Science.gov

Sample records for subsurface drainage systems

  1. An analytical solution for predicting the transient seepage from a subsurface drainage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Dan, Han-Cheng; Zhou, Tingzhang; Lu, Chunhui; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Subsurface drainage systems have been widely used to deal with soil salinization and waterlogging problems around the world. In this paper, a mathematical model was introduced to quantify the transient behavior of the groundwater table and the seepage from a subsurface drainage system. Based on the assumption of a hydrostatic pressure distribution, the model considered the pore-water flow in both the phreatic and vadose soil zones. An approximate analytical solution for the model was derived to quantify the drainage of soils which were initially water-saturated. The analytical solution was validated against laboratory experiments and a 2-D Richards equation-based model, and found to predict well the transient water seepage from the subsurface drainage system. A saturated flow-based model was also tested and found to over-predict the time required for drainage and the total water seepage by nearly one order of magnitude, in comparison with the experimental results and the present analytical solution. During drainage, a vadose zone with a significant water storage capacity developed above the phreatic surface. A considerable amount of water still remained in the vadose zone at the steady state with the water table situated at the drain bottom. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that effects of the vadose zone were intensified with an increased thickness of capillary fringe, capillary rise and/or burying depth of drains, in terms of the required drainage time and total water seepage. The analytical solution provides guidance for assessing the capillary effects on the effectiveness and efficiency of subsurface drainage systems for combating soil salinization and waterlogging problems.

  2. Effects of macro-pores on water flow in coastal subsurface drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Yu, Xiayang; Lu, Chunhui; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Leaching through subsurface drainage systems has been widely adopted to ameliorate saline soils. The application of this method to remove salt from reclaimed lands in the coastal zone, however, may be impacted by macro-pores such as crab burrows, which are commonly distributed in the soils. We developed a three-dimensional model to investigate water flow in subsurface drainage systems affected by macro-pores distributed deterministically and randomly through Monte Carlo simulations. The results showed that, for subsurface drainage systems under the condition of continuous surface ponding, macro-pores increased the hydraulic head in the deep soil, which in turn reduced the hydraulic gradient between the surface and deep soil. As a consequence, water infiltration across the soil surface was inhibited. Since salt transport in the soil is dominated by advection, the flow simulation results indicated that macro-pores decreased the efficiency of salt leaching by one order of magnitude, in terms of both the elapsed time and the amount of water required to remove salt over the designed soil leaching depth (0.6 m). The reduction of the leaching efficiency was even greater in drainage systems with a layered soil stratigraphy. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that with an increased penetration depth or density of macro-pores, the leaching efficiency decreased further. The revealed impact of macro-pores on water flow represents a significant shortcoming of the salt leaching technique when applied to coastal saline soils. Future designs of soil amelioration schemes in the coastal zone should consider and aim to minimize the bypassing effect caused by macro-pores.

  3. Subsurface Drainage Nitrate and Total Reactive Phosphorus Losses in Bioenergy-Based Prairies and Corn Systems.

    PubMed

    Daigh, Aaron L M; Zhou, Xiaobo; Helmers, Matthew J; Pederson, Carl H; Horton, Robert; Jarchow, Meghann; Liebman, Matt

    2015-09-01

    We compare subsurface-drainage NO-N and total reactive phosphorus (TRP) concentrations and yields of select bioenergy cropping systems and their rotational phases. Cropping systems evaluated were grain-harvested corn-soybean rotations, grain- and stover-harvested continuous corn systems with and without a cover crop, and annually harvested reconstructed prairies with and without the addition of N fertilizer in an Iowa field. Drainage was monitored when soils were unfrozen during 2010 through 2013. The corn-soybean rotations without residue removal and continuous corn with residue removal produced similar mean annual flow-weighted NO-N concentrations, ranging from 6 to 18.5 mg N L during the 4-yr study. In contrast, continuous corn with residue removal and with a cover crop had significantly lower NO-N concentrations of 5.6 mg N L when mean annual flow-weighted values were averaged across the 4 yr. Prairies systems with or without N fertilization produced significantly lower concentrations below <1 mg NO-N L than all the row crop systems throughout the study. Mean annual flow-weighted TRP concentrations and annual yields were generally low, with values <0.04 mg TRP L and <0.14 kg TRP ha, and were not significantly affected by any cropping systems or their rotational phases. Bioenergy-based prairies with or without N fertilization and continuous corn with stover removal and a cover crop have the potential to supply bioenergy feedstocks while minimizing NO-N losses to drainage waters. However, subsurface drainage TRP concentrations and yields in bioenergy systems will need further evaluation in areas prone to higher levels of P losses.

  4. Subsurface irrigation of potato crop (Solanum tuberosum ssp. Andigena) in Suka Kollus with different drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Coronel, Genaro; Chipana-Rivera, René; Fátima Moreno-Pérez, María; Roldán-Cañas, José

    2016-04-01

    Among the most important hydraulic structures of pre-Hispanic ancestral technology developed in the Andean region, we find the suka kollus, aymara word, called also waru waru, en quechua or raised fields, in English. They are raised platforms surrounded by water canals that irrigate subsurface, but also have the function of draining, to deal with floods because they are surrounding Lake Titicaca. They also have the property of generating a thermoregulatory effect to crops, depending on the configuration of the channels and platforms. Such agro-ecosystems are being abandoned, however, if properly addressed crop management and some drainage canals are replaced by underground drains for increased crop area could be very useful in enabling marginal soils affected by salts and / or excess water. For these reasons, the objective of this study was to evaluate the subsurface irrigation in the potato crop in suka kollus under a system of surface drainage, and mixed drainage (surface and subsurface). The study was conducted in marginal soils of Kallutaca area, located 30 km from the city of La Paz, Bolivia, at a height of 3892 m.a.s.l. The cultivation of the potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. Andigena) was used. Four treatments were tested with different widths of the platforms: T1 (Control) with drainage through channels; T2 (replacing a channel by a drain); T3 (replacing two channels by two drains); T4 (replacing three channels by three drains). The flow of water into the soil from the water table was predominantly upward, except during periods of high rainfall. In terms of treatments, the flow in T1 was higher, mainly at weeks 8 to 11 after seedling emergence, coinciding with the phenological phases of flowering and at the beginning of the tuber ripening. It was followed by T3, T2 and T4 treatments, respectively. Tuber yield, if one considers that the channels detract arable land, was higher in the T3 treatment,16.4 Mg / ha, followed by T2 treatment, 15.2 Mg / ha, T1

  5. Evaluation of Phosphorus Filter Media for an Inline Subsurface Drainage Treatment System.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Joseph R; Larson, Rebecca A

    2016-11-01

    Subsurface drainage from agricultural land has been identified as a contributor of both N and P into surface waters, leading to water quality degradation and eutrophication. This study evaluates the ability of P sorption media (PSM; expanded shale, expanded clay, furnace slag, and natural soil) to sorb P in both batch and column tests. Batch sorption tests estimated sorption of 3.4, 1.2, and 0.5 g P kg for expanded shale, expanded clay, and natural soil, respectively. Furnace slag sorption was evaluated for fine (FS), small (FS), and large (FS) particle sizes, with estimated sorption of 6.8, 5.1, and 3.8 g P kg, respectively. Phosphorus removal for the three furnace slag particle sizes and natural soil were tested in flow-through columns operated at residence times of 50, 17, and 7 s. A decrease in residence time reduced P removal in all columns evaluated. Following all trials, the average P removal from influent was 50% for FS, followed by 27% for FS (furnace slag-coated pea gravel), 22% for FS, and 6% for sandy loam-coated pea gravel. The data from this study provides crucial information for developing and sizing an inline tile drainage treatment system to remove P from tile drainage outlets before reaching surface waters. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Subsurface drainage erodes forested granitic terrane

    Treesearch

    Philip Durgin

    1984-01-01

    Abstract - Solution and landsliding, the dominant erosion processes in undisturbed forested mountainous watersheds, are both influenced by subsurface drainage. Biological processes that generate organic acids accelerate loss of dissolved solids by promoting the dissolution of primary minerals in granitic rock. These organic acids can also disperse the secondary...

  7. Research and Development of Laser-Beam Automatic Grade-Control System on High-Speed Subsurface Drainage Equipment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Subsurface drainage methods and materials technologies were modernized more through innovative research and development between 1960 and 1975 than during the previous 100 years. By the mid-1970’s, slow, inefficient trench-installation of heavy rigid draintile materials (clay and concrete) gave way t...

  8. Subsurface recharge to the Tesuque aquifer system from selected drainage basins along the western side of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains near Santa Fe, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wasiolek, Maryann

    1995-01-01

    Water budgets developed for basins of five streams draining the western side of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in northern New Mexico indicate that subsurface inflow along the mountain front is recharging the Tesuque aquifer system of the Espanola Basin. Approximately 14,700 acre-feet of water per year, or 12.7 percent of average annual precipitation over the mountains, is calculated to leave the mountain block and enter the basin as subsurface recharge from the drainage basins of the Rio Nambe, Rio en Medio, Tesuque Creek, Little Tesuque Creek, and Santa Fe River. About 5,520 acre- feet per year, or about 12 percent of average annual precipitation, is calculated to enter from the Rio Nambe drainage basin; about 1,710 acre- feet per year, or about 15 percent of average annual precipitation, is calculated to enter from the Rio en Medio drainage basin; about 1,530 acre- feet, or about 10 percent of average annual precipi- tation, is calculated to enter from the Tesuque Creek drainage basin; about 1,790 acre-feet, or about 19 percent of average annual precipitation, is calculated to enter from the Little Tesuque Creek drainage basin; and about 4,170 acre-feet per year, or about 12 percent average annual precipitation, is calculated to enter from the Santa Fe River drainage basin. Calculated subsurface recharge values were used to define maximum fluxes permitted along the specified-flux boundary defining the mountain front of the Sangre De Cristo Mountains in a numerical computer model of the Tesuque aquifer system near Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  9. Subsurface agricultural irrigation drainage: the need for regulation.

    PubMed

    Lemly, A D

    1993-04-01

    Subsurface drainage resulting from irrigated agriculture is a toxic threat to fish and wildlife resources throughout the western United States. Studies by the U.S. Department of the Interior show that migratory waterfowl have been poisoned by drainwater contaminants on at least six national wildlife refuges. Allowing this poisoning to continue is a violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act under U.S. Federal law. Critical wetlands and waterfowl populations are threatened in both the Pacific and Central flyways. The public is also at risk and health warnings have been issued in some locations. Subsurface irrigation drainage is a complex effluent containing toxic concentrations of trace elements, salts, and nitrogenous compounds. Some of the contaminants are classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as priority pollutants and they can be present in concentrations that exceed EPA's criteria for toxic waste. The on-farm drainage systems used to collect and transport this wastewater provide point-source identification as well as a mechanism for toxics control through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit process. A four-step approach is presented for dealing with irrigation drainage in an environmentally sound manner. This regulatory strategy is very similar to those commonly used for industrial discharges and includes site evaluation, contaminant reduction through NPDES, and compliance monitoring. The EPA must recognize subsurface irrigation drainage as a specific class of pollution subject to regulation under the NPDES process. Active involvement by EPA is necessary to ensure that adequate controls on this wastewater are implemented.

  10. Hydrologic Impact Of Subsurface Drainage Of Agricultural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, B. S.; Johannsen, C. J.; Bowling, L. C.

    2005-12-01

    Although subsurface drainage has benefited agricultural productions in many regions of the U.S., there are also concerns about the potential impacts of these systems on watershed hydrology and water quality. This study was focused on tile lines identification and hydrologic response of subsurface drainage systems for the Agronomy Center for Research and Education (ACRE), West Lafayette, Indiana and the Southeastern Purdue Agriculture Center (SEPAC) in southeastern, Indiana. The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate a remote sensing methodology for automatic detection of tile lines from aerial photographs and to evaluate the Distributed Hydrology Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) to analyze the hydrologic response of tile drained fields. A step-wise approach was developed to first use different image enhancement techniques to increase the visual distinction of tile lines from other details in the image. A new classification model was developed to identify locations of subsurface tiles using a decision tree classifier which compares the multiple data sets such as enhanced image data, land use class, soil drainage class, hydrologic group and surface slope. Accuracy assessment of the predicted tile map was done by comparing the locations of tile drains with existing historic maps and ground-truth data. The overall performance of decision tree classifier model coupled with other pre- and post- classification methods shows that this model can be a very effective tool in identifying tile lines from aerial photographs over large areas of land. Once the tile map was created, the DHSVM was applied to ACRE and SEPAC respectively to see the hydrological impact of the subsurface drainage network. Observed data for 3-years (1998-2000) at ACRE and for 6-years (1993-1998) at SEPAC were used to calibrate and validate the model. The model was simulated for three scenarios: 1) baseline scenario (no tiles), 2) with known tile lines and 3) with tile lines created through

  11. User’s Guide: Subsurface Drainage for Military Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE FOR MILITARY PAVEMENTS DTICSELECTE l S MAY2 51993 by C William P. Grogan US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station * Vicksburg, MS...TYPE AND DATES COVERED1 August 1992 I Final report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS User’s Guide: Subsurface Drainage for Military Pavements 6...Bi ~NrIS C;,A&I [.dlL TAB By 4 1A USER’S GUIDE: SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE FOR MILITARY PAVEMENTS PART I: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background Research conducted at

  12. Acidic mine drainage abatement in an anaerobic sub-surface flow wetland environment - case history of the treatment system at Corsica, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, J.M.; Stidinger, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Wetland Treatment Systems (WTS) have been constructed over the past decade for the treatment of Acidic Mine Drainage (AMD). Potential benefits of anaerobic sub-surface flow treatment were initially identified from attempts to improve effectiveness of a surface flow wetland at the Jennings Environmental Education Center in western Pennsylvania which, although not completely successful, resulted in acidity removal rates two to four times greater than pre-modification rates. This study was conducted to investigate the potential benefits of sub-surface flow design, which utilizes a sub-surface collection system, in comparison to conventional surface flow design. Two field-scale WTS, each containing anaerobic surface flow and sub-surface flow treatment cells (approximately 100 m{sup 2} each), were constructed along an existing AMD discharge, near Corsica, Pennsylvania, with a 3-4 pH, 250-400 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}) acidity, 20-40 mg/L iron, 15-40 mg/L manganese and 10-30 mg/L aluminum. Sampling of the WTS included two elements: a weekly monitoring program from March 1992 through November 1992 to collect discharge water quality data; and a post-flow design was found to provide statistically greater acidity removal with an average rate of 61.8 grams per day per square meter (GDM), in comparison to surface flow which had an average rate of 4.78 GDM, and provided effluent alkalinities greater than 100 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}) and pH greater than 6.5 at the flows and loading evaluated. Removal rates for iron and aluminum removal of 3.02 and 2.48 GDM in the sub-surface flow design were also significantly greater than surface flow design which had removal rates of 1.89 and 0.20 GDM, respectively. Manganese removal was ineffective in both surface and sub-surface flow designs.

  13. Agriculture and wildlife: ecological implications of subsurface irrigation drainage

    Treesearch

    A. Dennis Lemly

    1994-01-01

    Subsurface agricultural irrigation drainage is a wastewater with the potential to severely impact wetlands and wildlife populations. Widespread poisoning of migratory birds by drainwater contaminants has occurred in the western United States and waterfowl populations are threatened in the Pacific and Central flyways. Irrigated agriculture could produce subsurface...

  14. Continuous Passive Sampling of Solutes from Agricultural Subsurface Drainage Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad Vendelboe, Anders; de Jonge, Hubert; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Wollesen de Jonge, Lis

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural subsurface tube drain systems play an important role in water and solute transport. One study, focusing on lowland agricultural catchments, showed that subsurface tube drainage contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90% of the annual NO3 load from agricultural fields to the receiving water bodies. Knowledge of e.g. nutrient loads and drainage volumes, based on measurements and modelling, are important for adequate water quality management. Despite the importance of tube drain transport of solutes, monitoring data are scarce. This scarcity is a result of the existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant load from tube drains being expensive and labor-extensive. The study presented here aimed at developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor solute loads from tube drains. The method is based on the newly developed Flowcap, which can be attached to existing tube drain outlets and can measure total flow, contaminant load and flow-averaged concentrations of solutes in the drainage. The Flowcap builds on the existing Sorbicell principle, a passive sampling system that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various compounds. The Sorbicell consists of two compartments permeable to water. One compartment contains an adsorbent and one contains a tracer. When water passes through the Sorbicell the compound of interest is absorbed while a tracer is released. Using the tracer loss to calculate the volume of water that has passed the Sorbicell it is possible to calculate the average concentration of the compound. When mounting Sorbicells in the Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drainage is sampled from the main stream. To accommodate the wide range of drainage flow rates two Flowcaps with different capacities were tested in the laboratory: one with a capacity of 25 L min-1 (Q25) and one with a capacity of 256 L min-1 (Q256). In addition, Sorbicells with two different hydraulic

  15. Subsurface drainage processes and management impacts

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth T. Keppeler; David Brown

    1998-01-01

    Storm-induced streamflow in forested upland watersheds is linked to rainfall by transient, variably saturated flow through several different flow paths. In the absence of exposed bedrock, shallow flow-restrictive layers, or compacted soil surfaces, virtually all of the infiltrated rainfall reaches the stream as subsurface flow. Subsurface runoff can occur within...

  16. Subsurface Agricultural Irrigation Drainage: The Need for Regulation

    Treesearch

    A. Dennis Lemly

    1993-01-01

    Subsurface drainage resulting from irrigated agriculture is a toxic threat to fish and wildlife resources throughout the western United States. Studies by the U.S. Department of the Interior show that migratory waterfowl have been poisoned by drainwater contaminants on at least six national wildlife refuges. Allowing this poisoning to continue is a violation of the...

  17. Comparison of the performances of DRAINMOD-NII and ADAPT models in simulating nitrate losses from subsurface drainage systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adequate knowledge on the movement of nitrate under different subsurface (tile) drain configurations and management practices in the U.S. Midwest, is essential for developing remedial measures for reducing hypoxic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, DRAINMOD-NII, a daily time-step soil ...

  18. Winter rye as a cover crop reduces nitrate loss to subsurface drainage as simulated by HERMES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    HERMES is a widely used agricultural system model; however, it has never been tested for simulating N loss to subsurface drainage. Here, we integrated a simple drain flow component into HERMES. We then compared the predictions to four years of data (2002-2005) from central Iowa fields in corn-soybea...

  19. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson; R. Novotny

    1999-11-22

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

  20. Effect of subsurface drainage on streamflow in an agricultural headwater watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Artificial drainage, also known as subsurface or tile drainage is paramount to sustaining crop production agriculture in the poorly-drained, humid regions of the world. Hydrologic assessments of individual plots and fields with tile drainage are becoming common; however, a major void exists in our u...

  1. Mitigating nutrient leaching with a sub-surface drainage layer of granulated tires.

    PubMed

    Lisi, R D; Park, J K; Stier, J C

    2004-01-01

    Markets for scrap tires have expanded since the early 1990s with the development of value-added applications such as tire-derived fuel and crumb-rubber-amended asphalt. Granulated tires have also displayed the ability to adsorb volatile organic compounds, indicating that the rubber material can be a useful filter media. Sand-based root zones, typically used for golf course putting green and athletic field construction, lack sufficient cation exchange capacity to restrict nitrogen and phosphorus migration through the root zone and into sub-surface drainage systems. Therefore, the adsorptive properties of tire rubber for retaining nitrogen and phosphorus were studied when applied as a distinct sub-surface drainage or intermediate layer in golf course putting greens. A statistically significant reduction in the concentration of nitrate in leachate was achieved by replacing traditional pea gravel with equally sized granulated tires for the drainage layer media, although the mechanism of nitrate mitigation remains unclear. The results indicate that using granulated tires as a drainage layer or fill material beneath sand-based root zones does not compromise the function of the profile or quality of the vegetation while creating an environmentally beneficial and value-added option for scrap tire reuse.

  2. SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE INVESTIGATION 1945-1946. APPENDIX 4. REPORT ON FULL SCALE FIELD DRAINAGE TESTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDROLOGY, DRAINAGE ), (* DRAINAGE , TESTS), (*LANDING FIELDS, DRAINAGE ), SOIL MECHANICS, PARTICLE SIZE, POROSITY, PAVEMENTS, RUNWAYS, SIMULATION, CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS, DESIGN, THICKNESS, PERMEABILITY, LAMINAR FLOW

  3. Effects of soil type upon metolachlor losses in subsurface drainage.

    PubMed

    Novak, S M; Portal, J M; Schiavon, M

    2001-01-01

    A field experiment at La Bouzule (Lorraine, France) investigated metolachlor movement to subsurface drains in two soil types, a silt loam and a heavy clay soil, under identical agricultural management practices and climatic conditions. Drainage volumes and concentrations of metolachlor in the soil plough layer and drainwater were monitored after herbicide application from May 1996 to February 1997, and from May to August 1998. Total losses in drainwater were 0.08% and 0.18% of the amount applied to the silt loam compared with 0.59% and 0.41% for the clay soil, in 1996/97 and 1998, respectively. In 1996/97, 32% of total metolachlor loss from the silt loam and 91% from the clay soil occurred during the spring/summer period following treatment. Peak concentrations were 18.5 and 171.6 microg l(-1) for the silt loam and 130.6 and 395.3 microg l(-1) for the clay soil during the spring/summer periods of 1996/97 and 1998, respectively. During the autumn/winter period, concentrations did not exceed 2.2 microg l(-1) for the silt loam and 2.6 microg l(-1) for the clay soil. The experimental results indicate that metolachlor losses in drainwater were primarily caused by preferential flow (macropore flow) which was greater in the clay soil than in the silt loam, and occurring mainly during the spring/summer periods.

  4. Effect of replacing surface inlets with blind or gravel inlets on sediment and phosphorus subsurface drainage losses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Open surface inlets that connect to subsurface tile drainage systems provide a direct pathway for sediment, nutrients, and agrochemicals to surface waters. This study was conducted to determine whether modifying open inlets by burying them in gravel capped with 30 cm of sandy clay loam soil or in ve...

  5. PASSIVE TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE FROM A SUBSURFACE MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic, metal-contaminated drainages are a critical problem facing many areas of the world. Acid rock drainage results when metal sulfide minerals, particularly pyrite, are oxidized by exposure to oxygen and water. The deleterious effects of these drainages on receiving streams a...

  6. PASSIVE TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE FROM A SUBSURFACE MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic, metal-contaminated drainages are a critical problem facing many areas of the world. Acid rock drainage results when metal sulfide minerals, particularly pyrite, are oxidized by exposure to oxygen and water. The deleterious effects of these drainages on receiving streams a...

  7. Pipe downchute stormwater drainage system

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    SCS Engineers (SCS) was provided with the challenge of developing a completely enclosed pipe downchute system for stormwater drainage at the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, the largest landfill in the world. With a total landfill drainage subshed totaling over 1000 acres, and an average yearly precipitation at the site of approximately 4.2 feet, the final constructed stormwater drainage system would capture and convey over 591 million gallons of stormwater runoff per year, and discharge it into 17 stormwater basins.This paper describes the drainage system.

  8. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  9. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  10. Subsurface drainage volume reduction with drainage water management: Case studies in Ohio, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the main contributors to poor water quality in the Mississippi River and aeral increase in the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico is intensive drainage of the cropland within the watershed. Controlled drainage has been demonstrated as an approach to curb totla drainage outflow and nutrient di...

  11. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation.

  12. Subsurface Drainage of Pavement Structures: Current Corps of Engineers and Industry Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    few decades. General material on drainage an emphasis on subsurface drainage. The topics dis- issues can be found in the work of Cedergren (1974, cussed...the sides of the United States. bottom of the pavement layers. The assumptions made Cedergren (1974) bases his infiltration estimates on about these...temperature, but also whetheror all water falling on the pavement area will infiltrate. I Alternatively. Cedergren (1974) assumes that bitu- The FHWA

  13. Phosphorus transport in agricultural subsurface drainage: A review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields and watersheds has been an important water quality issue for decades because of the critical role P plays in eutrophication. Historically, most research focused on P losses by surface runoff and erosion because subsurface P losses were often deemed to be ...

  14. Nitrate-nitrogen losses through subsurface drainage under various agricultural land covers.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhiming; Helmers, Matthew J; Christianson, Reid D; Pederson, Carl H

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate-nitrogen (NO₃-N) loading to surface water bodies from subsurface drainage is an environmental concern in the midwestern United States. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various land covers on NO₃-N loss through subsurface drainage. Land-cover treatments included (i) conventional corn ( L.) (C) and soybean [ (L.) Merr.] (S); (ii) winter rye ( L.) cover crop before corn (rC) and before soybean (rS); (iii) kura clover ( M. Bieb.) as a living mulch for corn (kC); and (iv) perennial forage of orchardgrass ( L.) mixed with clovers (PF). In spring, total N uptake by aboveground biomass of rye in rC, rye in rS, kura clover in kC, and grasses in PF were 14.2, 31.8, 87.0, and 46.3 kg N ha, respectively. Effect of land covers on subsurface drainage was not significant. The NO₃-N loss was significantly lower for kC and PF than C and S treatments (p < 0.05); rye cover crop did not reduce NO₃-N loss, but NO₃-N concentration was significantly reduced in rC during March to June and in rS during July to November (p < 0.05). Moreover, the increase of soil NO₃-N from early to late spring in rS was significantly lower than the S treatment (p < 0.05). This study suggests that kC and PF are effective in reducing NO₃-N loss, but these systems could lead to concerns relative to grain yield loss and change in farming practices. Management strategies for kC need further study to achieve reasonable corn yield. The effectiveness of rye cover crop on NO-N loss reduction needs further investigation under conditions of different N rates, wider weather patterns, and fall tillage. by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Detecting Subsurface Agricultural Tile Drainage using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhathoki, M.; Gokkaya, K.; Tank, J. L.; Christopher, S. F.; Hanrahan, B.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface tile drainage is a common practice in many of the row crop dominated agricultural lands in the Upper Midwest, which increases yield by making the soil more productive. It is reported that nearly half of all cropland in Indiana benefits from some sort of artificial drainage. However, subsurface tile has a significant negative impact on surface water quality by providing a fast means of transport for nutrients from fertilizers. Therefore, generating spatial data of tile drainage in the field is important and useful for agricultural landscape and hydrological studies. Subsurface tile drains in Indiana's croplands are not widely mapped. In this study, we will delineate subsurface tile drainage in agricultural land in Shatto Ditch watershed, located in Kosciusko County, Indiana. We will use geo-spatial methodology, which was purposed by earlier researchers to detect tile drainage. We will use aerial color-infrared and satellite imagery along with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. In order to map tile lines with possible accuracy, we will use GIS-based analysis in combination with remotely sensed data. This research will be comprised of three stages: 1) masking out the potential drainage area using a decision tree rule based on land cover information, soil drainage category, surface slope, and satellite image differencing technique, 2) delineate tile lines using image processing techniques, and 3) check the accuracy of mapped tile lines with ground control points. To our knowledge, this study will be the first to check the accuracy of mapping with ground truth data. Based on the accuracy of results, we will extend the methodology to greater spatial scales. The results are expected to contribute to better characterizing and controlling water pollution sources in Indiana, which is a major environmental problem.

