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Sample records for substrate thermal resistance

  1. Impact of nucleation density on thermal resistance near diamond-substrate boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Touzelbaev, M.N.; Goodson, K.E.

    1996-12-31

    Existing theory cannot account for the experimentally-observed thermal boundary resistance between deposited layers and substrates at room temperature. This is due to microstructural disorder in the deposited film within tens of nanometers of the interface. This work develops a model for the resulting thermal resistance near diamond-substrate interfaces, where the best deposition processes continue to yield high concentrations of amorphous inclusions and nanocrystalline material. The model relies on phonon transport theory and a novel subdivision of the near-interfacial region, which shows that the resistance is governed by the number of diamond nucleation sites per unit substrate area, i.e. The nucleation density. The predictions are consistent with experimental data for diamond-silicon interfaces and indicate that the resistance reaches a minimum for a nucleation density near 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2}. This work facilitates the development microstructures that benefit more strongly from the excellent thermal-conduction properties of diamond.

  2. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  3. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  4. Effect of acidification and oil on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated in food substrate.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, F; Rodrigo, C; Fernández, P S; Rodrigo, M; Martínez, A

    1999-11-15

    The effect of the addition of vinegar and/or oil to a food homogenate (tomato sauce, tuna and vegetables) on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was studied. The results indicated that the food substrate without the addition of vinegar and oil and a pH value of 5.28 reduced the thermal resistance of B. stearothermophilus spores compared with that obtained in double-distilled water, (D121 = 1.41 and 3.08 min respectively). The addition of vinegar reduced the pH of the substrate (4.81) and consequently the D values were reduced (D121 = 1.28 min). The addition of soya oil and vinegar to substrate until a pH of 4.81, further reduced the thermal resistance of the spores, giving a D121 value of 0.93 min. PMID:10733251

  5. Impact of substrate and thermal boundary resistance on the performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs analyzed by means of electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, S.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Mateos, J.; González, T.; Pérez, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present results from the simulations of a submicrometer AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) by using an in-house electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulator. We study the temperature distribution and the influence of heating on the transfer characteristics and the transconductance when the device is grown on different substrates (sapphire, silicon, silicon carbide and diamond). The effect of the inclusion of a thermal boundary resistance (TBR) is also investigated. It is found that, as expected, HEMTs fabricated on substrates with high thermal conductivities (diamond) exhibit lower temperatures, but the difference between hot-spot and average temperatures is higher. In addition, devices fabricated on substrates with higher thermal conductivities are more sensitive to the value of the TBR because the temperature discontinuity is greater in the TBR layer.

  6. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Sung, Dahye; Lee, Junghoon; Kim, Yonghwan; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-12-01

    A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu2O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  7. Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2003-05-13

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  8. Development of a Frequency-Domain Method Using Completely Optical Techniques for Measuring the Interfacial Thermal Resistance between the Metal Film and the Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryozo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a new frequency-domain (FD) method using completely optical techniques for determining the interfacial thermal resistance between a metal film and its substrate. The 3ω method, which is a FD method based on the technique of photolithography to define a metal-film heater/thermometer pattern, has been most widely used so far. The 2ω method implemented a thermoreflectance technique for measuring ac temperature. In this study we additionally implement a laser technique for periodic heating. Our new method can provide the absolute value of interfacial thermal resistance between a film and its substrate, using the known thermophysical properties of the substrate material, even though the optical power of the pump laser and the optical properties of the metal film are unknown. To verify the method, we measure the thermal resistance of interfaces such as, Au-Al2O3, Bi-Al2O3, Au-SiO2 (thermally oxidized), and Bi-SiO2 (thermally oxidized). The results of the measurements show good agreement with the data obtained by the 2ω method and with the data theoretically predicted using the diffusion mismatch model (DMM).

  9. Intensified magneto-resistance by rapid thermal annealing in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film on SiO2 glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, H.; Morii, K.; Yamasaki, A.; Sugimura, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Horie, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Shimizu, T.

    2012-12-01

    We have observed large magneto-resistance (MR) intensified by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film (MTF) on SiO2 glass (a-SiO2) substrate. The MTF was produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method by using a magnetite target. The electrical resistivity (ER) of as-grown MTF (AG-MTF) showed the Mott's variable range hopping behavior, which implies that the AG-MTF is amorphous-like. Although the magneto-resistance (MR) ratio of bulk single crystal is very small except around the Verwey transition temperature (VTT), that of the AG-MTF showed moderately large below room temperature. Due to RTA of the AG-MTF by use of an IR image furnace, the MR ratio of MTFs was intensified, and especially by the annealing around the Curie temperature (585°C) of magnetite. Furthermore the ER of the rapid thermally annealed MTF (RTA-MTF) showed a slight kink at around the VTT, which indicates that the crystallinity of the RTA-MTF is higher than that of the AG-MTF The MTF produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method are composed of magnetite fine particles (MFPs). We consider that the directions of magnetic moments of MFPs in the MTF were spatially randomized by the RTA and the strong spin scattering of itinerant electrons transferring between adjacent MFPs caused the intensification of the MR ratio.

  10. Resist Characterization On Reflecting Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, John; Bell, William R.; Ferguson, Richard; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1986-07-01

    The bottleneck of quantitative characterization of resist materials is being relieved by the introduction of a commercial system with multiple channel capabilities working directly on silicon wafers. This convenience for the process engineer comes at considerable inconvenience in data analysis, primarily due to exposure standing wave effects from substrate reflection. On silicon, for example, an exposure variation of a factor of 8 occurs over a vertical distance of 65 nm within the resist. Data from this very thin layer can span almost the entire range of exposure state M of the resist and two orders of magnitude change in development rates. Experimental and software techniques developed in a benchmark study of the well characterized Kodak 820 resist are reported. Several software techniques were established for data analysis. A depth-dependent filtering technique was used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the rate vs depth data from the slowly developing channels. This noise is due to the high sampling rates, which are necessary to simultaneously monitor the most rapidly developing areas. A post processor for SAMPLE was developed to process the normal output of exposure state M versus depth and generate M values for the exposures specified in the data from the measurement system. A three column vector of development rate R, exposure state M and depth z is then generated for plotting R(M,z) and numerically fitting algebraic models. Measurements and data reduction were made on silicon wafers with various thin film coatings. A hard-baked resist coating was sufficiently absorbing that very little oscillation in the development rate with depth was observed. For aluminum coatings, it was not possible to get good thickness vs time or rate data. The rate versus depth on bare silicon wafers could be made well behaved after filtering. The resulting R(M,z) curve for bare silicon was somewhat noisy. Thus the use of a hard-baked coating is indicated in practice for

  11. The combined effect of thermal annealing of MgO substrate and Ca substitution on the surface resistance of YBa2Cu3Oz thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, M.; Obara, H.; Yamasaki, H.

    2005-07-01

    Single-layer Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3Oz (YCBCO) thin films (x =0.00, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.10) grown on annealed as well as unannealed MgO substrates have been systematically investigated for their carrier concentration, critical current density Jc, and microwave surface resistance Rs. For x ⩽0.05, the grain growth follows a three-dimensional-spiral growth mechanism, while for x =0.10 we observed a mainly two-dimensional-like growth of grains. The results of Hall data reveal that the x =0.05 film is overdoped while films with x =0.02 and 0.10 are underdoped with respect to the x =0.00 film. However, the Hall mobility μH is highly enhanced for the x =0.02 film. Thermal annealing of MgO substrates prior to film deposition results to an improvement in the overall superconducting properties of the film such as suppression of normal-state resistivity, enhancement of Jc, and minimization of Rs both for pure as well as Ca-substituted films. Annealing of MgO substrates enhances the Jc value to a magnitude (i) nearly doubled for x =0.00 films and (ii) more than an order for x =0.02 films. Also it leads to a minimization of the Rs value to (i) more than half and (ii) nearly an order of magnitude higher, respectively, for x =0.00 and x =0.02 films. Furthermore, for the x =0.02 film, below 60K, we realized an enhanced Jc value in self- as well as in large-applied fields. For other than the Ca-2% substituted films, a suppression of Jc with a strong field dependency has been noticed. Furthermore, the Rs value of the x =0.02 film (0.1mΩ at 20K, 21.9GHz) was three times lower compared to that of the x =0.00 film (0.35mΩ at 20K, 21.9GHz). At 20K and 21.9GHz, the Rs value for the x =0.05 film is comparable to that of the x =0.00 film, whereas for the x =0.10 film it is twice that of x =0.00. The low normal-state resistivity, enhanced mobility, high Jc, and the minimized Rs observed for x =0.02 films firmly support the possible improvement of superconducting order parameters near the grain

  12. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  13. Optimisation of trench isolated bipolar transistors on SOI substrates by 3D electro-thermal simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigrin, S.; Armstrong, G. A.; Kranti, A.

    2007-09-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of thermal resistance of trench isolated bipolar transistors on SOI substrates based on 3D electro-thermal simulations calibrated to experimental data. The impact of emitter length, width, spacing and number of emitter fingers on thermal resistance is analysed in detail. The results are used to design and optimise transistors with minimum thermal resistance and minimum transistor area.

  14. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Fleming, Austin; Hamaoui, Georges; Ban, Heng

    2016-07-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  15. Substrate temperature measurement and control during thermal plasma CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Q.D.; Guo, H.; Han, Q.Y.; Heberlein, J.V.R.; Pfender, E.

    1993-09-01

    A technique is proposed for substrate temperature control, with emphasis on temperature uniformity across substrate. The technique includes a substrate holder design employing non-uniform water cooling and a means of substrate attachment featured by controlled thermal contact resistance for a given heat flux distribution from the plasma. The technique was applied to deposit diamond films over a 5 cm diameter area in a DC thermal plasma reactor, and proved adequate. Performance of single-color (0.655 {mu}m) and two-color (2.1 and 2.4 {mu}m) pyrometers were evaluated against DC thermo.] plasma radiation. It was found that both line and continuum emission of plasma jets caused large errors in temperature measurement of the single-color pyrometer. The two-color pyrometer, however, is shown to be less sensitive to the plasma radiation. The way the substrate temperature was controlled and monitored in this study is in general applicable to other TPCVD processes where intense local heating and a bright plasma background exist.

  16. Structural, compositional, thermal resistant and hydro-oleophobic properties of fluorine based block-co-polymer films on quartz substrates by wet chemical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phani, A. R.; Passacantando, M.; Santucci, S.

    2006-08-01

    Crack free and smooth surfaces of poly [4,5-difluoro 2,2-bis (trifluoromethyl)-(1,3 dioxole)-co-tetrafluoroethylene] (TFE-co-TFD) thin films have been deposited by wet chemical dip coating technique on polished quartz and glass slide substrates. The deposited films have been subjected to annealing at different temperatures ranging from 100 to 500 °C for 1 h in argon atmosphere. The elemental composition of the as-deposited (xerogel) thin film as well as film annealed at 400 °C was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and observed that there was no change in the composition of the film. X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the amorphous behaviour of both as-deposited and film annealed at 400 °C. Surface morphology and elemental composition of the films have been examined by employing scanning electron microscopy attached with energy dispersive X-ray analyser, respectively. It was found that as the annealing temperature increased from 100 to 400 °C, nano-hemisphere-like structures have been grown, which in turn has shown increase in the water contact angle from 122o to 148o and oil (peanut) contact angle from 85° to 96°. No change in the water contact angle (122°) has been observed when the films deposited at room temperature were heated in air from 30 to 80 °C as well as exposed to steam for 8 days for 8 h/day indicating thermal stability of the film.

  17. Intergranular metal phase increases thermal shock resistance of ceramic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, H. W.

    1966-01-01

    Dispersed copper phase increases the thermal shock resistance of a plasma-arc-sprayed coating of zirconia used as a heat barrier on a metal substrate. A small amount of copper is deposited on the granules of the zirconia powder before arc-spraying the resultant powder composite onto the substrate.

  18. Low thermal resistance power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hassani, Vahab; Vlahinos, Andreas; Bharathan, Desikan

    2007-03-13

    A power module assembly with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate with passageways or openings for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface to an upper surface. A circuit substrate is provided and positioned on the spreader plate to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate includes a bonding layer configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening in the plate. The assembly includes power modules mounted on the circuit substrate on a surface opposite the bonding layer. The power modules are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

  19. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  20. Quantification of thermal and contact resistances of scanning thermal probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyeongtae E-mail: meyhofer@umich.edu Jeong, Wonho; Lee, Woochul; Sadat, Seid; Thompson, Dakotah; Meyhofer, Edgar E-mail: meyhofer@umich.edu; Reddy, Pramod E-mail: meyhofer@umich.edu

    2014-11-17

    Scanning thermal probes are widely used for imaging temperature fields with nanoscale resolution, for studying near-field radiative heat transport and for locally heating samples. In all these applications, it is critical to know the thermal resistance to heat flow within the probe and the thermal contact resistance between the probe and the sample. Here, we present an approach for quantifying the aforementioned thermal resistances using picowatt resolution heat flow calorimeters. The measured contact resistance is found to be in good agreement with classical predictions for thermal contact resistance. The techniques developed here are critical for quantitatively probing heat flows at the nanoscale.

  1. Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Interface Resistance of Pentacene Thin Films with Varying Morphology.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jillian; Ong, Wee-Liat; Bettinger, Christopher J; Malen, Jonathan A

    2016-07-27

    Temperature dependent thermal conductivities and thermal interface resistances of pentacene (Pn) thin films deposited on silicon substrates and self-assembled monolayer-modified [octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)] silicon substrates were measured using frequency domain thermoreflectance. Atomic force microscopy images were used to derive an effective film thickness for thermal transport that accounts for surface roughness. Data taken over a temperature range of 77-300 K for various morphologies and film thicknesses show that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing Pn grain size. The sum of the substrate-Pn and Pn-gold thermal interface resistances was isolated from the intrinsic thermal resistance of the Pn films and found to be independent of surface chemistry. Corresponding Kapitza lengths of approximately 150 nm are larger than the physical thicknesses of typical Pn thin films and indicate that the interfaces play a dominant role in the total thermal resistance. This study has implications for increasing the performance and effective thermal management of small molecule electronic and energy conversion devices.

  2. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  3. Hybrid organic/inorganic coatings for abrasion resistance on plastic and metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J.; Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.L.

    1996-12-31

    Novel abrasion resistant coatings have been successfully prepared by the sol-gel method. These materials are spin coated onto bisphenol-A polycarbonate, diallyl diglycol carbonate resin (CR-39) sheet, aluminum, and steel substrates and are thermally cured to obtain a transparent coating of a few microns in thickness. Following the curing, the abrasion resistance is measured and compared with an uncoated control. It was found that these hybrid organic/inorganic networks partially afford excellent abrasion resistance to the polycarbonate substrates investigated. In addition to having excellent abrasion resistance comparable to current commercial coatings, some newly developed systems are also UV resistant. Similar coating formulations applied to metals can greatly improve the abrasion resistance despite the fact that the coatings are lower in density than their substrates.

  4. An aluminum resist substrate for microfabrication by LIGA.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James J.; Boehme, Dale R.; Hauck, Cheryl A.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Hunter, Luke L.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Hachman, John T.; Losey, Matthew W.; Skala, Dawn M.; Korellis, John S.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2005-04-01

    Resist substrates used in the LIGA process must provide high initial bond strength between the substrate and resist, little degradation of the bond strength during x-ray exposure, acceptable undercut rates during development, and a surface enabling good electrodeposition of metals. Additionally, they should produce little fluorescence radiation and give small secondary doses in bright regions of the resist at the substrate interface. To develop a new substrate satisfying all these requirements, we have investigated secondary resist doses due to electrons and fluorescence, resist adhesion before exposure, loss of fine features during extended development, and the nucleation and adhesion of electrodeposits for various substrate materials. The result of these studies is a new anodized aluminum substrate and accompanying methods for resist bonding and electrodeposition. We demonstrate successful use of this substrate through all process steps and establish its capabilities via the fabrication of isolated resist features down to 6 {micro}m, feature aspect ratios up to 280 and electroformed nickel structures at heights of 190 to 1400 {micro}m. The minimum mask absorber thickness required for this new substrate ranges from 7 to 15 {micro}m depending on the resist thickness.

  5. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  6. Low thermal resistance power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hassani, Vahab; Vlahinos, Andreas; Bharathan, Desikan

    2010-12-28

    A power module assembly (400) with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate (410) with passageways or openings (414) for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface (411) to an upper surface (412). A circuit substrate (420) is provided and positioned on the spreader plate (410) to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate (420) includes a bonding layer (422) configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer (422) may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface (412) of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening (414) in the plate. The assembly includes power modules (430) mounted on the circuit substrate (420) on a surface opposite the bonding layer (422). The power modules (430) are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial thermal transport between silicene and substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingchao; Hong, Yang; Tong, Zhen; Xiao, Zhihuai; Bao, Hua; Yue, Yanan

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the interfacial thermal transport across silicene and various substrates, i.e., crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), crystalline silica (c-SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) are explored by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A transient pulsed heating technique is applied in this work to characterize the interfacial thermal resistance in all hybrid systems. It is reported that the interfacial thermal resistances between silicene and all substrates decrease nearly 40% with temperature from 100 K to 400 K, which is due to the enhanced phonon couplings from the anharmonicity effect. Analysis of phonon power spectra of all systems is performed to interpret simulation results. Contradictory to the traditional thought that amorphous structures tend to have poor thermal transport capabilities due to the disordered atomic configurations, it is calculated that amorphous silicon and silica substrates facilitate the interfacial thermal transport compared with their crystalline structures. Besides, the coupling effect from substrates can improve the interface thermal transport up to 43.5% for coupling strengths χ from 1.0 to 2.0. Our results provide fundamental knowledge and rational guidelines for the design and development of the next-generation silicene-based nanoelectronics and thermal interface materials.

  8. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  9. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Chojnowski, D.; Assoufid, L.; Worek, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    The issue of thermal contact resistance across metallic interfaces has been investigated for many situations over the past several decades. The application in the present case is contact cooling of high heat load optical substrates. High heat load x-ray mirrors and other optical components used at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are either internally cooled or contact cooled. In the internally cooled mirrors, a coolant flows through passages configured in the optical substrate. In the contact-cooled case, cooling is provided by placing cooling plates in contact with the mirror to extract the heat. Here, an experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include indium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance. Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the indium foil, and then the silver foil.

  10. Effect of microstructure on Au/sapphire interfacial thermal resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yibin; Kato, Ryozo; Goto, Masahiro

    2010-11-15

    We deposit Au films on single crystal sapphire substrates by sputtering and evaporation methods. The microstructure characteristics such as crystal textures, grain sizes, and fraction of contacted area of the films are examined by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The sputtered films have an average grain size of about 200 nm and perfectly attach to the substrates; the as-evaporated films partially attach to the substrate; the grain size varies from 10 to 30 nm, and after annealing, increases to 50 nm. Au{sub 2}Al phase is observed in the annealed samples. The interfacial thermal resistance is measured by a frequency domain thermoreflectance method. The thermal resistance of the sputtered Au/sapphire interfaces is 35.5x10{sup -9} m{sup 2} K W{sup -1}, and those of the evaporated samples are up to three times as large as this value. The change in interfacial thermal resistance is explained by the effect of detachment using a parallel arranged thermal resistance model, the effect of grain size, and the influence of chemical bonding at the interfaces.

  11. Enhanced performance thermal diode via thermal boundary resistance at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar-Padilla, M.; Licea-Jimenez, L.; Pérez-Garcia, S. A.; Alvarez-Quintana, J.

    2015-08-01

    Hypothetically, a thermal rectifier is a device which leads a greater heat flux in one direction than another one, similarly as the electrical diode works for the electrical flux. Here, a drastic increment in the rectification factor has been obtained in nanoscale layered thermal diodes due to the effect of thermal boundary resistance present on an asymmetrical stack of nanofilms. Measurements show a thermal rectification factor as large as 3.3 under a temperature bias well below 1 K, which is the biggest thermal rectification factor reported at room temperature compared to previously reported thermal diodes so far. According to the direction of the applied heat flux, the observed impact of the thermal boundary resistance on the device is manifested through the presence of an asymmetric temperature rise along the heat transfer axis. Such effect provides an alternative route for the development of high performance thermal diodes.

  12. Apparatus for thermally evolving chemical analytes from a removable substrate

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.

    2003-06-03

    Method and apparatus suited to convenient field use for heating a porous metallic substrate swiped on the surface of an article possibly bearing residue of contraband or other target chemical substances. The preferred embodiment of the device includes means for holding the swiped substrate between electrodes bearing opposite electrical charges, thereby completing an electrical circuit in which current can flow through the porous metallic substrate. Resistance causes the substrate to heat, thus driving adherent target chemicals, if present, into a space from which they are carried via gas flow into a detector such as a portable IMS for analysis.

  13. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Assoufid, L.; Worek, W.M.

    1997-10-27

    An experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include iridium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance, Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the iridium foil, and then the silver foil.

  14. Thermal Transport across a Substrate-Thin-Film Interface: Effects of Film Thickness and Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and a model AlN-GaN interface, we demonstrate that the interfacial thermal resistance RK (Kapitza resistance) between a substrate and thin film depends on the thickness of the film and the film surface roughness when the phonon mean free path is larger than film thickness. In particular, when the film (external) surface is atomistically smooth, phonons transmitted from the substrate can travel ballistically in the thin film, be scattered specularly at the surface, and return to the substrate without energy transfer. If the external surface scatters phonons diffusely, which is characteristic of rough surfaces, RK is independent of film thickness and is the same as RK that characterizes smooth surfaces in the limit of large film thickness. At interfaces where phonon transmission coefficients are low, the thickness dependence is greatly diminished regardless of the nature of surface scattering. The film thickness dependence of RK is analogous to the well-known fact of lateral thermal conductivity thickness dependence in thin films. The difference is that phonon-boundary scattering lowers the in-plane thermal transport in thin films, but it facilitates thermal transport from the substrate to the thin film.

  15. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  16. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graded Nanocomposites with Interfacial Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H. M.; Paulino, G. H.; Buttlar, W. G.; Sun, L. Z.

    2008-02-01

    This work employs the self-consistent method to investigate the effective thermal conductivity distribution in functionally graded materials (FGMs) considering the Kapitza interfacial thermal resistance. A heat conduction solution is first derived for one spherical particle embedded in a graded matrix with a prefect interface. The interfacial thermal resistance of a nanoparticle is simulated by a new particle with a lower thermal conductivity. A novel self-consistent formulation is developed to derive the averaged heat flux field of the particle phase. Then the temperature gradient can be obtained in the gradation direction. From the relation between the effective flux and temperature gradient in the gradation direction, the effective thermal conductivity distribution is solved. If the gradient of the volume fraction distribution is zero, the FGM is reduced to a composite containing uniformly dispersed nanoparticles and a explicit solution of the effective thermal conductivity is provided. Disregarding the interfacial thermal resistance, the proposed model recovers the conventional self-consistent model. Mathematically, effective thermal conductivity is a quantity exactly analogous to effective electric conductivity, dielectric permittivity, magnetic permeability and water permeability in a linear static state, so this method can be extended to those problems for graded materials.

  17. Performance Analysis and Modeling of Thermally Sprayed Resistive Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Marcoux, Pierre; Perrault, Michel; Abbott, Richard C.; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2013-08-01

    Many processes and systems require hot surfaces. These are usually heated using electrical elements located in their vicinity. However, this solution is subject to intrinsic limitations associated with heating element geometry and physical location. Thermally spraying electrical elements directly on surfaces can overcome these limitations by tailoring the geometry of the heating element to the application. Moreover, the element heat transfer is maximized by minimizing the distance between the heater and the surface to be heated. This article is aimed at modeling and characterizing resistive heaters sprayed on metallic substrates. Heaters were fabricated by using a plasma-sprayed alumina dielectric insulator and a wire flame-sprayed iron-based alloy resistive element. Samples were energized and kept at a constant temperature of 425 °C for up to 4 months. SEM cross-sectional observations revealed the formation of cracks at very specific locations in the alumina layer after thermal use. Finite-element modeling shows that these cracks originate from high local thermal stresses and can be predicted according to the considered geometry. The simulation model was refined using experimental parameters obtained by several techniques such as emissivity and time-dependent temperature profile (infra-red camera), resistivity (four-probe technique), thermal diffusivity (laser flash method), and mechanical properties (micro and nanoindentation). The influence of the alumina thickness and the substrate material on crack formation was evaluated.

  18. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy of graphene devices on flexible polyimide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Mir Mohammad; Park, Saungeun; Huang, Yu; Akinwande, Deji; Yao, Zhen; Murthy, Jayathi; Shi, Li

    2016-06-01

    A triple-scan scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) method and a zero-heat flux laser-heated SThM technique are investigated for quantitative thermal imaging of flexible graphene devices. A similar local tip-sample thermal resistance is observed on both the graphene and metal areas of the sample, and is attributed to the presence of a polymer residue layer on the sample surface and a liquid meniscus at the tip-sample junction. In addition, it is found that the tip-sample thermal resistance is insensitive to the temperature until it begins to increase as the temperature increases to 80 °C and exhibits an abrupt increase at 110 °C because of evaporation of the liquid meniscus at the tip-sample junction. Moreover, the variation in the tip-sample thermal resistance due to surface roughness is within the experimental tolerance except at areas with roughness height exceeding tens of nanometers. Because of the low thermal conductivity of the flexible polyimide substrate, the SThM measurements have found that the temperature rise in flexible graphene devices is more than one order of magnitude higher than those reported for graphene devices fabricated on a silicon substrate with comparable dimensions and power density. Unlike a graphene device on a silicon substrate where the majority of the electrical heating in the graphene device is conducted vertically through the thin silicon dioxide dielectric layer to the high-thermal conductivity silicon substrate, lateral heat spreading is important in the flexible graphene devices, as shown by the observed decrease in the average temperature rise normalized by the power density with decreasing graphene channel length from about 30 μm to 10 μm. However, it is shown by numerical heat transfer analysis that this trend is mainly caused by the size scaling of the thermal spreading resistance of the polymer substrate instead of lateral heat spreading by the graphene. In addition, thermoelectric effects are found to be negligible

  19. Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates for Rocket Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloesser, Jana; Fedorova, Tatiana; Bäker, Martin; Rösler, Joachim

    Currently a new generation of relaunchable space transportation system using liquid hydrogen/ liquid oxygen rocket engines is under development. The inner combustion chamber is exposed to extreme thermal loads and environmental attack during starts. To prevent failure of the cooling channels, a thermal barrier coating to provide thermal and oxidation protection could be applied. Thermal barrier coatings are state of the art for gas turbines and this concept should be transferred to copper substrates in rocket engine applications. The thermomechanical loading conditions are quite different from the gas turbine applications as heat fluxes and temperature gradients are much higher while overall service time is much shorter. As a start for optimization of a suitable coating, a material system known for gas turbines is employed. In this work a thermal barrier coating system is applied by atmospheric plasma spraying to the copper-based high strength alloy Cu-1%Cr-0.3%Zr. The bond coat consists of a NiCrAlY alloy, while partially stabilized zirconia is used as a top coat. Spraying parameter optimization for the new substrate is described. The reached coating system is tested in thermal cycling experiments, where no failure of the coating could be detected. In oxidation experiments good environmental protection of the coating is shown.

  20. Spin-dependent heat transport and thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taehee

    in thin film structures. A transient theraroreflectance (TTR) technique can be used for measuring the thermal conductivity of thin films in cross-sectional direction. In this study, a pump-probe scheme was employed for the TTR technique. We built an optical pump-probe system by using a nanosecond pulse laser for pumping and a continuous-wave laser for probing. A short-time heating event occured at the surface of a sample by shining a laser pulse on the surface. Then the time-resolved thermoreflectance signals were detected using a photodetector and an oscilloscope. The increased temperature decreases slowly and its thermal decay depends on the thermal properties of a sample. Since the reflectivity is linearly proportional to the temperature, the time-resolved thermoreflectance signals have the information of the thermal properties of a sample. In order to extract the thermal properties of a sample, a thermal analysis was performed by fitting the experimental data with thermal models. We developed 2-layered and 3-layered thermal models using the analogies between thermal conduction and electric conduction and a transmission-line concept. We used two sets of sample structures: Au/SiNx/Si substrate and Au/CoFe/SiNx/Si substrate with various thickness of SiN x layer. Using the pump-probe system, we measured the time-resolved thermoreflectance signals for each sample. Then, the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance were obtained by fitting the experimental data with the thermal models. The thermal conductivity of SiNx films was measured to be 2.0 W/mK for both structures. In the case of the thermal boundary resistance, it was 0.81x10-5 m 2K/W at the Au/SiNx interface and 0.54x10 -5 m2K/W at the CoFe/SiNx interface, respectively. The difference of the thermal boundary resistance between Au/SiNx and CoFe/SiNx might be came from the different phonon dispersion of Au and CoFe. The thermal conductivity did not depend on the thickness of SiNx films in the

  1. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, D. M.; Nied, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental and analytical investigation of the thermal shock phenomena in ceramic matrix composites is detailed. The composite systems examined were oxide-based, consisting of an aluminosilicate matrix with either polycrystalline aluminosilicate or single crystal alumina fiber reinforcement. The program was divided into three technical tasks; baseline mechanical properties, thermal shock modeling, and thermal shock testing. The analytical investigation focused on the development of simple expressions for transient thermal stresses induced during thermal shock. The effect of various material parameters, including thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and thermal expansion, were examined analytically for their effect on thermal shock performance. Using a simple maximum stress criteria for each constituent, it was observed that fiber fracture would occur only at the most extreme thermal shock conditions and that matrix fracture, splitting parallel to the reinforcing fiber, was to be expected for most practical cases. Thermal shock resistance for the two material systems was determined experimentally by subjecting plates to sudden changes in temperature on one surface while maintaining the opposite surface at a constant temperature. This temperature change was varied in severity (magnitude) and in number of shocks applied to a given sample. The results showed that for the most severe conditions examined that only surface matrix fracture was present with no observable fiber fracture. The impact of this damage on material performance was limited to the matrix dominated properties only. Specifically, compression strength was observed to decrease by as much as 50 percent from the measured baseline.

  2. Heat resistant substrates and battery separators made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, Alois (Inventor); Scala, Luciano C. (Inventor); Ruffing, Charles R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A flexible substrate having a caustic resistant support and at least one membrane comprising a solid polymeric matrix containing a network of interconnected pores and interdispersed inorganic filler particles with a ratio of filler: polymer in the polymeric matrix of between about 1:1 to 5:1, is made by coating at least one side of the support with a filler:coating formulation mixture of inorganic filler particles and a caustic resistant, water insoluble polymer dissolved in an organic solvent, and removing the solvent from the mixture to provide a porous network within the polymeric matrix.

  3. Thin film heat flux sensors fabricated on copper substrates for thermal measurements in microfluidic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperson, Benjamin A.; Schmale, Joshua; Qu, Weilin; Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Turner, Kevin T.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-scale heat flux sensors are fabricated on bulk copper surfaces using a combination of lithography-based microfabrication and micro end milling. The heat flux sensors are designed to enable heat transfer measurements on an individual pin in a copper micro pin fin heat sink. Direct fabrication of the sensors on copper substrates minimizes the thermal resistance between the sensor and pin. To fabricate the devices, copper wafers were polished to a flatness and roughness suitable for microfabrication and standard processes, including photolithography, polyimide deposition via spinning, and metal deposition through physical vapor deposition were tailored for use on the unique copper substrates. Micro end milling was then used to create 3D pin features and segment the devices from the copper substrate. Temperature calibrations of the sensors were performed using a tube furnace and the heat flux sensing performance was assessed through laser-based tests. This paper describes the design, fabrication and calibration of these integrated heat flux sensors.

  4. Sprayed superamphiphobic coatings on copper substrate with enhanced corrosive resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Bo; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Men, Xuehu; Zhu, Xiaotao; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2014-02-01

    The oil fouling and limited corrosion resistance problem severely hindered the use of copper, one of important engineering materials, in practical applications. Herein to address this problem, we fabricated a superamphiphobic coating on copper substrate by spray coating. The resulting superamphiphobic surface supports the Cassie-Baxter regime with apparent contact angles of more than 150° and low contact angle hysteresis to water and organic liquids with low surface tension. The resulting superamphiphobic surface also possesses enhanced corrosion resistance, allowing it to exhibit a more positive corrosion potential and a more negative corrosion current density than pristine copper substrate. Moreover, the surface wettability can be tuning by varying the surface composition of the coating. This study represents a key addition to functional superamphiphobic materials.

  5. Thermal shock resistance of silicon oxynitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glandus, J. C.; Boch, P.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of Si2N2O refractory material was studied. The thermal expansion coeff. is 3.55x10 to the -6th power at 20 to 800 C and 2.86x10 to the -6th power m/m/deg at 20 to 200 C. The breaking loads are high at high stress. Young's modulus E and the shear modulus G decrease linearly with increasing porosity. For dense material E sub o approx. = 216,500 N/mm2 and G approx = 90,600 N/mm2. The Vickers hardness of the dense material is comparable to that of sapphire. The results on thermal shock show that R, the breaking load, stays constant for T T sub c, the first cracks appear and R decreases sharply for T=T sub c. As the severity of the thermal shock is increased at T T sub c, a small no. of new, large-size cracks appears. The shock's cumulative effect is negligible, and repeated shocks do not change the cracks. The low values of the thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus and the high tension breaking load are considered. Sintered Si2N2O with 5% MgO shows excellent cracking resistance under thermal shock.

  6. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage. PMID:22097561

  7. Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a fabrication process of low-cost superlattices and simulations related with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity of semiconductor/semiconductor superlattices was studied by equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and on the Kapitza resistance of superlattice's interfaces by equilibrium molecular dynamics. The non-equilibrium method was the tool used for the prediction of the Kapitza resistance for a binary semiconductor/metal system. Physical explanations are provided for rationalizing the simulation results. PACS 68.65.Cd, 66.70.Df, 81.16.-c, 65.80.-g, 31.12.xv PMID:21711805

  8. Method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhr, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates, such as a baking enamel paint surface, is described wherein the uncured enamel paint surface is coated with a non-curing lacquer which is, in turn, coated with a partially cured lacquer. The non-curing lacquer adheres to the enamel and a photo resist material satisfactorily adheres to the partially cured lacquer. Once normal photo etching techniques are employed the lacquer coats can be easily removed from the enamel leaving the photo etched image. In the case of edge lighted instrument panels, a coat of uncured enamel is placed over the cured enamel followed by the lacquer coats and the photo resists which is exposed and developed. Once the etched uncured enamel is cured, the lacquer coats are removed leaving an etched panel.

  9. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  10. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Imide-linked perfluoroalkylene ether polymers, that were developed for the high temperature fuel tank sealant application, are discussed. Modifications of polymer structure and properties were realized through use of a new aromatic dianhydride intermediate containing an ether-linked perfluoroalkylene segment. Tests of thermal, oxidative and hydrolytic stability, fuel resistance, and adhesion are discussed along with tensile strength and elongation results. Efforts to effect a low temperature condensation of amic acid prepolymer to form imide links inside are described.

  11. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  12. Thermal engineering of non-local resistance in lateral spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, S. Takahashi, Y. K.; Hirayama, S.; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.; Adachi, H.; Ieda, J.; Maekawa, S.

    2014-04-21

    We study the non-local spin transport in Permalloy/Cu lateral spin valves (LSVs) fabricated on thermally oxidized Si and MgO substrates. While these LSVs show the same magnitude of spin signals, significant substrate dependence of the baseline resistance was observed. The baseline resistance shows much weaker dependence on the inter-electrode distance than that of the spin transport observed in the Cu wires. A simple analysis of voltage-current characteristics in the baseline resistance indicates the observed result can be explained by a combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects at the injector and detector junctions, suggesting the usage of high thermal conductivity substrate (or under-layer) is effective to reduce the baseline resistance.

  13. Phononic heat transfer across an interface: thermal boundary resistance.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J; Volokitin, A I; Ueba, H

    2011-02-01

    We present a general theory of phononic heat transfer between two solids (or a solid and a fluid) in contact at a flat interface. We present simple analytical results which can be used to estimate the heat transfer coefficient (the inverse of which is usually called the 'thermal boundary resistance' or 'Kapitza resistance'). We present numerical results for the heat transfer across solid-solid and solid-liquid He contacts, and between a membrane (graphene) and a solid substrate (amorphous SiO(2)). The latter system involves the heat transfer between weakly coupled systems, and the calculated value of the heat transfer coefficient is in good agreement with the value deduced from experimental data.

  14. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    SciTech Connect

    Akulinkin, Alexandr Shugurov, Artur Sergeev, Viktor; Panin, Alexey; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-27

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  15. Substrate-dependent thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride thin-films processed at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Belkerk, B. E.; Bensalem, S.; Soussou, A.; Carette, M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Scudeller, Y.; Al Brithen, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on investigation concerning the substrate-dependent thermal conductivity (k) of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin-films processed at low temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity of AlN films grown at low temperature (<200 °C) on single-crystal silicon (Si) and amorphous silicon nitride (SiN) with thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 4000 nm was measured with the transient hot-strip technique. The k values for AlN films on SiN were found significantly lower than those on Silicon consistently with their microstructures revealed by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The change in k was due to the thermal boundary resistance found to be equal to 10 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on SiN against 3.5 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on Si. However, the intrinsic thermal conductivity was determined with a value as high as 200 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} whatever the substrate.

  16. Thermal stability studies of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings deposited on pure tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, A.; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Sreekumar, K. P.; Satpute, R. U.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    Plasma sprayed Yttrium oxide is used for coating of crucibles and moulds that are used at high temperature to handle highly reactive molten metals like uranium, titanium, chromium, and beryllium. The alloy bond layer is severely attacked by the molten metal. This commonly used layer contributes to the impurity addition to the pure liquid metal. Yttrium oxide was deposited on tantalum substrates (25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk and 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk) by atmospheric plasma spray technique with out any bond coat using optimized coating parameters. Resistance to thermal shock was evaluated by subjecting the coated specimens, to controlled heating and cooling cycles between 300K to 1600K in an induction furnace in argon atmosphere having <= 0.1ppm of oxygen. The experiments were designed to examine the sample tokens by both destructive and non-destructive techniques, after a predetermined number of thermal cycles. The results upto 24 thermal cycles of 25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk coupons and upto 6 cycles of 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk coupons are discussed. The coatings produced with the optimized parameters were found to exhibit excellent thermal shock resistance.

  17. Instability of nanometric fluid films on a thermally conductive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, N.; Kondic, L.

    2016-10-01

    We consider thin fluid films placed on thermally conductive substrates and exposed to a time-dependent spatially uniform heat source. The evolution of the films is considered within the long-wave framework in the regime such that both fluid-substrate interaction, modeled via disjoining pressure, and Marangoni forces are relevant. We analyze the problem by the means of linear stability analysis as well as time-dependent nonlinear simulations. The main finding is that when self-consistent computation of the temperature field is performed, a complex interplay of different instability mechanisms results. This includes either monotonous or oscillatory dynamics of the free surface. This oscillatory behavior is absent if the film temperature is assumed to be slaved to the current value of the film thickness. The results are discussed within the context of liquid metal films but are of relevance to dynamics of any thin film involving variable temperature of the free surface, such that the temperature and the film interface itself evolve on comparable time scales.

  18. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  19. Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Glassy Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Julie Marie

    Engineering of alloys has for years allowed aircraft turbine engines to become more efficient and operate at higher temperatures. As advancements in these alloy systems have become more difficult, ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), often yttria (7 wt %) stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), have been utilized for thermal protection. TBCs have allowed for higher engine operating temperatures and better fuel efficiency but have also created new engineering problems. Specifically, silica based particles such as sand and volcanic ash that enter the engine during operation form glassy deposits on the TBCs. These deposits can cause the current industrial 7YSZ thermal barrier coatings to fail since the glass formed penetrates and chemically interacts with the TBC. When this occurs, coating failure may occur due to a loss of strain tolerance, which can lead to fracture, and phase changes of the TBC material. There have been several approaches used to stop calcium-magnesium aluminio-silcate (CMAS) glasses (molten sand) from destroying the entire TBC, but overall there is still limited knowledge. In this thesis, 7YSZ and new TBC materials will be examined for thermochemical and thermomechanical performance in the presence of molten CMAS and volcanic ash. Two air plasma sprayed TBCs will be shown to be resistant to volcanic ash and CMAS. The first type of coating is a modified 7YSZ coating with 20 mol% Al2O3 and 5 mol% TiO2 in solid solution (YSZ+20Al+5Ti). The second TBC is made of gadolinium zirconate. These novel TBCs impede CMAS and ash penetration by interacting with the molten CMAS or ash and drastically changing the chemistry. The chemically modified CMAS or ash will crystallize into an apatite or anorthite phase, blocking the CMAS or ash from further destroying the coating. A presented mechanism study will show these coatings are effective due to the large amount of solute (Gd, Al) in the zirconia structure, which is the key to creating the crystalline apatite or

  20. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  1. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  2. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  3. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  4. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  5. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  6. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  7. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  8. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  9. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  10. Characterization and thermal shock behavior of Y2O3 films deposited on freestanding CVD diamond substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Chenyi; Guo, Jianchao; Liu, Jinglong; Yan, Xiongbo; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Liangxian; Wei, Junjun; Hei, Lifu; Li, Chengming

    2016-07-01

    Y2O3 anti-reflection films were deposited on freestanding CVD diamond substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal shock resistance and oxidation resistance of Y2O3/diamond/Y2O3 samples at 727 °C and 800 °C in atmospheric air were investigated. No delamination of the Y2O3 films occurred after thermal shock, thereby demonstrating extreme adhesion to freestanding diamond substrates. After thermal shock, Y atoms in the films were almost fully oxidized. Moreover, the majority of monoclinic phase in the Y2O3 films transformed into cubic phase, crystallinity was enhanced, and the average grain size significantly increased. The maximum transmittance in the 8-12 μm long-wave IR range of the Y2O3/diamond/Y2O3 samples increased from 81.3% ± 0.3% to 84.7% ± 0.2% and 83.6% ± 0.4%. These findings indicated that the Y2O3 anti-reflection films displayed good resistance to thermal shock and provided sufficient protection for diamond substrates against elevated temperature oxidation.

  11. Effect of Aggregation and Interfacial Thermal Resistance on Thermal Conductivity of Nanocomposites and Colloidal Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    William Evans; Ravi Prasher; Jacob Fish; Paul Meakin; Patrick Phelan; Pawel Keblinski

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed the role of aggregation and interfacial thermal resistance on the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanocomposites. We found that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanocomposites can be significantly enhanced by the aggregation of nanoparticles into clusters. The value of the thermal conductivity enhancement is determined by the cluster morphology, filler conductivity and interfacial thermal resistance. We also compared thermal conductivity enhancement due to aggregation with that associated with high-aspect ratio fillers, including fibers and plates.

  12. Effects of Thermal Environments on the Thermal Shock Resistance of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiguo; Fang, Daining

    In the present study, the temperature-dependent thermal shock resistance parameter of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) was measured based on the current evaluation theories of thermal shock resistance parameters, since the material parameters of UHTCs are very sensitive to the changes of temperature. The influence of some important thermal environment parameters on the thermal shock resistance and critical temperature difference of rupture of UHTCs were studied. By establishing the relation between the temperature and the thermal or mechanical properties of the UHTCs, we found that thermal shock behavior of UHTCs is strongly affected by the surface heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer condition and initial temperature of the thermal shock.

  13. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Helen F.; Cooper, Sarah M.; Meyyappan, M.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials.

  14. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  15. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  16. Development of a protective decorative fire resistant low smoke emitting, thermally stable coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of suitable electrocoatings and subsequent application to nonconductive substrates are discussed. Substrates investigated were plastics or resin-treated materials such as FX-resin (phenolic-type resin) impregnated fiberglass mat, polyphenylene sulfide, polyether sulfone and polyimide-impregnated unidirectional fiberglass. Efforts were aimed at formulating a fire-resistant, low smoke emitting, thermally stable, easily cleaned coating material. The coating is to be used for covering substrate panels, such as aluminum, silicate foam, polymeric structural entities, etc., all of which are applied in the aircraft cabin interior and thus subject to the spillages, scuffing, spotting and the general contaminants which prevail in aircraft passenger compartments.

  17. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  18. Thermal resistances of solder-boss/potting compound combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, E. D.

    1968-01-01

    Formulas, which can be used as a design tool, are derived to calculate the thermal resistance of solder-boss/potting compound combinations, for different depths of a solder boss, in electronic cordwood modules. Since the solder boss is the heat source, its shape and position will affect the thermal resistance of the surrounding potting compound.

  19. Monolithic pixels on moderate resistivity substrate and sparsifying readout architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubilato, P.; Battaglia, M.; Bisello, D.; Caselle, M.; Chalmet, P.; Demaria, L.; Ikemoto, Y.; Kloukinas, K.; Mansuy, S. C.; Mattiazzo, S.; Marchioro, A.; Mugnier, H.; Pantano, D.; Potenza, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rousset, J.; Silvestrin, L.; Snoeys, W.

    2013-12-01

    The LePix projects aim realizing a new generation monolithic pixel detectors with improved performances at lesser cost with respect to both current state of the art monolithic and hybrid pixel sensors. The detector is built in a 90 nm CMOS process on a substrate of moderate resistivity. This allows charge collection by drift while maintaining the other advantages usually offered by MAPS, like having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line. The collection by drift mechanism, coupled to the low capacitance design of the collecting node made possible by the monolithic approach, provides an excellent signal to noise ratio straight at the pixel cell together with a radiation tolerance far superior to conventional un-depleted MAPS. The excellent signal-to-noise performance is demonstrated by the device ability to separate the 6 keV 55Fe double peak at room temperature. To achieve high granularity (10-20 μm pitch pixels) over large detector areas maintaining high readout speed, a completely new compressing architecture has been devised. This architecture departs from the mainstream hybrid pixel sparsification approach, which uses in-pixel logic to reduce data, by using topological compression to minimize pixel area and power consumption.

  20. Thermal expansion compatibility of ceramic chip capacitors mounted on alumina substrates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. V.; Caruso, S. V.; Wilson, L. K.; Kinser, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of a representative sample of BaTiO3 and TiO2 ceramic chip capacitors and alumina substrates have been examined. These data have revealed large potential mechanical stresses under thermal cycling. A mathematical analysis of a composite model of the capacitor to predict the thermal expansion and modulus of elasticity and an analysis of the capacitor-substrate system to predict the magnitude of thermally induced stresses have been conducted. In all cases studied, thermally induced stresses great enough to cause capacitor body rupture or termination failure was predicted.

  1. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates and Method Relating Thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Claire, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared, This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches. adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrates; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  2. Preparation of SERS-active substrates using thermal inkjet technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro-Mercado, P.; Renteria-Beleño, B.; Hernández-Rivera, S. P.

    2012-11-01

    Highly sensitive SERS substrates capable of detecting less than a hundred molecules were prepared via TIJ technology. Films were prepared by printing silver nanoparticles (Ag NP) suspensions on quartz and other surfaces. Prepared substrates were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Morphological evolution of films was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Inhomogeneous coverage of Ag NP was obtained for a single deposition, while a more uniform distribution of Ag NP was obtained when the number of depositions increased. SERS performance of the prepared SERS substrates was evaluated using p-aminobenzenethiol as a probe molecule. An estimated enhancement factor of 9.0 × 1012 was obtained.

  3. Experimental and numerical study of the effective thermal conductivity of silica nanocomposites with thermal boundary resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, Rushabh M; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The thermal interface resistance at the macro scale is mainly described by the physical gap between two interfaces and constriction resistance due to this gap. The small gaps between the two material faces makes up the majority of thermal interface resistance at the macro scale. So, most of the studies have been focused on characterizing effect of surface geometry and material properties to thermal interface resistance. This resistance is more widely known as thermal contact resistance, represented with Rc. There are various models to predict thermal contact resistance at macro scale. These models predict thermal resistance Rc for given two materials by utilizing their bulk thermomechanical properties. Although, Rc represents thermal resistance accurately for macro size contacts between two metals, it is not suitable to describe interface resistance of particles in modern TIMs, aka particulate composites. The particles inside recently available TIMs are micron size and with effort to further increase surface area this particle size is approaching nano scale. At this small scale, Rc does not accurately predict thermal interface, as it is very difficult to characterize the surface topography. The thermal discontinuity at perfectly bonded interface of two dissimilar materials is termed as thermal boundary resistance (Rb) or Kapitza resistance. The macroscopic assumptions that thermal discontinuity only exists due to gaps and surface geometry leads to substantial error in determining interface thermal properties at micron and nano scale. The phenomenon of thermal boundary resistance is an inherent material property and arises due to fundamental mechanism of thermal transport. For metal-matrix particulate composites, Rb plays more important role than Rc. The free flowing nature of the polymer would eliminate most of the gaps between the two materials at their interface. This means almost all of the thermal resistance at particle/matrix interface would occur due to Rb

  4. Silicon based substrate with environmental/ thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Nanottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  5. Silicon based substrate with environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  6. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  7. Thermal insulating layer on a conducting substrate. Analysis of thermoreflectance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frétigny, C.; Duquesne, J.-Y.; Fournier, D.; Xu, F.

