothesis that the frequency of substorms tracks v rather than the merging rate - despite the necessity of magnetotail flux loading prior to substorms. Here we investigate this conjecture about v and substorm probability. Specifically, a continuous list of substorm onsets compiled from SuperMAG covering January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2007 are studied. The continuity of SuperMAG data and near continuity of solar wind measurements minimize selection bias. In fact v is a much better predictor of onset probability than is the overall merging rate, with substorm odds rising sharply with v. Some loading by merging is necessary, and frontside merging does increase substorm probability, but nearly as strongly as does v taken alone. Likewise, the effects of dynamic pressure, p, are smaller than simply v taken by itself. Changes in the solar wind matter, albeit modestly. For a given level of v (or Bz), a change in v (or Bz) will increase the odds of a substorm for at least 2 h following the change. A decrease in driving elevates substorm probabilities to a greater extent than does an increase, partially supporting external triggering. Yet current v is the best single predictor of subsequently observing a substorm. These results explain why geomagnetically quiet years and active years are better characterized by low or high v (respectively) than by the distribution of merging estimators. It appears that the flow of energy

  1. Interball substorm observations: Christmas for space scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandahl, Ingrid; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Budnik, Elena Yu.; Dubinin, Edouard M.; Eklund, Ulrik; Hughes, Terence J.; Kokubun, Susumu; Koskinen, Hannu; Kudela, Karel; Lepping, Ronald P.; Lin, Robert P.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Lutsenko, Volt; Mostroem, Arne; Nozdrachev, Michail; Pissarenko, Novomir, F.; Prokhorenko, Victoria; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Yermolaev, Yuri I.; Zakharov, Alexander V.

    1996-01-01

    Observational results from the Interball Tail Probe spacecraft are presented. One of the main objectives of the Interball project is to study the dynamic processes in the magnetosphere. Three events observed by the spacecraft's instruments are investigated: a pseudobreakup during which earthward streaming ions were observed in the vicinity of a thin current sheet; a substorm in which the magnetic signatures in the lobe and on the ground were preceeded by northward re-orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component; and a magnetic storm at the beginning of which extreme deformation of the magnetotail was observed.

  2. Analysis of Auroral Morphology: Substorm Precursor and Onset on January 10, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.; Ranganath, H.; Elsen, R.; Richards, P. G.; Swift, W.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    The solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field is studied using global auroral images obtained by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on Polar. We study the dynam,cs of the poleward and equatorward boundaries of the auroral oval in response to the solar wind IMF on January 10, 1997 using a neural network algorithm to perform an automated morphological analysis. Poleward and equatorward boundaries identified by the algorithm demonstrate a clear growth motion with the southward turning of the IMF and growth and poleward expansion at substorm onset. The area poleward of the oval (polar cap) is found to increase in size coincident with the'southward turning of the IMF Bz component at 0220 UT and peaks at substorm onset at 0334 UT. The area of the oval, however, decreases continuously throughout the period of the polar cap area increase with a slight recovery observed during the substorm onset. These observations are consistent with the concept that magnetospheric dynamics are directly driven by the solar wind-geomagnetic field interactions.

  3. The Four-Part Field-Aligned Current System in the Ionosphere at Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, K. A.; Sofko, G. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    lines in the convection pattern have a strong vorticity near the convection reversal. By Faraday's Law of Induction there is a decrease in magnetic flux density on the poleward side of the convection reversal, and an increase on the equatorward side. We address this issue for two different time intervals, namely the late growth phase and then the substorm onset.

  4. Magnetotail Current Sheet Thinning and Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in Global Modeling of Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotail current sheet thinning and magnetic reconnection are key elements of magnetospheric substorms. We utilized the global MHD model BATS-R-US with Adaptive Mesh Refinement developed at the University of Michigan to investigate the formation and dynamic evolution of the magnetotail thin current sheet. The BATSRUS adaptive grid structure allows resolving magnetotail regions with increased current density up to ion kinetic scales. We investigated dynamics of magnetotail current sheet thinning in response to southwards IMF turning. Gradual slow current sheet thinning during the early growth phase become exponentially fast during the last few minutes prior to nightside reconnection onset. The later stage of current sheet thinning is accompanied by earthward flows and rapid suppression of normal magnetic field component $B-z$. Current sheet thinning set the stage for near-earth magnetic reconnection. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is non-gyrotropic effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. One of the major challenges in global MHD modeling of the magnetotail magnetic reconnection is to reproduce fast reconnection rates typically observed in smallscale kinetic simulations. Bursts of fast reconnection cause fast magnetic field reconfiguration typical for magnetospheric substorms. To incorporate nongyritropic effects in diffusion regions we developed an algorithm to search for magnetotail reconnection sites, specifically where the magnetic field components perpendicular to the local current direction approaches zero and form an X-type configuration. Spatial scales of the diffusion region and magnitude of the reconnection electric field are calculated self-consistently using MHD plasma and field parameters in the vicinity of the reconnection site. The location of the reconnection sites and spatial scales of the diffusion region are updated

  5. Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific work performed by the Aerospace Corporation under NASA Grant NAG5-10278, 'Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere during Geomagnetic Storms and Subsisting.' The period of performance for the Grant was March 1, 2001 to February 28, 2002. The following is a summary of the Statement of Work for this Grant. Use data from the PIXIE instrument on the Polar spacecraft from September 1998 onward to derive the statistical relationship between particle precipitation patterns and various geomagnetic activity indices. We are particularly interested in the occurrence of substorms during storm main phase and the efficacy of storms and substorms in injecting ring-current particles. We will compare stormtime simulations of the diffuse aurora using the models of Chen and Schulz with stormtime PIXIE measurements.

  6. A current disruption mechanism in the neutral sheet for triggering substorm expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Mankofsky, A.; Chang, C.-L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Wu, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Two main areas were addressed in support of an effort to understand mechanism responsible for the broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) observed in the magnetotail. The first area concerns the generation of BEN in the boundary layer region of the magnetotail whereas the second area concerns the occassional presence of BEN in the neutral sheet region. For the generation of BEN in the boundary layer region, a hybrid simulation code was developed to perform reliable longtime, quiet, highly resolved simulations of field aligned electron and ion beam flow. The result of the simulation shows that broadband emissions cannot be generated by beam-plasma instability if realistic values of the ion beam parameters are used. The waves generated from beam-plasma instability are highly discrete and are of high frequencies. For the plasma sheet boundary layer condition, the wave frequencies are in the kHz range, which is incompatible with the observation that the peak power in BEN occur in the 10's of Hz range. It was found that the BEN characteristics are more consistent with lower hybrid drift instability. For the occasional presence of BEN in the neutral sheet region, a linear analysis of the kinetic cross-field streaming instability appropriate to the neutral sheet condition just prior to onset of substorm expansion was performed. By solving numerically the dispersion relation, it was found that the instability has a growth time comparable to the onset time scale of substorm onset. The excited waves have a mixed polarization in the lower hybrid frequency range. The imposed drift driving the instability corresponds to unmagnetized ions undergoing current sheet acceleration in the presence of a cross-tail electric field. The required electric field strength is in the 10 mV/m range which is well within the observed electric field values detected in the neutral sheet during substorms. This finding can potentially account for the disruption of cross-tail current and its diversion to

  7. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Bernhard C.; Baehtz, Carsten; Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Goddard, Caroline J. L.

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  8. Eastward electrojet enhancements during substorm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Partamies, N.; Tanskanen, E.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we use a semi-automatic routine to identify negative and positive bays in the IMAGE magnetometer data during seven months in 2003. The IMAGE stations have been divided into three latitude regions to monitor the time evolution and temporal relationship between the regions during substorms. In particular, we focus on the events where both positive and negative ground magnetic deflections are observed in different latitude regions. We found 101 events in total. We examine separately a subset of 32 events, for which the local electrojet index values are larger than the global ones, suggesting that the strongest activity at that time takes place within or very close to the local time sector of IMAGE. We systematically analyze the temporal difference and the intensity of the positive and negative bays. Our results show that the magnitude of the positive bay is on average about half of that of the negative bay. Two thirds of the positive bays within the IMAGE network peak earlier than the negative bays. Because the positive and negative bays occur meridionally very close together, we suggest that the enhancements of the westward current at the poleward part of the auroral oval and the eastward current within the return flow are very tightly coupled through field-aligned currents and closing horizontal currents. The substorm current system appears as a superposition on the large-scale current pattern in the vicinity of the evening sector shear flow region.

  9. Geosynchronous Electron Fluxes and Chorus Generation During an MHD Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Jordanova, V.; Henderson, M. G.; Welling, D. T.; Vernon, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a numerical study of electron dynamics and whistler generation during an idealized substorm simulated using the Space Weather Modeling Framework. The time-dependent electric and magnetic fields from this simulated substorm are used to drive a new backwards particle tracing model, and the results from this model are used to identify the regions responsible for populating geosynchronous orbit during and after the substorm. Liouville mapping is then used to obtain electron fluxes at geosynchronous orbit as well as to assess the development of anisotropy during the earthward propagation of the electron injection.

  10. Magnetotail flux accumulation leading to auroral expansion and a substorm current wedge: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T. S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Weygand, J. M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotail burst busty flows, magnetic field dipolarization, and auroral poleward expansion are linked to the development of substorm current wedges (SCW). Although auroral brightening is often attributed to field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW produced by flow vorticity and pressure redistribution, in-situ observations addressing the mechanism that generates these currents have been scarce. Conjugate observations and modelling results utilizing magnetotail satellites, inversion technique for SCW, and auroral imagers were used to study the release, transport, and accumulation of magnetic flux by flows; dipolarization associated with substorm current wedge formation; and auroral poleward expansion during an isolated substorm on 13 February 2008. During early expansion phase, magnetic flux released by magnetic reconnection was transported by earthward flows. Some magnetic flux was accumulated in the near-Earth region, and the remainder was transported azimuthally by flow diversion. The accumulated flux created a high pressure region with vertically dipolarized and azimuthally bent magnetic field lines. The rotation of the magnetic field lines was consistent with the polarity of the SCW. In the near-Earth region, good agreement was found among the magnetic flux transported by the flows, the accumulated flux causing dipolarization inside the SCW, and the flux enclosed within the poleward-expanded auroral oval. This agreement demonstrates that magnetic flux from the flows accumulated and generated the SCW, the magnetic dipolarization, and the auroral poleward expansion. The quantity of accumulated flux appears to determine the amplitudes of these phenomena.

  11. The Mid-Latitude Positive Bay and the MPB Index of Substorm Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Chu, Xiangning

    2016-11-01

    Substorms are a major source of magnetic activity. At substorm expansion phase onset a westward current flows through the expanding aurora. This current is the ionospheric closure of the substorm current wedge produced by diversion of tail current along magnetic field lines. At low latitudes the field-aligned currents create a systematic pattern in the north (X) and east (Y) components of the surface magnetic field. The rise and decay in X is called a midlatitude positive bay whose start is a proxy for expansion onset. In this paper we describe a new index called the midlatitude positive bay index (MPB) which monitors the power in the substorm perturbations of X and Y. The index is obtained by removing the main field, storm time variations, and the solar quiet (Sq) variation from the measured field. These are estimated with spline fits and principal component analysis. The residuals of X and Y are high pass filtered to eliminate variations with period longer than 3 hours. The sum of squares of the X and Y power is determined at each of 35 midlatitude stations. The average power in night time stations is the MPB index. The index series is standardized and intervals above a fixed threshold are taken as possible bay signatures. Post processing constrains these to have reasonable values of rise time, strength, and duration. Minima in the index before and after the peak are taken as the start and end of the bay. The MPB and AL indices can be used to identify quiet intervals in the magnetic field.

  12. The Mid-Latitude Positive Bay and the MPB Index of Substorm Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-03-01

    Substorms are a major source of magnetic activity. At substorm expansion phase onset a westward current flows through the expanding aurora. This current is the ionospheric closure of the substorm current wedge produced by diversion of tail current along magnetic field lines. At low latitudes the field-aligned currents create a systematic pattern in the north (X) and east (Y) components of the surface magnetic field. The rise and decay in X is called a midlatitude positive bay whose start is a proxy for expansion onset. In this paper we describe a new index called the midlatitude positive bay index (MPB) which monitors the power in the substorm perturbations of X and Y. The index is obtained by removing the main field, storm time variations, and the solar quiet (Sq) variation from the measured field. These are estimated with spline fits and principal component analysis. The residuals of X and Y are high pass filtered to eliminate variations with period longer than 3 hours. The sum of squares of the X and Y power is determined at each of 35 midlatitude stations. The average power in night time stations is the MPB index. The index series is standardized and intervals above a fixed threshold are taken as possible bay signatures. Post processing constrains these to have reasonable values of rise time, strength, and duration. Minima in the index before and after the peak are taken as the start and end of the bay. The MPB and AL indices can be used to identify quiet intervals in the magnetic field.

  13. Growth and Morphology of Phase Separating Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegseth, John; Beysens, Daniel; Perrot, Francoise; Nikolayev, Vadim; Garrabos, Yves

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective is to study the relation between the morphology and the growth kinetics of domains during phase separation. We know from previous experiments performed near the critical point of pure fluids and binary liquids that there are two simple growth laws at late times. The 'fast' growth appears when the volumes of the phases are nearly equal and the droplet pattern is interconnected. In this case the size of the droplets grows linearly in time. The 'slow' growth appears when the pattern of droplets embedded in the majority phase is disconnected. In this case the size of the droplets increases in proportion to time to the power 1/3. The volume fraction of the minority phase is a good candidate to determine this change of behavior. All previous attempts to vary the volume fraction in a single experimental cell have failed because of the extreme experimental difficulties.

  14. Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that the vapor-crystal phase transition is actually a superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with variable density and a second-order phase transition with variable ordering. The latter, being a diffuse phase transition, results in the formation of a new, "pretransition," phase irreversibly spent in the course of the transition, which ends in the appearance of orthorhombic crystals. X-ray diffraction data and micrograph are presented.

  15. SAPS onset timing during substorms and the westward traveling surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present multispacecraft observations in the magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere of the onset time of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and tens of keV ring current injections on the duskside in three individual substorms. This is probably the first unequivocal determination of the substorm SAPS onset timing. The time lag between the SAPS and substorm onsets is much shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of ˜10 keV ions in the plasmasphere. It seemingly depends on the propagation time of substorm-injected plasma from the dipolarization onset region to the plasmasphere, as well as on the SAPS position. These observations suggest that fast onset SAPS and ring current injections are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  16. The Physical Elements of Onset of the Magnetospheric Substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    1997-01-01

    During this reporting period effort continued in the areas: (1) understanding the mechanisms responsible for substorm onset, and (2) application of a fundamental description of field-aligned currents and parallel electric fields to the plasma-sheet boundary layer.

  17. Comparison of substorms near two solar cycle maxima: (1999-2000 and 2012-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I.; Lubchich, A.; Kleimenova, N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the comparative analysis of the substorm behavior during two solar cycle maxima. The substorms, observed during the large solar cycle maximum (1999- 2000, with Wp> 100) and during the last maximum (2012-2013 with Wp~60), were studied. The considered substorms were divided into 3 types according to auroral oval dynamic. First type - substorms which are observed only at auroral latitudes ("usual" substorms); second type - substorms which propagate from auroral latitudes (<70?) to polar geomagnetic latitudes (>70°) ("expanded" substorms, according to expanded oval); third type - substorms which are observed only at latitudes above ~70° in the absence of simultaneous geomagnetic disturbances below 70° ("polar" substorms, according to contracted oval). Over 1700 substorm events have been analyzed. The following substorm characteristics have been studied: (i) the seasonal variations, (ii) the latitudinal range of the occurrence, (iii) solar wind and IMF parameters before substorm onset, (iiii) PC-index before substorm onset. Thus, the difference between two solar activity maxima could be seen in the difference of substorm behavior in these periods as well.

  18. Spatially Resolved Substorm Dynamical Model with Internal and External Substorm Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Crabtree, C.; Weigel, R. S.; Vassiliadis, D.; Doxas, I.

    2002-12-01

    A spatially-resolved nonlinear dynamics model of the coupled solar wind driven magnetosphere-ionosphere system is developed for the purpose of determining the electrical power flow from the solar wind through the nightside magnetosphere into the ionosphere. The model is derived from Maxwell equations and nonlinear plasma dynamics and focuses on the key conservation laws of mass, charge and energy in the power transfer elements in this complex dynamical system. The models has numerous feedback and feedforward loops for six forms of the distributed energy storage in the M-I system. In contrast to neural networks, the model delineates physically realizable time ordered sequence of energetic events in substorm dynamics. Three types of energy releases are observed in the substorm data and studied with the model. Type I events occur for solar wind conditions that lead to the creation of a near Earth neutral line (NENL) in the geomagnetic tail. Other solar wind conditions lead dominantly to the onset of convection in flux tubes with foot points in the auroral region that produced enhanced field aligned currents (FACs) closing in the ionosphere. These are the type II and type III events. In type II events a sudden northward turning of the IMF produces a transient mis-alignment of the pressure gradient with the gradient of the flux volumes as in the Lyons model. Large transient substorm current wedge and auroral region 1 sense currents are driven by the steep near-Earth pressure gradient in these events type II events. In type III events the slower evolving IMF field directly drives the nightside M-I system. This is the directly driven auroral substorm. We use physics-based filters to classify events in historical databases, and we use the 2-1/2D transport model to simulate the events for model solar wind inputs. The results of the research stress the need for more accurate determinations of the day-side magnetopause arrival times of structures in the solar wind required

  19. Deformation of Polar Cap Patches During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Ridley, A. J.; Nicolls, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Hampton, D.

    2015-12-01

    Polar cap patches refer to the islands of high F-region plasma density within the polar cap. Their formation on the dayside and deformation on the nightside are not well understood. The F-layer ionosphere density is strongly influenced by electric field, thermospheric wind as well as soft particle precipitation. This study combines observations from multiple instruments, including Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar, GPS TEC and optical instruments, as well as the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM), to investigate the effects of highly structured electric fields and winds on the deformation of polar cap patches during substorms. We will also discuss variations of the auroral emissions associated with the patch evolution.

  20. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, R.E. Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD ); Luehr, H. ); Anderson, B.J.; Newell, P.T.; McEntire, R.W. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the authors present multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred just after 0110 UT on April 25, 1985. The observations were made by spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7), ground auroral stations (EISCAT magnetometer cross, Syowa, Narssarssuaq, Great Whale River, and Fort Churchill), and mid-latitude stations (Furstenfeldbruck, Toledo, and Argentine Island). These data provide them with a broad range of observations, including the latitudinal extent of the polar cap, visual identification of substorm aurorae and the magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath them, in situ magnetic field and energetic particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region from two radially aligned spacecraft. The DMSP data indicate that the event took place during a period when the polar cap was relatively contracted, yet the disruption of the current sheet was observed by CCE at 8.56 R{sub E}. They have been able to infer a considerable amount of detail concerning the structure and westward expansion of the auroral features associated with the event, and they show that those auroral surges were located more than 10{degree} equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. Moreover, they present evidence that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa. Furthermore, the observations strongly imply that disruption of the cross-tail current began in the near-Earth region and that it had a component of expansion which was radially antisunward.

  1. In situ monitoring of liquid phase electroepitaxial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, A.; Isozumi, S.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    In situ monitoring of the layer thickness during liquid phase electroepitaxy (LPEE) was achieved with a submicron resolution through precise resistance measurements. The new approach to the study and control of LPEE was applied to growth of undoped and Ge-doped GaAs layers. The in situ determined growth kinetics was found to be in excellent agreement with theory.

  2. Crystal growth within a phase change memory cell.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abu; Le Gallo, Manuel; Krebs, Daniel

    2014-07-07

    In spite of the prominent role played by phase change materials in information technology, a detailed understanding of the central property of such materials, namely the phase change mechanism, is still lacking mostly because of difficulties associated with experimental measurements. Here, we measure the crystal growth velocity of a phase change material at both the nanometre length and the nanosecond timescale using phase-change memory cells. The material is studied in the technologically relevant melt-quenched phase and directly in the environment in which the phase change material is going to be used in the application. We present a consistent description of the temperature dependence of the crystal growth velocity in the glass and the super-cooled liquid up to the melting temperature.

  3. Dynamic Particle Growth Testing - Phase I Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z-C.

    2001-05-17

    There is clearly a great need to understand the processes of crystallization and solid scale formation that led to the shutdown of 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and could possibly cause similar problems in the future in other evaporators. Waste streams from SRS operations that enter the evaporators generally contain alkaline, sodium nitrate/nitrite-based solutions with various changing concentrations of silicates and aluminates. It has been determined. that the silicates and aluminates served as precursor reactants for forming unwanted minerals during solution evaporation, upon transport, or upon storage. Mineral forms of the Zeolite Linde A group--sodalites and cancrinite--along with gibbsite, have often been identified as contributing to deposit (scale) formation on surfaces of the 2H evaporator as well as to the formation of solid plugs in the gravity drain line and lift line. Meanwhile, solids (amorphous or crystalline minerals) are believed, without direct evidence, to form in the bulk solutions in the evaporator. In addition, the position of deposits in the 2H evaporator suggests that scale formation depends on the interplay of heat and mass transfer, hydrodynamics, and reaction mechanisms and kinetics. The origin of solid scale formation on walls could be due to heterogeneous nucleation and/or to homogeneous nucleation followed by cluster/particle deposition. Preliminary laboratory tests at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with standing metal coupons seem to support the latter mechanism for initial deposition; that is, the solid particles form in the bulk solution first and then deposit on the metal surfaces. Further buildup of deposits may involve both mechanisms: deposition and crystal growth. Therefore, there may be a direct linkage between the solid particle growth in bulk solution and the scale buildup on the wall surfaces. On the other hand, even if scale formation is due solely to a heterogeneous mechanism

  4. Elements of M-I Coupling in Repetitive Substorm Activity Driven by Interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    By means of case studies we explore key elements of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system associated with repetitive substorm activity during persistent strong forcing by ICMEs. Our approach consists of a combination of the magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives on the substorm activity. The first aspect is the near-Earth plasma sheet with its repetitive excitations of the substorm current wedge, as monitored by spacecraft GOES-10 when it traversed the 2100-0300 MLT sector, and its coupling to the westward auroral electrojet (WEJ) centered near midnight during the stable interplanetary (IP) conditions. The second aspect is the excitation of Bostrom type II currents maximizing at dusk and dawn and their associated ionospheric Pedersen current closure giving rise to EEJ (WEJ) events at dusk (dawn). As documented in our study, this aspect is related to the braking phase of Earthward-moving dipolarization fronts-bursty bulk flows. We follow the magnetospheric flow/field events from spacecraft Geotail in the midtail (X = - 11 Re) lobe to geostationary altitude at pre-dawn MLTs (GOES 10). The associated M-I coupling is obtained from ground-satellite conjunctions across the double auroral oval configuration along the meridian at dusk. By this technique we distinguish between ionospheric manifestations in three latitude regimes: (i) auroral oval south, (ii) auroral oval north, and (iii) polar cap. Regime (iii) is characterized by events of enhanced antisunward convection near the polar cap boundary (flow channel events) and in the central polar cap (PCN-index events). The repetitive substorm activity is discussed in the context of the level of IP driving as given by the geoeffective IP electric field (E_KL), magnetotail reconnection (inferred from the PCN-index and spacecraft Wind at X = - 77 Re) and the storm SYM-H index. We distinguish between different variants of the repetitive substorm activity, giving rise to electrojet (AL)-plasma convection (PCN) events

  5. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  6. Seasonal dependence of the substorm overshielding at the subauroral latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.

    2012-12-01

    We have shown that the equatorial counter electrojet (CEJ) is observed on the dayside when the overshielding electric field is dominant at subauroral latitudes on the dusk during substorm expansion phase. In this study, we examine if all the equatorial CEJs are accompanied by overshielding at subauroral latitudes by using ground magnetometer networks, IMAGE and INTERMAGNET during the period from 2000 to 2003. We selected 469 CEJ events from magnetometer data at Huancayo in Peru observed with the positive bay at Kakioka, Japan on the nightside. Overshielding was observed at subauroral stations of the IMAGE for 263 CEJ events, while it was not observed for 206 events. We found that the occurrence of the overshielding at subauroral latitudes significantly depends on the season; they tend to occur in the winter period from November to February. On the other hand, the convection electric field is dominant at the subauroral latitude during the northern summer period from April to August. Overshielding electric field that causes the CEJ during the northern summer should be originated from the southern hemisphere. Our results suggest that the overshielding electric field is stronger in winter than in summer if the convection electric field does not depend on the season. These features would be explained by assuming that the dynamo for the Region-1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs) is the voltage generator, while that for the R2 FACs is the current generator.

  7. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  8. Growth phase-dependent composition of the Helicobacter pylori exoproteome.

    PubMed

    Snider, Christina A; Voss, Bradley J; McDonald, W Hayes; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Analysis of H. pylori protein secretion is complicated by the occurrence of bacterial autolysis. In this study, we analyzed the exoproteome of H. pylori at multiple phases of bacterial growth and identified 74 proteins that are selectively released into the extracellular space. These include proteins known to cause alterations in host cells, antigenic proteins, and additional proteins that have not yet been studied in any detail. The composition of the H. pylori exoproteome is dependent on the phase of bacterial growth. For example, the proportional abundance of the vacuolating toxin VacA in culture supernatant is higher during late growth phases than early growth phases, whereas the proportional abundance of many other proteins is higher during early growth phases. We detected marked variation in the subcellular localization of putative secreted proteins within soluble and membrane fractions derived from intact bacteria. By providing a comprehensive view of the H. pylori exoproteome, these results provide new insights into the array of secreted H. pylori proteins that may cause alterations in the gastric environment.

  9. Physical Processes of Substorm Onset and Current Disruption Observed by AMPTE/CCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1998-03-01

    A new scenario of AMPTE/CCE observation of substorm onset and current disruption and the corresponding physical processes is presented. Toward the end of the late growth phase, plasma beta increases to greater than or equal to 50 and a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption. At the current disruption onset, higher-frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field form a turbulent state. Plasma transport and heating take place to reduce plasma beta and modify the ambient plasma pressure and velocity profiles so that the ambient magnetic field recovers from a tail-like geometry to a more dipole- like geometry. To understand the excitation of the low-frequency global instability, a new theory of kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) is proposed to explain the high critical beta threshold (greater than or equal to 50) of the low-frequency global instability observed by the AMPTE/CCE. The stabilization kinetic effects of trapped electron and finite ion Larmor radii give rise to a large parallel electric field and hence a parallel current that greatly enhances the stabilizing effect of field line tension to the ballooning mode. As a result, the high critical beta threshold for excitation of KBI is greatly increased over the ideal MHD ballooning instability threshold by greater than O(10 squared). The wave-ion magnetic drift resonance effect typically reduces the high critical beta threshold by up to 20% and produces a perturbed resonant ion velocity distribution with a duskward velocity roughly equal to the average ion magnetic drift velocity as the KBI grows to a large amplitude. Higher-frequency instabilities, such as the cross-field current instability (CCI), can be excited by the additional velocity space free energy associated with the positive slope in the perturbed resonant ion velocity distribution.

  10. Small and meso-scale properties of a substorm onset auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, H. U.; Amm, O.; Chaston, C. C.; Fu, S.; Haerendel, G.; Juusola, L.; Karlsson, T.; Lanchester, B.; Nakamura, R.; Østgaard, N.; Sakanoi, T.; Séran, E.; Whiter, D.; Weygand, J.; Asamura, K.; Hirahara, M.

    2010-10-01

    We present small and meso-scale properties of a substorm onset arc observed simultaneously by the Reimei and THEMIS satellites together with ground-based observations by the THEMIS GBO system. The optical observations revealed the slow equatorward motion of the growth-phase arc and the development of a much brighter onset arc poleward of it. Both arcs showed the typical particle signature of electrostatic acceleration in an inverted-V structure together with a strong Alfvén wave acceleration signature at the poleward edge of the onset arc. Two THEMIS spacecraft encountered earthward flow bursts around the times the expanding optical aurora reached their magnetic footprints in the ionosphere. The particle and field measurements allowed for the reconstruction of the field-aligned current system and the determination of plasma properties in the auroral source region. Auroral arc properties were extracted from the optical and particle measurements and were used to compare measured values to theoretical predictions of the electrodynamic model for the generation of auroral arcs. Good agreement could be reached for the meso-scale arc properties. A qualitative analysis of the internal structuring of the bright onset arc suggests the operation of the tearing instability which provides a 'rope-like' appearance due to advection of the current in the sheared flow across the arc. We also note that for the observed parameters ionospheric conductivity gradients due to electron precipitation will be unstable to the feedback instability in the ionospheric Alfvén resonator that can drive structuring in luminosity over the range of scales observed.

  11. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  12. The roles of direct input of energy from the solar wind and unloading of stored magnetotail energy in driving magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Akasofu, S. I.; Baumjohann, W.; Kamide, Y.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions to the substorm expansive phase of direct energy input from the solar wind and from energy stored in the magnetotail which is released in an unpredictable manner are considered. Two physical processes for the dispensation of the energy input from the solar wind are identified: (1) a driven process in which energy supplied from the solar wind is directly dissipated in the ionosphere; and (2) a loading-unloading process in which energy from the solar wind is first stored in the magnetotail and then is suddenly released to be deposited in the ionosphere. The pattern of substorm development in response to changes in the interplanetary medium has been elucidated for a canonical isolated substorm.

  13. Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Coupling During an Isolated Substorm Event: A Multispacecraft ISTP Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Turner, N. E.; Singer, H. J.; Frank, L. A.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Scudder, J.; Anderson, R.; Kokubun, S.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Blake, J. B.; Russell, C. T.; Kawano, H.; Mozer, F.; Slavin, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Multispacecraft data from the upstream solar wind, polar cusp, and inner magnetotail are used to show that the polar ionosphere responds within a few minutes to a southward IMF turning, whereas the inner tail signatures are visible within ten min from the southward turning. Comparison of two subsequent substorm onsets, one during southward and the other during northward IMF, demonstrates the dependence of the expansion phase characteristics on the external driving conditions. Both onsets are shown to have initiated in the midtail, with signatures in the inner tail and auroral oval following a few minutes later.

  14. The phase-field model in tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travasso, Rui D. M.; Castro, Mario; Oliveira, Joana C. R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor growth is becoming a central problem in biophysics both from its social and medical interest and, more fundamentally, because it is a remarkable example of an emergent complex system. Focusing on the description of the spatial and dynamical features of tumor growth, in this paper we review recent tumor modeling approaches using a technique borrowed from materials science: the phase-field models. These models allow us, with a large degree of generality, to identify the paramount mechanisms causing the uncontrolled growth of tumor cells as well as to propose new guidelines for experimentation both in simulation and in the laboratory. We finish by discussing open directions of research in phase-field modeling of tumor growth to catalyze the interest of physicists and mathematicians in this emergent field.

  15. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: 2. Relation to the interplanetary electric field E KL before substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, OA; Sormakov, DA

    2015-10-01

    This paper (the second of a series) presents the results of statistical investigation of relationship between the interplanetary electric field E KL and the Polar Cap (PC) index in case of magnetic substorms (1998-2001), which have been analyzed in Troshichev et al. (J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 2014). The PC index is directly related to the E KL field variations on interval preceding the substorm sudden onset (SO): correlation R > 0.5 is typical of more than 90 % of isolated substorms, 80 % of expanded substorms, and 99 % of events with coordinated E KL and PC jumps. The low or negative correlation observing in ~10 % of examined substorms suggests that the solar wind flow measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in the Lagrange point L1 did not encounter the magnetosphere in these cases. Examination of the delay times Δ T in the response of PC index to E KL variations provides the following results: (1) delay times do not depend on separate solar wind parameters, such as solar wind speed V X and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B Z component, contrary to general conviction, (2) the Δ T value is best controlled by the E KL field growth rate (d E KL/dt), (3) the lower Δ T limit (5-7 min is attained under conditions of the higher E KL growth rate, and (4) the PC index provides the possibility to verify the solar wind flow transportation time from ACE position (where the solar wind speed is estimated) to magnetosphere. These results, in combination with data testifying that the substorm onsets are related to the PC precursors, demonstrate that the PC index is an adequate ground-based indicator of the solar wind energy incoming into the magnetosphere.

  16. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  17. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  18. Periodic substorm activity in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Williams, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    On 19 May 1978 an anusual series of events is observed with the Quadrispherical LEPEDEA on board the ISEE-1 satellite in the Earth's geomagnetic tail. For 13 hours periodic bursts of both ions and electrons are seen in all the particle detectors on the spacecraft. On this day periodic activity is also seen on the ground, where multiple intensifications of the electrojets are observed. At the same time the latitudinal component of the interplanetary magnetic field shows a number of strong southward deflections. It is concluded that an extended period of substorm activity is occurring, which causes repeated thinnings and recoveries of the plasma sheet. These are detected by ISEE, which is situated in the plasma sheet boundary layer, as periodic dropouts and reappearances of the plasma. Comparisons of the observations at ISEE with those at IMP-8, which for a time is engulfed by the plasma sheet, indicate that the activity is relatively localized in spatial extent. For this series of events it is clear that a global approach to magnetospheric dynamics, e.g., reconnection, is inappropriate.

  19. Particle energization by a substorm dipolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Kalugin, G.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetotail dipolarizations, often associated with substorms, produce significant energetic particle enhancements in the nighttime magnetosphere. In this paper, we apply our recently developed magnetotail dipolarization model to the problem of energizing electrons and ions. Our model is two-dimensional in the meridional plane and is characterized by the ability to precisely control the location of the transition from the dipole-like to tail-like magnetic fields. Both magnetic and electric fields are calculated, self-consistently, as the transition zone retreats farther into the tail and the area around the Earth occupied by dipole-like lines increases in size. These fields are used to calculate the motion of electrons and ions and changes in their energies. We consider the energizing effects of the fields restricted to ±15° and ±30° sectors around the midnight meridian, as well the axisymmetric case. Energies of some electrons increase by a factor of 25, which is more than enough to produce observable ionospheric signatures. Electrons are treated using the Guiding Center approximation, while protons and heavier particles generally require description based on the Lorentz equations.

  20. Association of Energetic Neutral Atom Bursts and Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Kepko, L.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Frank, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that short-lived bursts of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed with the Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution/Imaging Proton Spectrometer (CEPPAD/IPS) instrument on the Polar spacecraft are signatures of substorms. The IPS was designed primarily to measure ions in situ, with energies between 17.5 and 1500 keV. However, it has also proven to be a very capable ENA imager in the range 17.5 keV to a couple hundred keV. It was expected that some ENA signatures of the storm time ring current would be observed. Interestingly, IPS also routinely measures weaker, shorter-lived, and more spatially confined bursts of ENAs with duration from a few tens of minutes to a few hours and appearing once or twice a day. One of these bursts was quickly associated with magnetospheric and auroral substorm activity and has been reported in the literature [Henderson et al., 19971. In this paper we characterize ENA bursts observed from Polar and establish statistically their association with classic substorm signatures (global auroral onsets, electron and ion injections, AL drops, and Pi2 onsets). We conclude that -90% of the observed ENA bursts are associated with classic substorms and thus represent a new type of substorm signature.

  1. Empirical evidence for two nightside current wedges during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and its coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) display a distinct latitudinal shift between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that the two WEJ regions are disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a new 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (substorm current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). There is some local time overlap between the two systems. The former maps to the region inside the near Earth neutral line and is associated with structured BPS type electron precipitation. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere and is associated with diffuse electron precipitation. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from Biot-Savart simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  2. Lag Phase Is a Distinct Growth Phase That Prepares Bacteria for Exponential Growth and Involves Transient Metal Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, Matthew D.; Rice, Christopher J.; Lucchini, Sacha; Pin, Carmen; Thompson, Arthur; Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Alston, Mark; Stringer, Michael F.; Betts, Roy P.; Baranyi, József; Peck, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Lag phase represents the earliest and most poorly understood stage of the bacterial growth cycle. We developed a reproducible experimental system and conducted functional genomic and physiological analyses of a 2-h lag phase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Adaptation began within 4 min of inoculation into fresh LB medium with the transient expression of genes involved in phosphate uptake. The main lag-phase transcriptional program initiated at 20 min with the upregulation of 945 genes encoding processes such as transcription, translation, iron-sulfur protein assembly, nucleotide metabolism, LPS biosynthesis, and aerobic respiration. ChIP-chip revealed that RNA polymerase was not “poised” upstream of the bacterial genes that are rapidly induced at the beginning of lag phase, suggesting a mechanism that involves de novo partitioning of RNA polymerase to transcribe 522 bacterial genes within 4 min of leaving stationary phase. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to discover that iron, calcium, and manganese are accumulated by S. Typhimurium during lag phase, while levels of cobalt, nickel, and sodium showed distinct growth-phase-specific patterns. The high concentration of iron during lag phase was associated with transient sensitivity to oxidative stress. The study of lag phase promises to identify the physiological and regulatory processes responsible for adaptation to new environments. PMID:22139505

  3. Lag phase is a distinct growth phase that prepares bacteria for exponential growth and involves transient metal accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Matthew D; Rice, Christopher J; Lucchini, Sacha; Pin, Carmen; Thompson, Arthur; Cameron, Andrew D S; Alston, Mark; Stringer, Michael F; Betts, Roy P; Baranyi, József; Peck, Michael W; Hinton, Jay C D

    2012-02-01

    Lag phase represents the earliest and most poorly understood stage of the bacterial growth cycle. We developed a reproducible experimental system and conducted functional genomic and physiological analyses of a 2-h lag phase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Adaptation began within 4 min of inoculation into fresh LB medium with the transient expression of genes involved in phosphate uptake. The main lag-phase transcriptional program initiated at 20 min with the upregulation of 945 genes encoding processes such as transcription, translation, iron-sulfur protein assembly, nucleotide metabolism, LPS biosynthesis, and aerobic respiration. ChIP-chip revealed that RNA polymerase was not "poised" upstream of the bacterial genes that are rapidly induced at the beginning of lag phase, suggesting a mechanism that involves de novo partitioning of RNA polymerase to transcribe 522 bacterial genes within 4 min of leaving stationary phase. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to discover that iron, calcium, and manganese are accumulated by S. Typhimurium during lag phase, while levels of cobalt, nickel, and sodium showed distinct growth-phase-specific patterns. The high concentration of iron during lag phase was associated with transient sensitivity to oxidative stress. The study of lag phase promises to identify the physiological and regulatory processes responsible for adaptation to new environments.