  16. Impact assessment of subsurface drainage on waterlogged and saline lands.

    PubMed

    Ghumman, Abdul R; Ghazaw, Yousry Mahmoud; Niazi, Muhammed F; Hashmi, Hashim N

    2011-01-01

    Waterlogging and salinity due to seepage from canals have polluted land and environment in various parts of Pakistan. A sustainable environment requires urgent remedial measures for this problem. The research in this paper presents the impacts of the Fourth Drainage Project, Faisalabad on the twin problem of waterlogging and salinity. Monitoring of the project was made on regular basis. The key performance indicators for the project include the lowering of water table, improvement of water quality and soil salinity, increase in area under cultivation, cropping intensity, and socioeconomic status of the project population. Data regarding water levels and discharge from the drain pipes were collected to monitor the impact on waterlogging. Soil samples were tested to evaluate the impact of drainage on land. It has been found that the percentage of the contaminated land in the project area has considerably been decreased, while the cropping intensities have been increased.

  17. Influence of alternative and conventional farming practices on subsurface drainage and water quality.

    PubMed

    Oquist, K A; Strock, J S; Mulla, D J

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural runoff contributes nutrients to nonpoint-source pollution of surface waters. This study was conducted to investigate the potential use of alternative farming practices to improve water quality. The study examined the effects of both alternative and conventional farming practices on subsurface drainage and nitrogen and phosphorus loss through subsurface drainage from glacial till soils (i.e., Calciaquolls, Endoaquolls, Eutrudepts, Hapludolls) in southwest Minnesota. Alternative farming practices included organic management practices, species biodiversity, and/or practices that include reduced inputs of synthetic fertilizer and pesticides. Conventional farming practices include corn-soybean (Zea mays L.-Glycine max L., respectively) rotations and their associated recommended fertilizer rates as well as pesticide usage. Precipitation was highly variable during the 3-yr study period including a below-average year (2003), an average year (2002), and an above-average year (2004). Results indicate that alternative farming practices reduced subsurface drainage discharge by 41% compared with conventional practices. Flow-weighted mean nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate N) concentrations during tile flow were 8.2 and 17.2 mg L(-1) under alternative and conventional farming practices, respectively. Alternative farming practices reduced nitrate N losses by between 59 and 62% in 2002 and 2004 compared with conventional practices. Ammonium-nitrogen (ammonium N), orthophosphorus, and total phosphorus losses in subsurface drainage were very low and did not pose a substantial risk of pollution. Results suggest that alternative farming practices have the potential to reduce agricultural impacts on water quality.

  18. Relative importance of impervious area, drainage density, width function, and subsurface storm drainage on flood runoff from an urbanized catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Raj Pradhan, Nawa; Downer, Charles W.; Zahner, Jon A.

    2011-12-01

    The literature contains contradictory conclusions regarding the relative effects of urbanization on peak flood flows due to increases in impervious area, drainage density and width function, and the addition of subsurface storm drains. We used data from an urbanized catchment, the 14.3 km2 Dead Run watershed near Baltimore, Maryland, USA, and the physics-based gridded surface/subsurface hydrologic analysis (GSSHA) model to examine the relative effect of each of these factors on flood peaks, runoff volumes, and runoff production efficiencies. GSSHA was used because the model explicitly includes the spatial variability of land-surface and hydrodynamic parameters, including subsurface storm drains. Results indicate that increases in drainage density, particularly increases in density from low values, produce significant increases in the flood peaks. For a fixed land-use and rainfall input, the flood magnitude approaches an upper limit regardless of the increase in the channel drainage density. Changes in imperviousness can have a significant effect on flood peaks for both moderately extreme and extreme storms. For an extreme rainfall event with a recurrence interval in excess of 100 years, imperviousness is relatively unimportant in terms of runoff efficiency and volume, but can affect the peak flow depending on rainfall rate. Changes to the width function affect flood peaks much more than runoff efficiency, primarily in the case of lower density drainage networks with less impermeable area. Storm drains increase flood peaks, but are overwhelmed during extreme rainfall events when they have a negligible effect. Runoff in urbanized watersheds with considerable impervious area shows a marked sensitivity to rainfall rate. This sensitivity explains some of the contradictory findings in the literature.

  19. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  20. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Markman

    2001-08-06

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of

  1. Benefits of digital thoracic drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Danitsch, Debbie

    A number of risks and complications are associated with traditional chest drainage systems. A trust decided to trial digital drainage systems, and found the new systems improved treatment time and patient mobility.

  2. Evaluation on the Efficiency of Subsurface Drainage in Chiu-Fen Landslide at Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, L. Y.; Lin, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    For administrative district, the Chiu-Fen landslide is situated at northern Taiwan and comes within the jurisdiction of Ruei-Fang district, New Taipei City Government. Chiu-Fen village is a famous spot for sightseeing and tourism in Southeast Asia. In the last decade, for economic purpose, a vast area of slope land in Chiu-Fen area was reclaimed into business and commercial districts. However, due to the complicated geological and hydrological conditions, improper reclamation, and lack of appropriate soil and water conservation facilities, large scale landslides are frequently triggered by typhoon rainfall and causes damages to the transportation and residential building in the community. As a consequence, the government initiated a comprehensive field investigations and remediation plans to stabilize the landslide from 1997 and the remediation works were concentrated on subsurface drainages, namely the application of drainage well (a vertical shaft with multi-level horizontal drainage boreholes). To investigate the efficiency of drainage wells on the landslide, the A1-profile in the landslide which covers the drainage wells W2 and W4 was selected for a series of rainfall seepage and slope stability analyses. In addition, a 48-hrs design rainfall with return period of 25, 50 and 100 years based on the local meteorological data bank was adopted for the analyses. The numerical results indicate the factor safety FS of the three potential sliding surfaces within A1-profile are constantly keeping greater than one (FS > 1.0) and without decreasing with the elapsed time during rainfall. This implies that the subsurface drainage works can drain off the infiltrated rainwater from a high intensity and long duration rainfall and preserve the slope stability of landslides from deterioration. Finally, the efficiency of the drainage wells can be evaluated quantitatively in terms of the time-dependent factor of safety and the pore water pressure distribution on several potential

  3. Isotopic mixing model for quantifying contributions of soil water and groundwater in subsurface ('tile') drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Gall, H.; Jafvert, C. T.; Bowen, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface (‘tile’) drainage, consisting of buried grids of perforated pipe, has provided a means of converting millions of acres of poorly drained soils in the Midwestern U.S. into fertile cropland. However, by altering pathways and rates of soil water and groundwater movement through agricultural lands, this practice may accelerate the loss of nitrate and other agrochemicals. To better understand the hydrological controls on nitrogen dynamics in artificially drained agricultural watersheds, a field sampling program has been established at the Animal Science Research and Education Center (ASREC) at Purdue University (West Lafayette, Indiana) to (1) measure precipitation amount, tile flow, and water-table elevation, and (2) collect water samples for analysis of nitrate, major ions, and oxygen isotope ratios in precipitation, tile drainage, shallow (1 m) and deep (3 m) groundwater, and soil water during storm events. Preliminary physical, chemical, and isotopic data collected at the ASREC show a coincident timing of peak storm ‘event water’ and peak nitrate flux in tile drainage, suggesting significant routing of infiltrating event water. In this work, we aim to refine our understanding of tile drainage at the ASREC by developing a mixing model for partitioning contributions of soil water and groundwater in tile drainage during several storm runoff events ranging in precipitation intensity and coinciding with varying antecedent soil moisture conditions. The results of our model will describe tile drainage in terms of its hydrological components, soil water and groundwater, which in turn will provide a means of incorporating the effects of tile drainage in surface/subsurface hydrological transport models.

  4. An overview of impact of subsurface drainage project studies on salinity management in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Priyanka; Goel, Arun

    2017-05-01

    Subsurface drainage has been used for more than a century to keep water table at a desired level of salinity and waterlogging control. This paper has been focused on the impact assessment of pilot studies in India and some other countries from 1969 to 2014 . This review article may prove quite useful in deciding the installation of subsurface drainage project depending on main design parameters, such as drain depth and drain spacing, installation area and type of used outlet. A number of pilot studies have been taken up in past to solve the problems of soil salinity and waterlogging in India. The general guidelines that arise on the behalf of this review paper are to adapt drain depth >1.2 m and spacing depending on soil texture classification, i.e., 100-150 m for light-textured soils, 50-100 m for medium-textured soils and 30-50 m heavy-textured soils, for better result obtained from the problem areas in Indian soil and climatic conditions. An attempt has been made in the manner of literature survey to highlight the salient features of these studies, and it is hopeful to go a long way in selecting design parameters for subsurface drainage problems in the future with similar soil, water table and climatic conditions.

  5. Fluxes of dissolved organic matter and mineral weathering products from Corn Belt landscapes dominated by subsurface drainage: large-scale soil and hydrologic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinski, N. A.; Yoo, K.; Strock, J.; Dalzell, B. J.; Finlay, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The human alteration of agricultural landscapes is one of the most important factors in pedologic and geomorphic change, and can influence hydrology and aquatic chemistry at large scales. Most of the Midwestern Corn Belt that is currently dominated by subsurface tile drainage (such as southern Minnesota) was historically prairie and wetland which had hydrologic flow-paths through organic-rich surface soil horizons, a condition that favored the export of dissolved organic matter. When hydrology is altered through subsurface drainage, adsorption of organic materials to mineral surfaces and increases in mineral weathering may result because more water is flowing through subsurface mineral soils. We suggest that the alteration of hydrologic flowpaths in agricultural landscapes can dramatically alter the rate of mineral weathering as well as surface export of weathering products and dissolved organic matter. This could be at least one contributing factor to observed increases in Mississippi River alkalinity over the past four decades. Here, we examine trends in dissolved organic carbon, total dissolved nitrogen, dissolved organic nitrogen, total suspended solids, and indicators of mineral weathering (Si, Ca, Na, K) from subsurface drainage systems located in southwestern MN. Then, using a simple conceptual model, we estimate the effects of subsurface drainage on the regional fluxes of these parameters and present directions for future research.

  6. Seasonal Patterns in Microbial Community Composition in Denitrifying Bioreactors Treating Subsurface Agricultural Drainage.

    PubMed

    Porter, Matthew D; Andrus, J Malia; Bartolerio, Nicholas A; Rodriguez, Luis F; Zhang, Yuanhui; Zilles, Julie L; Kent, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors, consisting of water flow control structures and a woodchip-filled trench, are a promising approach for removing nitrate from agricultural subsurface or tile drainage systems. To better understand the seasonal dynamics and the ecological drivers of the microbial communities responsible for denitrification in these bioreactors, we employed microbial community "fingerprinting" techniques in a time-series examination of three denitrifying bioreactors over 2 years, looking at bacteria, fungi, and the denitrifier functional group responsible for the final step of complete denitrification. Our analysis revealed that microbial community composition responds to depth and seasonal variation in moisture content and inundation of the bioreactor media, as well as temperature. Using a geostatistical analysis approach, we observed recurring temporal patterns in bacterial and denitrifying bacterial community composition in these bioreactors, consistent with annual cycling. The fungal communities were more stable, having longer temporal autocorrelations, and did not show significant annual cycling. These results suggest a recurring seasonal cycle in the denitrifying bioreactor microbial community, likely due to seasonal variation in moisture content.

  7. Improving subsurface hydrology in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, J. M.; Clark, M. P.; Swenson, S. C.; Lawrence, D. M.; Tyler, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrologic processes that govern storage and transport of soil water and groundwater can have strong dynamic relationships with biogeochemical and atmospheric processes. This understanding has lead to a push to improve subsurface hydrologic parametrization in Earth System Models. Here we present results related to improving the implementation of soil moisture distribution, groundwater recharge/discharge, and subsurface drainage in the Community Land Model (CLM) which is the land surface model in the Community Earth System Model. First we identified geo-climatically different locations around the world to develop test cases. For each case we compare the vertical soil moisture distribution from the different implementations of 1D Richards equation, considering the boundary conditions, the treatment of the groundwater sink term, the vertical discretization, and the time stepping schemes. Generally, large errors in the hydrologic mass balance within the soil column occur when there is a large vertical gradient in soil moisture or when there is a shallow water table within a soil column. We then test the sensitivity of the algorithmic parameters that control temporal discretization and error tolerance of the adaptive time-stepping scheme to help optimize its computational efficiency. In addition, we vary the spatial discretization of soil layers (i.e. quantity of layers and their thicknesses) to better understand the sensitivity of vertical discretization of soil columns on soil moisture variability in ESMs. We present multivariate and multi-scale evaluation for the different model options and suggest ways to move forward with future model improvements.

  8. Modeling hourly subsurface drainage using steady-state and transient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Changchi; Qi, Zhiming; Tan, Chin S.; Zhang, Tie-Quan

    2017-07-01

    Computer models have been frequently used to simulate the hydrologic and environmental processes in subsurface-drained cropland. The widely-tested steady-state Hooghoudt (ssH) equation, implemented in the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM2, version 2.94.00), serves in simulating subsurface drainage. However, transient methods such as the integrated Hooghoudt (inH) and van Schilfgaarde (vanS) equations have seldom been implemented in models. In the present study, RZWQM2's hydrologic component was modified to initiate the soil water redistribution process when rainfall occurred. The three drainage equations (ssH, inH and vanS) were tested in each of two versions of RZWQM2 (original and modified). Field data from Iowa (2007-2008) and Ontario (2009-2010) were used to evaluate different model version × equation combinations' simulation accuracy at both daily and hourly scales, evaluated using the percent of bias (PBIAS), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE), and the Index of Agreement (IoA). On a daily scale and across equations, for the Iowa data the original model (PBIAS ⩽ 14.96, NSE ⩾ 0.40, ⩾ 0.69) was outperformed by the modified model (PBIAS ⩽ 6.48, NSE ⩾ 0.70, IoA ⩾ 0.76). Similarly, for the Ontario data, the original model (PBIAS ⩽ 8.87, NSE ⩾ 0.19, IoA ⩾ 0.65) was outperformed by the modified model (PBIAS ⩽ 3.59, NSE ⩾ 0.31, IoA ⩾ 0.67). However, based on a parity of PBIAS, NSE and IoA values, hourly scale tile drainage computed using the modified model equipped with transient equations did not improve model performance compared with the original ssH equation.

  9. 24 CFR 3285.604 - Drainage system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drainage system. 3285.604 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Ductwork and Plumbing and Fuel Supply Systems § 3285.604 Drainage system. (a) Crossovers. Multi-section homes with plumbing in more than one section...

  10. 24 CFR 3285.604 - Drainage system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drainage system. 3285.604 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Ductwork and Plumbing and Fuel Supply Systems § 3285.604 Drainage system. (a) Crossovers. Multi-section homes with plumbing in more than one section...

  11. 24 CFR 3285.604 - Drainage system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drainage system. 3285.604 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Ductwork and Plumbing and Fuel Supply Systems § 3285.604 Drainage system. (a) Crossovers. Multi-section homes with plumbing in more than one section...

  12. 24 CFR 3285.604 - Drainage system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drainage system. 3285.604 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Ductwork and Plumbing and Fuel Supply Systems § 3285.604 Drainage system. (a) Crossovers. Multi-section homes with plumbing in more than one section...

  13. Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force (ADMSTF)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Agricultural Drainage Management Systems (ADMS) Task Force was initiated during a Charter meeting in the fall of 2002 by dedicated professional employees of Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies and Universities. The Agricultural Drainage Management (ADM) Coalition was established in 200...

  14. Climate, Landscape, and Management Effects on Nitrate and Soluble Phosphorus concentrations in subsurface drainage discharge in the western Lake Erie basin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Subsurface drainage, while an important and necessary agricultural production practice in the Midwest, contributes nitrate (NO3) and soluble phosphorus (P) to surface waters. The magnitude of NO3 and soluble P losses in subsurface drainage varies greatly by landscape, climate, and field management f...

  15. Evaluation of revised subsurface tile drainage algorithms in SWAT for a cold climate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Subsurface tile drains in agricultural systems of the Mid-west U.S. are a major contributor of nitrate loadings to the Mississippi River Basin and contribute to hypoxic conditions in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Development of strategies to reduce nitrate loadings from these agricultural systems req...

  16. Antibiotic resistance and community analysis of surface and subsurface drainage waters in the South Fork Iowa River watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Midwest is a center for swine production leading to application of swine manure onto lands that have artificial subsurface drainage. Previous reports have indicated elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in surface water and groundwater around confined animal feeding operations wh...

  17. Antibiotic resistance and community analysis of surface and subsurface drainage waters in the South Fork Iowa River watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Midwest is a center for swine production leading to application of swine manure onto lands that have artificial subsurface drainage. Previous reports have indicated elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in surface water and groundwater around confined animal feeding operations w...

  18. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Randle

    2000-01-07

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I&C) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I&C systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I&C systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored, controlled, and

  19. Socially optimal drainage system and agricultural biodiversity: a case study for Finnish landscape.

    PubMed

    Saikkonen, Liisa; Herzon, Irina; Ollikainen, Markku; Lankoski, Jussi

    2014-12-15

    This paper examines the socially optimal drainage choice (surface/subsurface) for agricultural crop cultivation in a landscape with different land qualities (fertilities) when private profits and nutrient runoff damages are taken into account. We also study the measurable social costs to increase biodiversity by surface drainage when the locations of the surface-drained areas in a landscape affect the provided biodiversity. We develop a general theoretical model and apply it to empirical data from Finnish agriculture. We find that for low land qualities the measurable social returns are higher to surface drainage than to subsurface drainage, and that the profitability of subsurface drainage increases along with land quality. The measurable social costs to increase biodiversity by surface drainage under low land qualities are negative. For higher land qualities, these costs depend on the land quality and on the biodiversity impacts. Biodiversity conservation plans for agricultural landscapes should focus on supporting surface drainage systems in areas where the measurable social costs to increase biodiversity are negative or lowest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitrate and phosphate removal from agricultural subsurface drainage using laboratory woodchip bioreactors and recycled steel byproduct filters.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guanghui; Salo, Morgan W; Schmit, Christopher G; Hay, Christopher H

    2016-10-01

    Woodchip bioreactors have been increasingly used as an edge-of-field treatment technology to reduce the nitrate loadings to surface waters from agricultural subsurface drainage. Recent studies have shown that subsurface drainage can also contribute substantially to the loss of phosphate from agricultural soils. The objective of this study was to investigate nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage using laboratory woodchip bioreactors and recycled steel byproduct filters. The woodchip bioreactor demonstrated average nitrate removal efficiencies of 53.5-100% and removal rates of 10.1-21.6 g N/m(3)/d for an influent concentration of 20 mg N/L and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 6-24 h. When the influent nitrate concentration increased to 50 mg N/L, the bioreactor nitrate removal efficiency and rate averaged 75% and 18.9 g N/m(3)/d at an HRT of 24 h. Nitrate removal by the woodchips followed zero-order kinetics with rate constants of 1.42-1.80 mg N/L/h when nitrate was non-limiting. The steel byproduct filter effectively removed phosphate in the bioreactor effluent and the total phosphate adsorption capacity was 3.70 mg P/g under continuous flow conditions. Nitrite accumulation occurred in the woodchip bioreactor and the effluent nitrite concentrations increased with decreasing HRTs and increasing influent nitrate concentrations. The steel byproduct filter efficiently reduced the level of nitrite in the bioreactor effluent. Overall, the results of this study suggest that woodchip denitrification followed by steel byproduct filtration is an effective treatment technology for nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Effect of replacing surface inlets with blind or gravel inlets on sediment and phosphorus subsurface drainage losses.

    PubMed

    Feyereisen, Gary W; Francesconi, Wendy; Smith, Douglas R; Papiernik, Sharon K; Krueger, Erik S; Wente, Christopher D

    2015-03-01

    Open surface inlets that connect to subsurface tile drainage systems provide a direct pathway for movement of sediment, nutrients, and agrochemicals to surface waters. This study was conducted to determine the reduction in drainage effluent total suspended sediment (TSS) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and loads when open surface inlets were replaced with blind (in gravel capped with 30 cm of soil) or gravel (in very coarse sand/fine gravel) inlets. In Indiana, a pair of closed depressions in adjacent fields was fitted with open inlet tile risers and blind inlets in 2005 and monitored for flow and water chemistry. Paired comparisons on a storm event basis during the growing season for years 2006 to 2013 showed that TSS loads were 40.4 and 14.4 kg ha event for tile risers and blind inlets, respectively. Total P (TP) and soluble reactive P (SRP) loads were 66 and 50% less for the blind inlets, respectively. In Minnesota, TSS and SRP concentrations were monitored for 3 yr before and after modification of 24 open inlets to gravel inlets in an unreplicated large-field on-farm study. Median TSS concentrations were 97 and 8.3 mg L and median SRP concentrations were 0.099 and 0.064 mg L for the open inlet and gravel inlet periods, respectively. Median TSS and SRP concentrations were elevated for snowmelt vs. non-snowmelt seasons for open and gravel inlets. Both replacement designs reduced suspended sediment and P concentrations and loads. The Indiana study suggests blind inlets will be effective beyond a 10-yr service life.

  2. Occurrence of atrazine and degradates as contaminants of subsurface drainage and shallow groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Jayachandran, K.; Steinheimer, T.R.; Moorman, T.B.

    1994-03-01

    Atrazine is a commonly used herbicide in corn (Zea mays L.) growing areas of the USA. Because of its heavy usage, moderate persistence, and mobility in soil, monitoring of atrazine movement under field conditions is essential to assess its potential to contaminate groundwater. Concentrations of atrazine, deisopropylatrazine (DIA), and deethlatraaine (DEA) were measured in subsurface drainage and shallow groundwater beneath continuous, no-till corn. Water samples were collected from the subsurface drain (tile) outlets and suction lysimeters in the growing seasons of 1990 and 1991, and analyzed for atrazine and two principle degradates won solid-phase extraction and HPLC. In 1990, atrazine concentration ranged from 1.3 to 5.1{mu}g L{sup -1} in tile-drain water and from 0.5 to 20.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} in lysimeter water. In general, concentrations of parent and degradates in solution were atrazine > DEA > DIA. Lesser levels of atrazine were measured in 1991 from Plots 2 and 4; however, greater concentrations of atrazine (6.0-8.4 {mu}g L{sup -1}) were measured from plot 5. Throughout the two growing seasons, atrazine concentration in Plot 5 tile-drain water was greater than that of Plots 2 and 4, suggesting a preferential movement of atrazine. Concentrations of DIA and DEA ranged from 0.1 to 2.2 and 0.9 to 3.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} respectively, indicating that the degradation products by themselves or in combination with parent atrazine can exceed the maximum contaminant level (mcl) of 3 {mu}g L{sup -1} even though atrazine by itself may be <3 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The deethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratio (DAR) is an indicator of residence time in soil during transport of atrazine to groundwater. In Plots 2 and 4, DAR values for tile-drain water ranged from 0.43 to 2.70 and 0.50 to 2.66 respectively. By comparison, a DAR of 0.38 to 0.60 was observed in Plot 5, suggesting less residence time in the soil. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. 24 CFR 3280.610 - Drainage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... designs the system for site assembly and also provides all materials and components, including piping... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drainage systems. 3280.610 Section 3280.610 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued...

  4. Dynamics of nitrate and chloride during storm events in agricultural catchments with different subsurface drainage intensity (Indiana, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Casey D.; Bataille, Clement; Liu, Zhongfang; Ale, Srinivasulu; VanDeVelde, Justin; Roswell, Charles R.; Bowling, Laura C.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2012-10-01

    SummaryDrainage tiles buried beneath many naturally poorly drained agricultural fields in the Midwestern U.S. are believed to "short circuit" pools of NO3--laden soil water and shallow groundwater directly into streams that eventually discharge to the Mississippi River. Although much is known about the mechanisms controlling this regionally pervasive practice of artificial drainage at the field-plot scale, an integrative assessment of the effect of drainage density (i.e., the number of tile drains per unit area) on the transport of nutrients and solutes in streams at the catchment scale is lacking. In this study, we quantified the flux and hydrological pathways of agricultural NO3- and road-salt Cl- from catchments lying within the Wabash River Basin, a major source of NO3- to the Mississippi River. The paired catchments differ primarily in drainage density (70% vs. 31%, by catchment area), with essentially all other agricultural management, land use, and soil drainage characteristics remaining equal. Our study revealed two significant hydrological responses to increased drainage density: (1) more near-surface storm event water (dilute in both NO3- and Cl) was transported early in the storm and (2) higher transport of Cl--laden pre-event soil water relative to shallow groundwater elevated in NO3- occurred later in the storm. These patterns are consistent with a proposed conceptual model in which increased drainage density results in (1) greater transport of soil water to streams and (2) a delayed rise in the water table. With respect to nutrient management implications, these results indicate that increased drainage density impacts subsurface pools of Cl- and NO3- differently, a finding that we propose is linked to soil/ground water dynamics in artificially drained agricultural catchments.

  5. Impacts of drainage water management on subsurface drain flow, nitrate concentration, and nitrate loads in Indiana

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drainage water management is a conservation practice that has the potential to reduce drainage outflow and nitrate (NO3) loss from agricultural fields while maintaining or improving crop yields. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of drainage water management on dra...

  6. Impacts of drainage water management on subsurface drain flow, nitrate concentration, and nitrate loads in Indiana

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drainage water management is a conservation practice that has the potential to reduce drainage outflow and nitrate (NO3) loss from agricultural fields while maintaining or improving crop yields. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of drainage water management on dra...