    2012-04-01

    Thermoreflectance experiments are sensitive to the thermal properties of thin layers deposited on substrates (conductivity and diffusivity). However, retrieving these properties from experimental data remains a difficult issue. The case of a conducting layer deposited on an insulating substrate was studied previously. We present here a mathematical and experimental analysis of the thermoreflectance response in the opposite case: an insulating layer on a conducting substrate. We show theoretically that conductivity and diffusivity can be determined independently thanks to a comparison with the substrate. The method is applied to experiments performed on a silicon substrate covered with a thin layer deposited by sputtering a titanium target.

  8. Investigation of the interaction between electrical discharges and low resistivity silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldera, F.; Burdiles, G.; Schmid, U.; Seidel, H.; Mücklich, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the impact of single discharge pulses in air on single-crystalline, p-type silicon having a low bulk resistivity of 0.009-0.012 Ω cm is investigated. Compared to platinum specimens, the craters in silicon have lateral dimensions which are about one order of magnitude larger despite comparable values for the melting point and the melting energy. This finding is attributed to the substantially higher bulk resistivity of silicon leading a higher energy input into the substrate when spark loaded. The energy generated by joule heating is, however, distributed across a larger area due to a current spreading effect. To study the impact of different surface properties on the sparking behaviour, the crater formation on the silicon substrate is investigated applying coatings with different material properties, such as sputter-deposited aluminium layers and thermally-grown silicon dioxide. In general, the crater characteristics formed on unmodified silicon is not influenced when a thin aluminium layer of 24 nm is deposited. At higher film thickness above 170 nm, the sparking energy is almost completely absorbed in the top layer with low influence on the underlying silicon substrate. In the case of a dielectric top layer with a thickness of 155 nm, the formation of many small distinct craters is supported in contrast to a 500 nm-thick SiO 2 film layer where the generation of a single crater with a large area is energetically favoured. A surface roughness of several nm on the silicon probes has no measurable effect on crater formation when compared to an original surface characteristic with values in the sub-nm range.

  9. Rocket Combustion Chambers Resist Thermal Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved design concept developed for combustion chambers for rocket engines, described in three reports. Provides compliance allowing unrestrained thermal expansion in circumferential direction. Compliance lengthens life of rocket engine by reducing amount of thermal deformation caused by repeated firings.

  10. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ∼mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m(-1) K(-1), 359 W m(-1) K(-1), 273 W m(-1) K(-1) and 33.5 W m(-1) K(-1), respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp(2) domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the

  11. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ~mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m-1 K-1, 359 W m-1 K-1, 273 W m-1 K-1 and 33.5 W m-1 K-1, respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp2 domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the other three. This

  12. Flexible and mechanical strain resistant large area SERS active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Chu, Hsiaoyun; Abell, Justin; Tripp, Ralph A.; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    We report a cost effective and facile way to synthesize flexible, uniform, and large area surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates using an oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique. The flexible SERS substrates consist of 1 μm long, tilted silver nanocolumnar films deposited on flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets using OAD. The SERS enhancement activity of these flexible substrates was determined using 10-5 M trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) Raman probe molecules. The in situ SERS measurements on these flexible substrates under mechanical (tensile/bending) strain conditions were performed. Our results show that flexible SERS substrates can withstand a tensile strain (ε) value as high as 30% without losing SERS performance, whereas the similar bending strain decreases the SERS performance by about 13%. A cyclic tensile loading test on flexible PDMS SERS substrates at a pre-specified tensile strain (ε) value of 10% shows that the SERS intensity remains almost constant for more than 100 cycles. These disposable and flexible SERS substrates can be integrated with biological substances and offer a novel and practical method to facilitate biosensing applications.

  13. Bilateral substrate effect on the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Bao, Hua; Hu, Ming

    2015-04-14

    Silicene, the silicon-based counterpart of graphene, has received exceptional attention from a wide community of scientists and engineers in addition to graphene, due to its unique and fascinating physical and chemical properties. Recently, the thermal transport of the atomic thin Si layer, critical to various applications in nanoelectronics, has been studied; however, to date, the substrate effect has not been investigated. In this paper, we present our nonequilibrium molecular dynamics studies on the phonon transport of silicene supported on different substrates. A counter-intuitive phenomenon, in which the thermal conductivity of silicene can be either enhanced or suppressed by changing the surface crystal plane of the substrate, has been observed. This phenomenon is fundamentally different from the general understanding of supported graphene, a representative two-dimensional material, in which the substrate always has a negative effect on the phonon transport of graphene. By performing phonon polarization and spectral energy density analysis, we explain the underlying physics of the new phenomenon in terms of the different impacts on the dominant phonons in the thermal transport of silicene induced by the substrate: the dramatic increase in the thermal conductivity of silicene supported on the 6H-SiC substrate is due to the augmented lifetime of the majority of the acoustic phonons, while the significant decrease in the thermal conductivity of silicene supported on the 3C-SiC substrate results from the reduction in the lifetime of almost the entire phonon spectrum. Our results suggest that, by choosing different substrates, the thermal conductivity of silicene can be largely tuned, which paves the way for manipulating the thermal transport properties of silicene for future emerging applications.

  14. An efficient numerical technique for calculating thermal spreading resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gale, E. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a thermal spreading resistance data generation technique study are reported. The method developed is discussed in detail, illustrative examples given, and the resulting computer program is included.

  15. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1972-01-01

    Process for determining thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials is described. Characteristics of materials are identified and used in development of mathematical models. Limitations of method are examined.

  16. Thermal contact resistance in solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillig, Marius; Biedermann, Thomas; Karl, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    For detailed thermal modelling of SOFC stacks, in particular research of improved thermal management, start-up and shut-down processes, thermal contact resistances (TCR) are required input parameters. These parameters are difficult to access analytically and strongly depend on temperature, geometry and material properties of the contact. Therefore, this work presents an experimental study of thermal contact resistance between different components of one SOFC stack repeating unit at varying temperatures up to typical operating temperatures (800 °C). Heat transfer rates are obtained for full repeating units, cell only, contact mesh only and sealing set-ups. Thermal interface resistances between interconnector and Ni-mesh, Ni-mesh and anode, cathode and interconnector as well as between interconnector and sealing are computed based on the measured data and provide information for numerical SOFC stack modelling.

  17. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Helen F; Cooper, Sarah M; Meyyappan, M; Cruden, Brett A

    2004-11-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials. PMID:15656186

  18. Thermal analysis of resin composites with ellipsoidal filler considering thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of composites with ellipsoidal fillers is analyzed by using a homogenization method that is able to represent the microstructure precisely. In this study, various parameters such as the volume fraction, shape, and distribution of the filler are quantitatively estimated to understand the mechanisms of heat transfer in the composite. First, thermal boundary resistance between resin and filler is important for obtaining composites with higher thermal conductivity. Second, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity arises from contact between filler in the case of ellipsoidal filler and produces lower thermal resistance. Finally, the filler network and thermal resistance are essential for the heat transfer in composites because the path of thermal conduction is improved by contact between neighboring filler particles.

  19. Evaluation of polycarbonate substrate hologram recording medium regarding implication of birefringence and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toishi, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Tomiji; Fukumoto, Atsushi; Sugiki, Mikio; Watanabe, Kenjiro

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate photopolymer media using a polycarbonate (PC) substrate. In holographic data storage medium, substrates that sandwich the photopolymer material are needed to protect the photopolymer material against exogenous shock and open air. An optical glass such as BK-7 is normally used as a substrate, but a PC substrate has a cost advantage and is easy to fabricate compared with optical glass. For holographic recording and reading, however, the high birefringence and high thermal expansion of a PC substrate are significant problems. First, we analyze the degree of degradation of output power by the polarization change and estimate the threshold value of birefringence to record hologram normally. Next, we estimate the temperature tolerance of hologram readout with polycarbonate substrate hologram medium. These analyses results indicate the possible usage of the PC substrate as holographic recording media.

  20. Thermal resistance of ultra-small-diameter disk microlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. E. Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Savelyev, A. V.; Shostak, I. I.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kudashova, Yu. V.; Kulagina, M. M.; Troshkov, S. I.

    2015-05-15

    The thermal resistance of AlGaAs/GaAs microlasers of the suspended-disk type with a diameter of 1.7–4 μm and InAs/InGaAs quantum dots in the active region is inversely proportional to the squared diameter of the microdisk. The proportionality factor is 3.2 × 10{sup −3} (K cm{sup 2})/W, and the thermal resistance is 120–20°C/mW.

  1. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA.

    PubMed

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-09-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters.

  2. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters. PMID:26238402

  3. Laser-induced thermal dynamic gratings in three-layer structures: active and nonactive substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakin, E. V.; Makarova, Ludmila; Rubanov, Alexander S.; Filippov, Valery N.

    1998-11-01

    Time evolution of the intensity of light diffracted by phase grating which is induced by thermal dynamic grating (TDG) in liquid film between glass or quartz substrates is studied theoretically and experimentally. Due to heat exchange at the film boundaries the thermal gratings are also formed in substrates. The diffraction intensity of substrates can be less or comparable to that of film (non-active and active substrates, respectively). The experimental results are in a good agreement with the theoretical calculations carried out for the case when the film thickness is less the TDG period. It is shown the essential influence of the film thickness and the active-substrates contribution on the evolution of the intensity of diffracted light.

  4. Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Mattson, Brad S.; Savas, Stephen E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

  5. Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Mattson, Brad S.; Savas, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

  6. The behavior of substrate dependency as surface treatment in the positive chemically amplified resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sin-Ju; Cha, Han-Sun; Kang, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Chul-Kyu; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Nam, Kee-Soo

    2007-10-01

    Positive chemically amplified resist (CAR) is widely used because of its benefit to high resolution in the semiconductor industry. Recent numerous studies have reported that resist pattern error such as resist scum and adhesion fail at the interface between substrate and positive CAR is caused by substrate dependency. Hence resist pattern error must be minimized. In this study we have observed the phenomena at the positive CAR coated mask blanks. And then we applied various surface treatments to the Cr film to minimize resist pattern error. Firstly, resist pattern error was occurred by the substrate dependency in the positive CAR coated mask blanks. We have investigated the root causes of this pattern error, we found that nitrogen radical and OH radical in the Cr film could combine with proton in the positive CAR easily. So various surface treatments were applied to minimize detrimental effects of substrate dependency to the positive CAR. And the behavior of substrate dependency was observed by various analyses to verify the effect of surface treatment method. The results showed that substrate dependency could be controlled by surface treatment in the positive CAR coated mask blanks.

  7. Significance of thermal contact resistance in two-layer thermal-barrier-coated turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of thermal contact resistance between layers in heat transfer through two layer, plasma sprayed, thermal barrier coatings applied to turbine vanes was investigated. Results obtained with a system of NiCrAlY bond and yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic show that thermal contact resistance between layers is negligible. These results also verified other studies which showed that thermal contact resistance is negligible for a different coating system of NiCr bond calcia stabilized zirconia ceramic. The zirconia stabilized ceramic thermal conductivity data scatter presented in the literature is ?20 to -10 percent about a curve fit of the data. More accurate predictions of heat transfer and metal wall temperatures are obtained when the thermal conductivity values are used at the ?20 percent level.

  8. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Conversion of fluorocarbon dicarboxylic acid to intermediates whose terminal functional groups permit polymerization is discussed. Resulting polymers are used as fuel tank sealers for jet fuels at elevated temperatures. Stability and fuel resistance of the prototype polymers is explained.

  9. Vendor Capability for Low Thermal Expansion Mask Substrates for EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Taylor, J S; Hector, S D; Yan, P Y; Ramamoorthy, A; Brooker, P D

    2002-04-12

    Development of manufacturing infrastructure is required to ensure a commercial source of mask substrates for the timely introduction of EUVL. Improvements to the low thermal expansion materials that compose the substrate have been made, but need to be scaled to production quantities. We have been evaluating three challenging substrate characteristics to determine the state of the infrastructure for the finishing of substrates. First, surface roughness is on track and little risk is associated with achieving the roughness requirement as an independent specification. Second, with new flatness-measuring equipment just coming on line, the vendors are poised for improvement toward the SEMI P37 flatness specification. Third, significant acceleration is needed in the reduction of defect levels on substrates. The lack of high-sensitivity defect metrology at the vendors' sites is limiting progress in developing substrates for EWL.

  10. Arrayed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators with inherent real-time feedback for actively modifying MEMS’ substrate warpage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Xiao, Dingbang; Chen, Zhihua; Wu, Xuezhong

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a batch-fabricated micro-thermal actuators array with inherent real-time self-feedback, which can be used to actively modify micro-electro-mechanical systems’ (MEMS’) substrate warpage. Arrayed polymer thermal actuators utilize SU-8 polymer (a thick negative photoresist) as a functional material with integrated Ti/Al film-heaters as a microscale heat source. The electro-thermo-mechanical response of a micro-fabricated actuator was measured. The resistance of the Al/Ti film resistor varies obviously with ambient temperature, which can be used as inherent feedback for observing real-time displacement of activated SU-8 bumps (0.43 μm Ω-1). Due to the high thermal expansion coefficient, SU-8 bumps tend to have relatively large deflection at low driving voltage and are very easily integrated with MEMS devices. Experimental results indicated that the proposed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators (array) are able to achieve accurate rectification of MEMS’ substrate warpage, which might find potential applications for solving stress-induced problems in MEMS.

  11. Arrayed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators with inherent real-time feedback for actively modifying MEMS’ substrate warpage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Xiao, Dingbang; Chen, Zhihua; Wu, Xuezhong

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a batch-fabricated micro-thermal actuators array with inherent real-time self-feedback, which can be used to actively modify micro-electro-mechanical systems’ (MEMS’) substrate warpage. Arrayed polymer thermal actuators utilize SU-8 polymer (a thick negative photoresist) as a functional material with integrated Ti/Al film-heaters as a microscale heat source. The electro-thermo-mechanical response of a micro-fabricated actuator was measured. The resistance of the Al/Ti film resistor varies obviously with ambient temperature, which can be used as inherent feedback for observing real-time displacement of activated SU-8 bumps (0.43 μm Ω‑1). Due to the high thermal expansion coefficient, SU-8 bumps tend to have relatively large deflection at low driving voltage and are very easily integrated with MEMS devices. Experimental results indicated that the proposed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators (array) are able to achieve accurate rectification of MEMS’ substrate warpage, which might find potential applications for solving stress-induced problems in MEMS.

  12. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring. PMID:27263656

  13. Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

    2010-11-03

    Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

  14. Thermal conductivities of sub-micron Bi2Te3 films sputtered on anisotropic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Shiping; Pei, Yili; Yang, Fan; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 450 nm thick Bi2Te3 films were deposited on flat Al2O3 substrate and nanochannel alumina (NCA) templates with different pore diameters through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The structure and morphology of Bi2Te3 films were investigated by x-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the thermal conductivities of the films deposited on anisotropic substrates were evaluated by micro-Raman method combined with numerical simulation and optimization conducted by COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal conductivities of Bi2Te3 films deposited on NCA templates with discontinuous Φ20 and Φ100 nm pores and flat Al2O3 substrate were 0.80, 0.99 and 1.54 Wm‑1 K‑1, respectively. The lower thermal conductivities of Bi2Te3 films deposited on NCA templates are attributed to much smaller grain size, bottom porous layers, and rougher surfaces through analysis.

  15. Thermal resistance of Saccharomyces yeast ascospores in beers.

    PubMed

    Milani, Elham A; Gardner, Richard C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2015-08-01

    The industrial production of beer ends with a process of thermal pasteurization. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus are yeasts used to produce top and bottom fermenting beers, respectively. In this research, first the sporulation rate of 12 Saccharomyces strains was studied. Then, the thermal resistance of ascospores of three S. cerevisiae strains (DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, Ethanol Red(®)) and one strain of S. pastorianus (ATCC 9080) was determined in 4% (v/v) ethanol lager beer. D60 °C-values of 11.2, 7.5, 4.6, and 6.0 min and z-values of 11.7, 14.3, 12.4, and 12.7 °C were determined for DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, ATCC 9080, and Ethanol Red(®), respectively. Lastly, experiments with 0 and 7% (v/v) beers were carried out to investigate the effect of ethanol content on the thermal resistance of S. cerevisiae (DSMZ 1848). D55 °C-values of 34.2 and 15.3 min were obtained for 0 and 7% beers, respectively, indicating lower thermal resistance in the more alcoholic beer. These results demonstrate similar spore thermal resistance for different Saccharomyces strains and will assist in the design of appropriate thermal pasteurization conditions for preserving beers with different alcohol contents.

  16. Effects of substrate properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, V. P.; Suarez, F. I.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Green roofs are a sustainable urban development solution that incorporates a growing media (also known as substrate) and vegetation into infrastructures to reach additional benefits such as the reduction of: rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy utilized for cooling/heating buildings, and the heat island effect. The substrate is a key component of the green roof that allows achieving these benefits. It is an artificial soil that has an improved behavior compared to natural soils, facilitating vegetation growth, water storage and typically with smaller densities to reduce the loads over the structures. Therefore, it is important to study the effects of substrate properties on green roof performance. The objective of this study is to investigate the physical properties of four substrates designed to improve the behavior of a green roof, and to study their impact on the efficiency of a green roof. The substrates that were investigated are: organic soil; crushed bricks; a mixture of mineral soil with perlite; and a mixture of crushed bricks and organic soil. The thermal properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) were measured using a dual needle probe (Decagon Devices, Inc.) at different saturation levels, and the hydraulic properties were measured with a constant head permeameter (hydraulic conductivity) and a pressure plate extractor (water retention curve). This characterization, combined with numerical models, allows understanding the effect of these properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof. Results show that substrates composed by crushed bricks improve the thermal insulation of infrastructures and at the same time, retain more water in their pores. Simulation results also show that the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof strongly depends on the moisture content prior to a rainstorm.

  17. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Bellantuono, Anthony J; Granados-Cifuentes, Camila; Miller, David J; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs in impending climate

  18. Pattern transfer from the e-beam resist, over the nanoimprint resist and to the final silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Howitz, S.; Richter, K.; Bartha, J. W.; Moench, J. I.

    2012-03-01

    We developed Fluor-based RIE processes to fabricate nanoimprint template in silicon and to transfer patterns from the imprint resist to the silicon substrate. The etched silicon patterns have slightly tapered and smooth sidewalls. The sidewall angle can be controlled between 85° and 90° by varying the ratio of the used gas. The dimension of the etched structures is identical with the patterns in the resist. We demonstrated line structures in silicon substrate down to 50 nm. The etching rate is over 100 nm per minute and the maximal achieved aspect ratio is more than 10.

  19. Analytical modeling and numerical simulations of the thermal behavior of trench-isolated bipolar transistors on SOI substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, I.; d'Alessandro, V.; Rinaldi, N.

    2008-05-01

    The thermal behavior of trench-isolated structures on SOI (silicon-on-insulator) substrates is analyzed. Detailed 3-D numerical simulations have been performed to investigate the impact of all technological and material parameters of interest. A novel analytical model for the temperature field is proposed, which is based on the reduction of the domain under analysis to a silicon rectangular parallelepiped with convective boundary conditions at lateral and bottom faces. An extensive comparison with numerical results proves that the model is extremely accurate in the overall parameter range, and can be adopted for a fast evaluation of the thermal resistance of a trench SOI device as well as of the temperature gradients within the silicon island surrounded by trenches and buried oxide.

  20. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Deep submicron PDSOI thermal resistance extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianhui, Bu; Jinshun, Bi; Linmao, Xi; Zhengsheng, Han

    2010-09-01

    Deep submicron partially depleted silicon on insulator (PDSOI) MOSFETs with H-gate were fabricated based on the 0.35 μm SOI process developed by the Institute of Microelectronics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Because the self-heating effect (SHE) has a great influence on SOI, extractions of thermal resistance were done for accurate circuit simulation by using the body-source diode as a thermometer. The results show that the thermal resistance in an SOI NMOSFET is lower than that in an SOI PMOSFET; and the thermal resistance in an SOI NMOSFET with a long channel is lower than that with a short channel. This offers a great help to SHE modeling and parameter extraction.

  1. Structural and optical properties of copper-coated substrates for solar thermal absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Stefano; De Lucia, Maurizio; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Spectral selectivity, i.e. merging a high absorbance at sunlight wavelengths to a low emittance at the wavelengths of thermal spectrum, is a key characteristics for materials to be used for solar thermal receivers. It is known that spectrally selective absorbers can raise the receiver efficiency for all solar thermal technologies. Tubular sunlight receivers for parabolic trough collector (PTC) systems can be improved by the use of spectrally selective coatings. Their absorbance is increased by deposing black films, while the thermal emittance is minimized by the use of properly-prepared substrates. In this work we describe the intermediate step in the fabrication of black-chrome coated solar absorbers, namely the fabrication and characterization of copper coatings on previously nickel-plated stainless steel substrates. We investigate the copper surface features and optical properties, correlating them to the coating thickness and to the deposition process, in the perspective to assess optimal conditions for solar absorber applications.

  2. Measurement of the sheet resistance of resistive films on thin substrates from 120 to 175 GHz using dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, R. J.; Hasko, D. G.

    2002-02-01

    A method is reported for the measurement of the sheet resistance, at microwave frequencies, of conducting films supported on thin dielectric substrates. The sheet resistance is found from measurements of the millimeter-wave power transmission through the film using a millimeter-wave source and power meter coupled through dielectric waveguides. The accuracy of this technique does not depend on the precise placement of the waveguide terminations with respect to the substrate, in contrast to methods using metallic waveguides or coils. This method is used to characterize the sheet resistance of semiconductor samples in the frequency range 120-175 GHz and the results are compared to the dc values obtained by conventional techniques. Sheet resistance values can be easily measured by this method in the range from 1 to 1000 Ω.

  3. Influence of a hot and humid environment on thermal transport across the interface between a Ag thin-film line and a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Noguchi, Kyohei; Saka, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the reliability of Ag thin-film lines for a wide range of applications in electronic devices, knowledge of the thermal transport across the interface between the line and the underlying substrate is of great importance. This is because such thermal transport significantly affects the temperature distribution in the line, the electrical performance of the line and the service life of the device the line is installed on. In this work, we examine the influence of a hot and humid environment on the thermal transport across the interface between a Ag thin-film line and a substrate. By performing a series of current-stressing experiments using the four-point probe method at atmospheric conditions (296 K and 30 RH%) on a Ag thin-film line for different durations of exposure to a hot and humid environment (323 K and 90 RH%), the electrical resistivity was found to increase with the exposure duration. Such an increase is believed to be the result of a decrease in the interfacial thermal conductance, which indicates less thermal transport from the line to the substrate. Moreover, by observing the surface morphology changes in the line and conducting a one-dimensional electro-thermal analysis, such variations can be attributed to the generation and growth of voids within the line, which hinder heat transfer from the line to the substrate through the interface.

  4. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  5. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Limaye, Santosh Y.

    1996-01-01

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4 P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.2X O.sub.24, .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-2X Y.sub.2X P.sub.6 O.sub.24 and .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-X Y.sub.X P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.X O.sub.24 wherein .phi. is either Strontium or Barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures.

  6. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Limaye, S.Y.

    1996-01-30

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub 2X}O{sub 24}, {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}2X}Y{sub 2X}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} and {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}X}Y{sub X}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub X}O{sub 24} wherein {phi} is either strontium or barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures. 7 figs.

  7. Modeling Penicillium expansum resistance to thermal and chlorine treatments.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Beatriz C M; Churey, John J; Aragão, Gláucia M F; Worobo, Randy W

    2009-12-01

    Apples and apple products are excellent substrates for Penicillium expansum to produce patulin. In an attempt to avoid excessive levels of patulin, limiting or reducing P. expansum contamination levels on apples designated for storage in packinghouses and/or during apple juice processing is critical. The aim of this work was (i) to determine the thermal resistance of P. expansum spores in apple juice, comparing the abilities of the Bigelow and Weibull models to describe the survival curves and (ii) to determine the inactivation of P. expansum spores in aqueous chlorine solutions at varying concentrations of chlorine solutions, comparing the abilities of the biphasic and Weibull models to fit the survival curves. The results showed that the Bigelow and Weibull models were similar for describing the heat inactivation data, because the survival curves were almost linear. In this case, the concept of D- and z-values could be used, and the D-values obtained were 10.68, 6.64, 3.32, 1.14, and 0.61 min at 50, 52, 54, 56, and 60 degrees C, respectively, while the z-value was determined to be 7.57 degrees C. For the chlorine treatments, although the biphasic model gave a slightly superior performance, the Weibull model was selected, considering the parsimony principle, because it has fewer parameters than the biphasic model has. In conclusion, the typical pasteurization regimen used for refrigerated apple juice (71 degrees C for 6 s) is capable of achieving a 6-log reduction of P. expansum spores.

  8. Thermal and radiation resistance of stabilized LDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, T.; Jipa, S.; Henderson, D.; Kappel, W.; Mariş, D. A.; Mariş, M.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of capsaicin on the radiation stability of low density polyethylene was accomplished by applying the chemiluminescence procedure. The neat and modified polymer with 0.25% and 0.50% (w/w) capsaicin were exposed to γ-irradiation in air receiving 10, 20 and 30 kGy. The synergistic effect due to the presence of metallic selenium was demonstrated. The significant improvement in oxidation induction time was obtained demonstrating the efficient antioxidant activity of capsaicin in LDPE. The simultaneous protection action of metallic selenium in LDPE/capsaicin systems brought about a supplementary enhancement in the oxidation resistance of irradiated samples.

  9. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  10. Techniques for Reducing Thermal Contact Resistance in Steady-State Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, C.; Simpkin, A. J.; Jarrett, R. N.

    2016-11-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a new variation on the established guarded hot plate technique for steady-state measurements of thermal conductivity. This new guarded hot plate has been specifically designed for making measurements on specimens with a thickness that is practical for advanced industrial composite materials and applications. During the development of this new guarded hot plate, NPL carried out an experimental investigation into methods for minimising the thermal contact resistance between the test specimen and the plates of the apparatus. This experimental investigation included tests on different thermal interface materials for use in another NPL facility based on a commercial guarded heat flow meter apparatus conforming to standard ASTM E1530-11. The results show the effect of applying different quantities of the type of heat transfer compound suggested in ASTM E1530-11 (clause 10.7.3) and also the effect on thermal resistance of alternative types of thermal interface products. The optimum quantities of two silicone greases were determined, and a silicone grease filled with copper was found to offer the best combination of repeatability, small hysteresis effect and a low thermal contact resistance. However, two products based on a textured indium foil and pyrolytic graphite sheet were found to offer similar or better reductions in thermal contact resistance, but with quicker, easier application and the advantages of protecting the apparatus plates from damage and being useable with specimen materials that would otherwise absorb silicone grease.

  11. Ambient cure polyimide foams. [thermal resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Hamermesh, C. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame and temperature resistant polyimide foams are prepared by the reaction of an aromatic dianhydride, (pyromellitic dianhydride) with an aromatic polyisocyanate, (polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate), in the presence of an inorganic acid and furfuryl alcohol. Usable acids include dilute sulfuric acid, dilute nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, polyphosphoric acid, and phosphoric acid, with the latter being preferred. The dianhydride and the isocyanate in about equimolar proportions constitute about 50% of the reaction mixture, the rest being made up with the acid and the alcohol in a ratio of about 1:10. An exothermic reaction between the acid and the alcohol provides the heat necessary for the other components to polymerize without recourse to external heat sources. The mixture can be sprayed on any surface to form polymeric foam in locations where the application of heat is not practical or possible, for instance, between walls or on mine tunnel surfaces.

  12. Targeting substrate-site in Jak2 kinase prevents emergence of genetic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwani, Meenu; Huber, Erika; Kincaid, Zachary; Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Rance, Mark; Thapa, Mahendra B.; Shah, Neil P.; Meller, Jarek; Zheng, Yi; Azam, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of genetic resistance against kinase inhibitors poses a great challenge for durable therapeutic response. Here, we report a novel mechanism of JAK2 kinase inhibition by fedratinib (TG101348) that prevents emergence of genetic resistance. Using in vitro drug screening, we identified 211 amino-acid substitutions conferring resistance to ruxolitinib (INCB018424) and cross-resistance to the JAK2 inhibitors AZD1480, CYT-387 and lestaurtinib. In contrast, these resistant variants were fully sensitive to fedratinib. Structural modeling, coupled with mutagenesis and biochemical studies, revealed dual binding sites for fedratinib. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins showed strong affinity for the substrate-binding site (Kd = 20 nM) while affinity for the ATP site was poor (Kd = ~8 μM). Our studies demonstrate that mutations affecting the substrate-binding pocket encode a catalytically incompetent kinase, thereby preventing emergence of resistant variants. Most importantly, our data suggest that in order to develop resistance-free kinase inhibitors, the next-generation drug design should target the substrate-binding site. PMID:26419724

  13. SOFI/Substrate integrity testing for cryogenic propellant tanks at extreme thermal gradient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; Fabian, P.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid propellant tank insulation for space flight requires low weight as well as high insulation factors. Use of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) is an accepted, cost effective technique for insulating a single wall cryogenic propellant tank and has been used extensively throughout the aerospace industry. Determining the bond integrity of the SOFI to the metallic substrate as well as its ability to withstand the in-service strains, both mechanical and thermal, is critical to the longevity of the insulation. This determination has previously been performed using highly volatile, explosive cryogens, which increases the test costs enormously, as well as greatly increasing the risk to both equipment and personnel. CTD has developed a new test system, based on a previous NASA test that simulates the mechanical and thermal strains associated with filling a large fuel tank with a cryogen. The test enables a relatively small SOFI/substrate sample to be monitored for any deformations, delaminations, or disjunctures during the cooling and mechanical straining process of the substrate, and enables the concurrent application of thermal and physical strains to two specimens at the same time. The thermal strains are applied by cooling the substrate to the desired cryogen temperature (from 4 K to 250 K) while maintaining the outside surface of the SOFI foam at ambient conditions. Multiple temperature monitoring points are exercised to ensure even cooling across the substrate, while at the same time, surface temperatures of the SOFI can be monitored to determine the heat flow. The system also allows for direct measurement of the strains in the substrate during the test. The test system as well as test data from testing at 20 K, for liquid Hydrogen simulation, will be discussed.

  14. Thermal resistance of ridge-waveguide lasers mounted upside down

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.

    1987-01-05

    The heat dissipation in upside down mounted ridge-waveguide lasers equipped with a double-channel structure is analyzed by a simplified device model. Assuming an isothermal active region, the thermal resistance is obtained by means of conformal mapping. A comparison to published experimental results shows good agreement.

  15. Metallic nanowire networks: effects of thermal annealing on electrical resistance.

    PubMed

    Langley, D P; Lagrange, M; Giusti, G; Jiménez, C; Bréchet, Y; Nguyen, N D; Bellet, D

    2014-11-21

    Metallic nanowire networks have huge potential in devices requiring transparent electrodes. This article describes how the electrical resistance of metal nanowire networks evolve under thermal annealing. Understanding the behavior of such films is crucial for the optimization of transparent electrodes which find many applications. An in-depth investigation of silver nanowire networks under different annealing conditions provides a case study demonstrating that several mechanisms, namely local sintering and desorption of organic residues, are responsible for the reduction of the systems electrical resistance. Optimization of the annealing led to specimens with transmittance of 90% (at 550 nm) and sheet resistance of 9.5 Ω sq(-1). Quantized steps in resistance were observed and a model is proposed which provides good agreement with the experimental results. In terms of thermal behavior, we demonstrate that there is a maximum thermal budget that these electrodes can tolerate due to spheroidization of the nanowires. This budget is determined by two main factors: the thermal loading and the wire diameter. This result enables the fabrication and optimization of transparent metal nanowire electrodes for solar cells, organic electronics and flexible displays.

  16. Metallic nanowire networks: effects of thermal annealing on electrical resistance.

    PubMed

    Langley, D P; Lagrange, M; Giusti, G; Jiménez, C; Bréchet, Y; Nguyen, N D; Bellet, D

    2014-11-21

    Metallic nanowire networks have huge potential in devices requiring transparent electrodes. This article describes how the electrical resistance of metal nanowire networks evolve under thermal annealing. Understanding the behavior of such films is crucial for the optimization of transparent electrodes which find many applications. An in-depth investigation of silver nanowire networks under different annealing conditions provides a case study demonstrating that several mechanisms, namely local sintering and desorption of organic residues, are responsible for the reduction of the systems electrical resistance. Optimization of the annealing led to specimens with transmittance of 90% (at 550 nm) and sheet resistance of 9.5 Ω sq(-1). Quantized steps in resistance were observed and a model is proposed which provides good agreement with the experimental results. In terms of thermal behavior, we demonstrate that there is a maximum thermal budget that these electrodes can tolerate due to spheroidization of the nanowires. This budget is determined by two main factors: the thermal loading and the wire diameter. This result enables the fabrication and optimization of transparent metal nanowire electrodes for solar cells, organic electronics and flexible displays. PMID:25267592

  17. Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Driver, M. Sky; Caruso, Anthony N.; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (~2 mm thick, ~10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to <5°, which was close to a value for super hydrophilic surfaces. XPS analysis indicated that the percent of elements associated with mineral in dentin/enamel or fillers in the composites increased. In addition, the percent of carbon (%C) decreased while %O increased for all four substrates. As a result, the O/C ratio increased dramatically, suggesting that new oxygen-containing polar moieties were formed on the surfaces after plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested. PMID:23755823

  18. Temperature behavior of spiral inductors on high resistivity substrate in SOI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kaamouchi, M.; Delatte, P.; Si Moussa, M.; Raskin, J.-P.; Vanhoenacker-Janvier, D.

    2008-12-01

    This paper reviews and analyzes a compact model for integrated planar spiral inductors on standard and high resistivity substrates in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. The inductors have been characterized over a temperature range from 25 to 200 °C. The temperature variation of each model parameter has been investigated. It demonstrates that only the variations of the metallic losses versus temperature have to be taken into account to model properly the high frequency behavior over a wide temperature range of a spiral inductor integrated on silicon high resistivity substrate. Based on these experimental and characterization results, guidelines for practical inductor designs in RFICs for high-temperature applications are drawn.

  19. The influence of thermophysical properties of an anisotropic heat-element substrate on the value of thermal emf in the stationary thermal mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Popov, P. A.; Reznikov, B. I.; Sakharov, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal and thermoelectric processes in anisotropic heat elements located on substrates made of different materials have been numerically simulated. It is shown that, when an invariable heat flux passes through a heat element, the thermophysical properties of the substrate and heat transfer coefficient at its rear surface affect significantly the temperature distribution and the value of generated thermal emf.

  20. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy based on determination of thermal probe dynamic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bodzenta, J; Juszczyk, J; Chirtoc, M

    2013-09-01

    Resistive thermal probes used in scanning thermal microscopy provide high spatial resolution of measurement accompanied with high sensitivity to temperature changes. At the same time their sensitivity to variations of thermal conductivity of a sample is relatively low. In typical dc operation mode the static resistance of the thermal probe is measured. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the sensitivity of measurement can be improved by a factor of three by measuring the dynamic resistance of a dc biased probe superimposed with small ac current. The dynamic resistance can be treated as a complex value. Its amplitude represents the slope of the static voltage-current U-I characteristic for a given I while its phase describes the delay between the measured ac voltage and applied ac current component in the probe. The phase signal also reveals dependence on the sample thermal conductivity. Signal changes are relatively small but very repeatable. In contrast, the difference between dynamic and static resistance has higher sensitivity (the same maximum value as that of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics), and also much higher amplitude than higher harmonics. The proposed dc + ac excitation scheme combines the benefits of dc excitation (mechanical stability of probe-sample contact, average temperature control) with those of ac excitation (base-line stability, rejection of ambient temperature influence, high sensitivity, lock-in signal processing), when the experimental conditions prohibit large ac excitation.

  1. Effective thermal resistance of a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Haret, L-D; Ghrib, A; Checoury, X; Cazier, N; Han, Z; El Kurdi, M; Sauvage, S; Boucaud, P

    2014-02-01

    We present a simple method to accurately measure the effective thermal resistance of a photonic crystal microcavity. The cavity is embedded between two Schottky contacts forming a metal-semiconductor-metal device. The photocarriers circulating in the device provide a local temperature rise that can be dominated by Joule effect under certain conditions. We show that the effective thermal resistance (R(th)) can be experimentally deduced from the spectral shift of the cavity resonance wavelength measured at different applied bias. We deduce a value of R(th)1.6×10(4) KW(-1) for a microcavity on silicon-on-insulator, which is in good agreement with 3D thermal modeling by finite elements. PMID:24487839

  2. Thermal resistance of composite panels containing superinsulation and urethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, adjusting for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  3. Thermal resistance of superinsulation/foam composite panels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-05-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, normalizing for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  4. Modeling of nonlinear thermal resistance in FinFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Kompala, Bala; Kushwaha, Pragya; Agarwal, Harshit; Khandelwal, Sourabh; Duarte, Juan-Pablo; Hu, Chenming; Singh Chauhan, Yogesh

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) device simulations for exact analysis of thermal transport in FinFETs are performed. We analyze the temperature rise in FinFET devices with the variation in the number of fins (N fin), shape of fins and fin pitch (F pitch). We investigate that the thermal resistance R th has nonlinear dependency on N fin and F pitch. We formulate a model for thermal resistance behavior correctly with N fin and F pitch variation. The proposed formulation is implemented in industry standard Berkeley short-channel independent gate FET model for common multi-gate transistors (BSIM-CMG) and validated with both experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  5. High-rate deposition of abrasion resistant coatings using a dual-source expanding thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepkens, M.; Selezneva, S.; Moeleker, P.; Iacovangelo, C. D.

    2003-07-01

    A unique high-rate plasma deposition process has been developed to generate abrasion resistant coatings on polymeric substrates. The process relies on the integration of a plurality of individual expanding thermal plasma sources into a multisource setup. In this work, we will discuss the effects of various hardware and process parameters on the performance of a dual-source system that has been used to apply abrasion resistant coatings to polycarbonate substrates. It will be shown that a properly engineered dual-source system can generate transparent organosilicon-based coatings that provide uniform glasslike abrasion resistance across a 30 cm width on substrates that are laterally translated past the dual-source array.

  6. Analysis of the Microstructure and Thermal Shock Resistance of Laser Glazed Nanostructured Zirconia TBCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Hao, Yunfei; Wang, Hongying; Tang, Weijie

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying using the reconstituted nanosized yttria partially stabilized zirconia powder. Field emission scanning electron microscope was applied to examine the microstructure of the resulting TBCs. The results showed that the TBCs exhibited a unique, complex structure including nonmelted or partially melted nanosized particles and columnar grains. A CO2 continuous wave laser beam has been applied to laser glaze the nanostructured zirconia TBCs. The effect of laser energy density on the microstructure and thermal shock resistance of the as-glazed coatings has been systematically investigated. SEM observation indicated that the microstructure of the as-glazed coatings was very different from the microstructure of the as-sprayed nanostructured TBCs. It changed from single columnar grain to a combination of columnar grains in the fracture surface and equiaxed grains on the surface with increasing laser energy density. Thermal shock resistance tests have showed that laser glazing can double the lifetime of TBCs. The failure of the as-glazed coatings was mainly due to the thermal stress caused by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the ceramic coat and metallic substrate.

  7. Thermal and Microstructure Characterization of Zn-Al-Si Alloys and Chemical Reaction with Cu Substrate During Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berent, Katarzyna; Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The problems associated with the corrosion of aluminum connections, the low mechanical properties of Al/Cu connections, and the introduction of EU directives have forced the potential of new materials to be investigated. Alloys based on eutectic Zn-Al are proposed, because they have a higher melting temperature (381 °C), good corrosion resistance, and high mechanical strength. The Zn-Al-Si cast alloys were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, which were performed to determine the melting temperatures of the alloys. Thermal linear expansion and electrical resistivity measurements were performed at temperature ranges of -50 to 250 °C and 25 to 300 °C, respectively. The addition of Si to eutectic Zn-Al alloys not only limits the growth of phases at the interface of liquid solder and Cu substrate but also raises the mechanical properties of the solder. Spreading test on Cu substrate using eutectic Zn-Al alloys with 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 wt.% of Si was studied using the sessile drop method in the presence of QJ201 flux. Spreading tests were performed with contact times of 1, 8, 15, 30, and 60 min, and at temperatures of 475, 500, 525, and 550 °C. After cleaning the flux residue from solidified samples, the spreadability of Zn-Al-Si on Cu was determined. Selected, solidified solder/substrate couples were cross-sectioned, and the interfacial microstructures were studied using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The growth of the intermetallic phase layer was studied at the solder/substrate interface, and the activation energy of growth of Cu5Zn8, CuZn4, and CuZn phases were determined.

  8. Thermal and Microstructure Characterization of Zn-Al-Si Alloys and Chemical Reaction with Cu Substrate During Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berent, Katarzyna; Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    The problems associated with the corrosion of aluminum connections, the low mechanical properties of Al/Cu connections, and the introduction of EU directives have forced the potential of new materials to be investigated. Alloys based on eutectic Zn-Al are proposed, because they have a higher melting temperature (381 °C), good corrosion resistance, and high mechanical strength. The Zn-Al-Si cast alloys were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, which were performed to determine the melting temperatures of the alloys. Thermal linear expansion and electrical resistivity measurements were performed at temperature ranges of -50 to 250 °C and 25 to 300 °C, respectively. The addition of Si to eutectic Zn-Al alloys not only limits the growth of phases at the interface of liquid solder and Cu substrate but also raises the mechanical properties of the solder. Spreading test on Cu substrate using eutectic Zn-Al alloys with 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 wt.% of Si was studied using the sessile drop method in the presence of QJ201 flux. Spreading tests were performed with contact times of 1, 8, 15, 30, and 60 min, and at temperatures of 475, 500, 525, and 550 °C. After cleaning the flux residue from solidified samples, the spreadability of Zn-Al-Si on Cu was determined. Selected, solidified solder/substrate couples were cross-sectioned, and the interfacial microstructures were studied using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The growth of the intermetallic phase layer was studied at the solder/substrate interface, and the activation energy of growth of Cu5Zn8, CuZn4, and CuZn phases were determined.

  9. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester.

    PubMed

    Burg, Brian R; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm(2) K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings. PMID:26724058

  10. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm2 K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings.

  11. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm{sup 2} K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings.

  12. Transport cycle intermediate in small multidrug resistance protein is revealed by substrate fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Basting, Daniel; Lorch, Mark; Lehner, Ines; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2008-02-01

    Efflux pumps of the small multidrug resistance family bind cationic, lipophilic antibiotics and transport them across the membrane in exchange for protons. The transport cycle must involve various conformational states of the protein needed for substrate binding, translocation, and release. A fluorescent substrate will therefore experience a significant change of environment while being transported, which influences its fluorescence properties. Thus the substrate itself can report intermediate states that form during the transport cycle. We show the existence of such a substrate-transporter complex for the EmrE homolog Mycobacterium tuberculosis TBsmr and its substrate ethidium bromide. The pH gradient needed for antiport has been generated by co-reconstituting TBsmr with bacteriorhodopsin. Sample illumination generates a DeltapH, which results in enhanced ethidium fluorescence intensity, which is abolished when DeltapH or DeltaPsi is collapsed or when the essential residue Glu-13 in TBsmr is exchanged with Ala. This observation shows the formation of a pH-dependent, transient substrate-protein complex between binding and release of ethidium. We have further characterized this state by determining the K(d), by inhibiting ethidium transport through titration with nonfluorescent substrate and by fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Our findings support a model with a single occluded intermediate state in which the substrate is highly immobile.

  13. Thermal Catalytic Oxidation of Airborne Contaminants by a Reactor Using Ultra-Short Channel Length, Monolithic Catalyst Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Tomes, K. M.; Tatara, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Contaminated air, whether in a crewed spacecraft cabin or terrestrial work and living spaces, is a pervasive problem affecting human health, performance, and well being. The need for highly effective, economical air quality processes spans a wide range of terrestrial and space flight applications. Typically, air quality control processes rely on absorption-based processes. Most industrial packed-bed adsorption processes use activated carbon. Once saturated, the carbon is either dumped or regenerated. In either case, the dumped carbon and concentrated waste streams constitute a hazardous waste that must be handled safely while minimizing environmental impact. Thermal catalytic oxidation processes designed to address waste handling issues are moving to the forefront of cleaner air quality control and process gas decontamination processes. Careful consideration in designing the catalyst substrate and reactor can lead to more complete contaminant destruction and poisoning resistance. Maintenance improvements leading to reduced waste handling and process downtime can also be realized. Performance of a prototype thermal catalytic reaction based on ultra-short waste channel, monolith catalyst substrate design, under a variety of process flow and contaminant loading conditions, is discussed.

  14. Thermal Resistance Measurements for Flexible Straps at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, G. F.; Lachner, B. F.; Lokken, O. D.; Stahl, B. L.; Crawford, L. D.

    2004-06-01

    An experimental test facility is described that is capable of accurately measuring the total thermal resistance of a flexible strap and decomposing this total resistance into components that correspond to heat transfer through each bolted interface and heat transfer by conduction through the strap. The experimental procedure, data reduction technique, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measurements are described. The thermal resistance values of conductive straps fabricated by joining many, thin copper laminations were measured. A test matrix was used to investigate several potentially important factors, including: total strap thickness, individual foil thickness, metal foil alloy, interface clamping force, interface surface finish, and the presence of indium foil in the interface. Each test was run at nominal temperatures of 35 K, 60 K, 77 K, and 110 K. The results of the testing indicate that the two most important factors that determine the thermal resistance of the flexible strap are its thickness and the presence of indium in the interface. Clamping force and surface finish are also found to be important, although less so when indium is used in the interface.

  15. Improving the thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, James William

    Zirconium diboride (ZrB2) and ZrB2--SiC ceramics with densities greater than 99% were fabricated by hot pressing ZrB 2 and SiC powders and reactively hot pressing ZrH2, B 4C and Si to form ZrB2-27 vol% SiC. Thermophysical properties were investigated for hot pressed ZrB2 and ZrB2-30 vol% SiC ceramics. The thermal conductivity of ZrB2 increased from 56 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature to 67.0 W m -1 K-1 at 1675 K, whereas the thermal conductivity of ZrB2-SiC decreased from 62.0 W m-1 K-1 to 56 W m-1 K-1 over the same temperature range. Electron and phonon contributions to thermal conductivity were determined using electrical resistivity measurements and were used, along with grain size models, to explain the observed trends. Thermal shock of high density ZrB2, ZrB2--30 vol% SiC and ZrB2--30 vol% SiC/graphite - 15 vol% SiC fibrous monoliths was studied. Experimental thermal shock values measured during a water quench test were the same for both materials (DeltaT crit˜400°C). A finite element model was used to estimate the temperature gradients and stresses in both ceramics during quench testing. The model predicted that maximum thermal stresses exceeded the strength of ZrB2 (568 MPa) but not ZrB2-30 vol% SiC (863 MPa). The lower than predicted thermal shock resistance of ZrB2-SiC was attributed to the non-uniform cooling between the ZrB2 matrix and the SiC particulate phase. Water quench thermal shock testing of ZrB2-based fibrous monolith ceramics had a critical thermal shock temperature (Delta Tcrit) of 1400°C, a 250% improvement over the previously reported DeltaTcrit values of ZrB2 and ZrB2-30 vol.% SiC of similar dimensions (4 x 3 x 45 mm). The improvement in thermal shock resistance was attributed to cell boundary crack propagation and crack deflection around the load bearing cells.

  16. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  17. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  18. Measurement of the lattice thermal expansion coefficients of thin metal films on substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, O.; Nix, W.D.