  4. Phase transitions in tumor growth: III vascular and metastasis behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Nieto-Villar, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular, vascular and metastasis tumor growth based on a chemical network model. Vascular growth and metastasis, appear as a hard phase transition type, as "first order", through a supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, emergence of limit cycle and then through a cascade of bifurcations type saddle-foci Shilnikov's bifurcation. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed shows that the entropy production rate, as a Lyapunov function, indicates the directional character and stability of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth according to this model.

  5. Decay of the Dst field of geomagnetic disturbance after substorm onset and its implication to storm-substorm relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyemori, T.; Rao, D. R. K.

    1996-06-01

    In order to investigate the causal relationship between magnetic storms and substorms, variations of the mid-latitude geomagnetic indices, ASY (asymmetric part) and SYM (symmetric part), at substorm onsets are examined. Substorm onsets are defined by three different phenomena; (1) a rapid increase in the mid-latitude asymmetric-disturbance indices, ASY-D and ASY-H, with a shape of so-called `mid-latitude positive bay\\'; (2) a sharp decrease in the AL index; (3) an onset of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsation. The positive bays are selected using eye inspection and a pattern-matching technique. The 1-min-resolution SYM-H index, which is essentially the same as the hourly Dst index except in terms of the time resolution, does not show any statistically significant development after the onset of substorms; it tends to decay after the onset rather than to develop. It is suggested by a simple model calculation that the decay of the magnetospheric tail current after substorm onset is responsible for the decay of the Dst field. The relation between the IMF southward turning and the development of the Dst field is re-examined. The results support the idea that the geomagnetic storms and substorms are independent processes; that is, the ring-current development is not the result of the frequent occurrence of substorms, but that of enhanced convection caused by the large southward IMF. A substorm is the process of energy dissipation in the magnetosphere, and its contribution to the storm-time ring-current formation seems to be negligible. The decay of the Dst field after a substorm onset is explained by a magnetospheric energy theorem. Acknowledgements. This study is supported in part by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, and Culture in Japan, under a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Category B). Topical Editor D. Alcaydé thanks M. Lockwood and N. J. Fox for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to: Y. Kamide->

  6. Growth of a two-phase finger in eutectics systems.

    PubMed

    Boussinot, G; Hüter, C; Brener, E A

    2011-02-01

    We present a theoretical study of the growth of a two-phase finger in eutectic systems. This pattern was observed experimentally by Akamatsu and Faivre [Phys. Rev. E 61, 3757 (2000)]. We study this two-phase finger using a boundary-integral formulation and we complement our investigation by a phase-field validation of the stability of the pattern. The deviations from the eutectic temperature and from the eutectic concentration provide two independent control parameters, leading to very different patterns depending on their relative importance. We propose scaling laws for the velocity and the different length scales of the pattern.

  7. Growth Phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetellae are Gram negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, is a human-restricted variant of Bordetella bronchiseptica, which infects a broad range of mammals causing chronic and often asymptomatic infections. Growth phase dependent gen...

  8. Occurrence frequencies of IMF triggered and nontriggered substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of triggered and nontriggered substorm are examined in light of current interest in such issues as substorm identification, IMF By variations, and potentially undetected small-scale solar wind perturbation. Global substorms are identified using a sudden, persistent decrease in the AL index. The onset of this global expansion is taken to be the time of the Pi 2 burst nearest in time to the beginning of the AL, decrease. IMF triggers were identified both subjectively through visual scanning of the data and automatically with a computer algorithm. Both northward turnings of the IMF Bz and decreases in the amplitude of the By component were considered as possible triggers. Two different solar wind monitors were used in the investigation: IMP-8 in a circular orbit with a distance 12 to approx.35 Re to the Earth-Sun line and ISEE-2 in an elliptical orbit with a distance only 5 to approx.10 Re to the Earth-Sun line. The IMP-8 results show that the triggering probability does not depend on the distance of the monitor from the Earth-Sun line in the range 12-35 Re. The ISEE dataset shows that closer than 12 Re the triggering probability is the same as it is in the IMP-8 data set. Thus there appears to be no dependence of triggering on the location of the monitor provided it is within 35 Re of the Earth. We also demonstrate that including the By component does not significantly increase the probability of substorm triggering. Approximately 60% of all substorms appear to be triggered. Of the 40% for which we could not identify a trigger, 10% occurred while the IMF was northward. The data suggest that substorm onset is a consequence of an internal magnetospheric instability that is highly sensitive to changes in magnetospheric convection induced by a sudden change in the IMF, but that these changes are not always necessary.

  9. Crystal growth in a three-phase system: Diffusion and liquid-liquid phase separation in lysozyme crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijna, M. C. R.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.; Vlieg, E.

    2007-07-01

    In the phase diagram of the protein hen egg-white lysozyme, a region is present in which the lysozyme solution demixes and forms two liquid phases. In situ observations by optical microscopy show that the dense liquid droplets dissolve when crystals grow in this system. During this process the demixed liquid region retracts from the crystal surface. The spatial distribution of the dense phase droplets present special boundary conditions for Fick’s second law for diffusion. In combination with the cylindrical symmetry provided by the kinetically roughened crystals, this system allows for a full numerical analysis. Using experimental data for setting the boundary conditions, a quasi-steady-state solution for the time-dependent concentration profile was shown to be valid. Comparison of kinetically rough growth in a phase separated system and in a nonseparated system shows that the growth kinetics for a three-phase system differs from a two-phase system, in that crystals grow more slowly but the duration of growth is prolonged.

  10. Crystal growth in a three-phase system: diffusion and liquid-liquid phase separation in lysozyme crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Heijna, M C R; van Enckevort, W J P; Vlieg, E

    2007-07-01

    In the phase diagram of the protein hen egg-white lysozyme, a region is present in which the lysozyme solution demixes and forms two liquid phases. In situ observations by optical microscopy show that the dense liquid droplets dissolve when crystals grow in this system. During this process the demixed liquid region retracts from the crystal surface. The spatial distribution of the dense phase droplets present special boundary conditions for Fick's second law for diffusion. In combination with the cylindrical symmetry provided by the kinetically roughened crystals, this system allows for a full numerical analysis. Using experimental data for setting the boundary conditions, a quasi-steady-state solution for the time-dependent concentration profile was shown to be valid. Comparison of kinetically rough growth in a phase separated system and in a nonseparated system shows that the growth kinetics for a three-phase system differs from a two-phase system, in that crystals grow more slowly but the duration of growth is prolonged.

  11. A binary phase field crystal study for liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanli; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth on predefined crystalline substrate is studied with binary phase field crystal (PFC) model. The purpose of this paper focuses on changes of the morphology of epitaxial films, influences of substrate vicinal angles on epitaxial growth, characteristics of islands growth on both sides of the substrate as well. It is found that the morphology of epitaxial films undergoes the following transitions: layer-by-layer growth, islands formation, mismatch dislocations nucleation and climb towards the film-substrate interface. Meanwhile, the density of steps and islands has obviously direct ratio relations with the vicinal angles. Also, preferential regions are found when islands grow on both sides of the substrate. For thinner substrate, the arrangement of islands is more orderly and the appearance of preferential growth is more obvious than that of thicker substrate. Also, the existing of preferential regions is much more valid for small substrate vicinal angles in contrast for big substrate vicinal angles.

  12. The Cross-field Current Instability for Substorm Expansion Onset

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2011-01-04

    A challenging problem in the topic of the nonlinear dynamics of the magnetosphere is the physical process responsible for the onset of magnetospheric substorms. The early collaboration with Dr. K. Papadopoulos has led to the proposal of a kinetic plasma instability, called the cross-field current instability, as the onset process. This has developed into a full-blown research effort, supplementing the initial theoretical analysis with in-depth data analysis and particle simulations. Several theoretical predictions based on this instability are successfully verified in observations. Data from the present NASA THEMIS mission provide some evidence for its validity. Further investigations for this substorm onset process are also discussed.

  13. Substorm simulation: Formation of westward traveling surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Auroral substorm expansion is characterized by initial brightening of aurora, followed by a bulge expanding in all directions, and a westward traveling surge (WTS). On the basis of the result obtained by a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation, we propose a scenario for the onset and the subsequent formation of WTS. (1) Near-Earth neutral line releases magnetic tension in the near-Earth plasma sheet to compress plasma and accelerate it earthward. (2) Earthward, perpendicular flow is converted to parallel flow in the near-Earth tail region. (3) Plasma moves earthward parallel to a field line. The plasma pressure is additionally enhanced at off-equator with an expanding slow-mode variation. (4) Flow vorticities coexist near the off-equatorial high-pressure region. Resultant field-aligned current (FAC) is connected to the ionosphere, which may manifest initial brightening. (5) Due to continued earthward flow, the high-plasma pressure region continues to expand to the east and west. (6) The ionospheric conductivity continues to increase in the upward FAC region, and the conductivity gradient becomes steeper. (7) The convergence of the Hall current gives rise to divergent electric field near the steep gradient of the conductivity. (8) Due to the divergent electric field, magnetospheric plasma moves counterclockwise at low altitude (in the Northern Hemisphere). (9) The additional flow vorticity generates a localized upward FAC at low altitudes, which may manifest WTS, and redistributes the ionospheric current and conductivity. Thus, WTS may be maintained in a self-consistent manner, and be a natural consequence of the overflow of the Hall current.

  14. Liquid phase epitaxial growth of bismuth based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, J.; Miyashita, S.; Inoue, T.; Komatsu, H.

    1996-05-01

    The liquid phase epitaxial growth of superconducting films of Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O y (2212 phase) and Bi 2Sr 2CuO z (2201 phase) were carried out on three types of substrates; SrTiO 3, LaAlO 3 and NdGaO 3. Twinning structures of the 2212 phase were observed in the films grown on the SrTiO 3 (100) and LaAlO 3 (100) substrates which belong to the cubic crystal system, while nearly twin-free structures were obtained when the film was grown on the NdGaO 3 (001) substrate (orthorhombic system). Atomic force microscopy revealed a 2201 phase film with a reasonably flat area (several μm 2) grown on the LaAlO 3 (100) substrate. It was observed that the 2212 phase nucleated on the substrate following the Volmer-Weber type mechanism (three-dimensional island growth mode). The enlarging processes of the island layers were discussed.

  15. Diurnal double maxima patterns in the F region ionosphere: Substorm-related aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, X.; Mendillo, M.; Fox, M.W.; Anderson, D.N.

    1993-08-01

    Daytime double maxima (twin peaks or bite-outs) in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) at middle and lower latitudes are found to be related to substorm signatures shown in both auroral electrojet and ring current variations. Case studies reveal that during substorm onset and recovery phases, the penetration of magnetospheric convection electric fields and their subsequent {open_quotes}overshielding{close_quotes} effects may be the major dynamical sources of these events. A theoretical low-latitude ionospheric model is used to simulate the dynamical effects of electric field disturbances on F region electron density and TEC. It is demonstrated that the diurnal double maxima in TEC can be created by a combined effect of E x B drift and altitude-dependent F region chemical loss. The required zonal electric fields are found to have greater penetration efficiency in the early evening sector and their latitudinal requirements appear to change with local time. The time scales for the modeled penetration and overshielding effects are 2-3 hours. Modeling results also show that considerable structuring in the local time variation of the ionospheric {open_quotes}equatorial anomaly{close_quotes} can occur due to the interplay of convection electric field penetration and overshielding effects. The possible cause of the midday bite-out ionospheric disturbances by the meridional winds associated with traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) is also addressed in modeling studies, but the specialized nature of the required TADs makes this a less well understood substorm-related mechanism. 64 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Generation mechanism of L-value dependence of oxygen flux enhancements during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument measures charged particles with an energy range from ~eV to ~ tens of keV. The observation shows that the energy flux of the particles increases inside the geosynchronous orbit during substorms. For some night-side events around the apogee, the energy flux of O+ ion enhances below ~10 keV at lower L shell, whereas the flux below ~8 keV sharply decreases at higher L shells. This structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux is observed only for the O+ ions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the generation mechanism of the structure by using numerical simulations. We utilized the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al (2010, JGR) to simulate the electric and magnetic fields during substorms. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields by applying the same model introduced by Nakayama et al. (2015, JGR). In the test particle simulation each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. Using the real number of particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density and differential flux of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after the substorm onset, the dawn-to-dusk electric field is enhanced to ~ 20 mV/m in the night side tail region at L > 7. (2) The O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner region (L > ~5.5) by the large-amplitude electric field. (3) The reconstructed L-energy spectrogram shows a similar structure to the Van Allen Probes observation. (4) The difference in the flux enhancement between at lower L shell and higher L shells is due to two distinct acceleration processes: adiabatic and non-adiabatic. We will discuss the relationship between the particle acceleration and the structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux enhancement in detail.

  17. A statistical relationship between the geosynchronous magnetic field and substorm electrojet magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the geosynchronous magnetic field variations during substorms measured by GOES 5 and the auroral electroject as measured by AE and Poste de la Baleine is examined. It is found that the more taillike the field prior to the local onset, the greater the dipolarization of the field during the substorm. The greater the deviation of the field from a dipolar configuration, the larger the change in AE during the event. It is inferred that stronger cross-tail currents prior to the substorm are associated with larger substorm-associated westward electrojets and thus more intense substorms. Since the westward electroject is the ionospheric leg of the substorm current wedge, it is inferred that the substorm-associated westward electrojet is drawn from the near-earth region. Most of the current diversion is found to occur in the near-earth magnetotail.

  18. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  19. Rapid enhancement of energetic oxygen ions in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations show that energetic (>100 keV) O+ ions are rapidly increased in the inner magnetosphere during substorms. The ultimate source of O+ ions is the Earth's ionosphere, so that O+ ions must be accelerated from ~eV to 100s keV somewhere in the magnetosphere. A fundamental question still arise regarding why O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner magnetosphere. We simulated substorms under two different solar wind conditions by using the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al. (2010, JGR). The solar wind speed is set to be 372 km/s for Case I, and 500 km/s for Case II. In both cases, the MHD simulation result shows that the dawn to dusk electric field is enhanced in the night side tail region at >7 Re just after the substorm onset. In particular, the electric field in the inner region (~7 Re) is highly enhanced by the tension force because of relatively strong magnetic field together with curved field lines. The strongest electric field takes place near the region where the plasma pressure is high. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields for Cases I and II. O+ ions are released from two planes located at ±2 Re in the Z direction in the tail region. O+ ions released at the two planes represent outflowing stream of O+ ions escaping from the Earth. The distribution function at the planes is assumed to be drifting Kappa distribution with temperature of 10 eV, the density of 105 m-3, and the parallel velocity given by the MHD simulation. In total, around a billion of particles are traced. Each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. After tracing particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density of O+ ions. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after substorm onset, the differential flux of O+ ions is almost simultaneously enhanced in the region where the electric field is strong. (2) The kinetic energy increases rapidly to

  20. Distinct Magnetospheric Responses to Southward IMF in Two Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Richard, R. L.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Sigwarth, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    Solar wind plasma parameters and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) observed by the WIND spacecraft upstream of the bow shock were used as input to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of two substorm events. The power deposited into the ionosphere due to electron precipitation was calculated both from VIS observations and from the simulations.

  1. A nonlinear dynamic analogue model of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Büchner, J.

    Linear prediction filter studies have shown that the magnetospheric response to energy transfer from the solar wind contains both directly driven and unloading components. These studies have also shown that the magnetospheric response is significantly nonlinear and, thus, the linear prediction filtering technique and other correlative techniques which assume a linear magnetospheric response cannot give a complete deacription of that response. Here, the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is discussed within the framework of deterministic nonlinear dynamics. An earlier dripping faucet mechanical analogue to the magnetosphere is first reviewed and then the plasma physical counterpart to the mechanical model is constructed. A Faraday loop in the magnetotail is considered and the relationship of electric potentials on the loop to changes in the magnetic flux threading the loop is developed. This approach leads to a model of geomagnetic activity which is similar to the earlier mechanical model but described in terms of the geometry and plasma contents of the magnetotail. This Faraday loop response model contains analogues to both the directly driven and the storage-release magnetospheric responses and it includes, in a fundamental way, the inherent nonlinearity of the solar wind-magnetosphere system. It can be chancterized as a nonlinear, damped harmonic oscillator that is driven by the loading-unloading substorm cycle. The model is able to explain many of the features of the linear prediction filter results. In particular, at low geomagnetic activity levels the model exbibits the "regular dripping" response which provides an explanation for the unloading component at 1 hour lag in the linear prediction filters. Further, the model suggests that the disappearance of the unloading component in the linear prediction filters at high geomagnetic activity levels is due to a chaotic transition beyond which the loading-unloading mechanism becomes aperiodic. The model predicts

  2. Nucleation and growth studies of crystalline carbon phases at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Radhika C.

    Understanding the nucleation and early stage growth of crystals from the vapor phase is important for realizing large-area single-crystal quality films, controlled synthesis of nanocrystals, and the possible discovery of new phases of materials. Carbon provides the most interesting system because all its known crystalline phases (diamond, graphite and carbon nanotubes) are technologically important materials. Hence, this dissertation is focused on studying the nucleation and growth of carbon phases synthesized from the vapor phase. Nucleation experiments were performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor, and the resulting carbon nanocrystals were analyzed primarily using electron nanodiffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These studies led to the discovery of two new crystalline phases of sp 3 carbon other than diamond: face-centered and body-centered cubic carbon. Nanodiffraction results revealed possible hydrogen substitution into diamond-cubic lattices, indicating that these new phases probably act as intermediates in diamond nucleation. Nucleation experiments also led to the discovery of two new morphologies for sp2 carbon: nanocrystals of graphite and tapered, hollow 1-D structures termed here as "carbon nanopipettes". A Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm was developed to simulate the growth of individual diamond crystals from the vapor phase, starting with small clusters of carbon atoms (or seeds). Specifically, KMC simulations were used to distinguish the kinetic rules that give rise to a star-shaped decahedral morphology compared to decahedral crystals. KMC simulations revealed that slow adsorption on the {111} step-propagation sites compared to kink sites leads to star-decahedral crystals, and higher adsorption leads to decahedral crystals. Since the surfaces of the nanocrystals of graphite and nanopipettes were expected to be composed primarily of edge-plane sites, the electrochemical behavior of both these materials were

  3. Special phase transformation and crystal growth pathways observed in nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Huang, Feng; Finnegan, Michael P; Waychunas, Glenn A; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-01-01

    Phase transformation and crystal growth in nanoparticles may happen via mechanisms distinct from those in bulk materials. We combine experimental studies of as-synthesized and hydrothermally coarsened titania (TiO2) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) with thermodynamic analysis, kinetic modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering, and UV-vis spectroscopy. At low temperatures, phase transformation in titania nanoparticles occurs predominantly via interface nucleation at particle–particle contacts. Coarsening and crystal growth of titania nanoparticles can be described using the Smoluchowski equation. Oriented attachment-based crystal growth was common in both hydrothermal solutions and under dry conditions. MD simulations predict large structural perturbations within very fine particles, and are consistent with experimental results showing that ligand binding and change in aggregation state can cause phase transformation without particle coarsening. Such phenomena affect surface reactivity, thus may have important roles in geochemical cycling.

  4. Force Balance and Substorm Effects in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Larson, Douglas J.; Kontodinas, Ioannis D.; Ball, Bryan M.

    1997-01-01

    A model of the quiet time middle magnetotail is developed using a consistent orbit tracing technique. The momentum equation is used to calculate geocentric solar magnetospheric components of the particle and electromagnetic forces throughout the current sheet. Ions generate the dominant x and z force components. Electron and ion forces almost cancel in the y direction because the two species drift earthward at comparable speeds. The force viewpoint is applied to a study of some substorm processes. Generation of the rapid flows seen during substorm injection and bursty bulk flow events implies substantial force imbalances. The formation of a substorm diversion loop is one cause of changes in the magnetic field and therefore in the electromagnetic force. It is found that larger forces are produced when the cross-tail current is diverted to the ionosphere than would be produced if the entire tail current system simply decreased. Plasma is accelerated while the forces are unbalanced resulting in field lines within a diversion loop becoming more dipolar. Field lines become more stretched and the plasma sheet becomes thinner outside a diversion loop. Mechanisms that require thin current sheets to produce current disruption then can create additional diversion loops in the newly thinned regions. This process may be important during multiple expansion substorms and in differentiating pseudoexpansions from full substorms. It is found that the tail field model used here can be generated by a variety of particle distribution functions. However, for a given energy distribution the mixture of particle mirror or reflection points is constrained by the consistency requirement. The study of uniqueness also leads to the development of a technique to select guiding center electrons that will produce charge neutrality all along a flux tube containing nonguiding center ions without the imposition of a parallel electric field.

  5. Analysis of a ``phase transition'' from tumor growth to latency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Romano, A.; Scalerandi, M.; Pescarmona, G. P.

    2000-08-01

    A mathematical model, based on the local interaction simulation approach, is developed in order to allow simulations of the spatiotemporal evolution of neoplasies. The model consists of a set of rules, which govern the interaction of cancerous cells among themselves and in competition with other cell populations for the acquisition of essential nutrients. As a result of small variations in the basic parameters, it leads to four different outcomes: indefinite growth, metastasis, latency, and complete regression. In the present contribution a detailed analysis of the dormant phase is carried on and the critical parameters for the transition to other phases are computed. Interesting chaotic behaviors can also be observed, with different attractors in the parameters space. Interest in the latency phase has been aroused by therapeutical strategies aiming to reduce a growing tumor to dormancy. The effect of such strategies may be simulated with our approach.

  6. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  7. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  8. Association of an auroral surge with plasma sheet recovery and the retreat of the substorm neutral line

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W. ); Elphinstone, R.; Murphree, J.S. . Dept. of Physics); Galvin, A.B. . Dept. of Space Physics); Heinemann, N.C. . Dept. of Physics); Parks, G.K. ); Rich, F.J. (Air Force Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA

    1990-01-01

    One of the periods being studied in the PROMIS CDAW (CDAW-9) workshops is the interval 0000-1200 UT on May 3, 1986, designated Event 9C.'' A well-defined substorm, starting at 0919 UT, was imaged by both DE 1 over the southern hemisphere and Viking over the northern hemisphere. The images from Viking, at 80-second time resolution, showed a surge-like feature forming at about 0952 UT at the poleward edge of the late evening sector of the oval. The feature remained relatively stationary until about 1000 UT when it seemed to start advancing westward. ISEE 1 and 2 were closely conjugate to the surge as mapped from both the DMSP and Viking images. We conclude that the plasma sheet recovery was occasioned by the arrival at ISEE 1,2 of a westward traveling wave of plasma sheet thickening, the wave itself being formed by westward progression of the substorm neutral line's tailward retreat. The westward traveling surge was the auroral manifestation of this nonuniform retreat of the neutral line. We suggest that the upward field aligned current measured by DMSP F7 above the surge head was driven by plasma velocity shear in the plasma sheet at the duskward kink'' in the retreating neutral line. By analogy with this observation we propose that the westward traveling surges and the current wedge field aligned currents that characterize the expanding auroral bulge during substorm expansive phase are manifestations of (and are driven by) velocity shear in the plasma sheet near the ends of the extending substorm neutral line.

  9. Phase field modeling of grain growth in porous polycrystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Karim E.

    The concurrent evolution of grain size and porosity in porous polycrystalline solids is a technically important problem. All the physical properties of such materials depend strongly on pore fraction and pore and grain sizes and distributions. Theoretical models for the pore-grain boundary interactions during grain growth usually employ restrictive, unrealistic assumptions on the pore and grain shapes and motions to render the problem tractable. However, these assumptions limit the models to be only of qualitative nature and hence cannot be used for predictions. This has motivated us to develop a novel phase field model to investigate the process of grain growth in porous polycrystalline solids. Based on a dynamical system of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and All en-Cahn equations, the model couples the curvature-driven grain boundary motion and the migration of pores via surface diffusion. As such, the model accounts for all possible interactions between the pore and grain boundary, which highly influence the grain growth kinetics. Through a formal asymptotic analysis, the current work demonstrates that the phase field model recovers the corresponding sharp-interface dynamics of the co-evolution of grain boundaries and pores; this analysis also fixes the model kinetic parameters in terms of real materials properties. The model was used to investigate the effect of porosity on the kinetics of grain growth in UO2 and CeO2 in 2D and 3D. It is shown that the model captures the phenomenon of pore breakaway often observed in experiments. Pores on three- and four- grain junctions were found to transform to edge pores (pores on two-grain junction) before complete separation. The simulations demonstrated that inhomogeneous distribution of pores and pore breakaway lead to abnormal grain growth. The simulations also showed that grain growth kinetics in these materials changes from boundary-controlled to pore-controlled as the amount of porosity increases. The kinetic growth

  10. Geotail Measurements Compared with the Motions of High-Latitude Auroral Boundaries during Two Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Burke, W. J.; Erickson, G. M.; Nakamura, M.; Mukai, T.; Kokubun, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Jacobsen, B.; Egeland, A.; Samson, J. C.; Weimer, D. R.; Reeves, G. D.; Luhr, H.

    1997-01-01

    Geotail plasma and field measurements at -95 R(sub E) are compared with extensive ground-based, near-Earth, and geosynchronous measurements to study relationships between auroral activity and magnetotail dynamics during the expansion phases of two substorms. The studied intervals are representative of intermittent, moderate activity. The behavior of the aurora and the observed effects at Geotail for both events are harmonized by the concept of the activation of near-Earth X lines (NEXL) after substorm onsets, with subsequent discharges of one or more plasmoids down the magnetotail. The plasmoids must be viewed as three-dimensional structures which are spatially limited in the dawn-dusk direction. Also, reconnection at the NEXL must proceed at variable rates on closed magnetic field lines for significant times before beginning to reconnect lobe flux. This implies that the plasma sheet in the near-Earth magnetotail is relatively thick in comparison with an embedded current sheet and that both the NEXL and distant X line can be active simultaneously. Until reconnection at the NEXL engages lobe flux, the distant X line maintains control of the poleward auroral boundary. If the NEXL remains active after reaching the lobe, the auroral boundary can move poleward explosively. The dynamics of high-latitude aurora in the midnight region thus provides a means for monitoring these processes and indicating when significant lobe flux reconnects at the NEXL.

  11. Geomagnetic Storm and Substorm effect on the total electron content using GPS at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, L.; Sabione, J. I.; van Zele, M. A.; Meza, A. M.; Brunini, C.

    The aim of this work is to characterize the ionospheric electron content variability during a geomagnetic storm and substorms during it This study is based on the vertical total electron content VTEC computed from global positioning system GPS GPS stations located at sub-auroral latitudes are taken into account for analyzing the signatures of the current wedge formed during the substorm expansion phase The study is focused on the geomagnetic storm befallen on April 6 and 7 2000 near the equinox Because our study is based on tying the geomagnetic disturbances with the variability of VTEC in local time the GPS stations are located at different geographic longitude The main results are a when the geomagnetic storm starts between pre-midnight and dawn a minimum of VTEC is recorded lasting all the long day ionospheric storm negative phase also the nighttime electron content may decrease below the corresponding for quiet days but near the 60z of latitude the ionization polar tongue can be observed at noon superimposed to the negative phase b the VTEC computed by GPS station placed lower than 50o recorded a positive phase when the geomagnetic storm starts between dawn and noon or a dusk effect if it starts at noon while those located between 50o and 60o show a sudden increase and later sudden decrease to nocturnal values c when it starts between afternoon and sunset the ionospheric negative phase is recorded during the next day and if the GPS station are located at higher latitude than 50o the VTEC representation shows the nocturnal end of the

  12. Extraordinary growth phases of nanobacteria isolated from mammalian blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Pelttari, Alpo; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1997-07-01

    Nanobacteria, novel sterile-filterable coccoid bacteria inhabiting mammalian blood and blood products, have different growth phases depending on the culture conditions. These minute organisms produce biogenic apatite as a part of their envelope. This becomes thicker as the cultures age, rendering them visible in microscopy and resistant to harsh conditions. Mineral deposits were not formed without live nanobacteria. Apatite formation was faster and more voluminous in serum-free (SF) medium, and within a week, several micrometer thick `castles' formed around each nanobacteria. These formations were firmly attached to the culture plates. Nanobacteria multiplied inside these thick layers by turning into D-shaped forms 2 - 3 micrometers in size. After a longer culture period, tens of them could be observed inside a common stony shelter. The apatite shelters had a hollow interior compartment occupied by the organisms as evidenced by SEM and TEM. Supplementing the culture medium with a milk growth-factor product, caused the castles to grow bigger by budding. These formations finally lost their mineral layer, and released typical small coccoid nanobacteria. When SF cultures were supplemented with sterile serum, mobile D-shaped nanobacteria together with small `elementary particles' 50 - 100 nm in size were found. Negative results in standard sterility testing, positivity in immunofluorescence staining and ELISA tests with nanobacteria-specific monoclonal antibodies, and 98% identity of 16S rRNA gene sequences proved that all of these unique creates are nanobacterial growth phases.

  13. Statistical comparison of inter-substorm timings in global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiducek, J. D.; Welling, D. T.; Morley, S.; Ozturk, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms are events in which energy stored in the magnetotail is released into the auroral zone and into the downstream solar wind. Because of the complex, nonlinear, and possibly chaotic nature of the substorm energy release mechanism, it may be extremely difficult to forecast individual substorms in the near term. However, the inter-substorm timing (the amount of time elapsed between substorms) can be reproduced in a statistical sense, as was demonstrated by Freeman and Morley (2004) using their Minimal Substorm Model (MSM), a simple solar-wind driven model with the only free parameter being a recurrence time. The goal of the present work is to reproduce the observed distribution of inter-substorm timings with a global MHD model. The period of 1-31 January 2005 was simulated using the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), driven by solar wind observations. Substorms were identified in the model output by synthesizing surface magnetometer data and by looking for tailward-moving plasmoids. Substorms identified in the MHD model are then compared with observational data from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geostationary satellite energetic particle data, and surface magnetometer data. For each dataset (MHD model and observations), we calculate the substorm occurrence rate, and for the MHD model we additionally calculate the timing error of the substorm onsets relative to the observed substorms. Finally, we calculate distribution functions for the inter-substorm timings in both the observations and the model. The results of this analysis will guide improvements to the MHD-based substorm model, including the use of Hall MHD and embedded particle in cell (EPIC), leading to a better reproduction of the observed inter-substorm timings and an improved understanding of the underlying physical processes. ReferencesM. P. Freeman and S. K. Morley. A minimal substorm model that

  14. Alloy Phase Diagrams for III-P Semiconductor Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennett, Adam

    Bulk crystals of III-V ternary and quaternary semiconductors with tunable band gaps and lattice constants are attractive for numerous electronic and optoelectronic applications. In particular, the ternary GaxIn 1-xP has a band gap range of 1.351 - 2.261 eV, which corresponds to wavelengths in the near infrared to green range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and lattice constant ranging of 5.4512 - 5.8688 A. This makes it attractive for applications such as a high energy junction in multi-junction photovoltaics, terahetrtz emission, and as a substrate for yellow, amber, orange, and red AlGaInP LEDs. However, bulk growth of GaxIn1-xP ternary III-V semiconductor crystals using elemental Ga-In-P melts or pseudo-binary GaP-InP melts is significantly challenging due to the high vapor pressure of phosphorus at the typical growth temperatures, the large variation in the lattice constant of the constituent binaries, and the slow growth rates necessary in order to avoid the formation of cracks, dislocations, and multiphase inhomogeneities. Lowering the growth temperature is desirable such that the vapor pressure of phosphorus can be more easily managed. Low growth temperatures can be achieved by using gallium or indium rich solutions, as is currently used for liquid phase epitaxy. However, this approach is less attractive for growing bulk crystals due to numerous experimental difficulties such as high segregation of gallium in indium as well as sticking of the growth solution to the crucible wall and to the grown crystal, making crystal extraction without causing damage challenging. The objective of this research is to establish the conditions required for the growth of uniform composition bulk crystals of GaxIn 1-xP at any desired composition from a stoichiometric GaxIn 1-xPySb1-y quaternary melt, as well as conditions for compositional grading from a binary III-V material seed. Due to large number of conditions of melt composition and temperature that are possible, trial

  15. Monitoring Growth of Closed Fatigue Crack Using Subharmonic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Endo, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Shintaku, Y.; Yamanaka, K.

    2010-02-01

    To ensure the safety and reliability of atomic power plants and airplanes, the technique of monitoring closed fatigue cracks is requisite. Here we monitored the distribution of the crack depths and closure behavior in the length direction after 48000 and 87000 fatigue cycles using subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). The crack depths in the subharmonic images were larger than those in the fundamental images. Specifically, the difference was larger at near the side surface than at the center. The percentage of the closed part varied with the crack growth in the specimen. In addition, we fabricated shoe for SPACE to facilitate mechanical scanning. Thus, it was demonstrated that SPACE is useful in monitoring closed fatigue crack growth.

  16. Characterization of secondary phases in modified vertical bridgman growth czt

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, Martine

    2009-07-10

    CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals are highly suitable for use as a room temperature based spectrometer for the detection and characterization of gamma radiation. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. For example, various structural heterogeneities within the CZT crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SP) can have a negative impact on the detector performance. In this study, a CZT material was grown by the modified vertical Bridgman growth (MVB) method with zone leveled growth without excess Te in the melt. Visual observations of material from the growth of this material revealed significant voids and SP. Three samples from this material was analyzed using various analytical techniques to evaluate its electrical properties, purity and detector performance as radiation spectrometers and to determine the morphology, dimension and elemental/structural composition of one of the SP in this material. This material was found to have a high resistivity but poor radiation spectrometer performance. It had SP that were rich in polycrystalline aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), metallic Te and polycrystalline CdZnTe and 15 to 50 {micro}m in diameter. Bulk elemental analyses of sister material from elsewhere in the boule did not contain high levels of Al so there is considerable elemental impurity heterogeneity within the boule from this growth.

  17. Determination of a geomagnetic storm and substorm effects on the ionospheric variability from GPS observations at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Luis; Ignacio Sabbione, Juan; Andrea van Zele, María; Meza, Amalia; Brunini, Claudio

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the ionospheric electron content variability during a standard and simple geomagnetic storm, and substorms during it. The analysis is based on tying the geomagnetic disturbances including the signatures of the current wedge formed during the substorm expansion phase, with the variability of ionospheric vertical total electron content (VTEC) in local time; for this reason the VTEC is computed for complete geographical longitude coverage at subauroral and auroral latitudes. The study is based on the geomagnetic storm befallen on April 6 and 7, 2000 (near the equinox) and the TEC are computed from global positioning system (GPS). The main results can be divided into three groups: (a) when the geomagnetic storm starts between pre-midnight and dawn, a minimum of VTEC is recorded, lasting all the long day (ionospheric storm negative phase); also the nighttime electron content may decrease below the corresponding for quiet days; but near the 60 of geomagnetic latitude the ionization polar tongue can be observed at noon, superimposed to the negative phase; (b) computed by GPS stations placed lower than 50, when the geomagnetic storm starts between dawn and noon the VTEC recorded a positive phase, but if it starts at noon a dusk effect is recorded; those located between 50 and 60 show a sudden increase and later sudden decrease to nocturnal values, (c) when the geomagnetic storm starts between afternoon and sunset, at stations located lower than 50 a dusk effect and an ionospheric negative phase during the next day are recorded, but if the GPS stations are located at higher latitude than 50 the VTEC representation shows the nocturnal end of the ionization polar tongue. Expansion phases of substorms are shown as small VTEC variations recorded for a short time: decreases if the substorm happens between dawn and midday; enhancements during the fall of the ionospheric positive phase. From the comparison with the results obtained by other

  18. Growth of manganese filled carbon nanofibers in the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, P. M.; Colliex, C.; Lambert, J. M.; Bernier, P.; Barbedette, L.; Tence, M.; Stephan, O.

    1994-03-01

    We report the vapor phase growth of partially filled graphitic fibers, 20-30 nm in diameter and up to a micron in length, during a manganese catalyzed carbon electric arc discharge. The fiber morphology resembles that of catalytic chemical vapor deposited carbon filaments but the inside hollow contains intermittent precipitates and continuous filling of Mn that at times occupy >50% of fiber lengths. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss line spectra show that the fillings form as solid cores and may correspond to pure metal.