  7. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton.

  8. Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

    2004-04-01

    The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

  9. Late Pleistocene drainage systems beneath Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Circe, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of an extensive grid of seismic-reflection profiles, along with previously published sedimentary data and geologic information from surrounding coastal areas, outline the ancestral drainage systems of the Delaware River beneath lower Delaware Bay. Major paleovalleys within these systems have southeast trends, relief of 10-35 m, widths of 1-8 km, and axial depths of 31-57 m below present sea level. The oldest drainage system was carved into Miocene sands, probably during the late Illinoian lowstand of sea level. It followed a course under the northern half of the bay, continued beneath the Cape May peninsula, and extended onto the present continental shelf. This system was buried by a transgressive sequence of fluvial, estuarine, and shallow-marine sediments during Sangamonian time. At the height of the Sangamonian sea-level transgression, littoral and nearshore processes built the Cape May peninsula southward over the northern drainage system and formed a contiguous submarine sedimentary ridge that extended partway across the present entrance to the bay. When sea level fell during late Wisconsinan time, a second drainage system was eroded beneath the southern half of the bay in response to the southerly shift of the bay mouth. This system, which continued across the shelf, was cut into Coastal Plain deposits of Miocene and younger age and included not only the trunk valley of the Delaware River but a large tributary valley formed by the convergence of secondary streams that drained the Delaware coastal area. During the Holocene rise of sea level, the southern drainage system was covered by a transgressive sequence of fluvial, estuarine, and paralic deposits that accumulated due to the passage of the estuarine circulation cell and to the landward and upward migration of coastal sedimentary environments. Some Holocene deposits have been scoured subsequently by strong tidal currents. The southward migration of the ancestral drainage systems beneath Delaware

  10. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  11. Preliminary results from agricultural drainage water management CIG projects on Ohio

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field demonstrations were monitored to compare the crop yields, drainage discharge, and nutrient loadings to streams from managed and unmanaged subsurface drainage systems. Paired drainage systems within the same field, under similar soil, area, cropping, and management conditions, were identified. ...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.610 - Drainage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... water seal trap (§ 3280.606(a)). (2) The drainage system shall be designed to provide an adequate circulation of air in all piping with no danger of siphonage, aspiration, or forcing of trap seals under... equipped with a water-tight cap or plug matching the drain outlet. The cap or plug shall be...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.610 - Drainage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... water seal trap (§ 3280.606(a)). (2) The drainage system shall be designed to provide an adequate circulation of air in all piping with no danger of siphonage, aspiration, or forcing of trap seals under... equipped with a water-tight cap or plug matching the drain outlet. The cap or plug shall be...

  14. Optimizing the closed suction surgical drainage system.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Katherine H; Eisemann, Bradley S; Lamp, Susan; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    Closed suction drains are indicated in a wide array of postoperative settings, with many distinct drainage systems available to the surgeon. The purpose of this study was to compare the suction gradients achieved using 2 different sizes of suction reservoirs and 2 different techniques for generating negative pressure. Drainage reservoirs of 100 and 400 ml were chosen to evaluate their ability to achieve suction. Suction was established in both sizes of drains by pressing the sides of the reservoir together or by pushing the bottom of the reservoir toward the top. Negative pressures were recorded with the reservoir empty, and after every 10-ml addition of saline. Averages were graphed to illustrate the applied suction over a range of drain volumes. The 100-ml drainage system reached a peak suction of -117.6 mmHg, while the 400-ml drainage system reached only a peak suction of -71.4 mmHg. Both of the maximum suction readings were achieved using the full-squeeze technique. The bottom-pushed-in technique did not result in any sustained measurable levels of suction using either of the reservoir volumes. Smaller drain reservoirs are more successful in generating a high initial suction than larger reservoirs, especially when the volume of fluid in the drain is relatively low. In all sizes of drains, compressing the sides of the reservoir is a far better technique for establishing negative pressure than pressing the bottom of the drain up toward the top.

  15. Quantifying subsurface hydrology effects on chemical transport in drainage ditches using a 20-meter flume

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agriculture drainage ditches serve as the veins of the Midwestern agricultural landscapes. The transport of chemical fertilizers and pesticides in these ditches affect the local and downstream ecosystems. Although much research has already been conducted on chemical transport in streams and drainage...

  16. Constructed wetland attenuation of nitrogen exported in subsurface drainage from irrigated and rain-fed dairy pastures.

    PubMed

    Tanner, C C; Nguyen, M L; Sukias, J P S

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen removal performance is reported for constructed wetlands treating subsurface drainage from irrigated and rain-fed dairy pastures in North Island, New Zealand. Flow-proportional sampling of inflow and outflow concentrations were combined with continuous flow records to calculate mass balances for the wetlands. Drainage flows from the irrigated catchment were 2.5-4 fold higher and N exports up to 5 fold higher per unit area than for the rain-fed catchment. Hydraulic and associated N loadings to the wetlands were highly pulsed, associated with rainfall, soil water status, and irrigation events. Transient pulses of organic nitrogen were an important form of N loss from the rain-fed landscape in the first year, and were very effectively removed in the wetland (> 90%). Median nitrate concentrations of approximately 10 g m(-3) in the drainage inflows were reduced by 15-67% during passage through the wetlands and annual nitrate-N loads by 16-61% (38-31 7 g N m(-2)y(-1)). Generation in the wetlands of net ammoniacal-N and organic-N (irrigated site) partially negated reduction in nitrate-N loads. The results show that constructed wetlands comprising 1-2% of catchment area can provide moderate reductions in TN export via pastoral drainage, but performance is markedly influenced by variations in seasonal loading and establishment/maturation factors.

  17. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  18. Variability of Near-stream, Sub-surface Major-ion and Tracer Concentrations in an Acid Mine Drainage Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Runkel, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    In acid mine drainage environments, tracer-injection and synoptic sampling approaches provide tools for making operational estimates of solute loading within a stream segment. Identifying sub-surface contaminant sources remains a challenge both for characterization of in-stream metal loading and hydrological process research. There is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along these flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Complicating the identification of inflows is the mixing of solute sources which may occur in the `near-stream' subsurface areas and specifically along hyporheic exchange flows (HEFs). In Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado), major-ion (SO42-, Cl-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) meter-scale sampling shows that subsurface inflows and likely HEFs occur in a hydro- geochemical setting of significant, one order-of-magnitude, spatial variation in the solute concentrations. Transient Storage Models (TSMs) are a tool for interpreting the in-stream responses of solute transport in streams influenced by hyporheic exchange flows. Simulations using the USGS TSM code OTIS are interpreted as suggesting that in Mineral Creek the strong concentration `tailing' of bromide following the tracer injection occurred, at least in part, from HEFs in a hydro - solute transport setting of likely multiple, dispersed and mixed sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the nominally gaining stream. In acid mine drainage environments, the ability to distinguish between local and deep solute sources is critical in modeling reactive transport along the stream, as well as in identifying the geochemical evolution of dispersed, subsurface inflows thorough the catchment.

  19. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  20. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  1. Use of Continuous Specific Conductance to Differentiate the Sources of Water to an Agricultural Stream With Subsurface Drainage Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. A.; Thornburg, J.; Capel, P. D.

    2008-12-01

    The sources of water to natural streams include direct precipitation, overland flow, and ground-water inflow. In glaciated areas, the presence of artificial surface and subsurface drainage networks, a common practice for removing excess water from agricultural fields, provides additional pathways of water movement to the stream. The artificial drainage of agricultural fields allows rainfall to move quickly through the catchment to the stream transporting nutrients, pesticides and other agricultural-related constituents. A largely agricultural (about 90%), 31 km2 subcatchment of the South Fork of the Iowa River in north-central Iowa was studied for two years. Discharge and specific conductance (SC) were measured continuously and discreet water samples were obtained for analyses of nutrients and other constituents. SC is an electrical measurement of the total ion content in the water. The SC of the rain and ground-water is about 10 microS/cm and 800-1,200 microS/cm, respectively. The typical, base-flow SC of the stream is 700-800 microS/cm. Within minutes after a substantial rain event, the stream discharge increases and the SC decreases (often times below 200"nmicroS/cm). The rain water is processed through the catchment before it reaches the stream via direct overland flow, preferential flow to subsurface drains, vertical drains attached to subsurface drains in ponded areas, and/or soil infiltration to ground-water. Water moving through each of these pathways has different characteristic time scales and different degrees of interactions with the soil yielding different ionic content, thus different SC. Both the discharge and SC concurrently return to the typical base-flow values over the following days and weeks. This strong relation between rainfall, discharge and SC is used to calculate the relative importance and time scale of the various hydrologic pathways. In addition to the two-year stream record, complementary discharge and SC data were collected in two

  2. Representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongyi; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-08-27

    Drainage systems can be categorized into natural or geomorphological drainage systems, agricultural drainage systems and urban drainage systems. They interact closely among themselves and with climate and human society, particularly under extreme climate and hydrological events such as floods. This editorial articulates the need to holistically understand and model drainage systems in the context of climate change and human influence, and discusses the requirements and examples of feasible approaches to representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework.

  3. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin [Houston, TX; Karanikas, John Michael [Houston, TX; Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX

    2011-10-25

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  4. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; McKinzie, II. Billy John

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  5. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  6. A Physically-based Model for Surface and Subsurface Drainage from Porous Pavement Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, B. J.; Barrett, M.; Charbeneau, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    A thin layer of porous asphalt is commonly overlain on regular impermeable pavement to reduce splash and spray and improve visibility in wet weather. The porous layer often has a large hydraulic conductivity (>1cm/s) to encourage infiltration and drainage and therefore contains runoff when the rainfall intensity is low. However, under high rainfall intensity, the layer’s capacity is exceeded and drainage occurs both within and on top of the porous pavement. The problem is analogous to hill-slope hydrology of a thin aquifer where infiltration occurs rapidly and sheet flow is generated only when the aquifer is full. Common roadway features such as slope transitions and curvature make the drainage two-dimensional. A computer model was developed to study this coupled, unsteady process. The porous layer is modeled using the Boussinesq equation. The diffusion wave model is used for sheet flow over the pavement surface. This presentation summarizes the model’s development, shows that model results compare favorably to field measurements, and gives a case study in which the porous layer reduces the maximum sheet flow depth by 25% compared to conventional pavement.

  7. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  8. Multiobjective Statistical Method for Interior Drainage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimes, Y. Y.; Loparo, K. A.; Olenik, S. C.; Nanda, S. K.

    1980-06-01

    In this paper the design of a levee drainage system is formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem in a probabilistic framework. The statistical nature of the problem is reflected by the probabilistic behavior of rainfall and river stage events in any given month. The multiobjective approach allows for the incorporation of noncommensurable objectives such as aesthetics, economics, and social issues into the optimization problem, providing a more realistic quantification of the impact of a flood or high water situation in an interior basin. A new method referred to as the multiobjective statistical method, which integrates statistical attributes with multiobjective optimization methodologies such as the surrogate worth trade-off method, is developed in this paper. A case study using data from the Moline area in Illinois suggests the use of the procedure.

  9. 24 CFR 3280.610 - Drainage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... siphonage, aspiration, or forcing of trap seals under conditions of ordinary use. (b) Materials—(1) Pipe... iron, or other listed or approved materials. (2) Fittings. Drainage fittings shall be recessed drainage pattern with smooth interior waterways of the same diameter as the piping and shall be of a...

  10. 24 CFR 3280.610 - Drainage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... iron, brass, copper tube DWV, listed plastic, cast iron, or other listed or approved materials. (2) Fittings. Drainage fittings shall be recessed drainage pattern with smooth interior waterways of the same... pipe shall be cast iron, malleable iron, brass, or listed plastic with standard pipe threads. (ii...

  11. Switching between hydrophobic and wettable conditions in soil: experiments to assess the influence of cracks, roots and subsurface drainage impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, E.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Shakesby, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Although much is known about soil hydrophobicity, assessments of the overall hydrological and erosional significance of the soil property in areas affected by it are greatly hampered by a lack of knowledge on switching between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states. This arises mainly because of (1) the destructive nature of methods of assessing hydrophobicity, (2) its often high local spatial variability and (3) difficulties of relating hydrophobicity results to meaningful soil moisture values. Also, very little is known about the influence which cracks and holes through hydrophobic soil and the presence or absence of subsurface impeding layers have on the 3D pattern and speed of hydrophobicity change during wetting and drying cycles. These issues form the focus of the present paper, which was carried out as part of the EU DESIRE Project. A laboratory experimental approach was adopted. Three different soils of equal initial hydrophibicity class when dry (18 % MED), but of contrasting texture and total carbon content, were investigated: (1) from the scrub-covered (dominated by Erica umbellata, Calluna vulgaris and Pterospartum tridentatum) Vale Torto catchment in Gois municipality, central Portugal (an area where the impacts of prescribed fire were being assessed); (2) soil around a Chamaecyparis lawsonia tree in South Wales; and (3) a vegetated coastal sand-dune location at Nicholaston, Gower Peninsula, South Wales. For the experiments, 106 samples of sieved (< 2 mm), dried soil were placed to a depth of 10 cm in standardized transparent pots (16.5 cm high, top diameter 16 cm, basal diameter 11 cm). Equal numbers of samples were prepared with either (i) five simulated holes, (ii) two simulated linear cracks (in both cases extending downwards to the sample base) and (iii) control soil samples without cracks or holes). Samples were also either (i) sealed at the base to create subsurface impeded drainage or (ii) provided with unimpeded basal drainage by insertion of

  12. Airport Pavement Drainage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    drainage layer and trench drains can be found in Cedergren (10). 4.2 COMPONENTS OF SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE SYSTEM 4.2.1 Outflow Once the water has found...According to Cedergren (10) the open graded aggregate can replace the normally used dense graded materials on an inch-for-inch basis. A main problem in...the perforated pipe to prevent fines from entering, Figure 4.24 (11). Cedergren (10) suggests that collector pipes should be 42 laid with the

  13. MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of contaminant transport through soil to groundwater to a receptor requires that consideration be given to the many processes which control the transport and fate of chemical constituents in the subsurface environment. These processes include volatilization, degradation,...

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM - BROWN & ROOT ENVIRONMENTAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS*) is an in-situ vacuum extraction/air sparging and bioremediation technology for the treatment of subsurface organic contamination in soil and groundwater. The technology, developed by Billings and Associates, Inc., and o...

  15. Evaluation of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for Roadway Drainage Systems.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Diana M; Grabowski, Marta K; Benitez, Amy C B; Schmidt, Arthur R; Guest, Jeremy S

    2017-08-15

    Roadway drainage design has traditionally focused on cost-effectively managing water quantity; however, runoff carries pollutants, posing risks to the local environment and public health. Additionally, construction and maintenance incur costs and contribute to global environmental impacts. While life cycle assessment (LCA) can potentially capture local and global environmental impacts of roadway drainage and other stormwater systems, LCA methodology must be evaluated because stormwater systems differ from wastewater and drinking water systems to which LCA is more frequently applied. To this end, this research developed a comprehensive model linking roadway drainage design parameters to LCA and life cycle costing (LCC) under uncertainty. This framework was applied to 10 highway drainage projects to evaluate LCA methodological choices by characterizing environmental and economic impacts of drainage projects and individual components (basin, bioswale, culvert, grass swale, storm sewer, and pipe underdrain). The relative impacts of drainage components varied based on functional unit choice. LCA inventory cutoff criteria evaluation showed the potential for cost-based criteria, which performed better than mass-based criteria. Finally, the local aquatic benefits of grass swales and bioswales offset global environmental impacts for four impact categories, highlighting the need to explicitly consider local impacts (i.e., direct emissions) when evaluating drainage technologies.

  16. 32. VIEW OF DRAINAGE SYSTEM AND WALL OF WELL AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF DRAINAGE SYSTEM AND WALL OF WELL AT CLOSER RANGE SHOWING VAULTED BRICK DRAIN AS IT ARCHED OUT FROM THE FOUNDATION (TO CENTER) - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  17. 26. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  18. SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration Test of Environmental Improvement Technologies’ (EIT) Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. The technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) ...

  19. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  20. Smouldering Subsurface Fires in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Smouldering fires, the slow, low-temperature, flameless form of combustion, are an important phenomena in the Earth system. These fires propagate slowly through organic layers of the forest ground and are responsible for 50% or more of the total biomass consumed during wildfires. Only after the 2002 study of the 1997 extreme haze event in South-East Asia, the scientific community recognised the environmental and economic threats posed by subsurface fires. This was caused by the spread of vast biomass fires in Indonesia, burning below the surface for months during the El Niño climate event. It has been calculated that these fires released between 0.81 and 2.57 Gton of carbon gases (13-40% of global emissions). Large smouldering fires are rare events at the local scale but occur regularly at a global scale. Once ignited, they are particularly difficult to extinguish despite extensive rains or fire-fighting attempts and can persist for long periods of time (months, years) spreading over very extensive areas of forest and deep into the soil. Indeed, these are the oldest continuously burning fires on Earth. Earth scientists are interested in smouldering fires because they destroy large amounts of biomass and cause greater damage to the soil ecosystem than flaming fires do. Moreover, these fires cannot be detected with current satellite remote sensing technologies causing inconsistencies between emission inventories and model predictions. Organic soils sustain smouldering fire (hummus, duff, peat and coal) which total carbon pool exceeds that of the world's forests or the atmosphere. This have important implications for climate change. Warmer temperatures at high latitudes are resulting in unprecedented permafrost thaw that is leaving large soil carbon pools exposed to fires. Because the CO2 flux from peat fires has been measured to be about 3000 times larger that the natural degradation flux, permafrost thaw is a risk for greater carbon release by fire and subsequently

  1. Artificial Lymphatic Drainage Systems for Vascularized Microfluidic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Truslow, James G.; Khankhel, Aimal H.; Chan, Kelvin L. S.; Tien, Joe

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a stably perfused microvasculature continues to be a major challenge in tissue engineering. Previous work has suggested the importance of a sufficiently large transmural pressure in maintaining vascular stability and perfusion. Here we show that a system of empty channels that provides a drainage function analogous to that of lymphatic microvasculature in vivo can stabilize vascular adhesion and maintain perfusion rate in dense, hydraulically resistive fibrin scaffolds in vitro. In the absence of drainage, endothelial delamination increased as scaffold density increased from 6 mg/mL to 30 mg/mL and scaffold hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor of twenty. Single drainage channels exerted only localized vascular stabilization, the extent of which depended on the distance between vessel and drainage as well as scaffold density. Computational modeling of these experiments yielded an estimate of 0.40–1.36 cm H2O for the minimum transmural pressure required for vascular stability. We further designed and constructed fibrin patches (0.8 by 0.9 cm2) that were perfused by a parallel array of vessels and drained by an orthogonal array of drainage channels; only with the drainage did the vessels display long-term stability and perfusion. This work underscores the importance of drainage in vascularization, especially when a dense, hydraulically resistive scaffold is used. PMID:23281125

  2. Evaluation of the lacrimal drainage system.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S D

    1978-12-01

    Methods of testing for lacrimal drainage insufficiency and a modification of the Jones fluorescein dye tests are presented. Despite their excellence, Jones tests have never been widely employed because of difficulty in dye retrieval. The modification consists of instilling one drop of the dye three times at 15 second intervals, and after a one minute period, placing the head down at a 45 degree angle for ten minutes. Anatomic and roentgenogram studies show that the dye can be easily lost posteriorly unless this is done. No nasal vasoconstrictors are used to avoid false negatives.

  3. Filter Fabrics for Airport Drainage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    Systems for *r- field Pavements," Harry R. Cedergren . d. "Development of Guidelines for the Design of Subsurfac( Drainage Systems for Highway Pavement...Structural 4Sectic s," H. R. Cedergren , J. A. Arman, and K. H. O’Brien. e. Drainage of Highway and Airfield Pavements, Harry R. Cedergren .> Five...by Cedergren (974).5 Additionally, several references were used, particularly those describing experimental anu construction prolects using filter

  4. Adequate drainage system design for heap leaching structures.

    PubMed

    Majdi, Abbas; Amini, Mehdi; Nasab, Saeed Karimi

    2007-08-17

    The paper describes an optimum design of a drainage system for a heap leaching structure which has positive impacts on both mine environment and mine economics. In order to properly design a drainage system the causes of an increase in the acid level of the heap which in turn produces severe problems in the hydrometallurgy processes must be evaluated. One of the most significant negative impacts induced by an increase in the acid level within a heap structure is the increase of pore acid pressure which in turn increases the potential of a heap-slide that may endanger the mine environment. In this paper, initially the thickness of gravelly drainage layer is determined via existing empirical equations. Then by assuming that the calculated thickness is constant throughout the heap structure, an approach has been proposed to calculate the required internal diameter of the slotted polyethylene pipes which are used for auxiliary drainage purposes. In order to adequately design this diameter, the pipe's cross-sectional deformation due to stepped heap structure overburden pressure is taken into account. Finally, a design of an adequate drainage system for the heap structure 2 at Sarcheshmeh copper mine is presented and the results are compared with those calculated by exiting equations.

  5. Analysis and modeling of flooding in urban drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Theo G.; Thomas, Martin; Ettrich, Norman

    2004-12-01

    The European research project in the EUREKA framework, RisUrSim (Σ!2255) is presented. The project consortium includes industrial mathematics and water engineering research institutes, municipal drainage works as well as an insurance company. The overall objective has been the development of an integrated planning and management tool to allow cost effective management for urban drainage systems. The paper outlines the regulatory background of European Standard EN 752 defining flood frequency as the one hydraulic performance criterion. The phenomenon of urban flooding caused by surcharged sewer systems in urban drainage systems is analyzed leading to the necessity of dual drainage modeling. A detailed dual drainage simulation model is described based upon hydraulic flow routing procedures for surface flow and pipe flow. Special consideration is given to the interaction between surface and sewer flow in order to most accurately compute water levels above ground as a basis for further assessment of possible damage costs. The model application is presented for small case study in terms of data needs, model verification and first simulation results.

  6. Crop yield summary for three wetland reservoir subirrigation systems in northwest Ohio

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wetland Reservoir Subirrigation Systems (WRSIS) are innovative agricultural water management and recycling systems comprised of three main components; a constructed wetland, a water storage reservoir, and cropland containing subsurface drainage pipe systems. Surface runoff and subsurface drainage f...

  7. Subsurface environment database for application of ground heat exchanger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, H.; Hachinohe, S.; Shiraishi, H.; Takashi, I.; Sasaka, K.; Miyakoshi, A.; Goto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Ground heat exchanger system is economical and environmentally friendly technology and widely used in Europe and North America, while it is rarely used in Japan. One of the causes is relatively complex topography and geological structure in Japan in comparison with those in Europe and North America. Complex structures produce regional differences in subsurface thermal properties and temperature structure, leading to regional variation in efficiency of heat exchanger system. It is thus important to evaluate available subsurface heat energy through thermal response tests and/or numerical simulation and to design appropriate systems (depth and number of boreholes for heat exchange). Information on subsurface environment in target areas is necessary for evaluation of potential subsurface heat energy, but little information has been published. Center for Environmental Science in Saitama is a research institute established by a local government, Saitama prefecture, which is located on the north of Tokyo and has a population of over seven million. We have been collecting various subsurface environmental data in Saitama (e.g., lithological column data on over 10,000 boreholes). We have compiled the accumulated data and obtained new data (geological information, subsurface temperature distribution, and hydrogeological properties) to construct a database for application of ground heat exchanger systems in Saitama. It is important to estimate demand for heat energy in the target areas as well as available subsurface heat energy. We therefore compile meteorological data (air temperature and solar radiation) necessary for estimation for the demand and investigate regional variation in meteorological condition. We intend to disclose the database and research products using web GIS (geographic information system) in the future. It will assist spread of ground heat exchanger systems in the target areas. Investigation methods of subsurface environment survey and database

  8. Evaluation of the sustainability of road drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Diez, Iván; Palencia, Covadonga; Fernández Raga, María

    2017-04-01

    Water is the most erosive agent that exists on the linear structures, because they are constantly subjected to outdoor condition like irregular infiltration, frosts and different rain intensities. Another variables that highly influence in the entire lifetime of a natural drainage system are the spatial and temporal variability of the rainfall, the soil, the vegetation cover and the design. All this factors are affecting the vulnerability of the clearings and embankments, by wearing away the weakest materials which surround the roads or train rails, producing erosion and very bumpy surfaces. The result is that the original pattern, developped to disminished the lost of soil, is not properly working and it cannot eliminate water, with the consequence destruction of the linear structure after several rainfall periods, and the accumulation of material down slope. The propose of this research focuses on analysing the drainage systems used in spanish roads and railways lines. For this purpose, a revision of the literature has been done, and the main drainage solutions have been recovered, carrying out an evaluation of them from an environmental point of view. This procedure has been requested by several authors in the past (Nwa, E.U. & Twocock, J.G., 1969; Goulter, I.C., 1992), together with the need of designing a more sustainable drainage system. The final objective of this complete revision is to compare objetively the designs to valuate them in order to develop a new drainage patter which minimize the erosion, increasing the durability and effectiveness of the drainage system. For this purpose, it is neccesary to assure that all the systems will be compare under similar parameters of flow rate, vegetation, substrate, lenght, slope and total section. Only the channels pattern and water distribution will change. The analysis has been done following Liu, H. & Zhu, X.B., (2012), who pointed out that the main parameters to take into account to select a road drainage

  9. Quaternary Reorganization of North American Mid-continent Drainage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, E. C.; Rawling, J. E., III; Attig, J. W.; Bates, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Identification of ancestral drainage systems in the North American mid-continent has been a topic of research and debate among geologists since the middle of the 19th Century. Over time our understanding of the significance of Quaternary glaciations in reshaping drainage patterns has grown. The ancestral Teays River, which drained large areas of the central Appalachians and flowed westward across Indiana and western Illinois, was dammed multiple times by Quaternary glaciers before finally being rerouted to the course of the modern central Ohio River. Similarly, the northward-flowing ancestral Pittsburgh River was dammed by pre-Illinoian glaciers; subsequent stream piracy converted this river system into the modern Allegheny, Monongahela and uppermost Ohio Rivers. Deposits and geomorphic features along the westward-flowing lower Wisconsin River indicate that the modern upper Mississippi River and Wisconsin River may have experienced a similar history of ice blockage, stream piracy, and radical rerouting. Coring into the Bridgeport strath terrace along the lower Wisconsin River reveals that the bedrock surface dips to the east, indicating the valley was cut by an eastward-flowing river. We believe the most likely scenario following this interpretation is that an ancestral river flowing along the modern upper Mississippi River valley made a sharp bend at Prairie du Chien, WI, and flowed eastward along the valley occupied by the modern lower Wisconsin River. This river, referred to here as the Wyalusing River, likely flowed northeastward into the Great Lakes (St. Lawrence) drainage until that path was blocked by ice advancing from the northwest. Subsequent stream piracy immediately south of the modern confluence of the Mississippi and Wisconsin Rivers rerouted these streams, converting them to the headwaters of the greater Mississippi drainage. The combined rerouting of these river systems into entirely different drainage basins necessitates significant fundamental

  10. Effect of dripline flushing on subsurface drip irrigation systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The velocity of dripline flushing in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems affects system design, cost, management, performance, and longevity. A 30-day field study was conducted at Kansas State University to analyze the effect of four targeted flushing velocities (0.23, 0.30, 0.46, and 0.61 m/s)...