    1998-03-01

    A difference in thermal expansion between a thin film and its substrate causes mechanical stresses in the film. Therefore, knowledge of the thermal expansion coefficients of thin films are important for their technological applications. In this article, we present an analysis which can be used to extract the thermal expansion coefficient of a thin film material using a commonly used x-ray technique. The major advantage of our approach is that it is not necessary to remove the film from the substrate. The knowledge of the elastic constants of the thin film material and their temperature dependence is not required, which is particularly useful when thin film alloys are studied whose thermal and elastic properties are not available. For verification of the method, we investigated thin Al films because the thermal and elastic properties of bulk Al are well known. The comparison of our results with the bulk properties shows a reasonable agreement, indicating the validity of the new method. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  20. Magneto-transport properties of oriented Mn{sub 2}CoAl films sputtered on thermally oxidized Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. Z.; Du, Y.; Zhang, X. M.; Liu, E. K.; Wang, W. H. Wu, G. H.; Zhang, H. G.

    2014-06-16

    Spin gapless semiconductors are interesting family of materials by embracing both magnetism and semiconducting due to their unique band structure. Its potential application in future spintronics requires realization in thin film form. In this Letter, we report fabrication and transport properties of spin gapless Mn{sub 2}CoAl films prepared on thermally oxidized Si substrates by magnetron sputtering deposition. The films deposited at 673 K are well oriented to (001) direction and display a uniform-crystalline surface. Magnetotransport measurements on the oriented films reveal a semiconducting-like resistivity, small anomalous Hall conductivity, and linear magnetoresistance representative of the transport signatures of spin gapless semiconductors. The magnetic properties of the films have also been investigated and compared to that of bulk Mn{sub 2}CoAl, showing small discrepancy induced by the composition deviation.

  1. Reducing GaN-on-diamond interfacial thermal resistance for high power transistor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huarui; Simon, Roland B.; Pomeroy, James W.; Francis, Daniel; Faili, Firooz; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Kuball, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Integration of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond offers promising thermal performance for GaN-based high power radio frequency amplifiers. One limiting factor is the thermal barrier at the GaN to diamond interface, often referred to as the effective thermal boundary resistance (TBReff). Using a combination of transient thermoreflectance measurement, finite element modeling and microstructural analysis, the TBReff of GaN-on-diamond wafers is shown to be dominated by the SiNx interlayer for diamond growth seeding, with additional impacts from the diamond nucleation surface. By decreasing the SiNx layer thickness and minimizing the diamond nucleation region, TBReff can be significantly reduced, and a TBReff as low as 12 m2K/GW is demonstrated. This enables a major improvement in GaN-on-diamond transistor thermal resistance with respect to GaN-on-SiC wafers. A further reduction in TBReff towards the diffuse mismatch limit is also predicted, demonstrating the full potential of using diamond as the heat spreading substrate.

  2. Thermally-Induced Substrate Release Via Intramolecular Cyclizations of Amino Esters and Amino Carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Knipp, Ralph J.; Estrada, Rosendo; Sethu, Palaniappan; Nantz, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    The relative cleavage of an alcohol from a panel of amino esters and amino carbonates via intramolecular cyclization was examined as a mechanism for substrate release. Thermal stability at 37 °C was observed only for the 7-membered ring progenitors. Applicability of the approach was illustrated by δ-lactam formation within a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchannel for release of a captured fluorescent probe. PMID:25061237

  3. Rapid thermal processing of Czochralski silicon substrates: Defects, denuded zones, and minority carrier lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozgonyi, G. S.; Yang, D. K.; Cao, Y. H.; Radzimski, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid thermal processing (RTP) of Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrates is discussed with its attendant effects on defects, denuded zones, and minority carrier lifetime. Preferential chemical etching and X-ray topography was used to delineate defects which were subsequently correlated with minority carrier lifetime; determined by a pulse metallo-organic decompositon (MOD) test device. The X-ray delineation of grown-in defects was enhanced by a lithium decoration procedure. Results, thus far, show excellent correlation between process-induced defects.

  4. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  5. Thermal shock and erosion resistant tantalum carbide ceramic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycutt, L., III; Manning, C. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic tantalum carbide artifacts with high thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance are provided by incorporating tungsten-rhenium and carbon particles in a tantalum carbide matrix. The mix is sintered by hot pressing to form the ceramic article which has a high fracture strength relative to its elastic modulus and thus has an improved thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance. The tantalum carbide is preferable less than minus 100 mesh, the carbon particles are preferable less than minus 100 mesh, and the tungsten-rhenium particles are preferable elongate, having a length to thickness ratio of at least 2/1. Tungsten-rhenium wire pieces are suitable as well as graphite particles.

  6. Experimental determination of satellite bolted joints thermal resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Basto, Jose Edson

    1990-01-01

    The thermal resistance was experimentally determined of the bolted joints of the first Brazilian satellite (SCD 01). These joints, used to connect the satellite structural panels, are reproduced in an experimental apparatus, keeping, as much as possible, the actual dimensions and materials. A controlled amount of heat is forced to pass through the joint and the difference of temperature between the panels is measured. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber with liquid nitrogen cooled walls, that simulates the space environment. Experimental procedures are used to avoid much heat losses, which are carefully calculated. Important observations about the behavior of the joint thermal resistance with the variation of the mean temperature are made.

  7. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a "segmented" thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed "segmented" model shows more precise than the "non-segmented" model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the "segmented" model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  8. Development of conformation independent computational models for the early recognition of breast cancer resistance protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Melisa Edith; Di Ianni, Mauricio Emiliano; Ruiz, María Esperanza; Talevi, Alan; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively. PMID:23984415

  9. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  10. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  11. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  12. Influence of thermal substrate properties on the damage threshold of UV coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Holger; Martin, Sven; Morak, Andreas; Koenigsdoerffer, Ch.; Roth, M.; Li, Bincheng; Welsch, Eberhard; Thielsch, Roland; Kaiser, Norbert

    1999-04-01

    The thermal decay of surface temperature has been calculated and measured on Al2O3/SiO2 coatings by using photothermal technique near damage threshold fluence. It could be shown that under certain conditions the decay times (tau) has been found to be in the order of some microseconds. This fact gives no explanation of the measured decrease of threshold fluence in some cases for higher repetition rates and shot numbers on Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 multilayers for (lambda) equals 248nm. Furthermore, it could not be found any influence of the substrate materials. Thus, other than thermal accumulation is responsible for the lowered damage threshold by increasing repetition rate. Additionally, performed calculations of the thermal decay using 20ns, 248nm laser excitation confirm the experimental results. Even in the case of Al2O3/SiO2 coatings on copper no effect of the substrate as a heat sink could be measured. For HfO2/SiO2 coatings the behavior is in accordance with the fact that the thermal conductivity of HfO2 films is markedly lowered compared to the bulk value.

  13. Thermal conductivity and contact resistance of metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, E.; Hsieh, S.; Bahrami, M.

    2011-03-01

    Accurate information on heat transfer and temperature distribution in metal foams is necessary for design and modelling of thermal-hydraulic systems incorporating metal foams. The analysis of heat transfer requires determination of the effective thermal conductivity as well as the thermal contact resistance (TCR) associated with the interface between the metal foam and the adjacent surfaces/layers. In this study, a test bed that allows the separation of effective thermal conductivity and TCR in metal foams is described. Measurements are performed in a vacuum under varying compressive loads using ERG Duocel aluminium foam samples with different porosities and pore densities. Also, a graphical method associated with a computer code is developed to demonstrate the distribution of contact spots and estimate the real contact area at the interface. Our results show that the porosity and the effective thermal conductivity remain unchanged with the variation of compression in the range 0-2 MPa; but TCR decreases significantly with pressure due to an increase in the real contact area at the interface. Moreover, the ratio of real to nominal contact area varies between 0 and 0.013, depending upon the compressive force, porosity, pore density and surface characteristics.

  14. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kany, A. M. I.; El-Gohary, M. I.; Kamal, S. M.

    1994-07-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barries of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure.

  15. Modeling of air-droplet interaction, substrate melting and coating buildup in thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanghua

    Among the many surface coating techniques now available, thermal spray is known to offer the most advantages. It can meet a wide range of technical and engineering requirements in a relatively inexpensive and easily controllable way with the capability of producing repeatable results. In the last few decades a lot of important strides have been made in the field of measurements and modelling of thermal spraying. However, due to the complex of the process and the lack of basic materials-based knowledge about the particle melting, spreading and deposition, the relationship between the process parameters and the coating properties still remains unclear. In thermal spraying, a particle is melted to form a droplet with morphology and thermal- and kinetic-energy status change by the interaction with the plasma/flame. In order to produce higher-quality coatings and expand the use of this versatile family of technologies, modelling of the particle behaviors during in-flight, spreading and deposition is essential. This thesis investigates the connections between particle characteristics and coating properties. Momentum, heat and mass transfer phenomena related to particle in-flight, droplet impacting, spreading, and splat layering are studied. Numerical models are developed to establish the quantitative relationships between spray parameters, particle and substrate properties and deposition characteristics. Most existing theoretical studies of in-flight particle assume that the particle is in a spherical shape without voids inside. The behavior of porous particles in thermal spray has not been well understood. However, the presence of voids in the feedstock powders may have a great impact on particle in-flight behaviors such as particle acceleration, melting and oxidation because a hollowed particle is also lighter than a densed one and this will affect the particle trajectory. The particle shape also needs to be taken into account because it influences the drag force and

  16. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  17. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  18. Thermal resistance at a solid/superfluid helium interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiere, Aymeric; Volz, Sebastian; Amrit, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Kapitza in 1941 discovered that heat flowing across a solid in contact with superfluid helium (<2 K) encounters a strong thermal resistance at the interface. Khalatnikov demonstrated theoretically that this constitutes a general phenomenon related to all interfaces at all temperatures, given the dependence of heat transmission on the acoustic impedance (sound velocity × density) of each medium. For the solid/superfluid interface, the measured transmission of heat is almost one hundred times stronger than the Khalatnikov prediction. This discrepancy could be intuitively attributed to diffuse scattering of phonons at the interface but, despite several attempts, a detailed quantitative comparison between theoretical and experimental findings to explain the occurrence of scattering and its contribution to heat transmission had been lacking. Here we show that when the thermal wavelength λ of phonons of the less dense medium (liquid 4He) becomes comparable to the r.m.s. surface roughness σ, the heat flux crossing the interface is amplified; in particular when σ ~ 0.33λ, a spatial resonant mechanism occurs, as proposed by Adamenko and Fuks. We used a silicon single crystal whose surface roughness was controlled and characterized. The thermal boundary resistance measurements were performed from 0.4 to 2 K at different superfluid pressures ranging from saturated vapour pressure (SVP) to above 4He solidification, to eliminate all hypothetical artefact mechanisms. Our results demonstrate the physical conditions necessary for resonant phonon scattering to occur at all interfaces, and therefore constitute a benchmark in the design of nanoscale devices for heat monitoring.

  19. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Kostallas, George; Löfblom, John; Samuelson, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are involved in many biological processes and have become important tools in biomedical research and industry. Technologies for engineering and characterization of, for example, proteolytic activity and specificity are essential in protease research. Here, we present a novel method for assessment of site-specific proteolysis. The assay utilizes plasmid-encoded reporters that, upon processing by a co-expressed protease, confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria in proportion to the cleavage efficiency. We have demonstrated that cells co-expressing cleavable reporters together with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) could be discriminated from cells with non-cleavable reporters by growth in selective media. Importantly, the resistance to antibiotics proved to correlate with the substrate processing efficiency. Thus, by applying competitive growth of a mock library in antibiotic-containing medium, we could show that the substrate preferred by TEVp was enriched relative to less-efficient substrates. We believe that this simple methodology will facilitate protease substrate identification, and hold great promise for directed evolution of proteases and protease recognition sequences towards improved or even new functionality.

  20. A Balance between Inhibitor Binding and Substrate Processing Confers Influenza Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Liu, Ping; Bank, Claudia; Renzette, Nicholas; Prachanronarong, Kristina; Yilmaz, Lutfu S; Caffrey, Daniel R; Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Schiffer, Celia A; Kowalik, Timothy F; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Finberg, Robert W; Wang, Jennifer P; Bolon, Daniel N A

    2016-02-13

    The therapeutic benefits of the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor oseltamivir are dampened by the emergence of drug resistance mutations in influenza A virus (IAV). To investigate the mechanistic features that underlie resistance, we developed an approach to quantify the effects of all possible single-nucleotide substitutions introduced into important regions of NA. We determined the experimental fitness effects of 450 nucleotide mutations encoding positions both surrounding the active site and at more distant sites in an N1 strain of IAV in the presence and absence of oseltamivir. NA mutations previously known to confer oseltamivir resistance in N1 strains, including H275Y and N295S, were adaptive in the presence of drug, indicating that our experimental system captured salient features of real-world selection pressures acting on NA. We identified mutations, including several at position 223, that reduce the apparent affinity for oseltamivir in vitro. Position 223 of NA is located adjacent to a hydrophobic portion of oseltamivir that is chemically distinct from the substrate, making it a hotspot for substitutions that preferentially impact drug binding relative to substrate processing. Furthermore, two NA mutations, K221N and Y276F, each reduce susceptibility to oseltamivir by increasing NA activity without altering drug binding. These results indicate that competitive expansion of IAV in the face of drug pressure is mediated by a balance between inhibitor binding and substrate processing.

  1. Surface preparation and thermal spray in a single step: The PROTAL process—Example of application for an aluminum-base substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddet, C.; Montavon, G.; Ayrault-Costil, S.; Freneaux, O.; Rigolet, F.; Barbezat, G.; Folio, F.; Diard, A.; Wazen, P.

    1999-06-01

    Thermal spray techniques can fulfill numerous industrial applications. Coatings are thus applied to resist wear and corrosion or to modify the surface characteristics of the substrate (e.g., thermal conductivity/thermal insulation). However, many of these applications remain inhibited by some deposit characteristics, such as a limited coating adhesion or pores or by industrial costs because several nonsynchronized and sequential steps (that is, degreasing, sand blasting, and spraying) are needed to manufacture a deposit. The PROTAL process was designed to reduce the aforementioned difficulties by implementing simultaneously a Q-switched laser and a thermal spray torch. The laser irradiation is primarily aimed to eliminate the contamination films and oxide layers, to generate a surface state enhancing the deposit adhesion, and to limit the contamination of the deposited layers by condensed vapors. From PROTAL arises the possibility to reduce, indeed suppress, the preliminary steps of degreasing and grit blasting. In this study, the benefits of the PROTAL process were investigated, comparing adhesion of different atmospheric plasma spray coatings (e.g., metallic and ceramic coatings) on an aluminum-base substrate. Substrates were coated rough from the machine shop, for example, manipulated barehanded and without any prior surface preparation. Results obtained this way were compared with those obtained using a classical procedure; that is, degreasing and grit blasting prior to the coating deposition.

  2. Cell-substrate contact: another factor may influence transepithelial electrical resistance of cell layers cultured on permeable filters.

    PubMed

    Lo, C M; Keese, C R; Giaever, I

    1999-08-01

    Transepithelial resistance (TER) measurement has often been used to study the paracellular transport properties of epithelia grown on permeable filters, especially the barrier function of tight junctions. However, the TER value includes another source, the resistance caused by cell-substrate contact, that may give rise to a high TER value if cell-substrate separation is small. In this study we use electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) to measure both paracellular resistance and the average cell-substrate distance of MDCK (II), HEp-2, and WI-38 VA13 cells. Comparing ECIS data with those from TER measurements of cell layers cultured on polycarbonate filters, we can obtain the approximate extra resistance resulting from cell-substrate contact for each cell type. The value of cell-substrate resistance was also estimated by two theoretical calculations that bracket the true values. Our results demonstrate that cell-substrate contact substantially influences the TER data measured using polycarbonate filters and that the extra resistance due to cell-substrate spaces depends on both cell type and filter property.

  3. The Mixed Processing Models Development Of Thermal Fracture And Laser Ablation On Glass Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Hong; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Hwang, Chi-Hung

    2011-01-01

    As the industries of cell phone and LCD TV were vigorously flourishing and the manufacturing requirements for LCD glass substrate were getting higher, the thermal fracture cutting technology (TFCT) has progressively become the main technology for LCD glass substrate cutting. Due to using laser as the heat source, the TFCT has many advantages, such as uniform heating, small heat effect zone, and high cutting speed, smooth cutting surface and low residual stress, etc. Moreover, a general laser ablation processing or traditional diamond wheel cutting does not have the last two advantages. The article presents a mixed processing of glass substrate, which consists of TFCT and laser ablation mechanisms, and how to enhance the cutting speed with little ablation laser energy. In this study, a 10W Nd:YAG laser and a 40W CO2 laser are used as the heat source of TFCT and laser ablation processing, respectively. The result indicates that the speed of the mixed processing is more than twice the speed of TFCT. Furthermore, after the mixed processing, the residual stresses in the glass substrates are also smaller.

  4. Fundamentals of planar-type inductively coupled thermal plasmas on a substrate for large-area material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tial, Mai Kai Suan; Irie, Hiromitsu; Maruyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the fundamentals of planar-type Ar inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTPs) with oxygen molecular gas on a substrate have been studied. Previously, aiming at large-area material processing, we developed a planar-type ICTP torch with a rectangular quartz vessel instead of a conventional cylindrical tube. For the adoption of such planar-type ICTP to material processing, it is necessary to sustain the ICTP with molecular gases on a substrate stably and uniformly. To determine the uniformity of the ICTP formed on the substrate, spectroscopic observation was carried out at 3 mm above the substrate. Results showed that the radiation intensities of specified O atomic lines were almost uniformly detected along the surface of the substrate. This means that excited O atoms, which are important radicals for thermal plasma oxidation, are present in the planar-type ICTP uniformly on the substrate.

  5. Submerged Arc Stainless Steel Strip Cladding—Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Thermal Fatigue Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, I. C.; Chou, C. P.; Tseng, C. F.; Lee, I. K.

    2009-03-01

    Two types of martensitic stainless steel strips, PFB-132 and PFB-131S, were deposited on SS41 carbon steel substrate by a three-pass submerged arc cladding process. The effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on thermal fatigue resistance and hardness were evaluated by thermal fatigue and hardness testing, respectively. The weld metal microstructure was investigated by utilizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that, by increasing the PWHT temperature, hardness decreased but there was a simultaneous improvement in weldment thermal fatigue resistance. During tempering, carbide, such as (Fe, Cr)23C6, precipitated in the weld metals and molybdenum appeared to promote (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 formation. The precipitates of (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 revealed a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure with fine grains distributed in the microstructure, thereby effectively increasing thermal fatigue resistance. However, by adding nickel, the AC1 temperature decreased, causing a negative effect on thermal fatigue resistance.

  6. Laser-resistance sensitivity to substrate pit size of multilayer coatings

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yingjie; Zhu, Meiping; Wang, Hu; Xing, Huanbin; Cui, Yun; Sun, Jian; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond laser-resistance to dielectric multilayer coatings on substrate pits was examined with respect to the electric-field (E-field) enhancement and mechanical properties. The laser-induced damage sensitivity to the shape of the substrate pits has not been directly investigated through experiments, thus preventing clear understanding of the damage mechanism of substrate pits. We performed a systematic and comparative study to reveal the effects of the E-field distributions and localized stress concentration on the damage behaviour of coatings on substrates with pits. To obtain reliable results, substrate pits with different geometries were fabricated using a 520-nm femtosecond laser-processing platform. By using the finite element method, the E-field distribution and localized stress of the pitted region were well simulated. The 1064-nm damage morphologies of the coated pit were directly compared with simulated E-field intensity profiles and stress distributions. To enable further understanding, a simplified geometrical model was established, and the damage mechanism was introduced. PMID:27252016

  7. Laser-resistance sensitivity to substrate pit size of multilayer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yingjie; Zhu, Meiping; Wang, Hu; Xing, Huanbin; Cui, Yun; Sun, Jian; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond laser-resistance to dielectric multilayer coatings on substrate pits was examined with respect to the electric-field (E-field) enhancement and mechanical properties. The laser-induced damage sensitivity to the shape of the substrate pits has not been directly investigated through experiments, thus preventing clear understanding of the damage mechanism of substrate pits. We performed a systematic and comparative study to reveal the effects of the E-field distributions and localized stress concentration on the damage behaviour of coatings on substrates with pits. To obtain reliable results, substrate pits with different geometries were fabricated using a 520-nm femtosecond laser-processing platform. By using the finite element method, the E-field distribution and localized stress of the pitted region were well simulated. The 1064-nm damage morphologies of the coated pit were directly compared with simulated E-field intensity profiles and stress distributions. To enable further understanding, a simplified geometrical model was established, and the damage mechanism was introduced.

  8. Thermal fatigue resistance of cobalt-modified UDIMET 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of comparative thermal fatigue resistances of five cobalt composition modifications of UDIMET 700 from fluidized bed tests is described. Cobalt compositional levels of 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8, 17.0 percent were being investigated in both the bare and coated (NiCrAlY overlay) conditions. Triplicate tests of each variation including duplicate tests of three control alloys are under investigation. Fluidized beds were maintained at 550 and 1850 F for the first 5500 cycles at which time the hot bed was increased to 1922 F. Immersion time in each bed is always 3 minutes. Upon the completion of 10,000 cycles, it appears that the 8.6 percent cobalt level gives the best thermal fatigue life. Considerable deformation of the test bars was observed.

  9. AcrB drug-binding pocket substitution confers clinically relevant resistance and altered substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Ricci, Vito; Modi, Niraj; Cacciotto, Pierpaolo; Kleinekathӧfer, Ulrich; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Baylay, Alison J.; Smith, Helen E.; Brandon, Yvonne; Galloway, David; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections is increasing globally and the need to understand the underlying mechanisms is paramount to discover new therapeutics. The efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria have a broad substrate range and transport antibiotics out of the bacterium, conferring intrinsic multidrug resistance (MDR). The genomes of pre- and posttherapy MDR clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium from a patient that failed antibacterial therapy and died were sequenced. In the posttherapy isolate we identified a novel G288D substitution in AcrB, the resistance-nodulation division transporter in the AcrAB-TolC tripartite MDR efflux pump system. Computational structural analysis suggested that G288D in AcrB heavily affects the structure, dynamics, and hydration properties of the distal binding pocket altering specificity for antibacterial drugs. Consistent with this hypothesis, recreation of the mutation in standard Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains showed that G288D AcrB altered substrate specificity, conferring decreased susceptibility to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin by increased efflux. At the same time, the substitution increased susceptibility to other drugs by decreased efflux. Information about drug transport is vital for the discovery of new antibacterials; the finding that one amino acid change can cause resistance to some drugs, while conferring increased susceptibility to others, could provide a basis for new drug development and treatment strategies. PMID:25737552

  10. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  11. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  12. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  13. Thermally evaporated conformal thin films on non-traditional/non-planar substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsifer, Drew Patrick

    Conformal thin films have a wide variety of uses in the microelectronics, optics, and coatings industries. The ever-increasing capabilities of these conformal thin films have enabled tremendous technological advancement in the last half century. During this period, new thin-film deposition techniques have been developed and refined. While these techniques have remarkable performance for traditional applications which utilize planar substrates such as silicon wafers, they are not suitable for the conformal coating of non-traditional substrates such as biological material. The process of thermally evaporating a material under vacuum conditions is one of the oldest thin-film deposition techniques which is able to produce functional film morphologies. A drawback of thermally evaporated thin films is that they are not intrinsically conformal. To overcome this, while maintaining the advantages of thermal evaporation, a procedure for varying the substrates orientation with respect to the incident vapor flux during deposition was developed immediately prior to the research undertaken for this doctoral dissertation. This process was shown to greatly improve the conformality of thermally evaporated thin films. This development allows for several applications of thermally evaporated conformal thin films on non-planar/non-traditional substrates. Three settings in which to evaluate the improved conformal deposition of thermally evaporated thin films were investigated for this dissertation. In these settings the thin-film morphologies are of different types. In the first setting, a bioreplication approach was used to fabricate artificial visual decoys for the invasive species Agrilus planipennis, commonly known as the emerald ash borer (EAB). The mating behavior of this species involves an overflying EAB male pouncing on an EAB female at rest on an ash leaflet before copulation. The male spots the female on the leaflet by visually detecting the iridescent green color of the

  14. Enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal pretreatment: Substrate versus digestate heating.

    PubMed

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Yeh, Daniel H; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Food waste (FW) represents a source of high potential renewable energy if properly treated with anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreating the substrates could yield a higher biomethane production in a shorter time. In this study, the effects of thermal (heating the FW in a separate chamber) and thermophilic (heating the full reactor content containing both FW and inoculum) pretreatments at 50, 60, 70 and 80°C prior to mesophilic AD were studied through a series of batch experiments. Pretreatments at a lower temperature (50°C) and a shorter time (<12h) had a positive effect on the AD process. The highest enhancement of the biomethane production with an increase by 44-46% was achieved with a thermophilic pretreatment at 50°C for 6-12h or a thermal pretreatment at 80°C for 1.5h. Thermophilic pretreatments at higher temperatures (>55°C) and longer operating times (>12h) yielded higher soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), but had a negative effect on the methanogenic activity. The thermal pretreatments at the same conditions resulted in a lower solubilization of COD. Based on net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production is sufficient to heat up the FW for the thermal, but not for the thermophilic pretreatment.

  15. Enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal pretreatment: Substrate versus digestate heating.

    PubMed

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Yeh, Daniel H; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Food waste (FW) represents a source of high potential renewable energy if properly treated with anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreating the substrates could yield a higher biomethane production in a shorter time. In this study, the effects of thermal (heating the FW in a separate chamber) and thermophilic (heating the full reactor content containing both FW and inoculum) pretreatments at 50, 60, 70 and 80°C prior to mesophilic AD were studied through a series of batch experiments. Pretreatments at a lower temperature (50°C) and a shorter time (<12h) had a positive effect on the AD process. The highest enhancement of the biomethane production with an increase by 44-46% was achieved with a thermophilic pretreatment at 50°C for 6-12h or a thermal pretreatment at 80°C for 1.5h. Thermophilic pretreatments at higher temperatures (>55°C) and longer operating times (>12h) yielded higher soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), but had a negative effect on the methanogenic activity. The thermal pretreatments at the same conditions resulted in a lower solubilization of COD. Based on net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production is sufficient to heat up the FW for the thermal, but not for the thermophilic pretreatment. PMID:26272711

  16. Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles

    DOEpatents

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Borom, Marcus Preston

    2002-01-01

    A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

  17. 71 FR 16677 - Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-04-03

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 121 RIN 2120-AI75 Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed... comply with the fire penetration resistance requirements of thermal/acoustic insulation used in transport... flammability requirements for thermal/acoustic insulation installed in the fuselage of transport...

  18. Thermal shock resistance of brittle ceramic materials with embedded elliptical cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. M.; Wang, B. L.

    2011-10-01

    An analytical model is established for the prediction of the thermal shock resistance of a ceramic plate with an embedded elliptical crack with ideal thermal insulation. The thermal stress intensity factors at the crack fronts are formulated by fitting the thermal stress to a polynomial form in an un-cracked plate. The thermal shock resistance of sapphire ceramic is evaluated as an example. In addition, the numerical solution of thermal shock resistance suitable for practical engineering applications is provided. The model developed applies to any brittle material in high temperature applications.

  19. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  20. Process for producing a well-adhered durable optical coating on an optical plastic substrate. [abrasion resistant polymethyl methacrylate lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A low temperature plasma polymerization process is described for applying an optical plastic substrate, such as a polymethyl methacrylate lens, with a single layer abrasive resistant coating to improve the durability of the plastic.

  1. Effect of headgroup-substrate interactions on the thermal behavior of long-chain amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Saranshu; Zhu, He; Dhinojwala, Ali

    The structure of amphiphilic molecules at liquid/solid and solid/solid interfaces is relevant in understanding lubrication, colloid stabilization, chromatography, and nucleation. Here, we characterize the interfacial structures of long chain amphiphilic molecules with different head groups (OH, COOH, NH2) using interface-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The behavior of these self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sapphire substrate is recorded in situ as a function of temperature (above and below bulk Tm) using SFG. Previous studies using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and SFG show that the melting point of an ordered hexadecanol monolayer is around 30°C above its bulk Tm. The thermal stability of the monolayer is explained due to strong hydrogen bonding interactions between the head-group and the sapphire substrate. The strength of these hydrogen-bonding interactions between substrate and different head groups is calculated using the Badger-Bauer equation. Below Tm, the ordered monolayer influenced the structure of the interfacial crystalline layer, and the transition from monolayer to the bulk crystalline phases. The results with different head groups will be presented.

  2. Response of wetland herbaceous communities to gradients of light and substrate following disturbance by thermal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunn, Christopher P.; Scott, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of thermal disturbance and site characteristics on distribution of herbs was studied in portions of a 3020 ha wetland in the southeastern USA. Presence-absence of 52 species in 130 0.25 m2 plots was determined from four sites with different disturbance histories and from an undisturbed site. Data from the four disturbed sites were ordinated by detrended correspondence analysis. Differences in species composition among sites (coarse scale) were associated with water depth, light, and substrate type. Within a site (at a fine scale), correlation of environmental variables with ordination scores at a chronically disturbed site was weakly correlated with light (r=0.50). At two sites with episodic disturbance, species composition correlated significantly and positively with substrate and water depth. At a recovering site, vegetation patterns were moderately correlated with water depth (r=−0.52). Species richness was correlated with substrate type along the disturbance gradient. Our results are consistent the intermediate disturbance hypothesis and the subsidy-stress gradient concept.

  3. Characterization and modeling of CCD devices on high-resistivity silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamasz, Stacy R.; Farrier, Michael G.; Smith, Charles R.

    1994-05-01

    CCD devices fabricated on low-resistivity silicon epi (30 - 60 (Omega) -cm) exhibit satisfactory imaging characteristics in the visible spectrum but inferior imaging characteristics in the near infrared and x ray regions. This is a result of the greater penetration depth of the photons, which tend to travel beyond the depletion regions under the CCD gates causing optical crosstalk and poor responsivity. This represents a performance limiting issue for acousto-optical applications and scientific imaging. CCD devices fabricated on high-resistivity silicon epi (>= 1000 (Omega) -cm) with increased epi layer thickness will exhibit superior imaging performance for near-infrared and x-ray photons. This is because the width of the depletion regions is much greater compared to devices on conventional substrates. DALSA has fabricated CCD structures on high-resistivity substrates and has examined their performance, in particular imaging behavior in the near-infrared region of the spectrum. We also examine the behavior of the nonimaging circuitry associated with the CCD such as the output amplifiers.

  4. Differential hepatic distribution of insulin receptor substrates causes selective insulin resistance in diabetes and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsuya; Kajiwara, Eiji; Iwamura, Tomokatsu; Kumagai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Taku; Inoue, Mariko; Takamoto, Iseki; Sasako, Takayoshi; Kumagai, Katsuyoshi; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Nakamuta, Makoto; Moroi, Masao; Sugi, Kaoru; Noda, Tetsuo; Terauchi, Yasuo; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic insulin signalling involves insulin receptor substrates (Irs) 1/2, and is normally associated with the inhibition of gluconeogenesis and activation of lipogenesis. In diabetes and obesity, insulin no longer suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis, while continuing to activate lipogenesis, a state referred to as ‘selective insulin resistance'. Here, we show that ‘selective insulin resistance' is caused by the differential expression of Irs1 and Irs2 in different zones of the liver. We demonstrate that hepatic Irs2-knockout mice develop ‘selective insulin resistance', whereas mice lacking in Irs1, or both Irs1 and Irs2, develop ‘total insulin resistance'. In obese diabetic mice, Irs1/2-mediated insulin signalling is impaired in the periportal zone, which is the primary site of gluconeogenesis, but enhanced in the perivenous zone, which is the primary site of lipogenesis. While hyperinsulinaemia reduces Irs2 expression in both the periportal and perivenous zones, Irs1 expression, which is predominantly in the perivenous zone, remains mostly unaffected. These data suggest that ‘selective insulin resistance' is induced by the differential distribution, and alterations of hepatic Irs1 and Irs2 expression. PMID:27708333

  5. Fabrication and characterisation of high resistivity SOI substrates for monolithic high energy physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddell, F. H.; Suder, S. L.; Bain, M. F.; Montgomery, J. H.; Armstrong, B. M.; Gamble, H. S.; Denvir, D.; Casse, G.; Bowcock, T.; Allport, P. P.; Marczewski, J.; Kucharski, K.; Tomaszewski, D.; Niemiec, H.; Kucewicz, W.

    2008-12-01

    Silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates offer a promising platform for monolithic high energy physics detectors with integrated read-out electronics and pixel diodes. This paper describes the fabrication and characterisation of specially-configured SOI substrates using improved bonded wafer ion split and grind/polish technologies. The crucial interface between the high resistivity handle silicon and the SOI buried oxide has been characterised using both pixel diodes and circular geometry MOS transistors. Pixel diode breakdown voltages were typically greater than 100 V and average leakage current densities at 70 V were only 55 nA/cm 2. MOS transistors subjected to 24 GeV proton irradiation showed an increased SOI buried oxide trapped charge of only 3.45 × 10 11 cm -2 for a dose of 2.7 Mrad.

  6. Identification and analysis of factors affecting thermal shock resistance of ceramic materials in solar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselman, D. P. H.; Singh, J. P.; Satyamurthy, K.

    1980-07-01

    An analysis was conducted of the possible modes of thermal stress failure of brittle ceramics for potential use in point-focussing solar receivers. The pertinent materials properties which control thermal stress resistance were identified for conditions of steady-state and transient heat flow, convective and radiative heat transfer, thermal buckling and thermal fatigue as well as catastrophic crack propagation. Selection rules for materials with optimum thermal stress resistance for a particular thermal environment were identified. Recommendations for materials for particular components were made. The general requirements for a thermal shock testing program quantitatively meaningful for point-focussing solar receivers were outlined. Recommendations for follow-on theoretical analyses were made.

  7. Thermal fatigue resistance of H13 steel treated by selective laser surface melting and CrNi alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xin; Dai, Ming-jiang; Zhang, Zhi-hui

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the selective laser surface melting and laser surface alloying technologies were adopted to improve the thermal fatigue resistance of medium carbon hot-work die steel (H13) by a CO2 laser. Two kinds of mixed chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) powders were used as the laser alloying materials, and the effects of the mixing ratio on the thermal fatigue resistance were investigated thoroughly. Some important results such as cross-sectional morphology, phases, hardness and thermal fatigue behavior were analyzed and evaluated. It indicates that the laser surface alloying technique using mixed powder with ratio of 75%Cr-25%Ni can considerably enhance the thermal fatigue resistance of the H13 steel. The laser alloyed zone has excellent properties such as preventing crack initiation and oxidation corrosion compared with original H13. Thermal cracking and oxidation corrosion that occurred at substrate surface can be surrounded and intercepted by a gridded laser strengthened structure. Therefore, the naturally developed cracks could be effectively prevented. Theses results and analysis show that laser surface technique can be positively used to improve surface mechanical properties of H13 dies.

  8. Thermal detection mechanism of SiC based hydrogen resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, Timothy J.; Wolan, John T.; Lloyd Spetz, Anita; Reyes, Meralys; Saddow, Stephen E.

    2006-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) resistive hydrogen gas sensors have been fabricated and tested. Planar NiCr contacts were deposited on a thin 3C-SiC epitaxial film grown on thin Si wafers bonded to polycrystalline SiC substrates. At 673K, up to a 51.75±0.04% change in sensor output current and a change in the device temperature of up to 163.1±0.4K were demonstrated in response to 100% H2 in N2. Changes in device temperature are shown to be driven by the transfer of heat from the device to the gas, giving rise to a thermal detection mechanism.

  9. CMOS pixel sensors on high resistive substrate for high-rate, high-radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, Toko; Barbero, Marlon; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stephanie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Pohl, David-Leon; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rymaszewski, Piotr; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    A depleted CMOS active pixel sensor (DMAPS) has been developed on a substrate with high resistivity in a high voltage process. High radiation tolerance and high time resolution can be expected because of the charge collection by drift. A prototype of DMAPS was fabricated in a 150 nm process by LFoundry. Two variants of the pixel layout were tested, and the measured depletion depths of the variants are 166 μm and 80 μm. We report the results obtained with the prototype fabricated in this technology.

  10. Multiferroic YCrO3 thin films grown on glass substrate: Resistive switching characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeongdae; Ahn, Yoonho; Son, Jong Yeog

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline YCrO3 thin films were deposited on (111) Pt/Ta/glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The YCrO3 thin films exhibited good ferroelectric properties with remnant polarization of about 5 µC/cm2. Large leakage current was observed by I- V curve and ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The YCrO3 resistive random access memory (RRAM) capacitor showed unipolar switching behaviors with SET and RESET voltages higher than those of general NiO RRAM capacitors. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics.

  12. Superhydrophobic surface fabricated on iron substrate by black chromium electrodeposition and its corrosion resistance property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Feng, Haitao; Lin, Feng; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Liping; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surface on iron substrate is carried out through 20 min black chromium electrodeposition, followed by immersing in 0.05 M ethanolic stearic acid solution for 12 h. The resultant superhydrophobic complex film is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), disperse Spectrometer (EDS), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle (CA), sliding angle (SA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and its corrosion resistance property is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the fabricated superhydrophobic film has excellent water repellency (CA, 158.8°; SA, 2.1°) and significantly high corrosion resistance (1.31 × 106 Ω cm-2) and excellent corrosion protection efficiency (99.94%).

  13. Evaluation of thermal resistance of building insulations with reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Št'astník, S.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal resistance of advanced insulation materials, applied namely in civil engineering, containing reflective surfaces and air gaps, cannot be evaluated correctly using the valid European standards because of presence of the dominant nonlinear radiative heat transfer and other phenomena not included in the recommended computational formulae. The proper general physical analysis refers to rather complicated problems from classical thermodynamics, whose both existence theory and numerical analysis contain open questions and cannot be done in practice when the optimization of composition of insulation layers is required. This paper, coming from original experimental results, demonstrates an alternative simplified computational approach, taking into account the most important physical processes, useful in the design of modern insulation systems.

  14. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop integrated thermal protection systems and heat resistant structures for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled early. This presentation provides an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team chose an Apollo-type capsule as the reference vehicle for the work. They began with the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield, a C/SiC deployable decelerator and several ablators. They additionally developed a health monitoring system, high temperature structures testing, and the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  15. Selection and Evaluation of Thermal Interface Materials for Reduction of the Thermal Contact Resistance of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Iida, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Taguchi, Yutaka; Hirayama, Naomi; Nishio, Keishi; Takanashi, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-01

    A variety of thermal interface materials (TIMs) were investigated to find a suitable TIM for improving the performance of thermoelectric power generators (TEGs) operating in the medium-temperature range (600-900 K). The thermal resistance at the thermal interface between which the TIM was inserted was evaluated. The TIMs were chosen on the basis of their thermal stability when used with TEGs operating at medium temperatures, their electrical insulating properties, their thermal conductivity, and their thickness. The results suggest that the boron nitride (BN)-based ceramic coating, Whity Paint, and the polyurethane-based sheet, TSU700-H, are suitable TIMs for the heat source and heat sink sides, respectively, of the TEG. Use of these effectively enhances TEG performance because they reduce the thermal contact resistance at the thermal interface.

  16. Nano-composite coatings with improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, X. C.; Liu, Z. W.; Wu, Y. S.; Liu, M. T.; Zeng, D. C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured coatings. To improve the mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of the materials, two new types of nanostructured coatings including CoNiCrAlY-MoSi2 and Ni60-TiB2 were designed. The nanocrystalline feedstock powders were prepared by high energy ball milling (HEBM). The particle size, morphology and grain size of the feed stocks were investigated. The preparation, microstructure, mechanical properties, and anti-oxidation behavior of the nanostructured CoNiCrAlY-MoSi2 and Ni60-TiB2 coatings are presented. With a lamellar and compact structure, the optimized nano-composite CoNiCrAlY-MoSi2 coatings is metallurgically bonded with the substrate. It exhibits low porosity, high fracture toughness and excellent thermal shock resistance. The nanostructured Ni60-TiB2 composite coatings also exhibited better mechanical properties and wear-corrosion resistance than those of its conventional counterpart. This work is expected to play an important role in the preparation and application of high performance nanostructured coatings.

  17. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1985-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on NI-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  18. A Sliding-press-type Reel-to-reel Thermal Imprint System for Fiber Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Akihiro; Mekaru, Harutaka; Takagi, Hideki; Kokubo, Mitsunori; Goto, Hiroshi

    In the emerging fields related to healthcare, energy, and environment, realization of devices on flexible sheets is imminent. The materialization of such sheets would require fabrication of parts of devices on a fiber substrate where they can be assembled and interconnected by weaving. To broaden the area of a flexible sheet device, larger number of such devices will need to be formed directly on the fibers. Moreover, fabrication cost of a flexible sheet device, larger number of such devices will have to be addressed in order to make large size fabric manufacturable at affordable price. Therefore, a high-speed, low-cost, environmental friendly batch-manufacturing process of the devices on fiber is required. In this paper, we developed a reel-to-reel thermal imprint system combined with a sliding roller imprint mechanism. In this process, fiber substrate is sandwiched by a couple of flat molds, and these molds slide opposite direction each other under suitable press force and temperature. And then, we optimized conditions of this imprint process. Finally, we succeeded to imprint continuously more than 100 times and to fabricate 1.6 m long imprinted fiber. And we succeeded to imprint almost on entire cylindrical surface. A stable imprinted region was about 160° at each side.

  19. The sulfated conjugate of biochanin A is a substrate of breast cancer resistant protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Morris, Marilyn E

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) in the transport of biochanin A and its metabolites. Transport studies were carried out in MDCK/bcrp1 as well as in control cells, and samples were analysed for biochanin A aglycone and metabolites using LC/MS/MS. In bidirectional transport studies biochanin A sulfate was detected in both apical and basolateral chambers after the addition of biochanin A. Analysis by RT-PCR revealed that the enzyme sulfotransferase 1A1 is expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK)-II cells. After its intracellular formation, biochanin A sulfate was preferentially transported to the basolateral side in MDCK/Mock cells, whereas apical transport of biochanin A sulfate was predominant in MDCK/Bcrp1 cells. Genistein, an additional metabolite of biochanin A formed intracellularly, was also found to be a bcrp1 substrate. Studies with MDCK/MRP2 (ABCC2) cells demonstrated that both genistein and biochanin A sulfate are not MRP2 substrates. In contrast, biochanin A aglycone was not transported by murine or human BCRP; nor is it a substrate of MRP2 or P-glycoprotein. Therefore, BCRP may play an important role in the enteric cycling of biochanin A sulfate and through this mechanism may alter the bioavailability of its non-substrate parent compound biochanin A. Moreover, MDCK-II cells might be a suitable model to investigate the synergistic role of sulfotransferase enzymes with efflux transporters. PMID:21910126

  20. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO2). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer etal . [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kho≪1, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation and ho is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute to surface

  1. Some effects of metallic substrate composition on degradation of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Alexander, K.B.; Pruessner, K.

    1997-12-31

    Comparisons have been made in laboratory isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests of the degradation of oxide scales grown on single crystal superalloy substrates and bond coating alloys intended for use in thermal barrier coatings systems. The influence of desulfurization of the superalloy and bond coating, of reactive element addition to the bond coating alloy, and of oxidation temperature on the spallation behavior of the alumina scales formed was assessed from oxidation kinetics and from SEM observations of the microstructure and composition of the oxide scales. Desulfurization of nickel-base superalloy (in the absence of a Y addition) resulted in an increase in the lifetime of a state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating applied to it compared to a Y-free, non-desulfurized version of the alloy. The lifetime of the same ceramic coating applied without a bond coating to a non-desulfurized model alloy that formed an ideal alumina scale was also found to be at least four times longer than on the Y-doped superalloy plus state-of-the-art bond coating combination. Some explanations are offered of the factors controlling the degradation of such coatings.

  2. Residual Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings for a Cu-8Cr-4Nb Substrate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Raj, Sai V.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical calculations were conducted to determine the thermal stresses developed in a coated copper-based alloy, Cu-8%(at.%)Cr-4%Nb (designated as GRCop-84), after plasma spraying and during heat-up in a simulated rocket engine environment. Finite element analyses were conducted for two coating systems consisting of a metallic top coat, a pure copper bond coat and the GRCop-84. The through thickness temperature variations were determined as a function of coating thickness for two metallic coatings, a Ni-17%(wt%)Cr-6%Al-0.5%Y alloy and a Ni-50%(at.%)Al alloy. The residual stresses after low-pressure plasma spraying of the NiCrAlY and NiAl coatings on GRCop-84 substrate were also evaluated. These analyses took into consideration a 50.8 mm copper bond coat and the effects of an interface coating roughness. The through the thickness thermal stresses developed in coated liners were also calculated after 15 minutes of exposure in a rocket environment with and without an interfacial roughness.

  3. Thermal Oxidation of WSe2 Nanosheets Adhered on SiO2/Si Substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingnan; Tan, Cheng; Chou, Harry; Nayak, Avinash; Wu, Di; Ghosh, Rudresh; Chang, Hsiao-Yu; Hao, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaohan; Kim, Joon-Seok; Piner, Richard; Ruoff, Rodney S; Akinwande, Deji; Lai, Keji

    2015-08-12

    Because of the drastically different intralayer versus interlayer bonding strengths, the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials are highly anisotropic between the in-plane and out-of-plane directions. The structural anisotropy may also play a role in chemical reactions, such as oxidation, reduction, and etching. Here, the composition, structure, and electrical properties of mechanically exfoliated WSe2 nanosheets on SiO2/Si substrates were studied as a function of the extent of thermal oxidation. A major component of the oxidation, as indicated from optical and Raman data, starts from the nanosheet edges and propagates laterally toward the center. Partial oxidation also occurs in certain areas at the surface of the flakes, which are shown to be highly conductive by microwave impedance microscopy. Using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, we also observed extensive oxidation at the WSe2-SiO2 interface. The combination of multiple microcopy methods can thus provide vital information on the spatial evolution of chemical reactions on 2D materials and the nanoscale electrical properties of the reaction products.

  4. 71 FR 18255 - Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-04-11

    ... operators to comply with the fire penetration resistance requirements of thermal/acoustic insulation used in... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 121 RIN 2120-AI75 Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  5. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  6. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  7. Comparative thermal fatigue resistances of twenty-six nickel and cobalt base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Spera, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal fatigue resistances were determined from fluidized bed tests. Cycles to cracking differed by almost three orders of magnitude for these materials with directional solidification and surface protection of definite benefit. The alloy-coating combination with the highest thermal fatigue resistance was directionally solidified NASA TAZ-8A with an RT-XP coating. It oxidation resistance was excellent, showing almost no weight change after 15 000 fluidized bed cycles.

  8. 72 FR 1438 - Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal/Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2007-01-12

    ... the fire penetration resistance requirements of thermal/ acoustic insulation used in transport... service. Section 25.856(b), in turn, requires that thermal/acoustic insulation installed in the lower half... the new thermal acoustic insulation standards would spare manufactures an added setup cost of...

  9. Effect of Substrates on the Resistivity and Adhesion of Copper Nanoparticle Ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Pritam

    Printed electronics processes have the potential to make electronics manufacturing more flexible by providing a wider choice of materials and easier processing steps. In traditional electronics manufacturing techniques, corrosive etching steps limit the choice of materials and also require advanced infrastructure for process implementation. High speed low cost printing processes (e.g. inkjet) can be used, and the printed tracks can then be cured to conductive circuits that meet the needs of electronic devices like radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, sensors, etc. In this work, intense flashes of broad spectrum light from Xenon lamps are used to cure inkjet printed metal nanoparticle inks. This technique is known as photonic curing. Paper, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyimide have been used as substrates with the aim of determining how different substrates affect the behavior of the ink and the photonic curing parameters. A statistical approach was employed for the experiments, and significant control variables determining curing of the ink were identified. Experiments were also conducted to obtain prints conforming to dimensional tolerances. Using the results from the experiments, standard curing parameters for low resistance and good adhesion of the ink were obtained. The results have been statistically validated and used to study the interaction between the control variables and individual effects of each control variable on the response variable.