  19. Signatures of Pseudo-breakup, Breakup of a Full Substorm Onset, and Poleward Border Intensifications Compared.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronkov, I.; Donovan, E. F.; Samson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    For several exceptional events, we use ground-based and in-situ data to compare the ionospheric, geostationary, and mid-tail signatures of the pseudo-breakup, breakup, and poleward border intensifications (PBIs). In doing so, we utilize CANOPUS magnetometer and multi-wavelength photometer and All-sky imager data, as well as field measurements provided by the GOES 8, GOES 9, and Geotail spacecraft. We have identified a set of distinguishable signatures of each process. Pseudo-breakup consists of two distinct stages: near-linear arc intensification corresponding to the ``explosive growth phase" at geostationary orbit, and poleward vortex expansion that starts simultaneously with explosive onset of short period pulsations (Pi1, Pi2) and dipolarization observed at geostationary orbit. It can be accompanied by local perturbations of the equatorward part of the electron precipitation region and by formation of the substorm-like local current system but neither by optical signatures of the lobe flux reconnection nor by perturbations in the mid-tail. It typically saturates near the equatorward border of the electron precipitation region producing a mushroom-like auroral structure. Breakup starts with the same two-stage initial scenario of the arc intensification and vortex evolution but it rapidly expands poleward and is accompanied by optical signatures of reconnection onset, namely the aurora develops into a cell-like structure of the size compatible with the whole auroral zone width. This occurs at the time when mid-tail disruption signatures are observed. Full onset launches a second, more global, larger Pi2 burst. Finally, we show an example of PBIs observed as long period pulses of electron precipitation at the poleward border of auroral region, followed by the high-latitude proton aurora. The commencement of PBI coincided with bursty bulk flows and pulses of plasma energization in the mid-tail. Observed features are discussed with respect to recent ideas claiming

  20. Correlation of plasma and field behaviors in the near-Earth magnetotail with substorm injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, T.; Ohtani, S.; Lui, A. T.; McEntire, R. W.; Maezawa, K.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.; Reeves, G. D.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated statistically correlation of plasma flows, energization, and field variations observed by the Geotail spacecraft with particle injections observed at geosynchronous orbit. For this study, we visually inspected both Geotail and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geosynchronous satellites data during Apr., 1995 - Mar., 2001 and have identified 50 conjunction events in which Geotail observed the near-Earth plasma sheet (-5 Re > X > -17 Re) when LANL observed dispersionless injection of energetic particles at geosynchronous distance on the nightside. We have made a superposed epoch analysis of plasma and field variations in the near-Earth plasma sheet by referring to the time of the associated dispersionless injections. The result is that, in all of the cases where Geotail and LANL are located closely in the dawn-dusk direction (|dY| < 3 Re), Geotail observed a gradual |Bx| increase prior to the injection time and then observed a sharp decrease in |Bx| as well as a rapid Bz increase around the injection time. These field signatures are consistent with the field stretching during the growth phase and subsequent dipolarization associated with a substorm onset. In addition to the field signatures, flux enhancements of energetic (>30 keV) ions and electrons are also observed in most of the cases when Geotail reenters the plasma sheet as expected from the thickening of the plasma sheet after onset. On the other hand, in the cases in which Geotail and LANL are separated azimuthally from each other (|dY| > 3 Re), the |Bx| increase prior to the injection time is not seen clearly and the Bz increase tends to be less sharp and smaller than those in the former cases. This result suggests that the thinning and subsequent thickening of the plasma sheet occurs more markedly at the injection sector and such a change in the field configuration becomes weaker away from there. We have also examined the spatial evolution in the X-Y plane of the region of

  1. Theoretical magnetograms based on quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Wolf, R. A.; Karty, J. L.; Harel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Substorm currents derived from the Rice University computer simulation of the September 19, 1976 substorm event are used to compute theoretical magnetograms as a function of universal time for various stations, integrating the Biot-Savart law over a maze of about 2700 wires and bands that carry the ring, Birkeland and horizontal ionospheric currents. A comparison of theoretical results with corresponding observations leads to a claim of general agreement, especially for stations at high and middle magnetic latitudes. Model results suggest that the ground magnetic field perturbations arise from complicated combinations of different kinds of currents, and that magnetic field disturbances due to different but related currents cancel each other out despite the inapplicability of Fukushima's (1973) theorem. It is also found that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the horizontal magnetic field disturbance component at low latitudes is due to a net downward Birkeland current at noon, a net upward current at midnight, and, generally, antisunward-flowing electrojets.

  2. The Differences in Onset Time of Conjugate Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weygand, J. M.; Zesta, E.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The auroral electrojet (AE) index is traditionally calculated from 13 ground magnetometer stations located around the typical northern auroral oval location. Similar coverage in the Southern Hemisphere index (SAE) does not exist, so the AE calculation has only been performed using Northern Hemisphere data. In the present study, we use seven southern auroral region ground magnetometers as well as their conjugate Northern Hemisphere data to calculate conjugate AE indices for 274 days covering all four seasons. With this dataset over 1200 substorm onsets have been identified in the SAE index using the technique of Hsu et al. [2012]. A comparison of the SAE index with the world data center standard AE index shows that the substorm onsets do not always occur at the same time with differences on the order of several minutes. In this study we examine the differences in the onset time and the reason for those differences using our conjugate AE indices and using pairs of conjugate ground magnetometer stations. Specifically, we used the pair of stations at West Antarctica Ice Sheet Divide and Sanikiluaq, Canada and Syowa, Antarctica and Tjörnes, Iceland. The largest differences in onset time appear to be related to the IMF Bz and magnetic field line length. Differences on the order of minutes for the onset time of conjugate substorms have serious implications for substorm theories. The problem is that waves from a current disruption region to the mid tail, or flows from the mid tail to the current disruption region take the same amount of time (~2 minutes), which makes it difficult to decide where the onset disturbance is initiated, particularly when onset indicators have differences on the order of minutes.

  3. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  4. Spectacular ionospheric flow structures associated with substorm auroral onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lacourt, B. I.; Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Zou, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.; Ruohoniemi, J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Nishitani, N.

    2013-12-01

    Auroral observations have shown that brightening at substorm auroral onset consists of azimuthally propagating beads forming along a pre-existing arc. However, the ionospheric flow structure related to this wavy auroral structure has not been previously identified. We present 2-d line-of-sight flow observations and auroral images from the SuperDARN radars and the THEMIS ground-based all-sky-imager array to investigate the ionospheric flow pattern associated with the onset. We have selected events where SuperDARN was operating in the THEMIS mode, which provides measurements along the northward looking radar beam that have time resolution (6 s) comparable to the high time resolution of the imagers and gives us a unique tool to detect properties of flows associated with the substorm onset instability. We find very fast flows (~1000 m/s) that initiated simultaneously with the onset arc beads propagating across the THEMIS-mode beam meridian. The flows show oscillations at ~9 mHz, which corresponds to the periodicity of the auroral beads propagating across the radar beam. 2-d radar measurements also show a wavy pattern in the azimuthal direction with a wavelength of ~74 km, which is close to the azimuthal separation of individual beads, although this determination is limited by the 2 minute radar scan period. These strong correlations (in time and space) between auroral beading and the fast ionospheric flows suggest that these spectacular flows are an important feature of the substorm onset instability within the inner plasma sheet. Also, a clockwise flow shear was observed in association with individual auroral beads, suggesting that such flow shear is a feature of the unstable substorm onset waves.

  5. The Large-Scale Current System During Auroral Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The substorm process has been discussed for more than four decades and new empirical large-scale models continue to be published. The continued activity implies both the importance and the complexity of the problem. We recently published a new model of the large-scale substorm current system (Gjerloev and Hoffman, JGR, 2014). Based on data from >100 ground magnetometers (obtained from SuperMAG), 116 isolated substorms, global auroral images (obtained by the Polar VIS Earth Camera) and a careful normalization technique we derived an empirical model of the ionospheric equivalent current system. Our model yield some unexpected features that appear inconsistent with the classical single current wedge current system. One of these features is a distinct latitudinal shift of the westward electrojet (WEJ) current between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that these two WEJ regions are quasi disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a modified 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (bulge current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). The two wedge systems are shifted in latitude but overlap in local time in the midnight region. Our model is at considerable variance with previous global models and conceptual schematics of the large-scale substorm current system. We speculate that the data coverage, the methodologies and the techniques used in these previous global studies are the cause of the differences in solutions. In this presentation we present our model, compare with other published models and discuss possible causes for the differences.

  6. Phenomenological and Theoretical Studies on Magnetic Indicators of Substorm Activity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-21

    docummeni-we report results of studies made on substorm de- tection, behavior, and irelationship to magnetospheric processes . A scheme is developed whereby...regard. Field aligned currents drive ionospheric current systems on a global scale. A model is developed to describe this process for quiet and disturbed...currents and ionospheric closure currents., This process is discussed and estimates are developed for the relative ’c6ntributions of Pederson and

  7. Quantitative Simulation of a Magnetospheric Substorm. 2. Comparison with Observations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-23

    we overestimated the polar-boundary potential drop; consequently the p) asma -sheet ions were injected deeper into the magnetosphere than was the case...Magnetospheric Substorms and Related Plasma Processes, Los Alamos, New Mexico , October 1978 and to be published in Astrophysics and Space Science Library...and Related Plasma Processes, Los Alamos, New Mexico , October 1978, published in Astrophysics and Space Science Library Series,p.14 3, Yasuhara, F., and

  8. Interaction of Substorm Injections with the Subauroral Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    The subauroral geospace includes the ring current (RC), innermost part of the outer radiation belt, and plasmasphere adjacent to the electron plasma sheet boundary and conjugate ionosphere. The purpose of this paper is to extend understanding of the active subauroral geospace by exploring subauroral events in the near-equatorial magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere soon after the onsets of individual substorms. Their fast appearance is consistent with the propagation of substorm injections. The documented features in the premidnight sector are described in terms of the effect of a short circuit of substorm-injected plasma jets over the plasmapause. The short-circuiting occurs when the cold plasma density exceeds a critical value of 5-10 c.c. As the polarization field at the front of the hot plasma jet is shorten out, the hot electrons are arrested, while the hot ions yet move inward. This provides a natural explanation of the long-known dispersionless auroral electron precipitation boundary and the SAID location just interior to the plasmapause. Enhanced plasma turbulence provides anomalous circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion leading to a turbulent boundary layer adjacent to the plasmapause. The hot ions' inward motion stops when their pressure gradient is balanced by the polarization electric field. Then, the ions experiencing gradient-curvature drift move westward and their interaction with the plasmasphere creates strong wave structures on the duskside.

  9. ATS-5 observations of plasma sheet particles before the expansion-phase onset, appendix C.. [plasma-particle interactions, magnetic storms and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, K.; Nishida, A.; Sharp, R. D.; Shelley, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    Behavior of the plasma sheet around its earthward edge during substorms was studied by using high resolution (every 2.6 sec) measurements of proton and electron fluxes by ATS-5. In the injection region near midnight the flux increase at the expansion-phase onset is shown to lag behind the onset of the low-latitude positive bay by several minutes. Depending upon the case, before the above increase (1) the flux stays at a constant level, (2) it gradually increases for some tens of minutes, or (3) it briefly drops to a low level. Difference in the position of the satellite relative to the earthward edge and to the high-latitude boundary of the plasma sheet is suggested as a cause of the above difference in flux variations during the growth phase of substorms. Magnetograms and tables (data) are shown.

  10. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  11. Observations of a nonthermal ion layer at the plasma sheet boundary during substorm recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the energy and angular distributions of energetic protons and alpha particles (not less than 30 keV/charge) in the geomagnetic tail are presented. The measurements were made during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic substorm on Apr. 19, 1978, with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on the Isee 1 satellite. The measurements were also correlated with plasma observations made by the LASL/MPE instrument on Isee 1. The data reveal the presence of a thin nonthermal layer of protons and alpha particles at the plasma sheet boundary. The particles have their maximum flux at 60 keV/charge and are streaming highly collimated in the earthward direction. The alpha particle layer is confined within the proton layer. Many aspects of the observations are in agreement with an acceleration model near the neutral line proposed by Jaeger and Speiser (1974)

  12. A nonthermal ion layer with high anisotropies at the plasmasheet boundary during substorm recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    The energy spectra and anisotropies of protons and alpha particles are investigated at the plasmasheet boundary during the recovery phase of geomagnetic substorms using the Max Planck Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on the ISEE-1 satellite. The observations are found to reveal the presence of a thin nonthermal layer of approximately 60 keV/charge protons and alpha particles at the plasmasheet boundary, the particles streaming highly collimated in earthward direction. It is pointed out that the alpha particle layer is confined within the proton layer. It is thought that the principal features of the layers can be explained in terms of an acceleration model proposed by Speiser (1965) for the environment of a magnetic neutral line.

  13. Crystal growth from the vapor phase experiment MA-085

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeir, H.; Sadeek, H.; Klaessig, F. C.; Norek, M.

    1976-01-01

    Three vapor transport experiments on multicomponent systems were performed during the Apollo Soyuz mission to determine the effects of microgravity forces on crystal morphology and mass transport rates. The mixed systems used germanium selenide, tellurium, germanium tetraiodide (transport agent), germanium monosulfide, germanium tetrachloride (transport agent), and argon (inert atmosphere). The materials were enclosed in evacuated sealed ampoules of fused silica and were transported in a temperature gradient of the multipurpose electric furnace onboard the Apollo Soyuz spacecraft. Preliminary evaluation of 2 systems shows improved quality of space grown crystals in terms of growth morphology and bulk perfection. This conclusion is based on a direct comparison of space grown and ground based crystals by means of X-ray diffraction, microscopic, and chemical etching techniques. The observation of greater mass transport rates than predicted for a microgravity environment by existing vapor transport models indicates the existence of nongravity caused transport effects in a reactive solid/gas phase system.

  14. Inertial magnetic field reconnection and magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Cross, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    We describe and calculate the growth rate of a magnetohydrodynamic neutral-sheet instability due to electron-inertia terms in the infinite-conductivity Ohm's law. The results are compared with an approximate Vlasov-equation calculation, and are shown to be particularly germane to the geomagnetic-tail instability.

  15. ZnO nanorod growth by plasma-enhanced vapor phase transport with different growth durations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Oh, Hee-bong; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Yun, Jondo; Lee, Won-Jae

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the structural properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by plasma-enhanced vapor phase transport (PEVPT) were investigated. Plasma-treated oxygen gas was used as the oxygen source for the ZnO growth. The structural properties of ZnO nanostructures grown for different durations were measured by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The authors comprehensively analyzed the growth of the ZnO nanostructures with different growth durations both with and without the use of plasma-treated oxygen gas. It was found that PEVPT has a significant influence on the growth of the ZnO nanorods. PEVPT with plasma-treated oxygen gas facilitated the generation of nucleation sites, and the resulting ZnO nanorod structures were more vertical than those prepared by conventional VPT without plasma-treated oxygen gas. As a result, the ZnO nanostructures grown using PEVPT showed improved structural properties compared to those prepared by the conventional VPT method.

  16. Electric and magnetic field observations during a substorm of 24 February 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    A series of electric field measurements is reported which was obtained from the Injun 5 satellite along with a simultaneous magnetic disturbance observed in the interplanetary medium and on the ground during a magnetic substorm. The substorm analyzed took place on February 24, 1970. Prior to the onset of the substorm a greatly enhanced anti-sunward plasma flow was observed over the polar cap. The enhanced plasma flow occurred about 30 minutes after a switch in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field from northward to southward. The electric fields across the polar cap immediately before and during the substorm were essentially unchanged indicating that an enhancement in the ionospheric conductivity rather than the electric field must be responsible for the large increase in the auroral electrojet current during the substorm.

  17. The Earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing: Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P. ); Freeman, M.P. ); Takahashi, K. )

    1993-05-01

    This is the third of three papers dealing with the interaction of an interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere in Jan 1988. Here the authors report on substorm observations made during this time period. They sampled information from six spacecraft and a larger number of ground based systems to serve as signals for the initiation of substorm behavior. They relate the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma conditions to the time of observation of substorm initiation. Current models tie substorm occurrence to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere. The IMF B[sub y] and B[sub z] components varied slowly over a range of 20 nT on both sides of zero during this observation period. During the period of northward IMF the magnetosphere was quiescent, but during the period of southward IMF a large magnetic storm was initiated. During this interval substorms were observed roughly every 50 minutes.

  18. Indium Growth and Island Height Control on Si Submonolayer Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jizhou

    2009-01-01

    ) have a wave length of 13.4 nm so it can curve on the surface of an sample to make structure as small as the order of 10 nm. however, lithograph usually causes permanent damages to the surface and in many cases the QDs are damaged during the lithograph and therefore result in high percentage of defects. Quantum size effect has attracted more and more interests in surface science due to many of its effects. One of its effects is the height preference in film growing and the resulting possibility of uniformly sized self-assemble nanostructure. The experiment of Pb islands on In 4x1 phase shows that both the height and the width can be controlled by proper growth conditions, which expands the growth dimensions from 1 to 2. This discover leads us to study the In/Pb interface. In Ch.3, we found that the Pb islands growing on In 4x1-Si(111) surface which have uniform height due to QSE and uniform width due to the constriction of In 4x1 lattice have unexpected stability. These islands are stable in even RT, unlike usual nanostructures on Pb/Si surface which are stable only at low temperature. Since similar structures are usually grown at low temperature, this discovery makes the grown structures closer to technological applications. It also shows the unusual of In/Pb interface. Then we studied the In islands grown on Pb-α-√3x√3-Si(111) phase in Ch.4. These islands have fcc structure in the first few layers, and then convert to bct structure. The In fcc islands have sharp height preference due to QSE like Pb islands. However, the preferred height is different (7 layer for Pb on Si 7x7 and 4 layer for Pb on In 4x1), due to the difference of interface. The In islands structure prefers to be bct than fcc with coverage increase. It is quantitatively supported by first-principle calculation. Unexpectedly, the In islands grown on various of In interfaces didn't show QSE effects and phase transition from fcc and bct structures as on the Pb-α interface (Ch.6). In g(s) curve there

  19. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    PubMed Central

    Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Freeman, M. P.; Huang, C.‐L.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Coxon, J. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV “seed” population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave‐particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1–3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM‐H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels. PMID:27656336

  20. Quantitative maps of geomagnetic perturbation vectors during substorm onset and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, N M; Weimer, D R; Moore, W B

    2015-01-01

    We have produced the first series of spherical harmonic, numerical maps of the time-dependent surface perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field following the onset of substorms. Data from 124 ground magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere at geomagnetic latitudes above 33° were used. Ground station data averaged over 5 min intervals covering 8 years (1998–2005) were used to construct pseudo auroral upper, auroral lower, and auroral electrojet (AU*, AL*, and AE*) indices. These indices were used to generate a list of substorms that extended from 1998 to 2005, through a combination of automated processing and visual checks. Events were sorted by interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation (at the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite), dipole tilt angle, and substorm magnitude. Within each category, the events were aligned on substorm onset. A spherical cap harmonic analysis was used to obtain a least error fit of the substorm disturbance patterns at 5 min intervals up to 90 min after onset. The fits obtained at onset time were subtracted from all subsequent fits, for each group of substorm events. Maps of the three vector components of the averaged magnetic perturbations were constructed to show the effects of substorm currents. These maps are produced for several specific ranges of values for the peak |AL*| index, IMF orientation, and dipole tilt angle. We demonstrate an influence of the dipole tilt angle on the response to substorms. Our results indicate that there are downward currents poleward and upward currents just equatorward of the peak in the substorms' westward electrojet. Key Points Show quantitative maps of ground geomagnetic perturbations due to substorms Three vector components mapped as function of time during onset and recovery Compare/contrast results for different tilt angle and sign of IMF Y-component PMID:26167445

  1. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    PubMed

    Forsyth, C; Rae, I J; Murphy, K R; Freeman, M P; Huang, C-L; Spence, H E; Boyd, A J; Coxon, J C; Jackman, C M; Kalmoni, N M E; Watt, C E J

    2016-07-01

    Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV "seed" population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave-particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1-3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM-H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels.

  2. Microarray and functional analysis of growth phase-dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Buboltz, Anne M; Harvill, Eric T; Brockmeier, Susan L

    2009-10-01

    Growth phase-dependent gene regulation has recently been demonstrated to occur in Bordetella pertussis, with many transcripts, including known virulence factors, significantly decreasing during the transition from logarithmic to stationary-phase growth. Given that B. pertussis is thought to have derived from a Bordetella bronchiseptica-like ancestor, we hypothesized that growth phase-dependent gene regulation would also occur in B. bronchiseptica. Microarray analysis revealed and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed that growth phase-dependent gene regulation occurs in B. bronchiseptica, resulting in prominent temporal shifts in global gene expression. Two virulence phenotypes associated with these gene expression changes were tested. We found that growth-dependent increases in expression of some type III secretion system (TTSS) genes led to a growth phase-dependent increase in a TTSS-dependent function, cytotoxicity. Although the transcription of genes encoding adhesins previously shown to mediate adherence was decreased in late-log and stationary phases, we found that the adherence of B. bronchiseptica did not decrease in these later phases of growth. Microarray analysis revealed and qRT-PCR confirmed that growth phase-dependent gene regulation occurred in both Bvg(+) and Bvg(-) phase-locked mutants, indicating that growth phase-dependent gene regulation in B. bronchiseptica can function independently from the BvgAS regulatory system.

  3. Phase conversion and interface growth in phase-separated 3He - 4He liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Haruka; Satoh, Takeo; Burmistrov, Serguei N.

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the transmission coefficient of a sound propagating through the interface in phase-separated He3-He4 liquid mixtures. The method and the results are described with discussions by examining the phase-conversion process of He3 quasiparticles driven to flow across the interface. From the data, we have determined the kinetic growth coefficient of the interface, ξ(T,P,ω) , as a function of temperature, pressure, and frequency. The temperature range of the present investigation is about 2-100mK at the pressure mainly around 1bar with sound frequency 9.64, 14.4, and 32.4MHz . The main specific features observed for the kinetic growth coefficient are, as follows: (i) there is a maximum at some temperature Tm(ω) depending on the frequency, (ii) above Tm(ω) , ξ decreases with the increase of temperature as ∝ω5/2T-3 , and (iii) below Tm(ω) , ξ becomes frequency independent and diminishes as a cube of temperature, T3 .

  4. Simultaneous observation of the poleward expansion of substorm electrojet activity and the tailward expansion of current sheet disruption in the near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Bosinger, T.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    A substorm that occurred on 7 June 1985 at 2209 UT for which simultaneous measurements from ground stations and CCE are available is considered. The event occurred during a close conjunction between CCE, the EISCAT magnetometer cross, and the STARE radar, allowing a detailed comparison of satellite and ground-based data. Two discrete activations took place during the first few minutes of this substorm: the expansion phase onset at 2209 UT and an intensification at 2212 UT, corresponding to a poleward expansion of activity. The energetic particle data indicate that the active region of the magnetotail during the 2212 UT intensification was located tailward of the active region at 2209 UT. This is direct evidence for a correspondence between tailward expansion of localized activity in the near-earth magnetotail (current disruption and particle energization) and poleward expansion of activity (electrojet formation) in the ionosphere.

  5. Nucleation and growth of the Alpha-Prime Phase martensitic phase in Pu-Ga Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Wall, M A; Massalski, T B; Schwartz, A J

    2005-02-09

    In a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy, it is observed experimentally that the amount of the martensitic alpha-prime product formed upon cooling the metastable delta phase below the martensite burst temperature (M{sub b}) is a function of the holding temperature and holding time of a prior conditioning (''annealing'') treatment. Before subjecting a sample to a cooling and heating cycle to form and revert the alpha-prime phase, it was first homogenized for 8 hours at 375 C to remove any microstructural memory of prior transformations. Subsequently, conditioning was carried out in a differential scanning calorimeter apparatus at temperatures in the range between -50 C and 370 C for periods of up to 70 hours to determine the holding time and temperature that produced the largest volume fraction of alpha-prime upon subsequent cooling. Using transformation peak areas (i.e., the heats of transformation) as a measure of the amount of alpha-prime formed, the largest amount of alpha-prime was obtained following holding at 25 C for at prime least 6 hours. Additional time at 25 C, up to 70 hours, did not increase the amount of subsequent alpha-prime formation. At 25 C, the Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy is below the eutectoid transformation temperature in the phase diagram and the expected equilibrium phases are {alpha} and Pu{sub 3}Ga, although a complete eutectoid decomposition of delta to these phases is expected to be extremely slow. It is proposed here that the influence of the conditioning treatment can be attributed to the activation of alpha-phase embryos in the matrix as a beginning step toward the eutectoid decomposition, and we discuss the effects of spontaneous self-irradiation accompanying the Pu radioactive decay on the activation process. Subsequently, upon cooling, certain embryos appear to be active as sites for the burst growth of martensitic alpha-prime particles, and their amount, distribution, and potency appear to contribute to the total amount of martensitic product formed. A

  6. Shewanella oneidensis Hfq promotes exponential phase growth, stationary phase culture density, and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hfq is an RNA chaperone protein that has been broadly implicated in sRNA function in bacteria. Here we describe the construction and characterization of a null allele of the gene that encodes the RNA chaperone Hfq in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium. Results Loss of hfq in S. oneidensis results in a variety of mutant phenotypes, all of which are fully complemented by addition of a plasmid-borne copy of the wild type hfq gene. Aerobic cultures of the hfq∆ mutant grow more slowly through exponential phase than wild type cultures, and hfq∆ cultures reach a terminal cell density in stationary phase that is ~2/3 of that observed in wild type cultures. We have observed a similar growth phenotype when the hfq∆ mutant is cultured under anaerobic conditions with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, and we have found that the hfq∆ mutant is defective in Cr(VI) reduction. Finally, the hfq∆ mutant exhibits a striking loss of colony forming units in extended stationary phase and is highly sensitive to oxidative stress induced by H2O2 or methyl viologen (paraquat). Conclusions The hfq mutant in S. oneidensis exhibits pleiotropic phenotypes, including a defect in metal reduction. Our results also suggest that hfq mutant phenotypes in S. oneidensis may be at least partially due to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. PMID:23394078

  7. Relativistic Electron Enhancements at GEO: Magnetic Storms vs. Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Kim, H. J.; Pinto, V. A.; Wang, C. P.; Kim, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    We find evidence that magnetic storms are not only unnecessary for relativistic electron enhancements at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) but also not directly relevant to the electron enhancements at GEO even if the enhancements are accompanied by magnetic storms. What is crucial for electron enhancements at GEO are sustained south-oriented or north-south fluctuating IMF Bz that drives sufficiently large substorm activity and small solar wind density Nsw that likely leads to low loss rate of relativistic electrons to the ionosphere and/or to the magnetopause for an extended time period. Specifically, almost all the abrupt, large electron increases in our data set took place under the condition of average AE > 235 nT and average Nsw ≤ 5 cm-3. Examination of detailed time profiles clearly shows that electron flux at GEO starts to increase quite immediately with arrival of the right IMF and solar wind conditions, regardless of a magnetic storm, leaving the accompanied magnetic storms merely co-incident, while the prolonged, intense substorms are critical.

  8. Relative Order of Auroral Transient Structure During Substorm Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozelov, B. V.; Rypdal, K.

    2007-12-01

    Variability of auroral structures is a manifestation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere plasma dynamics. During the last decade the complexity of magnetosphere-ionosphere plasma has been widely discussed in numerous papers. The most popular approaches are based on turbulence or/and self-organized criticality paradigms. However, there is no clear evidence that the dynamics during the discussed events is really organization, and not disorganization. The problem is that the magnetosphere-ionosphere system is an open non-equilibrium system, therefore classical thermodynamics is not directly applicable. Here we use an approach based on the S-theorem by Yu.L. Klimontovich. This approach allows us to compare the ordering which characterize the current (non- equilibrium) state of the system with experimental data. The considered characteristic is an analogy of entropy which has been extended to non- equilibrium states. Television observations of the auroral structure during substorm activation at the Barentsburg observatory (Svalbard) have been used as a data set. Dependence of the ordering on the spatial scale has been analyzed. We found that the ordering of the aurora increases during the substorm development. The same approach has been applied to data sets generated by cellular automata models. Evolution of the systems in time and dependence on external control parameters are compared and discussed. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by grant No 171076/V30 of the Norwegian Research Council and partly by the Division of Physical Sciences of Russian Academy of Science.

  9. Electric field variations during substorms: OGO-6 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OGO-6 electric field measurements make it clear that the general pattern of high latitude electric fields in magnetic time-invariant latitude coordinates is not highly variable and that when unusual variations, or field distributions, occur they are relatively isolated in time and spatial extent. Thus, electric field changes on a global scale cannot, in general, be evoked as a direct cause of substorms. Polar traverses along the 18(h) to 6(h) magnetic time meridian show that the sum of potential drops across the evening auroral belt and morning auroral belt approximately equals the potential drop across the polar cap. The integrated polar cap potential drop ranges from 20 to 100 keV and values in the center of this range are most common under conditions of moderate magnetic disturbance. Roughly near 18(h) magnetic local time, a latitudinally narrow strip at the transition between auroral belt and polar cap fields exhibits unusually large field fluctuations immediately following the sudden onset of a negative bay at later magnetic local times. It appears likely that this spatially isolated correlation is related to an effect rather than a cause of substorm enhancement.

  10. Phase field modelling on the growth dynamics of double voids of different sizes during czochralski silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X. J.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    To investigate their dynamics and interaction mechanisms, the growth process of the two voids with different sizes during Czochralski silicon crystal growth were simulated by use of an established phase field model and its corresponding program code. On the basis of the several phase field numerical simulation cases, the evolution laws of the double voids were acquired as follows: the phase field model is capable to simulate the growth process of double voids with different sizes; there are two modes of their growth, that is, either mutual integration or competitive growth; the exact moment of their fusion can be also captured, and it is τ of 7.078 (simulation time step of 14156) for the initial vacancy concentration of 0.02 and the initial space between two void centers of 44Δx.

  11. Auroral medium frequency burst radio emission associated with the 23 March 2007 THEMIS study substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Hughes, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive auroral radio emission associated with substorm onset detected by ground-based instruments between 1.3 and 4.5 MHz. On 23 March 2007 an MF burst emission was detected by the Dartmouth radio interferometer located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. This emission temporally coincides with the onset of the 23 March 2007 Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) study substorm. Directions of arrival computed using the Dartmouth radio interferometer for this event also coincide spatially with the location of the expanding auroral arcs to the south observed by the all-sky imager at Fort Yukon, Alaska. This observation represents the first example of a direction of arrival measurement for MF burst. It strongly supports the association of MF burst with intense auroral arcs accompanying substorm onset. The direction of arrival of the MF burst is consistent with the direction to the eastern edge of the substorm onset location determined by multiple data sets during this substorm and suggests that location of MF burst radio emissions may be an effective method of locating substorm onsets, much as radio atmospherics are used to locate lightning.

  12. Effects of substorm electrojet on declination along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes in the northern auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsen, Inge; Johnsen, Magnar G.; Løvhaug, Unni P.

    2016-10-01

    The geomagnetic field often experiences large fluctuations, especially at high latitudes in the auroral zones. We have found, using simulations, that there are significant differences in the substorm signature, in certain coordinate systems, as a function of longitude. This is confirmed by the analysis of real, measured data from comparable locations. Large geomagnetic fluctuations pose challenges for companies involved in resource exploitation since the Earth's magnetic field is used as the reference when navigating drilling equipment. It is widely known that geomagnetic activity increases with increasing latitude and that the largest fluctuations are caused by substorms. In the auroral zones, substorms are common phenomena, occurring almost every night. In principle, the magnitude of geomagnetic disturbances from two identical substorms along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes around the globe, at different local times, will be the same. However, the signature of a substorm will change as a function of geomagnetic longitude due to varying declination, dipole declination, and horizontal magnetic field along constant geomagnetic latitudes. To investigate and quantify this, we applied a simple substorm current wedge model in combination with a dipole representation of the Earth's magnetic field to simulate magnetic substorms of different morphologies and local times. The results of these simulations were compared to statistical data from observatories and are discussed in the context of resource exploitation in the Arctic. We also attempt to determine and quantify areas in the auroral zone where there is a potential for increased space weather challenges compared to other areas.

  13. Quantitative maps of geomagnetic perturbation vectors during substorm onset and recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothier, N. M.; Weimer, D. R.; Moore, W. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have produced the first series of spherical harmonic, numerical maps of the time-dependent surface perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field following the onset of substorms. Data from 124 ground magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere at geomagnetic latitudes above 33° were used. Ground station data averaged over 5 min intervals covering 8 years (1998-2005) were used to construct pseudo auroral upper, auroral lower, and auroral electrojet (AU*, AL*, and AE*) indices. These indices were used to generate a list of substorms that extended from 1998 to 2005, through a combination of automated processing and visual checks. Events were sorted by interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation (at the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite), dipole tilt angle, and substorm magnitude. Within each category, the events were aligned on substorm onset. A spherical cap harmonic analysis was used to obtain a least error fit of the substorm disturbance patterns at 5 min intervals up to 90 min after onset. The fits obtained at onset time were subtracted from all subsequent fits, for each group of substorm events. Maps of the three vector components of the averaged magnetic perturbations were constructed to show the effects of substorm currents. These maps are produced for several specific ranges of values for the peak |AL*| index, IMF orientation, and dipole tilt angle. We demonstrate an influence of the dipole tilt angle on the response to substorms. Our results indicate that there are downward currents poleward and upward currents just equatorward of the peak in the substorms' westward electrojet.

  14. Equatorward shift of the cleft during magnetospheric substorms as observed by Isis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila , W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Isis 1 satellite observations of the cleft position during magnetospheric substorms show that the cleft shifts equatorward as the interplanetary B sub z component turns southward and substorm activity increases and that it shifts back toward higher latitudes as substorm activity subsides and B sub z returns northward. Also, unusually low latitudes for the cleft (less than 70 deg invariant latitude) were found during geomagnetic storms with significant Dst values and large negative B sub z values. Significant shifts occur in the cleft location with no accompanying effect seen in the AE index; however, B sub z is observed to be southward during these periods.

  15. Microarray and functional analysis of growth-phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth-phase dependent gene regulation has recently been demonstrated to occur in B. pertussis, with many transcripts, including known virulence factors, significantly decreasing during the transition from logarithmic to stationary-phase growth. Given that B. pertussis is thought to have derived fro...

  16. Observations of a High-Latitude Stable Electron Auroral Emission at Approximately 16 MLT During a Large Substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C.; Dombeck, J.; Preiwisch, A.; Thaller, S.; Vo, P.; Wilson, L. B., III; Wygant, J.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Ilie, R.; Lu, G.

    2011-01-01

    During an interval when the interplanetary magnetic field was large and primarily duskward and southward, a stable region of auroral emission was observed on 17 August 2001 by IMAGE at 16 magnetic local time, poleward of the main aurora, for 1 h, from before the onset of a large substorm through the recovery phase. In a region where ions showed the energy dispersion expected for the cusp, strong field \\aligned currents and Poynting flux were observed by Polar (at 1.8 RE in the Southern Hemisphere) as it transited field lines mapping to the auroral spot in the Northern Hemisphere. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the long \\lasting electron auroral spot maps to the magnetopause region where reconnection was occurring. Under the assumption of conjugacy between the Northern and Southern hemispheres on these field lines, the Polar data suggest that the electrons on these field lines were accelerated by Alfven waves and/or a quasi \\static electric field, primarily at altitudes below a few RE since the in situ Poynting flux (mapped to 100 km) is comparable to the energy flux of the emission while the mapped in situ electron energy flux is much smaller. This event provides the first example of an emission due to electrons accelerated at low altitudes at the foot point of a region of quasi \\steady dayside reconnection. Cluster data in the magnetotail indicate that the Poynting flux from the reconnection region during this substorm is large enough to account for the observed nightside aurora.

  17. Electrodynamic parameters in the nighttime sector during auroral substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, R.; Hoffman, R. A.; Anderson, P. C.; Craven, J. D.; Sugiura, M.; Frank, L. A.; Maynard, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of the large-scale electrodynamic parameters, field-aligned currents (FACs), electric fields, and electron precipitation, which are associated with auroral substorm events in the nighttime sector, have been obtained through a unique analysis which places the ionospheric measurements of these parameters into the context of a generic substorm determined from global auroral images. A generic bulge-type auroral emission region has been deduced from auroral images taken by the Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE 1) satellite during a number of isolated substorms, and the form has been divided into six sectors, based on the peculiar emission characteristics in each sector: west of bulge, surge horn, surge, middle surge, eastern bulge, and east of bulge. By comparing the location of passes of the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite to the simultaneously obtained auroral images, each pass is placed onto the generic aurora. The organization of DE 2 data in this way has systematically clarified peculiar characteristics in the electrodynamic parameters. An upward net current mainly appears in the surge, with little net current in the surge horn and the west of bulge. The downward net current is distributed over wide longitudinal regions from the eastern bulge to the east of bulge. Near the poleward boundary of the expanding auroral bulge, a pair of oppositely directed FAC sheets is observed, with the downward FAC on the poleward side. This downward FAC and most of the upward FAC in the surge and the middle surge are assoc iated with narrow, intense antisunwqard convection, corresponding to an equatorward directed spikelike electric field. This pair of currents decreases in amplitude and latitudinal width toward dusk in the surge and the west of bulge, and the region 1 and 2 FACs become embedded in the sunward convection region. The upward FAC region associated with the spikelike field on the poleward edge of the bulge coincides well with intense electron

  18. Investigation of Growth Phase-Dependent Acid Tolerance in Bifidobacteria longum BBMN68.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junhua; Song, Jingyi; Ren, Fazheng; Zhang, Hongxing; Xie, Yuanhong; Ma, Jingsheng; Li, Xue

    2016-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms imparting the growth phase-dependent acid tolerance have not been extensively investigated. In this study, we compared the acid resistance of the Bifidobacterium longum strain BBMN68 from different growth phases at lethal pH values (pH 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5), and analyzed the activity of H(+)-ATPase, the composition of fatty acids, and the mRNA abundance of ffh, uvrA, recA, lexA, groES, and dnaK in cells from different growth phases. The results indicated that the survival rates of cells from early stationary (ES) and late stationary (LS) growth phases at lethal pH values were significantly higher than those of exponential growth phase cells. Our findings indicated that by inducing a continuously auto-acidizing environment during cell growth, the acid resistance of ES and LS cells was strengthened. The higher activity of H(+)-ATPase, the decrease in unsaturated fatty acids, and the increased expression of genes involved in DNA repair and protein protection in the cells in stationary growth phase were all implicated in the significantly increased acid resistance of ES and LS cells compared with exponential growth phase cells of the B. longum strain BBMN68.