  11. Effects of dripline flushing on subsurface drip irrigation systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The velocity of dripline flushing in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems affects system design, cost, management, performance, and longevity. A 30-day field study was conducted at Kansas State University to analyze the effect of four targeted flushing velocities (0.23, 0.30, 0.46, and 0.61 m/s)...

  12. Plug identification in drainage system using electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijriani, Arifa; Utama, Aji Surya; Boas, Andrianus; Mukti, M. Ridho; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    The evaluation of drainage system's performance is an important thing to do to prevent flooding. Conventionally the Government evaluates the drainage system by opening one by one the lid of drainage and detects the plug manually. This method is not effective and efficient because this method need many people, much time and relatively expensive. The purpose of this paper is to identify plugs in drainage system in G St. at Bandung Institute of Technology by using electromagnetic wave. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is one of geophysics method that using electromagnetic wave with high frequency. GPR is a non-destructive method with high resolution imaging for shallow depth (˜100m) and relatively cheap. We could identify the plug without opening the lid manually so that we could save much time. GPR's sensitivity is depends on resistivity, magnetic permeability, and permittivity of an object. The result of this research is we could identify the plug on the radargram that observed by a build-up amplitude anomaly.

  13. Yield response and economics of shallow subsurface drip irrigation systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field tests were conducted using shallow subsurface drip irrigation (S3DI) on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, L.), corn (Zea mays, L.), and peanut (Arachis hypogeae, L.) in rotation to investigate yield potential and economic sustainability of this irrigation system technique over a six year period. Dri...

  14. Estimating hydraulic conductivity for the Martian subsurface based on drainage patterns — A case study in the Mare Tyrrhenum Quadrangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Grudzinski, Bartosz; Pederson, Darryll

    2011-02-01

    Hydraulic conductivity K, as the coefficient of proportionality in Darcy's Law, is critical in understanding the past Martian hydrologic cycle, climate, and landform evolution. However, K and its spatial variability on Mars are thus far poorly constrained due to lack of accessibility. Using an innovative method based on surface drainage dissection patterns, which has been successfully tested in the Oregon Cascades on Earth, we estimated K in the Mare Tyrrhenum Quadrangle on Mars. The basic assumption is that under long-term dynamic equilibrium conditions, the overall dissection pattern in a watershed as reflected in drainage density is controlled by the interplay among surface runoff, groundwater flow, topography, and aquifer properties. K is calculated following a derivative of Darcy's Law under DuPuit-Forchheimer assumptions with drainage density D, valley depth d, recharge rate R, and aquifer thickness H as inputs. The results are consistent with the published K values and reveal spatial variability.

  15. Condensed research overview of agricultural drainage pipe detection and assessment using ground penetrating radar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural subsurface drainage practices are employed in many places throughout the world to remove excess water from soil, thereby improving crop production. In order to improve and evaluate the efficiency of these subsurface drainage systems, non-destructive methods are needed to not only locate...

  16. A hydrodynamic study of pleural drainage systems: some practical consequences.

    PubMed

    Manzanet, Gerardo; Vela, Antonio; Corell, Ricardo; Morón, Ramón; Calderón, Rogelio; Suelves, Consuelo

    2005-06-01

    A pleural drainage system must be capable of efficiently evacuating the air or fluids from the pleural cavity so that adequate lung reexpansion can take place. The air flow and negative pressure of the system will depend on the particular design of each model. This experimental study analyzes the specifications and performance of the pleural drainage systems currently on the market. Thirteen models of pleural drainage systems connected to wall suction were examined. The models were classified into the following three groups: dry systems; wet systems; and single-chamber systems. We determined the ambient air flow and the negative pressure generated according to the suction level. The components of each model are also described. Under normal conditions, dry (except for the Sentinel Seal; Sherwood Medical; Tullamore, Ireland), wet, and single-chamber systems reach similar air flow rates (17 to 30, 24 to 27, and 22 to 28 L/min, respectively). With higher wall suction levels, wet systems increase the air flow (26 to 49 L/min) but the negative pressure becomes unstable because of the water loss phenomenon, dry systems increase the air flow (29 to 50 L/min) without modifying the regulator pressure, and single-chamber systems also raise the air flow (45 to 51 L/min) but increase the negative pressure. When there is an air leak, dry systems (except for the Sentinel Seal) lose less negative pressure than the other systems. The functioning of these systems can be optimized only by applying a suitable wall suction level adjusted to each case. Although the three types of systems are capable of evacuating adequate air flow rates, the negative pressure and the capacity to maintain it in the presence of an air leak are different in each system. Being fitted with valves and not water compartments makes the dry systems the safest and the ideal for use when the patient has to be moved.

  17. Drilling systems for extraterrestrial subsurface exploration.

    PubMed

    Zacny, K; Bar-Cohen, Y; Brennan, M; Briggs, G; Cooper, G; Davis, K; Dolgin, B; Glaser, D; Glass, B; Gorevan, S; Guerrero, J; McKay, C; Paulsen, G; Stanley, S; Stoker, C

    2008-06-01

    Drilling consists of 2 processes: breaking the formation with a bit and removing the drilled cuttings. In rotary drilling, rotational speed and weight on bit are used to control drilling, and the optimization of these parameters can markedly improve drilling performance. Although fluids are used for cuttings removal in terrestrial drilling, most planetary drilling systems conduct dry drilling with an auger. Chip removal via water-ice sublimation (when excavating water-ice-bound formations at pressure below the triple point of water) and pneumatic systems are also possible. Pneumatic systems use the gas or vaporization products of a high-density liquid brought from Earth, gas provided by an in situ compressor, or combustion products of a monopropellant. Drill bits can be divided into coring bits, which excavate an annular shaped hole, and full-faced bits. While cylindrical cores are generally superior as scientific samples, and coring drills have better performance characteristics, full-faced bits are simpler systems because the handling of a core requires a very complex robotic mechanism. The greatest constraints to extraterrestrial drilling are (1) the extreme environmental conditions, such as temperature, dust, and pressure; (2) the light-time communications delay, which necessitates highly autonomous systems; and (3) the mission and science constraints, such as mass and power budgets and the types of drilled samples needed for scientific analysis. A classification scheme based on drilling depth is proposed. Each of the 4 depth categories (surface drills, 1-meter class drills, 10-meter class drills, and deep drills) has distinct technological profiles and scientific ramifications.

  18. Comparison between InfoWorks hydraulic results and a physical model of an urban drainage system.

    PubMed

    Rubinato, Matteo; Shucksmith, James; Saul, Adrian J; Shepherd, Will

    2013-01-01

    Urban drainage systems are frequently analysed using hydraulic modelling software packages such as InfoWorks CS or MIKE-Urban. The use of such modelling tools allows the evaluation of sewer capacity and the likelihood and impact of pluvial flood events. Models can also be used to plan major investments such as increasing storage capacity or the implementation of sustainable urban drainage systems. In spite of their widespread use, when applied to flooding the results of hydraulic models are rarely compared with field or laboratory (i.e. physical modelling) data. This is largely due to the time and expense required to collect reliable empirical data sets. This paper describes a laboratory facility which will enable an urban flood model to be verified and generic approaches to be built. Results are presented from the first phase of testing, which compares the sub-surface hydraulic performance of a physical scale model of a sewer network in Yorkshire, UK, with downscaled results from a calibrated 1D InfoWorks hydraulic model of the site. A variety of real rainfall events measured in the catchment over a period of 15 months (April 2008-June 2009) have been both hydraulically modelled and reproduced in the physical model. In most cases a comparison of flow hydrographs generated in both hydraulic and physical models shows good agreement in terms of velocities which pass through the system.

  19. Approach for evaluating inundation risks in urban drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Chen, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Urban inundation is a serious challenge that increasingly confronts the residents of many cities, as well as policymakers. Hence, inundation evaluation is becoming increasingly important around the world. This comprehensive assessment involves numerous indices in urban catchments, but the high-dimensional and non-linear relationship between the indices and the risk presents an enormous challenge for accurate evaluation. Therefore, an approach is hereby proposed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate inundation risks in urban drainage systems based on a storm water management model, the projection pursuit method, the ordinary kriging method and the K-means clustering method. This approach is tested using a residential district in Guangzhou, China. Seven evaluation indices were selected and twenty rainfall-runoff events were used to calibrate and validate the parameters of the rainfall-runoff model. The inundation risks in the study area drainage system were evaluated under different rainfall scenarios. The following conclusions are reached. (1) The proposed approach, without subjective factors, can identify the main driving factors, i.e., inundation duration, largest water flow and total flood amount in this study area. (2) The inundation risk of each manhole can be qualitatively analyzed and quantitatively calculated. There are 1, 8, 11, 14, 21, and 21 manholes at risk under the return periods of 1-yr, 5-yr, 10-yr, 20-yr, 50-yr and 100-yr, respectively. (3) The areas of levels Ⅲ, Ⅳ and Ⅴ increase with increasing rainfall return period based on analyzing the inundation risks for a variety of characteristics. (4) The relationships between rainfall intensity and inundation-affected areas are revealed by a logarithmic model. This study proposes a novel and successful approach to assessing risk in urban drainage systems and provides guidance for improving urban drainage systems and inundation preparedness.

  20. 27. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) BUT CLOSER RANGE SHOWING BRICK STRUCTURE WHICH CARRIED WATER FROM THE GUTTER DRAIN PIPE INTO THE BRICK DRAIN ALONG THE GROUND AND AWAY FROM THE FOUNDATION OF THE HOUSE - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  1. Approach for evaluating inundation risks in urban drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhihua; Chen, Zhihe; Chen, Xiaohong; He, Peiying

    2016-05-15

    Urban inundation is a serious challenge that increasingly confronts the residents of many cities, as well as policymakers. Hence, inundation evaluation is becoming increasingly important around the world. This comprehensive assessment involves numerous indices in urban catchments, but the high-dimensional and non-linear relationship between the indices and the risk presents an enormous challenge for accurate evaluation. Therefore, an approach is hereby proposed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate inundation risks in urban drainage systems based on a storm water management model, the projection pursuit method, the ordinary kriging method and the K-means clustering method. This approach is tested using a residential district in Guangzhou, China. Seven evaluation indices were selected and twenty rainfall-runoff events were used to calibrate and validate the parameters of the rainfall-runoff model. The inundation risks in the study area drainage system were evaluated under different rainfall scenarios. The following conclusions are reached. (1) The proposed approach, without subjective factors, can identify the main driving factors, i.e., inundation duration, largest water flow and total flood amount in this study area. (2) The inundation risk of each manhole can be qualitatively analyzed and quantitatively calculated. There are 1, 8, 11, 14, 21, and 21 manholes at risk under the return periods of 1-year, 5-years, 10-years, 20-years, 50-years and 100-years, respectively. (3) The areas of levels III, IV and V increase with increasing rainfall return period based on analyzing the inundation risks for a variety of characteristics. (4) The relationships between rainfall intensity and inundation-affected areas are revealed by a logarithmic model. This study proposes a novel and successful approach to assessing risk in urban drainage systems and provides guidance for improving urban drainage systems and inundation preparedness.

  2. Transient age distributions in subsurface hydrologic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; McCallum, James L.; Massoudieh, Arash

    2016-12-01

    Transient age distributions have received relatively little attention in the literature over the years compared to their steady-state counterparts. All natural systems are transient given enough time and it is becoming increasingly clear that understanding these effects and how they deviate from steady conditions will be important in the future. This article provides a high-level overview of the equations, techniques, and challenges encountered when considering transient age distributions. The age distribution represents the amount of water in a sample belonging to a particular age and the transient case implies that sampling the same location at two different times will result in different age distributions. These changes may be caused by transience in the boundary conditions, forcings (inputs), or physical changes in the geometry of the flow system. The governing equation for these problems contains separate dimensions for age and time and its solutions are more involved than the solute transport or steady-state age equations. Despite the complexity, many solutions have been derived for simplified, but transient, approximations and several numerical techniques exist for modeling more complex transient age distributions. This paper presents an overview of the existing solutions and contributes new examples of transient characteristic solutions and transient particle tracking simulations. The limitations for applying the techniques described herein are no longer theoretical or technological, but are now dominated by uncertainty in the physical properties of the flow systems and the lack of data for the historic inputs.

  3. SUBSURFACE BARRIER VALIDATION WITH THE SEAFACE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn

    1997-11-30

    The overall objective of the effort was to develop and demonstrate an integrated methodology and field system to evaluate the integrity of in situ, impermeable barriers constructed in the vadose zone. An autonomous, remotely accessible, automatic monitoring and analysis system was designed and fabricated. It was thoroughly tested under field conditions, and was able to function as designed throughout the test period. Data inversion software was developed with enhanced capabilities over the previous prototype version, and integrated with the monitoring system for real time operation. Analytical simulations were performed to determine the inversion code's sensitivity to model parameters. Numerical simulations were performed to better understand how typical field conditions differ from the ideal model(s) which are used (or have been developed for use) in the inversion code and to further validate the flux limited forward model developed for use with the system. Results from the analytical and numerical assessment of the inversion code showed that the SEAtrace{trademark} approach could locate leaks within 0.4 to 1.2 m. Leak size determination was less accurate, but produced results within a factor of 3 to 8 for leaks in the 2.5 to 10 cm diameter range. The smallest engineered leak in the test 1.1 cm diameter, could be located but its size estimate was high by a factor of 30. Data analysis was performed automatically after each gas scan was completed, yielding results in less than thirty minutes, although the bulk of the results reported required post test data analysis to remove effects of high background concentrations. The field test of the integrated system was problematic, primarily due to unanticipated, unintentional leaks formed in the impermeable liner. The test facility constructed to proof the system was ambitious, initially having 11 engineered leaks of various dimensions that could be independently operated. While a great deal of care went into the

  4. Modeling leakage pathways in subsurface formations. Fluid drainage through multiple fractures in porous media: Insights from Hele Shaw cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sujata

    2017-04-01

    Arresting the recent observed warming of the earth's climate is a challenge requiring the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. One option for reducing emissions into the atmosphere is to capture and sequester the released carbon dioxide in geological formations. However, potential geological storage first requires a risk assessment of carbon dioxide escaping to overlying layers and back to the atmosphere through leakage pathways in the formation. This, in turn, requires an understanding of fluid flow through the leakage pathways. In this study, the effect of leakage pathways on the flow of a gravity current was investigated, using an analogue system, a Hele-Shaw cell. Fluid was introduced through the top edge of the cell and flowed out through one or more holes in its impermeable base. The height of the accumulated fluid above the base of the cell at various points along its length and the outflow rate of fluid through the holes was measured. This measurement was conducted with varying conditions of the location, number and strength of source as well as the location and number of holes. At steady state, the fluid motion was in accordance with Darcy's law for horizontal flow in a long thin current. In another set of experiments, in which inflow was stopped and the fluid was allowed to drain out of a single open hole, the outflow rate was in accordance with Darcy's law for one-dimensional flow in the vertical direction until the fluid height above the hole fell below a certain limit. This threshold height was found to be 1.3 cm, which was similar in magnitude to the length of the hole. A time series of photographs tracked the flow of colored dye. The photographs demonstrated that at steady state the fluid traveled for some distance beyond the hole before draining through it. This implies that contaminants may be transported in a formation even beyond an outlet before finally draining out through it. The photographs also documented the shape of the

  5. Numeric Modeling of Valley Networks and Drainage Systems on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A.

    2006-12-01

    Valley networks observed on Mars are often invoked to support the historical presence of water on the surface of Mars. There is a need for quantification of these networks and the drainage processes associated with them. Numerical modeling of these streams and drainage basins within a GIS environment allows for rapid assessment of hydrologic surface processes. In this study, several areas of valley networks which had been previously mapped visually using Viking, MOC, and MOLA datasets were re-examined using numeric processes and tools available in ArcGIS. Specifically, stream length and drainage density were quantified using the MOLA gridded DEM and ArcGIS tools. This process is significantly faster than the visual identification and delineation techniques used in the past. The project sought to test whether or not computer-assisted techniques were comparable in accuracy and precision to previous studies using visual techniques. To do this, two quadrangles previously visually mapped by Carr (1995) and Hynek and Phillips (2003) were analyzed. Total valley network length at the first site was found to be 18,300 km, compared to previous estimates of 1,308 km (Carr) and 11,100 km (Hynek and Phillips). Drainage density was calculated to be 0.0605/km, compared to previous estimates of 0.0076/km (Carr) and 0.065/km (Hynek and Phillips). The highest stream order found was 5th, compared to 3rd (Carr) and 6th (Hynek and Phillips). In the second quadrangle, total valley network length was measured at 4,010 km, compared to 453 km and 3,496 km. The drainage density was calculated to be 0.068/km, compared to 0.011/km and 0.082/km. The highest stream order found was 4th, compared to 2nd and 5th. Results were very similar to those using visual interpretation of MOC shaded relief by Hynek and Phillips. A difference in stream order, however, suggests that the computer-aided technique may not connect systems that visually have been connected. Still, automated results offer an

  6. Method of sealing casings of subsurface materials management system

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-02-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  7. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, Guy G.; Weidner, Jerry R.; Farnsworth, Richard K.; Gardner, Bradley M.; Jessmore, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  8. Estimation of lateral water flow and bromide transport in a subsurface seepage irrigation system.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Y

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface seepage irrigation is a common method used by growers in the Tri-County Agricultural Area (TCAA), Florida, USA, owing to its cost-effectiveness and low maintenance requirements. This study investigated the lateral flow of the perched water and the lateral transport of bromide (Br-) in this irrigation system in the TCAA and estimated the potential discharge of Br- into the drainage canals at the edges of the field, using the Visual MODFLOW/ MT3DMS models in conjunction with field experiments. Simulations showed that the perched water flowed from the northeast to the southwest of the field. Migration of the Br- plume from the source areas toward the canals was very slow and varied depending on the selection of the outer Br- concentration contour levels. However, the lateral transport of Br- from the perched water into the canals occurred after about 61 days. The simulations further revealed that the rate of perched water Br- discharge into the canals averaged 8.6 g day(-1) during a 30-day discharge period (from 61 to 91 days). This rate is very important for estimating Br- discharge into the canals and could also provide useful information for evaluating dissolved nutrient discharge into canals from the subsurface seepage irrigation system.

  9. Hormones, sterols, and fecal indicator bacteria in groundwater, soil, and subsurface drainage following a high single application of municipal biosolids to a field.

    PubMed

    Gottschall, N; Topp, E; Edwards, M; Payne, M; Kleywegt, S; Russell, P; Lapen, D R

    2013-04-01

    A land application of dewatered municipal biosolids (DMB) was conducted on an agricultural field in fall 2008 at a rate of 22Mg dry weight (dw) ha(-1). Pre- and post- application, hormone, sterol and fecal indicator bacteria concentrations were measured in tile drainage water, groundwater (2, 4, 6m depth), surface soil cores, and DMB aggregates incorporated in the soil (∼0.2m depth) for a period of roughly 1year post-application. Hormones and sterols were detected up to 1year post-application in soil and in DMB aggregates. Hormone (androsterone, desogestrel, estrone) contamination was detected briefly in tile water samples (22d and ∼2months post-app), at lowngL(-1) concentrations (2-34ngL(-1)). Hormones were not detected in groundwater. Sterols were detected in tile water throughout the study period post-application, and multiple fecal sterol ratios suggested biosolids as the source. Coprostanol concentrations in tile water peaked at >1000ngL(-1) (22d post-app) and were still >100ngL(-1) at 6months post-application. Fecal indicator bacteria were detected throughout the study period in tile water, groundwater (⩽2m depth), soil and DMB aggregate samples. These bacteria were strongly linearly related to coprostanol in tile water (R(2)>0.92, p<0.05). The limited transport of hormones and sterols to tile drainage networks may be attributed to a combination of the hydrophobicity of these compounds and limited macroporosity of the field soil. This transitory contamination from hormones and sterols is unlikely to result in any significant pulse exposure risk in subsurface drainage and groundwater. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. IMPACT OF REDOX DISEQUILIBRIA ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning to mineral surfaces exerts significant control on inorganic contaminant transport in subsurface systems. Remedial technologies for in-situ treatment of subsurface contamination are frequently designed to optimize the efficiency of contaminant partitioning to solid s...

  11. IMPACT OF REDOX DISEQUILIBRIA ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning to mineral surfaces exerts significant control on inorganic contaminant transport in subsurface systems. Remedial technologies for in-situ treatment of subsurface contamination are frequently designed to optimize the efficiency of contaminant partitioning to solid s...

  12. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  13. Agricultural drainage pipe detection using ground penetrating radar: Effects of antenna orientation relative to drainage pipe directional trend

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Locating buried agricultural drainage pipes is a difficult problem confronting farmers and land improvement contractors, especially in the Midwest U.S., where the removal of excess soil water using subsurface drainage systems is a common farm practice. Enhancing the efficiency of soil water removal ...

  14. A GPR agricultural drainage pipe detection case study: Effects of antenna orientation relative to drainage pipe directional trend

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Locating buried drainage pipes is a difficult task confronting farmers and land improvement contractors, especially in the Midwest U.S., where the removal of excess soil water using subsurface drainage systems is a common farm practice. Enhancing the efficiency of soil water removal on land containi...

  15. Subsurface barrier validation with the SEAtrace{trademark} system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn; William Lowry; Veraun Chipman

    1999-09-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, Science and Engineering Associates has completed development and testing of a subsurface barrier verification and monitoring system. This system, called SEAtrace{trademark}, is able to locate and size leaks with a high degree of accuracy in subsurface barriers that are emplaced in an unsaturated medium. It uses gaseous tracer injection, in-field real-time monitoring, and real time data analysis to evaluate barrier integrity. The approach is: Conservative as it measures vapor leaks in a containment system whose greatest risk is posed by liquid leaks; Applicable to any impermeable type of barrier emplacement technology in the unsaturated zone; Inexpensive as it uses readily available, non-toxic, nonhazardous gaseous tracers, does not require an inordinately large number of sampling points, and injection and sampling points can be emplaced by direct push techniques; Capable of assessing not only a barrier's initial integrity, but can also provide long-term monitoring. To date, six demonstrations of the system have been completed. Results from two of the demonstrations are detailed in this report. They include the final developmental demonstration of the SEAtrace system and a comparison demonstration of two tracer based verification technologies. The final developmental demonstration of SEAtrace was completed at a naval facility in Brunswick, Maine. The demonstration was funded solely by the DOE and was performed in cooperation with the US Navy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

  16. An integrated urban drainage system model for assessing renovation scheme.

    PubMed

    Dong, X; Zeng, S; Chen, J; Zhao, D

    2012-01-01

    Due to sustained economic growth in China over the last three decades, urbanization has been on a rapidly expanding track. In recent years, regional industrial relocations were also accelerated across the country from the east coast to the west inland. These changes have led to a large-scale redesign of urban infrastructures, including the drainage system. To help the reconstructed infrastructures towards a better sustainability, a tool is required for assessing the efficiency and environmental performance of different renovation schemes. This paper developed an integrated dynamic modeling tool, which consisted of three models for describing the sewer, the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and the receiving water body respectively. Three auxiliary modules were also incorporated to conceptualize the model, calibrate the simulations, and analyze the results. The developed integrated modeling tool was applied to a case study in Shenzhen City, which is one of the most dynamic cities and facing considerable challenges for environmental degradation. The renovation scheme proposed to improve the environmental performance of Shenzhen City's urban drainage system was modeled and evaluated. The simulation results supplied some suggestions for the further improvement of the renovation scheme.