  10. Elastic modulus and thermal stress in coating during heat cycling with different substrate shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Daniel; Valarezo, Alfredo

    2015-09-01

    The elastic modulus of a deposit ( E d) can be obtained by monitoring the temperature (Δ T) and curvature (Δ k) of a one-side coated long plate, namely, a onedimensional (1D) deformation model. The aim of this research is to design an experimental setup that proves whether a 1D deformation model can be scaled for complex geometries. The setup includes a laser displacement sensor mounted on a robotic arm capable of scanning a specimen surface and measuring its deformation. The reproducibility of the results is verified by comparing the present results with Stony Brook University Laboratory's results. The Δ k-Δ T slope error is less than 8%, and the E d estimation error is close to 2%. These values reveal the repeatability of the experiments. Several samples fabricated with aluminum as the substrate and 100MXC nanowire (Fe and Cr alloy) as the deposit are analyzed and compared with those in finite element (FE) simulations. The linear elastic behavior of 1D (flat long plate) and 2D (squared plate) specimens during heating/cooling cycles is demonstrated by the high linearity of all Δ k-Δ T curves (over 97%). The E d values are approximately equal for 1D and 2D analyses, with a median of 96 GPa and standard deviation of 2 GPa. The correspondence between the experimental and simulated results for the 1D and 2D specimens reveals that deformation and thermal stress in coated specimens can be predicted regardless of specimen geometry through FE modeling and by using the experimental value of E d. An example of a turbine-bladeshaped substrate is presented to validate the approach.

  11. Thermal preference, thermal resistance, and metabolic rate of juvenile Chinese pond turtles Mauremys reevesii acclimated to different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Dang, Wei; Geng, Jun; Lu, Hong-Liang

    2015-10-01

    The thermal acclimatory capacity of a particular species may determine its resilience to environmental change. Evaluating the physiological acclimatory responses of economically important species is useful for determining their optimal culture conditions. Here, juvenile Chinese three-keeled pond turtles (Mauremys reevesii) were acclimated to one of three different temperatures (17, 25 or 33°C) for four weeks to assess the effects of thermal acclimation on some physiological traits. Thermal acclimation significantly affected thermal resistance, but not thermal preference, of juvenile M. reevesii. Turtles acclimated to 17°C were less resistant to high temperatures than those acclimated to 25°C and 33°C. However, turtles increased resistance to low temperatures with decreasing acclimation temperature. The acclimation response ratio of the critical thermal minimum (CTMin) was lower than that of the critical thermal maximum (CTMax) for acclimation temperatures between 17 and 25°C, but slightly higher between 25 and 33°C. The thermal resistance range (i.e., the difference between CTMax and CTMin) was widest in turtles acclimated to the intermediate temperature (25°C), and narrowest in those acclimated to low temperature (17°C). The standard metabolic rate increased as body temperature and acclimation temperature increased, and the temperature quotient (Q10) between acclimation temperatures 17 and 25°C was higher than the Q10 between 25 and 33°C. Our results suggest that juvenile M. reevesii may have a greater resistance under mild thermal conditions resembling natural environments, and better physiological performance at relatively warm temperatures.

  12. Preparation of water-resistant antifog hard coatings on plastic substrate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chao-Ching; Huang, Feng-Hsi; Chang, Hsu-Hsien; Don, Trong-Ming; Chen, Ching-Chung; Cheng, Liao-Ping

    2012-12-11

    A novel water resistant antifog (AF) coating for plastic substrates was developed, which has a special hydrophilic/hydrophobic bilayer structure. The bottom layer, acting both as a mechanical support and a hydrophobic barrier against water penetration, is an organic-inorganic composite comprising colloidal silica embedded in a cross-linked network of dipentaethritol hexaacrylate (DPHA). Atop this layer, an AF coating is applied, which incorporates a superhydrophilic species synthesized from Tween-20 (surfactant), isophorone diisocyanate (coupling agent), and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (monomer). Various methods, e.g., FTIR, SEM, AFM, contact angle, and steam test, were employed to characterize the prepared AF coatings. The results indicated that the size and the continuity of the hydrophilic domains on the top surface increased with increasing added amount of T20, however, at the expense of hardness, adhesiveness, and water resistivity. The optimal T20 content was found to be 10 wt %, at which capacity the resultant AF coating was transparent and wearable (5H, hardness) and could be soaked in water for 7 days at 25 °C without downgrading of its AF capability.

  13. Transparent resistive switching memory using aluminum oxide on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Seung-Won; Shin, Sang-Chul; Kim, Tan-Young; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Lee, Yun-Hi; Shim, Jae Won; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Resistive switching memory (ReRAM) has attracted much attention in recent times owing to its fast switching, simple structure, and non-volatility. Flexible and transparent electronic devices have also attracted considerable attention. We therefore fabricated an Al2O3-based ReRAM with transparent indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) electrodes on a flexible substrate. The device transmittance was found to be higher than 80% in the visible region (400-800 nm). Bended states (radius = 10 mm) of the device also did not affect the memory performance because of the flexibility of the two transparent IZO electrodes and the thin Al2O3 layer. The conduction mechanism of the resistive switching of our device was explained by ohmic conduction and a Poole-Frenkel emission model. The conduction mechanism was proved by oxygen vacancies in the Al2O3 layer, as analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. These results encourage the application of ReRAM in flexible and transparent electronic devices.

  14. Transparent resistive switching memory using aluminum oxide on a flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seung-Won; Shin, Sang-Chul; Kim, Tan-Young; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Lee, Yun-Hi; Shim, Jae Won; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-02-19

    Resistive switching memory (ReRAM) has attracted much attention in recent times owing to its fast switching, simple structure, and non-volatility. Flexible and transparent electronic devices have also attracted considerable attention. We therefore fabricated an Al2O3-based ReRAM with transparent indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) electrodes on a flexible substrate. The device transmittance was found to be higher than 80% in the visible region (400-800 nm). Bended states (radius = 10 mm) of the device also did not affect the memory performance because of the flexibility of the two transparent IZO electrodes and the thin Al2O3 layer. The conduction mechanism of the resistive switching of our device was explained by ohmic conduction and a Poole-Frenkel emission model. The conduction mechanism was proved by oxygen vacancies in the Al2O3 layer, as analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. These results encourage the application of ReRAM in flexible and transparent electronic devices. PMID:26763473

  15. Transparent, superhydrophobic, and wear-resistant surfaces using deep reactive ion etching on PDMS substrates.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Daniel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Surfaces that simultaneously exhibit superhydrophobicity, low contact angle hysteresis, and high transmission of visible light are of interest for many applications, such as optical devices, solar panels, and self-cleaning windows. Superhydrophobicity could also find use in medical devices where antifouling characteristics are desirable. These applications also typically require mechanical wear resistance. The fabrication of such surfaces is challenging due to the competing goals of superhydrophobicity and transmittance in terms of the required degree of surface roughness. In this study, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) was used to create rough surfaces on PDMS substrates using a O2/CF4 plasma. Surfaces then underwent an additional treatment with either octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma or vapor deposition of perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (PFOTCS) following surface activation with O2 plasma. The effects of surface roughness and the additional surface modifications were examined with respect to the contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and optical transmittance. To examine wear resistance, a sliding wear experiment was performed using an atomic force microscope (AFM).

  16. Transparent, superhydrophobic, and wear-resistant surfaces using deep reactive ion etching on PDMS substrates.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Daniel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Surfaces that simultaneously exhibit superhydrophobicity, low contact angle hysteresis, and high transmission of visible light are of interest for many applications, such as optical devices, solar panels, and self-cleaning windows. Superhydrophobicity could also find use in medical devices where antifouling characteristics are desirable. These applications also typically require mechanical wear resistance. The fabrication of such surfaces is challenging due to the competing goals of superhydrophobicity and transmittance in terms of the required degree of surface roughness. In this study, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) was used to create rough surfaces on PDMS substrates using a O2/CF4 plasma. Surfaces then underwent an additional treatment with either octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma or vapor deposition of perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (PFOTCS) following surface activation with O2 plasma. The effects of surface roughness and the additional surface modifications were examined with respect to the contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and optical transmittance. To examine wear resistance, a sliding wear experiment was performed using an atomic force microscope (AFM). PMID:27454031

  17. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on nickel-, cobalt- and iron-base alloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1986-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems have significantly longer lives than MCrAlY bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  18. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  19. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  20. Investigation for surface resistance of yttrium-barium-copper-oxide thin films on various substrates for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hongjun

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) materials such as YBCO (Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide) are very attractive in microwave applications because of their extremely low surface resistance. In the proposed all-HTS tunable filter, a layer of HTS thin film on a very thin substrate (100 mum) is needed to act as the toractor that can be rotated to tune the frequency. In order to provide more substrate candidates that meet both electrical and mechanical requirements for this special application, surface resistance of YBCO thin films on various substrates was measured using microstrip ring resonator method. For alumina polycrystalline substrate, a layer of YSZ (Yttrium stabilized Zirconia) was deposited using IBAD (ion beam assisted deposition) method prior to YBCO deposition. The surface resistance of the YBCO thin film on alumina was found to be 22 mO due to high-angle grain boundary problem caused by the mixed in-plane orientations and large FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the thin film. For YBCO thin films on a YSZ single crystal substrate, the surface resistance showed even higher value of 30 mO because of the mixed in-plane orientation problem. However, by annealing the substrate in 200 Torr oxygen at 730°C prior to deposition, the in-plane orientation of YBCO thin films can be greatly improved. Therefore, the surface resistance decreased to 1.4 mO, which is still more than an order higher than the reported best value. The YBCO thin films grown on LaAlO3 single crystal substrate showed perfect in-plane orientation with FWHM less 1°. The surface resistance was as low as 0.032 mO. A tunable spiral resonator made of YBCO thin film on LaAlO3 single crystal substrate demonstrated that the resonant frequency can be tuned in a rang as large as 500 MHz by changing the gap between toractor and substrate. The Q-factor was more than 12,000, which ensured the extraordinarily high sensitivity for the proposed all-HTS tunable filter.

  1. Microstructure and Properties of Thermally Sprayed Functionally Graded Coatings for Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The use of polymer matrix composites (PMCs) in the gas flow path of advanced turbine engines offers significant benefits for aircraft engine performance but their useful lifetime is limited by their poor erosion resistance. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed polymer/cermet functionally graded (FGM) coatings are being investigated as a method to address this technology gap by providing erosion and oxidation protection to polymer matrix composites. The FGM coating structures are based on a polyimide matrix filled with varying volume fractions of WC-Co. The graded coating architecture was produced using a combination of internal and external feedstock injection, via two computer-controlled powder feeders and controlled substrate preheating. Porosity, coating thickness and volume fraction of the WC-Co filler retained in the coatings were determined using standard metallographic techniques and computer image analysis. The pull-off strength (often referred to as the adhesive strength) of the coatings was evaluated according to the ASTM D 4541 standard test method, which measured the greatest normal tensile force that the coating could withstand. Adhesive/cohesive strengths were determined for three different types of coating structures and compared based on the maximum indicated load and the surface area loaded. The nature and locus of the fractures were characterized according to the percent of adhesive and/or cohesive failure, and the tested interfaces and layers involved were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  2. Method for preparation of thermally and mechanically stable metal/porous substrate composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Damle, Ashok S.

    2004-07-13

    A method is provided for the preparation of metal/porous substrate composite membranes by flowing a solution of metal to be plated over a first surface of a porous substrate and concurrently applying a pressure of gas on a second surface of the porous substrate, such that the porous substrate separates the solution of metal from the gas, and the use of the resulting membrane for the production of highly purified hydrogen gas.

  3. Low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1993-07-01

    A method for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection is presented. Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced from their normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Such connections should be straightforward to fabricate and provide reliable performance that is independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk.

  4. Low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D. ); Nicol, T.H. )

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection is presented. Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced from their normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Such connections should be straightforward to fabricate and provide reliable performance that is independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk.

  5. Enhancement in the quality of GaN crystal grown on a thermal-treated silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. F.; Kato, T.; Sawaki, N.

    2002-04-01

    By using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, GaN layers are deposited on nominal Si(2 1 1) substrates that undergo different types of thermal treatment before the epitaxial growth. X-ray diffraction rocking curves and photoluminescence experimental results indicate that the crystal quality is improved significantly if the thermal treatment is composed of a high-temperature heating followed by a speedy cool-down process. It is observed that a high-temperature heat treatment alone on the substrates does not provide with measurable improvements in the GaN layers. In addition, atomic force microscopic images indicate that the easy glide system of Si{1 1 1} plane can be also a source of residual stresses built up in the GaN film. Consequently, a suitable pre-thermal treatment for use on a silicon substrate is suggested to prevent the GaN film from suffering any extra stress arising from the substrate during the post-growth cooling process.

  6. Direct observation of Thermal contact resistance of a Carbon Nanotube heat spreader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain Baloch, Kamal; Voskanian, Norvik; Cumings, John

    2010-03-01

    For less than two decades the extraordinary thermal properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated much interest in the scientific community. Even though they are a new material with one of the highest of thermal conductivities, the amount of heat CNTs can transport is limited by their thermal contact resistance. Several experiments have been performed to date to experimentally extract the thermal contact resistance of the CNTs. Thus far, all values reported in literature are extracted indirectly through models with assumptions about an uncharacterized heat source, typically Joule heating from within the nanotube itself. Values in the literature vary by more than an order of magnitude, suggesting fundamental uncertainties in the system. We report for the first time a direct in-situ observation of the thermal contact resistance of CNTs using Electron Thermal Microscopy, and we show that the strength of this thermal contact resistance can be manipulated through orders of magnitude. This study opens doors for using CNTs as effective nanoscale thermal transport devices in which the contact resistance of the CNTs could be controlled by design. Experimental results, simulations along with review of the experimental technique will be presented in this talk.

  7. Modeling the interfacial thermal resistance of diamond nanorod composites and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, Tad; Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the effect on the interfacial thermal resistance between a composite system composed of a carbon nanotube or diamond nanorod and an octane matrix by the functionalization of those nanostructures with alkyl chains has been examined using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of functionalization was studied by varying the percent functionalization from 0.00% to 2.00% using octyl as the functional group. As the percent functionalization increased, both systems showed a decrease in the interfacial thermal resistance. At 1.00% functionalization, as the alkyl chain length was increased from one to eight atoms, the interfacial thermal resistance of the carbon nanotube systems decreased to a minimum, while in the diamond nanorod system the interfacial thermal resistance remained constant.

  8. A MEMS thermal shear stress sensor produced by a combination of substrate-free structures with anodic bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yi; Qu, Furong; Wang, Guanya; Nie, Mengyan; Li, Zhigang; Ou, Wen; Xie, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    By combining substrate-free structures with anodic bonding technology, we present a simple and efficient micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) thermal shear stress sensor. Significantly, the resulting depth of the vacuum cavity of the sensor is determined by the thickness of the silicon substrate at which Si is removed by the anisotropic wet etching process. Compared with the sensor based on a sacrificial layer technique, the proposed MEMS thermal shear-stress sensor exhibits dramatically improved sensitivity due to the much larger vacuum cavity depth. The fabricated MEMS thermal shear-stress sensor with a vacuum cavity depth as large as 525 μm and a vacuum of 5 × 10-2 Pa exhibits a sensitivity of 184.5 mV/Pa and a response time of 180 μs. We also experimentally demonstrate that the sensor power is indeed proportional to the 1/3-power of the applied shear stress. The substrate-free structures offer the ability to precisely measure the shear stress fluctuations in low speed turbulent boundary layer wind tunnels.

  9. Improving the Adhesion Resistance of the Boride Coatings to AISI 316L Steel Substrate by Diffusion Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Bernabé-Molina, S.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Rodríguez-Castro, G.; Meneses-Amador, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, new results about the practical adhesion resistance of boride coating/substrate system formed at the surface of AISI 316 L steel and improved by means of a diffusion annealing process are presented. First, the boriding of AISI 316 L steel was performed by the powder-pack method at 1173 K with different exposure times (4-8 h). The diffusion annealing process was conducted on the borided steels at 1273 K with 2 h of exposure using a diluent atmosphere of boron powder mixture. The mechanical behavior of the boride coating/substrate system developed by both treatments was established using Vickers and Berkovich tests along the depth of the boride coatings, respectively. Finally, for the entire set of experimental conditions, the scratch tests were performed with a continuously increasing normal force, in which the practical adhesion resistance of the boride coating/substrate system was represented by the critical load. The failure mechanisms developed over the surface of the scratch tracks were analyzed; the FeB-Fe2B/substrate system exhibited an adhesive mode, while the Fe2B/substrate system obtained by the diffusion annealing process showed predominantly a cohesive failure mode.

  10. Improving the Adhesion Resistance of the Boride Coatings to AISI 316L Steel Substrate by Diffusion Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Bernabé-Molina, S.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Rodríguez-Castro, G.; Meneses-Amador, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, new results about the practical adhesion resistance of boride coating/substrate system formed at the surface of AISI 316 L steel and improved by means of a diffusion annealing process are presented. First, the boriding of AISI 316 L steel was performed by the powder-pack method at 1173 K with different exposure times (4-8 h). The diffusion annealing process was conducted on the borided steels at 1273 K with 2 h of exposure using a diluent atmosphere of boron powder mixture. The mechanical behavior of the boride coating/substrate system developed by both treatments was established using Vickers and Berkovich tests along the depth of the boride coatings, respectively. Finally, for the entire set of experimental conditions, the scratch tests were performed with a continuously increasing normal force, in which the practical adhesion resistance of the boride coating/substrate system was represented by the critical load. The failure mechanisms developed over the surface of the scratch tracks were analyzed; the FeB-Fe2B/substrate system exhibited an adhesive mode, while the Fe2B/substrate system obtained by the diffusion annealing process showed predominantly a cohesive failure mode.

  11. Thermal Expansion and Electrical Resistivity Studies of Nickel and ARMCO Iron at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchaev, D. K.; Murlieva, Zh. Kh.; Gadzhimagomedov, S. H.; Iskhakov, M. E.; Rabadanov, M. Kh.; Abdulagatov, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    The electrical resistance, ρ (T), and thermal expansion coefficient, β (T), of nickel and ARMCO iron have been simultaneously measured over a wide temperature range from (300 to 1100) K. The well-known standard four-probe potentiometric method was used for measurements of the electrical resistance. The thermal expansion coefficient was measured using the quartz dilatometer technique. Both techniques were combined in the same apparatus for simultaneous measurements of the electrical resistance and TEC for the same specimen. The combined expanded uncertainty of the electrical resistance and thermal expansion coefficient measurements at the 95 % confidence level with a coverage factor of k = 2 is estimated to be 0.5 % and (1.5 to 4.0) %, respectively. The distinct ρ (T) scattering contribution (phonon ρ _{ph}, magnetic ρ m, and residual ρ S) terms were separated and extracted from the measured total resistivity. The physical nature and details of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of solid materials and correct estimations of the contributions of various scattering mechanisms to the measured total resistivity were discussed in terms of the anharmonic effect. We experimentally found simple, universal, physically based, semiempirical linear correlations between the kinetic coefficient (electrical resistance) and a thermodynamic (equilibrium) property, the thermal expansion coefficient, of solid materials. The developed, physically based, correlation model has been successfully applied for nanoscale materials (ferromagnetic nickel nanowire). A new s-d-exchange interaction energy determination technique has been proposed.

  12. Integrated thermal-microstructure model to predict the property gradients in resistance spot steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; Riemer, B.W.; Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1998-11-01

    An integrated model approach was proposed for relating resistance welding parameters to weldment properties. An existing microstructure model was used to determine the microstructural and property gradients in resistance spot welds of plain carbon steel. The effect of these gradients on the weld integrity was evaluated with finite element analysis. Further modifications to this integrated thermal-microstructure model are discussed.

  13. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, J. Emily; Bennion, Kevin; DeVoto, Doug; Mihalic, Mark; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-06-30

    The ability to remove heat from an electric machine depends on the passive stack thermal resistances within the machine and the convective cooling performance of the selected cooling technology. This report focuses on the passive thermal design, specifically properties of the stator and rotor lamination stacks. Orthotropic thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density are reported. Four materials commonly used in electric machines were tested, including M19 (29 and 26 gauge), HF10, and Arnon 7 materials.

  14. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  15. Extraction of temperature dependent electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity from silicon microwires self-heated to melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Adnane, Lhacene; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2012-09-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical resistivity, ρ(T), and thermal conductivity, k(T), of nanocrystalline silicon microwires self-heated to melt are extracted by matching simulated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics to experimental I-V characteristics. Electrical resistivity is extracted from highly doped p-type wires on silicon dioxide in which the heat losses are predominantly to the substrate and the self-heating depends mainly on ρ(T) of the wires. The extracted ρ(T) decreases from 11.8 mΩ cm at room-temperature to 5.2 mΩ cm at 1690 K, in reasonable agreement with the values measured up to ˜650 K. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity are extracted from suspended highly doped n-type silicon wires in which the heat losses are predominantly through the wires. In this case, measured ρ(T) (decreasing from 20.5 mΩ cm at room temperature to 12 mΩ cm at 620 K) is used to extract ρ(T) at higher temperatures (decreasing to 1 mΩ cm at 1690 K) and k(T) (decreasing from 30 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature to 20 W m-1 K-1 at 1690 K). The method is tested by using the extracted parameters to model wires with different dimensions. The experimental and simulated I-V curves for these wires show good agreement up to high voltage and temperature levels. This technique allows extraction of the electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity up to very high temperatures from self-heated microstructures.

  16. Effect of posture positions on the evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y S; Fan, J T; Yu, W

    2011-03-01

    Evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing are important parameters in the design and engineering of thermal environments and functional clothing. Past work on the measurement of evaporative resistance of clothing was, however, limited to the standing posture with or without body motion. Information on the evaporative resistance of clothing when the wearer is in a sedentary or supine posture and how it is related to that when the wearer is in a standing posture is lacking. This paper presents original data on the effect of postures on the evaporative resistance of clothing, thermal insulation and permeability index, based on the measurements under three postures, viz. standing, sedentary and supine, using the sweating fabric manikin-Walter. Regression models are also established to relate the evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing under sedentary and supine postures to those under the standing posture. The study further shows that the apparent evaporated resistances of standing and sedentary postures measured in the non-isothermal condition are much lower than those in the isothermal condition. The apparent evaporative resistances measured using the mass loss method are generally lower than those measured using the heat loss method due to moisture absorption or condensation within clothing. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The thermal insulation and evaporative resistance values of clothing ensembles under different postures are essential data for the ergonomics design of thermal environments (e.g. indoors or a vehicle's interior environment) and functional clothing. They are also necessary for the prediction of thermal comfort or duration of exposure in different environmental conditions.

  17. Termite Resistance of Thermally-Modified Dendrocalamus asper (Schultes f.) Backer ex Heyne.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Ronniel D; Garcia, Carlos M

    2012-03-27

    The effects of thermal modification on the resistance of Dendrocalamus asper against Microcerotermes losbañosensis were investigated after exposure to virgin coconut oil at 140-200 °C for 30-120 min. The results showed that heat treatment significantly improved bamboo's resistance to termites based on mass losses and visual observations. The enhancement was highest at 200 °C. Prolonged treatment had a positive effect on the resistance at lower temperatures only.

  18. Termite Resistance of Thermally-Modified Dendrocalamus asper (Schultes f.) Backer ex Heyne

    PubMed Central

    Manalo, Ronniel D.; Garcia, Carlos M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of thermal modification on the resistance of Dendrocalamus asper against Microcerotermes losbañosensis were investigated after exposure to virgin coconut oil at 140–200 °C for 30–120 min. The results showed that heat treatment significantly improved bamboo’s resistance to termites based on mass losses and visual observations. The enhancement was highest at 200 °C. Prolonged treatment had a positive effect on the resistance at lower temperatures only. PMID:26466531

  19. Effect of Ni content on thermal and radiation resistance of VVER RPV steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Frolov, A. S.; Fedotova, S. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper thermal stability and radiation resistance of VVER-type RPV steels for pressure vessels of advanced reactors with different nickel content were studied. A complex of microstructural studies and mechanical tests of the steels in different states (after long thermal exposures, provoking embrittling heat treatment and accelerated neutron irradiation) was carried out. It is shown that nickel content (other things being equal) determines the extent of materials degradation under influence of operational factors: steels with a lower nickel concentration demonstrate a higher thermal stability and radiation resistance.

  20. Effects of substrate deformation and sip thickness on tile/sip interface stresses for shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Garcia, R.

    1980-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis was used to study the effects of substrate deformation characteristics and strain isolator pad (SIP) thickness on TILE/SIP interface stresses for the space shuttle thermal protection system. The configuration analyzed consisted of a 5.08 cm thick, 15.24 cm square tile with a 12.7 cm square SIP footprint bordered by a 1.27 cm wide filler bar and was subjected to forces and moments representative of a 20.7 kPa aerodynamic shock passing over the tile. The SIP stress deflection curves were obtained after a 69 kPa proof load and 100 cycles conditioning at 55 kPa. The TILE/SIP interface stresses increase over flat substrate values for zero to peak substrate deformation amplitudes up to 0.191 cm by up to a factor of nearly five depending on deformation amplitude, half wave length, and location. Stresses for a 0.23 cm thick SIP found to be up to 60 percent greater than for a 0.41 cm thick SIP for identical loads and substrate deformation characteristics. A simplified method was developed for approximating the substrate location which produces maximum TILE/SIP interface stresses.

  1. Effective thermal boundary resistance from thermal decoupling of magnons and phonons in SrRuO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Langner, M.C.; Kantner, C.L.S.; Chu, Y.H.; Martin, L.M.; Yu, P.; Ramesh, R.; Orenstein, J.

    2010-01-20

    We use the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) to measure the local temperature and heat flow dynamics in ferromagnetic SrRuO3 thin films. After heating by a pump pulse, the film temperature decays exponentially, indicating that the heat flow out of the film is limited by the film/substrate interface. We show that this behavior is consistent with an effective boundary resistance resulting from disequilibrium between the spin and phonon temperatures in the film.

  2. Slurry and Plasma-spray Coating of Selective Emitting Rare-earth Oxides on High Temperature Resistant Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobler, W. J.; Durisch, W.

    2007-02-01

    Selective emitting coatings of the rare-earth oxides Yb2O3 and Yb-doped garnet have been applied on SiC by slurry coating and on the high refractory intermetallic compound MoSi2 by vacuum plasma-spraying. The TPV emitters produced are fully operable in oxygen atmosphere at high temperatures > 1500 °C. The novel technique of pairing MoSi2 substrate with plasma-sprayed rare-earth oxide results in highly thermal shock stable emitters due to an ideal match of the thermal expansion coefficients of intermetallic compound and ceramics.

  3. Deposition of a-C:H films on UHMWPE substrate and its wear-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong; Liu, Hengjun; Deng, Xingrui; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, Nan

    2009-10-01

    In prosthetic hip replacements, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris is identified as the main factor limiting the lifetime of the artificial joints. Especially UHMWPE debris from the joint can induce tissue reactions and bone resorption that may lead to the joint loosening. The diamond like carbon (DLC) film has attracted a great deal of interest in recent years mainly because of its excellent tribological property, biocompatibility and chemically inert property. In order to improve the wear-resistance of UHMWPE, a-C:H films were deposited on UHMWPE substrate by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PECVD) technology. During deposition, the working gases were argon and acetylene, the microwave power was set to 800 W, the biased pulsed voltage was set to -200 V (frequency 15 kHz, duty ratio 20%), the pressure in vacuum chamber was set to 0.5 Pa, and the process time was 60 min. The films were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, anti-scratch and wear test. The results showed that a typical amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) film was successfully deposited on UHMWPE with thickness up to 2 μm. The nano-hardness of the UHMWPE coated with a-C:H films, measured at an applied load of 200 μN, was increased from 10 MPa (untreated UHMWPE) to 139 MPa. The wear test was carried out using a ball (Ø 6 mm, SiC) on disk tribometer with an applied load of 1 N for 10000 cycles, and the results showed a reduction of worn cross-sectional area from 193 μm 2 of untreated UHMWPE to 26 μm 2 of DLC coated sample. In addition the influence of argon/acetylene gas flow ratio on the growth of a-C:H films was studied.

  4. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2016-08-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  5. Prediction of clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of the clothed body walking in wind.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoming; Fan, Jintu

    2006-11-01

    Clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance are the two most important parameters in thermal environmental engineering, functional clothing design and end use of clothing ensembles. In this study, clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of various types of clothing ensembles were measured using the walking-able sweating manikin, Walter, under various environmental conditions and walking speeds. Based on an extensive experimental investigation and an improved understanding of the effects of body activities and environmental conditions, a simple but effective direct regression model has been established, for predicting the clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance under wind and walking motion, from those when the manikin was standing in still air. The model has been validated by using experimental data reported in the previous literature. It has shown that the new models have advantages and provide very accurate prediction.

  6. Improvement in UOE pipe collapse resistance by thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sharif, A.M.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    A recent investigation has shown that the UOE pipe manufacturing process significantly degrades the collapse resistance of high strength line pipe. This paper assesses the degree of strength recovery that can be achieved by aging the pipe. An experimental investigation was performed in order to develop a quantitative relationship between time and temperature of aging, which produces an increase in compressive yield strength, with consequent increase in collapse resistance to external pressure loading.

  7. Thermal fatigue resistance of discontinuously reinforced cast aluminum-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Darlak, P.; Slawinski, Z.; Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P.

    2002-12-01

    The thermal fatigue resistance of AlSi alloys and discontinuously reinforced Al-matrix composites containing graphite, silicon carbide, and fly ash particulates, and short alumina (Saffil) fibers was characterized by measuring the total length of microcracks on gravity-cast and squeeze-cast test specimens as a function of number of thermal cycles (1000-5000 cycles, 270 K amplitude). In each thermal cycle, the test specimens were heated and stabilized in air at 375 °C, water quenched, and air stabilized. In all specimens, the total crack length on a specified region increased with increasing number of thermal cycles. Whereas among monolithic alloys, squeeze-cast Al-12SiCuNiMg alloy exhibited better resistance to thermal cracking than Al-25Si and Al-20SiNi alloys, among the composites, squeeze-cast Al-alumina and Al-fly ash composites exhibited the best thermal fatigue resistance. The theoretical estimates of the thermal fatigue resistance of these composites are consistent with the experimental observations.

  8. Using High-Resolution Hand-Held Radiometers To Measure In-Situ Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, Douglas M.; Krintz, Donald F.

    1984-03-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the accuracy of using high-resolution radiometers to determine the in situ thermal resistance of building components having conventional residential construction. Two different types of radiometers were used to determine the thermal resistances of the walls of six test buildings located at the National Bureau of Standards. These radiometer thermal resistance measurements were compared to reference thermal resistance values determined from steady-state series resistance predictions, time-averaged heat-flow-sensor measurements, and guarded-hot-box measurements. When measurements were carried out 5 hours after sunset when the outdoor temperature was relatively steady and the heating plant was operated in a typical cyclic fashion, the following results were obtained: for lightweight wood-frame cavity walls, the radiometer procedures were found to distinguish wall thermal resistance 4.4 h.ft2- °F/Btu (0.77 m2•K/W) systematically higher than corresponding reference values. Such a discrimination will per-mit insulated and uninsulated walls to be distinguished. However, in the case of walls having large heat capacity (e.g., masonry and log), thermal storage effects produced large time lags between the outdoor diurnal temperature variation and the heat-flow response at the inside surface. This phenomenon caused radiometer thermal resistances to deviate substantially from corresponding reference values. This study recommends that the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 101-1981 be modified requiring the heating plant to be operated in a typical cyclic fashion instead of being turned off prior to and during radiometer measurements.

  9. High-performance bilayer flexible resistive random access memory based on low-temperature thermal atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated a flexible resistive random access memory device through a low-temperature atomic layer deposition process. The device is composed of an HfO2/Al2O3-based functional stack on an indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate substrate. After the initial reset operation, the device exhibits a typical bipolar, reliable, and reproducible resistive switching behavior. After a 104-s retention time, the memory window of the device is still in accordance with excellent thermal stability, and a 10-year usage is still possible with the resistance ratio larger than 10 at room temperature and at 85°C. In addition, the operation speed of the device was estimated to be 500 ns for the reset operation and 800 ns for the set operation, which is fast enough for the usage of the memories in flexible circuits. Considering the excellent performance of the device fabricated by low-temperature atomic layer deposition, the process may promote the potential applications of oxide-based resistive random access memory in flexible integrated circuits. PMID:23421424

  10. Impact of remote mutations on metallo-β-lactamase substrate specificity: Implications for the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Oelschlaeger, Peter; Mayo, Stephen L.; Pleiss, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases have raised concerns due to their ability to hydrolyze a broad spectrum of β-lactam antibiotics. The G262S point mutation distinguishing the metallo-β-lactamase IMP-1 from IMP-6 has no effect on the hydrolysis of the drugs cephalothin and cefotaxime, but significantly improves catalytic efficiency toward cephaloridine, ceftazidime, benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, and imipenem. This change in specificity occurs even though residue 262 is remote from the active site. We investigated the substrate specificities of five other point mutants resulting from single-nucleotide substitutions at positions near residue 262: G262A, G262V, S121G, F218Y, and F218I. The results suggest two types of substrates: type I (nitrocefin, cephalothin, and cefotaxime), which are converted equally well by IMP-6, IMP-1, and G262A, but even more efficiently by the other mutants, and type II (ceftazidime, benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, and imipenem), which are hydrolyzed much less efficiently by all the mutants. G262V, S121G, F218Y, and F218I improve conversion of type I substrates, whereas G262A and IMP-1 improve conversion of type II substrates, indicating two distinct evolutionary adaptations from IMP-6. Substrate structure may explain the catalytic efficiencies observed. Type I substrates have R2 electron donors, which may stabilize the substrate intermediate in the binding pocket. In contrast, the absence of these stabilizing interactions with type II substrates may result in poor conversion. This observation may assist future drug design. As the G262A and F218Y mutants confer effective resistance to Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells (high minimal inhibitory concentrations), they are likely to evolve naturally. PMID:15722450

  11. Assessing the thermoelectric properties of single InSb nanowires: the role of thermal contact resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazji, S.; Swinkels, M. Y.; De Luca, M.; Hoffmann, E. A.; Ercolani, D.; Roddaro, S.; Abstreiter, G.; Sorba, L.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Zardo, I.

    2016-06-01

    The peculiar shape and dimensions of nanowires (NWs) have opened the way to their exploitation in thermoelectric applications. In general, the parameters entering into the thermoelectric figure of merit are strongly interdependent, which makes it difficult to realize an optimal thermoelectric material. In NWs, instead, the power factor can be increased and the thermal conductivity reduced, thus boosting the thermoelectric efficiency compared to bulk materials. However, the assessment of all the thermoelectric properties of a NW is experimentally very challenging. Here, we focus on InSb NWs, which have proved to be promising thermoelectric materials. The figure of merit is accurately determined by using a novel method based on a combination of Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. Remarkably, this type of experiment provides a powerful approach allowing us to neglect the role played by thermal contact resistance. Furthermore, we compare the thermal conductivity determined by this novel method to the one determined on the same sample by the thermal bridge method. In this latter approach, the thermal contact resistance is a non-negligible parameter, especially in NWs with large diameters. We provide experimental evidence of the crucial role played by thermal contact resistance in the assessment of the thermal properties of nanostructures, using two different measurement methods of the thermal conductivity.

  12. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia cells MOLM-13 and SKM-1 established for resistance by azacytidine are crossresistant to P-glycoprotein substrates.

    PubMed

    Messingerova, Lucia; Imrichova, Denisa; Kavcova, Helena; Turakova, Katarina; Breier, Albert; Sulova, Zdena

    2015-10-01

    Establishment of the acute myeloid leukemia cells SKM-1 and MOLM-13 for resistance by azacytidine (AzaC) resulted in SKM-1/AzaC and MOLM-13/AzaC cell variants with reduced sensitivity to AzaC. Despite the fact that AzaC is not substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the adaptation procedure resulted in an induction in P-gp expression/efflux activity that confers crossresistance to P-gp substrates in both resistant cell variants. While the resistance to P-gp substrates in SKM-1/AzaC and MOLM-13/AzaC cells could be reversed by the P-gp inhibitors, resistance to AzaC was insensitive to these inhibitors in both resistant cell variants. In addition, NF-κB and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 were downregulated and the proapoptotic proteins Bax and p53 were upregulated in both resistant cell variants when compared with their sensitive counterparts. Moreover, at least five times the elevation in overall glutathione S-transferase activity was measured with 1-chloro-2, 5-dinitrobenzene as a substrate in the resistant variant of both cell lines. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate that the treatment of AML cells with AzaC might lead to a drug resistance phenotype that may be associated with cross resistance to P-gp substrates and substrates of glutathione S-transferases.

  14. Thermal resistance across a copper/Kapton/copper interface at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.; Weber, B.R.

    1997-09-01

    The high-{Tc} superconductor current lead heat intercept connection, which is utilized as a thermal intercept to remove the Joule heat from the upper stage lead to a heat sink operating at 50--77 K, consists of a structure where a 152-{micro}m film is sandwiched between two concentric copper cylinders. The material chosen for the insulating film is Kapton MT, a composite film which has a relatively low thermal resistance, but yet a high voltage standoff capability. Here, the measured thermal conductance of a copper/Kapton MT/copper junction in a flat-plate geometry is compared to the results obtained from the actual heat intercept connection. Increasing the contact pressure reduces the thermal resistance to a minimum value determined by the film conduction resistance. A comparison between the resistance of the copper/Kapton MT/copper junction and a copper/G-10/copper junction demonstrates that the Kapton MT layer yields a lower thermal resistance while still providing adequate electrical isolation.

  15. Significant thickness dependence of the thermal resistance between few-layer graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuxiang; Chalopin, Yann; Volz, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    The inter-layer resistance in few layer graphene (FLG) is an unknown intrinsic property that affects the heat removal efficiency of FLG-based thermal devices. Here we present data that demonstrates the layer number dependence of the resistance between FLGs, by using molecular dynamics simulations. The resistance was found to decrease as the layer number increases. FLGs with larger thicknesses are proposed to be advantageous in heat spreading owing to their lower contact resistances. The observed properties do not depend on temperature, which is crucial for FLG based structures to retain a stable heat removal efficiency while working at a large temperature range.

  16. Investigation of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on TiN substrates using CupraSelect as precursor.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    Copper films were deposited on oxidized Si substrates covered with TiN using a novel chemical vapor deposition reactor in which reactions were assisted by a heated tungsten filament (hot-wire CVD, HWCVD). Liquid at room temperature hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) was directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a direct-liquid injection (DLI) system using N2 as carrier gas. The deposition rates of HWCVD Cu films obtained on TiN covered substrates were found to increase with filament temperature (65 and 170 degrees C were tested). The resistivities of HWCVD Cu films were found to be higher than for thermally grown films due to the possible presence of impurities into the Cu films from the incomplete dissociation of the precursor and W impurities caused by the presence of the filament. For HWCVD films grown at a filament temperature of 170 degrees C, smaller grains are formed than at 65 degrees C as shown from the taken SEM micrographs. XRD diffractograms taken on Cu films deposited on TiN could not reveal the presence of W compounds originating from the filament because the relative peak was masked by the TiN [112] peak. PMID:22097549

  17. Fabrication of extremely thermal-stable GaN template on Mo substrate using double bonding and step annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Wang; Yang, Liu; Yongjian, Sun; Yuzhen, Tong; Guoyi, Zhang

    2016-08-01

    A new layer transfer technique which comprised double bonding and a step annealing process was utilized to transfer the GaN epilayer from a sapphire substrate to a Mo substrate. Combined with the application of the thermal-stable bonding medium, the resulting two-inch-diameter GaN template showed extremely good stability under high temperature and low stress state. Moreover, no cracks and winkles were observed. The transferred GaN template was suitable for homogeneous epitaxial, thus could be used for the direct fabrication of vertical LED chips as well as power electron devices. It has been confirmed that the double bonding and step annealing technique together with the thermal-stable bonding layer could significantly improve the bonding strength and stress relief, finally enhancing the thermal stability of the transferred GaN template. Project supported by the Guangdong Innovative Research Team Program (No. 2009010044), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2014M562233), the National Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong, China (No. 2015A030312011), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics (No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  18. Changes in the Chemical Composition and Decay Resistance of Thermally-Modified Hevea brasiliensis Wood.

    PubMed

    Severo, Elias Taylor Durgante; Calonego, Fred Willians; Sansígolo, Cláudio Angeli; Bond, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of thermal treatment on the equilibrium moisture content, chemical composition and biological resistance to decay fungi of juvenile and mature Hevea brasiliensis wood (rubber wood) was evaluated. Samples were taken from a 53-year-old rubber wood plantation located in Tabapuã, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The samples were thermally-modified at 180°C, 200°C and 220°C. Results indicate that the thermal modification caused: (1) a significant increase in the extractive content and proportional increase in the lignin content at 220°C; (2) a significant decrease in the equilibrium moisture content, holocelluloses, arabinose, galactose and xylose content, but no change in glucose content; and (3) a significant increase in wood decay resistance against both Pycnoporus sanguineus (L.) Murrill and Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.) Murrill decay fungi. The greatest decay resistance was achieved from treatment at 220°C which resulted in a change in wood decay resistance class from moderately resistant to resistant. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the influence of thermal treatment in mature wood was lower than in juvenile wood.

  19. Changes in the Chemical Composition and Decay Resistance of Thermally-Modified Hevea brasiliensis Wood.

    PubMed

    Severo, Elias Taylor Durgante; Calonego, Fred Willians; Sansígolo, Cláudio Angeli; Bond, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of thermal treatment on the equilibrium moisture content, chemical composition and biological resistance to decay fungi of juvenile and mature Hevea brasiliensis wood (rubber wood) was evaluated. Samples were taken from a 53-year-old rubber wood plantation located in Tabapuã, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The samples were thermally-modified at 180°C, 200°C and 220°C. Results indicate that the thermal modification caused: (1) a significant increase in the extractive content and proportional increase in the lignin content at 220°C; (2) a significant decrease in the equilibrium moisture content, holocelluloses, arabinose, galactose and xylose content, but no change in glucose content; and (3) a significant increase in wood decay resistance against both Pycnoporus sanguineus (L.) Murrill and Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.) Murrill decay fungi. The greatest decay resistance was achieved from treatment at 220°C which resulted in a change in wood decay resistance class from moderately resistant to resistant. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the influence of thermal treatment in mature wood was lower than in juvenile wood. PMID:26986200

  20. Changes in the Chemical Composition and Decay Resistance of Thermally-Modified Hevea brasiliensis Wood

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of thermal treatment on the equilibrium moisture content, chemical composition and biological resistance to decay fungi of juvenile and mature Hevea brasiliensis wood (rubber wood) was evaluated. Samples were taken from a 53-year-old rubber wood plantation located in Tabapuã, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The samples were thermally-modified at 180°C, 200°C and 220°C. Results indicate that the thermal modification caused: (1) a significant increase in the extractive content and proportional increase in the lignin content at 220°C; (2) a significant decrease in the equilibrium moisture content, holocelluloses, arabinose, galactose and xylose content, but no change in glucose content; and (3) a significant increase in wood decay resistance against both Pycnoporus sanguineus (L.) Murrill and Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.) Murrill decay fungi. The greatest decay resistance was achieved from treatment at 220°C which resulted in a change in wood decay resistance class from moderately resistant to resistant. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the influence of thermal treatment in mature wood was lower than in juvenile wood. PMID:26986200

  1. Thermal-Interaction Matrix For Resistive Test Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Dhiman, Jaipal K.; Zamani, Nasser

    1990-01-01

    Linear mathematical model predicts increase in temperature in each segment of 15-segment resistive structure used to test electromigration. Assumption of linearity based on fact: equations that govern flow of heat are linear and coefficients in equations (heat conductivities and capacities) depend only weakly on temperature and considered constant over limited range of temperature.

  2. Fundamental of a Planar Type of Inductively Coupled Thermal Plasma (ICTP) on a Substrate for a Large-area Materials Processings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suantial, Maikai; Akao, Mika; Irie, Hiromitsu; Maruyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kanazawa University Team

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the fundamental of a planar type Ar inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP) with oxygen molecular gas have been studied on a substrate. Previously, we have developed a planar-ICTP torch with a rectangular quartz vessel with an air core coil or a ferrite core coil instead of a cylindrical tube for a large-area materials processing. For adoption of such a planar-ICTP to material processings, it needs to sustain the ICTP with molecular gases on a substrate stably. To consider the uniformity of the ICTP formed on the substrate, spectroscopic observation was carried out at 3 mm above the substrate. Results showed that the radiation intensities of specified O atomic lines were almost uniformly detected along the surface of the substrate. This means that O excited atoms, which are important radicals for thermal plasma oxidation, are present in planar-ICTP uniformly on the substrate.

  3. The laser ablation model development of glass substrate cutting assisted with the thermal fracture and ultrasonic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Lin, Ru-Li; Andrew Yeh, Jer-Liang

    2015-04-01

    This study presents three hybrid processing models for cutting a glass substrate, and compares their cutting speeds. The three models are (I) thermal fracture cutting technology (TFCT)-assisted laser ablation, (II) ultrasonic-assisted laser ablation, and (III) ultrasonic and TFCT-assisted laser ablation. In the experiment, a 12 W 355 nm Nd:YVO4 laser system, a 40 W CO2 laser and an ultrasonic transducer were used to cut 3 mm thick soda-lime glasses. Lasers and ultrasonic transducers were used as heat sources and vibration sources, respectively. Results show that the surface morphology of the soda-lime glass sheet depends on the processing models. After cutting, the surface and cross-sectional morphology of glass substrate were observed using a portable digital microscope and residual stresses were also evaluated thanks to a photoelasticity instrument.

  4. Aqueously dispersed silver nanoparticle-decorated boron nitride nanosheets for reusable, thermal oxidation-resistant surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E; Fernando, K A Shiral; Connell, John W

    2012-02-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because ofthe unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures. PMID:22280102

  5. Aqueously Dispersed Silver Nanoparticle-Decorated Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Reusable, Thermal Oxidation-Resistant Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E.; Fernandos, K. A. Shiral; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because of the unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures.

  6. Impact of thermal stress on the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of PbTiO{sub 3} thick films on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Gang; Liu, Zhiguo; Yan, Xiaobing; Zhang, Changchun

    2014-08-07

    The impact of thermal stress on the polarization, as well as dielectric and piezoelectric properties of (001) oriented PbTiO{sub 3} (PTO) thick films deposited on various substrates was investigated based on Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic model. The results showed that dielectric and piezoelectric properties of PTO films depend strongly on the thermal stress in PTO films decided by the deposition temperature T{sub G} and the thermal expansion coefficients' difference between PTO films and substrates. For IC-compatible substrates such as Si, c-sapphire, and a-sapphire that induce tensile in-plane thermal stresses, the dielectric and piezoelectric responses and tunabilities of PTO films were enhanced. Whereas for PTO films on MgO, compressive thermal in-plane stresses can degraded the dielectric and piezoelectric responses and tunabilities of the films.

  7. Toward Improved Lifetimes of Organic Solar Cells under Thermal Stress: Substrate-Dependent Morphological Stability of PCDTBT:PCBM Films and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Ho Chiu, Kar; Shahid Ashraf, Raja; Fearn, Sarah; Dattani, Rajeev; Cheng Wong, Him; Tan, Ching-Hong; Wu, Jiaying; Cabral, João T.; Durrant, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological stability is a key requirement for outdoor operation of organic solar cells. We demonstrate that morphological stability and lifetime of polymer/fullerene based solar cells under thermal stress depend strongly on the substrate interface on which the active layer is deposited. In particular, we find that the stability of benchmark PCDTBT/PCBM solar cells under modest thermal stress is substantially increased in inverted solar cells employing a ZnO substrate compared to conventional devices employing a PEDOT:PSS substrate. This improved stability is observed to correlate with PCBM nucleation at the 50 nm scale, which is shown to be strongly influenced by different substrate interfaces. Employing this approach, we demonstrate remarkable thermal stability for inverted PCDTBT:PC70BM devices on ZnO substrates, with negligible (<2%) loss of power conversion efficiency over 160 h under 85 °C thermal stress and minimal thermally induced “burn-in” effect. We thus conclude that inverted organic solar cells, in addition to showing improved environmental stability against ambient humidity exposure as widely reported previously, can also demonstrate enhanced morphological stability. As such we show that the choice of suitable substrate interfaces may be a key factor in achieving prolonged lifetimes for organic solar cells under thermal stress conditions. PMID:26468676

  8. Toward Improved Lifetimes of Organic Solar Cells under Thermal Stress: Substrate-Dependent Morphological Stability of PCDTBT:PCBM Films and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Ho Chiu, Kar; Shahid Ashraf, Raja; Fearn, Sarah; Dattani, Rajeev; Cheng Wong, Him; Tan, Ching-Hong; Wu, Jiaying; Cabral, João T.; Durrant, James R.