  19. Condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials instead of from vapor

    DOEpatents

    Geohegan, David B.; Seals, Roland D.; Puretzky, Alex A.; Fan, Xudong

    2010-10-19

    Compositions, systems and methods are described for condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials. A method includes providing a condensed phase matrix material; and activating the condensed phase matrix material to produce a plurality of nanorods by condensed phase conversion and growth from the condensed phase matrix material instead of from vapor. The compositions are very strong. The compositions and methods provide advantages because they allow (1) formation rates of nanostructures necessary for reasonable production rates, and (2) the near net shaped production of component structures.

  20. Recent Themis and Coordinated GBO Measurements of Substorm Expansion Onset: Do We Finally Have an Answer?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, Larry

    2011-01-01

    For nearly 30 years an often-times heated debate has engaged the substorm community: Do substorms begin with the formation of a new reconnection site in the midtail plasmasheet (the Near-Earth Neutral Line model) or do they begin near the transition region between stretched tail and dipolar field lines (the Current Disruption model). The THEMIS mission, with a coordinated suite of five in-situ spacecraft and ground observatories. has greatly extended our understanding of how substorms initiate and evolve. But have the new data resolved the fundamental question? In this talk I review the last few year's of substorm research, with an emphasis of how the THEMIS data have revolutionized our understanding.

  1. Observations of substorms during storms connected with different sources in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Despirak, Irina; Kozelov, Boris; Borovkov, Leonid

    All-sky cameras data at Kola Peninsula from the 2012/2013 winter seasons have been used to study the variations of substorm development under different conditions of the interplanetary medium. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters were taken from OMNI data base. Using solar wind data for the examined periods, different solar wind streams were revealed: recurrent high-speed streams (RS) and magnetic clouds (MC). It is known that these solar wind structures are the sources of geomagnetic storms. In our study substorm developments during storms with different origins and during quiet geomagnetic conditions were compared. Substorm onset time and further development were verified by data of IMAGE magnetometers network and by data of all-sky cameras at Apatity and Lovozero. The particularities in the behaviour of substorms observed by storms connected with solar wind recurrent streams and by magnetic clouds are discussed.

  2. Electric currents of a substorm current wedge on 24 February 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Martin; McPherron, Robert L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Russell, Christopher T.; Chu, Xiangning

    2014-07-01

    The three-dimensional "substorm current wedge" (SCW) was postulated by McPherron et al. (1973) to explain substorm magnetic perturbations. The origin and coherence as a physical system of this important paradigm of modern space physics remained unclear, however, with progress hindered by gross undersampling, and uniqueness problems in data inversion. Complementing AMPERE (Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment) space-derived radial electric currents with ground magnetic data allowing us to determine currents from the ionosphere up, we overcome problems of uniqueness identified by Fukushima (1969, 1994). For a substorm on 24 February 2010, we quantify SCW development consistently from ground and space data. Its westward electrojet carries 0.5 MA in the more poleward part of the auroral oval, in Region 1 (R1) sense spanning midnight. The evening sector electrojet also feeds into its upward current. We thus validate the SCW concept and obtain parameters needed for quantitative study of substorms.

  3. The earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing - Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and energetic particle observations from six spacecraft in the near-earth magnetotail are described and combined with ground magnetograms to document for the first time the magnetospheric substorm activity during a 30-hour long transit of an interplanetary cloud at 1 AU. During an earlier 11-hr interval when B(z) was continuously positive, the magnetosphere was quiescent, while in a later 18-hr interval when B(z) was uninterruptedly negative a large magnetic storm was set off. In the latter interval the substorm onsets recurred on average every 50 min. Their average recurrence frequency remained relatively undiminished even when the magnetic cloud B(z) and other measures of the interplanetary energy input decreased considerably. These results concur with current models of magnetospheric substorms based on deterministic nonlinear dynamics. The substorm onset occurred when the cloud's magnetic field had a persistent northward component but was predominantly westward pointing.

  4. Substorm Onset: Getting the Sequence of Events Right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.; Nishimura, Y.; Spanswick, E.; Kepko, L.

    2015-12-01

    New observations from THEMIS and complementary ground-based auroral observing programs have transformed our understanding of substorm onset. As far as we have come, however, there are still great challenges that must be addressed. Determining the relative timing of the different events which comprise onset is perhaps key amongst these, but has proven to be particularly challenging. Here we use optical observations of the onset in white light (THEMIS-ASI) and the 630 nm "redline" (TREx/REGO) to explore the causal relationship between events preceding onset (seen indirectly via auroral streamers) and onset (seen via auroral brightening). To do this, we employ a new analysis technique, called the 'circogram', which focuses on the direction of propagation of information in sequences of auroral images.

  5. Pressure changes in the plasma sheet during substorm injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Moebius, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the CHEM instrument on AMPTE CCE, data from the 3D plasma instrument and the SULEICA instrument on AMPTE IRM, and magnetometer data from both spacecraft are used to determine the particle pressure and total pressure as a function of radial distance in the plasma sheet for periods before and after the onset of substorm-associated ion enhancements over the range 7-19 RE. Events were chosen that occurred during times of increasing magnetospheric activity, as determined by an increasing AE index, in which a sudden increase, or 'injection', of energetic particle flux is observed. It is shown that the simultaneous appearance of energetic particles and changes in the magnetic field results naturally from pressure balance and does not necessarily indicate that the local changing field is accelerating the particles.

  6. Plasma pitch angle distributions near the substorm injection front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    ATS-6 spacecraft hot plasma instrument data obtained during January, 1980 is presented, which provides electron and ion pitch distributions in the vicinity of an earthward-propagating, substorm-associated abrupt plasma change near synchronous orbit. Evidence is found of symmetric atmospheric source cones for few 100-eV electrons after front passage, supporting both (1) concept of atmospheric electron degradation of the hot, high-altitude plasma, and (2) the proposal that the injection front is a moving, precipitation-flow boundary between the hot plasma and the cooler plasma that has become spectrally degraded via interaction with the atmosphere. The enhanced hot plasma electron intensities appearing in association with front passage exhibit a modest, field-aligned anisotropy with minima at pitch angles characteristic of symmetric loss cones, consistent with mirror compression of the electrons on inward-collapsing field lines.

  7. Anthropogenic trigger of substorms and energetic particles precipitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Ruzhin, Yu. Ya.

    2014-12-01

    The high-frequency (HF) emission in near-Earth space from various powerful transmitters (radio communications, radars, broadcasting, universal time and navigation stations, etc.) form an integral part of the modern world that it cannot do without. In particular, special-purpose research facilities equipped with powerful HF transmitters are used successfully for plasma experiments and local modification of the ionosphere. In this work, we are using the results of a complex space-ground experiment to show that exposure of the subauroral region to HF emission can not only cause local changes in the ionosphere, but can also trigger processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system that result in intensive substorm activity (precipitations of high-energy particles, aurorae, significant variations in the ionospheric parameters and, as a consequence, in radio propagation conditions).

  8. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  9. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  10. On the kinetics of oriented growth of two-phase colonies of platelet grains in the presence of second-phase particles phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'shanetskii, V. E.; Kononenko, Yu. I.

    2014-07-01

    Specific features of the formation of lamellar (columnar) two-phase structures have been considered in the process of the decomposition of the matrix in the presence of (1) immobile disperse second-phase particles and (2) mobile disperse second-phase inclusions. It has been shown that the approaches to the derivation of initial differential equations of growth should be based on the change in the behavior of particles of the second phase upon the potential propagation of the growth front. To retain the invariance of the driving force along the entire composite growth front of the colony-wise structure, equations of balance of interphase surface tensions in ternary junctions of the normal sections of matrix grains with lamellar grains of the two-phase colony-wise mixture have been taken into account.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus aconitase inactivation unexpectedly inhibits post-exponential-phase growth and enhances stationary-phase survival.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Greg A; Chaussee, Michael S; Morgan, Carrie I; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Dorward, David W; Reitzer, Lawrence J; Musser, James M

    2002-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus preferentially catabolizes glucose, generating pyruvate, which is subsequently oxidized to acetate under aerobic growth conditions. Catabolite repression of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle results in the accumulation of acetate. TCA cycle derepression coincides with exit from the exponential growth phase, the onset of acetate catabolism, and the maximal expression of secreted virulence factors. These data suggest that carbon and energy for post-exponential-phase growth and virulence factor production are derived from the catabolism of acetate mediated by the TCA cycle. To test this hypothesis, the aconitase gene was genetically inactivated in a human isolate of S. aureus, and the effects on physiology, morphology, virulence factor production, virulence for mice, and stationary-phase survival were examined. TCA cycle inactivation prevented the post-exponential growth phase catabolism of acetate, resulting in premature entry into the stationary phase. This phenotype was accompanied by a significant reduction in the production of several virulence factors and alteration in host-pathogen interaction. Unexpectedly, aconitase inactivation enhanced stationary-phase survival relative to the wild-type strain. Aconitase is an iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme that is highly susceptible to oxidative inactivation. We speculate that reversible loss of the iron-sulfur cluster in wild-type organisms is a survival strategy used to circumvent oxidative stress induced during host-pathogen interactions. Taken together, these data demonstrate the importance of the TCA cycle in the life cycle of this medically important pathogen.

  12. Multiwavelength Resonance Raman Characterization of the Effect of Growth Phase and Culture Medium on Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng; Gillis, David

    2015-08-01

    We examine the use of multiwavelength ultraviolet (UV) resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase and growth medium on gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Escherichia coli (E. coli), Citrobacter koseri (C. koseri), Citrobacter braakii (C. braakii), and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in nutrient broth and brain heart infusion broth. Resonance Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained at multiple wavelengths between 220 and 260 nm; a range that encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular constituents. We find that spectra of the same bacterial species exhibit differences due to both growth condition and growth phase, but the larger differences reflect changes due to growth phase. The differences in the Raman spectra correlate with genetic differences among the species. Using a Pearson correlation based algorithm, we achieve successful identification of these bacteria in 83% of the cases.

  13. A current disruption mechanism in the neutral sheet - A possible trigger for substorm expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Mankofsky, A.; Chang, C.-L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Wu, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A linear analysis is performed to investigate the kinetic cross-field streaming instability in the earth's magnetotail neutral sheet region. Numerical solution of the dispersion equation shows that the instability can occur under conditions expected for the neutral sheet just prior to the onset of substorm expansion. The excited waves are obliquely propagating whistlers with a mixed polarization in the lower hybrid frequency range. The ensuing turbulence of this instability can lead to a local reduction of the cross-tail current causing it to continue through the ionosphere to form a substorm current wedge. A substorm expansion onset scenario is proposed based on this instability in which the relative drift between ions and electrons is primarily due to unmagnetized ions undergoing current sheet acceleration in the presence of a cross-tail electric field. The required electric field strength is within the range of electric field values detected in the neutral sheet region during substorm intervals. The skew in local time of substorm onset location and the three conditions under which substorm onset is observed can be understood on the basis of the proposed scenario.

  14. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the "adiabat shaping" mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  15. Condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods instead of from vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B.; Seals, Roland D.; Puretzky, Alex A.; Fan, Xudong

    2005-08-02

    Compositions, systems and methods are described for condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials. A method includes providing a condensed phase matrix material; and activating the condensed phase matrix material to produce a plurality of nanorods by condensed phase conversion and growth from the condensed chase matrix material instead of from vacor. The compositions are very strong. The compositions and methods provide advantages because they allow (1) formation rates of nanostructures necessary for reasonable production rates, and (2) the near net shaped production of component structures.

  16. Morphology and growth speed of hcp domains during shock-induced phase transition in iron.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-01-10

    Emergence and time evolution of micro-structured new-phase domains play a crucial role in determining the macroscopic physical and mechanical behaviors of iron under shock compression. Here, we investigate, through molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical modelings, shock-induced phase transition process of iron from body-centered-cubic (bcc) to hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure. We present a central-moment method and a rolling-ball algorithm to calculate and analyze the morphology and growth speed of the hcp phase domains, and then propose a phase transition model to clarify our derived growth law of the phase domains. We also demonstrate that the new-phase evolution process undergoes three distinguished stages with different time scales of the hcp phase fraction in the system.

  17. Compact seaweed growth of peritectic phase on confined, flat properitectic dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A.; Mogeritsch, J.

    2016-12-01

    Peritectic alloys form a variety of different solidification morphologies at low growth rates. An alloy with a concentration that corresponds to the hyper-peritectic limit should show a cellular/dendritic solidification of the peritectic phase for growth velocities above the corresponding constitutional undercooling limit. However, due to nucleation retardation of the peritectic phase we observed growth of properitectic dendrites before cellular growth of the peritectic could established. The transition happened via an overgrowth of dendrites with a thin layer of peritectic phase. The observations were made using a transparent, metal-like solidifying peritectic system that was solidified directionally in thin samples. In the gap between the flat dendrites and the tubing walls, the peritectic phase grew with a compact seaweed morphology, whereas in the interdendritic spacing it formed small-curved bumps. At same distance behind the tip region, more and more polycrystalline-like objects appeared at the elongated traces of the compact seaweed morphology.

  18. Orbit Determination and Navigation of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinelli, Patrick; Cosgrove, jennifer; Blizzard, Mike; Nicholson, Ann; Robertson, Mika

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the launch and early orbit activities performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) in support of five probes comprising the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. The FDF was tasked to support THEMIS in a limited capacity providing backup orbit determination support for validation purposes for all five THEMIS probes during launch plus 30 days in coordination with University of California Berkeley Flight Dynamics Center (UCB/FDC). The FDF's orbit determination responsibilities were originally planned to be as a backup to the UCB/FDC for validation purposes only. However, various challenges early on in the mission and a Spacecraft Emergency declared thirty hours after launch placed the FDF team in the role of providing the orbit solutions that enabled contact with each of the probes and the eventual termination of the Spacecraft Emergency. This paper details the challenges and various techniques used by the GSFC FDF team to successfully perform orbit determination for all five THEMIS probes during the early mission. In addition, actual THEMIS orbit determination results are presented spanning the launch and early orbit mission phase. Lastly, this paper enumerates lessons learned from the THEMIS mission, as well as demonstrates the broad range of resources and capabilities within the FDF for supporting critical launch and early orbit navigation activities, especially challenging for constellation missions.

  19. Orbit Determination and Navigation of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinelli, Patrick; Cosgrove, Jennifer; Blizzard, Mike; Robertson, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the launch and early orbit activities performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) in support of five probes comprising the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. The FDF was tasked to support THEMIS in a limited capacity providing backup orbit determination support for validation purposes for all five THEMIS probes during launch plus 30 days in coordination with University of California Berkeley Flight Dynamics Center (UCB/FDC)2. The FDF's orbit determination responsibilities were originally planned to be as a backup to the UCB/FDC for validation purposes only. However, various challenges early on in the mission and a Spacecraft Emergency declared thirty hours after launch placed the FDF team in the role of providing the orbit solutions that enabled contact with each of the probes and the eventual termination of the Spacecraft Emergency. This paper details the challenges and various techniques used by the GSFC FDF team to successfully perform orbit determination for all five THEMIS probes during the early mission. In addition, actual THEMIS orbit determination results are presented spanning the launch and early orbit mission phase. Lastly, this paper enumerates lessons learned from the THEMIS mission, as well as demonstrates the broad range of resources and capabilities within the FDF for supporting critical launch and early orbit navigation activities, especially challenging for constellation missions.

  20. Substorms observations during two geomagnetically active periods in March 2012 and March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, V.; Despirak, I.; Kozelov, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work two events of strong geomagnetic activity were examined: the period 7-17 March 2012, which is one of the most disturbed periods during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24, and the severe geomagnetic storm on 17-20 March 2015. During the first period four consecutive magnetic storms occurred on 7, 9, 12, and 15 March. These storms were caused by Sheath, MC and HSS, and the detailed scenarios for the storms were different. The second event is a storm of fourth level with Kp = 8, the strongest one during the last four years, the so-called "St. Patrick's Day 2015 Event". A geomagnetic storm of such intensity was observed in September 2011. Our analysis was based on the 10-s sampled IMAGE magnetometers data, the 1-min sampled OMNI solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data and observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity. The particularities in the behaviours of substorms connected with different storms during these two interesting strongly disturbed periods are discussed.

  1. Chirality-dependent vapor-phase epitaxial growth and termination of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Tu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Jialu; Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-09-11

    Structurally uniform and chirality-pure single-wall carbon nanotubes are highly desired for both fundamental study and many of their technological applications, such as electronics, optoelectronics, and biomedical imaging. Considerable efforts have been invested in the synthesis of nanotubes with defined chiralities by tuning the growth recipes but the approach has only limited success. Recently, we have shown that chirality-pure short nanotubes can be used as seeds for vapor-phase epitaxial cloning growth, opening up a new route toward chirality-controlled carbon nanotube synthesis. Nevertheless, the yield of vapor-phase epitaxial growth is rather limited at the present stage, due in large part to the lack of mechanistic understanding of the process. Here we report chirality-dependent growth kinetics and termination mechanism for the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of seven single-chirality nanotubes of (9, 1), (6, 5), (8, 3), (7, 6), (10, 2), (6, 6), and (7, 7), covering near zigzag, medium chiral angle, and near armchair semiconductors, as well as armchair metallic nanotubes. Our results reveal that the growth rates of nanotubes increase with their chiral angles while the active lifetimes of the growth hold opposite trend. Consequently, the chirality distribution of a nanotube ensemble is jointly determined by both growth rates and lifetimes. These results correlate nanotube structures and properties with their growth behaviors and deepen our understanding of chirality-controlled growth of nanotubes.

  2. Event study combining magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives of the substorm current wedge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nakamura, R.; Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2014-12-01

    Unprecedented spacecraft and instrumental coverage and the isolated nature and distinct step-like development of a substorm on 17 March 2010 has allowed validation of the two-loop substorm current wedge model (SCW2L). We find a close spatiotemporal relationship of the SCW with many other essential signatures of substorm activity in the magnetotail and demonstrate its azimuthally localized structure and stepwise expansion in the magnetotail. We confirm that ground SCW diagnostics makes it possible to reconstruct and organize the azimuthal spatiotemporal substorm development pattern with accuracy better than 1 h magnetic local time (MLT) in the case of medium-scale substorm. The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)-based study of global field-aligned current distribution indicates that (a) the SCW-related field-aligned current system consists of simultaneously activated R1- and R2-type currents, (b) their net currents have a R1-sense, and (c) locations of net current peaks are consistent with the SCW edge locations inferred from midlatitude variations. Thanks to good azimuthal coverage of four GOES and three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we evaluated the intensities of the SCW R1- and R2-like current loops (using the SCW2L model) obtained from combined magnetospheric and ground midlatitude magnetic observations and found the net currents consistent (within a factor of 2) with the AMPERE-based estimate. We also ran an adaptive magnetospheric model and show that SCW2L model outperforms it in predicting the magnetic configuration changes during substorm dipolarizations.

  3. A phase-field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-02-02

    In this study, we present a new numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model takes into account the buoyancy induced convective flow and its effect on the crystal growth process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase-field method. Two novel phase-field models are developed to model the crystal growth interface in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups: 1) fixed wall temperature profile setup and 2) time-dependent temperature profile setup. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. This model is used to investigate the effect of furnace operational conditions on crystal growth interface profiles and growth velocities. For a simple case of macroscopic radial growth, the phase-field model is validated against an analytical solution. Crystal growth in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups have been also investigated using the developed model. The numerical simulations reveal that for a certain set of temperature boundary conditions, the heat transport in the melt near the phase interface is diffusion dominant and advection is suppressed.

  4. Development of the Near-Earth Magnetotail and the Auroral Arc Associated with Substorm Onset: Evidence for a New Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Y.; Hiraki, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the time sequence of the development of the near-Earth magnetotail and the auroral arc associated with a substorm onset, using the data from the THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based observatories at high temporal and spatial resolutions. We discuss four steps of the auroral development, linking them to magnetotail changes: the auroral fading, the initial brightening of an auroral onset arc, the enhancement of the wave-like structure, and the poleward expansion. A case study shows that near-Earth magnetic reconnection began at X~-17 RE at least ~3 min before the auroral initial brightening and ~1 min before the auroral fading. Ionospheric large-scale convection also became enhanced just before the auroral fading and before the auroral initial brightening. Then low-frequency waves were amplified in the plasma sheet at X~-10 RE, with the pressure increase due to the arrival of the earthward flow from the near-Earth reconnection site ~20 s before the enhancement of the auroral wave-like structure. Finally, the dipolarization began ~30 s before the auroral poleward expansion. On the basis of the present observations, we suggest that near-Earth magnetic reconnection plays two roles in the substorm triggering. First, it generates a fast earthward flow and Alfvén waves. When the Alfvén waves which propagate much faster than the fast flow reach the ionosphere, large-scale ionospheric convection is enhanced, leading to the auroral initial brightening and subsequent gradual growth of the auroral wave-like structure. Second, when the reconnection-initiated fast flow reaches the near-Earth magnetotail, it promotes rapid growth of an instability, such as the ballooning instability, and the auroral wave-like structure is further enhanced. When the instability grows sufficiently, the dipolarization and the auroral poleward expansion are initiated.

  5. [The two-phase growth medium for sub-culturing of Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Isaeva, G Sh; Aleshkin, V A; Sel'kova, E P; Gerasimova, M S; Moroz, P I

    2013-06-01

    A. Pylori is a very undemanding microorganism needing the in support of complex of conditions including particular atmosphere, temperature of culturing and composition of growth medium. The two-phase growth medium is recommended to sub-culturing in Petri dishes with diameter of 90 mm. The growth medium consists of chocolate agar with addition of Schedler broth and enriched with 10% serum of cattle.

  6. Nucleation kinetics and crystal growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Malygin, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Crystal growth kinetics accompanied by particle growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions is analyzed theoretically. The integro-differential model of governing equations is solved analytically for size-independent growth rates and arbitrary dependences of the nucleation frequency on supercooling/supersaturation. Two important cases of Weber-Volmer-Frenkel-Zel'dovich and Mier nucleation kinetics are detailed. A Fokker-Plank type equation for the crystal-size density distribution function is solved explicitly.

  7. Tyrosine requirement during the rapid catch-up growth phase of recovery from severe childhood undernutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirement for aromatic amino acids, during the rapid catch-up in weight phase of recovery from severe childhood under nutrition (SCU) is not clearly established. As a first step, the present study aimed to estimate the tyrosine requirement of children with SCU during the catch-up growth phase ...

  8. Ultrastructure of Pseudomonas saccharophila at early and late log phase of growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, H. L.; Chao, F.-C.; Turnbill, C.; Philpott, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the fine structure of Pseudomonas saccarophila at the early log phase and the late log phase of growth, such as shown by electron microscopy with the aid of various techniques of preparation. The observations reported suggested that, under the experimental conditions applied, P. saccharophila multiplies by the method of constrictive division.

  9. A Kinetic Model for GaAs Growth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Kevin L.; Simon, John; Jain, Nikhil; Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-11-21

    Precise control of the growth of III-V materials by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is complicated by the fact that the growth rate depends on the concentrations of nearly all inputs to the reactor and also the reaction temperature. This behavior is in contrast to metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), which in common practice operates in a mass transport limited regime where growth rate and alloy composition are controlled almost exclusively by flow of the Group III precursor. In HVPE, the growth rate and alloy compositions are very sensitive to temperature and reactant concentrations, which are strong functions of the reactor geometry. HVPE growth, particularly the growth of large area materials and devices, will benefit from the development of a growth model that can eventually be coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a specific reactor geometry. In this work, we develop a growth rate law using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) analysis, fitting unknown parameters to growth rate data from the literature that captures the relevant kinetic and thermodynamic phenomena of the HVPE process. We compare the L-H rate law to growth rate data from our custom HVPE reactor, and develop quantitative insight into reactor performance, demonstrating the utility of the growth model.

  10. Growth and characterization of α and β-phase tungsten films on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Cho, Jaehun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-03-15

    The growth conditions of tungsten thin films were investigated using various substrates including Si, Si/SiO{sub 2}, GaAs, MgO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and recipes were discovered for the optimal growth conditions of thick metastable β-phase tungsten films on Si, GaAs, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates, which is an important material in spin orbit torque studies. For the Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate, the crystal phase of the tungsten films was different depending upon the tungsten film thickness, and the transport properties were found to dramatically change with the thickness owing to a change in phase from the α + β phase to the α-phase. It is shown that the crystal phase changes are associated with residual stress in the tungsten films and that the resistivity is closely related to the grain sizes.

  11. Selective growth of single phase VO{sub 2}(A, B, and M) polymorph thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Amar; Saha, Surajit; Rotella, Helene; Pal, Banabir; Kalon, Gopinadhan; Mathew, Sinu; Motapothula, Mallikarjuna; Dykas, Michal; Yang, Ping; Okunishi, Eiji; Sarma, D. D.; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the growth of high quality single phase films of VO{sub 2}(A, B, and M) on SrTiO{sub 3} substrate by controlling the vanadium arrival rate (laser frequency) and oxidation of the V atoms. A phase diagram has been developed (oxygen pressure versus laser frequency) for various phases of VO{sub 2} and their electronic properties are investigated. VO{sub 2}(A) phase is insulating VO{sub 2}(B) phase is semi-metallic, and VO{sub 2}(M) phase exhibits a metal-insulator transition, corroborated by photo-electron spectroscopic studies. The ability to control the growth of various polymorphs opens up the possibility for novel (hetero)structures promising new device functionalities.

  12. Role of mga in growth phase regulation of virulence genes of the group A streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    McIver, K S; Scott, J R

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether growth phase affects the expression of mga and other virulence-associated genes in the group A streptococcus (GAS), total RNA was isolated from the serotype M6 GAS strain JRS4 at different phases of growth and transcript levels were quantitated by hybridization with radiolabeled DNA probes. Expression of mga (which encodes a multiple gene regulator) and the Mga-regulated genes emm (which encodes M protein) and scpA (which encodes a complement C5a peptidase) was found to be maximal in exponential phase and shut off as the bacteria entered stationary phase, while the housekeeping genes recA and rpsL showed constant transcript levels over the same period of growth. Expression of mga from a foreign phage promoter in a mga-deleted GAS strain (JRS519) altered the wild-type growth phase-dependent transcription profile seen for emm and scpA, as well as for mga. Therefore, the temporal control of mga expression requires its upstream promoter region, and the subsequent growth phase regulation of emm and scpA is Mga dependent. A number of putative virulence genes in JRS4 were shown not to require Mga for their expression, although several exhibited growth phase-dependent regulation that was similar to mga, i.e., slo (which encodes streptolysin O) and plr (encoding the plasmin receptor/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Still others showed a markedly different pattern of expression (the genes for the superantigen toxins MF and SpeC). These results suggest the existence of complex levels of global regulation sensitive to growth phase that directly control the expression of virulence genes and mga in GAS. PMID:9260962

  13. Improved thermodynamic analysis of gas reactions for compound semiconductor growth by vapor-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatomi, Yuya; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2017-03-01

    An improved thermodynamic analysis method for vapor-phase epitaxy is proposed. In the conventional method, the mass-balance constraint equations are expressed in terms of variations in partial pressure. Although the conventional method is appropriate for gas–solid reactions occurring near the growth surface, it is not suitable for gas reactions that involve changes in the number of gas molecules. We reconsider the constraint equations in order to predict the effect of gas reactions on semiconductor growth processes. To demonstrate the feasibility of the improved method, the growth process of group-III nitrides by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy has been investigated.

  14. Role of Nucleation and Growth in Two-Phase Microstructure Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong Ho

    2007-01-01

    During the directional solidification of peritectic alloys, a rich variety of two-phase microstructures develop, and the selection process of a specific microstructure is complicated due to the following two considerations. (1) In contrast to many single phase and eutectic microstructures that grow under steady state conditions, two-phase microstructures in a peritectic system often evolve under non-steady-state conditions that can lead to oscillatory microstructures, and (2) the microstructure is often governed by both the nucleation and the competitive growth of the two phases in which repeated nucleation can occur due to the change in the local conditions during growth. In this research, experimental studies in the Sn-Cd system were designed to isolate the effects of nucleation and competitive growth on the dynamics of complex microstructure formation. Experiments were carried out in capillary samples to obtain diffusive growth conditions so that the results can be analyzed quantitatively. At high thermal gradient and low velocity, oscillatory microstructures were observed in which repeated nucleation of the two phases was observed at the wall-solid-liquid junction. Quantitative measurements of nucleation undercooling were obtained for both the primary and the peritectic phase nucleation, and three different ampoule materials were used to examine the effect of different contact angles at the wall on nucleation undercooling. Nucleation undercooling for each phase was found to be very small, and the experimental undercooling values were orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory of nucleation. A new nucleation mechanism is proposed in which the clusters of atoms at the wall ahead of the interface can become a critical nucleus when the cluster encounters the triple junction. Once the nucleation of a new phase occurs, the microstructure is found to be controlled by the relative growth of the two phases that give rise to different

  15. Immunogenic protein variations of Clostridium chauvoei cellular antigens associated with the culture growth phase.

    PubMed

    Mattar, María Aída; Cortiñas, Teresa Inés; de Guzmán, Ana María Stefanini

    2002-03-25

    The immunoprotective capacity of four Clostridium chauvoei strains at different growth stages is reported. In all the strains tested, the cells coming from the stationary phase were those with the highest immunoprotective capacity and, depending on the strain, this protective capacity diminished or even disappeared in other phases. Protein profiles were similar in all the strains and few proteins were differentially expressed during growth as shown by SDS-PAGE. For strain 17, a local strain, a clear relationship was observed between the diminution of immunogenicity and the total loss of protective capacity of sonicated cells at late stationary phase.

  16. Continuous Lobe Reconnection in the Mid-Tail: Observational Signatures and Relation to Substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Pu, Z.; Cao, X.; Xiao, C.; Fu, S.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent a global interaction between the solar wind, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere. Energy extracted from the solar wind is mainly stored in the form of excess magnetic flux in the magnetotail lobes. There is little doubt that reconnection occurs in the magnetotail at some point during substorms. However, whether or not explosive release of this energy is required to cause the substorm and whether reconnection precedes or succeeds expansion onset are still subjects of big debate and controversy. In past three years (2001-2003) Cluster constellation passed through the plasma sheet more than one hundred times. Base on survey of the three yearAƒÆ'A+â_TAƒâ_sA,AøAƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A¡Aƒâ_sA,A¬AƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A_Aƒâ_sA,Aøs four spacecraft data, we have selected 39 continues lobe reconnection (CLR) events. A careful study of these events indicates that the CLR and plasma sheet closed field line reconnection manifest quite differently. The CLR occurs when the IMF is persistently southward (say, for more than a few tens of minutes) and maintains for more than about 20 minutes. It creates a low-density and low-temperature structure with high-speed plasma flows near the central plasma sheet. Quite often the CLRs appear quasi-periodically and in association with the presence of a magnetic storm. Comprehensive investigations have been made in this paper on the relationship between the occurrence of CLRs in the mid-tail and the substorm onsets in the near-Earth region. The 39 CLRs are all found to be corresponding to the appearance of intense substorms. In 37 events the CLRs precede substorms expansion onsets, while other two are opposite. These suggest that tail lobe unloading via CLR is a critical issue for the expansion onset of substorms occurring in persistently southward IMF periods. Nevertheless, this study does not exclude that substorms of other types may have different causes and that dynamical

  17. Reconnection in substorms and solar flares: analogies and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the crucial process in the release of magnetic energy associated with magnetospheric substorms and with solar flares. On the basis of three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations we investigate similarities and differences between the two scenarios. We address in particular mechanisms that lead to the onset of reconnection and on energy release, transport, and conversion mechanisms. Analogous processes might exist in the motion of field line footpoints on the sun and in magnetic flux addition to the magnetotail. In both cases such processes might lead to a loss of neighboring equilibrium, characterized by the formation of very thin embedded current sheet, which acts as trigger for reconnection. We find that Joule (or ohmic) dissipation plays only a minor role in the overall energy transfer associated with reconnection. The dominant transfer of released magnetic energy occurs to electromagnetic energy (Poynting) flux and to thermal energy transport as enthalpy flux. The former dominates in low-beta, specifically initially force-free current sheets expected for the solar corona, while the latter dominates in high-beta current sheets, such as the magnetotail. In both cases the outflow from the reconnection site becomes bursty, i.e. spatially and temporally localized, yet carrying most of the outflow energy. Hence an analogy might exist between bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetotail and pulses of Poynting flux in solar flares.

  18. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  19. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  20. Energetic Electron Transport in the Inner Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, D. L.; Anderson, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    We propose to examine the relationship of geomagnetic storms and substorms and the transport of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere using measurements of the auroral X-ray emissions by PIXIE. PIXIE provides a global view of the auroral oval for the extended periods of time required to study stormtime phenomena. Its unique energy response and global view allow separation of stormtime particle transport driven by strong magnetospheric electric fields from substorm particle transport driven by magnetic-field dipolarization and subsequent particle injection. The relative importance of substorms in releasing stored magnetospheric energy during storms and injecting particles into the inner magnetosphere and the ring current is currently hotly debated. The distribution of particles in the inner magnetosphere is often inferred from measurements of the precipitating auroral particles. Thus, the global distributions of the characteristics of energetic precipitating particles during storms and substorms are extremely important inputs to any description or model of the geospace environment and the Sun-Earth connection. We propose to use PIXIE observations and modeling of the transport of energetic electrons to examine the relationship between storms and substorms.

  1. Interaction of substorm injections with the plasmasphere: A turbulent plasmaspheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiolo, R.; Maes, L.; De Keyser, J.; Haaland, S.; Echim, M.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ measurements of plasma, fields, and waves around the plasmasphere's boundary in the evening sector during substorm injection events are presented. The data reveal that the cold plasma short-circuits substorm-injected hot plasma jets when the cold plasma density exceeds a critical value of 5-10 c.c. The substorm-injected hot electrons stop at the pre-substorm plasmapause, thereby providing a natural explanation of the long-known dispersionless auroral precipitation boundary. A turbulent plasmaspheric boundary layer forms initially near the pre-substorm plasmapause due to interactions between the injected and plasmaspheric populations. The main sources of the greatly-enhanced wave activity are the so-called modified two-stream instability driven by the hot electron diamagnetic drift in the entry layer, ion-ring instability driven by the highly-anisotropic hot ion distribution in the central part, and the diamagnetic drift of hot ions near the inner edge. Enhanced plasma turbulence leads to heating of the cold plasma and to acceleration of suprathermal electron tails, thereby enhancing the downward heat transport and concomitant heating of the ionospheric electrons observed by the DMSP satellites.

  2. Interaction of substorm injections with the plasmasphere: A turbulent plasmaspheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ measurements of plasma, fields, and waves around the plasmasphere's boundary in the evening sector during substorm injection events are presented. The data reveal that the cold plasma short-circuits substorm-injected hot plasma jets when the cold plasma density exceeds a critical value of 5-10 c.c. The substorm-injected hot electrons stop at the pre-substorm plasmapause, thereby providing a natural explanation of the long-known dispersionless auroral precipitation boundary. A turbulent plasmaspheric boundary layer forms initially near the pre-substorm plasmapause due to interactions between the injected and plasmaspheric populations. The main sources of the greatly-enhanced wave activity are the so-called modified two-stream instability driven by the hot electron diamagnetic drift in the entry layer, ion-ring instability driven by the highly-anisotropic hot ion distribution in the central part, and the diamagnetic drift of hot ions near the inner edge. Enhanced plasma turbulence leads to heating of the cold plasma and to acceleration of suprathermal electron tails, thereby enhancing the downward heat transport and concomitant heating of the ionospheric electrons observed by the DMSP satellites.

  3. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  4. Defect-phase-dynamics approach to statistical domain-growth problem of clock models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, K.

    1985-01-01

    The growth of statistical domains in quenched Ising-like p-state clock models with p = 3 or more is investigated theoretically, reformulating the analysis of Ohta et al. (1982) in terms of a phase variable and studying the dynamics of defects introduced into the phase field when the phase variable becomes multivalued. The resulting defect/phase domain-growth equation is applied to the interpretation of Monte Carlo simulations in two dimensions (Kaski and Gunton, 1983; Grest and Srolovitz, 1984), and problems encountered in the analysis of related Potts models are discussed. In the two-dimensional case, the problem is essentially that of a purely dissipative Coulomb gas, with a sq rt t growth law complicated by vertex-pinning effects at small t.

  5. Hybrid vapor phase-solution phase growth techniques for improved CZT(S,Se) photovoltaic device performance

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Liang-Yi; Gershon, Talia S.; Haight, Richard A.; Lee, Yun Seog

    2016-12-27

    A hybrid vapor phase-solution phase CZT(S,Se) growth technique is provided. In one aspect, a method of forming a kesterite absorber material on a substrate includes the steps of: depositing a layer of a first kesterite material on the substrate using a vapor phase deposition process, wherein the first kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se; annealing the first kesterite material to crystallize the first kesterite material; and depositing a layer of a second kesterite material on a side of the first kesterite material opposite the substrate using a solution phase deposition process, wherein the second kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, wherein the first kesterite material and the second kesterite material form a multi-layer stack of the absorber material on the substrate. A photovoltaic device and method of formation thereof are also provided.