  17. Regional view of a Trans-African Drainage System

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkareem, Mohamed; El-Baz, Farouk

    2014-01-01

    Despite the arid to hyperarid climate of the Great Sahara of North Africa, pluvial climates dominated the region. Radar data shed some light on the postulated Trans-African Drainage System and its relationship to active and inactive tributaries of the Nile basin. Interpretations of recent elevation data confirm a source of the river water from the Red Sea highlands did not connect the Atlantic Ocean across Tushka basin, highlands of Uwinate and Darfur, and Chad basin, but northward to the ancestral Nile Delta. Elements of topography and climate were considered. They show that the former segments of the Nile closely mirror present-day tributaries of the Nile basin in drainage geometry, landscape, and climate. A rainfall data interpolation scenario revealed that this basin received concurrent runoff from both flanks such as Gabgaba-Allaqi to the east and Tushka basin to the west, similar to present-day Sobat and White Nile tributaries, respectively. Overall the western tributaries such as those of Tushka basin and Howar lead to the Nile, which was (and still is) the biggest river system in Africa. PMID:26257941

  18. Exploring Agricultural Drainage's Influence on Wetland and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Artificial agricultural drainage (i.e. surface ditches or subsurface tile) is an important agricultural management tool. Artificial drainage allows for timely fieldwork and adequate root aeration, resulting in greater crop yields for farmers. This practice is widespread throughout many regions of the United States and the network of artificial drainage is especially extensive in flat, poorly-drained regions like the glaciated Midwest. While beneficial for crop yields, agricultural drains often empty into streams within the natural drainage system. The increased network connectivity may lead to greater contributing area for watersheds, altered hydrology and increased conveyance of pollutants into natural water bodies. While studies and models at broader scales have implicated artificial drainage as an important driver of hydrological shifts and eutrophication, the actual spatial extent of artificial drainage is poorly known. Consequently, metrics of wetland and watershed connectivity within agricultural regions often fail to explicitly include artificial drainage. We use recent agricultural census data, soil drainage data, and land cover data to create estimates of potential agricultural drainage across the United States. We estimate that agricultural drainage in the US is greater than 31 million hectares and is concentrated in the upper Midwest Corn Belt, covering greater than 50% of available land for 114 counties. Estimated drainage values for numerous countie

  19. Structure and evolution of the drainage system of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier, and its relationship with patterns of mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, Douglas I.; Thompson, Sarah; Gulley, Jason; Mertes, Jordan; Luckman, Adrian; Nicholson, Lindsey

    2017-09-01

    We provide the first synoptic view of the drainage system of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier and its evolution through time, based on speleological exploration and satellite image analysis of Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal. The drainage system has several linked components: (1) a seasonal subglacial drainage system below the upper ablation zone; (2) supraglacial channels, allowing efficient meltwater transport across parts of the upper ablation zone; (3) sub-marginal channels, allowing long-distance transport of meltwater; (4) perched ponds, which intermittently store meltwater prior to evacuation via the englacial drainage system; (5) englacial cut-and-closure conduits, which may undergo repeated cycles of abandonment and reactivation; and (6) a "base-level" lake system (Spillway Lake) dammed behind the terminal moraine. The distribution and relative importance of these elements has evolved through time, in response to sustained negative mass balance. The area occupied by perched ponds has expanded upglacier at the expense of supraglacial channels, and Spillway Lake has grown as more of the glacier surface ablates to base level. Subsurface processes play a governing role in creating, maintaining, and shutting down exposures of ice at the glacier surface, with a major impact on spatial patterns and rates of surface mass loss. Comparison of our results with observations on other glaciers indicate that englacial drainage systems play a key role in the response of debris-covered glaciers to sustained periods of negative mass balance.

  20. Impact of tile drainage on evapotranspiration in South Dakota, USA, based on high spatiotemporal resolution evapotranspiration time series from a multi-satellite data fusion system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Yun; Anderson, Martha C.; Gao, Feng; Hain, Christopher; Kustas, William P.; Meyers, Tilden P.; Crow, Wade; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Otkin, Jason; Sun, Liang; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Soil drainage is a widely used agricultural practice in the midwest USA to remove excess soil water to potentially improve the crop yield. Research shows an increasing trend in baseflow and streamflow in the midwest over the last 60 years, which may be related to artificial drainage. Subsurface drainage (i.e., tile) in particular may have strongly contributed to the increase in these flows, because of its extensive use and recent gain in the popularity as a yield-enhancement practice. However, how evapotranspiration (ET) is impacted by tile drainage on a regional level is not well-documented. To explore spatial and temporal ET patterns and their relationship to tile drainage, we applied an energy balance-based multisensor data fusion method to estimate daily 30-m ET over an intensively tile-drained area in South Dakota, USA, from 2005 to 2013. Results suggest that tile drainage slightly decreases the annual cumulative ET, particularly during the early growing season. However, higher mid-season crop water use suppresses the extent of the decrease of the annual cumulative ET that might be anticipated from widespread drainage. The regional water balance analysis during the growing season demonstrates good closure, with the average residual from 2005 to 2012 as low as -3 mm. As an independent check of the simulated ET at the regional scale, the water balance analysis lends additional confidence to the study. The results of this study improve our understanding of the influence of agricultural drainage practices on regional ET, and can affect future decision making regarding tile drainage systems.

  1. Impact of tile drainage on evapotranspiration in South Dakota, USA based on high spatiotemporal resolution ET timeseries from a multi-satellite data fusion system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil drainage is a widely used agricultural practice in the Midwest USA to remove excess soil water for better crop yield. Research shows an increasing trend in baseflow and streamflow in the Midwest over the last 60 years, which may be related to artificial drainage. Subsurface drainage (i.e., tile...

  2. Moat flow system around sunspots in shallow subsurface layers

    SciTech Connect

    Švanda, Michal; Sobotka, Michal; Bárta, Tomáš

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the subsurface moat flow system around McIntosh H-type symmetrical sunspots and compare it to the flow system within supergranular cells. Representatives of both types of flows are constructed by means of the statistical averaging of flow maps obtained by time-distance helioseismic inversions. We find that moat flows around H-type sunspots replace supergranular flows but there are two principal differences between the two phenomena: the moat flow is asymmetrical, probably due to the proper motion of sunspots with respect to the local frame of rest, while the flow in the supergranular cell is highly symmetrical. Furthermore, the whole moat is a downflow region, while the supergranule contains the upflow in the center, which turns into the downflow at about 60% of the cell radius from its center. We estimate that the mass downflow rate in the moat region is at least two times larger than the mass circulation rate within the supergranular cell.

  3. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SUBSURFACE LIGHTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Fernandez

    1998-09-09

    The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Subsurface Lighting System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, and the technical baseline requirements are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

  4. The evolution of cave systems from the surface to subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G. ); Handford, C.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Many carbonate reservoirs are the result of cave-forming processes. The origin and recognition of fractures, breccias, and sediment fills associated with paleocaves were determined through the study of modern and paleocaves systems. Cave formation and destruction are the products of near-surface processes. Near-surface processes include solutional excavation, clastic and chemical sedimentation, and collapse of cave walls and ceilings. Cave sediment is derived from inside and/or outside the system. Depositional mechanisms include suspension, tractional, mass-flow and rock-fall. Collapse of ceilings and walls from chaotic breakdown breccias. These piles can be tens of meters thick and contain large voids and variable amounts of matrix. Cave-roof crackle breccia forms from stress-and tension-related fractures in cave-roof strata. As the cave-bearing strata subside into the subsurface, mechanical compaction increases and restructures the existing breccias and remaining cavities. Fracture porosity increases and breccia and vug porosity decreases. Large cavities collapse forming burial chaotic breakdown breccias. Differentially compacted strata over the collapsed chamber fracture and form burial cave-roof crackle breccias. Continued burial leads to more extensive mechanical compaction causing previously formed clasts to fracture and pack closer together. The resulting product is a rebrecciated chaotic breakdown breccia composed predominantly of small clasts. Rebrecciated blocks are often overprinted by crackling. Subsurface paleocave systems commonly have a complex history with several episodes of fracturing and brecciation. The resulting collapsed-paleocave reservoir targets are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across.

  5. The evolution of cave systems from the surface to subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Handford, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Many carbonate reservoirs are the result of cave-forming processes. The origin and recognition of fractures, breccias, and sediment fills associated with paleocaves were determined through the study of modern and paleocaves systems. Cave formation and destruction are the products of near-surface processes. Near-surface processes include solutional excavation, clastic and chemical sedimentation, and collapse of cave walls and ceilings. Cave sediment is derived from inside and/or outside the system. Depositional mechanisms include suspension, tractional, mass-flow and rock-fall. Collapse of ceilings and walls from chaotic breakdown breccias. These piles can be tens of meters thick and contain large voids and variable amounts of matrix. Cave-roof crackle breccia forms from stress-and tension-related fractures in cave-roof strata. As the cave-bearing strata subside into the subsurface, mechanical compaction increases and restructures the existing breccias and remaining cavities. Fracture porosity increases and breccia and vug porosity decreases. Large cavities collapse forming burial chaotic breakdown breccias. Differentially compacted strata over the collapsed chamber fracture and form burial cave-roof crackle breccias. Continued burial leads to more extensive mechanical compaction causing previously formed clasts to fracture and pack closer together. The resulting product is a rebrecciated chaotic breakdown breccia composed predominantly of small clasts. Rebrecciated blocks are often overprinted by crackling. Subsurface paleocave systems commonly have a complex history with several episodes of fracturing and brecciation. The resulting collapsed-paleocave reservoir targets are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across.

  6. Illinois drainage water management demonstration project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitts, D.J.; Cooke, R.; Terrio, P.J.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Due to naturally high water tables and flat topography, there are approximately 4 million ha (10 million ac) of farmland artificially drained with subsurface (tile) systems in Illinois. Subsurface drainage is practiced to insure trafficable field conditions for farm equipment and to reduce crop stress from excess water within the root zone. Although drainage is essential for economic crop production, there have been some significant environmental costs. Tile drainage systems tend to intercept nutrient (nitrate) rich soil-water and shunt it to surface water. Data from numerous monitoring studies have shown that a significant amount of the total nitrate load in Illinois is being delivered to surface water from tile drainage systems. In Illinois, these drainage systems are typically installed without control mechanisms and allow the soil to drain whenever the water table is above the elevation of the tile outlet. An assessment of water quality in the tile drained areas of Illinois showed that approximately 50 percent of the nitrate load was being delivered through the tile systems during the fallow period when there was no production need for drainage to occur. In 1998, a demonstration project to introduce drainage water management to producers in Illinois was initiated by NRCS4 An initial aspect of the project was to identify producers that were willing to manage their drainage system to create a raised water table during the fallow (November-March) period. Financial assistance from two federal programs was used to assist producers in retrofitting the existing drainage systems with control structures. Growers were also provided guidance on the management of the structures for both water quality and production benefits. Some of the retrofitted systems were monitored to determine the effect of the practice on water quality. This paper provides background on the water quality impacts of tile drainage in Illinois, the status of the demonstration project, preliminary

  7. Feasibility study of a self-remediation system for mine drainage using its thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chamteut; Cheong, Youngwook; Yim, Giljae; Ji, Sangwoo

    2016-04-01

    Mine drainage is defined as the water which is discharged to the ground surface through shafts and/or cracks formed by mining activities. Typically, mine drainage features high concentration of acidity and metals since it passes through the underground. Therefore, for the purpose of protecting the surrounding natural environment, mine drainage should be remediated before being discharged to nature. Mine drainage, due to its nature of being retained underground, shows constant temperature which is independent from the temperature of the atmosphere above ground. This condition allows mine drainage to become a promising renewable energy source since energy can be recovered from water with constant temperature. In this research, a self-remediation system is proposed which remediates the mine drainage through electrochemical reactions powered by the thermal energy of mine drainage. High energy efficiency is able to be achieved by shortening the distance between the energy source and consumption, and therefore, this system has a strong advantage to be actualized. A feasibility study for the system was conducted in this research where the thermal energy of mine drainage over time and depth was calculated as energy supply and the required electrical energy for remediating the mine drainage was measured as energy consumption. While the technology of converting thermal energy directly into electrical energy is yet to be developed, energy balance analysis results showed that the proposed self-remediation system is theoretically possible.

  8. Comparative analysis of the outflow water quality of two sustainable linear drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Valeri, V C; Castro-Fresno, D; Sañudo-Fontaneda, L A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, J

    2014-01-01

    Three different drainage systems were built in a roadside car park located on the outskirts of Oviedo (Spain): two sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS), a swale and a filter drain; and one conventional drainage system, a concrete ditch, which is representative of the most frequently used roadside drainage system in Spain. The concentrations of pollutants were analyzed in the outflow of all three systems in order to compare their capacity to improve water quality. Physicochemical water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids, pH, electrical conductivity, turbidity and total petroleum hydrocarbons were monitored and analyzed for 25 months. Results are presented in detail showing significantly smaller amounts of outflow pollutants in SUDS than in conventional drainage systems, especially in the filter drain which provided the best performance.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF INAPPROPRIATE POLLUTANTS ENTRIES INTO STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEMS: A USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This User's Guide is the result of a series of EPA sponsored research tasks to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater entries into storm drainage systems. A number of past projects have found that dry-weather flows discharging from storm drainage systems can contribu...

  10. INVESTIGATION OF DRY-WEATHER POLLUTANT ENTRIES INTO STORM-DRAINAGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes the results of a series of research tasks to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater (dry-weather) entries into storm drainage systems. Dry-weather flows discharging from storm drainage systems can contribute significant pollutant loadings to rece...

  11. INVESTIGATION OF INAPPROPRIATE POLLUTANTS ENTRIES INTO STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEMS: A USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This User's Guide is the result of a series of EPA sponsored research tasks to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater entries into storm drainage systems. A number of past projects have found that dry-weather flows discharging from storm drainage systems can contribu...

  12. INVESTIGATION OF DRY-WEATHER POLLUTANT ENTRIES INTO STORM-DRAINAGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes the results of a series of research tasks to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater (dry-weather) entries into storm drainage systems. Dry-weather flows discharging from storm drainage systems can contribute significant pollutant loadings to rece...

  13. Modeling Subsurface Storm and Tile Drain Systems in GSSHA with SUPERLINK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    capable of representing flow through a pipe network with inputs typical for an urban storm drain network or an agricultural tile drainage system...greater than zero is input for the materials surrounding any pipe in the network, then tile drainage will be computed, and the GRID_PIPE file must...tile drain pipes , as shown in Figure 5. The drainage to tile from ground water under this common condition can be calculated with one of two optional

  14. Hydrodynamic model of cells for designing systems of urban groundwater drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Eric; Riccardi, Gerardo

    2000-08-01

    An improved mathematical hydrodynamic quasi-two-dimensional model of cells, CELSUB3, is presented for simulating drainage systems that consist of pumping well fields or subsurface drains. The CELSUB3 model is composed of an assemblage of algorithms that have been developed and tested previously and that simulate saturated flow in porous media, closed conduit flow, and flow through pumping stations. A new type of link between aquifer cells and drainage conduits is proposed. This link is verified in simple problems with well known analytical solutions. The correlation between results from analytical and mathematical solutions was considered satisfactory in all cases. To simulate more complex situations, the new proposed version, CELSUB3, was applied in a project designed to control the water-table level within a sewer system in Chañar Ladeado Town, Santa Fe Province, Argentina. Alternative drainage designs, which were evaluated under conditions of dynamic recharge caused by rainfall in a critical year (wettest year for the period of record) and a typical year, are briefly described. After analyzing ten alternative designs, the best technical-economic solution is a subsurface drainage system of closed conduits with pumping stations and evacuation channels. Résumé. Un modèle hydrodynamique perfectionné de cellules en quasi 2D, CELSUB3, est présenté dans le but de simuler des systèmes de drainage qui consistent en des champs de puits de pompage ou de drains souterrains. Le modèle CELSUB3 est composé d'un assemblage d'algorithmes développés et testés précédemment et qui simulent des écoulements en milieu poreux saturé, en conduites et dans des stations de pompage. Un nouveau type de lien entre des cellules d'aquifères et des drains est proposé. Ce lien est vérifié dans des problèmes simples dont les solutions analytiques sont bien connues. La corrélation entre les résultats des solutions analytiques et des solutions mathématiques a été consid

  15. Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) treatment train assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, C; Duffy, A; Berwick, N; McLean, N; Hemingway, A

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines a rationale and scoring system for the stormwater treatment train assessment tool (STTAT) which is a proposed regulatory tool for Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). STTAT provides guidance and regulatory consistency for developers about the requirements of planners and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). The tool balances the risks of pollution to the receiving water body with the treatment provided in a treatment train. It encourages developers to take SUDS into account early, avoiding any misunderstanding of SUDS requirements at the planning stage of a development. A pessimistic view on pollution risks has been adopted since there may be a change of land use on the development in the future. A realistic view has also been taken of maintenance issues and the 'survivability' of a SUDS component. The development of STTAT as a response to the requirements of the Water Framework Directive is explored, the individual scores being given in tabular format for receiving water and catchment risks. Treatment scores are proposed for single SUDS components as well as multiple components within treatment trains. STTAT has been tested on a range of sites, predominantly in Scotland where both development and receiving water information was known. The operational tool in use by SEPA is presented.

  16. Low Frequency Radio-wave System for subsurface investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Kudelya, Anatoliy; Denisov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Low frequency radio-wave methods (RWM) allow subsurface investigations in terms of lithological structure characterization, detection of filtration flows of ground water, anthropogenic and natural cavities. In this contribution, we present a RWM that exploits two coils working at frequencies of few MHz as transmitting and receiving antennas. The basic principle of this inductive method is as follows. The primary alternating electromagnetic field radiated by the transmitting coil induces eddy currents in the subsurface mainly due to the conductivity anomalies. These eddy currents generate a secondary (scattered) magnetic field which overlaps to the incident magnetic field and is detected by the receiving coil. Despite the simple operation of the system, the complexity of the electromagnetic scattering phenomenon at hand must be properly modeled to achieve adequate performance. Therefore, an advanced data processing technique, belonging to the class of the inverse scattering approaches, has been developed by the authors in a full 3D geometry. The proposed method allows to deal with data collected on a scanning surface under a dipole inductive profiling (DIP) modality, where the transmitting/receiving coils are moved simultaneously with fixed offset (multi-bistatic configuration). The hardware, called Dipole Inductive Radio-wave System (DIRS), is composed by an electronic unit and transmitting and receiving loop antennas radiating at frequencies of few MHz (2-4 MHz), which are installed on theodolite supports. The compactness of DIRS and its robustness to external electromagnetic interference offers the possibility to perform geophysical research up to the depth of some tens of meters and under several types of ground and water surfaces, vegetation, and weather conditions. The light weight and small size of system (the single antenna with support weights about 5 kg and has a diameter of 0.5m) allows two operators to perform geophysical research without disturbing the

  17. Assessment of the service performance of drainage system and transformation of pipeline network based on urban combined sewer system model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai-Qin; Liu, Yan; Wang, Hong-Wu; Ma, Lu-Ming

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, due to global climate change and rapid urbanization, extreme weather events occur to the city at an increasing frequency. Waterlogging is common because of heavy rains. In this case, the urban drainage system can no longer meet the original design requirements, resulting in traffic jams and even paralysis and post a threat to urban safety. Therefore, it provides a necessary foundation for urban drainage planning and design to accurately assess the capacity of the drainage system and correctly simulate the transport effect of drainage network and the carrying capacity of drainage facilities. This study adopts InfoWorks Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) to present the two combined sewer drainage systems in Yangpu District, Shanghai (China). The model can assist the design of the drainage system. Model calibration is performed based on the historical rainfall events. The calibrated model is used for the assessment of the outlet drainage and pipe loads for the storm scenario currently existing or possibly occurring in the future. The study found that the simulation and analysis results of the drainage system model were reliable. They could fully reflect the service performance of the drainage system in the study area and provide decision-making support for regional flood control and transformation of pipeline network.

  18. Adaptation Options for Land Drainage Systems Towards Sustainable Agriculture and Environment: A Czech Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulhavý, Zbyněk; Fučík, Petr

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, issues of agricultural drainage systems are introduced and discussed from the views of their former, current and future roles and functioning in the Czech Republic (CR). A methodologically disparate survey was done on thirty-nine model localities in CR with different intensity and state of land drainage systems, aimed at description of commonly occurred problems and possible adaptations of agricultural drainage as perceived by farmers, land owners, landscape managers or by protective water management. The survey was focused on technical state of drainage, fragmentation of land ownership within drained areas as well as on possible conflicts between agricultural and environmental interests in a landscape. Achieved results confirmed that there is obviously an increasing need to reassess some functions of prevailingly single-purpose agricultural drainage systems. Drainage intensity and detected unfavourable technical state of drainage systems as well as the risks connected with the anticipated climate change from the view of possible water scarcity claims for a complex solution. An array of adaptation options for agricultural drainage systems is presented, aiming at enhancement of water retention time and improvement of water quality. It encompasses additional flow-controlling measures on tiles or ditches, or facilities for making selected parts of a drainage system inoperable in order to retain or slow down the drainage runoff, to establish water accumulation zones and to enhance water self-cleaning processes. However, it was revealed that the question of landowner parcels fragmentation on drained land in CR would dramatically complicate design and realization of these measures. Presented solutions and findings are propounded with a respect to contemporary and future state policies and international strategies for sustainable agriculture, water management and environment.

  19. Managing selenium-contaminated agricultural drainage water by the integrated on-farm drainage management system: role of selenium volatilization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z Q; Cervinka, V; Pickering, I J; Zayed, A; Terry, N

    2002-07-01

    The Integrated on-Farm Drainage Management (IFDM) system was designed to dispose of selenium (Se)-contaminated agricultural irrigation drainage water through the sequential reuse of saline drainage water to grow crops having different salt tolerance. This study quantified the extent of biological volatilization in Se removal from the IFDM system located in the western San Joaquin Valley, California. Selenium volatilization from selected treatment areas, including pickleweed (Salicornia bigelovii Torr.), saltgrass (Distichlis spicata L.), bare soil, and the solar evaporator, was monitored biweekly using an open-flow sampling chamber system during the pickleweed growing season from February to September 1997, and monthly from September 1997 to January 1998. Biological volatilization from the pickleweed section removed 62.0 +/- 3.6 mg Se m(-2) y(-1) to the atmosphere, which was 5.5-fold greater than the Se accumulated in pickleweed tissues (i.e., phytoextraction). The total Se removed by volatilization from the bare soil, saltgrass, and the solar evaporator was 16.7 +/- 1.1, 4.8 +/- 0.3, and 4.3 +/- 0.9mg Se m(-2) y(-1), respectively. Selenium removal by volatilization accounted for 6.5% of the annual total Se input (957.7mg Sem(-2) y(-1)) in the pickleweed field, and about 1% of the total Se input (432.7 mg Se m(-2) y(-1)) in the solar evaporator. We concluded that Se volatilization under naturally occurring field conditions represented a relatively minor, but environmentally important pathway of Se removal from the IFDM system.

  20. Drill System Development for the Lunar Subsurface Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, Kris; Davis, Kiel; Paulsen, Gale; Roberts, Dustyn; Wilson, Jack; Hernandez, Wilson

    Reaching the cold traps at the lunar poles and directly sensing the subsurface regolith is a primary goal of lunar exploration, especially as a means of prospecting for future In Situ Resource Utilization efforts. As part of the development of a lunar drill capable of reaching a depth of two meters or more, Honeybee Robotics has built a laboratory drill system with a total linear stroke of 1 meter, capability to produce as much as 45 N-m of torque at a rotational speed of 200 rpm, and a capability of delivering maximum downforce of 1000 N. Since this is a test-bed, the motors were purposely chosen to be relative large to provide ample power to the drill system (the Apollo drill was a 500 Watt drill, i.e. not small in current standards). In addition, the drill is capable of using three different drilling modes: rotary, rotary percussive and percussive. The frequency of percussive impact can be varied if needed while rotational speed can be held constant. An integral part of this test bed is a vacuum chamber that is currently being constructed. The drill test-bed is used for analyzing various drilling modes and testing different drill bit and auger systems under low pressure conditions and in lunar regolith simulant. The results of the tests are used to develop final lunar drill design as well as efficient drilling protocols. The drill was also designed to accommodate a downhole neutron spectrometer for measuring the amount of hydrated material in the area surrounding the borehole, as well as downhole temperature sensors, accelerometers, and electrical properties tester. The presentation will include history of lunar drilling, challenges of drilling on the Moon, a description of the drill and chamber as well as preliminary drilling test results conducted in the ice-bound lunar regolith simulant with a variety of drill bits and augers systems.

  1. Discharge characteristics of four highway drainage systems in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Straub, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    Excessive water in the subbase of high-way combined with large traffic volumes and heavy loads is a major cause of road deterioration. Prompt removal of any excess water in a subbase will decrease the road deterioration and extend the effective life of a highway. This study presents discharge characteristics of four highway subbase drainage systems. These systems consisted of shallow, longitudal trenches with geocomposite drain materials (edge drains made from a polyethylene core surrounded by a geotextile filter fabric) that underline the joint between the shoulder and the traffic lane of State Route 16, approximately 1.0 mile southeast of Granville, Ohio. For selected rainfall-runoff events the maximum discharge, discharge characteristics from April 1991 through November 1993 were computed for three geocomposite products- a post type, an oblong-pipe type, and a cusp type-and a conventional perforated pipe edge drain. In general, the discharge characteristics of the conventional edge drain and that of the oblong-pipe edge drain were similar for most of the rainfall-runoff event characteristics. Both produced most of the highest maximum discharges and largest discharge volumes among the four longitudal edge drains. The post edge drain produced smaller maximum discharge and volumes than the conventional and oblong-pipe edge drains, but it had the shortest lag times for most of the event characteristics. The cusp edge drain produced small maximum discharges and small volumes similar to those from the post edge drain, but it had the longest lag times of all the edge drains for most of the event characteristics. The cusp edge drain may have also had some problems during installation which could have affected the discharge characteristics.

  2. Computed tomography-anatomy of the normal feline nasolacrimal drainage system.

    PubMed

    Nöller, Claudia; Henninger, Wolfgang; Grönemeyer, Dietrich H W; Hirschberg, Ruth M; Budras, Klaus D

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the nasolacrimal drainage system with and without contrast medium (barium sulfate) was used to create an anatomic basis for clinical evaluation in domestic cats. To evaluate and compare the anatomical findings, three casts were carried out and were followed by CT examinations. These CT series were also used for a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the nasolacrimal drainage system within surrounding structures. In noncontrast CT images, osseous structures limiting the nasolacrimal drainage system are easily recognizable. In most cats, this allows the identification of the nasolacrimal drainage system even without contrast enhancement. A distal part of the lacrimal sac adjoins directly to the respiratory mucosa of the nasal cavity without an osseous protection. Thus, this may represent a predilection site for infiltration of adjacent pathologic processes from the nasal cavity onto the lacrimal sac. The nasolacrimal duct begins on level with the maxillary third premolar tooth. The apex of the root of the canine tooth is situated very close to the nasolacrimal duct. This close topographic relation may lead to problems with the nasolacrimal drainage system. In domestic cats the nasolacrimal drainage system consists of a descending and a horizontal part, which form an angle of approximately 90 degrees for unhindered drainage of the lacrimal fluid.

  3. Particulate phosphorus transport by sub-surface drainage from agricultural land in the UK. Environmental significance at the catchment and national scale.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A S; Foster, I D; Lees, J A; Hodgkinson, R A; Jackson, R H

    2001-02-05

    Phosphorus (P) is the key limiting nutrient in most UK freshwater systems. With increased legislation controlling point source inputs, dissolved (DP) and particulate P (PP) derived from diffuse sources are making a more significant contribution to the total P loading of surface waters. Recent research has focused on pathways linking diffuse sources to the fluvial system and sub-surface field drains have been shown to transport both sediment and P rapidly to watercourses. Preliminary results are presented from an ongoing study using environmental tracers to identify the source of the drain sediment and its potential as a carrier of PP. These results suggest that the majority of sediment in drains is topsoil derived, but the significance of P loss via this pathway in a regional or UK context has yet to be evaluated. A protocol to study the potential problem at a regional/national scale is discussed and initial data presented.