    2015-10-01

    Morphological stability is a key requirement for outdoor operation of organic solar cells. We demonstrate that morphological stability and lifetime of polymer/fullerene based solar cells under thermal stress depend strongly on the substrate interface on which the active layer is deposited. In particular, we find that the stability of benchmark PCDTBT/PCBM solar cells under modest thermal stress is substantially increased in inverted solar cells employing a ZnO substrate compared to conventional devices employing a PEDOT:PSS substrate. This improved stability is observed to correlate with PCBM nucleation at the 50 nm scale, which is shown to be strongly influenced by different substrate interfaces. Employing this approach, we demonstrate remarkable thermal stability for inverted PCDTBT:PC70BM devices on ZnO substrates, with negligible (<2%) loss of power conversion efficiency over 160 h under 85 °C thermal stress and minimal thermally induced “burn-in” effect. We thus conclude that inverted organic solar cells, in addition to showing improved environmental stability against ambient humidity exposure as widely reported previously, can also demonstrate enhanced morphological stability. As such we show that the choice of suitable substrate interfaces may be a key factor in achieving prolonged lifetimes for organic solar cells under thermal stress conditions.

  9. Impact of contact and access resistances in graphene field-effect transistors on quartz substrates for radio frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ramón, Michael E. E-mail: hemacp@utexas.edu; Movva, Hema C. P. E-mail: hemacp@utexas.edu; Fahad Chowdhury, Sk.; Parrish, Kristen N.; Rai, Amritesh; Akinwande, Deji; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Magnuson, Carl W.; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2014-02-17

    High-frequency performance of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) has been limited largely by parasitic resistances, including contact resistance (R{sub C}) and access resistance (R{sub A}). Measurement of short-channel (500 nm) GFETs with short (200 nm) spin-on-doped source/drain access regions reveals negligible change in transit frequency (f{sub T}) after doping, as compared to ∼23% f{sub T} improvement for similarly sized undoped GFETs measured at low temperature, underscoring the impact of R{sub C} on high-frequency performance. DC measurements of undoped/doped short and long-channel GFETs highlight the increasing impact of R{sub A} for larger GFETs. Additionally, parasitic capacitances were minimized by device fabrication using graphene transferred onto low-capacitance quartz substrates.

  10. Factors affecting the thermal shock resistance of several hafnia based composites containing graphite or tungsten. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineback, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of hafnia based composites containing graphite powder or tungsten fibers was investigated in terms of material properties which include thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, compressive fracture stress, modulus of elasticity, and phase stability in terms of the processing parameters of hot pressing pressure and/or density, degree of stabilization of the hafnia, and composition. All other parameters were held constant or assumed constant. The thermal shock resistance was directly proportional to the compressive fracture stress to modulus of elasticity ratio and was not affected appreciably by the small thermal expansion or thermal conductivity changes. This ratio was found to vary strongly with the composition and density such that the composites containing graphite had relatively poor thermal shock resistance, while the composites containing tungsten had superior thermal shock resistance.

  11. Plane-wave spectrum approach for the AC thermal analysis of vertical thermal resistance on sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossel, Philippe; Depasse, Françoise; Gomès, Séverine

    1999-08-01

    The perturbation caused by a vertical thermal resistance to the alternating current temperature field in a homogeneous sample is analysed by using a plane-wave spectrum for which the reference plane is perpendicular to the crack. This unusual Fourier analysis gives rapid access to the temperature field in the frequency domain at any place in the sample. This can thus furnish the source term for a complete thermoelastic local response and complete the available surface temperature data.

  12. Removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from domestic sewage by constructed wetlands: Optimization of wetland substrates and hydraulic loading.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wei, Xiao-Dong; Liu, You-Sheng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; He, Liang-Ying; Su, Hao-Chang; Hu, Li-Xin; Chen, Fan-Rong; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to assess removal potential of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in raw domestic wastewater by various mesocosm-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (CWs) planted Cyperus alternifolius L. with different design parameters. Twelve CWs with three hydraulic loading rates (HLR 10, 20 and 30cm/day) and four substrates (oyster shell, zeolite, medical stone and ceramic) were set up in order to select the best optimized wetland. The result showed that 7 target antibiotics compounds including erythromycin-H2O, lincomycin, monensin, ofloxacin, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine and novobiocin were detected, and all selected 18 genes (three sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3), four tetracycline resistance genes (tetG, tetM, tetO and tetX), two macrolide resistance genes (ermB and ermC), three quinolone resistance genes (qnrB, qnrD and qnrS) and four chloramphenicol resistance genes (cmlA, fexA, fexB and floR)) and two integrase genes (int1 and int2) were positively detected in the domestic wastewaters. The aqueous removal rates of the total antibiotics ranged from17.9 to 98.5%, while those for the total ARGs varied between 50.0 and 85.8% by the mesocosm-scale CWs. After considering their aqueous removal rates in combination with their mass removals, the CW with zeolite as the substrate and HLR of 20cm/day was selected as the best choice. Combined chemical and biological analyses indicate that both microbial degradation and physical sorption processes were responsible for the fate of antibiotics and ARGs in the wetlands. The findings from this study suggest constructed wetlands could be a promising technology for the removal of emerging contaminants such as antibiotics and ARGs in domestic wastewater.

  13. Removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from domestic sewage by constructed wetlands: Optimization of wetland substrates and hydraulic loading.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wei, Xiao-Dong; Liu, You-Sheng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; He, Liang-Ying; Su, Hao-Chang; Hu, Li-Xin; Chen, Fan-Rong; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to assess removal potential of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in raw domestic wastewater by various mesocosm-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (CWs) planted Cyperus alternifolius L. with different design parameters. Twelve CWs with three hydraulic loading rates (HLR 10, 20 and 30cm/day) and four substrates (oyster shell, zeolite, medical stone and ceramic) were set up in order to select the best optimized wetland. The result showed that 7 target antibiotics compounds including erythromycin-H2O, lincomycin, monensin, ofloxacin, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine and novobiocin were detected, and all selected 18 genes (three sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3), four tetracycline resistance genes (tetG, tetM, tetO and tetX), two macrolide resistance genes (ermB and ermC), three quinolone resistance genes (qnrB, qnrD and qnrS) and four chloramphenicol resistance genes (cmlA, fexA, fexB and floR)) and two integrase genes (int1 and int2) were positively detected in the domestic wastewaters. The aqueous removal rates of the total antibiotics ranged from17.9 to 98.5%, while those for the total ARGs varied between 50.0 and 85.8% by the mesocosm-scale CWs. After considering their aqueous removal rates in combination with their mass removals, the CW with zeolite as the substrate and HLR of 20cm/day was selected as the best choice. Combined chemical and biological analyses indicate that both microbial degradation and physical sorption processes were responsible for the fate of antibiotics and ARGs in the wetlands. The findings from this study suggest constructed wetlands could be a promising technology for the removal of emerging contaminants such as antibiotics and ARGs in domestic wastewater. PMID:27173842

  14. Analysing the thermal state of voltage transformer based on resistive voltage divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V.; Zhukov, V.; Yablokov, A.

    2015-10-01

    We performed a simulation of the thermal state of a resistive voltage divider based on an equation of heat conductivity with internal sources of heat, solving this equation by using two numerical procedures. We also conducted experimental research regarding transformer thermal state on a laboratory stand. We obtained numerical results of the above heat conductivity equation, taking into account the supply of heat energy from internal sources, and compared the results of our calculations with our experimental data. Transformer thermal state simulation and numerical solution procedures enable us to formulate and resolve the problems of choosing optimal transformer design and operating modes, ensuring maximum measuring accuracy when limiting the thermal state of resistive elements.

  15. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  16. A technique for calculating the effective thermal resistance of steel stud walls for code compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.C.; Swinton, M.C.; Haysom, J.C.

    1998-12-31

    Canada`s Model National Energy Codes for Houses and for Buildings contain prescriptive requirements in the form of minimum thermal characteristics of envelope assemblies, including steel stud walls. To assist in the uniform enforcement of these requirements, it was necessary for the codes to prescribe acceptable methods of calculating the thermal resistance of steel and assemblies. The ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals proposes a simple method for predicting the thermal performance of stud walls, which is based on a weighted average of the values predicted by isothermal planes and parallel path calculation methods. The thermal resistance of 2440 mm x 2440 mm (8 ft x 8 ft) wall specimens, with 92 mm (3-5/8 in.) steel studs, was measured in a series of guarded hot box tests. Two stud gauges were evaluated, as well as two stud spacings, with one wood-based and three insulating sheathings. The measurements demonstrated that a weighting of 2:1 (isothermal planes:parallel path) provided an/ accurate prediction of the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 406 mm (16 in.) o.c., but that a 1:1 weighting best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 610 mm (24 in.) o.c. These results applied to walls with wood-based sheathing directly applied to the studs, whether or not the walls had insulating sheathing. Finally, the measurements demonstrated that an intermediate weighting of 3:2 best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with insulating sheathing installed directly onto the studs, i.e., without intermediate structural sheathing.

  17. An excellent candidate for largely reducing interfacial thermal resistance: a nano-confined mass graded interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pursuing extremely low interfacial thermal resistance has long been the task of many researchers in the area of nano-scale heat transfer, in particular pertaining to improve heat dissipation performance in electronic cooling. While it is well known and documented that confining a macroscopic third layer between two dissimilar materials usually increases the overall interfacial thermal resistance, no research has realized the fundamental decrease in resistance so far. By performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the overall interfacial thermal resistance can be reduced by 6 fold by confining mass graded materials with thickness of the order of nanometers. As comparison we also studied the thermal transport across the perfectly abrupt interface and the widely used alloyed (rough) interface, which shows an opposing and significantly large increase in the overall thermal resistance. With the help of frequency dependent interfacial thermal conductance and wave packet dynamics simulation, different mechanisms governing the heat transfer across these three types of interfaces are identified. It is found that for the rough interface there are two different regimes of interfacial heat transfer, which originates from the competition between phonon scattering and the thickness of the interface. The mechanism of dramatically improved interfacial heat transfer across the nano-confined mass graded interface resides in the minor phonon reflection when the phonons first reach the mass graded area and the rare occurrence of phonon scattering in the subsequent interior region. The phonons are found to be gradually truncated by the geometric interfaces and can travel through the mass graded layer with a high transmission coefficient, benefited from the small mass mismatch between two neighboring layers in the interfacial region. Our findings provide deep insight into the phonon transport across nano-confined mass graded layers and also offer significant

  18. On the early and developed stages of surface condensation: competition mechanism between interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-10-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the early and developed stages of surface condensation. We find that the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistances depend on the properties of solid and fluid, which are time-independent, while the condensate bulk thermal resistance depends on the condensate thickness, which is time-dependent. There exists intrinsic competition between the interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances in timeline and the resultant total thermal resistance determines the condensation intensity for a given vapor-solid temperature difference. We reveal the competition mechanism that the interfacial thermal resistance dominates at the onset of condensation and holds afterwards while the condensate bulk thermal resistance gradually takes over with condensate thickness growing. The weaker the solid-liquid bonding, the later the takeover occurs. This competition mechanism suggests that only when the condensate bulk thermal resistance is reduced after it takes over the domination can the condensation be effectively intensified. We propose a unified theoretical model for the thermal resistance analysis by making dropwise condensation equivalent to filmwise condensation. We further find that near a critical point (contact angle being ca. 153°) the bulk thermal resistance has the least opportunity to take over the domination while away from it the probability increases.

  19. On the early and developed stages of surface condensation: competition mechanism between interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the early and developed stages of surface condensation. We find that the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistances depend on the properties of solid and fluid, which are time-independent, while the condensate bulk thermal resistance depends on the condensate thickness, which is time-dependent. There exists intrinsic competition between the interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances in timeline and the resultant total thermal resistance determines the condensation intensity for a given vapor-solid temperature difference. We reveal the competition mechanism that the interfacial thermal resistance dominates at the onset of condensation and holds afterwards while the condensate bulk thermal resistance gradually takes over with condensate thickness growing. The weaker the solid-liquid bonding, the later the takeover occurs. This competition mechanism suggests that only when the condensate bulk thermal resistance is reduced after it takes over the domination can the condensation be effectively intensified. We propose a unified theoretical model for the thermal resistance analysis by making dropwise condensation equivalent to filmwise condensation. We further find that near a critical point (contact angle being ca. 153°) the bulk thermal resistance has the least opportunity to take over the domination while away from it the probability increases. PMID:27721397

  20. Thermal singularity and contact line motion in pool boiling: Effects of substrate wettability.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M T; Qian, Tiezheng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] is employed to model the growth of a single vapor bubble in a superheated liquid on a flat homogeneous substrate. The bubble spreading dynamics in the pool boiling regime has been numerically investigated for one-component van der Waals fluids close to the critical point, with a focus on the effect of the substrate wettability on bubble growth and contact line motion. The substrate wettability is found to control the apparent contact angle and the rate of bubble growth (the rate of total evaporation), through which the contact line speed is determined. An approximate expression is derived for the contact line speed, showing good agreement with the simulation results. This demonstrates that the contact line speed is primarily governed by (1) the circular shape of interface (for slow bubble growth), (2) the constant apparent contact angle, and (3) the constant bubble growth rate. It follows that the contact line speed has a sensitive dependence on the substrate wettability via the apparent contact angle which also determines the bubble growth rate. Compared to hydrophilic surfaces, hydrophobic surfaces give rise to a thinner shape of bubble and a higher rate of total evaporation, which combine to result in a much faster contact line speed. This can be linked to the earlier formation of a vapor film and hence the onset of boiling crisis.

  1. Thermal singularity and contact line motion in pool boiling: Effects of substrate wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. T.; Qian, Tiezheng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.036304] is employed to model the growth of a single vapor bubble in a superheated liquid on a flat homogeneous substrate. The bubble spreading dynamics in the pool boiling regime has been numerically investigated for one-component van der Waals fluids close to the critical point, with a focus on the effect of the substrate wettability on bubble growth and contact line motion. The substrate wettability is found to control the apparent contact angle and the rate of bubble growth (the rate of total evaporation), through which the contact line speed is determined. An approximate expression is derived for the contact line speed, showing good agreement with the simulation results. This demonstrates that the contact line speed is primarily governed by (1) the circular shape of interface (for slow bubble growth), (2) the constant apparent contact angle, and (3) the constant bubble growth rate. It follows that the contact line speed has a sensitive dependence on the substrate wettability via the apparent contact angle which also determines the bubble growth rate. Compared to hydrophilic surfaces, hydrophobic surfaces give rise to a thinner shape of bubble and a higher rate of total evaporation, which combine to result in a much faster contact line speed. This can be linked to the earlier formation of a vapor film and hence the onset of boiling crisis.

  2. Thermal singularity and contact line motion in pool boiling: Effects of substrate wettability.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M T; Qian, Tiezheng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] is employed to model the growth of a single vapor bubble in a superheated liquid on a flat homogeneous substrate. The bubble spreading dynamics in the pool boiling regime has been numerically investigated for one-component van der Waals fluids close to the critical point, with a focus on the effect of the substrate wettability on bubble growth and contact line motion. The substrate wettability is found to control the apparent contact angle and the rate of bubble growth (the rate of total evaporation), through which the contact line speed is determined. An approximate expression is derived for the contact line speed, showing good agreement with the simulation results. This demonstrates that the contact line speed is primarily governed by (1) the circular shape of interface (for slow bubble growth), (2) the constant apparent contact angle, and (3) the constant bubble growth rate. It follows that the contact line speed has a sensitive dependence on the substrate wettability via the apparent contact angle which also determines the bubble growth rate. Compared to hydrophilic surfaces, hydrophobic surfaces give rise to a thinner shape of bubble and a higher rate of total evaporation, which combine to result in a much faster contact line speed. This can be linked to the earlier formation of a vapor film and hence the onset of boiling crisis. PMID:27078445

  3. Study on the thermal resistance in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Qiu, L. E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zheng, X. H. E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W.

    2014-09-07

    In this article, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the heat transport in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel. The two adjacent particles as the basic heat transport unit were modelled to characterize the heat transfer through the calculation of thermal resistance and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The total thermal resistance of two contact particles was predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). The defects were formed by deleting atoms in the system randomly first and performing heating and quenching process afterwards to achieve the DLCA (diffusive limited cluster-cluster aggregation) process. This kind of treatment showed a very reasonable prediction of thermal conductivity for the silica aerogels compared with the experimental values. The heat transport was great suppressed as the contact length increased or defect concentration increased. The constrain effect of heat transport was much significant when contact length fraction was in the small range (<0.5) or the defect concentration is in the high range (>0.5). Also, as the contact length increased, the role of joint thermal resistance played in the constraint of heat transport was increasing. However, the defect concentration did not affect the share of joint thermal resistance as the contact length did. VDOS of the system was calculated by numerical method to characterize the heat transport from atomic vibration view. The smaller contact length and greater defect concentration primarily affected the longitudinal acoustic modes, which ultimately influenced the heat transport between the adjacent particles.

  4. Transient, heat-induced thermal resistance in the small intestine of mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.L.

    1980-06-01

    Heat-induced thermal resistance has been investigated in mouse jejunum by assaying crypt survival 24 h after treatment. Hyperthermia was achieved by immersing an exteriorized loop of intestine in a bath of Krebs-Ringer solution. Two approaches have been used. In the first, thermal survival curves were obtained following single hyperthermal treatments at temperatures in the range 42 to 44/sup 0/C. Transient thermal resistance, inducted by a plateau in the crypt survival curve, developed during heating at temperatures around 42.5/sup 0/C after 60 to 80 min. In the second series of experiments, a priming heat treatment (40.0, 41.0, 41.5, or 42.0/sup 0/C for 60 min) was followed at varying intervals by a test treatment at 43.0/sup 0/C. A transient resistance to the second treatment was induced, the extent and time of development being dependent upon the priming treatment. Crypt survival curves for thermally resistant intestine showed an increase in thermal D/sub 0/ and a decrease in n compared with curves from previously unheated intestine.

  5. Influence of bonding pressure on thermal resistance in reactively-bonded solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanetsuki, Shunsuke; Miyake, Shugo; Kuwahara, Koichi; Namazu, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    To realize the practical use of reactively bonded solder joints for thermally sensitive devices such as MEMS and electrical modules, we quantitatively measure the thermal resistance of solder joints fabricated by Al/Ni self-propagating exothermic reaction. By the laser flash method with response function analysis, the influence of bonding pressure on the thermal resistance of the reactive joints is investigated. The thermal resistance of the joints obtained by 3 MPa bonding is higher than that by 20 MPa bonding. By cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, many voids are found in the vicinity of the interface between the reacted AlNi and bottom-side solder layers in 3 MPa joints. In 20 MPa joints, a Ni-rich AlNi intermetallic compound instead of voids is produced around the interface. For reducing the thermal resistance of the reactive joints, the void generation mechanism is discussed in light of SEM observation and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) analysis results.

  6. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Emily; Bennion, Kevin; Devoto, Douglas; Naramanchi, Sreekant

    2015-07-06

    Thermal management for electric motors is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. The transition to more electrically dominant propulsion systems leads to higher-power duty cycles for electric-drive systems. Thermal constraints place significant limitations on how electric motors ultimately perform. As thermal management improves, there will be a direct trade-off among motor performance, efficiency, cost, and the sizing of electric motors to operate within the thermal constraints. During the development of thermal finite element analysis models and computational fluid dynamics models for electric motors, it was found that there was a lack of open literature detailing the thermal properties of key materials common in electric motors that are significant in terms of heat removal. The lack of available literature, coupled with the strong interest from industry in the passive-stack thermal measurement results, led to experiments to characterize the thermal contact resistance between motor laminations. We examined four lamination materials, including the commonly used 26 gauge and 29 gauge M19 materials, the HF10 and Arnon 7 materials. These latter two materials are thinner and reduce eddy currents responsible for core losses. We measured the thermal conductivity of the lamination materials and the thermal contact resistance between laminations in a stack, as well as investigated factors affecting contact resistance between laminations such as the contact pressure and surface finish. Lamination property data will be provided and we also develop a model to estimate the through-stack thermal conductivity for materials beyond those that were directly tested in this work. For example, at a clamping pressure of 138 kPa, the 29 gauge M19 material has a through-stack thermal conductivity of 1.68 W/m-K, and the contact resistance between laminations was measured to be 193 mm^2-K/W. The measured bulk

  7. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil.

  8. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil. PMID:23728806

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of thermal resistance at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Hung; Beskok, Ali; Cagin, Tahir

    2008-11-01

    Heat conduction between parallel plates separated by a thin layer of liquid Argon is investigated using three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential interactions. Channel walls are maintained at specific temperatures using a recently developed interactive thermal wall model. Heat flux and temperature distribution in nanochannels are calculated for channel heights varying from 12.96 to 3.24 nm. Fourier law of heat conduction is verified for the smallest channel, while the thermal conductivity obtained from Fourier law is verified using the predictions of Green-Kubo theory. Temperature jumps at the liquid/solid interface, corresponding to the well known Kapitza resistance, are observed. Using systematic studies thermal resistance length at the interface is characterized as a function of the surface wettability, thermal oscillation frequency, wall temperature, thermal gradient, and channel height. An empirical model for the thermal resistance length, which could be used as the jump coefficient of a Navier boundary condition, is developed. Temperature distribution in nanochannels is predicted using analytical solution of continuum heat conduction equation subjected to the new temperature jump condition. Analytical predictions are verified using MD simulations.

  10. Thermal contact resistance across a linear heterojunction within a hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride sheet.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jingchao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-21

    Interfacial thermal conductance plays a vital role in defining the thermal properties of nanostructured materials in which heat transfer is predominantly phonon mediated. In this work, the thermal contact resistance (R) of a linear heterojunction within a hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet is characterized using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The effects of system dimension, heat flux direction, temperature and tensile strain on the predicted R values are investigated. The spatiotemporal evolution of thermal energies from the graphene to the h-BN sheet reveals that the main energy carrier in graphene is the flexural phonon (ZA) mode, which also has the most energy transmissions across the interface. The calculated R decreases monotonically from 5.2 × 10(-10) to 2.2 × 10(-10) K m(2) W(-1) with system lengths ranging from 20 to 100 nm. For a 40 nm length hybrid system, the calculated R decreases by 42% from 4.1 × 10(-10) to 2.4 × 10(-10) K m(2) W(-1) when the system temperature increases from 200 K to 600 K. The study of the strain effect shows that the thermal contact resistance R between h-BN and graphene sheets increases with the tensile strain. Detailed phonon density of states (PDOS) is computed to understand the thermal resistance results. PMID:27531348

  11. The thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The effects of welding, five selected surface coatings, and stress relieving on the thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies were studied using eleven thermal fatigue specimens. Stress relieving was conducted after each 5,000 cycle interval at 1050 F for three hours. Four thermal fatigue specimens were welded with H-13 or maraging steel welding rods at ambient and elevated temperatures and subsequently, subjected to different post-weld heat treatments. Crack patterns were examined at 5,000, 10,000, and 15,000 cycles. The thermal fatigue resistance is expressed by two crack parameters which are the average maximum crack and the average cracked area. The results indicate that a significant improvement in thermal fatigue resistance over the control was obtained from the stress-relieving treatment. Small improvements were obtained from the H-13 welded specimens and from a salt bath nitrogen and carbon-surface treatment. The other surface treatments and welded specimens either did not affect or had a detrimental influence on the thermal fatigue properties of the H-13 die steel.

  12. Thermal compression chip interconnection using organic solderability preservative etched substrate by plasma processing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Won; Choi, JoonYoung; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-12-01

    The solderability of copper organic solderbility preservative (CuOSP) finished substrate was enhanced by the plasma etching. To improve the solderability of TC interconnection with the CuOSP finished substrate, the plasma etching process is used. An Oxygen-Hydrogen plasma treatment process is performed to remove OSP material. To prevent the oxidation by oxygen plasma treatment, hydrogen reducing process is also performed before TC interconnection process. The thickness of OSP material after plasma etching is measured by optical reflection method and the component analysis by Auger Electron Spectroscopy is performed. From the lowered thickness, the bonding force of TC interconnection after OSP etching process is lowered. Also the electrical open/short test was performed after assembling the completed semiconductor packaging. The improved yield due to the plasma etching process is achieved.

  13. FT-IR standoff detection of thermally excited emissions of trinitrotoluene (TNT) deposited on aluminum substrates.

    PubMed

    Castro-Suarez, John R; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Vélez-Reyes, Miguel; Diem, Max; Tague, Thomas J; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P

    2013-02-01

    A standoff detection system was assembled by coupling a reflecting telescope to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with a cryo-cooled mercury cadmium telluride detector and used for detection of solid-phase samples deposited on substrates. Samples of highly energetic materials were deposited on aluminum substrates and detected at several collector-target distances by performing passive-mode, remote, infrared detection measurements on the heated analytes. Aluminum plates were used as support material, and 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) was used as the target. For standoff detection experiments, the samples were placed at different distances (4 to 55 m). Several target surface temperatures were investigated. Partial least squares regression analysis was applied to the analysis of the intensities of the spectra obtained. Overall, standoff detection in passive mode was useful for quantifying TNT deposited on the aluminum plates with high confidence up to target-collector distances of 55 m.

  14. Assessment of accuracy of in-situ methods for measuring building-envelope thermal resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.B.; Grot, R.A.; Park, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    A series of field and laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of in-situ thermal-resistance-measurement techniques. The results of thermal-performance evaluation of the exterior walls of six thermal mass test houses situated in Gaithersburg, Maryland are presented. The wall construction of these one-room houses includes insulated light-weight wood frame, uninsulated light-weight wood frame, insulated masonry with outside mass, uninsulated masonry, log, and insulated masonry with inside mass. In-situ measurements of heat transfer through building envelopes were made with heat flux transducers and portable calorimeters.

  15. Thermal cycling and high power density hydrogen ion beam irradiation of tungsten layers on tungsten substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gretskaya, I. Yu; Grunin, A. V.; Dyachenko, M. Yu; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten layers with iron impurity were deposited on tungsten substrates modeling re-deposited layers in a fusion device. The samples were tested by thermocycling and hydrogen ion beam tests. Thermocycling revealed globule formation on the surface. The size of the globules depended on iron impurity content in the coating deposited. Pore formation was observed which in some cases lead to exfoliation of the coatings. Hydrogen ion irradiation lead to formation of blisters on the coating and finally its exfoliation.

  16. Influence of substrates on resistive switching behaviors of V-doped SrTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenhua; Xiong, Ying; Tang, Minghua; Cheng, Chuanpin; Xu, Dinglin; Xiao, Yongguang; Zhou, Yichun

    2014-03-01

    V-doped SrTiO3 (V:STO) thin films on Si and Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates are synthesized by sol-gel method to form metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures. Bipolar resistive switching (RS) characteristics were investigated in Pt/V:STO/Si and Pt/V:STO/Pt structures respectively. The enhancement of resistive switching behavior in Pt/V:STO/Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si structures were demonstrated in terms of the maximum operation voltage reduced from 20 to 2 V and the improved ROFF/RON ratio increased from 102 to 103. The electrochemical migration of oxygen vacancies resulted from the metal-oxide interfaces was applied to explain the resistive switching behaviors. On the basis of current-voltage characteristics, the switching mechanisms for the low resistance state (LRS) and high resistance state (HRS) currents of V:STO films are considered as Ohmic and trap-controlled space charge-limited current (SCLC) behavior, respectively.

  17. Thermal fatigue resistance of hot work die steel repaired by partial laser surface remelting and alloying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Dalong; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Zhenan; Zhang, Haifeng; Ren, Luquan; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei

    2014-03-01

    In this study, AISI H13 steel was processed using laser surface remelting and alloying with Co-based and iron-based powders for thermal fatigue resistance enhancement. The precracks were produced on the samples before laser treatment. The microstructures of laser treated zones were examined by scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in molten/alloying zones. Microhardness was measured and the thermal fatigue resistance was investigated with self-controlled thermal fatigue test method. The results indicate that laser surface remelting and alloying can repair a large proportion of thermal cracks. Meanwhile, the strengthening network obtains ultrafine microstructure and super thermal fatigue resistance, which restrains the propagation of thermal cracks. Compared with samples treated with laser surface remelting and laser surface alloying with iron-base powder, samples treated with Co-based powder produce lower cracking susceptibility and higher thermal fatigue resistance.

  18. Synthesis and optical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles grown on Sn-coated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somvanshi, Divya; Jit, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have been grown on n type silicon substrate using tin (Sn) metal as seed layer by a low cost thermal evaporation method. SEM images show that the ZnO nanoparticles have been uniformely grown on the whole substrate surface relatively perpendicular to the substrate. The Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum consists of strong UV emission at wavelength of 355 nm along with a broad near band edge (NBE) emission covering a wide range of wavelength from 370 to 550 nm. This broadening region exhibits blue, violet and green emission due to the presence of native defects such as zinc interstitial (Zni), oxygen vacancy (VO) and oxygen interstitial (Oi) in the band gap of ZnO. Raman spectroscopy shows the existence of E2 mode at 437 cm-1 which confirms the pure wurtzite hexagonal phase of ZnO. The optical and structural properties of ZnO nanoparticles could be explored for blue-violet light emitting diodes (LEDs) and gas sensing applications.

  19. Osteogenic potential of in situ TiO2 nanowire surfaces formed by thermal oxidation of titanium alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, A. W.; Ismail, R.; Chua, K. H.; Ahmad, R.; Akbar, S. A.; Pingguan-Murphy, B.

    2014-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanowire surface structures were fabricated in situ by a thermal oxidation process, and their ability to enhance the osteogenic potential of primary osteoblasts was investigated. Human osteoblasts were isolated from nasal bone and cultured on a TiO2 nanowires coated substrate to assess its in vitro cellular interaction. Bare featureless Ti-6Al-4V substrate was used as a control surface. Initial cell adhesion, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cell mineralization, and osteogenic related gene expression were examined on the TiO2 nanowire surfaces as compared to the control surfaces after 2 weeks of culturing. Cell adhesion and cell proliferation were assayed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Alamar Blue reduction assay, respectively. The nanowire surfaces promoted better cell adhesion and spreading than the control surface, as well as leading to higher cell proliferation. Our results showed that osteoblasts grown onto the TiO2 nanowire surfaces displayed significantly higher production levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), extracellular (ECM) mineralization and genes expression of runt-related transcription factor (Runx2), bone sialoprotein (BSP), ostoepontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN) compared to the control surfaces. This suggests the potential use of such surface modification on Ti-6Al-4V substrates as a promising means to improve the osteointegration of titanium based implants.

  20. Generalized Procedure for Improved Accuracy of Thermal Contact Resistance Measurements for Materials With Arbitrary Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2014-06-26

    Thermal contact resistance (TCR) is most commonly measured using one-dimensional steady-state calorimetric techniques. In the experimental methods we utilized, a temperature gradient is applied across two contacting beams and the temperature drop at the interface is inferred from the temperature profiles of the rods that are measured at discrete points. During data analysis, thermal conductivity of the beams is typically taken to be an average value over the temperature range imposed during the experiment. Our generalized theory is presented and accounts for temperature-dependent changes in thermal conductivity. The procedure presented enables accurate measurement of TCR for contacting materials whose thermal conductivity is any arbitrary function of temperature. For example, it is shown that the standard technique yields TCR values that are about 15% below the actual value for two specific examples of copper and silicon contacts. Conversely, the generalized technique predicts TCR values that are within 1% of the actual value. The method is exact when thermal conductivity is known exactly and no other errors are introduced to the system.

  1. Interfacial thermal resistance between high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kun; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yong-Mei; Tang, Da-Wei; Wang, Fo-Song

    2014-10-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of polymeric composites, the numerous interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) inside is usually considered as a bottle neck, but the direct measurement of the ITR is hardly reported. In this paper, a sandwich structure which consists of transducer/high density polyethylene (HDPE)/sapphire is prepared to study the interface characteristics. Then, the ITRs between HDPE and sapphire of two samples with different HDPE thickness values are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method and the results are ~ 2 × 10-7 m2·K·W-1. Furthermore, a model is used to evaluate the importance of ITR for the thermal conductivity of composites. The model's analysis indicates that reducing the ITR is an effective way of improving the thermal conductivity of composites. These results will provide valuable guidance for the design and manufacture of polymer-based thermally conductive materials.

  2. Bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance phenomenon and its physical mechanism in the Frenkel-Kontorova lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianqiang, Zhang; Linru, Nie; Chongyang, Chen; Xinyu, Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Thermal conduction of the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) lattices with interfacial coupling is investigated numerically. The results indicate that: (i) For appropriate lattice periods, as the system is symmetric, a bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR) phenomenon will appear. If the system is asymmetric, the bidirectional NDTR is gradually converted into an unidirectional NDTR. (ii) The bidirectional NDTR phenomenon effect also depends on the period of the FK lattice as the other parameters remains unchanged. With the increment of the lattice period, the bidirectional NDTR will gradually disappear. (iii) From a stochastic dynamics point of view, thermal transport properties of the system are determined by the competition between the two types of thermal conduction: one comes from the collusion between atoms, the other is due to the elastic coupling between atoms. For the smaller lattice periods, the former type of thermal conduction occupies the dominating position and the NDTR effect will appear.

  3. A theoretical study of electrical and thermal response in resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J.; Park, S.W.

    1996-08-01

    The effect of contact resistance including constriction and contamination resistance has been a major hurdle for the thermoelectrical analysis of the resistance spot welding process. In this paper, a simple model was suggested and used for calculating the electrical and thermal response of the resistance spot welding process to investigate the influence of contacting forces on the formation of weld nuggets. The electrode surface of the contact interface was assumed to be axisymmetric and its microasperities to have a trapezoidal cross-section. These microasperities were considered as the one-dimensional contact resistance elements in the finite element formulation. The contamination film was assumed to be a nonconducting oxide layer, which is very brittle, so that it is broken to some number of pieces when a contacting pressure is being applied. The crushed films were assumed to be distributed at regular intervals and to conserve their size and number during the welding process. The simulation results revealed that the proposed model can be successfully used to predict the effect of the contact resistance on the electrical and thermal response of the resistance spot welding process.

  4. Corrosion-resistant coating prepared by the thermal decomposition of lithium permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1999-09-01

    A ceramic, metal, or metal alloy surface is covered with lithium permanganate which is then thermally decomposed to produce a corrosion resistant coating on the surface. This coating serves as a primer coating which is preferably covered with an overcoat of a sealing paint.

  5. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment. PMID:26652422

  6. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment.

  7. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-23

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  8. Consistent effects of a major QTL for thermal resistance in field-released Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Norry, Fabian M

    2011-09-01

    Molecular genetic markers can be used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for thermal resistance and this has allowed characterization of a major QTL for knockdown resistance to high temperature in Drosophila melanogaster. The QTL showed trade-off associations with cold resistance under laboratory conditions. However, assays of thermal tolerance conducted in the laboratory may not necessarily reflect performance at varying temperatures in the field. Here we tested if lines with different genotypes in this QTL show different thermal performance under high and low temperatures in the field using a release recapture assay. We found that lines carrying the QTL genotype for high thermal tolerance were significantly better at locating resources in the field releases under hot temperatures while the QTL line carrying the contrasting genotype were superior at cold temperatures. Further, we studied copulatory success between the different QTL genotypes at different temperatures. We found higher copulatory success in males of the high tolerance QTL genotype under hot temperature conditions, while there was no difference in females at cold temperatures. The results allow relating components of field fitness at different environmental temperatures with genotypic variation in a QTL for thermal tolerance.

  9. Rolling-contact and wear resistance of hard coatings on bearing-steel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemir, A.

    1992-02-01

    Ever-increasing needs for high-performance ball- and roller-bearing components that can endure extreme applications have led to a growing interest in hard coatings for improved fatigue life and wear resistance. In particular, hard TiN and TiC coatings and, quite recently, diamond like carbon films have attracted much attention from manufacturers that produce bearing systems for both rolling- and sliding-contact applications. This paper presents an overview that highlights recent incremental progress in achieving improved fatigue and wear resistance in bearing steels through the use of hard coatings. Effects of coating adhesion, thickness, and morphology on fatigue and wear resistance of hard coatings are discussed in detail. Specific references are made to a few mechanistic models that correlate coating thickness and adhesion to improved fatigue life and wear resistance.

  10. New thermal and microbial resistant metal-containing epoxy polymers.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M

    2010-01-01

    A series of metal-containing epoxy polymers have been synthesized by the condensation of epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxy propane) with Schiff base metal complexes in alkaline medium. Schiff base was initially prepared by the reaction of 2,6 dihydroxy 1-napthaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1 : 2 molar ratio and then with metal acetate. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental, spectral, and thermal analysis. The physicochemical properties, viz., epoxy value, hydroxyl content, and chlorine content [mol/100 g] were measured by standard procedures. The antimicrobial activities of these metal-containing epoxy polymers were carried out by using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) methods against S. aureus, B. subtilis (Gram-positive bacteria), and E. coli, P. aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria). It was found that the ECu(II) showed higher antibacterial activity than other metal-chelated epoxy resin while EMn(II) exhibited reduced antibacterial activity against all bacteria. PMID:20689716

  11. New Thermal and Microbial Resistant Metal-Containing Epoxy Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of metal-containing epoxy polymers have been synthesized by the condensation of epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxy propane) with Schiff base metal complexes in alkaline medium. Schiff base was initially prepared by the reaction of 2,6 dihydroxy 1-napthaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1  :  2 molar ratio and then with metal acetate. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental, spectral, and thermal analysis. The physicochemical properties, viz., epoxy value, hydroxyl content, and chlorine content [mol/100 g] were measured by standard procedures. The antimicrobial activities of these metal-containing epoxy polymers were carried out by using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) methods against S. aureus, B. subtilis (Gram-positive bacteria), and E. coli, P. aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria). It was found that the ECu(II) showed higher antibacterial activity than other metal-chelated epoxy resin while EMn(II) exhibited reduced antibacterial activity against all bacteria. PMID:20689716

  12. Wear-resistant and antismudge superoleophobic coating on polyethylene terephthalate substrate using SiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxin; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-14

    It is of interest to create superoleophobic surfaces that exhibit high oil contact angle, low contact angle hysteresis, high wear resistance, antismudge properties, and optical transparency for industrial applications. In the superoleophobic surfaces developed to date, the mechanical durability data is lacking. By dip-coating polyethylene terephthalate substrate with hydrophobic SiO2 nanoparticles and methylphenyl silicone resin, followed by O2 plasma treatment and vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane, a durable superoleophobic surface was fabricated. The degree of superoleophobicity was found to be dependent on the particle-to-binder ratio. The coatings were found to exhibit wear resistance on microscale and macroscale, antismudge properties, and transparency.

  13. Effects of Substrate Bias on the Hardness and Resistivity of Reactively Sputtered TaN and TiN Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junqing; Arshi, Nishat

    2016-06-01

    TaN and TiN films are being widely used as conductive layers in electronic devices or protective coatings on metal surfaces. Among various deposition methods, reactive magnetron sputtering is preferred partly due to its ability to control the energy of the depositing ions by applying different substrate bias voltages. In this study, TaN and TiN films were deposited on Si/SiO2 substrates by using direct current magnetron sputtering technique with 370 W target power at 1.9 mTorr and under different substrate biases. The effects of the substrate bias on both the resistivity and the hardness of the deposited TaN and TiN films were investigated. The phase and composition of the deposited films were investigated by x-ray diffraction, the resistivity was measured by a four-point probe, and the hardness was obtained by nano-indentation. For TaN films, the use of substrate bias not only increased the hardness but also increased the resistivity. Moreover, the formation of the Ta3N5 phase at the -300 V substrate bias significantly increased the TaN film resistivity. For TiN films, the optimum resistivity (minimum) of 19.5 µΩ-cm and the hardness (maximum) of 31.5 GPa were achieved at the -100 V substrate bias. Since the phase changes occurred in both the TaN and the TiN films at higher substrate biases and these phase changes negatively affected the resistivity or hardness property of the films, the substrate bias should not significantly exceed -100 V.

  14. Influence of thermal boundary conditions on the current-driven resistive transition in VO2 microbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca, Nicola; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Marré, Daniele; Pellegrino, Luca

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the resistive switching behaviour of VO2 microbridges under current bias as a function of temperature and thermal coupling with the heat bath. Upon increasing the electrical current bias, the formation of the metallic phase can progress smoothly or through sharp jumps. The magnitude and threshold current values of these sharp resistance drops show random behaviour and are dramatically influenced by thermal dissipation conditions. Our results also evidence how the propagation of the metallic phase induced by electrical current in VO2, and thus the shape of the resulting high-conductivity path, are not predictable. We discuss the origin of the switching events through a simple electro-thermal model based on the domain structure of VO2 films that can be useful to improve the stability and controllability of future VO2-based devices.

  15. Thermal fatigue resistance of NASA WAZ-20 alloy with three commercial coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Screening tests using three commercial coatings (Jocoat, HI-15, and RT-1A) on the nickel-base alloy NASA WAZ-20 were performed by cyclic exposure in a Mach 1 burner facility. These tests showed Jocoated WAZ-20 to have the best cracking resistance. The thermal fatigue resistance of Jocoated WAZ-20 in both the random polycrystalline and directionally solidified polycrystalline forms relative to that of other superalloys was then evaluated in a fluidized-bed facility. This investigation showed that Jocoated random polycrystalline WAZ-20 ranked approximately in midrange in thermal fatigue life. The thermal fatigue life of directionally solidified Jocoated WAZ-20 was shorter than that of other directionally solidified alloys but still longer than that of all alloys in the random polycrystalline form.

  16. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  17. Formation of nanocrystalline GeSn thin film on Si substrate by sputtering and rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmodi, H.; Hashim, M. R.; Hashim, U.

    2016-10-01

    Nanocrystalline Ge1-xSnx thin films have been formed after rapid thermal annealing of sputtered GeSn layers. The alloy films were deposited onto the Silicon (100) substrate via low cost radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Then, the films were annealed by rapid thermal annealing at 350 °C, 400 °C, and 450 °C for 10 s. The morphological, structural, and optical properties of the layers were investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD). The Raman analysis showed that the only observed phonon mode is attributed to Ge-Ge vibrations. Raman phonon intensities of GeSn thin films were enhanced with increasing the annealing temperature. The results clearly revealed that by increasing the annealing temperature the crystalline quality of the films were improved. The XRD measurements revealed the nanocrystalline phase formation in the annealed films with (111) preferred orientation. The results showed the potentiality of using the sputtering technique and rapid thermal anneal to produce crystalline GeSn layer.

  18. Thermal resistance and compressive strain of underwater aerogel syntactic foam hybrid insulation at atmospheric and elevated hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Erik; Mollendorf, Joseph; Pendergast, David

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a new underwater thermal insulation designed for flexibility and high thermal resistance. The insulation was a hybrid composite of two constituents: syntactic foam and an insulating aerogel blanket. Methods for treating and combining the constituents into a hybrid insulation of several designs are presented. A final configuration was selected based on high thermal resistance and was tested for thermal resistance and compressive strain to a pressure of 1.2 MPa (107 msw, meters of sea water) for five continuous pressure cycles. The thermal resistance and compressive strain results were compared to foam neoprene and underwater pipeline insulation. It was found that the hybrid insulation has a thermal resistance significantly higher than both foam neoprene and underwater pipeline insulation at atmospheric and elevated hydrostatic pressures (1.2 MPa). The total thermal resistance of the hybrid insulation decreased 32% at 1.2 MPa and returned to its initial value upon decompression. It was concluded that the hybrid insulation, with modifications, could be used for wetsuit construction, shallow underwater pipeline insulation, or any underwater application where high thermal resistance, flexibility, and resistance to compression are desired.

  19. Thermal-shock Resistance of a Ceramic Comprising 60 Percent Boron Carbide and 40 Percent Titanium Diboride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeomans, C M; Hoffman, C A

    1953-01-01

    Thermal-shock resistance of a ceramic comprising 60 percent boron carbide and 40 percent titanium diboride was investigated. The material has thermal shock resistance comparable to that of NBS body 4811C and that of zirconia, but is inferior to beryllia, alumina, and titanium-carbide ceramals. It is not considered suitable for turbine blades.

  20. Thermal resistance at an interface between a crystal and its melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Evans, William J.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-07-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine interfacial thermal resistance (Kapitza resistance) between a crystal and its melt for three materials including Ar, H2O, and C8H18 (octane). The simulation results show that the Kapitza resistance at a crystal-melt interface is very small and thus has a negligible effect on thermal transport across the crystal-melt interface. The underlying origins of this behavior are the very good vibrational property match between the two materials forming the interface and good interfacial bonding. The result also indicates that the commonly-used assumption that temperature profile is continuous at the crystal-melt interface is valid even in the case of very rapid crystal melting or growth.

  1. TOF-SIMS investigations on thermally treated copper-molybdenum films on a carbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Puchner, Stefan; Hutter, Herbert; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph; Kiniger, M

    2008-03-01

    Metal-matrix composites are made of materials with different physical and chemical properties. It is possible to change the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties by variation of the mass ratio of the components; therefore, metal-matrix composites have great value for industrial and technological applications. Copper-carbon composites have a good chance to be used as heat sinks for electronic components, which can be explained by their high thermal conductivity, low density and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion. On the other hand, the mechanical adhesion of copper and carbon is extremely weak because of their immiscibility and weak chemical interactions. In order to compensate for the low wettability of carbon by copper, a thin molybdenum intermediate layer is used as an adhesion promoter. In this work a time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry technique was primarily used to detect the carbide formation in the molybdenum and copper layers, depending on different temperature conditions during sputter deposition and annealing afterwards. The CuMo layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The adhesion of the samples was determined by a destructive pull-off test. We found that heat treatment mainly modifies the carbide formation in the molybdenum and copper layers. PMID:18026861

  2. Fully Electrical Modeling of Thermoelectric Generators with Contact Thermal Resistance Under Different Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siouane, Saima; Jovanović, Slaviša; Poure, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The Seebeck effect is used in thermoelectric generators (TEGs) to supply electronic circuits by converting the waste thermal into electrical energy. This generated electrical power is directly proportional to the temperature difference between the TEG module's hot and cold sides. Depending on the applications, TEGs can be used either under constant temperature gradient between heat reservoirs or constant heat flow conditions. Moreover, the generated electrical power of a TEG depends not only on these operating conditions, but also on the contact thermal resistance. The influence of the contact thermal resistance on the generated electrical power have already been extensively reported in the literature. However, as reported in Park et al. (Energy Convers Manag 86:233, 2014) and Montecucco and Knox (IEEE Trans Power Electron 30:828, 2015), while designing TEG-powered circuit and systems, a TEG module is mostly modeled with a Thévenin equivalent circuit whose resistance is constant and voltage proportional to the temperature gradient applied to the TEG's terminals. This widely used simplified electrical TEG model is inaccurate and not suitable under constant heat flow conditions or when the contact thermal resistance is considered. Moreover, it does not provide realistic behaviour corresponding to the physical phenomena taking place in a TEG. Therefore, from the circuit designer's point of view, faithful and fully electrical TEG models under different operating conditions are needed. Such models are mainly necessary to design and evaluate the power conditioning electronic stages and the maximum power point tracking algorithms of a TEG power supply. In this study, these fully electrical models with the contact thermal resistance taken into account are presented and the analytical expressions of the Thévenin equivalent circuit parameters are provided.

  3. Lateral heat flow distribution and defect-dependent thermal resistance in an individual silicon nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Yong; Lee, Won-Yong; Thong, John T. L.; Kim, Gil-Sung; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Studies aiming to significantly improve thermal properties, such as figure-of-merit, of silicon nanowires (SiNW) have focused on diameter reduction and surface or interface roughness control. However, the mechanism underlying thermal conductivity enhancement of roughness controlled NWs remains unclear. Here, we report a significant influence of stacking faults (SFs) on the lateral thermal conductivity of a single SiNW, using a combination of newly developed in situ spatially-resolved thermal resistance experiments and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. We used as-grown SiNWs tapered along the growth direction with progressively lower roughness and SFs density. The results clearly confirmed that both surface roughness and twins or SFs densities suppress the thermal conductivity of an individual SiNW. The results and measurement techniques presented here hold great potential for inspecting minute changes in thermal resistance along an individual SiNW, caused by induced SFs on the nanostructure, and for improving one-dimensional nanowire-based thermoelectric device performance.