  6. GEOTAIL and POLAR Observations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Terrestrial Low Frequency Bursts and their Relationship to Energetic Particles, Auroras, and Other Substorm Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R . R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Imhoff, W. L.; Mobilia, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial low frequency (LF) bursts are plasma wave phenomena that appear to be a part of the low frequency end of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) spectrum and are observed during strong substorms, GEOTAIL and POLAR plasma wave observations from within the magnetosphere show that the AKR increases in intensity and its lower frequency limits decrease when LF bursts are observed. The first is expected as it is shows substorm onset and the latter indicates that the AKR source region is expanding to higher altitudes. Images from the POLAR VIS Earth Camera operating in the far-UV range and the POLAR UVI experiment usually feature an auroral brightening and an expansion of the aurora to higher latitudes at the time of the LF bursts. Enhanced fluxes of X-rays from precipitating electrons have also been observed by POLAR PIXIE. High resolution ground Abstract: magnetometer data from the CANOPUS and IMAGE networks show that the LF bursts occur when the expansive phase onset signatures are most intense. The ground magnetometer data and the CANOPUS meridian scanning photometer data sometimes show that during the LF burst events the expansive phase onset starts at unusually low latitudes and moves poleward. Large injections of energetic protons and electrons have also been detected by the GOES and LANL geosynchronous satellites during LF burst events. While most of the auroral brightenings and energetic particle injections associated with the LF bursts occur near local midnight, several have been observed as early as mid-afternoon. From these various measurements, we are achieving a better understanding of the plasma and particle motions during substorms that are associated with the generation and propagation of terrestrial LF bursts

  7. Numerical simulation of liquid phase electro-epitaxial selective area growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenner, M.; Braun, R. J.

    2005-05-01

    A computational model for semiconductor crystal growth on a partially masked substrate under simplified liquid phase electroepitaxy conditions is developed. The model assumes isothermal diffusional growth, which is enhanced by applied DC current through crystal-solution interface. A finite-difference, front-tracking method is used to numerically evolve the interface. Computed examples show strong influence of the electromigration on growth rates in vertical and lateral directions and the dependence of growth on electrical resistance of mask material, and on the wetting contact angle.

  8. Phase field modelling of stressed grain growth: Analytical study and the effect of microstructural length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshidian, M.; Rabczuk, T.

    2014-03-15

    We establish the correlation between the diffuse interface and sharp interface descriptions for stressed grain boundary migration by presenting analytical solutions for stressed migration of a circular grain boundary in a bicrystalline phase field domain. The validity and accuracy of the phase field model is investigated by comparing the phase field simulation results against analytical solutions. The phase field model can reproduce precise boundary kinetics and stress evolution provided that a thermodynamically consistent theory and proper expressions for model parameters in terms of physical material properties are employed. Quantitative phase field simulations are then employed to investigate the effect of microstructural length scale on microstructure and texture evolution by stressed grain growth in an elastically deformed polycrystalline aggregate. The simulation results reveal a transitional behaviour from normal to abnormal grain growth by increasing the microstructural length scale.

  9. Radiosensitivity of different tissues from carrot root at different phases of growth in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Degani, N.; Pickholtz, D.

    1980-09-01

    The present work compares the effect of ..gamma..-radiation dose and time in culture on the growth of cambium and phloem carrot (Daucus carota) root explants. It was found that the phloem is more radiosensitive than the cambium and that both tissues were more radiosensitive when irradiated on excision at the G/sub 1/ phase rather than at the end of the lag phase on the ninth day of growth in culture when cells were predominantly at the G/sub 2/ phase. The nuclear volumes of cells from both tissues were similar but were larger at the end of the more radioresistant lag phase than those of the G/sub 1/ phase on excision. However, nuclear volume could not account for the differences in radiosensitivity between either the tissues or irradiation times in culture.

  10. Growth method for chalcongenide phase-change nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Bin (Inventor); Sun, Xuhui (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for growth of an alloy for use in a nanostructure, to provide a resulting nanostructure compound including at least one of Ge.sub.xTe.sub.y, In.sub.xSb.sub.y, In.sub.xSe.sub.y, Sb.sub.xTe.sub.y, Ga.sub.xSb.sub.y, Ge.sub.xSb.sub.y,Te.sub.z, In.sub.xSb.sub.yTe.sub.z, Ga.sub.xSe.sub.yTe.sub.z, Sn.sub.xSb.sub.yTe.sub.z, In.sub.xSb.sub.yGe.sub.z, Ge.sub.wSn.sub.xSb.sub.yTe.sub.z, Ge.sub.wSb.sub.xSe.sub.yTe.sub.z, and Te.sub.wGe.sub.xSb.sub.yS.sub.z, where w, x, y and z are numbers consistent with oxidization states (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) of the corresponding elements. The melt temperatures for some of the resulting compounds are in a range 330-420.degree. C., or even lower with some compounds.

  11. CDAW 7 revisited - Further evidence for the creation of a near-earth substorm neutral line. [Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettmann, G.; Fritz, T. A.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Eastman et al. (1988) have interpreted the CDAW 7 substorm of April 24, 1979, previously taken as unambiguously supporting the near-earth neutral line model of magnetospheric substorms, in terms of spatial movements of a preexisting plasma-sheet boundary layer (PSBL) and its associated current sheets across the observing ISEE 1 and 2 spacercraft. It is presently noted that, by contrast, a reinvestigation of ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle measurements around substorm onset on short time-scales shows the observed flux pattern to require the formation of a particle source eastward of the ISEE spacecraft, well within the plasma sheet, associated with the substorm onset. Strong flows were absent prior to substorm onset, indicating the temporal nature of the event, as opposed to an encounter with a preexisting PSBL containing large flows.

  12. Growth behavior of GaSb by metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathi, Manish K.; Hawkins, Brian E.; Kuech, Thomas F.

    2006-11-01

    The growth mechanisms of GaSb in a metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) system were studied for both trimethyl gallium (TMG)/trimethyl antimony (TMSb) and triethyl gallium (TEG)/TMSb growth chemistries. The effect of growth temperature and precursor mole fractions on GaSb growth rate was determined experimentally. Numerical analysis of the reactor and growth process was described in a combined chemical-thermal-fluid flow model. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type mechanism involving a surface reaction between adsorbed monomethyl gallium (MMG) and adsorbed monomethyl antimony (MMSb) or adsorbed Ga and adsorbed MMSb was proposed for the growth of GaSb by MOVPE using TMG or TEG and TMSb chemistries, respectively. The chemical model for TMG/TMSb chemistry included bounds on the surface chemistry derived for the range of V/III precursor ratio which were observed to lead to a second phase, i.e., elemental Ga or Sb, formation. Two growth regimes were observed for TMG/TMSb chemistry: above 575 °C the growth rate was mass transfer controlled whereas for lower temperatures it is kinetically limited. No such temperature dependence has been found for the TEG/TMSb chemistry over all experimental employed ranges of growth parameters.

  13. Energy supply processes for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares - Tippy bucket model or pitcher model?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, both magnetospheric substorms and solar flares have almost exclusively been discussed in terms of explosive magnetic reconnection. Such a model may conceptually be illustrated by the so-called 'tippy-bucket model', which causes sudden unloading processes, namely a sudden (catastrophic, stochastic, and unpredictable) conversion of stored magnetic energy. However, recent observations indicate that magnetospheric substorms can be understood as a result of a directly driven process which can conceptually be illustrated by the 'pitcher model' in which the output rate varies in harmony with the input rate. It is also possible that solar flare phenomena are directly driven by a photospheric dynamo. Thus, explosive magnetic reconnection may simply be an unworkable hypothesis and may not be a puzzle to be solved as the primary energy supply process for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares.

  14. Recent THEMIS and Coordinated GBO Measurements of Substorm Expansion Onset: Do We Finally Have an Answer?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.

    2011-01-01

    For nearly 30 years an often-times heated debate has engaged the substorm community: Do substorms begin with the formation of a new reconnection site in the midtail plasma sheet (the Near-Earth Neutral Line model) or do they begin near the transition region between stretched tail and dipolar field lines (the Current Disruption model). The THEMIS mission, with a coordinated suite of five in-situ spacecraft and ground observatories, has greatly extended our understanding of how substorms initiate and evolve. But have the new data resolved the fundamental question? In this talk I review the last few year's of sub storm research, with an emphasis of how the THEMIS data have revolutionized our understanding.

  15. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; ...

    2016-03-02

    Here we report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Lastly, above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5 ± 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  17. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in the Ionospheric Trough Region During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Coster, A. J.; Yizengaw, E.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric troughs are regions of remarkable electron density depression at the subauroral and auroral latitudes, and are categorized into the mid-latitude trough or high-latitude trough, depending on their relative location to the auroral oval. Substorms are one fundamental element of geomagnetic activity, during which structured field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection flows develop in the subauroral and auroral ionosphere. The auroral/trough region is expected to experience severe electron density variations during substorms. Accurate specification of the trough dynamics during substorms and understanding its relationship with the structured FACs and convection flows are of important practical purpose, including providing observational foundations for assessing the attendant impact on navigation and communication. In addition, troughs are important since they map to magnetospheric boundaries allowing the remote sensing of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of the mid-latitude and high-latitude troughs during substorms based on multi-instrument observations. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) data, we characterize the location and width of the mid-latitude trough through the substorm lifecycle and compare them with existing trough empirical models. Using a combination of incoherent scattering radar (ISR), GPS TEC, auroral imager and a data assimilative model, we investigate the relationship between the high-latitude trough and FACs as well as convection flows. The high-latitude trough is found to be collocated with a counter-clockwise convection flow vortex east of the Harang reversal region, and downward FACs as part of the substorm current system are suggested to be responsible for the high-latitude trough formation. In addition, complex ionospheric electron temperature within the high-latitude trough is found, i.e., increase in the E region while decrease in the F region. We discuss possible

  18. Limited by sensing - A minimal stochastic model of the lag-phase during diauxic growth.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dominique

    2017-02-07

    Many microbes when grown on a mixture of two carbon sources utilise first and exclusively the preferred sugar, before switching to the less preferred carbon source. This results in two distinct exponential growth phases, often interrupted by a lag-phase of reduced growth termed the lag-phase. While the lag-phase appears to be an evolved feature, it is not clear what drives its evolution, as it comes with a substantial up-front fitness penalty due to lost growth. In this article a minimal mathematical model based on a master-equation approach is proposed. This model can explain many empirically observed phenomena. It suggests that the lag-phase can be understood as a manifestation of the trade-off between switching speed and switching efficiency. Moreover, the model predicts heterogeneity of the population during the lag-phase. Finally, it is shown that the switch from one carbon source to another one is a sensing problem and the lag-phase is a manifestation of known fundamental limitations of biological sensors.

  19. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingjiang

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energization of particles (both electrons and ions) to tens and hundreds of keV and the associated transport process in the magnetotail during substorms. Particles energized in the magnetotail are further accelerated to even higher energies (hundreds of keV to MeV) in the radiation belts, causing space weather hazards to human activities in space and on ground. We develop an analytical model to quantitatively estimate flux changes caused by betatron and Fermi acceleration when particles are transported along narrow high-speed flow channels from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere. The model shows that energetic particle flux can be significantly enhanced by a modest compression of the magnetic field and/or shrinking of the distance between the magnetic mirror points. We use coordinated spacecraft measurements, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by measured upstream solar wind conditions, and large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulations to quantify electron local acceleration in the near-Earth reconnection region and nonlocal acceleration during plasma earthward transport. Compared to the analytical model, application of the LSK simulations is much less restrictive because trajectories of millions of test particles are calculated in the realistically determined global MHD fields and the results are statistical. The simulation results validated by the observations show that electrons following a power law distribution at high energies are generated earthward of the reconnection site, and that the majority of the energetic electrons observed in the inner magnetosphere are caused by adiabatic acceleration in association with magnetic dipolarizations and fast flows during earthward transport. We extend the global MHD+LSK simulations to examine ion energization and compare it with electron energization. The simulations demonstrate that ions in the magnetotail are first nonadiabatically accelerated in the weak

  20. Metabolic flux analysis of CHO cells at growth and non-growth phases using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2011-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the main platform for production of biotherapeutics in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, relatively little is known about the metabolism of CHO cells in cell culture. In this work, metabolism of CHO cells was studied at the growth phase and early stationary phase using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry. CHO cells were grown in fed-batch culture over a period of six days. On days 2 and 4, [1,2-(13)C] glucose was introduced and the labeling of intracellular metabolites was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) at 6, 12 and 24h following the introduction of tracer. Intracellular metabolic fluxes were quantified from measured extracellular rates and (13)C-labeling dynamics of intracellular metabolites using non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). The flux results revealed significant rewiring of intracellular metabolic fluxes in the transition from growth to non-growth, including changes in energy metabolism, redox metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and anaplerosis. At the exponential phase, CHO cell metabolism was characterized by a high flux of glycolysis from glucose to lactate, anaplerosis from pyruvate to oxaloacetate and from glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and cataplerosis though malic enzyme. At the stationary phase, the flux map was characterized by a reduced flux of glycolysis, net lactate uptake, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux, and reduced rate of anaplerosis. The fluxes of pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle were similar at the exponential and stationary phase. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of CHO cell metabolism for applications such as cell line development and medium optimization for high-titer production of recombinant proteins.

  1. Statistical visualization of the Earth's magnetotail based on Geotail data and the implied substorm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nosé, M.; Nagata, D.; Liou, K.; Obara, T.; Nishida, A.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the temporal and spatial development of the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms based on multi-dimensional superposed-epoch analysis of Geotail data. The start time of the auroral break-up (t=0) of each substorm was determined from auroral data obtained by the Polar and IMAGE spacecraft. The key parameters derived from the plasma, magnetic-field, and electric-field data from Geotail were sorted by their meridional X(GSM)-Z(proxy) coordinates. The results show that the Poynting flux toward the plasma-sheet center starts at least 10 min before the substorm onset, and is further enhanced at X~-12 RE (Earth radii) around 4 min before the onset. Simultaneously, large-amplitude fluctuations occurred, and earthward flows in the central plasma sheet between X~-11 RE and X~-19 RE and a duskward flow around X=-10 RE were enhanced. The total pressure starts to decrease around X=-16 RE about 4 min before the onset of the substorm. After the substorm onset, a notable dipolarization is observed and tailward flows commence, characterised by southward magnetic fields in the form of a plasmoid. We confirm various observable-parameter variations based on or predicted by the relevant substorm models; however, none of these can explain our results perfectly. Therefore, we propose a catapult (slingshot) current-sheet relaxation model, in which an earthward convective flow produced by catapult current-sheet relaxation and a converted duskward flow near the Earth are enhanced through flow braking around 4 min before the substorm onset. These flows induce a ballooning instability or other instabilities, causing the observed current disruption. The formation of the magnetic neutral line is a natural consequence of the present model, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current-sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense earthward and tailward magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic

  2. Streaming energetic electrons in earth's magnetotail - Evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, J. W.; Stone, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    This letter reports the results of a systematic study of streaming greater than 200 keV electrons observed in the magnetotail with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometers aboard IMP-7 and IMP-8. A clear statistical association of streaming events with southward magnetic fields, often of steep inclination, and with substorms as evidenced by the AE index is demonstrated. These results support the interpretation that streaming energetic electrons are indicative of substorm-associated magnetic reconnection in the near-earth plasma sheet.

  3. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  4. The Substorm Current Wedge: Further Insights from MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a recent magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail dynamics, we further investigate the buildup and evolution of the substorm current wedge (SCW), resulting from flow bursts generated by near-tail reconnection. Each flow burst generates an individual current wedge, which includes the reduction of cross-tail current and the diversion to region 1 (R1)-type field-aligned currents (earthward on the dawn and tailward on the duskside), connecting the tail with the ionosphere. Multiple flow bursts generate initially multiple SCW patterns, which at later times combine to a wider single SCW pattern. The standard SCWmodel is modified by the addition of several current loops, related to particular magnetic field changes: the increase of Bz in a local equatorial region (dipolarization), the decrease of |Bx| away from the equator (current disruption), and increases in |By| resulting from azimuthally deflected flows. The associated loop currents are found to be of similar magnitude, 0.1-0.3 MA. The combined effect requires the addition of region 2 (R2)-type currents closing in the near tail through dawnward currents but also connecting radially with the R1 currents. The current closure at the inner boundary, taken as a crude proxy of an idealized ionosphere, demonstrates westward currents as postulated in the original SCW picture as well as North-South currents connecting R1- and R2-type currents, which were larger than the westward currents by a factor of almost 2. However, this result should be applied with caution to the ionosphere because of our neglect of finite resistance and Hall effects.

  5. Nonguiding Center Motion and Substorm Effects in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Kontodinas, Ioannis D.; Ball, Bryan M.; Larson, Douglas J.

    1997-01-01

    Thick and thin models of the middle magnetotail were developed using a consistent orbit tracing technique. It was found that currents carried near the equator by groups of ions with anisotropic distribution functions are not well approximated by the guiding center expressions. The guiding center equations fail primarily because the calculated pressure tensor is not magnetic field aligned. The pressure tensor becomes field aligned as one moves away from the equator, but here there is a small region in which the guiding center equations remain inadequate because the two perpendicular components of the pressure tensor are unequal. The significance of nonguiding center motion to substorm processes then was examined. One mechanism that may disrupt a thin cross-tail current sheet involves field changes that cause ions to begin following chaotic orbits. The lowest-altitude chaotic region, characterized by an adiabaticity parameter kappa approx. equal to 0.8, is especially important. The average cross-tail particle drift is slow, and we were unable to generate a thin current sheet using such ions. Therefore, any process that tends to create a thin current sheet in a region with kappa approaching 0.8 may cause the cross-tail current to get so low that it becomes insufficient to support the lobes. A different limit may be important in resonant orbit regions of a thin current sheet because particles reach a maximum cross-tail drift velocity. If the number of ions per unit length decreases as the tail is stretched, this part of the plasma sheet also may become unable to carry the cross-tail current needed to support the lobes. Thin sheets are needed for both resonant and chaotic orbit mechanisms because the distribution function must be highly structured. A description of current continuity is included to show how field aligned currents can evolve during the transition from a two-dimensional (2-D) to a 3-D configuration.

  6. Substorm simulation: Insight into the mechanisms of initial brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-09-01

    Initial brightening of the aurora is an optical manifestation of the beginning of a substorm expansion and is accompanied by large-amplitude upward field-aligned currents (FACs). Based on global magnetohydrodynamic simulation, we suggest the possible generation mechanism of the upward FAC that may manifest the initial brightening. (1) A formation of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) releases the tension force that accelerates plasma earthward. (2) The earthward (perpendicular) flow is converted to a field-aligned flow when flow braking takes place. (3) A high-pressure region propagates earthward along a field line. (4) The off-equatorial high-pressure region pulls in and discharges ambient plasma, which generates a flow vorticity around it. (5) Region 1-sense FAC is generated in the upper part of the off-equatorial high-pressure region. (6) The upward FAC is connected with the ionosphere in the center of the Harang discontinuity, causing the initial brightening. Additional dynamo is generated in the near-Earth region, which transmits electromagnetic energy. Upward FAC that manifests the initial brightening seems to be necessarily originated in the near-Earth off-equatorial region where the magnitude of the perpendicular (diamagnetic) current is relatively small in comparison with that of the FAC. Near the equatorial plane, the perpendicular current is comparable to or larger than FAC so that a current line is diverted from a magnetic field line and that the FAC generated near the equatorial plane is not necessarily connected with the ionosphere. The proposed mechanism occurs regardless of the location of the NENL and may explain some of auroral forms.

  7. Grain growth kinetics in liquid-phase-sintered zinc oxide-barium oxide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Sung-Chul; German, Randall M.

    1991-01-01

    Grain growth of ZnO in the presence of a liquid phase of the ZnO-BaO system has been studied for temperatures from 1300 to 1400 C. The specimens were treated in boiling water and the grains were separated by dissolving the matrix phase in an ultrasonic bath. As a consequence 3D grain size measurements were possible. Microstructural examination shows some grain coalescence with a wide range of neck size ratios and corresponding dihedral angles, however, most grains are isolated. Lognormal grain size distributions show similar shapes, indicating that the growth mechanism is invariant over this time and temperature. All regressions between G exp n and time for n = 2 and 3 proved statistically significant. The rate constants calculated with the growth exponent set to n = 3 are on the same order of magnitude as in metallic systems. The apparent activation energy for growth is estimated between 355 and 458 kJ/mol.

  8. Characterizing ice crystal growth behavior under electric field using phase field method.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2009-07-01

    In this article, the microscale ice crystal growth behavior under electrostatic field is investigated via a phase field method, which also incorporates the effects of anisotropy and thermal noise. The multiple ice nuclei's competitive growth as disclosed in existing experiments is thus successfully predicted. The present approach suggests a highly efficient theoretical tool for probing into the freeze injury mechanisms of biological material due to ice formation during cryosurgery or cryopreservation process when external electric field was involved.

  9. The growth of vapor bubble and relaxation between two-phase bubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadein, S. A.; Subba Reddy Gorla, Rama

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the behavior of the bubble growth and relaxation between vapor and superheated liquid. The growth and thermal relaxation time between the two-phases are obtained for different levels of superheating. The heat transfer problem is solved numerically by using the extended Scriven model. Results are compared with those of Scriven theory and MOBY DICK experiment with reasonably good agreement for lower values of superheating.

  10. Determining the Number of Latent Classes in Single- and Multi-Phase Growth Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Young

    2014-01-01

    Stage-sequential (or multiphase) growth mixture models are useful for delineating potentially different growth processes across multiple phases over time and for determining whether latent subgroups exist within a population. These models are increasingly important as social behavioral scientists are interested in better understanding change processes across distinctively different phases, such as before and after an intervention. One of the less understood issues related to the use of growth mixture models is how to decide on the optimal number of latent classes. The performance of several traditionally used information criteria for determining the number of classes is examined through a Monte Carlo simulation study in single- and multi-phase growth mixture models. For thorough examination, the simulation was carried out in two perspectives: the models and the factors. The simulation in terms of the models was carried out to see the overall performance of the information criteria within and across the models, while the simulation in terms of the factors was carried out to see the effect of each simulation factor on the performance of the information criteria holding the other factors constant. The findings not only support that sample size adjusted BIC (ADBIC) would be a good choice under more realistic conditions, such as low class separation, smaller sample size, and/or missing data, but also increase understanding of the performance of information criteria in single- and multi-phase growth mixture models. PMID:24729675

  11. Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Jiang, Weilin; Wang, Chong M.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhu, Zihua; Gao, Fei; Lian, Jie; Weber, William J.

    2010-11-10

    Grain growth, oxygen stoichiometry and phase stability of nanostructurally-stabilized zirconia (NSZ) in pure cubic phase are investigated under 2 MeV Au ion bombardment at 160 and 400 K to doses up to 35 displacements per atom (dpa). The NSZ films are produced by ion-beam-assisted deposition technique at room temperature with an average grain size of 7.7 nm. The grain size increases with dose, and follows a power law (n=6) to a saturation value of ~30 nm that decreases with temperature. Slower grain growth is observed under 400 K irradiations, as compared to 160 K irradiations, indicating that thermal grain growth is not activated and defect-stimulated grain growth is the dominating mechanism. While cubic phase is perfectly retained and no new phases are identified after the high-dose irradiations, reduction of oxygen in the irradiated NSZ films is detected. The ratio of O to Zr decreases from ~2.0 for the as-deposited films to ~1.65 after irradiation to ~35 dpa. Significant increase of oxygen vacancies in nanocrystalline zirconia suggests substantially enhanced oxygen diffusion under ion irradiation, a materials behavior far from equilibrium. The oxygen deficiency may be essential in stabilizing cubic phase to larger grain sizes.

  12. Arginine methylation in yeast proteins during stationary-phase growth and heat shock.

    PubMed

    Lakowski, Ted M; Pak, Magnolia L; Szeitz, András; Thomas, Dylan; Vhuiyan, Mynol I; Clement, Bernd; Frankel, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Arginine methyltransferases (RMTs) catalyze the methylation of arginine residues on proteins. We examined the effects of log-phase growth, stationary-phase growth, and heat shock on the formation of methylarginines on yeast proteins to determine if the conditions favor a particular type of methylation. Utilizing linear ion trap mass spectrometry, we identify methylarginines in wild-type and RMT deletion yeast strains using secondary product ion scans (MS(3)), and quantify the methylarginines using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Employing MS(3) and isotopic incorporation, we demonstrate for the first time that Nη1, Nη2-dimethylarginine (sDMA) is present on yeast proteins, and make a detailed structural determination of the fragment ions from the spectra. Nη-monomethylarginine (ηMMA), Nδ-monomethylarginine (δMMA), Nη1, Nη1-dimethylarginine (aDMA), and sDMA were detected in RMT deletion yeast using MS(3) and MRM with and without isotopic incorporation, suggesting that additional RMT enzymes remain to be discovered in yeast. The concentrations of ηMMA and δMMA decreased by half during heat shock and stationary phase compared to log-phase growth of wild-type yeast, whereas sDMA increased by as much as sevenfold and aDMA decreased by 11-fold. Therefore, upon entering stressful conditions like heat shock or stationary-phase growth, there is a net increase in sDMA and decreases in aDMA, ηMMA, and δMMA on yeast proteins.

  13. Effect of growth phase on the fatty acid compositions of four species of marine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Mai, Kangsen

    2005-04-01

    The fatty acid compositions of four species of marine diatoms ( Chaetoceros gracilis MACC/B13, Cylindrotheca fusiformis MACC/B211, Phaeodactylum tricornutum MACC/B221 and Nitzschia closterium MACC/B222), cultivated at 22°C±1°C with the salinity of 28 in f/2 medium and harvested in the exponential growth phase, the early stationary phase and the late stationary phase, were determined. The results showed that growth phase has significant effect on most fatty acid contents in the four species of marine diatoms. The proportions of 16:0 and 16:1n-7 fatty acids increased while those of 16:3n-4 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased with increasing culture age in all species studied. The subtotal of saturated fatty acids (SFA) increased with the increasing culture age in all species with the exception of B13. The subtotal of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) increased while that of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) decreased with culture age in the four species of marine diatoms. MUFA reached their lowest value in the exponential growth phase, whereas PUFA reached their highest value in the same phase.

  14. Growth of different phases of yttrium manganese oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manish; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2012-06-05

    Various phases of yttrium manganese oxide (YMO) thin films have been synthesized on different substrates from a single target of h-YMnO{sub 3}. It is observed that the phase stability and crystallinity of YMO thin films depend on the substrate used and oxygen partial pressure (OPP). (110) oriented and polycrystalline growth of h-YMnO{sub 3} are observed on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) and NGO (110) substrates respectively, when grown in OPP {approx_equal} 10{sup -6} Torr. While for similar OPP value, growth of mixed phases (h-YMnO{sub 3} and o-YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is observed on Si (001) substrate. Oriented growth of O-YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase film on Si (001) substrate is observed first time, when deposited at OPP value of 225 and 350 mTorr. +3 and mixed oxidation states (+3 and +4) of Mn were confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in pure YMnO{sub 3} phase and YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase respectively.

  15. Selective growth of GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, R.; Dugrand, L.

    1991-01-01

    Complete selective epitaxy of GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure was achieved by using TMG, AsH3, and AsCl3 as starting gases. Selectivity was observed at growth temperatures ranging from 650 to 750 °C. The blocking of polycrystal deposition on the mask, Si3N4, or W, is attributed to the adsorption of HCl on the mask, thus preventing the nucleation of GaAs. On the openings, the growth rate may be adjusted by controlling the TMG/AsCl3 ratio. When TMG/AsCl3<1, no growth occurs, but etching is observed.

  16. The problem of the acceleration of electrons of the outer radiation belt and magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, E. E.; Stepanova, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting of the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes filling a new radiation belt is an endeavor being carried out by physicists studying the magnetosphere. We analyzed the data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and ground-based magnetometers obtained during geomagnetic storm on 8-9 October 2012. The minimum value of the disturbance storm time (Dst) was -111 nT, and the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes that appeared during the recovery phase was observed at L = 4 Re. At the same time, we analyzed the motion of the auroral oval toward lower latitudes and related substorm activity using the data of the low-orbiting DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetic meridian network. It was found from the DMSP satellites' measurements that the maximum of the energy density of precipitating ions, the maximum of the plasma pressure, and the most equatorial part of the westward auroral electrojet are all located at the 60° geomagnetic latitude. This value corresponds to L = 4 Re, i.e., it coincides with the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes. This L-value also agrees with the predictions of the Tverskaya relation between the minimum in Dst variation and the location of the maximum of the energetic electron fluxes, filling a new radiation belt. The obtained results show that the location of this maximum could be predicted solely from the data of the auroral particle precipitations and/or ground-based magnetic observations.

  17. Profiling of Burkholderia cepacia Secretome at Mid-Logarithmic and Early-Stationary Phases of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Hashim, Onn Haji; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2011-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cepacia is a Gram-negative pathogen that causes serious respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients and individuals with cystic fibrosis. This bacterium is known to release extracellular proteins that may be involved in virulence. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, B. cepacia grown to mid-logarithmic and early-stationary phases were investigated on their ability to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 lung epithelial cells in order to discern the fate of these bacteria in the pathogenesis of B. cepacia lung infections in in vitro condition. The early-stationary phase B. cepacia was demonstrated to be more invasive than mid-logarithmic phase. In addition, culture supernatants of B. cepacia obtained from these phases of growth were also demonstrated to cause different cytotoxic potency on the A549 human lung epithelial cells. Profiling of the supernatants using the gel-based proteomics approach identified 43 proteins that were commonly released in both the growth phases and 40 proteins newly-released at the early-stationary phase. The latter proteins may account for the higher cytotoxic activity of the early-stationary culture supernatant compared to that obtained at the mid-logarithmic phase. Among the newly-released proteins in the early-stationary phase supernatant were flagellar hook-associated domain protein (FliD), flagellar hook-associated protein (FlgK), TonB-dependent siderophore (Fiu), Elongation factor G (FusA), phosphoglycerate kinase (Pgk) and sulfatase (AslA) which are known for their virulence. Conclusion/Significance Differences in the ability of B. cepacia to invade and survive intracellularly inside the epithelial cells at different phases of growth may improve our understanding of the varied disease progressions associated with B. cepacia infections. In addition, the identified culture supernatant proteins may be used as targets for the development of new strategies to control B. cepacia

  18. Surface and Thin Film Analysis during Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    In-situ analysis of epitaxial growth is the essential ingredient in order to understand the growth process, to optimize growth and last but not least to monitor or even control the epitaxial growth on a microscopic scale. In MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) in-situ analysis tools existed right from the beginning because this technique developed from Surface Science technology with all its electron based analysis tools (LEED, RHEED, PES etc). Vapour Phase Epitaxy, in contrast, remained for a long time in an empirical stage ("alchemy") because only post growth characterisations like photoluminescence, Hall effect and electrical conductivity were available. Within the last two decades, however, optical techniques were developed which provide similar capabilities as in MBE for Vapour Phase growth. I will discuss in this paper the potential of Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for the growth of thin epitaxial semiconductor layers with zincblende (GaAs etc) and wurtzite structure (GaN etc). Other techniques and materials will be also mentioned.

  19. Surface and Thin Film Analysis during Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxial Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Wolfgang

    2007-06-14

    In-situ analysis of epitaxial growth is the essential ingredient in order to understand the growth process, to optimize growth and last but not least to monitor or even control the epitaxial growth on a microscopic scale. In MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) in-situ analysis tools existed right from the beginning because this technique developed from Surface Science technology with all its electron based analysis tools (LEED, RHEED, PES etc). Vapour Phase Epitaxy, in contrast, remained for a long time in an empirical stage ('alchemy') because only post growth characterisations like photoluminescence, Hall effect and electrical conductivity were available. Within the last two decades, however, optical techniques were developed which provide similar capabilities as in MBE for Vapour Phase growth. I will discuss in this paper the potential of Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for the growth of thin epitaxial semiconductor layers with zincblende (GaAs etc) and wurtzite structure (GaN etc). Other techniques and materials will be also mentioned.

  20. Bulk water phase and biofilm growth in drinking water at low nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik; Jørgensen, Claus

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the bacterial growth dynamics of a drinking water distribution system at low nutrient conditions was studied in order to determine bacterial growth rates by a range of methods, and to compare growth rates in the bulk water phase and the biofilm. A model distribution system was used to quantify the effect of retention times at hydraulic conditions similar to those in drinking water distribution networks. Water and pipe wall samples were taken and examined during the experiment. The pipes had been exposed to drinking water at approximately 13 degrees C, for at least 385 days to allow the formation of a mature quasi-stationary biofilm. At retention times of 12 h, total bacterial counts increased equivalent to a net bacterial growth rate of 0.048 day(-1). The bulk water phase bacteria exhibited a higher activity than the biofilm bacteria in terms of culturability, cell-specific ATP content, and cell-specific leucine incorporation rate. Bacteria in the bulk water phase incubated without the presence of biofilm exhibited a bacterial growth rate of 0.30 day(-1). The biofilm was radioactively labelled by the addition of 14C-benzoic acid. Subsequently, a biofilm detachment rate of 0.013 day(-1) was determined by measuring the release of 14C-labelled bacteria of the biofilm. For the quasi-stationary phase biofilm, the detachment rate was equivalent to the net growth rate. The growth rates determined in this study by different independent experimental approaches were comparable and within the range of values reported in the literature.

  1. On the shape of the in-phase TEAS oscillations during epitaxial growth of Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelsema, Bene; Becker, Andreas F.; Rosenfeld, Georg; Kunkel, Ralf; Nagel, Nicolas; Verheij, Laurens K.; Comsa, George

    The growth of Pt(111) from its vapour phase is investigated by means of TEAS (thermal energy atom scattering) in a wide range of substrate temperatures: 100-800 K. The evolution of the in-phase He specular peak height during Pt deposition is studied in particular. At higher substrate temperatures ( T s > 500K), the in-phase peak height exhibits longlived temporal oscillations with a clearly asymmetric shape. This asymmetry, which increases with temperature, reveals substantial coarsening of the adatom islands during monolayer deposition, most likely due to Ostwald ripening processes.

  2. Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and Scalable Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-15

    period, that is, growth plus termination, we assume the average growth rate (R̅t) of a (n, m) SWCNT at time t follows exponential kinetics ?̅?...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0319 Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and...controlled growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using vapor phase epitaxy: mechanistic understanding and scalable production FA9550-14-1-0115 Zhou

  3. In vitro antifungal susceptibilities of Sporothrix schenckii in two growth phases.

    PubMed

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; Dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Wanke, Bodo; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; de Almeida Paes, Rodrigo; Inza, Isabel; Guarro, Josep

    2005-09-01

    We have determined the antifungal susceptibilities of 34 clinical isolates of the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii to 11 drugs using a microdilution method. In general, the type of growth phase (mycelial or yeast) and the temperature of incubation (30 or 35 degrees C) exerted a significant influence on the MICs.

  4. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibilities of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Growth Phases

    PubMed Central

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Wanke, Bodo; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; de Almeida Paes, Rodrigo; Inza, Isabel; Guarro, Josep

    2005-01-01

    We have determined the antifungal susceptibilities of 34 clinical isolates of the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii to 11 drugs using a microdilution method. In general, the type of growth phase (mycelial or yeast) and the temperature of incubation (30 or 35°C) exerted a significant influence on the MICs. PMID:16127080

  5. Vapor phase growth of group 3, 4, and 5 compounds by HCl transport of elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Mcnear, M. F.; Crouch, R. K.; Breckenridge, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Technique has been devised for vapor-phase epitaxial growth of group 3, 4, and 5 binary, ternary, or quaternary compounds by HCl transport of the constituent elements or dopants. Technique uses all the constituents of the alloy system in their elemental form. Transport of these elements by an HCl + H2 carrier gas facilitates their transport as subchlorides.

  6. Studies of proteinograms in dermatophytes by disc electrophoresis. 1. Protein bands in relation to growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danev, P.; Friedrich, E.; Balabanov, V.

    1983-01-01

    Homogenates were prepared from various growth phases of Microsporum gypseum grown on different amino acids as the nitrogen source. When analyzed on 7.5% polyacrylamide disc gels, the water-soluble proteins in these homogenates gave essentially identical banding patterns.

  7. Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxial Growth of (211)B CdTe on Nanopatterned (211)Si

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-15

    SUBJECT TERMS CdTe Epitaxy, Molecular Transfer Lithography, Dislocation Reduction Shashidhar Shintri*,1, , Sunil Rao2, , Charles Schaper3, , Witold...2012) / DOI 10.1002/pssc.201100653 Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial growth of (211)B CdTe on nanopatterned (211)Si Shashidhar Shintri*,1, Sunil

  8. Correlated observations of substorm effects in the near-earth region and the deep magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Baumjohann, W.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of energetic particle measurements from the geosynchronous satellite 1982-019 and magnetic field, electron plasma, and energetic proton and electron measurements obtained with ISEE 3 in the deep tail are presented. The data are supplemented by ground magnetograms. A substorm occurred on March 22, 1983, close to 0300 UT as identified in the ground magnetograms and by a particle injection at geosynchronous orbit. About 10 min later, ISEE 3 observed (at a distance of approximately 130 RE in the deep tail) magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle signatures consistent with the passage of a plasmoid. After the passage of the plasmoid the satellite enters shortly into a lobelike environment, in which an energetic proton beam is observed. High-resolution magnetic field data are indicative of small-scale structures in the postplasmoid plasma sheet. From the plasma sheet flow speed during the plasmoid's passage it is concluded that the 0300 UT substorm is responsible for its origin. This allows an approximate timing of the plasmoid release at a near-earth neutral line and of the plasma sheet recovery after substorm onset, and it indicates a close relationship between processes in the near-earth plasma sheet and the deep tail during substorms.