  4. Discontinuous drainage systems formed by highland precipitation and ground-water outflow in the Navua Valles and southwest Hadriacus Mons regions, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, H. I.; Gulick, V. C.; Glines, N. H.

    2017-09-01

    The Navua Valles are systems of paleodrainages located north of Dao Vallis, which empty into Hellas Planitia, the largest impact basin on Mars. In this study, we mapped and characterized the Navua Valles Region's individual drainage systems, including drainages along the southwestern flank of Hadriacus Mons, and one valley network from the same source as Navua Valles but flowing in the opposite direction. The major drainage systems share morphological characteristics common to both outflow channels and valley networks. The slopes in this region are dissected by two major Navua drainage systems (here Navua A* and B*) and several shorter, sub-parallel valleys formed on the highest gradient (approximately 20 m/km [1.15°]) slopes, at the lowest part of Hellas Basin's rim. The two major drainage systems originate in the highlands, and empty into the basin. Our mapping suggests that water in Navua Valles reached the basin floor in a complicated descent and included several episodes of surface ponding, surface runoff, infiltration, subsurface flow and subsequent outflow. The most prominent channel system, Navua A, forms a repetitive sequence of deep incision into bedrock, followed by a transition into broad channels in erodible materials, and then into unconfined deposits. This successive erosion-transport-deposition sequence continues to repeat along the valley's entire length forming a discontinuous pattern that is consistent with classical fluvial process models. The channels cut into volcanic plains likely emplaced from the formation of Tyrrhenus and Hadriacus Montes. The dendritic source valleys of Navua A originate from the rim of a highland crater while the rest of this subsystem consists of a single, discontinuous channel which is consistent with a single water source zone that likely supplied water for all channels downslope. These drainages may have formed as discontinuous channels, revealing the potential existence of subsurface drainage pathways located

  5. Design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Tian, Jiwei; Zhao, Wei; Song, Dalei; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jun

    2013-09-23

    Mooring systems are the most effective method for making sustained time series observations in the oceans. Generally there are two types of ocean mooring systems: surface and subsurface. Subsurface mooring system is less likely to be damaged after deployment than surface system. However, subsurface system usually needs to be retrieved from the ocean for data recovery. This paper describes the design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery: Timed Communication Buoy System (TCBS). TCBS is usually integrated in the main float and the designated data is downloaded from the control system. After data retrieval, TCBS will separate from main float, rise up to the sea surface, and transmit data by satellite communication.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF SRB TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB) technology to treat acid mine drainage (AMD), Bench-scale testing, field demonstrations, and engineered applications of SRBs for the treatment of AMD will be presented...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF SRB TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB) technology to treat acid mine drainage (AMD), Bench-scale testing, field demonstrations, and engineered applications of SRBs for the treatment of AMD will be presented...

  8. Analyzing subsurface drain network performance in an agricultural monitoring site with a three-dimensional hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousiainen, Riikka; Warsta, Lassi; Turunen, Mika; Huitu, Hanna; Koivusalo, Harri; Pesonen, Liisa

    2015-10-01

    Effectiveness of a subsurface drainage system decreases with time, leading to a need to restore the drainage efficiency by installing new drain pipes in problem areas. The drainage performance of the resulting system varies spatially and complicates runoff and nutrient load generation within the fields. We presented a method to estimate the drainage performance of a heterogeneous subsurface drainage system by simulating the area with the three-dimensional hydrological FLUSH model. A GIS analysis was used to delineate the surface runoff contributing area in the field. We applied the method to reproduce the water balance and to investigate the effectiveness of a subsurface drainage network of a clayey field located in southern Finland. The subsurface drainage system was originally installed in the area in 1971 and the drainage efficiency was improved in 1995 and 2005 by installing new drains. FLUSH was calibrated against total runoff and drain discharge data from 2010 to 2011 and validated against total runoff in 2012. The model supported quantification of runoff fractions via the three installed drainage networks. Model realisations were produced to investigate the extent of the runoff contributing areas and the effect of the drainage parameters on subsurface drain discharge. The analysis showed that better model performance was achieved when the efficiency of the oldest drainage network (installed in 1971) was decreased. Our analysis method can reveal the drainage system performance but not the reason for the deterioration of the drainage performance. Tillage layer runoff from the field was originally computed by subtracting drain discharge from the total runoff. The drains installed in 1995 bypass the measurement system, which renders the tillage layer runoff calculation procedure invalid after 1995. Therefore, this article suggests use of a local correction coefficient based on the simulations for further research utilizing data from the study area.

  9. The Martain drainage system and the origin of valley networks and fretted channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1995-04-01

    Outflow channels provide strong evidence for abundant water near the Martian surface and an extensive groundwater system. Collapse of the surface into some channels suggests massive subsurface erosion and/or solution in addition to erosion by flow across the surface. Flat floors, steep walls, longitudinal striae and ridges, downstream deflection of striae from channel walls, and lack of river channels suggest that fretted channels form dominantly by mass wasting. A two-stage process is proposed. In the first stage, extension of valleys heads is favored by seepage of groundwater into debris shed from slopes. The debris moves downstream, aided by interstitial groundwater at the base of the debris, possibly with high pore pressures. In the second stage, because of climate change or a lower heat flow, groundwater can no longer seep into the debris flows in the valleys, their movement almost stops, and more viscous ice-lubricated debris aprons form. Almost all uplands at elevations greater than +1 km are dissected by valley networks, although the drainage densities are orders of magnitude less than is typical for the Earth. The valley networks resemble terrestrial river systems in planimetric shape, but U-shaped and rectangular-shaped cross sections, levee- like peripheral ridges, median ridges, patterns of branching and rejoining, and flat floors without river channels suggest that the networks may not be true analogs to terrestrial river valleys. It is proposed that they, like the fretted channels, formed mainly by mass wasting, aided by groundwater seepage into the mass-wasted debris. Movements of only millimeters to centimeters per year are needed to explain the channel lengths. Most valley formation ceased early at low latitudes because of progressive dehydration of the near surface, the result of sublimation of water and/or drainage of groundwater to regions of lower elevations. Valley formation persisted to later dates where aided by steep slopes, as on crater

  10. Shallow Aquifer Connectivity and Early Season Water Supply of Seasonal Wetlands and Drainages Leading to Regional Drainage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarten, N. F.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers in the Central Valley, California are recognized being seasonally supplied by early season direct surface water runoff and later season snow melt runoff from their tributaries. In addition, early season water supply to these rivers is derived from precipitation (PPT) that has infiltrated into soils underlain by a near surface aquitard, typically at less than 2 m depth. These shallow perched groundwater systems contribute a potentially substantial amount of water from more than 500,000 hectares of landforms associated with geomorphic terraces underlain by these aquitards. Early season water input to seasonal and perennial drainages is regulated by the hydraulic conductivity of the (clay-) loamy soils and by surface and aquitard slope of the local catchments associated with these old alluvial landforms. Research on these landforms and shallow aquifers has identified a complex PPT and evapotranspiration (ET) sensitive system that includes shallow depressions that seasonally produce water table derived wetlands (“vernal pools”). These wetlands have been recognized for a very high level of plant and invertebrate species diversity including endangered species. In addition, these seasonal wetlands provide migratory feeding areas of birds. Our work on these seasonal perched systems shows that as much as 80 percent of the soil column above the aquitard is saturated, during average to high rainfall years, for up to 90 to 120 days. Where the water table of this perched system intercepts the land surface, vernal pools develop. The perched groundwater drains into seasonal surface drainages that ultimately supply the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. At the end of the rainy season, both the vernal pools and the perched aquifer rapidly and synchronously disappear. Once the soil is unsaturated, water flow is vertically upward due to ET. Variably saturated modeling of this system was conducted using HYDRUS 2D/3D. Climate inputs were from

  11. Numerical evaluation of the groundwater drainage system for underground storage caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eui Seob; Chae, Byung Gon

    2015-04-01

    A novel concept storing cryogenic liquefied natural gas in a hard rock lined cavern has been developed and tested for several years as an alternative. In this concept, groundwater in rock mass around cavern has to be fully drained until the early stage of construction and operation to avoid possible adverse effect of groundwater near cavern. And then rock mass should be re-saturated to form an ice ring, which is the zone around cavern including ice instead of water in several joints within the frozen rock mass. The drainage system is composed of the drainage tunnel excavated beneath the cavern and drain holes drilled on rock surface of the drainage tunnel. In order to de-saturate sufficiently rock mass around the cavern, the position and horizontal spacing of drain holes should be designed efficiently. In this paper, a series of numerical study results related to the drainage system of the full-scale cavern are presented. The rock type in the study area consists mainly of banded gneiss and mica schist. Gneiss is in slightly weathered state and contains a little joint and fractures. Schist contains several well-developed schistosities that mainly stand vertically, so that vertical joints are better developed than the horizontals in the area. Lugeon tests revealed that upper aquifer and bedrock are divided in the depth of 40-50m under the surface. Groundwater level was observed in twenty monitoring wells and interpolated in the whole area. Numerical study using Visual Modflow and Seep/W has been performed to evaluate the efficiency of drainage system for underground liquefied natural gas storage cavern in two hypothetically designed layouts and determine the design parameters. In Modflow analysis, groundwater flow change in an unconfined aquifer was simulated during excavation of cavern and operation of drainage system. In Seep/W analysis, amount of seepage and drainage was also estimated in a representative vertical section of each cavern. From the results

  12. Subsurface pipeflow dynamics of north-coastal California swale systems

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer; Jeffrey S. Albright

    1987-01-01

    Abstract - Pipeflow dynamics are being studied at Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed in north-coastal California near Ft. Bragg. Pipes have been observed at depths to 2 m within trenched swales and at the heads of gullied channels in small (0.8 to 2 ha) headwater drainages. Digital data loggers connected to pressure transducers monitor discharge using calibrated...

  13. Urban drainage system planning and design--challenges with climate change and urbanization: a review.

    PubMed

    Yazdanfar, Zeinab; Sharma, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Urban drainage systems are in general failing in their functions mainly due to non-stationary climate and rapid urbanization. As these systems are becoming less efficient, issues such as sewer overflows and increase in urban flooding leading to surge in pollutant loads to receiving water bodies are becoming pervasive rapidly. A comprehensive investigation is required to understand these factors impacting the functioning of urban drainage, which vary spatially and temporally and are more complex when weaving together. It is necessary to establish a cost-effective, integrated planning and design framework for every local area by incorporating fit for purpose alternatives. Carefully selected adaptive measures are required for the provision of sustainable drainage systems to meet combined challenges of climate change and urbanization. This paper reviews challenges associated with urban drainage systems and explores limitations and potentials of different adaptation alternatives. It is hoped that the paper would provide drainage engineers, water planners, and decision makers with the state of the art information and technologies regarding adaptation options to increase drainage systems efficiency under changing climate and urbanization.

  14. Comparison of subgaleal and subdural closed drainage system in the surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Sukru; Borklu, Resul Emin; Kucuk, Ahmet; Ulutabanca, Halil; Selcuklu, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One or two burr-hole craniostomies with subgaleal or subdural drainage system and irrigation are the most common methods for surgical treatment of CSDH. The aim of this study is to compare the advantages or disadvantages of these techniques used for CSDH. METHODS: Seventy patients were treated by burr-hole subdural drainage or subgaleal drainage system with irrigation. Our patients were classified into two groups according to the operative procedure as follows: Group I, one or two burr-hole craniostomy with subgaleal closed system drainage and irrigation (n=36), Group II, one or two burr-hole craniostomies with subdural closed drainage system and irrigation (n=38). We compared male and female ratios, complication rates, and age distribution between groups. RESULTS: There was no remarkable difference between recurrence rates of the two groups. Recurrence rate was 6.25% in Group I and 7.8% in Group II. Subdural empyema occurred in one of the patients in Group II. Symptomatic pneumocephalus did not develop in patients. Four patients were reoperated for recurrence at an average of 12–20 days after the operation with the same methods. CONCLUSION: Both of the techniques have a higher cure rate and a lower risk of recurrence. However, subgaleal drainage system is relatively less invasive, safe, and technically easy. So it is applicable for aged and higher risk patients. PMID:28058351

  15. Design of a high temperature subsurface thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qi

    Solar thermal energy is taking up increasing proportions of future power generation worldwide. Thermal energy storage technology is a key method for compensating for the inherent intermittency of solar resources and solving the time mismatch between solar energy supply and electricity demand. However, there is currently no cost-effective high-capacity compact storage technology available (Bakker et al., 2008). The goal of this work is to propose a high temperature subsurface thermal energy storage (HSTES) technology and demonstrate its potential energy storage capability by developing a solar-HSTES-electricity generation system. In this work, main elements of the proposed system and their related state-of-art technologies are reviewed. A conceptual model is built to illustrate the concept, design, operating procedure and application of such a system. A numerical base model is built within the TOUGH2-EOS1 multiphase flow simulator for the evaluation of system performance. Additional models are constructed and simulations are done to identify the effect of different operational and geological influential factors on the system performance. Our work shows that when the base model is run with ten years operation of alternate injection and production processes - each for a month - with a thermal power input of 10.85 MW, about 83% of the injected thermal energy could be recovered within each working cycle from a stabilized HSTES system. After the final conversion into electrical energy, a relative (compared with the direct use of hot water) electricity generation efficiency of 73% is obtained. In a typical daily storage scenario, the simulated thermal storage efficiency could exceed 78% and the relative electricity generation efficiency is over 66% in the long run. In a seasonal storage scenario, these two efficiencies reach 69% and 53% respectively by the end of the simulation period of 10 years. Additional simulations reveal a thinner storage aquifer with a higher

  16. Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Farmayan, Walter Farman; Giles, Steven Paul; Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip; Munshi, Abdul Wahid; Abbasi, Faraz; Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony; Anderson, Karl Gregory; Tsai, Kuochen; Siddoway, Mark Alan

    2011-05-31

    A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

  17. Development of Systematic Approaches for Calibration of Subsurface Transport Models Using Hard and Soft Data on System Characteristics and Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-02

    environmental problems to include the simulation of contaminant transport and volatilization in the shallow subsurface and water content fluctuation...REPORT Development of systematic approaches for calibration of subsurface transport models using hard and soft data on system characteristics and...Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS model calibration, data assimilation, subsurface transport Tissa H. Illangasekare, Toshihiro Sakaki Colorado

  18. A novel high vacuum chest drainage system – a pilot study*

    PubMed Central

    Tille, Jean-Christophe; Khabiri, Ebrahim; Giliberto, Jean-Pierre; Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Kalangos, Afksendiyos; Walpoth, Beat H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the safety and feasibility of use of a novel high vacuum chest drainage system (HVCDS) and its influence on the cardiovascular system compared to a conventional system (CCDS). Material and methods Five anesthetized pigs underwent a median sternotomy. Three drains were placed in retrocardiac, retrosternal and left pleural positions. The animals received a HVCDS (22 Fr with 180 2-mm holes, n = 2) or a CCDS (n = 2). In the fifth animal off pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG) stabilizers were tested. After chest closure animals had three 30 min runs of artificial bleeding (5 ml/min) under different negative aspiration pressures (–2, –20, –40 kPa) for both groups, followed by standardized surgical bleeding (–40 kPa – HVCDS, – 2 kPa – CCDS). Hemodynamic parameters and each drain's output were registered every 5 minutes and the residual blood was assessed. All catheters, the heart and left lung underwent macroscopic and histopathological examination. Results The application of the different pressures showed neither hemodynamic changes nor differences in blood drainage with both systems in two bleeding models. The HVCDS enabled drainage comparable to the CCDS but showed relevant clotting. Application of –20 kPa and –40 kPa caused macroscopic epicardial and pulmonary lesions in all tested devices including OPCABG stabilizers consisting of sub-epicardial or sub-pleural hemorrhage without myocyte or alveolar damage. Conclusions The novel and conventional chest drainage systems used at pressures up to 40 kPa induced no hemodynamic instability. Both systems showed adequate equal drainage, despite major HVCDS clotting. High negative pressure drainage with both systems showed focal sub-epicardial and subpleural hemorrhage. Thus, long-term assessment of high pressure drainage and potential interaction with fragile structures (coronary bypass graft) should be carried out. PMID:26336441

  19. A Geographic Information System procedure to quantify drainage-basin characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The Basin Characteristics System (BCS) has been developed to quantify characteristics of a drainage basin. The first of four main BCS processing steps creates four geographic information system (GIS) digital maps representing the drainage divide, the drainage network, elevation contours, and the basin length. The drainage divide and basin length are manually digitized from 1:250,000-scale topographic maps. The drainage network is extracted using GIS software from 1:100,000-scale digital line graph data. The elevation contours are generated using GIS software from 1:250,000-scale digital elevation model data. The second and third steps use software developed to assign attributes to specific features in three of the four digital maps and analyze the four maps to quantify 24 morphometric basin characteristics. The fourth step quantifies two climatic characteristics from digitized State maps of precipitation data. Compared to manual methods of measurement, the BCS provides a reduction in the time required to quantify the 26 basin characteristics. Comparison tests indicate the BCS measurements are not significantly different from manual topographic-map measurements for 11 of 12 primary drainage-basin characteristics. Tests indicate the BCS significantly underestimates basin slope. Comparison-measurement differences for basin slope, main channel slope, and basin relief appear to be due to limitations in the digital elevation model data.

  20. Fluvial drainage systems: Margaritifer Sinus and Agyre (NC, NE) quadrangles, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothroyd, J. C.; Grant, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fluvial drainage systems, delineated by mapping on stereo pairs of Viking Orbiter images, have developed in various-sized basins in the Margaritifer Sinus (MC-19) and Agyre (MC-26) Quadrangles, Mars. The Ladon Valles system is the largest, draining into and through two multi-ringed impact basins. Smaller fluvial basins to the southeast of the Ladon structural basin appear to have internal drainage. An intermediate-scale fluvial basin containing Himera Vallis extends along a north-south axis at 22 W and opens northward toward outflow channels south of Margaritifer Chaos. Stereo-pair mapping was extended furhter to the east, in MC-19 Ne, Se, and MC-26 NE, to investigate sources of outflow to the Ares Vallis system. The direction of flow in the channel at the northeast quadrant of the Ladon Basin is unresolved at present because of the poor quality of images available to form stereo pairs. However, an easterly drainage basin boundary running north-south along longitude 9 W, and extending westward at latitude 32-35 S, encloses a series of longitudinal drainage systems. Both the Parana Valles-Loire Vallis system and the Samara Valles system appear to drain in a northwesterly direction. The Samara flows to the Himera drainage basin, and the Parana-Loire to the northeast Ladon channel area.

  1. The Effectiveness of the Methane Drainage of Rock-Mass with a U Ventilation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlązak, Nikodem; Swolkień, Justyna

    2016-09-01

    Methane drainage is used in Polish coal mines in order to reduce mine methane emission as well as to keep methane concentration in mine workings at safe levels. The article describes the method of methane drainage used in longwall D-2 in seam 410. In Poland, coal seams are frequently mined under difficult geological conditions in the roof and in the presence of very high methane hazard. In such situations, mines usually use a system with roof caving and a U ventilation system, which means that methane is drawn off from a tail entry behind the longwall front. In this system, boreholes are drilled from a tailgate and methane is drawn off from behind longwall face. The article shows the influence of a specific ventilation system on the drainage efficiency at longwall D-2 in seam 410. At this longwall, measurements of methane emission and the efficiency of methane capture were conducted. They consisted in gauging methane concentration, air velocity, absolute air pressure and the amount of methane captured by the drainage system. Experimental data were used to estimate the variations in absolute methane-bearing capacity and ventilation methane, and - most importantly - to gauge the efficiency of methane drainage.

  2. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endobiliary Drainage of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst with Rupture into the Biliary System: An Unusual Route for Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, Mehmet; Soyupak, Suereyya; Akguel, Erol; Ezici, Hueseyin

    2002-10-15

    The most common and serious complication of hydatid cyst of the liver is rupture into the biliary tract causing obstructive jaundice, cholangitis and abscess. The traditional treatment of biliary-cystic fistula is surgery and recently endoscopic sphincterotomy. We report a case of complex heterogeneous cyst rupture into the biliary tract causing biliary obstruction in which the obstruction and cyst were treated successfully by percutaneous transhepatic endobiliary drainage. Our case is the second report of percutaneous transbiliary internal drainage of hydatid cyst with rupture into the biliary duct in which the puncture and drainage were not performed through the cyst cavity.

  3. Complex Systems Science for Subsurface Fate and Transport Report from the August 2009 Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    The subsurface environment, which encompasses the vadose and saturated zones, is a heterogeneous, geologically complex domain. Believed to contain a large percentage of Earth's biomass in the form of microorganisms, the subsurface is a dynamic zone where important biogeochemical cycles work to sustain life. Actively linked to the atmosphere and biosphere through the hydrologic and carbon cycles, the subsurface serves as a storage location for much of Earth's fresh water. Coupled hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical processes occurring within the subsurface environment cause the local and regional natural chemical fluxes that govern water quality. These processes play a vital role in the formation of soil, economically important fossil fuels, mineral deposits, and other natural resources. Cleaning up Department of Energy (DOE) lands impacted by legacy wastes and using the subsurface for carbon sequestration or nuclear waste isolation require a firm understanding of these processes and the documented means to characterize the vertical and spatial distribution of subsurface properties directing water, nutrient, and contaminant flows. This information, along with credible, predictive models that integrate hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical knowledge over a range of scales, is needed to forecast the sustainability of subsurface water systems and to devise ways to manage and manipulate dynamic in situ processes for beneficial outcomes. Predictive models provide the context for knowledge integration. They are the primary tools for forecasting the evolving geochemistry or microbial ecology of groundwater under various scenarios and for assessing and optimizing the potential effectiveness of proposed approaches to carbon sequestration, waste isolation, or environmental remediation. An iterative approach of modeling and experimentation can reveal powerful insights into the behavior of subsurface systems. State-of-science understanding codified in models

  4. Laboratory evaluation of zero valent iron and sulfur modified iron filter materials for agricultural drainage water treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    On site filter treatment systems have the potential to remove nutrients and pesticides from agricultural subsurface drainage waters. The effectiveness and efficiency of this type of drainage water treatment will depend on the actual filter materials utilized. Two promising filter materials that coul...

  5. Location and assessment of drainage pipes beneath farm fields and golf course greens using ground penetrating radar: A research summary

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhancing the efficiency of soil water removal, and in turn crop productivity, on farmland already containing a subsurface drainage system, typically involves installing new drain lines between the old ones. However, before this approach can be attempted, the older drainage pipes need to be located...

  6. Balance mass flux and ice velocity across the equilibrium line in drainage systems of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Giovinetto, Mario B.

    2001-12-01

    Estimates of balance mass flux and depth-averaged ice velocity through the cross section aligned with the equilibrium line are produced for each of six drainage systems in Greenland. The estimates are based on a model equilibrium line fitted to field data and on a revised distribution of surface mass balance for the conterminous ice sheet. Ice drainage divides and six major drainage systems are delineated using surface topography from ERS radar altimeter data. Ice thicknesses at the equilibrium line and throughout each drainage system are based on the latest compilation of airborne radar sounding data described elsewhere. The net accumulation rate in the area bounded by the equilibrium line is 399 Gt a-1, and net ablation rate in the remaining area is 231 Gt a-1. Excluding an east central coastal ridge reduces the net accumulation rate to 397 Gt a-1, with a range from 42 to 121 Gt a-1 for the individual drainage systems. The mean balance mass flux and depth-averaged ice velocity at the cross-section aligned with the modeled equilibrium line are 0.1011 Gt km-2 a-1 and 0.111 km a-1, respectively, with little variation in these values from system to system. In contrast, the mean mass discharge per unit length along the equilibrium line ranges from one half to double the overall mean rate of 0.0468 Gt km-1 a-1. The ratio of the ice mass in the area bounded by the equilibrium line to the rate of mass output implies an effective exchange time of approximately 6 ka for total mass exchange. The range of exchange times, from a low of 3 ka in the SE drainage system to 14 ka in the NE, suggests a rank as to which regions of the ice sheet may respond more rapidly to climate fluctuations.

  7. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  8. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger N.; Boulanger, Albert; Bagdonas, Edward P.; Xu, Liqing; He, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  9. Effect of subsurface drip irrigation system uniformity on cotton production in the Texas High Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Planned reductions in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system uniformity in the semi-arid environment of West Texas could reduce installation costs. A SDI system was installed and cotton production experiment conducted from 2001 to 2006 to evaluate irrigation system water distribution uniformities h...

  10. Contributions of systematic tile drainage to watershed scale phosphorus transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphorus (P) transport from agricultural fields continues be a focal point for addressing harmful algal blooms (HABs) and nuisance algae in freshwater systems throughout the world. In humid, poorly drained regions, attention has turned to P delivery through subsurface tile drainage. Research on th...

  11. Gravitational drainage systems in urban areas: case study (Galaţi town, Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfirescu, Fl.; Popa, I.; Danchiv, Al.

    2006-03-01

    The water leakage in the urban areas causes a continuous rise in the water table, with harmful effects. An experimental drainage system, based on horizontal well technology, was designed and implemented in a populated area. Groundwater flow modeling was used to assess the hydrodynamic efficiency of the system through drain conductance parameter estimation.

  12. Miocene karst drainage system: seismic stratigraphy of the continental shelf west of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution geophysical data recorded on the continental shelf west of Tampa Bay, Florida show three stratigraphic units: Holocene, Plio-Pleistocene, and Miocene. Within the Miocene unit is an expansive drainage system extending about 80 kilometers offshore. In most areas, a system such as this would typically be characterized as a paleo-fluvial system. Although this drainage system probably initiated fluvially, geophysical data showing much evidence of karstification suggest that this system probably formed on the inner shelf as a result of large scale dissolution and collapse of Miocene limestones during lowered sea-level. The overlying Plio-Pleistocene unit infills the Miocene drainage system, while exiguously covering Miocene rocks in areas where the system is absent. Deposition of this unit probably took place during high-stands of sea-level, followed by erosion and transport of sediment farther offshore, exposing Miocene rocks. The Holocene unit sporadically covers underlying units throughout the study area. Sediments making up this unit have been reworked into several bedform types probably resulting from various boundary layer flow events such as hurricanes, storms, currents and tides. This scenario is probably not unique to the continental shelf west of Tampa Bay, Florida, but may also characterize other karstic shelves where paleo-fluvial processes were previously thought to be the dominant mechanism forming paleo-coastal drainage systems.