  4. Substrate Inhibition of VanA by d-Alanine Reduces Vancomycin Resistance in a VanX-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    van der Aart, Lizah T; Lemmens, Nicole; van Wamel, Willem J; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-08-01

    The increasing resistance of clinical pathogens against the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin, a last-resort drug against infections with Gram-positive pathogens, is a major problem in the nosocomial environment. Vancomycin inhibits peptidoglycan synthesis by binding to the d-Ala-d-Ala terminal dipeptide moiety of the cell wall precursor lipid II. Plasmid-transferable resistance is conferred by modification of the terminal dipeptide into the vancomycin-insensitive variant d-Ala-d-Lac, which is produced by VanA. Here we show that exogenous d-Ala competes with d-Lac as a substrate for VanA, increasing the ratio of wild-type to mutant dipeptide, an effect that was augmented by several orders of magnitude in the absence of the d-Ala-d-Ala peptidase VanX. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that high concentrations of d-Ala led to the production of a significant amount of wild-type cell wall precursors, while vanX-null mutants produced primarily wild-type precursors. This enhanced the efficacy of vancomycin in the vancomycin-resistant model organism Streptomyces coelicolor, and the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium (VRE) increased by up to 100-fold. The enhanced vancomycin sensitivity of S. coelicolor cells correlated directly to increased binding of the antibiotic to the cell wall. Our work offers new perspectives for the treatment of diseases associated with vancomycin-resistant pathogens and for the development of drugs that target vancomycin resistance. PMID:27270282

  5. Deposition and thermal characterization of nano-structured aluminum nitride thin film on Cu-W substrate for high power light emitting diode package.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Min; Kim, Min-Sun

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed AlN thick film on metal substrate for hybrid type LED package such as chip on board (COB) using metal printed circuit board (PCB). Conventional metal PCB uses ceramic-polymer composite as electrical insulating layer. Thermal conductivities of such type dielectric film are typically in the range of 1~4 W/m · K depending on the ceramic filler. Also, Al or Cu alloy are mainly used for metal base for high thermal conduction to dissipate heat from thermal source mounted on metal PCB. Here we used Cu-W alloy with low thermal expansion coefficient as metal substrate to reduce thermal stress between insulating layer and base metal. AlN with polyimide (PI) powder were used as starting materials for deposition. We could obtain very high thermal conductivity of 28.3 W/m · K from deposited AlN-PI thin film by AlN-3 wt% PI powder. We made hybrid type high power LED package using AlN-PI thin film. We tested thermal performance of this film by thermal transient measurement and compared with conventional metal PCB substrate. PMID:25936009

  6. Deposition and thermal characterization of nano-structured aluminum nitride thin film on Cu-W substrate for high power light emitting diode package.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Min; Kim, Min-Sun

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed AlN thick film on metal substrate for hybrid type LED package such as chip on board (COB) using metal printed circuit board (PCB). Conventional metal PCB uses ceramic-polymer composite as electrical insulating layer. Thermal conductivities of such type dielectric film are typically in the range of 1~4 W/m · K depending on the ceramic filler. Also, Al or Cu alloy are mainly used for metal base for high thermal conduction to dissipate heat from thermal source mounted on metal PCB. Here we used Cu-W alloy with low thermal expansion coefficient as metal substrate to reduce thermal stress between insulating layer and base metal. AlN with polyimide (PI) powder were used as starting materials for deposition. We could obtain very high thermal conductivity of 28.3 W/m · K from deposited AlN-PI thin film by AlN-3 wt% PI powder. We made hybrid type high power LED package using AlN-PI thin film. We tested thermal performance of this film by thermal transient measurement and compared with conventional metal PCB substrate.

  7. Generalized Procedure for Improved Accuracy of Thermal Contact Resistance Measurements for Materials With Arbitrary Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2014-06-26

    Thermal contact resistance (TCR) is most commonly measured using one-dimensional steady-state calorimetric techniques. In the experimental methods we utilized, a temperature gradient is applied across two contacting beams and the temperature drop at the interface is inferred from the temperature profiles of the rods that are measured at discrete points. During data analysis, thermal conductivity of the beams is typically taken to be an average value over the temperature range imposed during the experiment. Our generalized theory is presented and accounts for temperature-dependent changes in thermal conductivity. The procedure presented enables accurate measurement of TCR for contacting materials whose thermalmore » conductivity is any arbitrary function of temperature. For example, it is shown that the standard technique yields TCR values that are about 15% below the actual value for two specific examples of copper and silicon contacts. Conversely, the generalized technique predicts TCR values that are within 1% of the actual value. The method is exact when thermal conductivity is known exactly and no other errors are introduced to the system.« less

  8. Hydrophobicity attainment and wear resistance enhancement on glass substrates by atmospheric plasma-polymerization of mixtures of an aminosilane and a fluorocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múgica-Vidal, Rodolfo; Alba-Elías, Fernando; Sainz-García, Elisa; Pantoja-Ruiz, Mariola

    2015-08-01

    Mixtures of different proportions of two liquid precursors were subjected to plasma-polymerization by a non-thermal atmospheric jet plasma system in a search for a coating that achieves a hydrophobic character on a glass substrate and enhances its wear resistance. 1-Perfluorohexene (PFH) was chosen as a low-surface-energy precursor to promote a hydrophobic character. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was chosen for its contribution to the improvement of wear resistance by the formation of siloxane bonds. The objective of this work was to determine which of the precursors' mixtures that were tested provides the coating with the most balanced enhancement of both hydrophobicity and wear resistance, given that coatings deposited with fluorocarbon-based precursors such as PFH are usually low in resistance to wear and coatings deposited with APTES are generally hydrophilic. The coatings obtained were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), static Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements, tribological ball-on-disc tests and contact profilometry. A relationship between the achievement of a hydrophobic character and the modifications to roughness and surface morphology and the incorporation of fluorocarbon groups in the surface chemistry was observed. Also, it was seen that the wear resistance was influenced by the SiOSi content of the coatings. In turn, the SiOSi content appears to be directly related to the percentage of APTES used in the mixture of precursors. The best conjunction of hydrophobicity and wear resistance in this work was found in the sample that was coated using a mixture of APTES and PFH in proportions of 75 and 25%, respectively. Its WCA (100.2 ± 7.5°) was the highest of all samples that were measured and more than three times that of the uncoated glass (31 ± 0.7°). This sample underwent a change from a hydrophilic to a

  9. Silver conductive features on flexible substrates from a thermally accelerated chain reaction at low sintering temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Kao, Zhen-Kai; Lin, Jeng-Lung; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a simple and effective silver ink formulation was developed to generate silver tracks with high electrical conductivity on flexible substrates at low sintering temperatures. Diethanolamine (DEA), a self-oxidizing compound at moderate temperatures, was mixed with a silver ammonia solution to form a clear and stable solution. After inkjet-printed or pen-written on plastic sheets, DEA in the silver ink decomposes at temperatures higher than 50 °C and generates formaldehyde, which reacts spontaneously with silver ammonia ions to form silver thin films. The electrical conductivity of the inkjet-printed silver films can be 26% of the bulk silver after heating at 75 °C for 20 min and show great adhesion on plastic sheets. PMID:23186160

  10. Facile and scalable preparation of highly wear-resistance superhydrophobic surface on wood substrates using silica nanoparticles modified by VTES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shanshan; Liu, Ming; Wu, Yiqiang; Luo, Sha; Qing, Yan; Chen, Haibo

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an efficient, facile method has been developed for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces on wood substrates using silica nanoparticles modified by VTES. The as-prepared superhydrophobic wood surface had a water contact angle of 154° and water slide angle close to 0°. Simultaneously, this superhydrophobic wood showed highly durable and robust wear resistance when having undergone a long period of sandpaper abrasion or being scratched by a knife. Even under extreme conditions of boiling water, the superhydrophobicity of the as-prepared wood composite was preserved. Characterizations by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that a typical and tough hierarchical micro/nanostructure was created on the wood substrate and vinyltriethoxysilane contributed to preventing the agglomeration of silica nanoparticles and serving as low-surface-free-energy substances. This superhydrophobic wood was easy to fabricate, mechanically resistant and exhibited long-term stability. Therefore, it is considered to be of significant importance in the industrial production of functional wood, especially for outdoor applications.

  11. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  12. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  13. Soil thermal resistivity and thermal stability measuring instrument. Volume 2: Manual for operation and use of the thermal property analyzer and statistical weather analysis program to determine thermal design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. A.; Radhakrishna, H. S.; Chu, F. Y.; Ford, G. L.; Griffin, J. D. A.; Steinmanis, J.

    1981-11-01

    Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is in turn a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties (resistivity and diffusivity). For design purposes, these parameters should be treated statistically, since weather varies greatly from year to year. As well, soil thermal property surveys are normally required along the route to assess the thermal quality of the native soil. This project is intended to fill the gap between the need to carry out thermal design and the use of the Neher-McGrath formalism which is normally employed. This goal has been addressed through: development of instrumentation and methods of measuring soil thermal properties in situ and in the laboratory; recommendation of methods for conducting soil surveys along a proposed cable route and of assessing the thermal quality of soils; and development of a computerized method to treat soil thermal design parameters on a statistical basis using computerized weather records as supplied by the US Environmental Data Service. The use of the methods and instrumentation developed as a result of this contract should permit less conservative thermal design thereby improving the economics of underground transmission. As well, these techniques and instrumentation facilitate weather-dependent prediction of cable ampacity for installed cables, monitoring of backfill thermal stability, and many other new practices.

  14. Thermal boundary resistance in Si/Ge interfaces determined by approach-to-equilibrium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Hahn, Konstanze; Melis, Claudio; Colombo, Luciano

    2015-03-01

    Nanostructured materials hold great promises as efficient thermoelectrics. In such materials, the propagation of phonons is hindered by the internal interfaces (grain boundaries), leading to a reduced overall thermal conductivity and, therefore, to a larger figure of merit. Any further improvement in this field does, however, require a better fundamental understanding of the specific interface effects on thermal transport. In the present work we use approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (AEMD) to investigate the interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) of Si/Ge interfaces, occurring in very promising nanostructured SiGe alloys. We discuss how ITR depends on the thickness of the interface layer, as well as on its composition. Furthermore, the effect of the heat flux direction has been investigated at ambient temperature showing lower ITR for thermal transport from Si to Ge than vice versa. This feature is discussed in connection to possible rectification effects. Present address: The Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago.

  15. Defect structure transformation after thermal annealing in a surface layer of Zn-implanted Si(001) substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbachev, Kirill; Privezentsev, Vladimir; Kulikauskas, Vaclav; Zatekin, Vladimir; Saraykin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    A combination of high-resolution X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) methods were used to characterize structural transformations of the damaged layer in Si(001) substrates heavily doped by Zn ions after a multistage thermal treatment. The shape of the SIMS profiles for Zn atoms correlates with the crystal structure of the damaged layer and depends on the presence of the following factors influencing the mobility of Zn atoms: (i) an amorphous/crystalline (a/c) interface, (ii) end-of-range defects, which are located slightly deeper than the a/c interface; (iii) a surface area enriched by Si vacancies; and (iv) the chemical interaction of Zn with Si atoms, which leads to the formation of Zn-containing phases in the surface layer. PMID:24046492

  16. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    SciTech Connect

    Yusufali, C. Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.

    2014-04-24

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  17. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufali, C.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-04-01

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al2O3 layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  18. Survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus during thermal processing of frankfurters, summer sausage, and ham.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan A; Dickson, James S; Cordray, Joseph C; Olson, Dennis G; Mendonca, Aubrey F; Prusa, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a major concern for human health professionals around the world. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is just one of the resistant organisms of concern. MRSA prevalence has also been recently reported in retail meat products at rates higher than originally thought. Although the risk of contracting an infection from handling contaminated meat products is thought to be low, very little is known about this organism from a food safety perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the survival of MRSA during thermal processing of frankfurters, summer sausage, and boneless ham. Frankfurters, summer sausage, and boneless ham were manufactured using formulations and processing procedures developed at the Iowa State University meat laboratory. Thermal processing resulted in a significant log reduction (p<0.05) for boneless ham, summer sausage, and frankfurters when compared to uncooked, positive controls for each of the three processed meat products. All products were thermally processed to an internal temperature of 70°C and promptly cooled to 7.2°C. Boneless ham showed the highest log reduction (7.28 logs) from cooking, followed by summer sausage (6.75 logs) and frankfurters (5.53 logs). The results of this study indicate that thermal processing of ham, summer sausage, and frankfurters to 70°C is sufficient to reduce the risk of MRSA as a potential food safety hazard.

  19. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  20. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe2O3 nanowires on iron substrate in thermal annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, Sanjay; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    A detail cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of as-grown α-Fe2O3 nanowire sample, synthesized on iron substrate by thermal annealing method, was carried out to understand the mechanism of growth in this system. Iron undergoes sequential oxidation to form a layered structure of Fe/FeO/Fe3O4/α-Fe2O3. α-Fe2O3 nanowires grow on to the top of α-Fe2O3 layer. It was found that subsequent oxide layers grow topotaxially on the grains of iron, which results in a direct orientation relationship between the α-Fe2O3 nanowire and the parent grain of iron. The results also showed that the grains of α-Fe2O3 layer, which were uniquely oriented in [110] direction, undergo highly anisotropic growth to form the nanowire. This anisotropic growth occurs at a twin interface, given by (-11-1), in the α-Fe2O3 layer. It was concluded that the growth at twin interface could be the main driving factor for such anisotropic growth. These observations are not only helpful in understanding the growth mechanism of α-Fe2O3 nanowires, but it also demonstrates a way of patterning the nanowires by controlling the texture of iron substrate.

  1. Thermal spin filtering, thermal spin switching and negative-differential-resistance in thermal spin currents in zigzag SiC nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan-Dan; Fu, Hua-Hua; Gu, Lei; Ni, Yun; Zu, Feng-Xia; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2014-09-01

    Spin caloritronics with a combination of spintronics and thermoelectrics has potential applications in future information science and opens a new direction in the development of multi-functional materials. Based on density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method, we calculate thermal spin-dependent transport through a zigzag silicon carbide nanoribbon (ZSiCNR), which is a heterojunction consisting of a left electrode (ZSiC-2H1H) and right electrode terminated (ZSiC-1H1H) by hydrogen. Our results show that when the temperature in the left contact increases over a critical value, the thermal spin-down current increases remarkably from zero, while the thermal spin-up current remains zero in the total-temperature region, indicating that a perfect thermal spin filter together with a perfect spin switcher is obtained. Furthermore, the thermal spin current shows a negative differential resistance effect and quantum oscillation behaviors. These results suggest that the zigzag SiC nanoribbon proposed by us can be designed as a highly-efficient spin caloritronics device with multiple functionalities.

  2. Fabrication of Fe nanowires on yittrium-stabilized zirconia single crystal substrates by thermal CVD methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahito, A.; Yanase, T.; Endo, T.; Nagahama, T.; Shimada, T.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic nanowires (NWs) are promising as material for use in spintronics and as the precursor of permanent magnets because they have unique properties due to their high aspect ratio. The growth of magnetic Fe whiskers was reported in the 1960s, but the diameter was not on a nanoscale level and the growth mechanism was not fully elucidated. In the present paper, we report the almost vertical growth of Fe NWs on a single crystal yttrium-stabilized zirconia (Y{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 2}) by a thermal CVD method. The NWs show a characteristic taper part on the bottom growing from a trigonal pyramidal nucleus. The taper angle and length can be controlled by changing the growth condition in two steps, which will lead to obtaining uniformly distributed thin Fe NWs for applications.

  3. Air, aqueous and thermal stabilities of Ce3+ ions in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers with substrates.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Tamaki; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-06-21

    Abundant oxygen vacancies coexisting with Ce(3+) ions in fluorite cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have the potential to enhance catalytic ability, but the ratio of unstable Ce(3+) ions in CNPs is typically low. Our recent work, however, demonstrated that the abundant Ce(3+) ions created in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers (CNPLs) by Ar ion irradiation were stable in air at room temperature. Ce valence states in CNPs correlate with the catalytic ability that involves redox reactions between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) ions in given application environments (e.g. high temperature in carbon monoxide gas conversion and immersion conditions in biomedical applications). To better understand the mechanism by which Ce(3+) ions achieve stability in CNPLs, we examined (i) extra-long air-stability, (ii) thermal stability up to 500 °C, and (iii) aqueous stability of Ce(3+) ions in water, buffer solution and cell culture medium. It is noteworthy that air-stability of Ce(3+) ions in CNPLs persisted for more than 1 year. Thermal stability results showed that oxidation of Ce(3+) to Ce(4+) occurred at 350 °C in air. Highly concentrated Ce(3+) ions in ultra-thin CNPLs slowly oxidized in water within 1 day, but stability was improved in the cell culture medium. Ce(3+) stability of CNPLs immersed in the medium was associated with phosphorus adsorption on the Ce(3+) sites. This study also illuminates the potential interaction mechanisms of stable Ce(3+) ions in CNPLs. These findings could be utilized to understand catalytic mechanisms of CNPs with abundant oxygen vacancies in their application environments.

  4. Phonon cross-plane transport and thermal boundary resistance: effect of heat source size and thermal boundary resistance on phonon characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    Phonon cross-plane transport across silicon and diamond thin films pair is considered, and thermal boundary resistance across the films pair interface is examined incorporating the cut-off mismatch and diffusive mismatch models. In the cut-off mismatch model, phonon frequency mismatch for each acoustic branch is incorporated across the interface of the silicon and diamond films pair in line with the dispersion relations of both films. The frequency-dependent and transient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is presented, and the equilibrium phonon intensity ratios at the silicon and diamond film edges are predicted across the interface for each phonon acoustic branch. Temperature disturbance across the edges of the films pair is incorporated to assess the phonon transport characteristics due to cut-off and diffusive mismatch models across the interface. The effect of heat source size, which is allocated at high-temperature (301 K) edge of the silicon film, on the phonon transport characteristics at the films pair interface is also investigated. It is found that cut-off mismatch model predicts higher values of the thermal boundary resistance across the films pair interface as compared to that of the diffusive mismatch model. The ratio of equilibrium phonon intensity due to the cut-off mismatch over the diffusive mismatch models remains >1 at the silicon edge, while it becomes <1 at the diamond edge for all acoustic branches.

  5. Reducing the thermal resistance of a pressed contact by employing an interfacial filler

    SciTech Connect

    Babus'haq, R.F.; O'Callaghan, P.W.; Probert, S.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Previous investigations into the use of interstitial inserts as a means of controlling the thermal conductance occurring across metallic contacts are reviewed. The factors influencing the choice of a suitable filler for a particular application are discussed. A mathematical model has been used to predict the behavior of a joint formed between the flat surfaces of two, originally isothermal cylindrical components, one of duralumin and the other of a titanium alloy. The model was validated by comparing the predictions from it with experimental measurements. For this particular contact, aluminum cooking foil proved to be a superior insert to the more expensive, commercially advocated, thermal control materials for reducing contact resistances.

  6. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by Ti-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Galilea, I.; Ordás, N.; García-Rosales, C.; Lindig, S.

    2009-04-01

    Ti-doped isotropic graphite is a promising candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its reduced chemical erosion by hydrogen bombardment and its high thermal shock resistance, mainly due the catalytic effect of TiC on the graphitization leading to an increase of thermal conductivity and to higher mechanical strength. Several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in order to establish a relationship between these parameters and the final properties.

  7. Study of thermal stability and degradation of fire resistant candidate polymers for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, M. T. S.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemistry of bismaleimide resins and phenolphthalein polycarbonate was studied. Both materials are fire-resistant polymers and may be suitable for aircraft interiors. The chemical composition of the polymers has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy and by elemental analysis. Thermal properties of these polymers have been characterized by thermogravimetric analyses. Qualitative evaluation of the volatile products formed in pyrolysis under oxidative and non-oxidative conditions has been made using infrared spectrometry. The residues after pyrolysis were analyzed by elemental analysis. The thermal stability of composite panel and thermoplastic materials for aircraft interiors was studied by thermogravimetric analyses.

  8. Fabrication of suspended thermally insulating membranes using frontside micromachining of the Si substrate: characterization of the etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tserepi, A.; Tsamis, C.; Kokkoris, G.; Gogolides, E.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.

    2003-03-01

    We describe a frontside Si micromachining process for the fabrication of suspended silicon oxide or nitride membranes for thermal sensors. Membrane release is achieved by means of lateral nearly isotropic dry etching of the bulk silicon substrate, the etching being optimized for high rates and high selectivity with respect to the photoresist used to protect the device and the membrane material. Lateral Si etch rates of the order of 6-7 mum min-1 have been achieved in a high-density F-based plasma, which permit a reasonable etching time for the release of the membrane and the simultaneous formation of the cavity underneath ensuring thermal isolation of the final device. The proposed process can enhance the flexibility of device design and reduce the complexity of the fabrication process, since it does not require any additional steps other than the photoresist lithography for the protection of the active elements (e.g. polysilicon heaters and catalytic materials) that are formed on top of the membrane, due to the high selectivity of the process for Si etching with respect to the photoresist. We attempt to explain the observed dependencies of etch rates and selectivities on the plasma parameters and the dimensions of the released membranes by means of a simulator of the mechanisms involved in etching of structures.

  9. The Anticancer Agent Prodigiosin Is Not a Multidrug Resistance Protein Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters. PMID:23373476

  10. The anticancer agent prodigiosin is not a multidrug resistance protein substrate.

    PubMed

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Seyed Abbas

    2013-03-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters.

  11. Engineering of protease-resistant phytase from Penicillium sp.: high thermal stability, low optimal temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianqian; Liu, Honglei; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2010-12-01

    Phytase is widely used as a feed additive in industry. It is important to investigate the thermal stability, optimal pH and temperature and protease resistance of phytases in application. We introduced random mutations in a protease-resistance phytase gene of Penicillium sp. using Mn²+-dITP random mutation method, and identified two mutants 2-28 (T11A, G56E, L65F, Q144H and L151S) and 2-249 (T11A, H37Y, G56E, L65F, Q144H, L151S and N354D) with improved thermal stability and optimal temperature and pH. The mutants retained their high resistance to pepsin. The catalytic activity at 37 °C was up to 133.3 U and 136.6 U per mg protein with broad optimal temperature ranges of 37-55 °C and 37-50 °C, respectively. After a heat treatment at 100 °C for 5 min, the two mutant proteins retained about 72.81% and 92.43% of the initial activity, respectively. In addition, the optimal pH of mutant 2-249 was reduced to 4.8. All these improved properties made them more suitable to be used as feed additive in the feed industry than the present commercial phytases. Structure analysis suggested that the replacements of G56E, L65F, Q144H, and L151S improved the thermal stability of the protein by increasing new hydrogen bonds among the adjacent secondary structures. Moreover, the mutation of L151S enhanced the activity in the range of 37-70 °C and pH 2.5-7.0 by facilitating the interaction between the substrate and the catalytic centre. The substitution of N354D influenced the pH profile by weakening the bondage with the side chain of D353, which caused a pKa shift of the catalytic centre. PMID:20826112

  12. Role of Powder Granulometry and Substrate Topography in Adhesion Strength of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, R.; Cormier, J.; Costil, S.

    2016-06-01

    APS coating is deposited with different treated surfaces to understand the effects of surface topography and particle sizes on adhesion bond strength. Grit blasting and laser surface texturing have been used to create a controlled roughness and controlled surface topography, respectively. Coating adhesion is mainly controlled by a mechanical interlocking mechanism. Fully melted Ni-Al powder fills the respected target surface with high-speed radial flow. Pores around central flattening splat are usually seen due to splash effects. Laser surface texturing has been used to study near interface coating depending on the target shape and in-contact area. Pull-off test results have revealed predominant correlation with powder, surface topography, and adhesion bond strength. Adhesion bond strength is linked to the in-contact area. So, coating adhesion might be optimized with powder granulometry. Pores near the interface would be localized zones for crack initiations and propagations. A mixed-mode failure has been reported for sharp interface (interface and inter-splats cracks) due to crack kicking out phenomena. Coating toughness near the interface is a key issue to maximize adhesion bond strength. Volume particles and topography parameters have been proposed to enhance adhesion bond strength for thermal spray process for small and large in-contact area.

  13. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A

    2013-01-01

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  14. THERMAL MODIFICATION OF RUBBERWOOD TO INCREASE ITS RESISTANCE AGAINST ASIAN SUBTERRANEAN TERMITES.

    PubMed

    Tarasin, M

    2014-01-01

    The potential of thermal modification to improve the resistance of rubberwood to Asian subterranean termites Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) was studied. The rubberwood samples were dried at 185, 200 or 215 °C until constant weight before termite tests. The choice experiment in the field had three months duration. The results indicated that drying at 215 °C gave rubberwood the best resistance to C. gestroi infestation among these samples, with the lowest relative loss of mass, followed in rank order by 200, 185 °C and control treatments. However, the relative loss of mass did not differ significantly between the 200 and the 185 °C treatments. The control samples were distinctly infested by C. gestroi. The thermal treatments affected meachanical properties, and bending strength and density decreased while compressive strength parallel to grain increased with the treatment temperature.

  15. Silicon nitride: A ceramic material with outstanding resistance to thermal shock and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, K. H.; Saure, F.

    1983-01-01

    The known physical, mechanical and chemical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride are summarized. This material deserves interest especially because of its unusually good resistance to thermal shock and corrosion at high temperatures. Two types are distinguished: reaction-sintered (porous) and hot-pressed (dense) Si3N4. Only the reaction-sintered material which is being produced today in large scale as crucibles, pipes, nozzles and tiles is considered.

  16. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza boundary resistance of He-4 near T(gamma)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, T. C. P.; Li, Q.; Lipa, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The preliminary results of high resolution measurements of the thermal conductivity of He-4 in a cell with a nominal 1 mm gap are reported and compared with previous results obtained with a 2 mm gap. The temperature dependence of the conductivity was found to be similar for both cells, indicating that size and boundary effects are well controlled. The detailed behavior of the Kapitza resistance just below T(gamma) is also reported.

  17. Robust superhydrophobic surface on Al substrate with durability, corrosion resistance and ice-phobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoyong; Liu, Shuai; Wei, Sufeng; Liu, Yan; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Practical application of superhydrophobic surfaces is limited by the fragility of nanoscale asperities. Combining chemical etching and anodization, microscale pits and nanoscale pores, instead of the micro and nano protrusions on traditional superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking Lutos leaves, were fabricated on commercially pure aluminum surfaces. After modified by FDTS, the surfaces were superhydrophobic and self-cleaning. The ultrahigh hardness and electrochemical stability of Al2O3 coating endowed the surface excellent mechanical durability and good corrosion resistance. Because the method is scalable, it may find practical application on body panels of automobiles and aircrafts and so on.

  18. Robust superhydrophobic surface on Al substrate with durability, corrosion resistance and ice-phobicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoyong; Liu, Shuai; Wei, Sufeng; Liu, Yan; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Practical application of superhydrophobic surfaces is limited by the fragility of nanoscale asperities. Combining chemical etching and anodization, microscale pits and nanoscale pores, instead of the micro and nano protrusions on traditional superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking Lutos leaves, were fabricated on commercially pure aluminum surfaces. After modified by FDTS, the surfaces were superhydrophobic and self-cleaning. The ultrahigh hardness and electrochemical stability of Al2O3 coating endowed the surface excellent mechanical durability and good corrosion resistance. Because the method is scalable, it may find practical application on body panels of automobiles and aircrafts and so on. PMID:26853810

  19. Robust superhydrophobic surface on Al substrate with durability, corrosion resistance and ice-phobicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoyong; Liu, Shuai; Wei, Sufeng; Liu, Yan; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Practical application of superhydrophobic surfaces is limited by the fragility of nanoscale asperities. Combining chemical etching and anodization, microscale pits and nanoscale pores, instead of the micro and nano protrusions on traditional superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking Lutos leaves, were fabricated on commercially pure aluminum surfaces. After modified by FDTS, the surfaces were superhydrophobic and self-cleaning. The ultrahigh hardness and electrochemical stability of Al2O3 coating endowed the surface excellent mechanical durability and good corrosion resistance. Because the method is scalable, it may find practical application on body panels of automobiles and aircrafts and so on. PMID:26853810

  20. Robust superhydrophobic surface on Al substrate with durability, corrosion resistance and ice-phobicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoyong; Liu, Shuai; Wei, Sufeng; Liu, Yan; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Practical application of superhydrophobic surfaces is limited by the fragility of nanoscale asperities. Combining chemical etching and anodization, microscale pits and nanoscale pores, instead of the micro and nano protrusions on traditional superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking Lutos leaves, were fabricated on commercially pure aluminum surfaces. After modified by FDTS, the surfaces were superhydrophobic and self-cleaning. The ultrahigh hardness and electrochemical stability of Al2O3 coating endowed the surface excellent mechanical durability and good corrosion resistance. Because the method is scalable, it may find practical application on body panels of automobiles and aircrafts and so on.

  1. Crystallinity and thermal resistance of microcrystalline cellulose prepared from manau rattan (Calamusmanan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizkiansyah, Raden Reza; Mardiyati, Steven, Suratman, R.

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare microcrystalline cellulose from Manau rattan (Calamusmanan) and to investigate the influence of concentration of sulfuric acid and hydrolysis time on crystallinity and thermal resistance of the microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). In this research, MCC was extracted through two stages, which is alkalization and acid hydrolysis. Alkalization was prepared by soaking manau rattan powder into sodium hydroxide (NaOH) 17.5wt% at 100°C for 8 hours. Acid hydrolysis was prepared by using sulfuric acid with concentration 0.1 M; 0.3 M; and 0.5 M for 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours. Crystallinity of MCC was measured by XRD, and thermal resistance was characterized by TGA. MCC was successfully extracted from manau rattan. The highest crystallinity of MCC obtained was 72.42% which prepared by acid hydrolysis with concentration 0.5 M for 10 hours. MCC prepared by acid hydrolysis with concentration 0.5 M for 10 hours not only resulted the highest crystallinity but also the best thermal resistance.

  2. Bioindicator production with Bacillus atrophaeus' thermal-resistant spores cultivated by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Guizelini, Belquis P; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Medeiros, Adriane B P; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Bacillus atrophaeus' spores are used in the preparation of bioindicators to monitor the dry heat, ethylene oxide, and plasma sterilization processes and in tests to assess sterilizing products. Earlier production methods involved culture in chemically defined medium to support sporulation with the disadvantage of requiring an extended period of time (14 days) besides high cost of substrates. The effect of cultivation conditions by solid-state fermentation (SSF) was investigated aiming at improving the cost-productivity relation. Initial SSF parameters such as the type of substrate were tested. Process optimization was carried out using factorial experimental designs and response surface methodology in which the influence of different variables--particle size, moisture content, incubation time, pH, inoculum size, calcium sources, and medium composition--was studied. The results have suggested that soybean molasses and sugarcane bagasse are potential substrate and support, respectively, contributing to a 5-day reduction in incubation time. Variables which presented significant effects and optimum values were mean particle size (1.0 mm), moisture content (93%), initial substrate pH (8.0), and water as a solution base. The high-yield spore production was about 3 logs higher than the control and no significant difference in dry heat resistance was observed. PMID:19039586

  3. Thermal (Kapitza) resistance of interfaces in compositional dependent ZnO-In2O3 superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin; Baram, Mor; Clarke, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Compositionally dependent superlattices, In2O3(ZnO)k, form in the ZnO-rich portion of the ZnO-In2O3 phase diagram, decreasing thermal conductivity and altering both the electron conductivity and Seebeck coefficient over a wide range of composition and temperature. With increasing indium concentration, isolated point defects first form in ZnO and then superlattice structures with decreasing interface spacing evolve. By fitting the temperature and indium concentration dependence of the thermal conductivity to the Klemens-Callaway model, incorporating interface scattering and accounting for conductivity anisotropy, the Kapitza resistance due to the superlattice interfaces is found to be 5.0 ± 0.6 × 10-10 m2K/W. This finding suggests that selecting oxides with a compositionally dependent superlattice structure can be a viable approach, unaffected by grain growth, to maintaining low thermal conductivity at high temperatures.

  4. A quasi-physical model for predicting the thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of clothing.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoming; Fan, Jintu

    2009-07-01

    Based on the improved understanding of the effects of wind and walking motion on the thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of clothing induced by air ventilation in the clothing system, a new model has been derived based on fundamental mechanisms of heat and mass transfer, which include conduction, diffusion, radiation and natural convection, wind penetration and air ventilation. The model predicts thermal insulation of clothing under body movement and windy conditions from the thermal insulation of clothing measured when the person is standing in the still air. The effects of clothing characteristics such as fabric air permeability, garment style, garment fitting and construction have been considered in the model through the key prediction parameters. With the new model, an improved prediction accuracy is achieved with a percentage of fit being as high as 0.96.

  5. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  6. High thermal shock resistance of the hot rolled and swaged bulk W-ZrC alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z. M.; Liu, R.; Miao, S.; Yang, X. D.; Zhang, T.; Fang, Q. F.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.; Lian, Y. Y.; Liu, X.; Luo, G. N.

    2016-02-01

    The thermal shock (single shot) resistance and mechanical properties of the W-0.5wt% ZrC (WZC) alloys manufactured by ordinary sintering followed by swaging or rolling process were investigated. No cracks or surface melting were detected on the surface of the rolled WZC alloy plates after thermal shock at a power density of 0.66 GW/m2 for 5 ms, while primary intergranular cracks appear on the surface of the swaged WZC samples after thermal shock at a power density of 0.44 GW/m2 for 5 ms. Three point bending tests indicate that the rolled WZC alloy has a flexural strength of ˜2.4 GPa and a total strain of 1.8% at room temperature, which are 100% and 260% higher than those of the swaged WZC, respectively. The fracture energy density of the rolled WZC alloy is 3.23 × 107 J/m3, about 10 times higher than that of the swaged WZC (2.9 × 106 J/m3). The high thermal shock resistance of the rolled WZC alloys can be ascribed to their extraordinary ductility and plasticity.

  7. Transparent, superhydrophobic, and wear-resistant coatings on glass and polymer substrates using SiO2, ZnO, and ITO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Daniel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-08-01

    It is of significant interest to create surfaces that simultaneously exhibit high water contact angle, low contact angle hysteresis, and high transmission of visible light, as well as mechanical wear resistance for industrial applications. The fabrication of such surfaces has often involved complex or expensive processes, required techniques that were not suitable for a variety of substrates and particles, required surface post-treatment, or lacked wear resistance. A systematic study has been performed in which transparent superhydrophobic surfaces were created on glass, polycarbonate, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates using surface-functionalized SiO(2), ZnO, and indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles. The contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and optical transmittance were measured for samples using all particle-substrate combinations. To examine wear resistance, multiscale wear experiments were performed using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a water jet apparatus.

  8. Excretion of fluorescent substrates of mammalian multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) in the Schistosoma mansoni excretory system.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kusel, J R; Thornhill, J

    2004-01-01

    The protonephridium of platyhelminths including Schistosoma mansoni plays a pivotal role in their survival by excretion of metabolic wastes as well as xenobiotics, and can be revealed in the living adult parasite by certain fluorescent compounds which are concentrated in excretory tubules and collecting ducts. To determine the presence of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) as a possible transporter in protonephridial epithelium, adult schistosomes were exposed to a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3 acetyloxymethyl ester, which is a potential substrate of mammalian MRP. Specific fluorescence related to fluo-3/Ca2+ chelate delineated the whole length of the protonephridial system. Simultaneously, a fluorescent substance was accumulated in the posterior part of collecting ducts and the excretory bladder. Similarly, when other fluorogenic substrates for mammalian MRP such as monoclorobimane, fluorescein diacetate, and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate were applied to adult schistosomes, these fluorescent markers were observed in the excretory tubules through to the excretory bladder. The excretory system of mechanically-transformed schistosomula was not labelled with any of these 4 fluorescent markers. These findings suggest that the protonephridial epithelium of adult schistosomes, but not schistosomula, might express the homologue of the mammalian MRP transporting organic anionic conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulphate as well as unconjugated amphiphilic organic anions.

  9. Measuring the thermal insulation and evaporative resistance of sleeping bags using a supine sweating fabric manikin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. S.; Fan, Jintu

    2009-09-01

    For testing the thermal insulation of sleeping bags, standard test methods and procedures using heated manikins are provided in ASTM F1720-06 and EN 13537:2002. However, with regard to the evaporative resistance of sleeping bags, no instrument or test method has so far been established to give a direct measurement. In this paper, we report on a novel supine sweating fabric manikin system for directly measuring the evaporative resistance of sleeping bags. Eleven sleeping bags were tested using the manikin under the isothermal condition, namely, both the mean skin temperature of the manikin and that of the environment were controlled to be the same at 35 °C, with the wind speed and ambient relative humidity at 0.3 m s-1 and 50%, respectively. The results showed that the novel supine sweating fabric manikin is reproducible and accurate in directly measuring the evaporative resistance of sleeping bags, and the measured evaporative resistance can be combined with thermal insulation to calculate the moisture permeability index of sleeping bags.

  10. Effect of thermal fatigue on the wear resistance of graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhengjun; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chuanwei; Meng, Chao; Cong, Dalong

    2013-04-01

    Thermal fatigue and wear exist simultaneously during the service life of brake discs. Previous researchers only studied thermal fatigue resistance or abrasion resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI), rather than combining them together. In this paper, wear resistance after thermal fatigue of CGI was investigated basing on the principle of bionics, which was close to actual service condition of the brake discs. In the meanwhile, the effect of thermal fatigue on wear resistance was also discussed. Non-smooth bionic units were fabricated by laser cladding WC powder with different proportions (50 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 70 wt.%). Microstructure and microhardness of the units were investigated, and wear mass losses of the samples were also compared. The results indicate that thermal fatigue has a negative effect on the wear resistance. After the same thermal fatigue cycles times, the wear resistance of laser cladding WC samples is superior to that of laser remelting ones and their wear resistance enhances with the increase of WC content.

  11. LL-37-derived peptides eradicate multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from thermally wounded human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  12. Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2012-06-01

    In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

  13. Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2012-06-20

    In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

  14. Direct observation of thermal energy transfer across the thin metal film on silicon substrates by a rear heating-front detection thermoreflectance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoz, S. H.; Yagi, T.; Taketoshi, N.; Ishikawa, K.; Baba, T.

    2011-02-01

    The thermal energy transfer across molybdenum thin films on silicon substrates has been observed by a picosecond light pulse heating method under the rear heating-front detection (RF) configuration. A picosecond laser with 1550 nm wavelength is introduced as a heating laser. Since silicon is transparent and molybdenum is opaque to that wavelength, the surface of the molybdenum film on the silicon substrate side can be heated directly. Another picosecond pulse laser having a wavelength of 780 nm was incident on the front surface to observe the temperature history curve. Thin films were deposited on silicon and synthetic quartz substrates under the same batch process for present observation. The thermal diffusivities of the films are 3.8 × 10-5 m2 s-1, which were calculated from the one-dimensional heat diffusion equation considering the heat effusion from the films to the substrates. Those values were independent of the substrates. This report demonstrated that the light pulse thermoreflectance method under the RF-type configuration could be applied to a wide variety of thin films on silicon substrates that is familiar to electronics industry.

  15. Understanding polyspecificity within the substrate-binding cavity of the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Lorena; Arnaud, Ophélie; Henin, Emilie; Tao, Houchao; Chaptal, Vincent; Doshi, Rupak; Andrieu, Thibault; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Tod, Michel; Di Pietro, Attilio; Zhang, Qinghai; Chang, Geoffrey; Falson, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) controls drugs bioavailability by pumping structurally unrelated drugs out of cells. The X-ray structure of the mouse P-gp ortholog has been solved, with two SSS enantiomers or one RRR enantiomer of the selenohexapeptide inhibitor QZ59, found within the putative drug-binding pocket (Aller SG, Yu J, Ward A, Weng Y, Chittaboina S, Zhuo R, Harrell PM, Trinh YT, Zhang Q, Urbatsch IL et al. (2009). Science 323, 1718-1722). This offered the first opportunity to localize the well-known H and R drug-binding sites with respect to the QZ59 inhibition mechanisms of Hoechst 33342 and daunorubicin transports, characterized here in cellulo. We found that QZ59-SSS competes efficiently with both substrates, with K(I,app) values of 0.15 and 0.3 μM, which are 13 and 2 times lower, respectively, than the corresponding K(m,app) values. In contrast, QZ59-RRR non-competitively inhibited daunorubicin transport with moderate efficacy (K(I,app) = 1.9 μM); it also displayed a mixed-type inhibition of the Hoechst 33342 transport, resulting from a main non-competitive tendency (K(i2,app) = 1.6 μM) and a limited competitive tendency (K(i1,app) = 5 μM). These results suggest a positional overlap of QZ59 and drugs binding sites: full for the SSS enantiomer and partial for the RRR enantiomer. Crystal structure analysis suggests that the H site overlaps both QZ59-SSS locations while the R site overlaps the most embedded location.

  16. Phononic thermal resistance due to a finite periodic array of nano-scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang Nghiêm, T. T.; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The wave property of phonons is employed to explore the thermal transport across a finite periodic array of nano-scatterers such as circular and triangular holes. As thermal phonons are generated in all directions, we study their transmission through a single array for both normal and oblique incidences, using a linear dispersionless time-dependent acoustic frame in a two-dimensional system. Roughness effects can be directly considered within the computations without relying on approximate analytical formulae. Analysis by spatio-temporal Fourier transform allows us to observe the diffraction effects and the conversion of polarization. Frequency-dependent energy transmission coefficients are computed for symmetric and asymmetric objects that are both subject to reciprocity. We demonstrate that the phononic array acts as an efficient thermal barrier by applying the theory of thermal boundary (Kapitza) resistances to arrays of smooth scattering holes in silicon for an exemplifying periodicity of 10 nm in the 5-100 K temperature range. It is observed that the associated thermal conductance has the same temperature dependence as that without phononic filtering.

  17. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10‑4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed.

  18. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10−4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed. PMID:27713527

  19. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  20. Novel negative resists using thermally stable crosslinkers based on phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Toru; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Ota, Toshiyuki; Miura, Takao

    1993-09-01

    This is a preliminary report on a family of crosslinkers based on phenolic compounds for negative-working photoresists which are suitable for KrF excimer laser exposure using poly(hydroxystyrene) (PHS) as a base resin. The crosslinkers are benzylic derivatives having etherificated or esterificated phenolic hydroxyl group. Several effects upon the resist performances of chemically amplified (CA) resist systems comprising onium salt, PHS, and the crosslinkers are mainly discussed: i.e., sort of substituent, sort of mother molecular structure, sort of crosslinkable group, baking conditions, PHS's molecular weight, additives, and so on. The CA resist gives quarter-micron line and space pairs without swelling using a KrF excimer laser exposure. Moreover, in this report another effective method for inhibiting the swelling is proposed. Finally, a unique negative resist, which is not a CA resist, is also presented. It gives negative-tone images by thermal crosslinking reaction following photo- induced dissociation of the protective group of crosslinker.

  1. Homogeneous Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes on Surface-Modified Bulk Titanium Substrates by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hogyu; Kwak, Seoung Yeol; Park, Ju Hyuk; Suk, Myung Jin; Oh, Sung Tag; Kim, Young Do

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic syntheses of CNTs on the pristine Ti mesh, the pristine Ti plate and the etched Ti plate have been conducted using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with Fe catalysts. Surface of the pristine Ti plate was etched in a sulfuric acid (H₂SO₄) solution to facilitate the uniform dispersion of Fe catalysts. The surface of Ti substrates, the distribution and the composition of catalysts, and the structure and dispersion of the CNTs were examined using Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. Fe catalysts were dispersed uniformly on the surface of the etched Ti plate indicating that Surface modification by etching was effective. CNTs on the pristine Ti mesh and the etched Ti plate are more densely populated and have smaller diameters than CNTs on the pristine Ti plate. These results can be attributed to smaller Fe catalysts more homogeneously distributed on the pristine Ti mesh and the etched Ti plate. The calculated I(G)/I(D) ratios of 1.02 and 0.97 for CNTs on the pristine Ti mesh and the etched Ti plate, respectively, indicate a high degree of structural disorders on CNTs. PMID:27398544

  2. Cyclic Thermal Stress-Induced Degradation of Cu Metallization on Si3N4 Substrate at -40°C to 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Fengqun; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The high-temperature reliability of active metal brazed copper (AMC) on Si3N4 ceramic substrates used for fabricating SiC high-temperature power modules was investigated under harsh environments. The AMC substrate underwent isothermal storage at 300°C for up to 3000 h and a thermal cycling test at -40°C to 300°C for up to 3000 cycles. During isothermal storage at 300°C, the AMC substrate exhibited high reliability, characterized by very little deformation of the copper (Cu) layer, low crack growth, and low oxidation rate of the Cu layer. Under thermal cycling conditions at -40°C to 300°C, no detachment of the Cu layer was observed even after the maximum 3000 cycles of the experiment. However, serious deformation of the Cu layer occurred and progressed as the number of thermal cycles increased, thus significantly roughening the surface of the Cu metallized layer. The cyclic thermal stress led to a significant increase in the crack growth and oxidation of the Cu layer. The maximum depth of the copper oxides reached up to 5/6 of the Cu thickness. The deformation of the Cu layer was the main cause of the decrease of the bond strength under thermal cycling conditions. The shear strength of the SiC chips bonded on the AMC substrate with a Au-12 wt.%Ge solder decreased from the original 83 MPa to 14 MPa after 3000 cycles. Therefore, the cyclic thermal stress destroyed the Cu oxides and enhanced the oxidation of the Cu layer.

  3. Calculation of Local Stress and Fatigue Resistance due to Thermal Stratification on Pressurized Surge Line Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Bandriyana, B.; Utaja

    2010-06-22

    Thermal stratification introduces thermal shock effect which results in local stress and fatigue problems that must be considered in the design of nuclear power plant components. Local stress and fatigue calculation were performed on the Pressurize Surge Line piping system of the Pressurize Water Reactor of the Nuclear Power Plant. Analysis was done on the operating temperature between 177 to 343 deg. C and the operating pressure of 16 MPa (160 Bar). The stagnant and transient condition with two kinds of stratification model has been evaluated by the two dimensional finite elements method using the ANSYS program. Evaluation of fatigue resistance is developed based on the maximum local stress using the ASME standard Code formula. Maximum stress of 427 MPa occurred at the upper side of the top half of hot fluid pipe stratification model in the transient case condition. The evaluation of the fatigue resistance is performed on 500 operating cycles in the life time of 40 years and giving the usage value of 0,64 which met to the design requirement for class 1 of nuclear component. The out surge transient were the most significant case in the localized effects due to thermal stratification.

  4. Effect of Nisin and Thermal Treatments on the Heat Resistance of Clostridium sporogenes Spores.

    PubMed

    Ros-Chumillas, Maria; Esteban, Maria-Dolores; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of thermal treatments (isothermal or nonisothermal) combined with nisin, a natural antimicrobial, on the survival and recovery of Clostridium sporogenes spores. The addition of nisin to the heating medium at concentrations up to 0.1 mg liter(-1) did not reduce the heat resistance of C. sporogenes. Without a thermal treatment, nisin added at concentrations up to 0.1 mg liter(-1) did not reduce the viable counts of C. sporogenes when added to the recovery medium, but inactivation of more than 4 log cycles was achieved after only 3 s at 100°C. At 100°C, the time needed to reduce viable counts by more than 3 log cycles was nine times shorter when 0.01 mg liter(-1) nisin was added to the recovery medium than without it. The heat resistance values calculated under isothermal conditions were used to predict the survival in the nonisothermal experiments, and the predicted values accurately fit the experimental data. The combination of nisin with a thermal treatment can help control C. sporogenes.

  5. Calculation of Local Stress and Fatigue Resistance due to Thermal Stratification on Pressurized Surge Line Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandriyana, B.; Utaja

    2010-06-01

    Thermal stratification introduces thermal shock effect which results in local stress and fatique problems that must be considered in the design of nuclear power plant components. Local stress and fatique calculation were performed on the Pressurize Surge Line piping system of the Pressurize Water Reactor of the Nuclear Power Plant. Analysis was done on the operating temperature between 177 to 343° C and the operating pressure of 16 MPa (160 Bar). The stagnant and transient condition with two kinds of stratification model has been evaluated by the two dimensional finite elements method using the ANSYS program. Evaluation of fatigue resistance is developed based on the maximum local stress using the ASME standard Code formula. Maximum stress of 427 MPa occurred at the upper side of the top half of hot fluid pipe stratification model in the transient case condition. The evaluation of the fatigue resistance is performed on 500 operating cycles in the life time of 40 years and giving the usage value of 0,64 which met to the design requirement for class 1 of nuclear component. The out surge transient were the most significant case in the localized effects due to thermal stratification.