  9. Observations of magnetospheric substorms occurring with no apparent solar wind/IMF trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Murphree, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    An outstanding topic in magnetospheric physics is whether substorms are always externally triggered by disturbances in either the interplanetary magnetic field or solar wind, or whether they can also occur solely as the result of an internal magnetospheric instability. Over the past decade, arguments have been made on both sides of this issue. Horwitz and McPherron have shown examples of substorm onsets which they claimed were not externally triggered. However, as pointed out by Lyons, there are several problems associated with these studies that make their results somewhat inconclusive. In particular, in the McPherron et al. study, fluctuations in the B{sub y} component were not considered as possible triggers. Furthermore, Lyons suggests that the sharp decreases in the AL index during intervals of steady IMF/solar wind, are not substorms at all but rather that they are just enhancements of the convection driven DP2 current system that are often observed to occur during steady magnetospheric convection events. In the present study, we utilize a much more comprehensive dataset (consisting of particle data from the Los Alamos energetic particle detectors at geosynchronous orbit, IMP 8 magnetometer and plasma data, Viking UV auroral imager data, mid-latitude Pi2 pulsation data, ground magnetometer data and ISEE1 magnetic field and energetic particle data) to show as unambiguously as possible that typical substorms can indeed occur in the absence of an identifiable trigger in the solar wind/IMF.

  10. Substorm Onset and the Possible Role of O+ IONS Flowing out during Pseudo-Breakup Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fillingim, M. O.; Fu, S.; Cui, Y.; Hong, J.

    2014-12-01

    An isolated substorm onset event that occurred on 14 February 2001 was recorded by the WIC on IMAGE. WIC observed an enhanced electron precipitation region that grew out of a pseudo-breakup auroral spot at the poleward boundary that moved southward and activitated an aurora. An isolated substorm onset was triggered when the pseudo-breakup region connected to the activitated aurora at the lower boundary. This observation is a global scale phenomenon, whose behavior is similar but also different from observations of north-south motion at smaller localized scales that precede the onset of substorms (Nishimura et al., 2010). Fortuitously, Cluster during this pseudo-break auroral activity, detected escape of low energy (20-50 eV) field-aligned O+ ions. The triggered onset was accompanied by the escape of more energetic O+ (80 eV -300 eV) ions. Our observations suggest that the escaping O+ ions during pseudo-breakup auroras may be the seed for the onset of isolated substorms needed in some simulation models (Winglee and Harnett, 2010).

  11. Characterization of the Acinetobacter baumannii growth phase-dependent and serum responsive transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anna C; Sayood, Khalid; Olmsted, Stephen B; Blanchard, Catlyn E; Hinrichs, Steven; Russell, David; Dunman, Paul M

    2012-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a bacterial pathogen of considerable healthcare concern. Yet, little is known about the organism's basic biological processes and the regulatory networks that modulate expression of its virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Using Affymetrix GeneChips , we comprehensively defined and compared the transcriptomes of two A. baumannii strains, ATCC 17978 and 98-37-09, during exponential and stationary phase growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Results revealed that in addition to expected growth phase-associated metabolic changes, several putative virulence factors were dramatically regulated in a growth phase-dependent manner. Because a common feature between the two most severe types of A. baumannii infection, pneumonia and septicemia, includes the organism's dissemination to visceral organs via the circulatory system, microarray studies were expanded to define the expression properties of A. baumannii during growth in human serum. Growth in serum significantly upregulated iron acquisition systems, genes associated with epithelial cell adherence and DNA uptake, as well as numerous putative drug efflux pumps. Antibiotic susceptibility testing verified that the organism exhibits increased antibiotic tolerance when cultured in human serum, as compared to LB medium. Collectively, these studies provide researchers with a comprehensive database of A. baumannii's expression properties in LB medium and serum and identify biological processes that may contribute to the organism's virulence and antibiotic resistance.

  12. Analysis of grain growth in a two-phase gamma titanium aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharaman, V.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1997-04-01

    Microstructure evolution during annealing of a wrought near-gamma titanium aluminide alloy, Ti-45.5Al-2Nb-2Cr (at. pct), in the temperature range 1,200 C to 1,320 C was investigated. The mean grain size of the alpha phase as well as the volume fraction and size of the gamma particles were evaluated as a function of annealing temperature and time. Isothermal annealing at temperatures above the alpha transus, T{sub {alpha}} = 1,300 C, led to rapid grain growth of the alpha phase, the kinetics of which could be described by a simple power-law type expression with a grain growth exponent p = 2.3. Alpha grain growth was significantly retarded during annealing at subtransus temperatures (1,200 C {le} T {le} 1,300 C) by the pinning influence of gamma-phase particles. Limiting grain size values predicted by computer simulation models applicable for high-volume fractions of precipitates/particles were in good agreement with experimental findings. The kinetics of alpha grain growth in the presence of gamma particles were analyzed, and the results showed that a grain growth exponent of p {approx} 2.6 could satisfactorily account for the experimental results.

  13. A new mechanistic growth model for simultaneous determination of lag phase duration and exponential growth rate and a new Belehdradek-type model for evaluating the effect of temperature on growth rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new mechanistic growth model was developed to describe microbial growth under isothermal conditions. The new mathematical model was derived from the basic observation of bacterial growth that may include lag, exponential, and stationary phases. With this model, the lag phase duration and exponen...

  14. Growth phase and elemental stoichiometry of bacterial prey influences ciliate grazing selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Tuorto, Steven; Taghon, Gary L

    2009-01-01

    Protozoa are known to selectively graze bacteria and can differentiate prey based on size and viability, but less is known about the effects of prey cellular composition on predator selectivity. We measured the effect of growth phase and elemental stoichiometry of Escherichia coli on grazing by two ciliates, Euplotes vannus and Cyclidium glaucoma. Bacterial cells of a single strain were transformed with green and red fluorescent protein and harvested from culture at differing growth stages. Cells in exponential growth phase had low carbon:phosphorus (39) and nitrogen:phosphorus (9) ratios, while cells from stationary phase had high carbon:phosphorus of 104 and nitrogen:phosphorus of 26. When offered an equal mixture of both types of bacteria, Cyclidium grazed stationary phase, high carbon:phosphorus, high nitrogen:phosphorus cells to 22% of initial abundance within 135 min, while Euplotes reduced these cells to 33%. Neither ciliate species decreased the abundance of the exponential phase cells, lower carbon:phosphorus and nitrogen:phosphorus, relative to control treatments. Because protozoa have higher nitrogen:phosphorus and carbon:phosphorus ratios than their prokaryotic prey, this study raises the possibility that it may be advantageous for protozoa to preferentially consume more slowly growing bacteria.

  15. Grain growth in U-7Mo alloy: A combined first-principles and phase field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Liang, Linyun; Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, Tom; O'Hare, Edward; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Hofman, Gerard; Anitescu, Mihai

    2016-05-01

    Grain size is an important factor in controlling the swelling behavior in irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuels. Increasing the grain size in U-Mo fuel particles by heat treatment is believed to delay the fuel swelling at high fission density. In this work, a multiscale simulation approach combining first-principles calculation and phase field modeling is used to investigate the grain growth behavior in U-7Mo alloy. The density functional theory based first-principles calculations were used to predict the material properties of U-7Mo alloy. The obtained grain boundary energies were then adopted as an input parameter for mesoscale phase field simulations. The effects of annealing temperature, annealing time and initial grain structures of fuel particles on the grain growth in U-7Mo alloy were examined. The predicted grain growth rate compares well with the empirical correlation derived from experiments.

  16. VISIONS: Combined remote sensing and in situ observations of auroral zone ion outflow during a substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Hecht, J. H.; Lemon, C. L.; Collier, M. R.; Keller, J. W.; Pfaff, R. F.; Klenzing, J.; McLain, J.

    2013-12-01

    The 'first step' in the chain of events that energizes thermal ions from a few tenths of an eV to 10 keV and transports them from the topside ionosphere to high altitudes occurs in the 300-1000 km altitude regime. In this region, various drivers work together to heat and accelerate the ions and push them up the field line. These include Joule heating, soft electron precipitation (driving ambipolar fields), and BBELF and VLF waves. Since the ions need to gain at least several eV to reach the higher altitudes where wave-particle interactions have been observed to form ion conics and beams, the low-altitude region serves as a 'rate limiting step' for the overall process of ion energization and outflow. Major outstanding questions still remain as to the extent and duration of outflow, and the details of the mechanisms that drive it - questions that can only be resolved by studying this critical altitude region. VISIONS (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) was a sounding rocket mission launched Feb 7, 2013, at 0821 UTC from Poker Flat, AK into the expansion phase of an auroral substorm. VISIONS was expressly designed to take advantage of the sounding rocket trajectory (slow motion through the auroral features and vertical profile) and a unique combination of in situ and remote sensing to shed new light on the drivers of low-altitude ion outflow. VISIONS carried five instruments, which together with ground-based instrumentation, measure the relevant parameters for studying ion outflow: 1) a low-energy energetic neutral atom (ENA) imager, MILENA, to remotely sense ion outflow from 50 eV to 3 keV 2) an electrostatic analyzer for electrons from 3 eV - 30 keV 3) an electrostatic analyzer for ions from 1.5 eV - 15 eV 4) a four-channel visible imager (6300, 3914, H-Beta, and 8446) with 90 degree field of view for understanding electron precipitation over a wide area and for comparison with the ENA images 5) a fields and thermal plasma suite that

  17. Characterization of single phase copper selenide nanoparticles and their growth mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patidar, D.; Saxena, N. S.

    2012-03-01

    The high quality Cu3Se2 phase of copper selenide nanoparticles was synthesized through the solution-phase chemical reaction between copper and selenium. In this synthesis process, hydrazine hydrate acts as reducing agent whereas ethylene glycol controls the nucleation and growth of particles. An effort has been made to explain the growth mechanism to form copper selenide nanoparticles through the coordination of selenium to the Cu2+ complexes with OH groups of ethylene glycol. Result indicates the formation of Cu3Se2 single phase nanoparticles. The particles with the average particle size 25 nm are spherical in shape having tetragonal structure. The particles are well crystallized having 94% degree of crystallinity. An effort has also been made to determine the energy band gap of copper selenide nanoparticles through the absorption spectra.

  18. Epitaxial graphene growth and shape dynamics on copper: phase-field modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Meca, Esteban; Lowengrub, John; Kim, Hokwon; Mattevi, Cecilia; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2013-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of graphene on copper foils is a complex process, influenced by thermodynamic, kinetic, and growth parameters, often leading to diverse island shapes including dendrites, squares, stars, hexagons, butterflies, and lobes. Here, we introduce a phase-field model that provides a unified description of these diverse growth morphologies and compare the model results with new experiments. Our model explicitly accounts for the anisotropies in the energies of growing graphene edges, kinetics of attachment of carbon at the edges, and the crystallinity of the underlying copper substrate (through anisotropy in surface diffusion). We show that anisotropic diffusion has a very important, counterintuitive role in the determination of the shape of islands, and we present a "phase diagram" of growth shapes as a function of growth rate for different copper facets. Our results are shown to be in excellent agreement with growth shapes observed for high symmetry facets such as (111) and (001) as well as for high-index surfaces such as (221) and (310).

  19. Zebra pattern in rocks as a function of grain growth affected by second-phase particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel; Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    In this communication we present a simple microdynamic model which can explain the beginning of the zebra pattern formation in rocks. The two dimensional model consists of two main processes, mineral replacement along a reaction front, and grain boundary migration affected by impurities. In the numerical model we assume that an initial distribution of second-phase particles is present due to sedimentary layering. The reaction front percolates the model and redistributes second-phase particles by shifting them until the front is saturated and drops the particles again. This produces and enhances initial layering. Grain growth is hindered in layers with high second-phase particle concentrations whereas layers with low concentrations coarsen. Due to the grain growth activity in layers with low second-phase particle concentrations these impurities are collected at grain boundaries and the crystals become very clean. Therefore the white layers in the pattern contain large grains with low concentration of second-phase particles, whereas the dark layers contain small grains with a large second-phase particle concentration.

  20. Effects of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil on Staphylococcus aureus in biofilms and stationary growth phase.

    PubMed

    Kwieciński, Jakub; Eick, Sigrun; Wójcik, Kinga

    2009-04-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is known for its antimicrobial activity. In this study, we determined whether TTO is effective against Staphylococcus aureus in biofilms and how TTO activity is affected by the S. aureus growth phase. All clinical strains tested were killed by TTO both as planktonic cells and as biofilms. The minimum biofilm eradication concentration was usually two times higher than the minimum bactericidal concentration, yet it was never higher than 1% v/v. The fastest killing of biofilm occurred during the first 15min of contact with TTO and was not influenced by increasing TTO concentration above 1% v/v. Planktonic stationary phase cells exhibited decreased susceptibility to TTO compared with exponential phase cells. The killing rate for stationary phase cells was also less affected by increasing TTO concentration than that for exponential phase cells. These data show that TTO efficiently kills S. aureus in the stationary growth phase and within biofilms and is therefore a promising tool for S. aureus eradication.

  1. Supercritical supersaturations and ultrafast cooling of the growth solution in liquid-phase epitaxy of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, A. V.; Deryagin, N. G.; Tret'yakov, D. N.

    1996-04-01

    A method for accomplishing ultrafast cooling is proposed which makes possible supercritical supersaturations of the growth solution in liquid-phase epitaxy. Growth boat designs providing cooling rates as high as 0268-1242/11/4/025/img1 are considered. The temperatures of contact, 0268-1242/11/4/025/img2, of a GaAs substrate with a Ga-based solution and of a Si substrate with a Sn-based growth solution, calculated for various substrate 0268-1242/11/4/025/img3 and solution temperatures 0268-1242/11/4/025/img4, are in good agreement with experimental values. The maximum attainable supercooling is markedly increased to as high as 0268-1242/11/4/025/img5 for the Ga - As system, when the growth solution is subjected to ultrafast cooling. The prospects of using the method for fabricating heterostructures with a large lattice mismatch are discussed.

  2. Dynamic proteome changes of Shigella flexneri 2a during transition from exponential growth to stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Liu, Xian-Kai; Zhao, Ge; Zhi, Yi-Dan; Bu, Xin; Ying, Tian-Yi; Feng, Er-Ling; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xue-Min; Huang, Pei-Tang; Wang, Heng-Liang

    2007-05-01

    Shigella flexneri is an infectious pathogen that causes dysentery to human, which remains a serious threat to public health, particularly in developing countries. In this study, the global protein expression patterns of S. flexneri during transition from exponential growth to stationary phase in vitro were analyzed by using 2-D PAGE combined with MALDI-TOF MS. In a time-course experiment with five time points, the relative abundance of 49 protein spots varied significantly. Interestingly, a putative outer membrane protein YciD (OmpW) was almost not detected in the exponential growth phase but became one of the most abundant proteins in the whole stationary-phase proteome. Some proteins regulated by the global regulator FNR were also significantly induced (such as AnsB, AspA, FrdAB, and KatG) or repressed (such as AceEF, OmpX, SodA, and SucAB) during the growth phase transition. These proteins may be the key effectors of the bacterial cell cycle or play important roles in the cellular maintenance and stress responses. Our expression profile data provide valuable information for the study of bacterial physiology and form the basis for future proteomic analyses of this pathogen.

  3. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  4. Fitness Impact of Obligate Intranuclear Bacterial Symbionts Depends on Host Growth Phase

    PubMed Central

    Bella, Chiara; Koehler, Lars; Grosser, Katrin; Berendonk, Thomas U.; Petroni, Giulio; Schrallhammer, Martina

    2016-01-01

    According to text book definition, parasites reduce the fitness of their hosts whereas mutualists provide benefits. But biotic and abiotic factors influence symbiotic interactions, thus under certain circumstances parasites can provide benefits and mutualists can harm their host. Here we addressed the question which intrinsic biotic factors shape a symbiosis and are crucial for the outcome of the interaction between the obligate intranuclear bacterium Holospora caryophila (Alphaproteobacteria; Rickettsiales) and its unicellular eukaryotic host Paramecium biaurelia (Alveolata; Ciliophora). The virulence of H. caryophila, i.e., the negative fitness effect on host division and cell number, was determined by growth assays of several P. biaurelia strains. The performances of genetically identical lines either infected with H. caryophila or symbiont-free were compared. Following factors were considered as potentially influencing the outcome of the interaction: (1) host strain, (2) parasite strain, and (3) growth phases of the host. All three factors revealed a strong effect on the symbiosis. In presence of H. caryophila, the Paramecium density in the stationary growth phase decreased. Conversely, a positive effect of the bacteria during the exponential phase was observed for several host × parasite combinations resulting in an increased growth rate of infected P. biaurelia. Furthermore, the fitness impact of the tested endosymbionts on different P. biaurelia lines was not only dependent on one of the two involved strains but distinct for the specific combination. Depending on the current host growth phase, the presence of H. caryophila can be harmful or advantageous for P. biaurelia. Thus, under the tested experimental conditions, the symbionts can switch from the provision of benefits to the exploitation of host resources within the same host population and a time-span of less than 6 days. PMID:28066397

  5. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Growth and Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S; Specht, E

    2005-06-14

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  6. Thermal Soret Diffusion in the Liquid Phase Epitaxial Growth of Binary Iii-V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chung-Ping

    The conditions necessary for stable nucleation and growth in the liquid phase epitaxial growth of GaAs and InP are analytically established and, in the former, experimentally confirmed in this research. A transient thermodynamic transport treatment of supersaturated to undersaturated melts, which includes the coupling between solute and heat transport(thermal Soret diffusion), has been solved in closed form. The thermal Soret diffusion effect has been found to be a very important factor for the stabilization of solute transport. For steady-state LPE growth, the thermal Soret diffusion will give rise to a separation effect that forces the steady -state solute concentration to exceed the equilibrium liquidus concentration at a noninteracting interface. This increased concentration, near the growth interface, can cause localized nonuniformities in the melt which leads to terrace, miniscus -line and/or hillock growth morphologies. When nucleation and growth are initiated at near equilibrium liquidus conditions, at the substrate interface with a temperature gradient, meltback and spontaneous nucleation are minimized. To enhance stable uniform growth, the substrate should be brought into contact with the melt at a very critical time, during melt saturation, when the equilibrium liquidus concentration is reached at the noninteracting interface of the slider. The critical melt saturation time for the transient concentration to reach the liquidus concentration at this interface has been analytically determined and experimentally confirmed. In this analysis, the Soret thermal diffusion coefficient has also been evaluated in terms of the solute and solvent masses and the temperature dependence of the solute diffusion coefficient. The critical time determined in this analysis appears to be in close agreement with the experimental results for LPE GaAs. When near steady-state solute transport is achieved at the initiation of growth on the substrate, i.e., the liquidus solute

  7. Thin-film growth dynamics with shadowing effects by a phase-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvalaglio, Marco; Backofen, Rainer; Voigt, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Shadowing effects during the growth of nano- and microstructures are crucial for the realization of several technological applications. They are given by the shielding of the incoming material flux provided by the growing structures themselves. Their features have been deeply investigated by theoretical approaches, revealing important information to support experimental activities. However, comprehensive investigations able to follow every stage of the growth processes as a whole, particularly useful to design and understand targeted experiments, are still challenging. In this work, we study the thin-film growth dynamics by means of a diffuse interface approach accounting for both deposition with shadowing effects and surface diffusion driven by the minimization of the surface energy. In particular, we introduce the coupling between a phase-field model and the detailed calculation of the incoming material flux at the surface deposited from vacuum or vapor phase in the ballistic regime. This allows us to finely reproduce the realistic morphological evolution during the growth on nonflat substrates, also accounting for different flux distributions. A general assessment of the method, focusing on two-dimensional profiles, is provided thanks to the comparison with a sharp-interface approach for the evolution of the early stages. Then, the long-time-scale dynamics is shown in two and three dimensions, providing a general overview of the features observed during deposition on corrugated surfaces involving flattening, increasing of surface roughness with the growth of columnar structures, and voids formation.

  8. The relation between growth phases, cell volume changes and metabolism of adherent cells during cultivation.

    PubMed

    Rehberg, M; Ritter, J B; Genzel, Y; Flockerzi, D; Reichl, U

    2013-04-15

    In biotechnology, mathematical models often consider changes in cell numbers as well as in metabolite conversion to describe different cell growth phases. It has been frequently observed that the cell number is only a delayed indicator of cell growth compared to the biomass, which challenges the principle structure of corresponding models. Here, we evaluate adherent cell growth phases in terms of cell number and biomass increase on the basis of detailed experimental data of three independent cultivations for Madin Darby canine kidney cells. We develop a model linking cell numbers and mean cell diameters to estimate cell volume changes during growth without the need for diameter distribution measurements. It simultaneously describes the delay between cell number and cell volume increase, cell-specific volume changes and the transition from growth to maintenance metabolism while taking different pre-culture conditions, which affect the cell diameter, into account. In addition, inspection of metabolite uptake and release rates reveals that glucose is mainly used for generation of cellular energy and glutamine is not required for cellular maintenance. Finally, we conclude that changes in cell number, cell diameter and metabolite uptake during cultivation contribute to the understanding of the time course of intracellular metabolites during the cultivation process.

  9. Programmed functionalization of SURMOFs via liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth and post-synthetic modification.

    PubMed

    Tu, Min; Wannapaiboon, Suttipong; Fischer, Roland A

    2013-12-07

    Heterostructured surface mounted metal-organic frameworks (SURMOFs) [Cu2(NH2-bdc)2(dabco)] (B) on top of [Cu2(bdc)2(dabco)] (A) were deposited on pyridyl-terminated Au covered QCM substrate using a step-by-step liquid phase epitaxial growth method. Sequentially, the pore size of the top layer [Cu2(NH2-bdc)2(dabco)] (B) was modified by targeting the installed amino moiety with tert-butyl isothiocyanate (tBITC). The adsorption properties of the programmed functionalized SURMOFs studied using an environment controlled quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) instrument exhibited the possibility to achieve high selectivity and capacity by heteroepitaxial growth and post-synthetic modification.

  10. Liquid phase epitaxy growth of GaAs/GaAlAs multi-quantum well structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cser, J.; Katz, J.; Hwang, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments in liquid phase epitaxial fabrication of thin GaAs/GaAlAs layers over a planar substrates have been carried out. Layer thicknesses smaller than 300 A were routinely obtained, with the best result being 120 A. Interface sharpness between the layers is approximately 10 A, which is comparable to OMCVD results, but the layers' thicknesses are usually not uniform. Of the experimental parameters, the growth time and the cooling rate seem to have the largest effect on the obtained layer thickness, while the growth temperature and the substrate crystallographic orientation produce less noticeable effects. Quantum effects in the grown layers were observed by photoluminescence measurements.

  11. GPU phase-field lattice Boltzmann simulations of growth and motion of a binary alloy dendrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, T.; Rojas, R.; Ohno, M.; Shimokawabe, T.; Aoki, T.

    2015-06-01

    A GPU code has been developed for a phase-field lattice Boltzmann (PFLB) method, which can simulate the dendritic growth with motion of solids in a dilute binary alloy melt. The GPU accelerated PFLB method has been implemented using CUDA C. The equiaxed dendritic growth in a shear flow and settling condition have been simulated by the developed GPU code. It has been confirmed that the PFLB simulations were efficiently accelerated by introducing the GPU computation. The characteristic dendrite morphologies which depend on the melt flow and the motion of the dendrite could also be confirmed by the simulations.

  12. Modeling void growth and movement with phase change in thermal energy storage canisters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darling, Douglas; Namkoong, David; Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1993-01-01

    A scheme was developed to model the thermal hydrodynamic behavior of thermal energy storage salts. The model included buoyancy, surface tension, viscosity, phases change with density difference, and void growth and movement. The energy, momentum, and continuity equations were solved using a finite volume formulation. The momentum equation was divided into two pieces. The void growth and void movement are modeled between the two pieces of the momentum equations. Results showed this scheme was able to predict the behavior of thermal energy storage salts.

  13. Design of gas inlets for the growth of gallium nitride by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulos, C.; Mountziaris, T. J.; Moffat, H. K.; Han, J.

    2000-07-01

    The problem of gas inlet design for metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of group III nitrides from metal alkyls and ammonia is addressed. The focus is on GaN growth from trimethyl-gallium and ammonia. In traditional reactors with well-mixed inlet streams, parasitic gas-phase reactions between the two precursors may lead to the formation of stable adducts that can condense on cool inlet walls, thus reducing the film growth efficiency. Such reactions may also lead to the formation of particulates through gas-phase condensation reactions (e.g. during AlN growth). A fundamentally-based model was developed to describe the MOVPE of GaN and was used to study the effect of inlet design and reactor operating conditions on film thickness uniformity in vertical stagnation-flow and rotating-disk reactors. The model includes a description of gas-phase kinetics and a simple gas-surface reaction mechanism. The kinetic model was coupled to a two-dimensional transport model describing flow, heat and mass transfer in a vertical MOVPE reactor. Predictions of growth rate compare well to experimental observations from a vertical rotating-disk reactor, without any adjustable parameters. The model was also used to study the distribution of gaseous species in the reactor and their role in film growth. Finite element simulations using a massively parallel computer code (MPSalsa) indicate that the species responsible for film growth are Ga-alkyls and not their adducts with ammonia. Sensitivity analysis was also performed to assess the relative importance of each reaction in determining the growth rate. The model was subsequently employed in the design of axisymmetric, multi-aperture gas inlets feeding precursors into the reactor in an alternating (not well-mixed) fashion. Simulations were performed to study the effect of key design parameters, such as inlet velocities, susceptor rotating speed, inlet to susceptor distance as well as the number and distribution of inlets, on GaN film

  14. A multisatellite case study of the expansion of a substorm current wedge in the near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on observations from four satellites (GOES 5, GOES 6, AMPTE CCE, and AMPTE IRM) and two ground stations (San Juan and Tucson) on a substorm that occurred on April 19, 1985 at about 0830 UT. The four spacecraft were arrayed in a configuration that made it possible to separate the effects arising from the longitudinal versus the radial expansion of the substorm current wedge and thus to examine its spatial evolution. The sequence of events that was observed suggests that, during this substorm, the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, the formation of the substorm current wedge, and the expansion of the plasma sheet began in the near-earth region, and subsequently spread tailward as well as longitudinally.

  15. Analytical studies of Gibbs-Thomson effect on the diffusion controlled spherical phase growth in a subcooled medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T.; Chen, Y.-Z.

    2003-09-01

    By using a small-time series expansion technique, the thermal effect of surface tension (Gibbs-Thomson effect) on the early-stage phase growth of a spherical nucleus immersed in an infinite subcooled liquid is studied in this paper. The result shows that surface tension greatly reduces the incipient growth rate of the solid nucleus. Critical value of surface tension is found beyond which the decreasing of the phase growth rate with time becomes non-monotonic. Analytical expression for the phase growth rate in terms of relevant physical parameters is also derived under the condition of small degree of undercooling.

  16. [Effect of microwaves on Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture in the stationary phase of growth].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, O O; Berezovskaia, M A; Datsenko, A I

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the microwave radiation on the culture of Chlamydomonas actinochloris green flagellar alga in the stationary phase of growth are studied. After exposure to radiation at the maximum dose of 125 J/g, the cell functional state worsened but all the studied parameters were restored in 20 days and in the long run found to be even better than the control indices. The data are compared with the similar ones obtained earlier for the lag phase culture. The studied sample is found to be more resistant to the irradiation than the previous one.

  17. Initial signatures of magnetic field and energetic particle fluxes at tail reconfiguration - Explosive growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Takahashi, K.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.; Mcentire, R. W.; Iijima, T.

    1992-01-01

    The initial signatures of tail field reconfiguration observed in the near-earth magnetotail are examined using data obtained by the AMPTE/CCE magnetometer and the Medium Energy Particle Analyzer. It is found that the tail reconfiguration events could be classified as belonging to two types, Type I and Type II. In Type I events, a current disruption is immersed in a hot plasma region expanding from inward (earthward/equatorward) of the spacecraft; consequently, the spacecraft is immersed in a hot plasma region expanding from inward. The Type II reconfiguration event is characterized by a distinctive interval (explosive growth phase) just prior to the local commencement of tail phase.

  18. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail during Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Our studies elucidated the relationship between the auroral arcs and magnetotail phenomena. One paper examined particle energization in the source region of the field-aligned currents that intensify at substorm onset when the arc brightens to form the westward electrojet. A second paper examined the relationship between the precipitating particles in the arcs, the location of the westward electrojet, and magnetospheric source regions. Two earlier papers also investigated the roles that field aligned currents and particle acceleration have during substorms.

  19. Spectroscopically characterized cadmium sulfide quantum dots lengthening the lag phase of Escherichia coli growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiganesh, T.; Daisy Vimala Rani, J.; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2012-06-01

    The present study reports the effect of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots on the life cycle of Escherichia coli. CdS quantum dots were synthesized by pH sensitive organochemical route using cadmium chloride and sodium sulfide as precursors and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as capping agent. It is observed that varying concentration of MPA leads to the production of different sized quantum dots with inverse proportionality and increment in the fluorescence quantum yield. The investigation also shows that CdS quantum dots have no antibacterial activity except it delays the log phase growth of bacteria in terms of size of the particles. The largest synthesized particles significantly elongate the lag phase growth.

  20. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior at Notched Hole in 7075-T6 Under Biaxial and Uniaxial Fatigue with Different Phases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES...CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES THESIS...UNLIMITED AFIT-ENY-MS-15-S-065 CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH

  1. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalsvik, Y.; Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations) is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard - Scandinavia - Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0-4.5 mV m-1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP), Φ (Boyle) = 115 kV) during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME), choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz < 0; By < 0). The combination of continuous monitoring of ground magnetic deflections and the F13 cross-track ion drift observations in the polar cap allows us to infer the temporal CPCP structure on time scales less than the ~10 min duration of F13 polar cap transits. We arrived at the following estimates of the dayside and nightside contributions to the CPCP (CPCP = CPCP/day + CPCP/night) under two intervals of substorm activity: CPCP/day ~110 kV; CPCP/night ~50 kV (45% CPCP increase during substorms). The temporal CPCP structure during one of the substorm cases resulted in a dawn-dusk convection asymmetry measured by DMSP F13 which

  2. Long-term variations in the plasma sheet ion composition and substorm occurrence over 23 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosé, Masahito

    2016-12-01

    The Geotail satellite has been operating for almost two solar cycles (~23 years) since its launch in July 1992. The satellite carries the energetic particle and ion composition (EPIC) instrument that measures the energetic ion flux (9.4-212 keV/e) and enables the investigation of long-term variations of the ion composition in the plasma sheet for solar cycles 22-24. From the statistical analysis of the EPIC data, we find that (1) the plasma ion mass ( M) is approximately 1.1 amu during the solar minimum, whereas it increases to 1.5-2.7 amu during the solar maximum; (2) the increases in M seem to have two components: a raising of the baseline levels (~1.5 amu) and a large transient enhancement (~1.8-2.7 amu); (3) the baseline level change of M correlates well with the Mg II index, which is a good proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or far ultraviolet (FUV) irradiance; and (4) the large transient enhancement of M is caused by strong magnetic storms. We also study the long-term variations of substorm occurrences in 1992-2015 that are evaluated with the number of Pi2 pulsations detected at the Kakioka observatory. The results suggest no clear correlation between the substorm occurrence and the Mg II index. Instead, when the substorms are classified into externally triggered events and non-triggered events, the number of the non-triggered events and the Mg II index are negatively correlated. We interpret these results that the increase in the solar EUV/FUV radiation enhances the supply of ionospheric ions (He+ and O+ ions) into the plasma sheet to increase M, and the large M may suppress spontaneous plasma instabilities initiating substorms and decrease the number of the non-triggered substorms. The present analysis using the unprecedentedly long-term dataset covering ~23 years provides additional observational evidence that heavy ions work to prevent the occurrence of substorms.

  3. What Might We Learn About Magnetospheric Substorms at the Earth from the MESSENGER Measurements at Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Satellite observations at the Earth, supported by theory and modeling, have established a close connection between the episodes of intense magnetospheric convection termed substorms and the occurrence of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause results in strong energy input to the magnetosphere. This energy can either be stored or used immediately to power the magnetospheric convection that produces the phenomena that collectively define the 'substorm.' However, many aspects of magnetic reconnection and the dynamic response of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere system at the Earth during substorms remain poorly understood. For example, the rate of magnetic reconnection is thought to be proportional to the local Alfven speed, but the limited range of changes in this solar wind parameter at 1 AU have made it difficult to detect its influence over energy input to the Earth's magnetosphere. In addition, the electrical conductance of the ionosphere and how it changes in response to auroral charged particle precipitation are hypothesized to play a critical role in the development of substorms, but the nature of this electrodynamic interaction remain difficult to deduce from Earth observations alone. The amount of energy the terrestrial magnetosphere can store in its tail, the duration of the storage, and the trigger(s) for its dissipation are all thought to be determined by not only the microphysics of the cross-tail current layer, but also the properties of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system. Again, the separation of microphysics effects from system response has proved very difficult using measurements taken only at the Earth. If MESSENGER'S charged particle and magnetic field measurements confirm the occurrence of terrestrial-style substorms in Mercury's miniature magnetosphere, then it may be possible to determine how magnetospheric convection, field-aligned currents, charged particle acceleration

  4. An integrated model for predictive microbiology and simultaneous determination of lag phase duration and exponential growth rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new mechanistic growth model was developed to describe microbial growth under isothermal conditions. The development of the mathematical model was based on the fundamental phenomenon of microbial growth, which is normally a three-stage process that includes lag, exponential, and stationary phases...

  5. Growth phase-dependent effect of clindamycin on production of exoproteins by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Jun; Hasegawa, Tadao; Kamimura, Takuya; Okamoto, Akira; Ohmori, Daisuke; Nosaka, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Keiko; Torii, Keizo; Ohta, Michio

    2007-02-01

    The administration of high-dose clindamycin plus benzylpenicillin has been recommended for the treatment of streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, and clindamycin has been found to be more effective than beta-lactams in retrospective analyses of human cases. Although therapeutic doses of clindamycin have also been shown to be effective against experimental infections and clindamycin has great efficacy against the production of bacterial exoproteins, we recently reported that the level of production of some exoproteins was unchanged or even increased by a subinhibitory dose of clindamycin when it is added upon the initiation of bacterial culture and the treated cultures were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In this study we further examined the effect of clindamycin on the production of exoproteins by adding it to Streptococcus pyogenes cultures during various growth phases. We found that the levels of production of some proteins, NAD+ glycohydrolase, streptolysin O, and streptococcal inhibitor of complement, were increased when clindamycin was added at early-log-phase growth, which was the result that was seen when clindamycin was added at the beginning of culture. However, clindamycin inhibited the production of most types of proteins when it was administered to Streptococcus pyogenes cultures at mid-log-phase growth. In csrS- or mga-knockout bacterial strains, the increase in exoproteins seen in parental strains was considerably inhibited. Our study indicates that the in vitro effect of clindamycin on the production of exoproteins greatly depends on the growth phase of bacteria and some regulatory factors of Streptococcus pyogenes that are involved in this phenomenon.

  6. Abnormal grain growth in Eurofer-97 steel in the ferrite phase field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V. B.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Raabe, D.

    2017-03-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) Eurofer-97 steel is a candidate material for structural applications in future fusion reactors. Depending on the amount of prior cold rolling strain and annealing temperature, important solid-state softening reactions such as recovery, recrystallization, and grain growth occur. Eurofer-97 steel was cold rolled up to 70, 80 and 90% reductions in thickness and annealed in the ferrite phase field (below ≈ 800 °C). Changes in microstructure, micro-, and mesotexture were followed by orientation mappings provided by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Eurofer-97 steel undergoes abnormal grain growth above 650 °C and this solid-state reaction seems to be closely related to the high mobility of a few special grain boundaries that overcome pinning effects caused by fine particles. This solid-state reaction promotes important changes in the microstructure and microtexture of this steel. Abnormal grain growth kinetics for each condition was determined by means of quantitative metallography.

  7. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  8. Transcriptional Characterization of Salmonella TAl00 in Growth and Stationary Phase: Mutagenesis of MX in Both Types of Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay can be performed using cells that are in different growth phases. Thus, the plate-incorporation assay involves plating stationary-phase cells with the mutagen, after which the cells undergo a brief lag phase and, consequently, are exposed ...