  13. Analysis of Surface Drainage Paths for Mine Reclamation Using Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, H.

    2009-05-01

    This study presents an application of GIS-based hydrological modeling and spatial analysis to a coal mining site to effectively control the contaminated surface runoff for mine reclamation. A reliable DEM (Digital Elevation Model) was generated at the study area by detailed topographical surveys. Hydrological analyses were performed to extract the characteristics of drainage system such as flow direction, flow accumulation and catchment area from DEM. The results of spatial analysis showed that some runoff drained through waste dump can flow in the river without any purification. Consequently, several practical actions were suggested to optimize the design of drainage system in the study area for mine reclamation.

  14. Lymphatic drainage system of the brain: A novel target for intervention of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Liang; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Tuo; Sun, Jing-Yi; Mao, Lei-Lei; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Colvin, Robert A; Yang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-09-10

    The belief that the vertebrate brain functions normally without classical lymphatic drainage vessels has been held for many decades. On the contrary, new findings show that functional lymphatic drainage does exist in the brain. The brain lymphatic drainage system is composed of basement membrane-based perivascular pathway, a brain-wide glymphatic pathway, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage routes including sinus-associated meningeal lymphatic vessels and olfactory/cervical lymphatic routes. The brain lymphatic systems function physiological as a route of drainage for interstitial fluid (ISF) from brain parenchyma to nearby lymph nodes. Brain lymphatic drainage helps maintain water and ion balance of the ISF, waste clearance, and reabsorption of macromolecular solutes. A second physiological function includes communication with the immune system modulating immune surveillance and responses of the brain. These physiological functions are influenced by aging, genetic phenotypes, sleep-wake cycle, and body posture. The impairment and dysfunction of the brain lymphatic system has crucial roles in age-related changes of brain function and the pathogenesis of neurovascular, neurodegenerative, and neuroinflammatory diseases, as well as brain injury and tumors. In this review, we summarize the key component elements (regions, cells, and water transporters) of the brain lymphatic system and their regulators as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurologic diseases and their resulting complications. Finally, we highlight the clinical importance of ependymal route-based targeted gene therapy and intranasal drug administration in the brain by taking advantage of the unique role played by brain lymphatic pathways in the regulation of CSF flow and ISF/CSF exchange. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Reducing nitrate loss in tile drainage water with cover crops and water-table management systems.

    PubMed

    Drury, C F; Tan, C S; Welacky, T W; Reynolds, W D; Zhang, T Q; Oloya, T O; McLaughlin, N B; Gaynor, J D

    2014-03-01

    Nitrate lost from agricultural soils is an economic cost to producers, an environmental concern when it enters rivers and lakes, and a health risk when it enters wells and aquifers used for drinking water. Planting a winter wheat cover crop (CC) and/or use of controlled tile drainage-subirrigation (CDS) may reduce losses of nitrate (NO) relative to no cover crop (NCC) and/or traditional unrestricted tile drainage (UTD). A 6-yr (1999-2005) corn-soybean study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of CC+CDS, CC+UTD, NCC+CDS, and NCC+UTD treatments for reducing NO loss. Flow volume and NO concentration in surface runoff and tile drainage were measured continuously, and CC reduced the 5-yr flow-weighted mean (FWM) NO concentration in tile drainage water by 21 to 38% and cumulative NO loss by 14 to 16% relative to NCC. Controlled tile drainage-subirrigation reduced FWM NO concentration by 15 to 33% and cumulative NO loss by 38 to 39% relative to UTD. When CC and CDS were combined, 5-yr cumulative FWM NO concentrations and loss in tile drainage were decreased by 47% (from 9.45 to 4.99 mg N L and from 102 to 53.6 kg N ha) relative to NCC+UTD. The reductions in runoff and concomitant increases in tile drainage under CC occurred primarily because of increases in near-surface soil hydraulic conductivity. Cover crops increased corn grain yields by 4 to 7% in 2004 increased 3-yr average soybean yields by 8 to 15%, whereas CDS did not affect corn or soybean yields over the 6 yr. The combined use of a cover crop and water-table management system was highly effective for reducing NO loss from cool, humid agricultural soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Identifying weak points of urban drainage systems by means of VulNetUD.

    PubMed

    Möderl, M; Kleidorfer, M; Sitzenfrei, R; Rauch, W

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the development and application of the software tool VulNetUD. VulNetUD is a tool for GIS-based identification of vulnerable sites of urban drainage systems (UDS) using hydrodynamic simulations undertaken using EPA SWMM. The benefit of the tool is the output of different vulnerability maps rating sewer surcharging, sewer flooding, combined sewer overflow (CSO) efficiency and CSO emissions. For this, seven predefined performance indicators are used to evaluate urban drainage systems under abnormal, critical and future conditions. The application on a case study highlights the capability of the tool to identify weak points of the urban drainage systems. Thereby it is possible to identify urban drainage system components which cause the highest performance decrease across the entire system. The application of the method on a real world case study shows for instance that a reduction of catchment areas which are located upstream of CSOs with relatively less capacity in the downstream sewers achieves the highest increases efficiency of the system. Finally, the application of VulNetUD is seen as a valuable tool for managers and operators of waste water utilities to improve the efficiency of their systems. Additionally vulnerability maps generated by VulNetUD support risk management e.g. decision making in urban development planning or the development of rehabilitation strategies.

  17. Event mean concentration and first flush effect from different drainage systems and functional areas during storms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai-Qin; Liu, Yan; Wang, Hong-Wu; Gao, Xue-Long; Ma, Lu-Ming

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of the event mean concentration (EMC) and first flush effect (FFE) during typical rainfall events in outfalls from different drainage systems and functional areas. Stormwater outfall quality data were collected from five outfalls throughout Fuzhou City (China) during 2011-2012. Samples were analyzed for water quality parameters, such as COD, NH3-N, TP, and SS. Analysis of values indicated that the order of the event mean concentrations (EMCs) in outfalls was intercepting combined system > direct emission combined system > separated system. Most of the rainfall events showed the FFE in all outfalls. The order of strength of the FFE was residential area of direct emission combined system > commercial area of separated system > residential area of intercepting combined system > office area of separated system > residential area of separated system. Results will serve as guide in managing water quality to reduce pollution from drainage systems.

  18. Re-engineering the urban drainage system for resource recovery and protection of drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, B

    2000-01-01

    The Harare metropolis in Zimbabwe, extending upstream from Manyame Dam in the Upper Manyame River Basin, consists of the City of Harare and its satellite towns: Chitungwiza, Norton, Epworth and Ruwa. The existing urban drainage system is typically a single-use-mixing system: water is used and discharged to "waste", excreta are flushed to sewers and eventually, after "treatment", the effluent is discharged to a drinking water supply source. Polluted urban storm water is evacuated as fast as possible. This system not only ignores the substantial value in "waste" materials, but it also exports problems to downstream communities and to vulnerable fresh-water sources. The question is how can the harare metropolis urban drainage system, which is complex and has evolved over time, be rearranged to achieve sustainability (i.e. water conservation, pollution prevention at source, protection of the vulnerable drinking water sources and recovery of valuable materials)? This paper reviews current concepts regarding the future development of the urban drainage system in line with the new vision of "Sustainable Cities of the Future". The Harare Metropolis in Zimbabwe is taken as a case, and philosophical options for re-engineering the drainage system are discussed.

  19. Utility of 222Rn as a passive tracer of subglacial distributed system drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhoff, Benjamin S.; Charette, Matthew A.; Nienow, Peter W.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Tedstone, Andrew J.; Cowton, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Water flow beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has been shown to include slow-inefficient (distributed) and fast-efficient (channelized) drainage systems, in response to meltwater delivery to the bed via both moulins and surface lake drainage. This partitioning between channelized and distributed drainage systems is difficult to quantify yet it plays an important role in bulk meltwater chemistry and glacial velocity, and thus subglacial erosion. Radon-222, which is continuously produced via the decay of 226Ra, accumulates in meltwater that has interacted with rock and sediment. Hence, elevated concentrations of 222Rn should be indicative of meltwater that has flowed through a distributed drainage system network. In the spring and summer of 2011 and 2012, we made hourly 222Rn measurements in the proglacial river of a large outlet glacier of the GrIS (Leverett Glacier, SW Greenland). Radon-222 activities were highest in the early melt season (10-15 dpm L-1), decreasing by a factor of 2-5 (3-5 dpm L-1) following the onset of widespread surface melt. Using a 222Rn mass balance model, we estimate that, on average, greater than 90% of the river 222Rn was sourced from distributed system meltwater. The distributed system 222Rn flux varied on diurnal, weekly, and seasonal time scales with highest fluxes generally occurring on the falling limb of the hydrograph and during expansion of the channelized drainage system. Using laboratory based estimates of distributed system 222Rn, the distributed system water flux generally ranged between 1-5% of the total proglacial river discharge for both seasons. This study provides a promising new method for hydrograph separation in glacial watersheds and for estimating the timing and magnitude of distributed system fluxes expelled at ice sheet margins.

  20. The Influence of Plant Root Systems on Subsurface Flow: Implications for Slope Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although research has explained how plant roots mechanically stabilize soils, in this article we explore how root systems create networks of preferential flow and thus influence water pressures in soils to trigger landslides. Root systems may alter subsurface flow: Hydrological m...

  1. The Influence of Plant Root Systems on Subsurface Flow: Implications for Slope Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although research has explained how plant roots mechanically stabilize soils, in this article we explore how root systems create networks of preferential flow and thus influence water pressures in soils to trigger landslides. Root systems may alter subsurface flow: Hydrological m...

  2. EPA Seeks Public Comments on Addition of Subsurface Intrusion Component to the Superfund Hazard Ranking System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking public comment on the proposed addition of a subsurface intrusion (SsI) component to the Superfund Hazard Ranking System (HRS). The HRS is a scoring system EPA uses to identify

  3. Structural adjustment for accurate conditioning in large-scale subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman

    2017-03-01

    Most of the current subsurface simulation approaches consider a priority list for honoring the well and any other auxiliary data, and eventually adopt a middle ground between the quality of the model and conditioning it to hard data. However, as the number of datasets increases, such methods often produce undesirable features in the subsurface model. Due to their high flexibility, subsurface modeling based on training images (TIs) is becoming popular. Providing comprehensive TIs remains, however, an outstanding problem. In addition, identifying a pattern similar to those in the TI that honors the well and other conditioning data is often difficult. Moreover, the current subsurface modeling approaches do not account for small perturbations that may occur in a subsurface system. Such perturbations are active in most of the depositional systems. In this paper, a new methodology is presented that is based on an irregular gridding scheme that accounts for incomplete TIs and minor offsets. Use of the methodology enables one to use a small or incomplete TI and adaptively change the patterns in the simulation grid in order to simultaneously honor the well data and take into account the effect of the local offsets. Furthermore, the proposed method was used on various complex process-based models and their structures are deformed for matching with the conditioning point data. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are successfully demonstrated by applying it to models of several complex examples.

  4. The Inchworm Deep Drilling System for Kilometer Scale Subsurface Exploration of Europa (IDDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafeek, S.; Gorevan, S. P.; Bartlett, P. W.; Kong, K. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The Inchworm Deep Drilling System (IDDS) is a compact subsurface transport system capable of accessing regions of astrobiological interest deep below the surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa. The IDDS answers Focus Investigation Area 1 as an innovative concept for implementing subsurface exploration of Europa. The concept is being developed at Honeybee Robotics to reach depths on the order of one kilometer with no tether or umbilical of any kind. The device's unique, inchworm-burrowing method appears capable of achieving this near-term depth goal and it is foreseeable that the IDDS will be capable of autonomously drilling to tens of kilometers below the surface. Logical applications of the concept also include accessing the proposed subsurface oceans on Ganymede and Callisto, subsurface water ice on Mars, and Lake Vostok on Earth. The conference presentation will communicate the IDDS concept and how it can enable the search for prebiotic and biotic chemical processes on Europa by bringing proper instrumentation to the subsurface ocean for in-situ investigation and/or returning samples to the surface. Currently, a proposal for breadboarding the IDDS is pending for the Research Opportunities for Space Science's Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development NRA. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Intraatrial baffle repair of anomalous systemic venous return without hepatic venous drainage in heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turkoz, Riza; Ayabakan, Canan; Vuran, Can; Omay, Oğuz

    2010-08-01

    A 7-month-old boy with heterotaxy syndrome had partial atrioventricular septal defect and interrupted inferior vena cava with hemiazygos continuation to a left superior vena cava. The left side of the common atrium receiving all the venous drainage was in connection with the left ventricle and the aorta. The small atrium and the proximity of the pulmonary and hepatic vein orifices precluded complete baffling. This report describes an intraatrial baffle repair of anomalous systemic venous return without hepatic venous drainage. This resulted in good oxygenation postoperatively, with oxygen saturation ranging from 93% to 98%.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF INAPPROPRIATE POLLUTANT ENTRIES INTO STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEMS: A USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This User's Guide, summarized here, is the result of a series of research tasks (sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater entries into storm drainage systems. Past projects have found that dry-weather flows disc...

  7. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Plumbing. Course: Drainage and Vent Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, T.

    One of three individualized courses included in a plumbing curriculum, this course focuses on planning, preparing, and assembling the rough-in portions of drainage, waste, and vent systems. The course is comprised of two units: (1) Pipe and Fittings Assembly and (2) Planning, Layout, and Assembly. Each unit begins with a Unit Learning Experience…

  8. Phosphorus losses from drainage systems: breaking the surface tile riser connection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In freshwater ecosystems, phosphorus is generally the nutrient most limiting algal growth. Agricultural drainage systems in the upper Midwestern US are generally designed to drain water as quickly as possible, in order to ensure trafficability and minimize crop damage due to flooding. An unintended ...

  9. INVESTIGATION OF INAPPROPRIATE POLLUTANT ENTRIES INTO STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEMS: A USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This User's Guide, summarized here, is the result of a series of research tasks (sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater entries into storm drainage systems. Past projects have found that dry-weather flows disc...

  10. An initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Bachichi, Thiago; Holanda, Caio; Rizzo, Luiz Augusto Lucas Martins De

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report an initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive patients, ≤ 14 years of age, treated at a pediatric thoracic surgery outpatient clinic, for whom pulmonary resection (lobectomy or segmentectomy via muscle-sparing thoracotomy) was indicated. The parameters evaluated were air leak (as quantified with the digital system), biosafety, duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, and complications. The digital system was used in 11 children (mean age, 5.9 ± 3.3 years). The mean length of hospital stay was 4.9 ± 2.6 days, the mean duration of drainage was 2.5 ± 0.7 days, and the mean drainage volume was 270.4 ± 166.7 mL. The mean maximum air leak flow was 92.78 ± 95.83 mL/min (range, 18-338 mL/min). Two patients developed postoperative complications (atelectasis and pneumonia, respectively). The use of this digital system facilitated the decision-making process during the postoperative period, reducing the risk of errors in the interpretation and management of air leaks. PMID:28117476

  11. Effects of Starvation of Bacterial Transport in the Subsurface: Impacts on Natural and Engineered Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R.; Cunningham, A.

    2005-05-01

    The movement of bacteria in the subsurface is of great importance to many areas of science and engineering including biogeosciences, microbial ecology, public health and bioremediation. Many researchers have studied bacterial transport through natural and engineered porous media systems. However, few have studied how starvation, or survival under extreme oligatrophic conditions, may enhance bacterial transport in the subsurface. The impact of starvation on many types of bacteria was studied to determine how it may impact pathogen transport, in situ bioremediation, and microbial diversity in the subsurface. The studies determined how nutrient starvation changed cell size, cell shape, adhesion efficiency, exo-cellular polysaccharide production, and maintenance of genetic and phenotypic attributes. Results to be presented will demonstrate how starvation physically and physiologically changes bacterial cells to enhance their transport properties regardless of soil type, hydraulic conductivity or bacterial species. The work will also show how bacterial adhesion onto porous media can be reduced by starvation and what impact that has on bacterial transport though various types of soil and aquifer material. The results also show the physiological and genetic consequences of starvation and their potential impact on microbial ecology, degradative potential and over-all survival in the subsurface. Adversely, the results will indicate how the resuscitation of the starved cells within the sub-surface may change the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer material, resulting in reduced permeability and variable hydraulic flow characteristics.

  12. Optimal design for problems involving flow and transport phenomena in saturated subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Alex S.; Kelley, C. T.; Miller, Cass T.

    Estimation problems arise routinely in subsurface hydrology for applications that range from water resources management to water quality protection to subsurface restoration. Interest in optimal design of such systems has increased over the last two decades and this area is considered an important and active area of research. In this work, we review the state of the art, assess important challenges that must be resolved to reach a mature level of understanding, and summarize some promising approaches that might help meet some of the challenges. While much has been accomplished to date, we conclude that more work remains before comprehensive, efficient, and robust solution methods exist to solve the most challenging applications in subsurface science. We suggest that future directions of research include the application of direct search solution methods, and developments in stochastic and multi-objective optimization. We present a set of comprehensive test problems for use in the research community as a means for benchmarking and comparing optimization approaches.

  13. Macroscopic features of the venous drainage of the reproductive system of the male ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Elias, M Z J; Aire, T A; Soley, J T

    2008-12-01

    The macroscopic features of the venous drainage of the reproductive system of the male ostrich were studied in six pre-pubertal and three sexually mature and active birds. Each testis was drained by one to four testicular veins. The right testicular veins drained the right testis and epididymis and its appendix to the caudal vena cava and to the right common iliac vein, whereas the left testicular veins drained the left testis and epididymis and its appendix exclusively to the left common iliac vein. A number of variations in the drainage pattern based on the point of entry and number of testicular veins were observed. The cranial aspect of the testis was also linked to the caudal vena cava or common iliac vein via the adrenal veins. The cranial, middle and caudal segments of the ductus deferens (and ureter) were drained by the cranial, middle and caudal ureterodeferential veins respectively, to the caudal testicular veins, the caudal renal veins and pudendal/caudal part of the internal iliac veins. In some specimens, the caudal ureterodeferential veins also drained into the caudal mesenteric vein. The surface of the phallus was drained by tributaries of the pudendal vein. The basic pattern of venous drainage of the reproductive organs of the male ostrich was generally similar to that described for the domestic fowl. However, important differences, including the partial fusion of the caudal renal veins, drainage of the cranial aspect of the testes via the adrenal veins, drainage of the caudal ureterodeferential veins into the caudal mesenteric vein and the presence of veins draining the surface of the phallus, were observed. Although significant, these differences may simply reflect variations in the normal pattern of venous drainage of the reproductive tract of birds which could be verified by studying more specimens and more species.

  14. Calibrated Methodology for Assessing Adaptation Costs for Urban Drainage Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in precipitation patterns associated with climate change may pose significant challenges for storm water management systems across much of the U.S. In particular, adapting these systems to more intense rainfall events will require significant investment. The assessment ...

  15. Calibrated Methodology for Assessing Adaptation Costs for Urban Drainage Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in precipitation patterns associated with climate change may pose significant challenges for storm water management systems across much of the U.S. In particular, adapting these systems to more intense rainfall events will require significant investment. The assessment ...

  16. Simplified Equations to Estimate Flushline Diameter for Subsurface Drip Irrigation Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A formulation of the Hazen-Williams equation is typically used to determine the diameter of the common flushline that is often used at the distal end of subsurface drip irrigation systems to aid in joint flushing of a group of driplines. Although this method is accurate, its usage is not intuitive a...

  17. A Mobile Acoustic Subsurface Sensing (MASS) System for Rapid Roadway Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yifeng; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Yinghong; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves are commonly used for vibration-based nondestructive testing for infrastructure. Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) has been used to detect subsurface properties for geologic inspections. Recently, efforts were made to scale down these subsurface detection approaches to see how they perform on small-scale structures such as concrete slabs and pavements. Additional efforts have been made to replace the traditional surface-mounted transducers with non-contact acoustic transducers. Though some success has been achieved, most of these new approaches are inefficient because they require point-to-point measurements or off-line signal analysis. This article introduces a Mobile Acoustic Subsurface Sensing system as MASS, which is an improved surface wave based implementation for measuring the subsurface profile of roadways. The compact MASS system is a 3-wheeled cart outfitted with an electromagnetic impact source, distance register, non-contact acoustic sensors and data acquisition/processing equipment. The key advantage of the MASS system is the capability to collect measurements continuously at walking speed in an automatic way. The fast scan and real-time analysis advantages are based upon the non-contact acoustic sensing and fast air-coupled surface wave analysis program. This integration of hardware and software makes the MASS system an efficient mobile prototype for the field test. PMID:23698266

  18. Rapid assessment system based on ecosystem services for retrofitting of sustainable drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Miklas

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) design and retrofitting is predominantly based on expert opinion supported by descriptive guidance documents. The aim of this paper is to develop an innovative rapid decision support tool based on novel ecosystem service variables for retrofitting of key SuDS techniques. This unique tool proposes the retrofitting of a SuDS technique that obtained the highest ecosystem service score for a specific urban site. This approach contrasts with methods based on traditional civil engineering judgement linked to standard variables based on community and environment studies. For a case study area (Greater Manchester), a comparison with the traditional approach of determining community and environment variables indicates that permeable pavements, filter strips, swales, ponds, constructed wetlands and below-ground storage tanks are generally less preferred than infiltration trenches, soakaways and infiltration basins. However, permeable pavements and belowground storage tanks also received relatively high scores, because of their great potential impact in terms of water quality improvement and flood control, respectively. The application of the proposed methodology will lead to changes of the sustainable drainage infrastructure in the urban landscape.

  19. Anatomy of a meltwater drainage system beneath the ancestral East Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkins, Lauren M.; Anderson, John B.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Prothro, Lindsay O.; Halberstadt, Anna Ruth W.; Stearns, Leigh A.; Pollard, David; Deconto, Robert M.

    2017-09-01

    Subglacial hydrology is critical to understand the behaviour of ice sheets, yet active meltwater drainage beneath contemporary ice sheets is rarely accessible to direct observation. Using geophysical and sedimentological data from the deglaciated western Ross Sea, we identify a palaeo-subglacial hydrological system active beneath an area formerly covered by the East Antarctic ice sheet. A long channel network repeatedly delivered meltwater to an ice stream grounding line and was a persistent pathway for episodic meltwater drainage events. Embayments within grounding-line landforms coincide with the location of subglacial channels, marking reduced sedimentation and restricted landform growth. Consequently, channelized drainage at the grounding line influenced the degree to which these landforms could provide stability feedbacks to the ice stream. The channel network was connected to upstream subglacial lakes in an area of geologically recent rifting and volcanism, where elevated heat flux would have produced sufficient basal melting to fill the lakes over decades to several centuries; this timescale is consistent with our estimates of the frequency of drainage events at the retreating grounding line. Based on these data, we hypothesize that ice stream dynamics in this region were sensitive to the underlying hydrological system.

  20. A generalised Dynamic Overflow Risk Assessment (DORA) for Real Time Control of urban drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzaro, Luca; Grum, Morten

    2014-07-01

    An innovative and generalised approach to the integrated Real Time Control of urban drainage systems is presented. The Dynamic Overflow Risk Assessment (DORA) strategy aims to minimise the expected Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) risk by considering (i) the water volume presently stored in the drainage network, (ii) the expected runoff volume (calculated by radar-based nowcast models) and - most important - (iii) the estimated uncertainty of the runoff forecasts. The inclusion of uncertainty allows for a more confident use of Real Time Control (RTC). Overflow risk is calculated by a flexible function which allows for the prioritisation of the discharge points according to their sensitivity and intended use. DORA was tested on a hypothetical example inspired by the main catchment in the city of Aarhus (Denmark). An analysis of DORA’s performance over a range of events with different return periods, using a simple conceptual model, is presented. Compared to a traditional local control approach, DORA contributed to reduce CSO volumes from the most sensitive points while reducing total CSO volumes discharged from the catchment. Additionally, the results show that the inclusion of forecasts and their uncertainty contributed to further improving the performance of drainage systems. The results of this paper will contribute to the wider usage of global RTC methods in the management of urban drainage networks.

  1. Subsurface sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airborne or spaceborne electromagnetic systems used to detect subsurface features are discussed. Data are given as a function of resistivity of ground material, magnetic permeability of free space, and angular frequency. It was noted that resistivities vary with the water content and temperature.

  2. Nonlinear analysis of drainage systems to examine surface deformation: an example from Potwar Plateau (Northern Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, F.; Mahmood, S. A.; Gloaguen, R.

    2010-03-01

    We devise a procedure in order to characterize the relative vulnerability of the Earth's surface to tectonic deformation using the geometrical characteristics of drainage systems. The present study focuses on the nonlinear analysis of drainage networks extracted from Digital Elevation Models in order to localize areas strongly influenced by tectonics. We test this approach on the Potwar Plateau in northern Pakistan. This area is regularly affected by damaging earthquakes. Conventional studies cannot pinpoint the zones at risk, as the whole region is characterized by a sparse and diffuse seismicity. Our approach is based on the fact that rivers tend to linearize under tectonic forcing. Thus, the low fractal dimensions of the Swan, Indus and Jehlum Rivers are attributed to neotectonic activity. A detailed textural analysis is carried out to investigate the linearization, heterogeneity and connectivity of the drainage patterns. These textural aspects are quantified using the fractal dimension, as well as lacunarity and succolarity analysis. These three methods are complimentary in nature, i.e. objects with similar fractal dimensions can be distinguished further with lacunarity and/or succolarity analysis. We generate maps of fractal dimensions, lacunarity and succolarity values using a sliding window of 2.5 arc minutes by 2.5 arc minutes (2.5'×2.5'). These maps are then interpreted in terms of land surface vulnerability to tectonics. This approach allowed us to localize several zones where the drainage system is highly structurally controlled on the Potwar Plateau. The region located between Muree and Muzaffarabad is found to be prone to destructive events whereas the area westward from the Indus seems relatively unaffected. We conclude that a nonlinear analysis of the drainage system is an efficient additional tool to locate areas likely to be affected by massive destructing events affecting the Earth's surface and therefore threaten human activities.