  6. Microthruster with integrated platinum thin film resistance temperature detector (RTD), heater, and thermal insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, N.; Legner, W.; Ziemann, T.; Telitschkin, D.; Fecht, H.-J.; Friedberger, A.

    2011-06-01

    We have fabricated microthruster chip pairs - one chip with microthruster structures such as injection capillaries, combustion chamber and nozzle, the other chip with platinum thin film devices such as resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) and a heater. The platinum thin film was sputtered on thermally oxidized silicon wafers WITHOUT adhesion layer. The effects of anneal up to 1050°C on the surface morphology of platinum thin films with varied geometry as well as with / without PECVD-SiO2 coating were investigated in air and N2 and results will also be presented. Electrical characterization of sensors was carried out in a furnace tube in which the sensors' temperature was varied between room temperature and 1000°C with a ramp of +/-5Kmin-1 in air and N2. The experiments showed that the temperature-resistance characteristics of sensors had stabilized after the first heating up to 1000°C in N2. After stabilization the sensors underwent further 8 temperature cycles which correspond to over 28h of operation time between 800 - 1000°C. To reduce the loss of combustion heat, chip material around the microthruster structures was partially removed. The effects of thermal insulation were investigated with microthruster chip pairs which were clamped together mechanically. The heater power was varied up to 20W and the temperature distribution in the chip pairs with / without thermal insulation was monitored with 7 integrated thin film sensors.

  7. Specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, resistivity and thermal expansion of the superconductor Zr B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lortz, R.; Wang, Y.; Abe, S.; Meingast, C.; Paderno, Yu. B.; Filippov, V.; Junod, A.

    2005-07-01

    In an attempt to clarify conflicting published data, we report new measurements of specific heat, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and thermal expansivity up to room temperature for the 6K superconductor ZrB12 , using well-characterized single crystals with a residual resistivity ratio >9 . The specific heat gives the bulk result 2Δ(0)/kBTc=3.7 for the superconducting gap ratio, and excludes multiple gaps and d -wave symmetry for the Cooper pairs. The Sommerfeld constant γn=0.34mJK-2gat-1 and the magnetic susceptibility χ=-2.1×10-5 indicate a low density of states at the Fermi level. The Debye temperature θD is in the range 1000-1200K near zero and room temperature, but decreases by a factor of ˜2 at ˜35K . The specific heat and resistivity curves are inverted to yield approximations of the phonon density of states F(ω) and the spectral electron-phonon scattering function αtr2F(ω) , respectively. Both unveil a 15meV mode, attributed to Zr vibrations in oversized B cages, which gives rise to electron-phonon coupling. The thermal expansivity further shows that this mode is anharmonic, while the vanishingly small discontinuity at Tc establishes that the cell volume is nearly optimal with respect to Tc .

  8. Thermal Conductivity and Electrical Resistivity of FeTe1-xSx Sintered Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikegawa, Takako; Sato, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Keisuke

    The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity and the temperature and magnetic field dependence of electrical resistivity have been measured for FeTe1-xSx polycrystalline samples. The samples were prepared by solid state reaction with a three-step procedure. For FeTe0.8S0.2 and FeTe0.7S0.3, zero resistivity due to the superconducting transition was observed not only in oxygen post-annealed samples but also in as-grown ones. These samples include the certain amount of impurities FeTe2 and Fe3O4. The formation of these ion compounds reduces the excess Fe atoms leading to the appearance of the zero resistivity in as-grown samples. Positive magnetoresistivity and/or negative magnetoresistivity, which were extremely small, were observed for FeTe and S-doped samples. The magnetoresistivity curves show B2 dependence. It was observed that the thermal conductivity κ of FeTe exhibits a hump structure below 72 K which corresponds to the crystal structural and magnetic transitions. The enhancement of κ due to the superconducting transition could not be detected for as-grown FeTe0.8S0.2 and FeTe0.7S0.3 because of the absence of the bulk superconductivity in the as-grown samples and the extremely small ratio of the electronic contribution to κ.

  9. Investigation of thermally evaporated high resistive B-doped amorphous selenium alloy films and metal contact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oner, Cihan; Nguyen, Khai V.; Pak, Rahmi O.; Mannan, Mohammad A.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) alloy materials with arsenic, chlorine, boron, and lithium doping were synthesized for room temperature nuclear radiation detector applications using an optimized alloy composition for enhanced charge transport properties. A multi-step synthetic process has been implemented to first synthesize Se-As and Se-Cl master alloys from zone-refined Se (~ 7N), and then synthesized the final alloys for thermally evaporated large-area thin-film deposition on oxidized aluminum (Al/Al2O3) and indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates. Material purity, morphology, and compositional characteristics of the alloy materials and films were examined using glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive analysis by x-rays (EDAX). Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements were carried out to confirm very high resistivity of the alloy thin-films. We have further investigated the junction properties of the alloy films with a wide variety of metals with different work functions (Au, Ni, W, Pd, Cu, Mo, In, and Sn). The aim was to investigate whether the choice of metal can improve the performance of fabricated detectors by minimizing the dark leakage current. For various metal contacts, we have found significant dependencies of metal work functions on current transients by applying voltages from -800 V to +1000 V.

  10. Corrosion and wear resistance of tungsten carbide-cobalt and tungsten carbide-cobalt-chromium thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Quets, J.; Alford, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings provide wear surfaces to new and overhauled components for various industries. Their wear resistance is obtained by incorporating small tungsten carbide particles into a metal matrix. This presentation will show what parameters influence their corrosion resistance in the ASTM B-117 Salt Spray Corrosion Test,

  11. Synthesis of organic-inorganic hybrid sols with nano silica particles and organoalkoxysilanes for transparent and high-thermal-resistance coating films using sol-gel reaction.

    PubMed

    Na, Moonkyong; Park, Hoyyul; Ahn, Myeongsang; Lee, Hyeonhwa; Chung, Ildoo

    2010-10-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid sols were synthesized from nano silica particles dispersed in water and from organoalkoxysilanes, using the sol-gel reaction. This work focuses on the effects of the three multifunctional organoalkoxysilanes dimethyldimethoxysilane (DMDMS), methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) to form a transparent and high-thermal-resistance coating film. The stability of the hybrid sol was evaluated as a function of the reaction time for 10 d through the variation of the viscosity. The viscosity of the silica/DMDMS and silica/MTMS sol was slightly increased for 10 d. The multifunctional organoalkoxysilanes formed dense silica networks through hydrolysis and condensation reaction, which enhanced the thermal resistance of the coating films. No thermal degradation of the silica/DMDMS sample occurred up to 600 degrees C, and none of the silica/MTMS and silica/TMOS samples occurred either up to 700 degrees C. The organic-inorganic hybrid sols were coated on the glass substrate using a spin-coating procedure. The organic-inorganic hybrid sols formed flat coating films without cracks. The transmittance of the hybrid sol coating films using MTMS and DMDMS was shown to be over 90%. The transmittance of the silica/TMOS sol coating film reacted for 10 d abruptly decreased due to faster gelation. The silica/DMDMS and silica/MTMS hybrid sols formed smooth coating films while the surface roughness of the silica/TMOS coating film markedly increased when the hybrid sol reacted for 10 d. The increase of the surface roughness of the silica/TMOS coating film can be attributed to the degradation of the stability of the hybrid sol and to the loss of transmittance of the coating film. It was confirmed in this study that the use of organic-inorganic hybrid sol can yield transparent and high-thermal-resistance coating films.

  12. The FLT3 and PDGFR inhibitor crenolanib is a substrate of the multidrug resistance protein ABCB1 but does not inhibit transport function at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Trevor J; Natarajan, Karthika; Shukla, Suneet; Doshi, Kshama A; Singh, Zeba N; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Baer, Maria R

    2015-04-01

    Background Crenolanib (crenolanib besylate, 4-piperidinamine, 1-[2-[5-[(3-methyl-3-oxetanyl)methoxy]-1H-benzimidazol-1-yl]-8-quinolinyl]-, monobenzenesulfonate) is a potent and specific type I inhibitor of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) that targets the active kinase conformation and is effective against FLT3 with internal tandem duplication (ITD) with point mutations induced by, and conferring resistance to, type II FLT3 inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Crenolanib is also an inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and beta and is in clinical trials in both gastrointestinal stromal tumors and gliomas. Methods We tested crenolanib interactions with the multidrug resistance-associated ATP-binding cassette proteins ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein) and ABCC1 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1), which are expressed on AML cells and other cancer cells and are important components of the blood-brain barrier. Results We found that crenolanib is a substrate of ABCB1, as evidenced by approximate five-fold resistance of ABCB1-overexpressing cells to crenolanib, reversal of this resistance by the ABCB1-specific inhibitor PSC-833 and stimulation of ABCB1 ATPase activity by crenolanib. In contrast, crenolanib was not a substrate of ABCG2 or ABCC1. Additionally, it did not inhibit substrate transport by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Finally, incubation of the FLT3-ITD AML cell lines MV4-11 and MOLM-14 with crenolanib at a pharmacologically relevant concentration of 500 nM did not induce upregulation of ABCB1 cell surface expression. Conclusions Thus ABCB1 expression confers resistance to crenolanib and likely limits crenolanib penetration of the central nervous system, but crenolanib at therapeutic concentrations should not alter cellular exposure to ABC protein substrate chemotherapy drugs.

  13. Formalising a mechanistic linkage between heterotrophic feeding and thermal bleaching resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, Scott A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, I utilise the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to propose a new biochemical framework that explains how certain (well-adapted) coral species can utilise heterotrophic carbon acquisition to combat the damaging algal photoinhibition response sequence that underpins thermal bleaching, thereby increasing thermal bleaching resistance. This mechanistic linkage helps to clarify a number of previously challenging experimental responses arising from feeding (versus starved) temperature stress experiments, and isotope labelling (tracer) experiments with heterotrophic carbon sources (e.g., zooplankton). In an era of rapidly warming surface ocean temperatures, the conferred fitness benefits arising from such a mechanistic linkage are considerable. Yet, various ecological constraints are outlined which caution against the ultimate benefit of the mechanism for raising bleaching thresholds at the coral community (reef) scale. Future experiments are suggested that can strengthen these proposed arguments.

  14. Cancellation of drift kinetic effects between thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Drift kinetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is computationally investigated using MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K following the non-perturbative approach (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503), for both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas. Toroidal precessional drift resonance effects from trapped energetic ions (EIs) and various kinetic resonances between the mode and the guiding center drift motions of thermal particles are included into the self-consistent toroidal computations. The results show cancellation effects of the drift kinetic damping on the RWM between the thermal particles and EIs contributions, in both RFP and tokamak plasmas, even though each species alone can provide damping and stabilize RWM instability by respective kinetic resonances. The degree of cancellation generally depends on the EIs equilibrium distribution, the particle birth energy, as well as the toroidal flow speed of the plasma.

  15. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  16. Resistance of fly ash-Portland cement blends to thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi

    2015-09-11

    Thermal-shock resistance of high-content fly ash-Portland cement blends was tested in the following ways. Activated and non-activated blends with 80-90 % fly ash F (FAF) were left to set at room temperature, then hydrated for 24 hours at 85°C and 24-more hours at 300°C and tested in five thermal-shock cycles (600°C heat - 25°C water quenching). XRD, and thermal gravimetric analyses, along with calorimetric measurements and SEM-EDX tests demonstrated that the activated blends form more hydrates after 24 hours at 300°C, and achieve a higher short-term compressive strength than do non-activated ones. Sodium meta-silicate and sodaash engendered the concomitant hydration of OPC and FAF, with the formation of mixed crystalline FAF-OPC hydrates and FAF hydrates, such as garranite, analcime, and wairakite, along with the amorphous FAF hydration products. In SS-activated and non-activated blends separate OPC (tobermorite) and FAF (amorphous gel) hydrates with no mixed crystalline products formed. The compressive strength of all tested blends decreased by nearly 50% after 5 thermal-shock test cycles. These changes in the compressive strength were accompanied by a marked decrease in the intensities of XRD patterns of the crystalline hydrates after the thermalshock. As a result, there was no significant difference in the performance of the blends with different activators

  17. Resistance of fly ash-Portland cement blends to thermal shock

    DOE PAGES

    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi

    2015-09-11

    Thermal-shock resistance of high-content fly ash-Portland cement blends was tested in the following ways. Activated and non-activated blends with 80-90 % fly ash F (FAF) were left to set at room temperature, then hydrated for 24 hours at 85°C and 24-more hours at 300°C and tested in five thermal-shock cycles (600°C heat - 25°C water quenching). XRD, and thermal gravimetric analyses, along with calorimetric measurements and SEM-EDX tests demonstrated that the activated blends form more hydrates after 24 hours at 300°C, and achieve a higher short-term compressive strength than do non-activated ones. Sodium meta-silicate and sodaash engendered the concomitant hydrationmore » of OPC and FAF, with the formation of mixed crystalline FAF-OPC hydrates and FAF hydrates, such as garranite, analcime, and wairakite, along with the amorphous FAF hydration products. In SS-activated and non-activated blends separate OPC (tobermorite) and FAF (amorphous gel) hydrates with no mixed crystalline products formed. The compressive strength of all tested blends decreased by nearly 50% after 5 thermal-shock test cycles. These changes in the compressive strength were accompanied by a marked decrease in the intensities of XRD patterns of the crystalline hydrates after the thermalshock. As a result, there was no significant difference in the performance of the blends with different activators« less

  18. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline TiZrN films on AISI 304 stainless steel substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Huang, Jia-Hong; Yu, Ge-Ping

    2010-07-15

    This study investigated the microstructure and properties of nanocrystalline TiZrN films on AISI 304 stainless steel substrate. TiZrN films were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering based on the previous optimum coating conditions (substrate temperature, system pressure, nitrogen flow, etc.) for TiN and ZrN thin films. The composition ratio of TiZrN coatings were adjusted by changing the Zr target power, while keeping the Ti target power constant. Experiments were conduced to find the optimum composition with desired properties. The ratio of TiZrN composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometer. In terms of phase formation, there were two types of coatings that were considered: single-phase solid solutions of TiZrN and interlacing nuclei of TiZr in the matrix of TiZrN. The thickness of all TiZrN films as measured by the secondary ion mass spectroscopy was about 500 nm, and the composition depth profiles indicated that the compositions in the TiZrN films were uniform from the film surface to the 304 stainless steel substrate. The crystal structure of the TiZrN films was determined by x-ray diffraction using a M18XHF-SRA diffractometer with Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation. A diffraction peak of TiZrN (002) was observed between that of TiN (002) and ZrN (002); similarly, a diffraction peak of TiZrN (111) was observed between that of TiN(111) and ZrN(111), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the TiZrN film deposited on the 304 stainless steel has been investigated by electrochemical measurement. The electrolyte, 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing 0.05M KSCN, was used for the potentiodynamic polarization. The potentiodynamic scan was conducted from -800 to 800 mV standard calomel electrode (SCE).

  19. Investigation of thermal sensitivity and radiation resistance of SiOx metal-dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepeliavyi, P. E.; Indutnyi, I. Z.; Dan'ko, V. A.; Neimash, V. B.; Povarchuk, V. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    In this investigation the composite SiOx films were prepared by the thermal evaporation of a mixture of silicon oxide (SiO2) and Тi powders. The optical transmission of the films in the IR spectral range and their temperature-sensitive properties are studied. By varying the contents of the metal in vaporizer and time of evaporation it is possible to obtain SiOx layers with resistance (for monopixel of 0.8 × 1 mm) from tens kOhms to MOhms and a value of the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) is equal to -2.22% K-1. IR spectrum of SiOx film is characterized by a broad absorption band in the range of 8-12 μm which is associated with the Si-O-Si stretching mode.

  20. Thermal stress resistance and aging effects of Panax notoginseng polysaccharides on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shiling; Cheng, Haoran; Xu, Zhou; Shen, Shian; Yuan, Ming; Liu, Jing; Ding, Chunbang

    2015-11-01

    Panax notoginseng attract public attention due to their potential biomedical properties and corresponding health benefits. The present study investigated the anti-aging and thermal stress resistance effects of polysaccharides from P. notoginseng on Caenorhabditis elegans. Results showed polysaccharides had little scavenging ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro, but significantly extended lifespan of C. elegans, especially the main root polysaccharide (MRP) which prolongs the mean lifespan of wild type worms by 21%. Further study demonstrated that the heat stress resistance effect of polysaccharides on C. elegans might be attributed to the elevation of antioxidant enzyme activities (both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)) and the reduction lipid peroxidation of malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Taken together, the results provided a scientific basis for the further exploitation of the mechanism of longer lifespan controlled by P. notoginseng polysaccharides on C. elegans. The P. notoginseng polysaccharides might be considered as a potential source to delay aging.

  1. Resist-free antireflective nanostructured film fabricated by thermal-NIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young Hun; Han, Jae Hyung; Cho, Song Yun; Choi, Choon-Gi

    2014-05-01

    Resist-free antireflective (AR) nanostructured films are directly fabricated on polycarbonate (PC) film using thermal-nanoimprint lithography (T-NIL) and the moth-eye shape of AR nanostructure is elaborately optimized with different oxygen reactive ion etching conditions. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates are directly used as master molds of T-NIL for preparation of AR nanostructures on PC film without an additional T-NIL resist. AR nanostructures are well arranged with a period of about 200 nm and diameter of about 150 nm, which corresponds to those of the AAO template mold. The moth-eye AR nanostructures exhibit the average reflectance of 2% in wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm. From the results, highly enhanced AR properties with simple direct imprinting on PC film demonstrate the potential for panel application in the field of flat display, touch screen, and solar cells.

  2. Low resistive p-type GaN using two-step rapid thermal annealing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, M.; Schwegler, V.; Seyboth, M.; Kirchner, C.; Kamp, M.; Pelzmann, A.; Drechsler, M.

    2001-06-15

    Two-step thermal annealing processes were investigated for electrical activation of magnesium- doped galliumnitride layers. The samples were studied by room-temperature Hall measurements and photoluminescence spectroscopy at 16 K. After an annealing process consisting of a short-term step at 960{degree}C followed by a 600{degree}C dwell step for 5 min a resistivity as low as 0.84 {Omega}cm is achieved for the activated sample, which improves the results achieved by standard annealing (800{degree}C for 10 min) by 25% in resistivity and 100% in free hole concentration. Photoluminescence shows a peak centered at 3.0 eV, which is typical for Mg-doped samples with high free hole concentrations.{copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. The thermal flash technique: the inconsequential effect of contact resistance and the characterization of carbon nanotube clusters.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Nayandeep K; Abramson, Alexis R

    2012-05-01

    This article presents a comprehensive mathematical treatment of the theory behind the thermal flash technique used to measure the thermal diffusivity of nanostructures. Analytical expressions predicting the temperature and its rate of change for various combinations of sample length and diffusivity confirmed that the presence of contact resistance between the heat sink/source or within a cluster of materials does not influence the measurement. Measurements on multi-walled carbon nanotube clusters provide further experimental evidence supporting the claim that contact resistance is inconsequential to this technique and yield a thermal conductivity of 2665 W/m K, which corresponds to an isolated nanotube and not the overall cluster.

  4. Development of fire-resistant, low smoke generating, thermally stable end items for aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Materials were developed to improve aircraft interior materials by modifying existing polymer structures, refining the process parameters, and by the use of mechanical configurations designed to overcome specific deficiencies. The optimization, selection, and fabrication of five fire resistant, low smoke emitting open cell foams are described for five different types of aircraft cabin structures. These include: resilient foams, laminate floor and wall paneling, thermal/acoustical insulation, molded shapes, and coated fabrics. All five have been produced from essentially the same polyimide precursor and have resulted in significant benefits from transfer of technology between the various tasks.

  5. Altered Landscapes and Groundwater Sustainability — Exploring Impacts with Induced Polarization, DC Resistivity, and Thermal Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy-Miller, C.; Caldwell, R.; Wheeler, J.; McCarthy, P.; Binley, A. M.; Constantz, J. E.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenically impacted landscapes constitute rising proportions of the Earth’s surface that are characterized by generally elevated nutrient and sediment loadings concurrent with increased consumptive water withdrawals. In recent years a growing number of hydraulically engineered riparian habitat restoration projects have attempted to ameliorate negative impacts of land use on groundwater-surface water systems resulting, e.g., from agricultural practices and urban development. Often the nature of groundwater-surface water interactions in pre- and minimally altered systems is poorly known, making it difficult to assess the impacts of land use and restoration projects on groundwater sustainability. Traditional assessments of surface water parameters (flow, temperature, dissolved oxygen, biotic composition, etc.) can be complemented by hydraulic and thermal measurements to better understand the important role played by groundwater-surface water interactions. Hydraulic and thermal measurements are usually limited to point samples, however, making non-invasive and spatially extensive geophysical characterizations an attractive additional tool. Groundwater-surface water interactions along the Smith River, a tributary to the Missouri River in Montana, and Fish Creek and Flat Creek, tributaries to the Snake River in Wyoming, are being examined using a combination of hydraulic measurements, thermal tracing, and electrical-property imaging. Ninety-two direct-current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization cross sections were obtained at stream transects covering a wide variety of hydrogeologic settings ranging from shallow bedrock to thick alluvial sequences, nature of groundwater-surface water interactions (always gaining, always losing, or seasonally varying) and anthropogenic impacts (minimal low-intensity agriculture to major landscape engineering, including channel reconstruction). DC resistivity and induced polarization delineated mutually distinct features

  6. Thermal-resistive current filamentation in the cathode plasma of a pinch-reflex diode

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V.K.; Ottinger, P.F.; Guillory, J.

    1983-06-01

    Electron current flow drawn off a hollow cylindrical cathode in a pinch-reflex ion diode is observed to have a filamentary structure. Such filamentation can lead to nonuniform anode turn on and ion emission. Consequently, ion beam brightness is degraded. In this context a purely growing thermal-resistive instability in the cathode plasma is examined. The instability causes current filamentation and grows on a time scale comparable to the electron--ion energy equilibration time. Electron inelastic collisions have a stabilizing influence on the instability.

  7. Thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations decreases under simulated winter conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.S.; Wilkes, K.E.; McElroy, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    Two absolute techniques were used to measure the thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations: the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) and the Unguarded Thin-Heater Apparatus (UTHA). Two types of attic loose-fill insulations (unbonded and bonded/cubed) were tested under simulated winter conditions. To simulate winter conditions for an attic insulation, the specimens were tested with heat flow up, large temperature differences, and an air gap. The specimens were tested either with a constant mean temperature (30 or 21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference or with a constant base temperature (21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference (i.e., a decreasing mean temperature). The UTHA test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.2 m of loose-fill insulation. The LSCS test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.3 m of loose-fill insulation contained in a 4.2 by 5 m attic test module with a gypsum board base. The module had a gabled attic with a 5 in 12 slope roof. The tests yielded the surface-to-surface thermal resistance, R, which includes the thermal resistance due to gypsum, insulation, and any wood joists. Tests with and without an air gap were conducted in the UTHA. Surface-to-surface thermal resistance results from the LSCS and the UTHA show similar trends for these two types of loose-fill insulation when tested under simulated winter conditions. Tests with no air gap gave values of R that agreed with the bag label R-value for the insulations; R increased with lower mean temperatures. These no-gap values of R were 2 to 5% greater than the values of R obtained with an air gap for temperature differences of less than 22{degrees}C. For larger temperature differences R decreased, and at temperature differences of over 40{degrees}C, the R values were 50% less than those at small temperature differences.

  8. Evaluation of thermal and evaporative resistances in cricket helmets using a sweating manikin.

    PubMed

    Pang, Toh Yen; Subic, Aleksandar; Takla, Monir

    2014-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to establish an approach for measuring the dry and evaporative heat dissipation cricket helmets. A range of cricket helmets has been tested using a sweating manikin within a controlled climatic chamber. The thermal manikin experiments were conducted in two stages, namely the (i) dry test and (ii) wet test. The ambient air temperature for the dry tests was controlled to ~ 23 °C, and the mean skin temperatures averaged ~ 35 °C. The thermal insulation value measured for the manikin with helmet ensemble ranged from 1.0 to 1.2 clo. The results showed that among the five cricket helmets, the Masuri helmet offered slightly more thermal insulation while the Elite helmet offered the least. However, under the dry laboratory conditions and with minimal air movement (air velocity = 0.08 ± 0.01 ms(-1)), small differences exist between the thermal resistance values for the tested helmets. The wet tests were conducted in an isothermal condition, with an ambient and skin mean temperatures averaged ~ 35 °C, the evaporative resistance, Ret, varied between 36 and 60 m(2) Pa W(-1). These large variations in evaporative heat dissipation values are due to the presence of a thick layer of comfort lining in certain helmet designs. This finding suggests that the type and design of padding may influence the rate of evaporative heat dissipation from the head and face; hence the type of material and thickness of the padding is critical for the effectiveness of evaporative heat loss and comfort of the wearer. Issues for further investigations in field trials are discussed.

  9. Trade-off between thermal tolerance and insecticide resistance in Plutella xylostella

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin Jie; Wu, Zhao Li; Wang, Kuan Fu; Liu, Qun; Zhuang, Hua Mei; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Fitness costs associated with resistance to insecticides have been well documented, usually at normal temperature conditions, in many insect species. In this study, using chlorpyrifos-resistant homozygote (RR) and chlorpyrifos-susceptible homozygote (SS) of resistance ace1 allele of Plutella xylostella (DBM), we confirmed firstly that high temperature experience in pupal stage influenced phenotype of wing venation in insecticide-resistant and insecticide-susceptible Plutella xylostella, and SS DBM showed significantly higher thermal tolerance and lower damages of wing veins under heat stress than RR DBM. As compared to SS DBM, RR DBM displayed significantly lower AChE sensitivity to chlorpyrifos, higher basal GSTs activity and P450 production at 25°C, but higher inhibitions on the enzyme activities and P450 production as well as reduced resistance to chlorpyrifos under heat stress. Furthermore, RR DBM displayed significantly higher basal expressions of hsp69s, hsp72s, hsp20,hsp90,Apaf-1, and caspase-7 at 25°C, but lower induced expressions of hsps and higher induced expressions of Apaf-1,caspase-9, and caspase-7 under heat stress. These results suggest that fitness costs of chlorpyrifos resistance in DBM may partly attribute to excess consumption of energy caused by over production of detoxification enzymes and hsps when the proteins are less demanded at conducive environments but reduced expressions when they are highly demanded by the insects to combat environmental stresses, or to excess expressions of apoptotic genes under heat stress, which results in higher apoptosis. The evolutionary and ecological implications of these findings at global warming are discussed. PMID:25691976

  10. Applying thermosettable zwitterionic copolymers as general fouling-resistant and thermal-tolerant biomaterial interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ying-Nien; Chang, Yung; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2015-05-20

    We introduced a thermosettable zwitterionic copolymer to design a high temperature tolerance biomaterial as a general antifouling polymer interface. The original synthetic fouling-resistant copolymer, poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-co-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (poly(VP-co-SBMA)), is both thermal-tolerant and fouling-resistant, and the antifouling stability of copolymer coated interfaces can be effectively controlled by regulating the VP/SBMA composition ratio. We studied poly(VP-co-SBMA) copolymer gels and networks with a focus on their general resistance to protein, cell, and bacterial bioadhesion, as influenced by the thermosetting process. Interestingly, we found that the shape of the poly(VP-co-SBMA) copolymer material can be set at a high annealing temperature of 200 °C while maintaining good antifouling properties. However, while the zwitterionic PSBMA polymer gels were bioinert as expected, control of the fouling resistance of the PSBMA polymer networks was lost in the high temperature annealing process. A poly(VP-co-SBMA) copolymer network composed of PSBMA segments at 32 mol % showed reduced fibrinogen adsorption, tissue cell adhesion, and bacterial attachment, but a relatively higher PSBMA content of 61 mol % was required to optimize resistance to platelet adhesion and erythrocyte attachment to confer hemocompatibility to human blood. We suggest that poly(VP-co-SBMA) copolymers capable of retaining stable fouling resistance after high temperature shaping have a potential application as thermosettable materials in a bioinert interface for medical devices, such as the thermosettable coating on a stainless steel blood-compatible metal stent investigated in this study. PMID:25912841

  11. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Joseph R; Kline, La'Kesha C; Kenyon, William J

    2015-10-26

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H₂O₂). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  12. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  13. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  14. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-07-18

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  15. Controlling the Integration of Polyvinylpyrrolidone onto Substrate by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation To Achieve Excellent Protein Resistance and Detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Wang, Lin; Zeng, Xiangze; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Sa; Shi, Xuetao; Wang, Yingjun; Huang, Xuhui; Ren, Li

    2016-07-27

    Blood purification systems, in which the adsorbent removes exogenous and endogenous toxins from the blood, are widely used in clinical practice. To improve the protein resistance of and detoxification by the adsorbent, researchers can modify the adsorbent with functional molecules, such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). However, achieving precise control of the functional molecular density, which is crucial to the activity of the adsorbent, remains a significant challenge. In the present study, we prepared a model system for blood purification adsorbents in which we controlled the integration density of PVP molecules of different molecular weights on an Au substrate by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). We characterized the samples with atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and QCM-D and found that the molecular density and the chain length of the PVP molecules played important roles in determining the properties of the sample. At the optimal condition, the modified sample demonstrated strong resistance to plasma proteins, decreasing the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) by 92.5% and 79.2%, respectively. In addition, the modified sample exhibited excellent detoxification, and the adsorption of bilirubin increased 2.6-fold. Interestingly, subsequent atomistic molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the favorable interactions between PVP and bilirubin were dominated by hydrophobic interactions. An in vitro platelet adhesion assay showed that the adhesion of platelets on the sample decreased and that the platelets were maintained in an inactivated state. The CCK-8 assay indicated that the modified sample exhibited negligible cytotoxicity to L929 cells. These results demonstrated that our method holds great potential for the modification of adsorbents in blood purification systems. PMID:27363467

  16. Chromium-niobium co-doped vanadium dioxide films: Large temperature coefficient of resistance and practically no thermal hysteresis of the metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kenichi; Shibuya, Keisuke; Suzuki, Megumi; Sakai, Kenichi; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Sawa, Akihito

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the effects of chromium (Cr) and niobium (Nb) co-doping on the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the thermal hysteresis of the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) films. We determined the TCR and thermal-hysteresis-width diagram of the V1-x-yCrxNbyO2 films by electrical-transport measurements and we found that the doping conditions x ≳ y and x + y ≥ 0.1 are appropriate for simultaneously realizing a large TCR value and an absence of thermal hysteresis in the films. By using these findings, we developed a V0.90Cr0.06Nb0.04O2 film grown on a TiO2-buffered SiO2/Si substrate that showed practically no thermal hysteresis while retaining a large TCR of 11.9%/K. This study has potential applications in the development of VO2-based uncooled bolometers.

  17. Development of a Laboratory Experiment to Derivate the Thermal Conductivity based on Electrical Resistivity Measurments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, T.; Firmbach, L.; Dietrich, P.

    2014-12-01

    In the course of the energy transition, the number of shallow geothermal systems is constantly growing. These systems allow the exploitation of renewable energy from the subsurface, reduced CO2 emission and additionally, energy storage. An efficient performance of geothermal systems strongly depends upon the availability of exploration data (e.g. thermal conductivity distribution). However, due to high exploration costs, the dimensioning of smaller plants (< 30 kW) is generally based on literature values. While standard in-situ-tests are persistent for larger scale projects, they yield only integral values, e.g. entire length of a borehole heat exchanger. Hence, exploring the distribution of the thermal conductivity as important soil parameter requires the development of new cost-efficient technologies. The general relationship between the electrical (RE) and the thermal resistivity (RT) can be described as log(RE) = CR log(RT) with CRas a multiplier depending on additional soil parameter (e.g. water content, density, porosity, grain size and distribution). Knowing the influencing factor of these additional determining parameters, geoelectrical measurements could provide a cost-efficient exploration strategy of the thermal conductivity for shallow geothermal sites. The aim of this study now is to define the multiplier CRexperimentally to conclude the exact correlation of the thermal and electrical behavior. The set-up consists of an acrylic glass tube with two current electrodes installed at the upper and lower end of the tube. Four electrode chains (each with eight electrodes) measure the potential differences in respect to an induced heat flux initiated by a heat plate. Additional, eight temperature sensors measure the changes of the temperature differences. First, we use this set-up to analyze the influence of soil properties based on differing homogenous sediments with known chemical and petro-physical properties. Further, we analyze the influence of the water

  18. High-Resistivity Semi-insulating AlSb on GaAs Substrates Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, E. I.; Addamane, S.; Shima, D. M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Hecht, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Thin-film structures containing AlSb were grown using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy and characterized for material quality, carrier transport optimization, and room-temperature radiation detection response. Few surface defects were observed, including screw dislocations resulting from shear strain between lattice-mismatched layers. Strain was also indicated by broadening of the AlSb peak in x-ray diffraction measurements. Threading dislocations and interfacial misfit dislocations were seen with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Doping of the AlSb layer was introduced during growth using GaTe and Be to determine the effect on Hall transport properties. Hall mobility and resistivity were largest for undoped AlSb samples, at 3000 cm2/V s and 106 Ω cm, respectively, and increased doping levels progressively degraded these values. To test for radiation response, p-type/intrinsic/ n-type (PIN) diode structures were grown using undoped AlSb on n-GaAs substrates, with p-GaSb cap layers to protect the AlSb from oxidation. Alpha-particle radiation detection was achieved and spectra were produced for 241Am, 252Cf, and 239Pu sources. Reducing the detector surface area increased the pulse height observed, as expected based on voltage-capacitance relationships for diodes.

  19. Multifunctional substrate of Al alloy based on general hierarchical micro/nanostructures: superamphiphobicity and enhanced corrosion resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuewu; Shi, Tian; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Huang, Xingjiu

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum alloys are vulnerable to penetrating and peeling failures in seawater and preparing a barrier coating to isolate the substrate from corrosive medium is an effective anticorrosion method. Inspired by the lotus leaves effect, a wetting alloy surface with enhanced anticorrosion behavior has been prepared via etch, deposition, and low-surface-energy modification. Results indicate that excellent superamphiphobicity has been achieved after the modification of the constructed hierarchical labyrinth-like microstructures and dendritic nanostructures. The as-prepared surface is also found with good chemical stability and mechanical durability. Furthermore, superior anticorrosion behaviors of the resultant samples in seawater are investigated by electrochemical measurements. Due to trapped air in micro/nanostructures, the newly presented solid-air-liquid contacting interface can help to resist the seawater penetration by greatly reducing the interface interaction between corrosive ions and the superamphiphobic surface. Finally, an optimized two-layer perceptron artificial neural network is set up to model and predict the cause-and-effect relationship between preparation conditions and the anticorrosion parameters. This work provides a great potential to extend the applications of aluminum alloys especially in marine engineering fields. PMID:27775053

  20. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  1. Thermal behavior of resistant starches RS 2, RS 3, and RS 4.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, W S; Jackson, D S

    2008-06-01

    The thermal behaviors of 3 resistant starch types-RS 2, RS 3, and RS 4-were investigated. Samples were heated in excess water to specific temperatures, from 35 to 85 degrees C at 5 degrees C intervals, and freeze-dried. The treated samples were analyzed using SEM, DSC, XRD, and HPSEC to determine the structural changes at granular and molecular levels. Light microscopy was used to determine real-time thermal behavior of the starches. Although the resistant starches did not show significant morphological changes, as revealed by microscopy, they underwent internal structural changes at low temperatures before complete phase transitions occurred. The structural changes were less in RS 2 compared to the other 2 starches studied. The nongranular material of RS 3's crystallinity decreased gradually from 35 to 85 degrees C and showed microscopically visible changes at >80 degrees C. Cross-linking might have prevented RS 4 from becoming completely amorphous within the temperature range (35 to 85 degrees C) tested. The study indicated that the extent of structural changes depended on the treatment temperature and RS type.

  2. Cellulose nanobiocomposites with reinforcement of boron nitride: study of thermal, oxygen barrier and chemical resistant properties.

    PubMed

    Swain, Sarat K; Dash, Satyabrata; Behera, Chandini; Kisku, Sudhir K; Behera, Lingaraj

    2013-06-20

    A series of cellulose based nanobiocomposites (cellulose/BN) were prepared with incorporation of various percentage of nano boron nitride (BN). The interaction between cellulose and boron nitride was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of cellulose/BN nanobiocomposites was investigated by XRD, FESEM, and HRTEM. It was observed that the boron nitride nanoparticles were dispersed within cellulose matrix due to intercalation and partial exfoliation. The quantitative identification of nanobiocomposites was investigated by selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Thermal stabilities of the prepared nanobiocomposites were measured by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and it was found that thermal stability of the nanobiocomposites was higher than the virgin cellulose. The oxygen barrier property of cellulose/BN nanobiocomposites was measured using a gas permeameter and a substantial reduction in oxygen permeability due to increase in boron nitride loading was observed. Further it was noticed that the chemical resistance of the nanobiocomposites was more than the virgin cellulose. Hence, the prepared nanobiocomposite may be widely used for insulating and temperature resistant packaging materials. PMID:23648034

  3. Two-Dimensional Thermal Resistance Analysis of a Waste Heat Recovery System with Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gia-Yeh; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-07-01

    In this study, it is shown that two-dimensional (2D) thermal resistance analysis is a rapid and simple method to predict the power generated from a waste heat recovery system with thermoelectric generators (TEGs). Performance prediction is an important part of system design, generally being simulated by numerical methods with high accuracy but long computational duration. Use of the presented analysis saves much time relative to such numerical methods. The simple 2D model of the waste heat recovery system comprises three parts: a recovery chamber, the TEGs, and a cooling system. A fin-structured duct serves as a heat recovery chamber, to which were attached the hot sides of two TEGs; the cold sides were attached to a cooling system. The TEG module and duct had the same width. In the 2D analysis, unknown temperatures are located at the centroid of each cell into which the system is divided. The relations among the unknown temperatures of the cells are based on the principle of energy conservation and the definition of thermal resistance. The temperatures of the waste hot gas at the inlet and of the ambient fluid are known. With these boundary conditions, the unknown temperatures in the system become solvable, and the power generated by the TEGs can be predicted. Meanwhile, a three-dimensional (3D) model of the system was simulated in FloTHERM 9.2. The 3D numerical solution matched the solution of the 2D analysis within 10%.

  4. Thermal nucleation of kink-antikink pairs in the presence of impurities: the case of a Remoissenet-Peyrard substrate potential.

    PubMed

    Woulaché, Rosalie Laure; Yemélé, David; Kofané, Timoléon C

    2005-09-01

    Thermal nucleation of kink-antikink pairs in a nonlinear Klein-Gordon (NKG) model with a Remoissenet-Peyrard (RP) substrate potential in the presence of impurities and coupled to an applied field is analyzed in the limits of moderate temperature and strong damping. Using the Kolmogorov method, the average velocity of particles of the lattice is calculated and its dependence on the intensity of impurities is discussed in connection with the deformability parameter or the shape of the RP substrate potential. Numerical values are carried out by making use of parameters of the hydrogen atom adsorbed in the tungsten and ruthenium substrates. We show that, for large values of the applied field, the presence of impurities in the system makes the nucleation process of kink-antikink pairs more favorable in the high-temperature regime while they contribute to make it less favorable in the low-temperature regime.

  5. Measurement of effective bulk and contact resistance of gas diffusion layer under inhomogeneous compression - Part II: Thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Prabudhya; Vikram, Ajit; Phillips, Ryan K.; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-07-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) is a thin porous layer sandwiched between a bipolar plate (BPP) and a catalyst coated membrane in a fuel cell. Besides providing passage for water and gas transport from and to the catalyst layer, it is responsible for electron and heat transfer from and to the BPP. In this paper, a method has been developed to measure the GDL bulk thermal conductivity and the contact resistance at the GDL/BPP interface under inhomogeneous compression occurring in an actual fuel cell assembly. Toray carbon paper GDL TGP-H-060 was tested under a range of compression pressure of 0.34 to 1.71 MPa. The results showed that the thermal contact resistance decreases non-linearly (from 3.8 × 10-4 to 1.17 × 10-4 Km2 W-1) with increasing pressure due to increase in microscopic contact area between the GDL and BPP; while the effective bulk thermal conductivity increases (from 0.56 to 1.42 Wm-1 K-1) with increasing the compression pressure. The thermal contact resistance was found to be greater (by a factor of 1.6-2.8) than the effective bulk thermal resistance for all compression pressure ranges applied here. This measurement technique can be used to identify optimum GDL based on minimum bulk and contact resistances measured under inhomogeneous compression.

  6. Improvements of Thermal, Mechanical, and Water-Resistance Properties of Polybenzoxazine/Boron Carbide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdani, Noureddine; Derradji, Mehdi; Wang, Jun; Mokhnache, El-Oualid; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-07-01

    Novel kinds of nanocomposites based on bisphenol A-aniline based polybenzoxazine matrix P(BA-a) and 0 wt.%-20 wt.% boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles were produced and their properties were evaluated in terms of the nano-B4C content. The thermal conductivity of the P(BA-a) matrix was improved approximately three times from 0.18 W/m K to 0.86 W/m K at 20 wt.% nano-B4C loading, while its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was deceased by 47% with the same nanofiller content. The microhardness properties were significantly improved by adding the B4C nanoparticles. At 20 wt.% of nano-B4C content, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a marked increase in the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature (T g) of the nanocomposites, reaching 3.9 GPa and 204°C, respectively. Hot water uptake tests showed that the water-resistance of the polybenzoxazine matrix was increased by filling with nano-B4C nano-filler. The morphological analysis reflected that the improvements obtained in the mechanical and thermal properties are related to the uniform dispersion of the nano-B4C particles and their strong adhesion to the P(BA-a) matrix.

  7. Improvements of Thermal, Mechanical, and Water-Resistance Properties of Polybenzoxazine/Boron Carbide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdani, Noureddine; Derradji, Mehdi; Wang, Jun; Mokhnache, El-Oualid; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-09-01

    Novel kinds of nanocomposites based on bisphenol A-aniline based polybenzoxazine matrix P(BA-a) and 0 wt.%-20 wt.% boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles were produced and their properties were evaluated in terms of the nano-B4C content. The thermal conductivity of the P(BA-a) matrix was improved approximately three times from 0.18 W/m K to 0.86 W/m K at 20 wt.% nano-B4C loading, while its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was deceased by 47% with the same nanofiller content. The microhardness properties were significantly improved by adding the B4C nanoparticles. At 20 wt.% of nano-B4C content, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a marked increase in the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature ( T g) of the nanocomposites, reaching 3.9 GPa and 204°C, respectively. Hot water uptake tests showed that the water-resistance of the polybenzoxazine matrix was increased by filling with nano-B4C nano-filler. The morphological analysis reflected that the improvements obtained in the mechanical and thermal properties are related to the uniform dispersion of the nano-B4C particles and their strong adhesion to the P(BA-a) matrix.

  8. Immunological control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in an immunodeficient murine model of thermal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Katakura, T; Yoshida, T; Kobayashi, M; Herndon, D N; Suzuki, F

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a major cause of sepsis in patients who are immunosuppressed by their burns. In this study, an immunological regulation of MRSA infection was attempted in a mouse model of thermal injury. SCIDbg mice were resistant to MRSA infection, while SCIDbgMN mice (SCIDbg mice depleted of neutrophils and macrophages (Mφ)) were susceptible to the same infection. Also, thermally injured SCIDbg mice were shown to be susceptible to MRSA infection. On the other hand, the resistance of SCIDbgMN mice to the infection was completely recovered after an inoculation with Mφ from normal mice. However, anti-MRSA resistance was not shown in SCIDbgMN mice inoculated with Mφ from thermally injured mice. Mφ from MRSA-infected thermally injured mice were identified as alternatively activated Mφ, and Mφ from MRSA-infected unburned mice were characterized as classically activated Mφ. Mφ from thermally injured SCIDbg mice previously treated with 2-carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide (Ge-132) protected SCIDbgMN mice against MRSA infection. Ge-132 has been described as an inhibitor of alternatively activated Mφ generation. These results suggest that MRSA infection in thermally injured patients is controlled immunologically through the induction of anti-MRSA effector cells and elimination of burn-associated alternatively activated Mφ, which are cells that inhibit the generation of classically activated Mφ. PMID:16297152

  9. Thermally-induced transition of lamellae orientation in block-copolymer films on ‘neutral’ nanoparticle-coated substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Yager, Kevin G.; Forrey, Christopher; Singh, Gurpreet; Satija, Sushil K.; Page, Kirt A.; Patton, Derek L.; Jones, Ronald L.; Karin, Alamgir; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-06-01

    Block-copolymer orientation in thin films is controlled by the complex balance between interfacial free energies, including the inter-block segregation strength, the surface tensions of the blocks, and the relative substrate interactions. While block-copolymer lamellae orient horizontally when there is any preferential affinity of one block for the substrate, we recently described how nanoparticle-roughened substrates can be used to modify substrate interactions. We demonstrate how such ‘neutral’ substrates can be combined with control of annealing temperature to generate vertical lamellae orientations throughout a sample, at all thicknesses. We observe an orientational transition from vertical to horizontal lamellae upon heating, as confirmedmore » using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), neutron reflectometry (NR) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (RSANS). Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we identify substrate-localized distortions to the lamellar morphology as the physical basis of the novel behavior. In particular, under strong segregation conditions, bending of horizontal lamellae induce a large energetic cost. At higher temperatures, the energetic cost of conformal deformations of lamellae over the rough substrate is reduced, returning lamellae to the typical horizontal orientation. Thus, we find that both surface interactions and temperature play a crucial role in dictating block-copolymer lamellae orientation. As a result, our combined experimental and simulation findings suggest that controlling substrate roughness should provide a useful and robust platform for controlling block-copolymer orientation in applications of these materials.« less

  10. Thermally-induced transition of lamellae orientation in block-copolymer films on ‘neutral’ nanoparticle-coated substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, Kevin G.; Forrey, Christopher; Singh, Gurpreet; Satija, Sushil K.; Page, Kirt A.; Patton, Derek L.; Jones, Ronald L.; Karin, Alamgir; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-06-01

    Block-copolymer orientation in thin films is controlled by the complex balance between interfacial free energies, including the inter-block segregation strength, the surface tensions of the blocks, and the relative substrate interactions. While block-copolymer lamellae orient horizontally when there is any preferential affinity of one block for the substrate, we recently described how nanoparticle-roughened substrates can be used to modify substrate interactions. We demonstrate how such ‘neutral’ substrates can be combined with control of annealing temperature to generate vertical lamellae orientations throughout a sample, at all thicknesses. We observe an orientational transition from vertical to horizontal lamellae upon heating, as confirmed using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), neutron reflectometry (NR) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (RSANS). Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we identify substrate-localized distortions to the lamellar morphology as the physical basis of the novel behavior. In particular, under strong segregation conditions, bending of horizontal lamellae induce a large energetic cost. At higher temperatures, the energetic cost of conformal deformations of lamellae over the rough substrate is reduced, returning lamellae to the typical horizontal orientation. Thus, we find that both surface interactions and temperature play a crucial role in dictating block-copolymer lamellae orientation. As a result, our combined experimental and simulation findings suggest that controlling substrate roughness should provide a useful and robust platform for controlling block-copolymer orientation in applications of these materials.

  11. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-20

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink α-Al(2)O(3)/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier's law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring α-Al(2)O(3) fillers to be 1.16 × 10(-8) m(2)K W(-1), which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  12. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink α-Al2O3/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier’s law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring α-Al2O3 fillers to be 1.16 × 10-8 m2K W-1, which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  13. Chemical Modification of Cellulose Nanofibers for the Production of Highly Thermal Resistant and Optically Transparent Nanopaper for Paper Devices.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, Hitomi; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira; Koga, Hirotaka; Nogi, Masaya

    2015-10-01

    Optically transparent cellulose nanopaper is one of the best candidate substrates for flexible electronics. Some types of cellulose nanopaper are made of mechanically or chemically modified cellulose nanofibers. Among these, nanopapers produced from chemically modified cellulose nanofibers are the most promising substrate because of their lower power consumption during fabrication and higher optical transparency (lower haze). However, because their thermal durability is as low as plastics, paper devices using chemically modified nanopaper often do not have sufficiently high performance. In this study, by decreasing the carboxylate content in the cellulose nanofibers, the thermal durability of chemically modified nanopaper was drastically improved while maintaining high optical transparency, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and low power consumption during fabrication. As a result, light-emitting diode lights illuminated on the chemically modified nanopaper via highly conductive lines, which were obtained by printing silver nanoparticle inks and high-temperature heating. PMID:26402324

  14. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of gadolinium as functions of pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, P.; Sundqvist, B.