  9. Role of growth phase and ethanol in freeze-thaw stress resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J G; Learmonth, R P; Watson, K

    1993-04-01

    The freeze-thaw tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined throughout growth in aerobic batch culture. Minimum tolerance to rapid freezing (immersion in liquid nitrogen; cooling rate, approximately 200 degrees C min-1) was associated with respirofermentative (exponential) growth on glucose. However, maximum tolerance occurred not during the stationary phase but during active respiratory growth on ethanol accumulated during respirofermentative growth on glucose. The peak in tolerance occurred several hours after entry into the respiratory growth phase and did not correspond to a transient accumulation of trehalose which occurred at the point of glucose exhaustion. Substitution of ethanol with other carbon sources which permit high levels of respiration (acetate and galactose) also induced high freeze-thaw tolerance, and the peak did not occur in cells shifted directly from fermentative growth to starvation conditions or in two respiratorily incompetent mutants. These results imply a direct link with respiration, rather than exhaustion of glucose. The role of ethanol as a cryoprotectant per se was also investigated, and under conditions of rapid freezing (cooling rate, approximately 200 degrees C min-1), ethanol demonstrated a significant cryoprotective effect. Under the same freezing conditions, glycerol had little effect at high concentrations and acted as a cryosensitizer at low concentrations. Conversely, under slow-freezing conditions (step freezing at -20, -70, and then -196 degrees C; initial cooling rate, approximately 3 degrees C min-1), glycerol acted as a cryoprotectant while ethanol lost this ability. Ethanol may thus have two effects on the cryotolerance of baker's yeast, as a respirable carbon source and as a cryoprotectant under rapid-freezing conditions.

  10. Measurement of crystal growth velocity in a melt-quenched phase-change material

    PubMed Central

    Salinga, Martin; Carria, Egidio; Kaldenbach, Andreas; Bornhöfft, Manuel; Benke, Julia; Mayer, Joachim; Wuttig, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Phase-change materials are the basis for next-generation memory devices and reconfigurable electronics, but fundamental understanding of the unconventional kinetics of their phase transitions has been hindered by challenges in the experimental quantification. Here we obtain deeper understanding based on the temperature dependence of the crystal growth velocity of the phase-change material AgInSbTe, as derived from laser-based time-resolved reflectivity measurements. We observe a strict Arrhenius behaviour for the growth velocity over eight orders of magnitude (from ~10 nm s−1 to ~1 m s−1). This can be attributed to the formation of a glass at elevated temperatures because of rapid quenching of the melt. Further, the temperature dependence of the viscosity is derived, which reveals that the supercooled liquid phase must have an extremely high fragility (>100). Finally, the new experimental evidence leads to an interpretation, which comprehensively explains existing data from various different experiments reported in literature. PMID:23986035

  11. Minimization of diauxic growth lag-phase for high-efficiency biogas production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Sang Hun

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a minimization method of a diauxic growth lag-phase for the biogas production from agricultural by-products (ABPs). Specifically, the effects of proximate composition on the biogas production and degradation rates of the ABPs were investigated, and a new method based on proximate composition combinations was developed to minimize the diauxic growth lag-phase. Experiments were performed using biogas potential tests at a substrate loading of 2.5 g VS/L and feed to microorganism ratio (F/M) of 0.5 under the mesophilic condition. The ABPs were classified based on proximate composition (carbohydrate, protein, and fat etc.). The biogas production patterns, lag phase, and times taken for 90% biogas production (T90) were used for the evaluation of the biogas production with biochemical methane potential (BMP) test. The high- or medium-carbohydrate and low-fat ABPs (cheese whey, cabbage, and skim milk) showed a single step digestion process and low-carbohydrate and high-fat ABPs (bean curd and perilla seed) showed a two-step digestion process. The mixture of high-fat ABPs and high-carbohydrate ABPs reduced the lag-phase and increased the biogas yield more than that from single ABP by 35-46%.

  12. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-03-01

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities.

  13. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-03-09

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities.

  14. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-01-01

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities. PMID:25748825

  15. Effect of ion irradiation on the interdiffusion growth of aluminide phases in Ti Al diffusion couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romankov, S. E.; Mamaeva, A.; Vdovichenko, E.; Ermakov, E.

    2005-08-01

    During annealing on the Ti surface coated by the Al film, different aluminide phases were formed as the result of reactions between Ti and Al. Preliminary irradiation of the Al film with the thickness of 7 μm by Ti + ions had a strong effect on the interdiffusion growth of aluminide phases on the Ti substrate. Preliminary ion irradiation resulted in the development of more homogeneous and fine-grain microstructure during subsequent annealing. During ion irradiation of the two-phase (TiAl + Ti 3Al) overlayer the decomposition of the TiAl compound and the formation of Ti 3Al happened. In the processing of subsequent annealing, diffusion cementation of the overlayer occurred faster on the surface of the irradiated samples. After irradiation by different ions (Ti + and Al +), and during subsequent annealing the kinetics of structural formation developed in a different way.

  16. Separation of nuclei representing different phases of the growth cycle from unsynchronized mammalian cell cultures.

    PubMed

    McBride, O W; Peterson, E A

    1970-10-01

    Nuclei have been isolated from unsynchronized cultures of Chinese hamster fibroblasts after varying intervals of growth following the incorporation of thymidine (-3)H for 20 min. These nuclei were fractionated by unit gravity sedimentation in a stabilizing density gradient of sucrose, and fractions were analyzed for the concentration of nuclei, DNA, and radioactivity. A more rapidly sedimenting population of nuclei in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle was separated from a group of nuclei in the G(1) phase, and nuclei in progressive stages of DNA synthesis (S phase) were distributed between these two regions. The fractionation of intact cells by sedimentation according to their position in the cell cycle was found to be less satisfactory than the corresponding separation of nuclei. This probably results from the continuous accumulation of mass within individual cells throughout the entire cell cycle, whereas most of the mass of a nucleus is replicated during a relatively narrow interval of the total cell cycle.

  17. OMVPE growth and gas-phase reactions of AlGaN for UV emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Figiel, J.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Banas, M.A.; Bartram, M.E.; Biefeld, R.M.; Song, Y.K.; Nurmikko, A.V.

    1998-06-01

    Gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH3, are investigated by monitoring of the growth rate/incorporation efficiency of GaN and AlN using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is suggested that gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) reactions not only reduce the incorporation efficiency of TMA but also affect the incorporation behavior of TMGa. The observed phenomena can be explained by either a synergistic gas-phase scavenging effect or a surface site-blocking effect. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 354 nm (FWHM {approximately} 6 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  18. Robust growth of avirulent phase II Coxiella burnetii in bone marrow-derived murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Diane C.; Long, Carrie M.; Robertson, Shelly J.; Shannon, Jeffrey G.; Miller, Heather E.; Myers, Lara; Larson, Charles L.; Starr, Tregei; Beare, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Published data show that murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) restrict growth of avirulent phase II, but not virulent phase I, Coxiella burnetii. Growth restriction of phase II bacteria is thought to result from potentiated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which leads to production of inhibitory effector molecules. Past studies have used conditioned medium from L-929 murine fibroblasts as a source of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to promote differentiation of bone marrow-derived myeloid precursors into macrophages. However, uncharacterized components of conditioned medium, such as variable amounts of type I interferons, can affect macrophage activation status and their permissiveness for infection. In the current study, we show that the C. burnetii Nine Mile phase II (NMII) strain grows robustly in primary macrophages from C57BL/6J mice when bone marrow cells are differentiated with recombinant murine M-CSF (rmM-CSF). Bacteria were readily internalized by BMDM, and replicated within degradative, LAMP1-positive vacuoles to achieve roughly 3 logs of growth over 6 days. Uninfected BMDM did not appreciably express CD38 or Egr2, markers of classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, respectively, nor did infection change the lack of polarization. In accordance with an M0 phenotype, infected BMDM produced moderate amounts of TNF and nitric oxide. Similar NMII growth results were obtained using C57BL/6J myeloid progenitors immortalized with an estrogen-regulated Hoxb8 (ER-Hoxb8) oncogene. To demonstrate the utility of the ER-Hoxb8 system, myeloid progenitors from natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1) C57BL/6J knock-in mice were transduced with ER-Hoxb8, and macrophages were derived from immortalized progenitors using rmM-CSF and infected with NMII. No difference in growth was observed when compared to macrophages from wild type mice, indicating depletion of metal ions by the Nramp1

  19. A statistical study of magnetic field magnitude changes during substorms in the near earth tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Using AMPTE/CCE data taken in 1985 and 1986 when the CCE apogee (8.8 earth radii) was within 4.5 hours of midnight, 167 injection events in the near-earth magnetotail have been cataloged. These events are exactly or nearly dispersionless on a 72-sec time scale from 25 keV to 285 keV. The changes in the field magnitude are found to be consistent with the expected effects of the diversion/disruption of the cross-tail current during a substorm, and the latitudinal position of the current sheet is highly variable within the orbit of CCE. The local time variation of the magnetic-field changes implies that the substorm current wedge is composed of longitudinally broad Birkeland currents.

  20. Substorm variations in the magnitude of the magnetic field - AMPTE/CCE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Sibeck, D. G.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Takahashi, K.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Using energetic-particle data taken in the near-earth tail by the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) satellite, 167 ion injection events, that were essentially dispersionless over a 25-285 keV energy range, were identified, and the variations in the total magnetic field strength over the course of these events were examined in order to determine the dependence of the magnetic field strength on dipole latitude. Results indicate that, during periods of substorm activity, the latitudinal position of the current sheet varied significantly within the 32-deg wedge centered on the dipole equator traversed by CCE. Results also suggest that, even in the near-earth magnetotail out to 8.8 R(E) (CCE apogee), the local field measurements are a better guide to the determination of satellite's position relative to the current shield during a substorm, than is the magnetic latitude.

  1. An ISEE 3 study of average and substorm conditions in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Both average and substorm conditions in the distant magnetotail were investigated using ISEE 3 magnetic field and plasma observations. The diameter of the tail, the strength of the lobe magnetic fields, and their dependence on downstream distance were all found to agree well with the flaring tail models of magnetopause geometry and pressure balance. The gradual filling of the lobes by mantle plasma reported in previous ISEE 3 studies were further investigated, and the results were found to be in qualitative agreement with leaky magnetopause model of Pilipp and Morfill (1978). The variations of plasma parameters with X + or -Y, and AE in the plasma sheet were examined. At all distances, the greatest tailward flow speeds were found to be directly proportional to the embedded southward B(z). THe magnitudes of tailward V(x) and southward B(z) are directly proportional to the level of substorm activity near the earth as measured by the AE index.

  2. Evidence for the tailward retreat of a magnetic neutral line in the magnetotail during substorm recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Hones, E. W.; Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma sheet observations made during a substorm recovery at 0400 to 0430 UT on March 1, 1978 with the ISEE satellites strongly suggest that the observed field-aligned flow of plasma in the earthward direction has mirrored in the vicinity of the earth and returned to the position of the satellites to produce the tailward flow seen at this time. The correlation between the estimated speeds of the earthward and tailward moving distribution indicates that the observed changes in velocity are spatial rather than temporal. It is concluded that the movement of the plasma sheet surface results from the propagation of an energetic particle source on to new magnetic field lines which progressively map deeper into the tail and also to higher polar latitudes at the earth. The movement of the source onto new magnetic field lines is clearly consistent with the tailward retreat of a magnetic neutral line in the plasma sheet during substorm recovery.

  3. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth

  4. Magnetic local time, substorm, and particle precipitation-related variations in the behaviour of SuperDARN Doppler spectral widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, M.; Chisham, G.; Pinnock, M.; Dyson, P.; Devlin, J.

    2004-12-01

    Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (DARN) radars often detect a distinct transition in line-of-sight Doppler velocity spread, or spectral width, from <50ms-1 at lower latitude to >200ms-1 at higher latitude. They also detect a similar boundary, namely the range at which ionospheric scatter with large spectral width suddenly commences (i.e. without preceding scatter with low spectral width). The location and behaviour of the spectral width boundary (SWB) (and scatter boundary) and the open-closed magnetic field line boundary (OCB) are thought to be closely related. The location of the nightside OCB can be inferred from the poleward edge of the auroral oval determined using energy spectra of precipitating particles measured on board Defence Meteorology Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. Observations made with the Halley SuperDARN radar (75.5° S, 26.6° W, geographic; -62.0°Λ) and the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) (43.4° S, 147.2° E; -54.5°Λ) are used to compare the location of the SWB with the DMSP-inferred OCB during 08:00 to 22:00 UT on 1 April 2000. This study interval was chosen because it includes several moderate substorms, whilst the Halley radar provided almost continuous high-time resolution measurements of the dayside SWB location and shape, and TIGER provided the same in the nightside ionosphere. The behaviour of the day- and nightside SWB can be understood in terms of the expanding/contracting polar cap model of high-latitude convection change, and the behaviour of the nightside SWB can also be organised according to substorm phase. Previous comparisons with DMSP OCBs have proven that the radar SWB is often a reasonable proxy for the OCB from dusk to just past midnight (Chisham et al., 2004). However, the present case study actually suggests that the nightside SWB is often a better proxy for the poleward edge of Pedersen conductance enhanced by hot particle precipitation in the auroral zone. Simple modeling implies that

  5. Solid-phase diffusion mechanism for GaAs nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ann I.; Larsson, Magnus W.; Stenström, Stig; Ohlsson, B. Jonas; Samuelson, Lars; Wallenberg, L. Reine

    2004-10-01

    Controllable production of nanometre-sized structures is an important field of research, and synthesis of one-dimensional objects, such as nanowires, is a rapidly expanding area with numerous applications, for example, in electronics, photonics, biology and medicine. Nanoscale electronic devices created inside nanowires, such as p-n junctions, were reported ten years ago. More recently, hetero-structure devices with clear quantum-mechanical behaviour have been reported, for example the double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode and the single-electron transistor. The generally accepted theory of semiconductor nanowire growth is the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism, based on growth from a liquid metal seed particle. In this letter we suggest the existence of a growth regime quite different from VLS. We show that this new growth regime is based on a solid-phase diffusion mechanism of a single component through a gold seed particle, as shown by in situ heating experiments of GaAs nanowires in a transmission electron microscope, and supported by highly resolved chemical analysis and finite element calculations of the mass transport and composition profiles.

  6. Growth factor and protease expression during different phases of healing after rabbit deep flexor tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Berglund, M E; Hart, D A; Reno, C; Wiig, M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to contribute to the mapping of molecular events during flexor tendon healing, in particular the growth factors insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-13) and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3, and the protease cathepsin K. In a rabbit model of flexor tendon injury, the mRNA expression for the growth factors, MMPs and TIMPs were measured in tendon and tendon sheath tissue at several time points (3, 6, 21, and 42 days) representing different phases of the healing process. We found that MMP-13 remained increased during the study period, whereas MMP-3 returned to normal levels within the first week after injury. TIMP-3 was down-regulated in the tendon sheaths. Cathepsin K was up-regulated in tendons and sheaths after injury. NGF was present in both tendons and sheaths, but unaltered. IGF-1 exhibited a late increase in the tendons, while VEGF was down-regulated at the later time points. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of NGF in flexor tendons. MMP-13 expression appears to play a more protracted role in flexor tendon healing than MMP-3. The relatively low levels of endogenous IGF-1 and VEGF mRNA following injury support their potential beneficial role as exogenous modulators to optimize tendon healing and strength without increasing adhesion formation.

  7. Heterogeneous growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases at the (101¯4) calcite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Man; Ilton, Eugene S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of surface precipitates to form heteroepitaxially is an important factor that controls the extent of heterogeneous growth. In this work, the growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases on (10-14) calcite surfaces is compared for a range of initial saturation states with respect to otavite (CdCO3) and sphaerocobaltite (CoCO3), two isostructural metal carbonates that exhibit different lattice misfits with respect to calcite. Calcite single crystals were reacted in static conditions for 16 hours with CdCl2 and CoCl2 aqueous solutions with initial concentrations 0.3 ≤ [Cd2+]0 ≤ 100 μM and 25 ≤ [Co2+]0 ≤ 200 μM. The reacted crystals were imaged in situ with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed ex situ with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images of Cd-reacted crystals showed the formation of large islands elongated along the direction, clear evidence of heteroepitaxial growth, whereas surface precipitates on Co-reacted crystals were small round islands. Deformation of calcite etch pits in both cases indicated the incorporation of Cd and Co at step edges. XPS analysis pointed to the formation of a Cd-rich (Ca,Cd)CO3 solid solution coating atop the calcite substrate. In contrast, XPS measurements of the Co-reacted crystals provided evidence for the formation of a mixed hydroxy-carbonate cobalt phase. The combined AFM and XPS results suggest that the lattice misfit between CoCO3 and CaCO3 ( 15% based on surface areas) is too large to allow for heteroepitaxial growth of a pure cobalt carbonate phase on calcite surfaces in aqueous solutions and at ambient conditions. The use of the satellite structure of the Co 2p3/2 photoelectron line as a tool for determining the nature of cobalt surface precipitates is also discussed.

  8. Dependence of poleward auroral and equatorward motion on substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T. S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pu, Z.; Yao, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connors, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Flux pileup from fast flows and dipolarization, physical processes in the magnetotail, cause auroral evolution (brightening, poleward expansion, and equatorward motion) in the ionosphere during substorms. Although such flows have been shown to produce auroral brightening, the causes of auroral poleward expansion and equatorward motion remain unclear. Two mechanisms, tailward movement of the pileup region and dipolarization of the substorm current wedge (SCW), are thought to contribute to auroral poleward expansion, but no study has addressed which mechanism makes the dominant contribution. The hypothesis that auroral poleward expansion is caused by the tailward-moving pileup region is based on the assumption of a steady magnetosphere. This assumption is not necessarily true during substorms, however, because dipolarization of the SCW changes magnetospheric configuration and thus ionospheric footprints (and mapping) of the flows. Because they lack a dynamic SCW, previous magnetospheric models are statistical and static. We evaluated the dynamic effect of the SCW using a dynamic magnetospheric model in which the SCW is superimposed on Tsyganenko model. The current wedge is obtained from a recently developed inversion model using only ground magnetic field data as input, and model parameters are updated every minute. Applying our dynamic magnetospheric model to data from an isolated substorm observed by THEMIS and GOES 10 spacecraft and ground ASIs on 13 February 2008, we found that 1) our model predicts dipolarization at GOES 10 (it can predict near-Earth magnetic variations with ground data alone); 2) there is a good temporal correlation between successive auroral brightenings and flows; 3) flow footprints from our model are collocated with auroral poleward expansion and equatorward motion. These results suggest that in this event, auroral poleward expansion and equatorward motion are mainly caused by mapping changes in the dynamic magnetosphere by the SCW.

  9. On the Dynamics of the Auroral Ionosphere during the Breakup of a Substorm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    using preliminary ground- based observations (Hughes and Rostoker, 1979; Rostoker and Hughes, 1979; Tighe and Rostoker, 1981). A comprehensive static ...comprehensive static model of the westward starting near local midnight during the substorm electrodynamic structure within the surge. Kan et al...measured by the DMSP satellite F-6. sure on the poleward surge boundary. Using static conduc- In this example we see evidence for multiple surge

  10. In situ spatiotemporal measurements of the detailed azimuthal substructure of the substorm current wedge

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, C; Fazakerley, A N; Rae, I J; J Watt, C E; Murphy, K; Wild, J A; Karlsson, T; Mutel, R; Owen, C J; Ergun, R; Masson, A; Berthomier, M; Donovan, E; Frey, H U; Matzka, J; Stolle, C; Zhang, Y

    2014-01-01

    The substorm current wedge (SCW) is a fundamental component of geomagnetic substorms. Models tend to describe the SCW as a simple line current flowing into the ionosphere toward dawn and out of the ionosphere toward dusk, linked by a westward electrojet. We use multispacecraft observations from perigee passes of the Cluster 1 and 4 spacecraft during a substorm on 15 January 2010, in conjunction with ground-based observations, to examine the spatial structuring and temporal variability of the SCW. At this time, the spacecraft traveled east-west azimuthally above the auroral region. We show that the SCW has significant azimuthal substructure on scales of 100 km at altitudes of 4000–7000 km. We identify 26 individual current sheets in the Cluster 4 data and 34 individual current sheets in the Cluster 1 data, with Cluster 1 passing through the SCW 120–240 s after Cluster 4 at 1300–2000 km higher altitude. Both spacecraft observed large-scale regions of net upward and downward field-aligned current, consistent with the large-scale characteristics of the SCW, although sheets of oppositely directed currents were observed within both regions. We show that the majority of these current sheets were closely aligned to a north-south direction, in contrast to the expected east-west orientation of the preonset aurora. Comparing our results with observations of the field-aligned current associated with bursty bulk flows (BBFs), we conclude that significant questions remain for the explanation of SCW structuring by BBF-driven “wedgelets.” Our results therefore represent constraints on future modeling and theoretical frameworks on the generation of the SCW. Key Points The substorm current wedge (SCW) has significant azimuthal structure Current sheets within the SCW are north-south aligned The substructure of the SCW raises questions for the proposed wedgelet scenario PMID:26167439

  11. Dynamical effects of substorms in the middle and lower latitude ionosphere. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Xiaoqing

    1995-01-01

    The Earth`s ionosphere, a region of the the upper atmosphere spanning altitudes from approximately 100 to 1000 km, contains a complex pattern of electron densities produced by solar emissions, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical processes. In this dissertation, a plasma disturbance effect is identified in long-term observations, characterized statistically, and analyzed using numerical modeling. Results drawn from the model are subjected to verification using a dedicated observational campaign. The distinctive feature treated is a pattern of diurnal double maxima (DDM) in total electron content (TEC) observations. The observed DDM events have a clear relationship with geomagnetic disturbances known as substorms. A time-dependent ionospheric model is used to simulate observed DDM events over a latitudinal range of +/- 38 deg. (dip latitude), and in two longitude sectors (75 deg. W and 7 deg. E). Modeling results show that TEC DDM patterns can be created by a combined effect of ionospheric F region plasma vertical drifts and highly altitude-dependent chemical loss mechanisms. Modeling studies explore two possible substorm-related dynamical sources for these perturbation: magnetospheric electric field penetration and overshielding effects, or traveling disturbances in the neutral atmosphere. Local time, latitudinal, and longitudinal characteristics of these dynamical perturbations are investigated in order to define global-scale signatures of the ionosphere`s response to substorms. An observational campaign was formulated and conducted to verify model predictions. The techniques included: magnetometer in the auroral zone for indications of substorm activity; incoherent scatter radars, from high to low latitudes near 75 deg. W longitude, to measure ionospheric electron densities, plasma drifts and meridional neutral winds; and all sky CCD cameras and a Fabry-Perot interferometer for 6300 A airglow and neutral winds at a sub-auroral site.

  12. Intensification of β-poly(L: -malic acid) production by Aureobasidium pullulans ipe-1 in the late exponential growth phase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weifeng; Luo, Jianquan; Zhao, Juan; Qiao, Changsheng; Ding, Luhui; Qi, Benkun; Su, Yi; Wan, Yinhua

    2012-07-01

    β-Poly(malic acid) (PMLA) has attracted industrial interest because this polyester can be used as a prodrug or for drug delivery systems. In PMLA production by Aureobasidium pullulans ipe-1, it was found that PLMA production was associated with cell growth in the early exponential growth phase and dissociated from cell growth in the late exponential growth phase. To enhance PMLA production in the late phase, different fermentation modes and strategies for controlling culture redox potential (CRP) were studied. The results showed that high concentrations of produced PMLA (above 40 g/l) not only inhibited PMLA production, but also was detrimental to cell growth. Moreover, when CRP increased from 57 to 100 mV in the late exponential growth phase, the lack of reducing power in the broth also decreased PMLA productivity. PMLA productivity could be enhanced by repeated-batch culture to maintain cell growth in the exponential growth phase, or by cell-recycle culture with membrane to remove the produced PMLA, or by maintaining CRP below 70 mV no matter which kind of fermentation mode was adopted. Repeated-batch culture afforded a high PMLA concentration (up to 63.2 g/l) with a productivity of 1.15 g l(-1) h(-1). Cell-recycle culture also confirmed that PMLA production by the strain ipe-1 was associated with cell growth.

  13. Effect of Nb on the Growth Behavior of Co3Sn2 Phase in Undercooled Co-Sn Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jilong; Xu, Wanqiang; Wei, Xiuxun; Ferry, Michael; Li, Jinfu

    2016-12-01

    The growth behavior of the primary β-Co3Sn2 phase in (Co67Sn33)100- x Nb x ( x = 0, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0) hypereutectic alloys at different melt undercoolings was investigated systematically. The growth pattern of the β-Co3Sn2 phase at low undercooling changes with the Nb content from fractal seaweed ( x = 0, 0.5) into dendrite ( x = 0.8) and then returns to fractal seaweed ( x = 1.0) as a response to the changes in interface energy anisotropy and interface kinetic anisotropy. As undercooling increases, the dendritic growth of the β-Co3Sn2 phase in (Co67Sn33)99.2Nb0.8 alloy gives way to fractal seaweed growth at an undercooling of 32 K (-241 °C). At larger undercooling, the fractal seaweed growth is further replaced by compact seaweed growth, which occurred in the other three alloys investigated. The growth velocity of the β-Co3Sn2 phase slightly increases at low and intermediate undercooling but clearly decreases at larger undercooling due to the Nb addition. The growth velocity sharply increases as the growth pattern of the Co3Sn2 phase transits from fractal seaweed into compact seaweed.

  14. Advances in modeling semiconductor epitaxy: Contributions of growth orientation and surface reconstruction to InN metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, Akira; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kempisty, Pawel; Shiraishi, Kenji; Kakimoto, Koichi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2016-12-01

    We propose a newly improved thermodynamic analysis method that incorporates surface energies. The new theoretical approach enables us to investigate the effects of the growth orientation and surface reconstruction. The obtained knowledge would be indispensable for examining the preferred growth conditions in terms of the contribution of the surface state. We applied the theoretical approach to study the growth processes of InN(0001) and (000\\bar{1}) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Calculation results reproduced the difference in optimum growth temperature. That is, we successfully developed a new theoretical approach that can predict growth processes on various growth surfaces.

  15. Who's on first? Tracking in real time the growth of multiple crystalline phases of an organic semiconductor: Tetracene on SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, R. K.; Engstrom, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    We have examined the effect of growth rate on the evolution of two polymorphs of thin films of tetracene on SiO2 using synchrotron X-ray radiation and molecular beam techniques. Ex situ X-ray reflectivity shows that tetracene forms two phases on SiO2: a thin-film phase and a bulk phase. We have used in situ, real-time grazing incidence diffraction during growth to reveal the nature of growth concerning these two phases. We observe that there is initially growth of only the thin-film phase, up to a thickness of several monolayers. This is followed by the nucleation of the bulk phase, growth of both phases, and finally growth of only the bulk phase. We find that the deposited thickness when the bulk phase nucleates increases with increasing growth rate. Similarly, we find that the deposited thickness at which the thin-film phase saturates also increases with increasing growth rate. These apparent dependencies on growth rate are actually a consequence of the local coverage, which depends on growth rate, particularly for the former effect. At low growth rates, there is 3D growth resulting from the upward transport of tetracene at island edges, resulting in tall features where molecules escape the influence of the substrate and form into the bulk phase. Increasing the growth rate leads to growth that is more 2D and uniform in coverage, delaying the formation of the bulk phase.

  16. Who's on first? Tracking in real time the growth of multiple crystalline phases of an organic semiconductor: Tetracene on SiO2.

    PubMed

    Nahm, R K; Engstrom, J R

    2017-02-07

    We have examined the effect of growth rate on the evolution of two polymorphs of thin films of tetracene on SiO2 using synchrotron X-ray radiation and molecular beam techniques. Ex situ X-ray reflectivity shows that tetracene forms two phases on SiO2: a thin-film phase and a bulk phase. We have used in situ, real-time grazing incidence diffraction during growth to reveal the nature of growth concerning these two phases. We observe that there is initially growth of only the thin-film phase, up to a thickness of several monolayers. This is followed by the nucleation of the bulk phase, growth of both phases, and finally growth of only the bulk phase. We find that the deposited thickness when the bulk phase nucleates increases with increasing growth rate. Similarly, we find that the deposited thickness at which the thin-film phase saturates also increases with increasing growth rate. These apparent dependencies on growth rate are actually a consequence of the local coverage, which depends on growth rate, particularly for the former effect. At low growth rates, there is 3D growth resulting from the upward transport of tetracene at island edges, resulting in tall features where molecules escape the influence of the substrate and form into the bulk phase. Increasing the growth rate leads to growth that is more 2D and uniform in coverage, delaying the formation of the bulk phase.

  17. Transient composite electric field disturbances near dip equator associated with auroral substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumath Sastri, J.; Ramesh, K.B.; Ranganath Rao, H.N. )

    1992-07-24

    Ionosonde data of Kodaikanal and Huancayo are used to show the simultaneous occurrence of a transient disturbance in F region height of composite polarity in day and night sectors near the dip equator during the auroral substorm activity on 20 August 1979. At Kodaikanal which is on the nightside at the time of the substorm activity, h[prime]F first underwent an abrupt and rapid decrease (80km in 1 hr) followed by a much larger increase (120km in 1 hr). Perturbation in hpF2 of exactly opposite polarity was simultaneously seen at Huancayo which is on the dayside. The decrease in h[prime]F at Kodaikana (increase in hpF2 at Huancayo) occurred in association with an increase in polar cap potential drop, [phi] (estimated from IMF parameters), and the subsequent increase (decrease at Huancayo) with a decrease in polar cap potential. The F-region height disturbance is interpreted as the manifestation of a global transient composite disturbance in equatorial zonal electric field caused by the prompt penetration of substorm-related high latitude electric fields into the equatorial ionosphere. The polarity pattern of the electric field disturbance is consistent with the global convection models which predict westward (eastward) electric fields at night (by day) near the geomagnetic equator in response to an increase in polar cap potential drop, and fields of opposite signs for a decrease in polar cap potential.

  18. Substorm aurorae and their connection to the inner magnetosphere. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, R.E.; Meng, C.I.; Spence, H.E.

    1994-04-15

    In this report the authors present evidence from the low-altitude DMSP F7 satellite that the poleward edge of auroral luminosity in the nightside auroral zone does not necessarily correspond to the boundary between plasma-filled flux tubes and flux tubes devoid of plasma. Assuming that the low-altitude boundary corresponds to the boundary between the lobe and the plasma sheet, this implies that the boundary between open and closed field lines may lie poleward of the most poleward auroral luminosity. Thus the assumption that the poleward boundary of auroral luminosity is a good indicator of the open-closed boundary may not always be correct. Furthermore, they show clear evidence that an auroral surge may also be located equatorward of the open-closed boundary. Therefore, tailward of the region of the plasma sheet to which the surge is connected there may exist undisturbed plasma sheet that has not yet been disconnected from the ionosphere. This means that substorm-associated reconnection does not necessarily begin to reconnect lobe field lines at the onset of a substorm. Moreover, available evidence strongly suggests that the arc that brightens at the onset of a substorm and that develops into a surge maps to the inner magnetotail, to that region at the inner edge of the plasma sheet where the magnetic field changes from a dipolar to a tail-like configuration. This would be consistent with recent studies that connect auroral breakup to the near-Earth (

  19. Kinetic PIC simulations of reconnection signal propagation parallel to magnetic field lines: Implifications for substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, M. A.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    In a recent substorm case study using THEMIS data [1], it was inferred that auroral intensification occurred 96 seconds after reconnection onset initiated a substorm in the magnetotail. These conclusions have been the subject of some controversy [2,3]. The time delay between reconnection and auroral intensification requires a propagation speed significantly faster than can be explained by Alfvén waves. Kinetic Alfvén waves, however, can be much faster and could possibly explain the time lag. To test this possiblity, we simulate large scale reconnection events with the kinetic PIC code P3D and examine the disturbances on a magnetic field line as it propagates through a reconnection region. In the regions near the separatrices but relatively far from the x-line, the propagation physics is expected to be governed by the physics of kinetic Alfvén waves. Indeed, we find that the propagation speed of the magnetic disturbance roughly scales with kinetic Alfvén speeds. We also examine energization of electrons due to this disturbance. Consequences for our understanding of substorms will be discussed. [1] Angelopoulos, V. et al., Science, 321, 931, 2008. [2] Lui, A. T. Y., Science, 324, 1391-b, 2009. [3] Angelopoulos, V. et al., Science, 324, 1391-c, 2009.

  20. Phase transformation process and step growth mechanism of hydroxyapatite whiskers under constant impulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changlian; Li, Jianqiu; Huang, Zhiliang; Cheng, Xiaokun; Yu, Jun; Wang, Han; Chi, Ru-an; Hu, Yuehua

    2011-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) whiskers were synthesized using urea as the precipitator by a phase transformation method, and their phase transformation process and growth mechanism were investigated. The results showed that with the decomposition of urea and the corresponding increase of pH value of the reaction system, dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) were precipitated at pH of 3.3-4.3; then Ca 2+ and HPO42- ions began to be released from DCPA at pH values greater than 4.5. Finally HAP whiskers heterogeneously nucleated and grew up into short column crystals along the surface of the OCP flakes. In the absence of the ionic resources, DCPA gradually dissolved and the OCP flakes transformed into HAP continuously and the short columnar HAP whiskers grew up. The aspect ratio of the HAP whiskers with length of 20-100 μm and diameter of 1-2 μm was about 25. The HRTEM and AFM images showed that HAP whiskers grew along the c-axis direction, the (1 0 0) steps were clearly observed at their heads and the straight step lines instead of helical Frank ones were present on the side face of the (1 0 0) steps. The calculation on the basis of the surface energy of the HAP crystal showed that the growth rate of the (0 0 1) plane was the fastest, the growth rate at the homogeneous twist sites was the second and that at heterogeneous twist sites could be the slowest, which were the main factors finally leading to the preferential growth of HAP whiskers along the c-axis direction as well as the formation of the growth steps.

  1. Plasmasphere pulsations observed simultaneously by midlatitude SuperDARN radars, ground magnetometers and THEMIS spacecraft during an auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Shi, X.; Baker, J. B. H.; Frissell, N. A.; Hartinger, M.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present simultaneous ground and space-based observations of ultra-low frequency (ULF) pulsations which occurred during an auroral substorm on September 25th, 2014. Expansion phase onset began at 06:04 UT at which time three midlatitude SuperDARN radars observed strong pulsations in the Pi2 frequency range with peak to peak amplitude reaching as high as 1km/s. Similar pulsations occurred during a later auroral intensification which started at 06:20 UT. Both sets of pulsations were detected in a region of radar backscatter located inside the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) equatorward of the auroral oval specified by THEMIS all sky imagers and inside the midlatitude density trough as mapped by GPS/TEC measurements. The amplitude of the pulsations was large enough to reverse the direction of the SAPS flow from westward to eastward. Similar pulsations were detected by electric field instrument aboard the THEMIS probe D located inside the plasmasphere. Simultaneous observations from several low-latitude ground magnetometers (some located on the dayside) further illustrate the global nature of the pulsations and suggest they may have been associated with a plasmaspheric cavity resonance (PCR). Pulsed tailward plasma flow observed by THEMIS probe E at the geosynchronous orbit suggests that the compressional energy to generate the PCR was from the Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs) braking against the magnetospheric dipolar region.

  2. Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event

    DOE PAGES

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; ...

    2015-03-20

    Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ –40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within 10 min, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first onemore » is a dispersionless, short-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a gradual dipolarization signature. We combined ground magnetometer data from various stations and in situ particle and magnetic field data from multiple satellites in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet to determine the spatial extent of these injections, their temporal evolution, and their effects in the inner magnetosphere. Our results indicate that there are different spatial and temporal scales at which injections can occur in the inner magnetosphere and depict the necessity of multipoint observations of both particle and magnetic field data in order to determine these scales.« less

  3. Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event

    SciTech Connect

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Turner, D. L.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Nosé, M.; Koga, K.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-03-20

    Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ –40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within 10 min, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first one is a dispersionless, short-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a gradual dipolarization signature. We combined ground magnetometer data from various stations and in situ particle and magnetic field data from multiple satellites in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet to determine the spatial extent of these injections, their temporal evolution, and their effects in the inner magnetosphere. Our results indicate that there are different spatial and temporal scales at which injections can occur in the inner magnetosphere and depict the necessity of multipoint observations of both particle and magnetic field data in order to determine these scales.

  4. Production of an Extracellular Matrix as an Isotropic Growth Phase of Penicillium rubens on Gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, M.; Adan, O. C. G.; Samson, R. A.; Wyatt, T.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor mold represents an important environmental concern, but a fundamental knowledge of fungal growth stages is needed to limit indoor fungal proliferation on finishing materials used in buildings. The present study focused on the succession of germination stages of the common indoor fungus Penicillium rubens on a gypsum substrate. This substrate is used as a model system representing porous materials that are widely used in indoor environments. Imaging with cryo-scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) is a phase of the isotropic growth of P. rubens that is uniquely related to germinating conidia. Furthermore, the ECM is observed only when a dry-state inoculation of the surface is applied, i.e., applying conidia directly from a 7-day-old colony, mimicking airborne contamination of the surface. When inoculation is done by spraying an aqueous conidial suspension, no ECM is observed. Moreover, it is concluded that the formation of an ECM requires active processes in the fungal cell. The porosity of the substrate proved that the ECM substance has high-viscosity characteristics. The present results stress that studies of indoor fungal growth should consider the method of inoculation, knowing that the common aqueous suspension may obscure specific stages in the initial phases of germination. PMID:22843536

  5. Morphological analysis and muscle-associated gene expression during different muscle growth phases of Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Zhu, K C; Yu, D H; Zhao, J K; Wang, W M; Wang, H L

    2015-09-28

    Skeletal muscle growth is regulated by both positive and negative factors, such as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and myostatin (MSTN), and involves both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In the present study, morphological changes during muscle development in Megalobrama amblycephala were characterized and gene expression levels were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis in juvenile [60, 90, 120, and 180 days post-hatching (dph)] and adult fish. Our results show that during muscle development, the frequency of muscle fibers with a diameter <20 μm dramatically decreased in both red and white muscles, with a concomitant increase in the frequency of >30 μm fibers in red muscle and >50 μm fibers in white muscle. At 90-120 dph, the ratio of hyperplastic to hypertrophic areas in red and white muscles increased, but later decreased at 120-180 dph. The effect of hypertrophy was significantly larger than hyperplasia during these phases. qRT-PCR indicated MRF and MSTN (MSTNa and MSTNb) genes had similar expression patterns that peaked at 120 dph, with the exception of MSTNa. This new information on the molecular regulation of muscle growth and rapid growth phases will be of value to the cultivation of M. amblycephala.

  6. Nonaqueous seeded growth of flower-like mixed-phase titania nanostructures for photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.-C.; Lin, H.-C.; Chen, C.-H.; Liao, Y.-T.; Yang, C.-M.

    2010-09-15

    A nonaqueous seeded-grown synthesis of three-dimensional TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in the benzyl alcohol reaction system was reported. The synthesis was simple, high-yield, and requires no structural directing or capping agents. It could be largely accelerated by applying microwave heating. The TiO{sub 2} nanostructures had a unique flower-like morphology and high surface area. Furthermore, the structural analyses suggested that the nanostructures had a non-uniform distribution of crystalline phases, with the inner part rich in anatase and the outer part rich in rutile. After heat treatments, the mixed-phase TiO{sub 2} nanostructures exhibited high photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of methylene blue as compared to Degussa P25. The high photoactivities may be associated with the high surface area and the synergistic effect resulting from the anisotropic mixed-phase nanostructures. The results demonstrate the uniqueness of the nonaqueous seeded growth and the potential of the TiO{sub 2} nanostructures for practical applications. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like TiO{sub 2} nanostructures synthesized by a nonaqueous seeded growth without using any structural directing or capping agents.

  7. Impact of nanoscale zero valent iron on bacteria is growth phase dependent.

    PubMed

    Chaithawiwat, Krittanut; Vangnai, Alisa; McEvoy, John M; Pruess, Birgit; Krajangpan, Sita; Khan, Eakalak

    2016-02-01

    The toxic effect of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particles on bacteria from different growth phases was studied. Four bacterial strains namely Escherichia coli strains JM109 and BW25113, and Pseudomonas putida strains KT2440 and F1 were experimented. The growth curves of these strains were determined. Bacterial cells were harvested based on the predetermined time points, and exposed to nZVI. Cell viability was determined by the plate count method. Bacterial cells in lag and stationary phases showed higher resistance to nZVI for all four bacterial strains, whereas cells in exponential and decline phases were less resistant to nZVI and were rapidly inactivated when exposed to nZVI. Bacterial inactivation increased with the concentration of nZVI. Furthermore, less than 14% bacterial inactivation was observed when bacterial cells were exposed to the filtrate of nZVI suspension suggesting that the physical interaction between nZVI and cell is necessary for bacterial inactivation.

  8. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  9. Influence of Crystal Growth Cooling Conditions on Thermoelectric Properties of Aurivillius Phase Bi-V-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Hitoshi; Segawa, Mizuki; Yagasaki, Takayoshi

    2016-11-01

    Aurivillius phase Bi2VO5.5 is known as an oxygen ion conductor. In previous studies on Bi2VO5.5, the Seebeck coefficient of the sintered body was about 10 mVK-1 at 800 K. However, the resistivity was 103 Ω m at 800 K. It seemed that this high resistivity was caused by high grain boundary resistance because of cracks at boundaries. In this study, specimens have been prepared by a melting method, aimed at reducing the boundaries. The influence of crystal growth cooling conditions on the thermoelectric properties of Aurivillius phase Bi-V-O is discussed. The crystal growth cooling conditions investigated were slow cooling with cooling rate of 9 K h-1, furnace cooling, and quenching. The surface and cross-section of the sample were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phase was identified by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The resistivity was measured by the direct current (DC) two or four terminals method. The Seebeck coefficient was measured by the small temperature difference method. The transgranular resistance and grain boundary resistance were evaluated by the complex impedance method. All samples consisted of layered grains. The grain thickness at cross section decreased with increasing cooling rate. The resistivity of the quenched and slowly cooled specimens was approximately 1000 times lower compared with the furnace cooled specimen and sintered body over the measured temperature range.

  10. Population growth in random media. I. Variational formula and phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greven, A.; den Hollander, F.

    1991-12-01

    We consider an infinite system of particles on the integer lattice Z that: (1) migrate to the right with a random delay, (2) branch along the way according to a random law depending on their position (random medium). In Part I, the first part of a two-part presentation, the initial configuration has one particle at each site. The long-time limit exponential growth rate of the expected number of particles at site 0 (local particle density) does not depend on the realization of the random medium, but only on the law. It is computed in the form of a variational formula that can be solved explicitly. The result reveals two phase transitions associated with localization vs. delocalization and survival vs. extinction. In earlier work the exponential growth rate of the Cesaro limit of the number of particles per site (global particle density) was studied and a different variational formula was found, but with similar structure, solution, and phases. Combination of the two results reveals an intermediate phase where the population globally survives but locally becomes extinct (i.e., dies out on any fixed finite set of sites).

  11. Ground and satellite observations of the low-latitude onsets of auroral substorm during a major magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor; Parnikov, Stanislav; Alexeyev, Valeriy

    It is known that the first onset of auroral substorm expansion is connected with the brightness increase and breakup of the most equatorial arc. The subsequent substorm activizations can be observed in the intensification of auroral arcs at higher latitudes. As a result a formation of auroral bulge and poleward shift of a westward electrojet maximum takes place. The development of auroral bulge maps the precipitation dynamics of energetic particles during magnetospheric substorms. In this work the research results of auroral substorm during the major magnetic storm on March 20, 2001 (Dst =-150 nT) are submitted. The aurorae were registered at the Yakutsk meridian (130ºE; 200ºE, geom.) by the meridian-scanning and zenith photometers in the 630, 557.7 [OI], 427.8 (N2+) and 486.1 nm (H beta) emissions. Before the substorm onset the equatorial arc is observed at low geomagnetic latitudes of 55-57ºN (the dipole L=3.0-3.3). The zenith photometer registers an intense H beta emission in the arc (~400 R). The fast increase of the 427.8, 557.7 nm emission intensity during two equatorial arc breakups is accompanied by the decrease of H beta intensity by a factor of ~5. The aurora dynamics is compared with the measurements of precipitating flux of electrons and protons aboard DMSP F15 satellite, substorm injections at a geosynchronous orbit, variations in the solar wind and IMF and also images of the auroral oval from the IMAGE satellite. The ground and satellite observations are considered from a position of change of the magnetic field configuration during the low-latitude substorm. We assume that the sharp drop of H beta emission intensity (precipitating protons flux) during the breakups of equatorial arc may testify to a connection of its location with a proton isotropic boundary in the inner magnetosphere.

  12. Global-scale ionospheric flow and aurora precursors of auroral substorms: Coordinated SuperDARN and IMAGE/WIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Zesta, Eftyhia

    2014-06-01

    We use global-scale polar cap flow vector measurements from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) with the concurrent auroral observations from the Wideband Imaging Camera on board Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE/WIC) to study the polar cap flow and auroral precursors during a substorm onset on 26 December 2000. We show, for the first time, close connection between the dayside and nightside polar cap flow enhancements (with the enhanced dayside flow preceding the nightside one by several minutes) and the ensuing poleward boundary intensification (PBI)/streamer, and the later onset, forming a complete preonset sequence for a substorm onset. Our results supplement our previous study by providing further evidence that the dayside polar cap flow disturbance may be the key to initiate the whole process of a certain type of substorm by triggering reconnection somewhere in the tail via applied field (or flow) perturbations on the nightside plasma sheet boundary layer. Our results also indicate that a preexisting double oval structure is likely a favorable precondition for a certain type of substorm to be triggered by polar cap flow disturbance and the associated PBIs/streamers. On the other hand, not all our global-scale preonset auroral sequences support the recent revised onset scenario proposed by Nishimura et al. using the all-sky imagers of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms mission. This suggests that the preceding PBI/streamer is not a sufficient condition to trigger a substorm. It may not even be a necessary condition considering the existence of various types of substorm onsets.

  13. Timing of a Substorm Event at ~07:13UT, Jan 29, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Frey, H. U.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K.; Mende, S. B.; Russell, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    We report a timing analysis on a substorm around ~07:10UT on Jan 29, 2008 captured by the THEMIS spacecraft. The spacecraft (probes) were aligned along the tail between XGSM=-7 RE to -30 RE. During the time of the substorm, the solar wind had a vz component of ~50 km/s corresponding to a 6.5o southward tilt of the magnetotail. Thus we rotate the GSM coordinate system 6.5o anticlockwise around the Y axis to form a more physical coordinate system and investigate the satellite data in this coordinate system. The most distant probe P1 (XGSM=-29.5 RE) detected a bipolar magnetic signature corresponding to a tailward moving structure. P2 (XGSM=-18.5 RE) also saw magnetic signatures indicating tailward moving structure, while P3 (XGSM=-10.8 RE) and P4 (XGSM=-10.6 RE) captured dipolarization fronts and Earthward flows. THEMIS ground stations and all-sky imagers recorded Pi2 pulsations and brightening in a white-light auroral imager. We perform a detailed timing analysis of probe and ground-based data and reconstruct the time sequence of phenomena during this substorm. The earliest event related to the substorm was the Earthward beams on P3 and P4, followed by the aurora intensification at 07:12:22UT. The first magnetic deflection was detected by P2 and then bipolar perturbation in the north-south component of the magnetic field was captured by P1 at 07:12:32UT. Dipolarization fronts as well as convective flows arrived at P3 and P4 later at ~07:13:35UT accompanied by sudden increase of the cumulative magnetic flux transferred Earthward, and ground magnetic pulsations happened about the same time or later. We consider this substorm to be generated by tail reconnection at ~18 RE, different from the interpretation by Lui et al. [2008] on the same event. It is inferred that reconnection in the tail preceded the aurora intensification by ~2 minutes and preceded the ground magnetic perturbation and near-Earth dipolarization by ~3 minutes.

  14. Single-crystal CdSe nanowires prepared via vapor-phase growth assisted with silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Y; Zhang, L D; Ye, C H; Fang, X S; Xiao, Z D; Kong, M G

    2005-12-01

    Hexagonal cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanowires, with diameter around 20 nm, were synthesized using a simple vapor-phase growth. Silicon (Si) powder acts as a source material assisting the synthesis, which is very important to the formation of the CdSe nanowires. We also suggest that self-catalysis at the Cd-terminated (0001) surface, together with the assistance action of Si, leads to the formation of wire-like structures to be formed. Meanwhile, the assistance of Si is responsible for the fineness and uniformity of the CdSe nanowires. The possible growth mechanism of the CdSe nanowires is proposed, and the optical property of the as-grown CdSe nanowires is characterized.

  15. A phase 1 clinical trial of nerve growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Thal, Leon; Pay, Mary; Salmon, David P; U, Hoi Sang; Bakay, Roy; Patel, Piyush; Blesch, Armin; Vahlsing, H Lee; Ho, Gilbert; Tong, Gang; Potkin, Steven G; Fallon, James; Hansen, Lawrence; Mufson, Elliott J; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gall, Christine; Conner, James

    2005-05-01

    Cholinergic neuron loss is a cardinal feature of Alzheimer disease. Nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates cholinergic function, improves memory and prevents cholinergic degeneration in animal models of injury, amyloid overexpression and aging. We performed a phase 1 trial of ex vivo NGF gene delivery in eight individuals with mild Alzheimer disease, implanting autologous fibroblasts genetically modified to express human NGF into the forebrain. After mean follow-up of 22 months in six subjects, no long-term adverse effects of NGF occurred. Evaluation of the Mini-Mental Status Examination and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subcomponent suggested improvement in the rate of cognitive decline. Serial PET scans showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in cortical 18-fluorodeoxyglucose after treatment. Brain autopsy from one subject suggested robust growth responses to NGF. Additional clinical trials of NGF for Alzheimer disease are warranted.

  16. Growth Phase-Dependent Modulation of Rgg Binding Specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Anbalagan, Srivishnupriya; Dmitriev, Alexander; McShan, W. Michael; Dunman, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes Rgg is a transcriptional regulator that interacts with the cofactor LacD.1 to control growth phase-dependent expression of genes, including speB, which encodes a secreted cysteine protease. LacD.1 is thought to interact with Rgg when glycolytic intermediates are abundant in a manner that prevents Rgg-mediated activation of speB expression via binding to the promoter region. When the intermediates diminish, LacD.1 dissociates from Rgg and binds to the speB promoter to activate expression. The purpose of this study was to determine if Rgg bound to chromatin during the exponential phase of growth and, if so, to identify the binding sites. Rgg bound to 62 chromosomal sites, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarrays. Thirty-eight were within noncoding DNA, including sites upstream of the genes encoding the M protein (M49), serum opacity factor (SOF), fibronectin-binding protein (SfbX49), and a prophage-encoded superantigen, SpeH. Each of these sites contained a promoter that was regulated by Rgg, as determined with transcriptional fusion assays. Purified Rgg also bound to the promoter regions of emm49, sof, and sfbX49 in vitro. Results obtained with a lacD.1 mutant showed that both LacD.1 and Rgg were necessary for the repression of emm49, sof, sfbX49, and speH expression. Overall, the results indicated that the DNA binding specificity of Rgg is responsive to environmental changes in a LacD.1-dependent manner and that Rgg and LacD.1 directly control virulence gene expression in the exponential phase of growth. PMID:22636768

  17. Siderophore production by Bacillus megaterium: effect of growth phase and cultural conditions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia; Neto, Isabel F F; Machado, Manuela D; Soares, Helena M V M; Soares, Eduardo V

    2014-01-01

    Siderophore production by Bacillus megaterium was detected, in an iron-deficient culture medium, during the exponential growth phase, prior to the sporulation, in the presence of glucose; these results suggested that the onset of siderophore production did not require glucose depletion and was not related with the sporulation. The siderophore production by B. megaterium was affected by the carbon source used. The growth on glycerol promoted the very high siderophore production (1,182 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass); the opposite effect was observed in the presence of mannose (251 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass). The growth in the presence of fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, maltose or sucrose, originated similar concentrations of siderophore (546-842 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass). Aeration had a positive effect on the production of siderophore. Incubation of B. megaterium under static conditions delayed and reduced the growth and the production of siderophore, compared with the incubation in stirred conditions.

  18. Solid-liquid phase epitaxial growth of Li4Ti5O12 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Katase, Takayoshi; Zhu, Yanbei; Matsumoto, Takao; Umemura, Tomonari; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2016-12-01

    A thin film of Li4Ti5O12, a candidate anode material for solid-state Li-ion batteries, was heteroepitaxially grown on a (001) SrTiO3 substrate using solid-liquid phase epitaxy. An amorphous Li4Ti5O12 film deposited at room temperature was first heated with LiNO3 powder in air and then washed with distilled water. The Li4Ti5O12 epitaxial film was obtained by heating with molten LiNO3 at 600 °C the liquid LiNO3 completely covered the film, suppressing the formation of Li deficiencies and enhancing the low-temperature crystal growth. Solid-liquid phase epitaxy is a powerful approach to grow Li-containing-oxide films, which are difficult to fabricate because of the loss of Li species at high temperature.

  19. Growth phase and pH influence peptide signaling for competence development in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Zhou, Xuedong; Burne, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The development of competence by the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is mediated primarily through the alternative sigma factor ComX (SigX), which is under the control of multiple regulatory systems and activates the expression of genes involved in DNA uptake and recombination. Here we report that the induction of competence and competence gene expression by XIP (sigX-inducing peptide) and CSP (competence-stimulating peptide) is dependent on the growth phase and that environmental pH has a potent effect on the responses to XIP. A dramatic decline in comX and comS expression was observed in mid- and late-exponential-phase cells. XIP-mediated competence development and responses to XIP were optimal around a neutral pH, although mid-exponential-phase cells remained refractory to XIP treatment, and acidified late-exponential-phase cultures were resistant to killing by high concentrations of XIP. Changes in the expression of the genes for the oligopeptide permease (opp), which appears to be responsible for the internalization of XIP, could not entirely account for the behaviors observed. Interestingly, comS and comX expression was highly induced in response to endogenously overproduced XIP or ComS in mid-exponential-phase cells. In contrast to the effects of pH on XIP, competence induction and responses to CSP in complex medium were not affected by pH, although a decreased response to CSP in cells that had exited early-exponential phase was observed. Collectively, these results indicate that competence development may be highly sensitive to microenvironments within oral biofilms and that XIP and CSP signaling in biofilms could be spatially and temporally heterogeneous.

  20. Growth of new ternary intermetallic phases from Ca/Zn eutectic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanovic, Milorad Latturner, Susan E.

    2007-03-15

    The eutectic 7.3:2.7 molar ratio mixture of calcium and zinc metal melts at 394 deg. C and was explored as a solvent for the growth of new intermetallic phases for potential use as hydrogen storage materials. The reaction of nickel in this molten mixture produces two new phases-the CaCu{sub 5}-related structure CaNi{sub 2}Zn{sub 3} (P6/mmm, a=8.9814(5) A, c=4.0665(5) A) and a new cubic structure Ca{sub 21}Ni{sub 2}Zn{sub 36} (Fd-3m, a=21.5051(4) A). Palladium-containing reactions produced CaPd{sub 0.85}Zn{sub 1.15} with the orthorhombic TiNiSi structure type (Pnma, a=7.1728(9) A, b=4.3949(5) A, c=7.7430(9) A). Reactions of platinum in the Ca/Zn mixture produce Ca{sub 6}Pt{sub 3}Zn{sub 5}, with an orthorhombic structure related to that of W{sub 3}CoB{sub 3} (Pmmn, a=13.7339(9) A, b=4.3907(3) A, c=10.7894(7) A). - Graphical abstract: The calcium/zinc eutectic is a useful synthesis medium for the growth of new intermetallic phases. Addition of group 10 transition metals to this flux produces ternary phases CaNi{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}, Ca{sub 21}Ni{sub 2}Zn{sub 36}, CaPd{sub 0.85}Zn{sub 1.15}, and Ca{sub 6}Pt{sub 3}Zn{sub 5}. The nickel-centered zinc icosahedron surrounded by a pentagonal dodecahedron of calcium atoms is found in Ca{sub 21}Ni{sub 2}Zn{sub 36}.

  1. Ion beam-induced amorphous-to-tetragonal phase transformation and grain growth of nanocrystalline zirconia.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Zhang, Jiaming; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen; Lu, Fengyuan; Haider, Hani; Garvin, Kevin; Weber, W J; Ewing, Rodney C

    2009-06-17

    Nanocrystalline zirconia has recently attracted extensive research interest due to its unique mechanical, thermal and electrical properties as compared with bulk zirconia counterparts, and it is of particular importance for controlling the phase stability of different polymorphs (amorphous, cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic phases) in different size regimes. In this work, we performed ion beam bombardments on bilayers (amorphous and cubic) of nano-zirconia using 1 MeV Kr2+ irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis reveals that amorphous zirconia transforms to a tetragonal structure under irradiation at room temperature, suggesting that the tetragonal phase is more energetically favorable under these conditions. The final grain size of the tetragonal zirconia can be controlled by irradiation conditions. A slower kinetics in the grain growth from cubic nanocrystalline zirconia was found as compared with that for the tetragonal grains recrystallized from the amorphous layer. The radiation-induced nanograins of tetragonal ZrO2 are stable at ambient conditions and maintain their physical integrity over a long period of time after irradiation. These results demonstrated that ion beam methods provide the means to control the phase stability and structure of zirconia polymorphs.

  2. Growth and Printability of Multilayer Phase Defects on EUV MaskBlanks

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ted; Ultanir, Erdem; Zhnag, Guojing; Park, Seh-Jin; Anderson, Erik; Gullikson, Eric; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mirkarimi, Paul; Spiller, Eberhard; Baker, Sherry

    2007-06-10

    The ability to fabricate defect-free mask blanks is a well-recognized challenge in enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) for semiconductor manufacturing. Both the specification and reduction of defects necessitate the understanding of their printability and how they are generated and grow during Mo-Si multilayer (ML) deposition. A ML phase defect can be depicted by its topographical profile on the surface as either a bump or pit, which is then characterized by height or depth and width. The complexity of such seemingly simple phase defects lies in the many ways they can be generated and the difficulties of measuring their physical shape/size and optical effects on printability. An effective way to study phase defects is to use a programmed defect mask (PDM) as 'model' test sample where the defects are produced with controlled growth on a ML blank and accurate placement in varying proximity to absorber patterns on the mask. This paper describes our recent study of ML phase defect printability with resist data from exposures of a ML PDM on the EUV micro-exposure tool (MET, 5X reduction with 0.3NA).

  3. Glucose triggers ATP secretion from bacteria in a growth-phase-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Ippei; Iwase, Tadayuki; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-04-01

    ATP modulates immune cell functions, and ATP derived from gut commensal bacteria promotes the differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells in the intestinal lamina propria. We recently reported that Enterococcus gallinarum, isolated from mice and humans, secretes ATP. We have since found and characterized several ATP-secreting bacteria. Of the tested enterococci, Enterococcus mundtii secreted the greatest amount of ATP (>2 μM/10(8) cells) after overnight culture. Glucose, not amino acids and vitamins, was essential for ATP secretion from E. mundtii. Analyses of energy-deprived cells demonstrated that glycolysis is the most important pathway for bacterial ATP secretion. Furthermore, exponential-phase E. mundtii and Enterococcus faecalis cells secrete ATP more efficiently than stationary-phase cells. Other bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, also secrete ATP in exponential but not stationary phase. These results suggest that various gut bacteria, including commensals and pathogens, might secrete ATP at any growth phase and modulate immune cell function.

  4. Initial stages of multilayer growth and structural phase transitions of physisorbed benzene on Ru(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, P.; Menzel, D.

    1996-09-01

    The initial stages of the multilayer growth of a model system for molecular solids, namely physisorbed benzene on Ru(001), have been studied in detail by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy. A variety of different phases have been discriminated spectroscopically and characterized in situ: the parallel oriented first physisorbed layer which is found to rearrange into a more crowded layer with a high tilt angle at slightly higher coverages; an amorphous layer which grows at low temperatures (T ≤55 K), and a crystalline layer to which the former converts at elevated temperatures. Clear evidence for structural disorder of the uppermost layer of the crystalline phase is found. The amorphous-crystalline phase transformation is irreversible and the required temperatures vary considerably with the layer thickness. This is attributed to two different processes: at high coverages (Θ ≥10 ML) crystallization is possible at low T without mass transport and requires only a reorientation and minor rearrangement of the benzene molecules. Low initial coverages (Θ=2.5-5 ML) require nucleation and diffusion of benzene molecules to form stable 3D crystallites with the former process acting as the kinetically limiting factor. Particular attention has been devoted to the unravelling of the nature of the metastable state observed in thermal desorption spectroscopy and its transformation into the more stable crystalline phase.

  5. Multiple-satellite studies of magnetospheric substorms: Plasma sheet recovery and the poleward leap of auroral-zone activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pytte, T.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.; West, H. I., Jr.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Particle observations from pairs of satellites (Ogo 5, Vela 4A and 5B, Imp 3) during the recovery of plasma sheet thickness late in substorms were examined. Six of the nine events occurred within about 5 min in locations near the estimated position of the neutral sheet, but over wide ranges of east-west and radial separations. The time of occurrence and spatial extent of the recovery were related to the onset (defined by ground Pi 2 pulsations) and approximate location (estimated from ground mid-latitude magnetic signatures) of substorm expansions. It was found that the plasma sheet recovery occurred 10 - 30 min after the last in a series of Pi bursts, which were interpreted to indicate that the recovery was not due directly to a late, high latitude substorm expansion. The recovery was also observed to occur after the substorm current wedge had moved into the evening sector and to extend far to the east of the center of the last preceding substorm expansion.

  6. Introduction to the special issue on history development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Parks, G.; Svalgaard, L.; Kamide, Y.; Lui, T.

    2016-12-01

    Solar terrestrial (ST) sciences started centuries ago and branched into different disciplines. Starting with naked eye to highly sophisticated novel experimental techniques, observations have revealed the secrets of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, plasmasphere, and ionosphere-atmosphere components of the ST system. Theories and theoretical models have been developed for the different components independently and together. World-wide efforts under different umbrella are being persuaded to understand the challenges of the ST system. The onset problem and role of O+ ions in sub-storm physics are two issues that are hotly debated. The onset problem is whether sub-storm is triggered by magnetic reconnection in the tail region at 15-20 Re or by a current disruption at ~12 Re. The issue on O+ role is whether O+ ions affect the dynamics of sub-storms under magnetic storm and non-storm conditions differently. This special issue of Geoscience Letters contains a collection of 15 papers on the history and development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms. Over half of the papers are based on the presentations in a session on the same topic organized at the AOGS (Asia Oceania geosciences Society) General Assembly held in Singapore during 02-07 August 2015. The rest of the papers from outside the assembly also falls within the theme of the special issue. The papers are organized in the order of history and development of ST coupling, sub-storms, and outer heliosphere.

  7. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  8. Towards an organic palaeosalinity proxy: the effect of salinity, growth rate and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones produced by haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2013-04-01

    Palaeosalinity is one of the most important oceanographic parameters which currently cannot be quantified with reasonable accuracy from sedimentary records. Schouten et al.1 established that the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between growth water and alkenones produced by the haptophyte algae Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica is salinity dependent. As such, the δD values of alkenones recovered from sediment cores can be used to reconstruct variations in palaeo- sea surface salinity.2 However, to accurately determine absolute palaeosalinity requires a better constraining of the relationship between this hydrogen fractionation, salinity and other parameters such as growth rate and growth phase. Here, we present results from our ongoing work to constrain the relationship between the fractionation factor αalkenone-water, salinity, growth rate and growth phase for the major alkenone-producing haptophytes. In batch cultures of different strains of the open-ocean haptophyte E. huxleyi sampled during the exponential growth phase, αC37alkenone-growthwater increases by between 0.0022 and 0.0033 per unit increase in salinity. A similar relationship is observed in batch cultures of the coastal haptophyte Isochrysis galbana, where α increases with each unit of salinity by 0.0019 - slightly less than for E. huxleyi. However, absolute αC37alkenone-growthwater values vary strongly between species suggesting that species composition has a strong impact on the δD value of alkenones. The fractionation factor for alkenones produced by batch cultures of I. galbana is affected by growth phase: the rate of change of αC37alkenone-growthwater with each unit of salinity decreases from 0.0019 in the exponential phase to 0.0010 during the stationary phase. We also show the effect of varying growth rate over the range 0.2-0.8 day-1 on the fractionation factor for alkenones produced by E. huxleyi grown in continuous culture. These data show that alkenone δD can be used to

  9. [Chemo- and endocrino-therapy of breast carcinoma xenografts in the dormant or exponential growth phase].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T

    1995-06-01

    In case of concerning about recurrence case after operative treatment of breast cancer, we must suppose existence of dormant breast cancer cell. To elucidate a rational treatment of the breast cancer in the dormant stage, we have developed a new treatment model using human breast carcinoma xenografts (MCF-7, R-27 and Br-10) in nude mice. After the sc inoculation of the tumors, the treatment was initiated with or without the previous estradiol (E2) stimulation. While MCF-7 was sensitive to mitomycin C (6 mg/kg i.p.) and and tamoxifen pellet (2.5 mg/mouse s.c.) in the dormant and exponential growth phase, R-27 and Br-10 were sensitive to the drugs only in the exponential growth phase but not in the dormant stage. These results suggested that the sensitivity of human breast carcinoma cells in the dormant stage is rather low, however some strain would be also sensitive to the treatment. This model seems to be useful in evaluating the adjuvant therapy of breast carcinoma after surgery.

  10. Vibrio fischeri exhibit the growth advantage in stationary-phase phenotype.

    PubMed

    Petrun, Branden; Lostroh, C Phoebe

    2013-02-01

    Vibrio fischeri are bioluminescent marine bacteria that can be isolated from their symbiotic animal partners or from ocean water. A V. fischeri population increases exponentially inside the light organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) while the host is quiescent during the day. This bacterial light organ population reaches stationary phase and then remains high during the night, when the squid use bacterial bioluminescence as a counter-predation strategy. At dawn, host squid release 90%-95% of the light organ contents into the ocean water prior to burying in the sand for the day. As the squid sleeps, the cycle of bacterial population growth in the light organ begins again. These V. fischeri cells that are vented into the ocean must persist under typical marine low nutrient conditions until they encounter another opportunity to colonize a host. We hypothesized that because V. fischeri regularly encounter cycles of feast and famine in nature, they would exhibit the growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype. We found that older V. fischeri cells exhibit a Class 2 GASP response in which old cells increase dramatically in frequency while the population of young V. fischeri cells remains almost constant during co-incubation.

  11. Battle of the Bacteria: Characterizing the Evolutionary Advantage of Stationary Phase Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Karin E.; Yim, Kristina M.; Coleman, Aaron B.; Sato, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Providing students with authentic research opportunities has been shown to enhance learning and increase retention in STEM majors. Accordingly, we have developed a novel microbiology lab module, which focuses on the molecular mechanisms of evolution in E. coli, by examining the growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype. The GASP phenotype is demonstrated by growing cells into long-term stationary phase (LTSP) and then competing them against un-aged cells in a fresh culture. This module includes learning goals related to strengthening practical laboratory skills and improving student understanding of evolution. In addition, the students generate novel data regarding the effects of different environmental stresses on GASP and the relationship between evolution, genotypic change, mutation frequency, and cell stress. Pairs of students are provided with the experimental background, select a specific aspect of the growth medium to modify, and generate a hypothesis regarding how this alteration will impact the GASP phenotype. From this module, we have demonstrated that students are able to achieve the established learning goals and have produced data that has furthered our understanding of the GASP phenotype. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27158307

  12. Growth phase-dependent transcription of the Streptomyces ramocissimus tuf1 gene occurs from two promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, L N; van Wezel, G P; Bibb, M J; Kraal, B

    1997-01-01

    The str operon of Streptomyces ramocissimus contains the genes for ribosomal proteins S12 (rpsL) and S7 (rpsG) and for the polypeptide chain elongation factors G (EF-G) (fus) and Tu (EF-Tu) (tuf). This kirromycin producer contains three tuf or tuf-like genes; tuf1 encodes the regular EF-Tu and is located immediately downstream of fus. In vivo and in vitro transcription analysis revealed a transcription start site directly upstream of S. ramocissimus tuf1, in addition to the operon promoter rpsLp. Transcription from these promoters appeared to be growth phase dependent, diminishing drastically upon entry into stationary phase and at the onset of production of the EF-Tu-targeted antibiotic kirromycin. In surface-grown cultures, a second round of tuf1 transcription, coinciding with aerial mycelium formation and kirromycin production, was observed. The tuf1-specific promoter (tuf1p) was located in the intercistronic region between fus and tuf1 by high-resolution S1 mapping, in vitro transcription, and in vivo promoter probing. During logarithmic growth, the tuf1p and rpsLp transcripts are present at comparable levels. In contrast to Escherichia coli, which has two almost identical tuf genes, the gram-positive S. ramocissimus contains only tuf1 for its regular EF-Tu. High levels of EF-Tu may therefore be achieved by the compensatory activity of tuf1p. PMID:9171408

  13. An experimental study of growth and phase change of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Teets, Edward

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the progress made on understanding phase changes related to solutions which may comprise Polar Stratospheric Clouds. In particular, it is concerned with techniques for investigating specific classes of metastability and phase change which may be important not only in Polar Stratospheric Clouds but in all atmospheric aerosols in general. While the lower level atmospheric aerosol consists of mixtures of (NH4)(SO4)2, NH4HSO4, NaCl among others, there is evidence that aerosol at PSC levels is composed of acid aerosol, either injected from volcanic events (such as Pinatubo) or having diffused upward from the lower atmosphere. In particular, sulfuric acid and nitric acid are known to occur at PSC levels, and are suspected of catalyzing ozone destruction reactions by adsorption on surfaces of crystallized particles. The present study has centered on two approaches: (1) the extent of supercooling (with respect to ice) and supersaturation (with respect to hydrate) and the nature of crystal growth in acid solutions of specific molality; and (2) the nature of growth from the vapor of HNO3 - H2O crystals both on a substrate and on a pre-existing aerosol.

  14. Non-triggered auroral substorms and long-period (1-4 mHz) geomagnetic and auroral luminosity pulsations in the polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagova, Nadezda; Nosikova, Natalia; Baddeley, Lisa; Kozyreva, Olga; Lorentzen, Dag A.; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Johnsen, Magnar G.

    2017-03-01

    A study is undertaken into parameters of the polar auroral and geomagnetic pulsations in the frequency range 1-4 mHz (Pc5/Pi3) during quiet geomagnetic intervals preceding auroral substorms and non-substorm background variations. Special attention is paid to substorms that occur under parameters of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions typical for undisturbed days (non-triggered substorms). The spectral parameters of pulsations observed in auroral luminosity as measured by a meridian scanning photometer (Svalbard) in the polar cap and near the polar boundary of the auroral oval are studied and compared with those for the geomagnetic pulsations measured by the magnetometer network IMAGE in the same frequency range. It is found that Pc5/Pi3 power spectral density (PSD) is higher during pre-substorm time intervals than for non-substorm days and that specific variations of pulsation parameters (substorm precursors) occur during the last 2-4 pre-substorm hours.

  15. Inactivation of human pathogens during phase II composting of manure-based mushroom growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Weil, Jennifer D; Cutter, Catherine N; Beelman, Robert B; LaBorde, Luke F

    2013-08-01

    Commercial production of white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) requires a specialized growth substrate prepared from composted agricultural by-products. Because horse and poultry manures are widely used in substrate formulations, there is a need to determine the extent to which the composting process is capable of eliminating human pathogens. In this study, partially composted substrate was inoculated with a pathogen cocktail (log 10⁶ to 10⁸ CFU/g) containing Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. Pathogen and indicator-organism reductions were followed at temperatures that typically occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning procedure. Controlled-temperature water bath studies at 48.8, 54.4, and 60°C demonstrated complete destruction of the three pathogens after 36.0, 8.0, and 0.5 h, respectively. Destruction of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 at 54.4°C occurred more slowly than E. coli, total coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and Salmonella. Microbial reductions that occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning treatment were studied in a small-scale mushroom production research facility. After phase II composting, E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels, and inoculated pathogens were not detected by direct plating or by enrichment. The results of this study show that a phase II composting process can be an effective control measure for eliminating risks associated with the use of composted animal manures during mushroom production. Growers are encouraged to validate and verify their own composting processes through periodic microbial testing for pathogens and to conduct studies to assure uniform distribution of substrate temperatures during phase II.

  16. Early stage reversed crystal growth of zeolite A and its phase transformation to sodalite.

    PubMed

    Greer, Heather; Wheatley, Paul S; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Morris, Russell E; Zhou, Wuzong

    2009-12-16

    Microstructural analysis of the early stage crystal growth of zeolite A in hydrothermal synthetic conditions revealed a revised crystal growth route from surface to core in the presence of the biopolymer chitosan. The mechanism of this extraordinary crystal growth route is discussed. In the first stage, the precursor and biopolymer aggregated into amorphous spherical particles. Crystallization occurred on the surface of these spheres, forming the typical cubic morphology associated with zeolite A with a very thin crystalline cubic shell and an amorphous core. With a surface-to-core extension of crystallization, sodalite nanoplates were crystallized within the amorphous cores of these zeolite A cubes, most likely due to an increase of pressure. These sodalite nanoplates increased in size, breaking the cubic shells of zeolite A in the process, leading to the phase transformation from zeolite A to sodalite via an Ostwald ripening process. Characterization of specimens was performed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, supported by other techniques including X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and N(2) adsorption/desorption.

  17. Acetaldehyde addition throughout the growth phase alleviates the phenotypic effect of zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cheraiti, Naoufel; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    During experiments to determine the effects of exogenously added acetaldehyde on pure cultures of various yeast strains, we discovered that an early acetaldehyde perfusion during the growth phase allowed several yeasts to partially overcome the phenotypic effects of zinc depletion during alcoholic fermentation. We, therefore, performed genome-wide expression and proteomic analysis on an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain (VL1) growing in zinc-replete or zinc-depleted conditions in the presence of perfused acetaldehyde to identify molecular markers of this effect. Zinc depletion severely affects ethanol production and therefore nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) regeneration, although we observed partial compensation by the upregulation of the poorly efficient Fe-dependent Adh4p in our conditions. A coordinate metabolic response was indeed observed in response to the early acetaldehyde perfusion, and particularly of the lower part of glycolysis, leading to the cellular replenishment of NAD cofactor. These various findings suggest that acetaldehyde exchange between strains may inhibit the growth of some yeast strains while encouraging the growth of others. This phenomenon could be particularly important for understanding the ecology of colonization of complex fermentation media by S. cerevisiae after elimination of non-Saccharomyces yeasts.

  18. Vapor phase epitaxy growth of CdTe epilayers for RT x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovergine, Nico; Mancini, A. M.; Prete, P.; Cola, Adriano; Tapfer, Leander

    2000-11-01

    We report on the growth of thick CdTe layers on ZnTe/(100) GaAs hybrid substrates by the novel H2 transport vapor phase epitaxy (H2T-VPE) method. High crystalline quality (100)-oriented CdTe single crystal epilayers can be fabricated under atmospheric pressure and at growth temperatures (TD) in the 600 - 800 degree Celsius interval. Double crystal X-ray diffraction measurements performed on epilayers thicker than 30 micrometer show CdTe (400) peaks with FWHM <