    1989-11-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ and the thermal diffusivity a of gadolinium have been measured as functions of T in the range 45-400 K. The thermal conductivity λ has been calculated from a and experimental data for the specific-heat capacity, cp. λ can be analyzed in terms of simple models for the lattice and electronic components above the Curie temperature TC~=291.4 K. Below TC an additional term, identified as a magnon (spin-wave) thermal conductivity λm, is found. ρ and λ have also been studied as functions of T and P in the range 150-400 K and 0-2.5 GPa. The Lorenz function L=ρλ/T increases by about 20%/GPa under pressure due to a very strong pressure dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity. The pressure coefficients of ρ and λ are -5.1×10-2 and 0.22 GPa-1, respectively, at 300 K (above TC), and 0 and 0.16 GPa-1 at 200 K (below TC). TC and the spin-reorganization temperature Tr~=219 K both decrease under pressure, at the rates -14.0 and -22.0 K/GPa, respectively. Although the magnitude of λm cannot be accurately calculated from the zero-pressure data for λ, the temperature dependence of dλ/dP allows us to distinguish between several models and assign a value of λm~=1.5 W m-1 K-1, or 16.0% of λ, at 200 K.

  15. Thermal resistance of Francisella tularensis in infant formula and fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Trujillo, S; Hao, Y Y D; Whiting, R C

    2008-11-01

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause gastrointestinal or oropharyngeal tularemia from ingestion of contaminated food or water. Despite the potential for accidental or intentional contamination of foods with F. tularensis, little information exists on the thermal stability of this organism in food matrices. In the present study, the thermal resistance of the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis in four food products (liquid infant formula, apple juice, mango juice, and orange juice) was investigated. D-values ranged from 12 s (57.5 degrees C) to 580 s (50 degrees C) in infant formula with a z-value of 4.37 degrees C. D-values in apple juice ranged from 8 s (57.5 degrees C) to 59 s (50 degrees C) with a z-value of 9.17 degrees C. The live vaccine strain did not survive at temperatures above 55 degrees C in mango juice and orange juice (>6-log inactivation). D-values at 55 to 47.5 degrees C were 15 to 59 s in mango juice and 16 to 105 s in orange juice with z-values of 9.28 and 12.30 degrees C, respectively. These results indicate that current pasteurization parameters used for destroying common foodborne bacterial pathogens are adequate for eliminating F. tularensis in the four foods tested. This study is the first to determine thermal inactivation of F. tularensis in specific foods and will permit comparisons with the thermal inactivation data of other more traditional foodborne pathogens.

  16. Thermal resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger in a closed system.

    PubMed Central

    Peeler, J T; Reyes, A L; Crawford, R G; Wehby, A J; Campbell, J E

    1977-01-01

    The heat resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger has been measured from 85 to 125 degrees C using moisture levels of percent relative humidity (%RH) less than or equal to 0.001 to 100 in a closed system. Five curves have been presented to characterize the thermal destruction, using thermal death times defined as F values at a given combination of three moisture and temperature conditions. Reductions of 99.99% (4-log10 cycles) of the initial population were estimated for the three moisture conditions. At 110 degrees C, the expected time for a 4-log10 reduction was 1.1 h at %RH = 100, 3.1 h at %RH less than or equal to 0.1 and 54 h at %RH = 10.7. Goodness-of-fit tests to examine the adequacy of three polynomial models failed to indicate a trend. The linear model (from which estimates of D are obtained) was satisfactory for estimating the thermal death times (%RH less than or equal to 0.1) in the plate count range. The estimates based on observed thermal death times and D values for the %RH = 100 diverged so that D values generally gave a more conservative estimate over the temperature range 90 to 125 degrees C. Estimates of ZF and ZL ranged from 32.1 to 58.3 degrees C for the %RH less than or equal to 0.1 and 100. A ZD value of 30.0 was obtained for data observed at %RH less than or equal to 0.1. The ZF results were obtained from plotting observed log times to achieve a 99.99% reduction in the initial population versus temperature. Estimates of ZL and ZD were obtained by using linear estimates of L100 approximately equal to 4D and D values in a similar plot. PMID:402113

  17. Elevated [CO2] magnifies isoprene emissions under heat and improves thermal resistance in hybrid aspen

    PubMed Central

    Niinemets, Ülo

    2013-01-01

    Isoprene emissions importantly protect plants from heat stress, but the emissions become inhibited by instantaneous increase of [CO2], and it is currently unclear how isoprene-emitting plants cope with future more frequent and severe heat episodes under high [CO2]. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) saplings grown under ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol−1 and elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol−1 were used to test the hypothesis that acclimation to elevated [CO2] reduces the inhibitory effect of high [CO2] on emissions. Elevated-[CO2]-grown plants had greater isoprene emission capacity and a stronger increase of isoprene emissions with increasing temperature. High temperatures abolished the instantaneous [CO2] sensitivity of isoprene emission, possibly due to removing the substrate limitation resulting from curbed cycling of inorganic phosphate. As a result, isoprene emissions were highest in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants under high measurement [CO2]. Overall, elevated growth [CO2] improved heat resistance of photosynthesis, in particular, when assessed under high ambient [CO2] and the improved heat resistance was associated with greater cellular sugar and isoprene concentrations. Thus, contrary to expectations, these results suggest that isoprene emissions might increase in the future. PMID:24153419

  18. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat

  19. Hyper-resistivity and electron thermal conductivity due to destroyed magnetic surfaces in axisymmetric plasma equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R. H.

    2012-06-15

    In order to model the effects of small-scale current-driven magnetic fluctuations in a mean-field theoretical description of a large-scale plasma magnetic field B(x,t), a space and time dependent hyper-resistivity {Lambda}(x,t) can be incorporated into the Ohm's law for the parallel electric field E Dot-Operator B. Using Boozer coordinates, a theoretical method is presented that allows for a determination of the hyper-resistivity {Lambda}({psi}) functional dependence on the toroidal magnetic flux {psi} for arbitrary experimental steady-state Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric plasma equilibria, if values are given for the parallel plasma resistivity {eta}({psi}) and the local distribution of any auxiliary plasma current. Heat transport in regions of plasma magnetic surfaces destroyed by resistive tearing modes can then be modeled by an electron thermal conductivity k{sub e}({psi})=({epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}/e{sup 2}){Lambda}({psi}), where e and m{sub e} are the electron charge and mass, respectively, while {epsilon}{sub 0} is the permittivity of free space. An important result obtained for axisymmetric plasma equilibria is that the {psi}{psi}-component of the metric tensor of Boozer coordinates is given by the relation g{sup {psi}{psi}}({psi}){identical_to}{nabla}{psi} Dot-Operator {nabla}{psi}=[{mu}{sub 0}G({psi})][{mu}{sub 0}I({psi})]/{iota}({psi}), with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space, G({psi}) the poloidal current outside a magnetic surface, I({psi}) the toroidal current inside a magnetic surface, and {iota}({psi}) the rotational transform.

  20. Dymalloy: A composite substrate for high power density electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Colella, N.J.; Makowiecki, D.; Davidson, H.L.

    1995-06-29

    High power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors must operate below the maximum rated device junction temperature to ensure reliability. function temperatures are determined by the amount of heat generated and the thermal resistance from junction to the ambient thermal environment. Two of the Largest contributions to this thermal resistance are the die attach interface and the package base. A decrease in these resistances can allow increased component packing density in MCMs, reduction of heat sink volume in tightly packed systems, enable the use of higher performance circuit components, and improve reliability. The substrate for high power density devices is the primary thermal link between the junctions and the heat sink. Present high power multichip modules and single chip packages use substrate materials such as silicon nitride or copper tungsten that have thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/mK. We have developed Dymalloy, a copper-diamond composite, that has a thermal conductivity of 420 W/mK and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion, nominally 5.5 ppm/C at 25 C, compatible with silicon and gallium arsenide. Because of the matched coefficient of thermal expansion it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. Dymalloy is a composite material made using micron size Type I diamond powder that has a published thermal conductivity of 600 to 1000 W/mK in a metal matrix that has a thermal conductivity of 350 W/mK. The region of chemical bonding between the matrix material and diamond is limited to approximately 1000 A to maintain a high effective thermal conductivity for the composite. The material may be fabricated in near net shapes. Besides having exceptional thermal properties, the mechanical properties of this material also make it an attractive candidate as an electronic component substrate material.

  1. Increasing substrate resistance to improve the turn-on uniformity of a high-voltage multi-finger GG-nLDMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, He; Lingli, Jiang; Hang, Fan; Bo, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    With the impact of the non-uniform turn-on phenomenon, the ESD robustness of high-voltage multi-finger devices is limited. This paper describes the operational mechanism of a GG-nLDMOS device under ESD stress conditions and analyzes the reason that causes the non-uniform turn-on characteristics of a multi-finger GG-nLDMOS device. By means of increasing substrate resistance, an optimized device structure is proposed to improve the turn-on uniformity of a high-voltage multi-finger GG-nLDMOS. This approach has been successfully verified in a 0.35 μm 40 V BCD process. The TLP test results reveal that increasing the substrate resistance can effectively enhance the turn-on uniformity of the 40 V multi-finger GG-nLDMOS device and improve its ESD robustness.

  2. Influence of growth medium on thermal resistance of Pediococcus sp. NRRL B-2354 (formerly Micrococcus freudenreichii) in liquid foods.

    PubMed

    Annous, B A; Kozempel, M F

    1998-05-01

    Pediococcus sp. is a nonpathogenic heat-resistant spoilage organism that has been used as a test organism in milk pasteurization studies. These characteristics make this bacterium an attractive test organism to study the mode of bacterial thermal inactivation in a food pilot plant. We report here the effect of growth medium on the thermal D value of this organism in skim milk, whole liquid egg, 10% glucose solution, pineapple juice, apple juice, tomato juice, and water at 60 degrees C. Thermal inactivation was done in a submerged coil; D values were calculated from the linear portion of the survival curves by linear regression analysis. The range of D values of stationary-phase cells grown at 28 degrees C in tryptone glucose yeast extract (TGY) or tryptic soy broth (TSB) was 0.14 to 12.05 min in all heating menstrua tested. The TSB-grown cells exhibited the highest thermal resistance with skim milk and 10% glucose solution as the heating menstrua. Survival curves of the TGY-grown cells indicated the presence of a cell population heterogeneous in thermal resistance. The TSB-grown cells exhibited a cell population uniform in thermal resistance and with a lag time for thermal inactivation. When compared to TGY-grown cells, Pediococcus sp. grown in TSB showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in D values by up to eightfold in all heating menstrua. Results from this study suggested that thermal inactivation of Pediococcus sp. was dependent on the growth medium and on the heating menstruum with respect to both pH and composition.

  3. Simulation of thermal reset transitions in resistive switching memories including quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Villena, M. A.; Jiménez-Molinos, F.; Roldán, J. B.; Suñé, J.; Miranda, E.; Romera, E.

    2014-06-07

    An in-depth study of reset processes in RRAMs (Resistive Random Access Memories) based on Ni/HfO{sub 2}/Si-n{sup +} structures has been performed. To do so, we have developed a physically based simulator where both ohmic and tunneling based conduction regimes are considered along with the thermal description of the devices. The devices under study have been successfully fabricated and measured. The experimental data are correctly reproduced with the simulator for devices with a single conductive filament as well as for devices including several conductive filaments. The contribution of each conduction regime has been explained as well as the operation regimes where these ohmic and tunneling conduction processes dominate.

  4. Diffusion in liquid metal systems. [information on electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Physical properties of twenty liquid metals are reported; some of the data on such liquid metal properties as density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity are summarized in graphical form. Data on laboratory handling and safety procedure are summarized for each metal; heat-transfer-correlations for liquid metals under various conditions of laminar and turbulent flow are included. Where sufficient data were available, temperature equations of properties were obtained by the method of least-squares fit. All values of properties given are valid in the given liquid phase ranges only. Additional tabular data on some 40 metals are reported in the appendix. Included is a brief description of experiments that were performed to investigate diffusion in liquid indium-gallium systems.

  5. Thermal Barrier Coatings Chemically and Mechanically Resistant to High Temperature Attack by Molten Ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Andrew

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used on component in the hottest sections of gas turbine engines, used for power generation and aviation. These coatings insulate the underlying metal components and allow for much higher engine operating temperatures, improving the engine efficiency. These increase temperatures engender a new set of materials problems for TBCs. Operating temperatures in engines are now high enough for silicate impurities, either present in the fuel or ingested into the engines, to melt and adhere to the surface of the TBCs. The effects of four such impurities, two coal fly ashes, a petroleum coke-fly ash blend, and volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajokull volcano were tested with conventional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, and found to penetrate through the entire thickness of the coating. This penetration reduces the strain tolerance of the coatings, and can result in premature failure. Testing on a newly built thermal gradient burner rig with simultaneous injection of ash impurities has shown a reduction of life up to 99.6% in these coatings when ash is present. Coatings of an alternative ceramic, gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr 2O7), were found to form a dense reaction layer with each of these impurities, preventing further penetration of the molten ash. This dense layer also reduces the strain tolerance, but these coatings were found to have a significantly higher life than the YSZ coatings. Testing with a small amount of ash baked onto the samples showed thirteen times the life of YSZ coatings. When the ash is continuously sprayed onto the hot sample, the life of the Gd2Zr2O7 coatings was nearly twice that of the YSZ. Finally, a delamination model was employed to explain the degradation of both types of coatings. This elastic model that takes into account the degree of penetration, differential cooling in thermal gradient testing, and thermal expansion mismatch with the underlying substrate, predicted the failure of

  6. Development of silane-hydrolysate binder for UV-resistant thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed characterizaton and formulation studies were performed on a methyltriakoxysilane hydrolysate as a binder for thermal control coatings. The binder was optimized by varying hydrolysis temperature, time, catalyst type, and water concentration. The candidate coating formulations, based on this binder with TiO2 pigment, were optimized via a detailed series of sprayed test panels that included the parameters of binder/pigment ratio, ethanol content, pigment particle size, coating thickness and cure conditions. A typical optimized coating was prepared by acetic acid catalyzed hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane with 3.25 mol-equivalents of water over a 24 hour period at room temperature. The resulting hydrolysate was directly mixed with pre-milled TiO2 (12 grams pigment/26 grams binder) to yield a sprayable consistency. Panels were sprayed to result in a nominal cure coating thickness of 2 mils. Cure was affected by air drying for 24 hr at room temperature plus 72 hr at 150 F. These coatings are typically extremely tough and abrasion-resistant, with an absorptance (alpha) of 0.20 and emittance (e) of 0.89. No significant coating damage was observed in the mandrel bend test, even after exposure to thermal cycling from -160 to 160 F. Vacuum exposure of the coatings for 930 hours at 1 equivalent UV sun resulted in no visible degradation and no significant increase in absorptance.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic development a small, simplified, proliferation-resistant reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Hill, D. J.; Sienicki, J. J.; Spencer, B. W.; Wade, D. C.

    1999-07-02

    This paper addresses thermal-hydraulics related criteria and preliminary concepts for a small (300 MWt), proliferation-resistant, liquid-metal-cooled reactor system. A main objective is to assess what extent of simplification is achievable in the concepts with the primary purpose of regaining economic competitiveness. The approach investigated features lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and a low power density core for ultra-long core lifetime (goal 15 years) with cartridge core replacement at end of life. This potentially introduces extensive simplifications resulting in capital cost and operating cost savings including: (1) compact, modular, pool-type configuration for factory fabrication, (2) 100+% natural circulation heat transport with the possibility of eliminating the main coolant pumps, (3) steam generator modules immersed directly in the primary coolant pool for elimination of the intermediate heat transport system, and (4) elimination of on-site fuel handling and storage provisions including rotating plug. Stage 1 natural circulation model and results are presented. Results suggest that 100+% natural circulation heat transport is readily achievable using LBE coolant and the long-life cartridge core approach; moreover, it is achievable in a compact pool configuration considerably smaller than PRISM A (for overland transportability) and with peak cladding temperature within the existing database range for ferritic steel with oxide layer surface passivation. Stage 2 analysis follows iteration with core designers. Other thermal hydraulic investigations are underway addressing passive, auxiliary heat removal by air cooling of the reactor vessel and the effects of steam generator tube rupture.

  8. Examinations of Chemical Resistance and Thermal Behaviour of Ceramic Filter Materials for Hot-Gas Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Angermann, J.; Meyer, B.; Horlbeck, W.

    2002-09-19

    Increasing prosperity and the steady growth of the world population lead to a strongly rising energy requirement. Therefore the saving of the available resources as well as the limitation of CO{sub 2}-emission are the main reasons for developing highly efficient power stations. The use of combined cycle technology for advanced coal fired power plants allow a significantly higher conversion efficiency than it is possible in an only steam power plant. In order to increase the gas turbine inlet temperature, the filtration of fine particles is necessary. Therefore the filtration unit is one of the key components of the circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology (PFBC). To use this technology more effectively, gas cleaning at high temperatures or in an reducing atmosphere is necessary. A possibility of the effective gas cleaning at high temperatures is the use of porous ceramic candle filters. The structure of such filter elements usually consists of a highly porous sup port which ensures the mechanical strength and a layer which operates as the functional part for the particle removal. To ensure a guaranteed lifetime of about 16000 h the effect of combustion or gasification atmosphere and temperature on the thermal and mechanical properties of the filter material has to be studied. The examinations and results, described in this article, are part of some previous work. This paper focuses especially on the chemical resistance and the thermal behaviour of the used ceramic filter materials.

  9. Thermal-fatigue and oxidation resistance of cobalt-modified Udimet 700 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Barrow, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Comparative thermal-fatigue and oxidation resistances of cobalt-modified wrought Udimet 700 alloy (obtained by reducing the cobalt level by direct substitution of nickel) were determined from fluidized-bed tests. Bed temperatures were 1010 and 288 C (1850 and 550 C) for the first 5500 symmetrical 6-min cycles. From cycle 5501 to the 14000-cycle limit of testing, the heating bed temperature was increased to 1050 C (1922 F). Cobalt levels between 0 and 17 wt% were studied in both the bare and NiCrAlY overlay coated conditions. A cobalt level of about 8 wt% gave the best thermal-fatigue life. The conventional alloy specification is for 18.5% cobalt, and hence, a factor of 2 in savings of cobalt could be achieved by using the modified alloy. After 13500 cycles, all bare cobalt-modified alloys lost 10 to 13 percent of their initial weight. Application of the NiCrAlY overlay coating resulted in weight losses of 1/20 to 1/100 of that of the corresponding bare alloy.

  10. Center wavelength shift dependence on substrate coefficient of thermal expansion for optical thin-film interference filters deposited by ion-beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey T

    2004-08-10

    Single-layer films of Ta2O5 and multilayer thin-film filters of Ta2O5 and SiO2 were deposited by ion-beam-sputter deposition. Postdeposition annealing of the structures resulted in increased optical thickness of the films, resulting in an upward shift in the wavelength of the transmission-reflection spectra. Modeling of the single-layer films by means of the effective media approximation indicates an increase in the void fraction of the film after annealing. This increase is consistent with an observed decrease in refractive index and an increase in physical film thickness. The multilayer structures, deposited on substrates of varying coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), were annealed at various temperatures, and the change in the center wavelength was measured. The measured change is dependent on the annealing temperature and the substrate CTE, indicating that the increase in the void fraction is caused in part by thermally induced stress during the annealing process. A simple model is proposed that relates the void fraction present in the films after annealing with the substrate CTE and the annealing temperature.

  11. Evidence of a Substrate-Discriminating Entrance Channel in the Lower Porter Domain of the Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump AcrB.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Sabine; Vavra, Martina; Kern, Winfried V

    2016-07-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) transporter family, such as AcrB of Escherichia coli, play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance, but the molecular basis for their substrate promiscuity is not yet completely understood. From a collection of highly clarithromycin-resistant AcrB periplasmic domain mutants derived from in vitro random mutagenesis, we identified variants with an unusually altered drug resistance pattern characterized by increased susceptibility to many drugs of lower molecular weight, including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, and oxazolidinones, but unchanged or increased resistance to drugs of higher molecular weight, including macrolides. Sequencing of 14 such "divergent resistance" phenotype mutants and 15 control mutants showed that this unusual phenotype was associated with mutations at residues I38 and I671 predominantly to phenylalanine and threonine, respectively, both conferring a similar susceptibility pattern. Reconstructed I38F and I671T single mutants as well as an engineered I38F I671T double mutant with proved efflux competence revealed an equivalent phenotype with enhanced or unchanged resistance to many large AcrB substrates but increased susceptibility to several lower-molecular-weight drugs known to bind within the distal binding pocket. The two isoleucines located in close vicinity to each other in the lower porter domain of AcrB beneath the bottom of the proximal binding pocket may be part of a preferential small-drug entrance pathway that is compromised by the mutations. This finding supports recent indications of distinct entrance channels used by compounds with different physicochemical properties, of which molecular size appears to play a prominent role. PMID:27161641

  12. Modeling of the effects of different substrate materials on the residual thermal stresses in the aluminum nitride crystal grown by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2009-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical finite element modeling method is applied to compare interfacial residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystals grown by using different substrates such as silicon carbide, boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum carbide, and niobium carbide. A dimensionless coordinate system is used which reduces the numbers of computations and hence simplifies the stress analysis. All components of the stress distribution, both in the film and in the substrate, including the normal stress along the growth direction as well as in-plane normal stresses and shear stresses are fully investigated. This information about the stress distribution provides insight into understanding and controlling the AlN single crystal growth by the sublimation technique. The normal stress in the film at the interface along the growth direction and the shear stresses are zero except at the edges, whereas in-plane stresses are nonzero. The in-plane stresses are compressive when TaC and NbC substrates are used. A small compressive stress might be beneficial in prohibiting crack growth in the film. The compressive stress in the AlN is lower for the TaC substrate than that for the NbC. Tensile in-plane stresses are formed in the AlN for 6H-SiC, BN, and W substrates. This tensile stress in the film is detrimental as it will assist in the crack growth. The stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film at the interface is compressive in nature when TaC and NbC are used as a substrate. This causes the film to bend downward (i.e., convex shape) and assist it to adhere to the substrate. The AlN film curves upward or in a concave shape when SiC, BN, and W substrates are used since the stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film is tensile at the interface and this may cause detachment of the film from the substrate.

  13. Thermal annealing and zinc doping effects on the lattice constant of organometallic vapor phase grown GaAs epilayers on heavily In-doped substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Tetsuji; Fuke, Shunro; Mori, Katsumi; Kuwahara, Kazuhiro

    1989-02-01

    Undoped and Zn-doped (˜3×1020/cm3) GaAs epilayers are grown on In-doped (order of 1020/cm3) GaAs substrates by the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy method. By thermal annealing of the undoped epilayer, changes in the perpendicular lattice constant a⊥, together with the apparent changes in surface morphology such as the appearance of a cross-hatched structure or a narrowing of the cross-hatched line spacing, are observed. It is also found that Zn doping is very effective to obtain thick, coherently grown epilayers on In-doped GaAs substrates. No appreciable changes in a⊥ and no generation of misfit dislocations are found because of the hardening of the crystalline lattice, similar to the case of In doping to GaAs bulk crystals.

  14. Performance improvement of GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal photodiodes grown on Si(111) substrate by thermal cycle annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyun-Hao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2014-01-01

    A simple thermal cycle annealing (TCA) process was used to improve the quality of GaN grown on a Si substrate. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and etch pit density (EPD) results revealed that using more process cycles, the defect density cannot be further reduced. However, the performance of GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes (PDs) prepared on Si substrates showed significant improvement. With a two-cycle TCA process, it is found that the dark current of the device was only 1.46 × 10-11 A, and the photo-to-dark-current contrast ratio was about 1.33 × 105 at 5 V. Also, the UV/visible rejection ratios can reach as high as 1077.

  15. Substrate-mediated strain effect on the role of thermal heating and electric field on metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide nanobeams

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Woo; Jung, Wan-Gil; Hyun-Cho; Bae, Tae-Sung; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jang, Ja-Soon; Hong, Woong-Ki; Kim, Bong-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystalline vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructures have recently attracted great attention because of their single domain metal-insulator transition (MIT) nature that differs from a bulk sample. The VO2 nanostructures can also provide new opportunities to explore, understand, and ultimately engineer MIT properties for applications of novel functional devices. Importantly, the MIT properties of the VO2 nanostructures are significantly affected by stoichiometry, doping, size effect, defects, and in particular, strain. Here, we report the effect of substrate-mediated strain on the correlative role of thermal heating and electric field on the MIT in the VO2 nanobeams by altering the strength of the substrate attachment. Our study may provide helpful information on controlling the properties of VO2 nanobeam for the device applications by changing temperature and voltage with a properly engineered strain. PMID:26040637

  16. Correlation of the nanostructure with optoelectronic properties during rapid thermal annealing of Ga(NAsP) quantum wells grown on Si(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegele, Tatjana; Beyer, Andreas; Gies, Sebastian; Zimprich, Martin; Heimbrodt, Wolfram; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Ga(NAsP) quantum wells grown pseudomorphically on Si substrate are promising candidates for optically active light sources in future optoelectronically integrated circuits on Si substrates. As the material is typically grown at low temperatures, it has to be thermally annealed after growth to remove defects and optimize optoelectronic properties. Here we show by quantitative transmission electron microscopy that two different kinds of structural development are associated with the annealing. First of all, the quantum well homogeneity improves with increasing annealing temperature. For annealing temperatures above 925 °C the composition becomes less homogeneous again. Second, voids form in the quantum well for annealing temperatures above 850 °C. Their density and size increase continuously with increasing annealing temperature. These results are correlated to the optical properties of the samples, where we find from temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements two scales of disorder, which show the same temperature dependence as the structural properties.

  17. Comparison of ozone and thermal hydrolysis combined with anaerobic digestion for municipal and pharmaceutical waste sludge with tetracycline resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jin; Yao, Hong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Jia; Yu, Xiaohua

    2016-08-01

    Biosolids from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) are environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which attract great concerns on their efficient treatments. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is widely used for sewage sludge treatment but its effectiveness is limited due to the slow hydrolysis. Ozone and thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment were employed to improve AD efficiency and reduce antibiotic-resistant genes in municipal and pharmaceutical waste sludge (MWS and PWS, respectively) in this study. Sludge solubilization achieved 15.75-25.09% and 14.85-33.92% after ozone and thermal hydrolysis, respectively. Both pre-treatments improved cumulative methane production and the enhancements were greater on PWS than MWS. Five tetracycline-resistant genes (tet(A), tet(G), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(X)) and one mobile element (intI1) were qPCR to assess pre-treatments. AD of pre-treated sludge reduced more tet genes than raw sludge for both ozonation and thermal hydrolysis in PWS and MWS. Thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment was more efficient than ozone for reduction after AD. Results of this study help support management options for reducing the spread of antibiotic resistance from biosolids. PMID:27151286

  18. Effects of Chicken Litter Storage Time and Ammonia Content on Thermal Resistance of Desiccation-Adapted Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Hongye; Ionita, Claudia; Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Broiler chicken litter was kept as a stacked heap on a poultry farm, and samples were collected up to 9 months of storage. Chicken litter inoculated with desiccation-adapted Salmonella cells was heat-treated at 75, 80, 85, and 150°C. Salmonella populations decreased in all these samples during heat treatment, and the inactivation rates became lower in chicken litter when storage time was extended from 0 to 6 months. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in thermal resistance of Salmonella in 6- and 9-month litter samples, indicating that a threshold for thermal resistance was reached after 6 months. Overall, the thermal resistance of Salmonella in chicken litter was affected by the storage time of the litter. The changes in some chemical, physical, and microbiological properties during storage could possibly contribute to this difference. Moisture and ammonia could be two of the most significant factors influencing the thermal resistance of Salmonella cells in chicken litter. Our results emphasize the importance of adjusting time and temperature conditions for heat processing chicken litter when it is removed from the chicken house at different time intervals. PMID:26209673

  19. Effects of Chicken Litter Storage Time and Ammonia Content on Thermal Resistance of Desiccation-Adapted Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Hongye; Ionita, Claudia; Luo, Feng; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-10-01

    Broiler chicken litter was kept as a stacked heap on a poultry farm, and samples were collected up to 9 months of storage. Chicken litter inoculated with desiccation-adapted Salmonella cells was heat-treated at 75, 80, 85, and 150°C. Salmonella populations decreased in all these samples during heat treatment, and the inactivation rates became lower in chicken litter when storage time was extended from 0 to 6 months. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in thermal resistance of Salmonella in 6- and 9-month litter samples, indicating that a threshold for thermal resistance was reached after 6 months. Overall, the thermal resistance of Salmonella in chicken litter was affected by the storage time of the litter. The changes in some chemical, physical, and microbiological properties during storage could possibly contribute to this difference. Moisture and ammonia could be two of the most significant factors influencing the thermal resistance of Salmonella cells in chicken litter. Our results emphasize the importance of adjusting time and temperature conditions for heat processing chicken litter when it is removed from the chicken house at different time intervals.

  20. Spectral features and thermal resistance of 976-nm cw laser diodes with a power up to 15 W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Pevtsov, V. F.; Popov, Yu M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2016-08-01

    The spectral characteristics of cw laser diodes with a maximum reliable power of 15 W mounted on F-mount heat sinks are studied. It is found that the spectrum envelopes have features at emission powers exceeding 5 - 7 W. A method for determining the maximum of a spectrum envelope under the conditions of its broadening and appearance of features is discussed. The thermal resistance of diodes is determined experimentally at pump currents from threshold to maximum (14 A) and is found to be 2.25 K W-1 at a current of 10 A and 1.5 K W-1 at a current of 4 A. The results obtained are compared with the literature data. The adequacy of using the thermal resistance parameter for comparing and estimating thermal characteristics of laser diodes is considered.

  1. Fabrication and thermal shock resistance of HfB2-SiC composite with B4C additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, L.; Han, W.; Hong, Ch.

    2011-12-01

    A HfB2 based ceramic matrix composite containing 20 vol.% SiC particles with 2 vol.% B4C as sintering additives was fabricated by hot-pressed sintering. The microstructure and properties, especially the thermal shock resistance of the composite were investigated. Results showed that the addition of B4C improved the powder sinterability and led to obtaining nearly full dense composite. The flexural strength and fracture toughness of the composite were 771 MPa and 7.06 MPam1/2, respectively. The thermal shock resistance tests indicated that the residual strength decreased significantly when the thermal shock temperature difference was higher than 600 °C. The large number of microcracks on the sample surface was the main reason for the catastrophic failure.

  2. Quantum Dots: Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on GaAs (511)A Substrates: The Competition between Thermal Dynamics and Kinetics (Small 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    On page 4277, G. Li and co-workers aim to promote III-V compound semiconductors and devices for a broad range of applications with various technologies. The growth process of InAs quantum dots on GaAs (511)A substrates is systematically studied. By carefully controlling the competition between growth thermal-dynamics and kinetics, InAs quantum dots with high size uniformity are prepared, which are highly desirable for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells. PMID:27510365

  3. Flexible crossbar-structured resistive memory arrays on plastic substrates via inorganic-based laser lift-off.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjun; Son, Jung Hwan; Lee, Seung Hyun; You, Byoung Kuk; Park, Kwi-Il; Lee, Hwan Keon; Byun, Myunghwan; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-11-26

    Crossbar-structured memory comprising 32 × 32 arrays with one selector-one resistor (1S-1R) components are initially fabricated on a rigid substrate. They are transferred without mechanical damage via an inorganic-based laser lift-off (ILLO) process as a result of laser-material interaction. Addressing tests of the transferred memory arrays are successfully performed to verify mitigation of cross-talk on a plastic substrate. PMID:25200396

  4. Electrostatic Assembly Preparation of High-Toughness Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites with Enhanced Thermal Shock Resistance Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxi; Zhang, Xinghong; Hong, Changqing; Qiu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Jia; Han, Jiecai; Hu, PingAn

    2016-05-11

    The central problem of using ceramic as a structural material is its brittleness, which associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds. Whiskers or fibers of strong ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon nitride (Si3N4) are widely embedded in a ceramic matrix to improve the strength and toughness. The incorporation of these insulating fillers can impede the thermal flow in ceramic matrix, thus decrease its thermal shock resistance that is required in some practical applications. Here we demonstrate that the toughness and thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride (ZrB2)/SiC composites can be improved simultaneously by introducing graphene into composites via electrostatic assembly and subsequent sintering treatment. The incorporated graphene creates weak interfaces of grain boundaries (GBs) and optimal thermal conductance paths inside composites. In comparison to pristine ZrB2-SiC composites, the toughness of (2.0%) ZrB2-SiC/graphene composites exhibited a 61% increasing (from 4.3 to 6.93 MPa·m(1/2)) after spark plasma sintering (SPS); the retained strength after thermal shock increased as high as 74.8% at 400 °C and 304.4% at 500 °C. Present work presents an important guideline for producing high-toughness ceramic-based composites with enhanced thermal shock properties.

  5. Electrostatic Assembly Preparation of High-Toughness Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites with Enhanced Thermal Shock Resistance Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxi; Zhang, Xinghong; Hong, Changqing; Qiu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Jia; Han, Jiecai; Hu, PingAn

    2016-05-11

    The central problem of using ceramic as a structural material is its brittleness, which associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds. Whiskers or fibers of strong ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon nitride (Si3N4) are widely embedded in a ceramic matrix to improve the strength and toughness. The incorporation of these insulating fillers can impede the thermal flow in ceramic matrix, thus decrease its thermal shock resistance that is required in some practical applications. Here we demonstrate that the toughness and thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride (ZrB2)/SiC composites can be improved simultaneously by introducing graphene into composites via electrostatic assembly and subsequent sintering treatment. The incorporated graphene creates weak interfaces of grain boundaries (GBs) and optimal thermal conductance paths inside composites. In comparison to pristine ZrB2-SiC composites, the toughness of (2.0%) ZrB2-SiC/graphene composites exhibited a 61% increasing (from 4.3 to 6.93 MPa·m(1/2)) after spark plasma sintering (SPS); the retained strength after thermal shock increased as high as 74.8% at 400 °C and 304.4% at 500 °C. Present work presents an important guideline for producing high-toughness ceramic-based composites with enhanced thermal shock properties. PMID:27031536

  6. The effect of substrate bias voltages on impact resistance of CrAlN coatings deposited by modified ion beam enhanced magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunyan, Yu; Linhai, Tian; Yinghui, Wei; Shebin, Wang; Tianbao, Li; Bingshe, Xu

    2009-01-01

    CrAlN coatings were deposited on silicon and AISI H13 steel substrates using a modified ion beam enhanced magnetron sputtering system. The effect of substrate negative bias voltages on the impact property of the CrAlN coatings was studied. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) data show that all CrAlN coatings were crystallized in the cubic NaCl B1 structure, with the (1 1 1), (2 0 0) (2 2 0) and (2 2 2) diffraction peaks observed. Two-dimensional surface morphologies of CrAlN coatings were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results show that with increasing substrate bias voltage the coatings became more compact and denser, and the microhardness and fracture toughness of the coatings increased correspondingly. In the dynamic impact resistance tests, the CrAlN coatings displayed better impact resistance with the increase of bias voltage, due to the reduced emergence and propagation of the cracks in coatings with a very dense structure and the increase of hardness and fracture toughness in coatings.

  7. Perturbation Methods for Real-Time In Situ Evaluation of Hot-Side Thermal Resistances in Thermoelectric Energy Recovery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) power systems in high-temperature industrial, transportation, and military energy systems require high-performance hot-side and cold-side heat transfer to provide the critical temperature differential and transfer the required thermal energy to create the power output. Hot- and cold-side heat transfer performance is typically characterized by the hot-side and cold-side thermal resistance, R h,th and R c,th, respectively. This heat transfer performance determines the hot-side temperature, T h, and cold-side temperature, T c, conditions when operating in energy recovery environments with available temperature differentials characterized by an external driving temperature, T src, and ambient temperature, T amb. It is crucial to monitor and track the hot-side thermal performance at all times during TE energy recovery system operation, thereby allowing one to track the system "health," predict future expected system performance, and anticipate/prevent system failures. This paper describes the use of a perturbation methodology and a direct coupling between the TE current, voltage, and hot-side energy flow to extract a real-time in situ evaluation of hot-side thermal resistances. External measurable TE parameters, either system current or T src, can be perturbed during system operation, and the resulting TE system response can then be coupled mathematically to the hot-side thermal transfer performance (i.e., thermal resistance). This paper discusses the mathematical formalism of this technique, and TE module experimental data showing successful application of real-time current perturbation. This technique provides a pathway for developing faster, real-time system monitoring and diagnostics to alleviate system performance degradation, or prevent system damage from dramatic changes in hot-side thermal transfer conditions in industrial, transportation, and spacecraft TE power systems.

  8. Increasing activity and thermal resistance of Bacillus gibsonii alkaline protease (BgAP) by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ronny; Jakob, Felix; Tu, Ran; Siegert, Petra; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus gibsonii Alkaline Protease (BgAP) is a recently reported subtilisin protease exhibiting activity and stability properties suitable for applications in laundry and dish washing detergents. However, BgAP suffers from a significant decrease of activity at low temperatures. In order to increase BgAP activity at 15°C, a directed evolution campaign based on the SeSaM random mutagenesis method was performed. An optimized microtiter plate expression system in B. subtilis was established and classical proteolytic detection methods were adapted for high throughput screening. In parallel, the libraries were screened for increased residual proteolytic activity after incubation at 58°C. Three iterative rounds of directed BgAP evolution yielded a set of BgAP variants with increased specific activity (K(cat)) at 15°C and increased thermal resistance. Recombination of both sets of amino acid substitutions resulted finally in variant MF1 with a 1.5-fold increased specific activity (15°C) and over 100 times prolonged half-life at 60°C (224 min compared to 2 min of the WT BgAP). None of the introduced amino acid substitutions were close to the active site of BgAP. Activity-altering amino acid substitutions were from non-charged to non-charged or from sterically demanding to less demanding. Thermal stability improvements were achieved by substitutions to negatively charged amino acids in loop areas of the BgAP surface which probably fostered ionic and hydrogen bonds interactions.

  9. Multiscale simulation of thermal disruption in resistance switching process in amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. M.; Shumkin, G. N.; Nikishin, N. G.

    2015-09-01

    The switching of material atomic structure and electric conductivity is used in novel technologies of making memory on the base of phase change. The possibility of making memory on the base of amorphous carbon is shown in experiment [1]. Present work is directed to simulation of experimentally observed effects. Ab initio quantum calculations were used for simulation of atomic structure changes in amorphous carbon [2]. These simulations showed that the resistance change is connected with thermally induced effects. The temperature was supposed to be the function of time. In present paper we propose a new multiscale, self-consistent model which combines three levels of simulation scales and takes into account the space and time dependencies of the temperature. On the first level of quantum molecular dynamic we provide the calculations of phase change in atomic structure with space and time dependence of the temperature. Nose-Hover thermostats are used for MD simulations to reproduce space dependency of the temperature. It is shown that atomic structure is localized near graphitic layers in conducting dot. Structure parameter is used then on the next levels of the modeling. Modified Ehrenfest Molecular Dynamics is used on the second level. Switching evolution of electronic subsystem is obtained. In macroscopic scale level the heat conductivity equation for continuous media is used for calculation space-time dependence of the temperature. Joule heat source depends on structure parameter and electric conductivity profiles obtained on previous levels of modeling. Iterative procedure is self-consistently repeated combining three levels of simulation. Space localization of Joule heat source leads to the thermal disruption. Obtained results allow us to explain S-form of the Volt-Ampere characteristic observed in experiment. Simulations were performed on IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer at Moscow State University.

  10. Resistive switching characteristics of Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6/Al devices constructed on plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2012-07-01

    In this study, Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6Al devices are fabricated on plastic substrates using the sputtering method at room temperature. The ratio of O/S in the zinc oxysulfide thin film is confirmed to be 0.4/0.6 from the Auger depth profiling. The Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6/Al devices show unipolar resistive switching behaviors and the ratio of the measured resistance in the low-resistance state (LRS) to that in the high-resistance state (HRS) is above 10(4). The conduction mechanism of the LRS is governed by Ohm's law. On the other hand, in the HRS, the conduction mechanism at low voltages is controlled by Ohm's law, but that at high voltages results from the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism. The Ohmic and Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanisms observed in the LRS and HRS support the filament model of unipolar resistive switching. The memory characteristics of the Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6/Al devices are retained for 10(4) sec without any change.

  11. Rapid thermal annealing effect on the spatial resistivity distribution of AZO thin films deposited by pulsed-direct-current sputtering for solar cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayachi, Boubakeur; Aviles, Thomas; Vilcot, Jean-Pierre; Sion, Cathy

    2016-03-01

    Room temperature deposited aluminium-doped zinc oxide thin films on glass substrate, using pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering, have shown high optical transmittance and low electrical resistivity with high uniformity of its spatial distribution after they were exposed to a rapid thermal annealing process at 400 °C under N2H2 atmosphere. It is particularly interesting to note that such an annealing process of AZO thin films for only 30 s was sufficient, on one hand to improve their optical transmittance from 73% to 86%, on the other hand to both decrease their resistivity from 1.7 × 10-3 Ω cm to 5.1 × 10-4 Ω cm and achieve the highest uniformity spatial distribution. To understand the mechanisms behind such improvements of the optoelectronic properties, electrical, optical, structural and morphological changes as a function of annealing time have been investigated by using hall measurement, UV-visible spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope imaging, respectively.

  12. Effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-liang; Meng, Hui-min; Liang, Li-kang; Li, Sen; Shi, Jin-hui

    2015-10-01

    LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were applied to carbon steels with a NiCoCrAlY bond coat by plasma spraying. The effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 TBCs were investigated in 3.5wt% NaCl solution using polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that a large number of cracks are found in the LaMgAl11O19 TBCs after the samples are heat-treated, including some through-thickness cracks. The corrosion forms of the as-sprayed and heat-treated TBCs are uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion, respectively. The as-sprayed TBCs exhibit three EIS time constants after being immersed for less than 7 d, and then a new time constant appears because of steel substrate corrosion. When the immersion time is increased to 56 d, a Warburg impedance ( W) component appears in the EIS data. The EIS data for the heat-treated TBCs exhibit only two time constants after the samples are immersed for less than 14 d, and a new time constant appears when the immersion time is increased further. The heat treatment reduces the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 TBCs. The corrosion products are primarily γ-FeOOH and Fe3O4.

  13. Effect of sporulation temperature on the resistance of Clostridium botulinum type A spores to thermal and high pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kristin M; Nowaczyk, Louis; Morrissey, Travis R; Loeza, Viviana; Halik, Lindsay A; Skinner, Guy E; Reddy, N Rukma; Fleischman, Gregory J; Larkin, John W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sporulation temperature on the resistance of Clostridium botulinum type A spores of strains 62A and GiorgioA to thermal and high pressure processing (HPP). Spore crops produced in Trypticase-peptone-glucose-yeast extract broth at four incubation temperatures (20, 27, 37, and 41°C) were harvested, and heat resistance studies were conducted at 105°C (strain 62A) and 100°C (strain GiorgioA). Resistance to HPP was evaluated by subjecting the spores to a high pressure (700 MPa) and temperature combination (105°C, strain 62A; 100°C strain GiorgioA) in a laboratory-scale pressure test system. The decimal reduction time (D-value) was calculated using the log-linear model. Although the time to sporulation for GiorgioA was shorter and resulted in higher spore concentrations than for 62A at 20, 27, and 37°C, GiorgioA did not produce a sufficient spore crop at 41°C to be evaluated. The heat resistance of 62A spores was greatest when produced at 27°C and decreased for spore crops produced above or below 27°C (D105°C-values: 20°C, 1.9 min; 27°C, 4.03 min; 37°C, 3.66 min; and 41°C, 3.5 min; P < 0.05). Unlike 62A, the heat resistance behavior of GiorgioA spores increased with rising sporulation temperature, and spores formed at the organism's optimum growth temperature of 37°C were the most resistant (D100°C-values: 20°C, 3.4 min; 27°C, 5.08 min; and 37°C, 5.65 min; P < 0.05). Overall, all spore crops were less resistant to pressure-assisted thermal processing than thermal treatment alone. Sporulation temperature has an effect on the resistance of C. botulinum spores to heat and HPP, and is characteristic to a particular strain. Knowledge of the effect of sporulation temperature on the resistance of C. botulinum spores is vital for the production of spores utilized in thermal and high pressure inactivation studies.

  14. Junction-to-Case Thermal Resistance of a Silicon Carbide Bipolar Junction Transistor Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Junction temperature of a prototype SiC-based bipolar junction transistor (BJT) was estimated by using the base-emitter voltage (V(sub BE)) characteristic for thermometry. The V(sub BE) was measured as a function of the base current (I(sub B)) at selected temperatures (T), all at a fixed collector current (I(sub C)) and under very low duty cycle pulse conditions. Under such conditions, the average temperature of the chip was taken to be the same as that of the temperature-controlled case. At increased duty cycle such as to substantially heat the chip, but same I(sub C) pulse height, the chip temperature was identified by matching the V(sub BE) to the thermometry curves. From the measured average power, the chip-to-case thermal resistance could be estimated, giving a reasonable value. A tentative explanation for an observed bunching with increasing temperature of the calibration curves may relate to an increasing dopant atom ionization. A first-cut analysis, however, does not support this.

  15. Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores. [Viking spacecraft dry heat decontamination simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puleo, J. R.; Bergstrom, S. L.; Peeler, J. T.; Oxborrow, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5- and 15-h cycles at 125 C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 0.001 to 0.0001) of very resistant spores can be tolerated.

  16. Improving Metallic Thermal Protection System Hypervelocity Impact Resistance Through Design of Experiments Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2001-01-01

    A design of experiments approach has been implemented using computational hypervelocity impact simulations to determine the most effective place to add mass to an existing metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) to improve hypervelocity impact protection. Simulations were performed using axisymmetric models in CTH, a shock-physics code developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and validated by comparison with existing test data. The axisymmetric models were then used in a statistical sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of five design parameters on degree of hypervelocity particle dispersion. Several damage metrics were identified and evaluated. Damage metrics related to the extent of substructure damage were seen to produce misleading results, however damage metrics related to the degree of dispersion of the hypervelocity particle produced results that corresponded to physical intuition. Based on analysis of variance results it was concluded that the most effective way to increase hypervelocity impact resistance is to increase the thickness of the outer foil layer. Increasing the spacing between the outer surface and the substructure is also very effective at increasing dispersion.

  17. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, A.; Laufer, S.; Rabinowitch, H. D.; Rubinsky, B.

    2011-02-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 °C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  18. Evaluating the thermal damage resistance of graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid composite coatings

    PubMed Central

    David, L.; Feldman, A.; Mansfield, E.; Lehman, J.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    We study laser irradiation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and chemically modified graphene (rGO)-composite spray coatings for use as a thermal absorber material for high-power laser calorimeters. Spray coatings on aluminum test coupon were exposed to increasing laser irradiance for extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The coatings, prepared at varying mass % of MWCNTs in rGO, demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power at 10.6 μm wavelength than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens show that the coating prepared at 50% CNT loading endure at least 2 kW.cm−2 for 10 seconds without significant damage. The improved damage resistance is attributed to the unique structure of the composite in which the MWCNTs act as an efficient absorber of laser light while the much larger rGO sheets surrounding them, dissipate the heat over a wider area. PMID:24603681

  19. Evaluating the thermal damage resistance of graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, L.; Feldman, A.; Mansfield, E.; Lehman, J.; Singh, G.

    2014-03-01

    We study laser irradiation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and chemically modified graphene (rGO)-composite spray coatings for use as a thermal absorber material for high-power laser calorimeters. Spray coatings on aluminum test coupon were exposed to increasing laser irradiance for extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The coatings, prepared at varying mass % of MWCNTs in rGO, demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power at 10.6 μm wavelength than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens show that the coating prepared at 50% CNT loading endure at least 2 kW.cm-2 for 10 seconds without significant damage. The improved damage resistance is attributed to the unique structure of the composite in which the MWCNTs act as an efficient absorber of laser light while the much larger rGO sheets surrounding them, dissipate the heat over a wider area.

  20. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance.

    PubMed

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S; Rabinowitch, H D; Rubinsky, B

    2011-02-21

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 °C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.