  3. Performance assessment of a street-drainage bioretention system.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Cameron; Horner, Richard R

    2010-02-01

    Event-based, flow-paced composite sampling was carried out at the inlet and outlet of a street-side bioretention facility in Seattle, Washington, to assess its ability to reduce street runoff quantity and pollutants. Over 2.5 years, 48 to 74% of the incoming runoff was lost to infiltration and evaporation. Outlet pollutant concentrations were significantly lower than those at the inlet for nearly all monitored constituents. In terms of mass, the system retained most of the incoming pollutants. Besides soluble reactive phosphorus (the mass of which possibly increased), dissolved copper was the least effectively retained; at least 58% of dissolved copper (and potentially as much as 79%) was captured by the system. Motor oil was removed most effectively, with 92 to 96% of the incoming motor oil not leaving the system. The results indicate that bioretention systems can achieve a high level of runoff retention and treatment in real-weather conditions.

  4. Hygienic drainage for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Peter Jennings, technical director for ACO Building Drainage, which specialises in the development of corrosion-resistant drainage systems and building products, looks at the key issues to consider when specifying and installing pipework and drainage for hygiene-critical environments such as hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

  5. A global analysis approach for investigating structural resilience in urban drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Mugume, Seith N; Gomez, Diego E; Fu, Guangtao; Farmani, Raziyeh; Butler, David

    2015-09-15

    Building resilience in urban drainage systems requires consideration of a wide range of threats that contribute to urban flooding. Existing hydraulic reliability based approaches have focused on quantifying functional failure caused by extreme rainfall or increase in dry weather flows that lead to hydraulic overloading of the system. Such approaches however, do not fully explore the full system failure scenario space due to exclusion of crucial threats such as equipment malfunction, pipe collapse and blockage that can also lead to urban flooding. In this research, a new analytical approach based on global resilience analysis is investigated and applied to systematically evaluate the performance of an urban drainage system when subjected to a wide range of structural failure scenarios resulting from random cumulative link failure. Link failure envelopes, which represent the resulting loss of system functionality (impacts) are determined by computing the upper and lower limits of the simulation results for total flood volume (failure magnitude) and average flood duration (failure duration) at each link failure level. A new resilience index that combines the failure magnitude and duration into a single metric is applied to quantify system residual functionality at each considered link failure level. With this approach, resilience has been tested and characterised for an existing urban drainage system in Kampala city, Uganda. In addition, the effectiveness of potential adaptation strategies in enhancing its resilience to cumulative link failure has been tested. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling and real-time control of urban drainage systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Barreiro-Gomez, J.; Escobar, E.; Téllez, D.; Quijano, N.; Ocampo-Martinez, C.

    2015-11-01

    Urban drainage systems (UDS) may be considered large-scale systems given their large number of associated states and decision actions, making challenging their real-time control (RTC) design. Moreover, the complexity of the dynamics of the UDS makes necessary the development of strategies for the control design. This paper reviews and discusses several techniques and strategies commonly used for the control of UDS. Moreover, the models to describe, simulate, and control the transport of wastewater in UDS are also reviewed.

  7. The usefulness of Wi-Fi based digital chest drainage system in the post-operative care of pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Min; Hong, Yoon Joo; Byun, Chun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest drainage systems are usually composed of chest tube and underwater-seal bottle. But this conventional system may restrict patients doing exercise and give clinicians obscure data about when to remove tubes because there is no objective indicator. Recently developed digital chest drainage systems may facilitate interpretation of the grade of air leak and make it easy for clinicians to decide when to remove chest tubes. In addition, with combination of wireless internet devices, monitoring and managing of drainage system distant from the patient is possible. Methods Sixty patients of primary pneumothorax were included in a prospective randomized study and divided into two groups. Group I (study) consisted of digital chest drainage system while in group II (control), conventional underwater-seal chest bottle system was used. Data was collected from January, 2012 to September, 2013 in Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. Results There was no difference in age, sex, smoking history and postoperative pain between two groups. But the average length of drainage was 2.2 days in group I and 3.1 days in group II (P<0.006). And more, about 90% of the patients in group I was satisfied with using new device for convenience. Conclusions Digital system was beneficial on reducing the length of tube drainage by real time monitoring. It also had advantage in portability, loudness and gave more satisfaction than conventional system. Moreover, internet based digital drainage system will be a good method in thoracic telemedicine area in the near future. PMID:27076934

  8. Fractal characterization of subsurface fracture network for geothermal energy extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe; Takahashi, H.

    1993-01-28

    As a new modeling procedure of geothermal energy extraction systems, the authors present two dimensional and three dimensional modeling techniques of subsurface fracture network, based on fractal geometry. Fluid flow in fractured rock occurs primarily through a connected network of discrete fractures. The fracture network approach, therefore, seeks to model fluid flow and heat transfer through such rocks directly. Recent geophysical investigations have revealed that subsurface fracture networks can be described by "fractal geometry". In this paper, a modeling procedure of subsurface fracture network is proposed based on fractal geometry. Models of fracture networks are generated by distributing fractures randomly, following the fractal relation between fracture length r and the number of fractures N expressed with fractal dimension D as N =C·r-D, where C is a constant to signify the fracture density of the rock mass. This procedure makes it possible to characterize geothermal reservoirs by the parameters measured from field data, such as core sampling. In this characterization, the fractal dimension D and the fracture density parameter C of a geothermal reservoir are used as parameters to model the subsurface fracture network. Using this model, the transmissivities between boreholes are also obtained as a function of the fracture density parameter C, and a parameter study of system performances, such as heat extraction, is performed. The results show the dependence of thermal recovery of geothermal reservoir on fracture density parameter C.

  9. Hydrologic Systems in Transition - Historical Observations and Modeling of Subsurface Flow in Discontinuous Permafrost Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvoord, M. A.; Kurylyk, B. L.; Striegl, R. G.

    2016-12-01

    Though boundary conditions routinely change through time across hydrologic landscapes, hydrostratigraphy and subsurface physical properties are generally considered to be static over timescales of interest for water resource investigations. However, these assumptions do not apply to permafrost systems that are vulnerable to changes in hydraulic, thermal, and mechanical subsurface properties upon thaw. Thaw-induced changes in the subsurface must be considered in addition to alterations in hydrologic, thermal, and topographic boundary conditions when evaluating shifts in the movement and storage of freshwater in boreal regions. Due to imperfect knowledge of past, current, and future subsurface conditions, it is necessary to integrate historical observations, current characterization information, and hydrologic modeling to better understand and anticipate changes in water resources and fluxes at local to basin scales. We present an overview of historical trend analyses and supportive modeling studies used to infer hydrologic changes linked to various modes of thaw in discontinuous permafrost. We discuss how this collective work provides insight into important factors that control the rates and hydrologic responses of permafrost thaw. Realizing that response across heterogeneous systems will be neither spatially uniform nor synchronous, this synthesis offers a framework for discussing vulnerabilities and impacts of permafrost thaw on hydrologic processes at various spatial and temporal scales.

  10. Enhancing future resilience in urban drainage system: Green versus grey infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xin; Guo, Hao; Zeng, Siyu

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, the concept transition from fail-safe to safe-to-fail makes the application of resilience analysis popular in urban drainage systems (UDSs) with various implications and quantifications. However, most existing definitions of UDSs resilience are confined to the severity of flooding, while uncertainties from climate change and urbanization are not considered. In this research, we take into account the functional variety, topological complexity, and disturbance randomness of UDSs and define a new formula of resilience based on three parts of system severity, i.e. social severity affected by urban flooding, environmental severity caused by sewer overflow, and technological severity considering the safe operation of downstream facilities. A case study in Kunming, China is designed to compare the effect of green and grey infrastructure strategies on the enhancement of system resilience together with their costs. Different system configurations with green roofs, permeable pavement and storage tanks are compared by scenario analysis with full consideration of future uncertainties induced by urbanization and climate change. The research contributes to the development of sustainability assessment of urban drainage system with consideration of the resilience of green and grey infrastructure under future change. Finding the response measures with high adaptation across a variety of future scenarios is crucial to establish sustainable urban drainage system in a long term. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A Remote Characterization System for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W.; Martinson, L.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a development project that will provide new technology for characterizing hazardous waste burial sites. The project is a collaborative effort by five of the national laboratories, involving the development and demonstration of a remotely controlled site characterization system. The Remote Characterization System (RCS) includes a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for non-invasive inspection of the surface and subsurface.

  12. A conceptual model for the development of pristine drainage systems during exhumation of metamorphic core complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trost, Georg; Neubauer, Franz; Robl, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) are defined as large scale geological features of domal shape. The essential characteristic comprises metamorphic rocks, which have been exhumed from lower crustal levels and now are exposed to the surface. The updoming process occurs at different tectonic settings of high strain zones initially exposing pristine gently dipping fault planes to Earth's surface. Consequently, the dome shape highly influences the type of adaption of the drainage systems to the active landforms. However, drainage systems and their characteristic metrics in regions shaped by MCCs have only been sparsely investigated and were not examined regarding the distinction between different MCC-types (A-type, B-type, C-type). In this study we investigate the drainage patterns of MCCs formed by different tectonic settings and build up a conceptual model for the development of the drainage systems under these conditions. We apply the χ-method to detect variations in uplift, as well as spatial unconformities in the drainage patterns. The χ-method is a mathematical approach to transform stream longitudinal profiles to the χ space where the slope of steady state profiles is solely dependent on uplift rate and bedrock erodibility. From this transformation we calculate color-coded χ-maps and χ-profiles of the main streams draining the MCCs. The applied method allows the interpretation of channel metrics in terms of (a) spatial gradients in uplift rate and (b) the time dependent evolution of drainage divides including drainage divide migration. Our results show a high variation in the shape and greatest elevation of the χ-profiles. This indicates the migration of active uplift zones along the dome axes. Even though only MCCs younger than Miocene age are investigated, the shape of the χ-profiles clearly points to different development stages of these areas. K-profiles plotted over the detachment underlying an active updoming process show concave shaped

  13. Balance Mass Flux and Velocity Across the Equilibrium Line in Ice Drainage Systems of Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Giovinetto, Mario B.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Estimates of balance mass flux and the depth-averaged ice velocity through the cross-section aligned with the equilibrium line are produced for each of six drainage systems in Greenland. (The equilibrium line, which lies at approximately 1200 m elevation on the ice sheet, is the boundary between the area of net snow accumulation at higher elevations and the areas of net melting at lower elevations around the ice sheet.) Ice drainage divides and six major drainage systems are delineated using surface topography from ERS (European Remote Sensing) radar altimeter data. The net accumulation rate in the accumulation zone bounded by the equilibrium line is 399 Gt/yr and net ablation rate in the remaining area is 231 Gt/yr. (1 GigaTon of ice is 1090 kM(exp 3). The mean balance mass flux and depth-averaged ice velocity at the cross-section aligned with the modeled equilibrium line are 0.1011 Gt kM(exp -2)/yr and 0.111 km/yr, respectively, with little variation in these values from system to system. The ratio of the ice mass above the equilibrium line to the rate of mass output implies an effective exchange time of approximately 6000 years for total mass exchange. The range of exchange times, from a low of 3 ka in the SE drainage system to 14 ka in the NE, suggests a rank as to which regions of the ice sheet may respond more rapidly to climate fluctuations.

  14. An Automated, Gravity-driven CSF Drainage System Decreases Complications and Lowers Costs

    PubMed Central

    Lieberson, Robert E; Meyer, William; Trang, Tung

    2017-01-01

    Background: FlowSafeTM (BeckerSmith Medical, Irvine, CA, USA) is a novel, robotic, external lumbar drainage (ELD) system, which was designed to control cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, reduce complications, and decrease treatment costs. Methods: Forty-seven consecutive neurosurgical patients requiring ELD were treated using the FlowSafe system. Results: In 39 of 40 patients with traumatic and surgical dural openings, potential CSF leaks were avoided. In seven patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus, post-infectious ventriculomegaly, or pseudotumor cerebrum, we were able to assess the likelihood of improvement with shunting. The system, therefore, produced what we considered to be the “desired result” in 46 of 47 patients (98%). Our one treatment failure (2%) involved a patient with unrecognized hydrocephalus who, following a Chiari repair with a dural patch graft, was drained for six days. A persistent CSF leak eventually required a reoperation. Two patients (4%) described low-pressure headaches during treatment. Both responded to temporarily suspending or reducing the drainage rate. We saw no complications. Required nursing interventions were minimal.  Conclusions: The FlowSafe system was safe and effective. In our experience, there were fewer complications compared to currently available ELD systems. The FlowSafe was well tolerated by our patients. The near elimination of nursing interventions should allow lumbar drainage to be delivered in less costly, non-intensive care unit settings. Larger trials will be needed. PMID:28331772

  15. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  16. Ground penetrating imaging radar system for locating and mapping subsurface structures: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackman, R.H.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the first phase of a two phase program directed at the development of an advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar (GPIR) system. This system will be capable of locating and mapping buried pipes, utilities lines and other conducting and non-conducting subsurface structures to depths of 4 meters. The system will employ advanced radar hardware technology and advanced signal and image processing capable of generating robust 3-dimensional subsurface maps. The system will be designed for both on- and off-road operation and for real time imaging. The first phase of the program: (1) established a proof of principle for the GPIR concept through a series of subsurface imaging experiments at the Lockheed Martin Ground Penetrating Radar site; (2) developed a system model for prediction of system performance; (3) developed an engineering design for the phase 2 program. In the third element, radar hardware and antenna technologies were evaluated for suitability for the buried utilities problem and selected for further phase 2 development and integration. The program objectives, approach and organization are described further in the Introduction.

  17. Digital and smart chest drainage systems to monitor air leaks: the birth of a new era?

    PubMed

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Varela, Gonzalo; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2010-08-01

    Recently, several companies have manufactured and commercialized new pleural drainage units that incorporate electronic components for the digital quantification of air through chest tubes and, in some instances, pleural pressure assessment. The goal of these systems is to objectify this previously subjective bedside clinical parameter and allow for more objective, consistent measurement of air leaks. The belief is this will lead to quicker and more accurate chest tube management. In addition, some systems feature portable suction devices. These may afford earlier mobilization of patients because the pleural drainage chamber is attached to a battery-powered smart suction device. In this article we review the clinical experiences using these new devices. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The co-genetic evolution of metamorphic core complexes and drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trost, Georg; Neubauer, Franz; Robl, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) are large scale geological features that globally occur in high strain zones where rocks from lower crustal levels are rapidly exhumed along discrete fault zones, basically ductile-low-angle normal faults recognizable by a metamorphic break between the cool upper plate and hot lower plate. Standard methods, structural analysis and geochronology, are applied to reveal the geodynamic setting of MCCs and to constrain timing and rates of their exhumation. Exhumation is abundantly accompanied by spatially and temporally variable vertical (uplift) and horizontal motions (lateral advection) representing the tectonic driver of topography formation that forces drainage systems and related hillslopes to adjust. The drainage pattern commonly develops in the final stage of exhumation and contributes to the decay of the forming topography. Astonishingly, drainage systems and their characteristic metrics (e.g. normalized steepness index) in regions coined by MCCs have only been sparsely investigated to determine distinctions between different MCC-types (A- and B-type MCCs according to Le Pourhiet et al., 2012). They however, should significantly differ in their topographic expression that evolves by the interplay of tectonic forcing and erosional surface processes. A-type MCCs develop in an overall extensional regime and are bounded partly by strike-slip faults showing transtensional or transpressional components. B-type MCCs are influenced by extensional dynamics only. Here, we introduce C-type MCCs that are updoming along oversteps of crustal-scale, often orogen-parallel strike-slip shear zones. In this study, we analyze drainage systems of several prominent MCCs, and compare their drainage patterns and channel metrics to constrain their geodynamic setting. The Naxos MCC represents an A-type MCC. The Dayman Dome located in Papua New Guinea a B-type MCC, whereas MCCs of the Red River Shear Zone, the Diancang, Ailao-Shan and Day Nui Con Voi

  19. Intelligent real-time operation of a pumping station for an urban drainage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Lin; Wei, Chih-Chiang

    2013-05-01

    SummaryIn this study, we apply artificial intelligence techniques to the development of two real-time pumping station operation models, namely, a historical and an optimized adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS-His and ANFIS-Opt, respectively). The functions of these two models are the determination of the real-time operation criteria of various pumping machines for controlling flood in an urban drainage system during periods when the drainage gate is closed. The ANFIS-His is constructed from an adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) using historical operation records. The ANFIS-Opt is constructed from an ANFIS using the best operation series, which are optimized by a tabu search of historical flood events. We use the Chung-Kong drainage basin, New Taipei City, Taiwan, as the study area. The operational comparison variables are the highest water level (WL) and the absolute difference between the final WL and target WL of a pumping front-pool. The results show that the ANFIS-Opt is better than the ANFIS-His and historical operation models, based on the operation simulations of two flood events using the two operation models.

  20. Agricultural Drainage Water Management in the Upper Mississippi River Basin: Potential Impact and Implementation Strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The unique soil and climate of the Upper Mississippi River Basin area provide the resources for bountiful agricultural production. Agricultural drainage (both surface and subsurface drainage) is essential for achieving economically viable crop production and management. Drainage practices alter the ...

  1. Exploring Agricultural Drainage's Influence on Wetland and Watershed Connectivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Artificial agricultural drainage (i.e. surface ditches or subsurface tile) is an important agricultural management tool. Artificial drainage allows for timely fieldwork and adequate root aeration, resulting in greater crop yields for farmers. This practice is widespread throughou...

  2. The role of recharge zones, discharge zones, springs and tile drainage systems in peneplains of Central European highlands with regard to water quality generation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolezal, F.; Kvitek, T.

    2003-04-01

    Large areas of ploughed lands in old peneplains of Central Europe (such as the Bohemo-Moravian Highland) are located on flat tops of hills. Their soils, mostly Cambisols on weathered acid crystalline rocks (e.g., granite and gneiss) are permeable and shallow or medium-deep. These are the zones of groundwater recharge and it is through them that the local water-bearing formations (weathered rocks, colluvia and quaternary sediments in valleys) receive their portions of nitrate and other pollutants. The groundwater exfiltrates on the lower parts of slopes and in narrow valleys, creating dispersed springs and waterlogged areas. The latter were traditionally used, if at all, as forests or meadows. Since about 1960, many of the former meadows in foothill zones of Czech highlands have been drained by subsurface tile drainage systems and turned into arable lands. Field measurements in several small experimental catchments in this area proved that the water which is being discharged into the main stream either by small surface tributaries collecting water from subsurface drainage systems or by the subsurface drainage systems themselves reveals high concentrations of nitrate. Strong intraseasonal variation of water quality and the results of runoff separation suggest that the overall turnover of groundwater is fast. It is hypothesised that the redox status of the formerly waterlogged sites has been shifted toward the oxidation side due to drainage and tillage, rendering the removal of nitrogen from groundwater by denitrification less efficient. Hence, it is mainly the combination of diffuse pollution by nitrate in the recharge zones and the lack of opportunity for denitrification in the transitional and discharge zones which makes the stream water polluted. The ploughed lands in the recharge zones represent an established basis for local agriculture and cannot be set aside. Many of them have however been declared as vulnerable zones in terms of the nitrate pollution risk

  3. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  4. Modeling Subsurface Behavior at the System Level: Considerations and a Path Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geesey, G.

    2005-12-01

    The subsurface is an obscure but essential resource to life on Earth. It is an important region for carbon production and sequestration, a source and reservoir for energy, minerals and metals and potable water. There is a growing need to better understand subsurface possesses that control the exploitation and security of these resources. Our best models often fail to predict these processes at the field scale because of limited understanding of 1) the processes and the controlling parameters, 2) how processes are coupled at the field scale 3) geological heterogeneities that control hydrological, geochemical and microbiological processes at the field scale and 4) lack of data sets to calibrate and validate numerical models. There is a need for experimental data obtained at scales larger than those obtained at the laboratory bench that take into account the influence of hydrodynamics, geochemical reactions including complexation and chelation/adsorption/precipitation/ion exchange/oxidation-reduction/colloid formation and dissolution, and reactions of microbial origin. Furthermore, the coupling of each of these processes and reactions needs to be evaluated experimentally at a scale that produces data that can be used to calibrate numerical models so that they accurately describe field scale system behavior. Establishing the relevant experimental scale for collection of data from coupled processes remains a challenge and will likely be process-dependent and involve iterations of experimentation and data collection at different intermediate scales until the models calibrated with the appropriate date sets achieve an acceptable level of performance. Assuming that the geophysicists will soon develop technologies to define geological heterogeneities over a wide range of scales in the subsurface, geochemists need to continue to develop techniques to remotely measure abiotic reactions, while geomicrobiologists need to continue their development of complementary technologies

  5. Subsurface materials management and containment system, components thereof and methods relating thereto

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-04-18

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  6. An optimization model to design and manage subsurface drip irrigation system for alfalfa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandelous, M.; Kamai, T.; Vrugt, J. A.; Simunek, J.; Hanson, B.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is one of the most efficient and cost-effective methods for watering alfalfa plants. Lateral installation depth and distance, emitter discharge, and irrigation time and frequency of SDI, in addition to soil and climatic conditions affect alfalfa’s root water uptake and yield. Here we use a multi-objective optimization approach to find optimal SDI strategies. Our approach uses the AMALGAM evolutionary search method, in combination with the HYDRUS-2D unsaturated flow model to maximize water uptake by alfalfa’s plant roots, and minimize loss of irrigation and drainage water to the atmosphere or groundwater. We use a variety of different objective functions to analyze SDI. These criteria include the lateral installation depth and distance, the lateral discharge, irrigation duration, and irrigation frequency. Our framework includes explicit recognition of the soil moisture status during the simulation period to make sure that the top soil is dry for harvesting during the growing season. Initial results show a wide spectrum of optimized SDI strategies for different root distributions, soil textures and climate conditions. The developed tool should be useful in helping farmers optimize their irrigation strategy and design.

  7. Modulation of the antioxidant system in Citrus under waterlogging and subsequent drainage.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; López-Climent, María F; Arbona, Vicent; Pérez-Clemente, Rosa M; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2009-09-01

    Soil flooding induces an impairment of the photosynthetic system that often leads to an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues. Moreover, flooding release by drainage can cause a sudden oxygen burst that exacerbates oxidative damage. To examine the influence of different anoxic and post-anoxic periods on citrus physiology, citrumelo CPB4475, a moderate flood-tolerant genotype, was subjected to three different periods of soil flooding followed by drainage. Plant performance in terms of visible damage, photosynthetic activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide accumulation was examined together with the plant antioxidant response. The results indicated that coordinated antioxidant activity, involving increased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) (EC 1.15.1.1) and catalase (CAT) (EC 1.11.1.6), together with a modulation of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, allowed plants to cope with flooding-induced oxidative stress up to a certain point. Elevated ascorbate peroxidase (APX) (EC 1.11.1.11) activity or discrete increases in AsA or glutathione concentrations seemed inefficient in maintaining low levels of oxidative damage. Waterlogging stress release by soil drainage did not improve plant performance but, on the contrary, enhanced oxidative stress and even accelerated plant injury. This appears to be the result of sudden oxygen burst soon after release of water.

  8. Sequential geophysical and flow inversion to characterize fracture networks in subsurface systems

    DOE PAGES

    Mudunuru, Maruti Kumar; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; ...

    2017-09-05

    Subsurface applications, including geothermal, geological carbon sequestration, and oil and gas, typically involve maximizing either the extraction of energy or the storage of fluids. Fractures form the main pathways for flow in these systems, and locating these fractures is critical for predicting flow. However, fracture characterization is a highly uncertain process, and data from multiple sources, such as flow and geophysical are needed to reduce this uncertainty. We present a nonintrusive, sequential inversion framework for integrating data from geophysical and flow sources to constrain fracture networks in the subsurface. In this framework, we first estimate bounds on the statistics formore » the fracture orientations using microseismic data. These bounds are estimated through a combination of a focal mechanism (physics-based approach) and clustering analysis (statistical approach) of seismic data. Then, the fracture lengths are constrained using flow data. In conclusion, the efficacy of this inversion is demonstrated through a representative example.« less

  9. Lymphadiposal Flaps and Lymphaticovenular Anastomoses for Severe Leg Edema: Functional Reconstruction for Lymph Drainage System.

    PubMed

    Koshima, Isao; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mihara, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Hara, Hisako; Ohshima, Azusa; Kikuchi, Kazuki; Todokoro, Ken; Seki, Yukio; Iida, Takuya; Nakagawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Collecting lymphatics have lymph-drainage function with contraction of smooth muscle cells. Patients with edema have lost this drainage function due to degeneration of smooth muscle cells. Lymphaticovenular (LV) anastomosis salvages smooth muscle cells from reversible degeneration (mild edema), but muscle cells cannot be recovered from irreversible degeneration (severe edema). Therefore, in severe edema, LV anastomoses cannot reestablish the drainage function of the lymphatic system.To overcome this weakness of LV bypass methods for severe edema, new methods were instituted for repair of this missing drainage function using a lymphadiposal flap from the contralateral foot for hemilateral edema, or transfer of lateral thoracic lymph nodes for bilateral edema. A total of 13 cases were repaired with lymphadiposal flaps and additional LV anastomoses. These cases have frequent phlegmon or cellulitis or resisted to previous LV anastomoses and/or compression therapy. The ages ranged from 15 to 75 years. There were four cases of primary edema and nine cases of secondary edema. Regarding the lymphadiposal flap (n = 8), three cases showed an excellent response (37.5%; no need for compression therapy), four cases had a good response (50%; improvement with compression), one case showed no change (12.5%; no improvement), and there were no cases of deterioration. Regarding the lateral thoracic lymph nodes transfer (n = 5), two cases had a good response (40%), three showed no improvement (60%), and there were no cases of deterioration. It is concluded that lymphadiposal flap or lymph nodes transfer is suitable for severe edema having frequent cellulitis in unilateral or bilateral lower extremities resisting previous LV anastomoses and/or compression therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Biosphere frontiers of subsurface life in the sedimented hydrothermal system of Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; Callaghan, Amy V.; LaRowe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is one of the key constraints on the spatial extent, physiological and phylogenetic diversity, and biogeochemical function of subsurface life. A model system to explore these interrelationships should offer a suitable range of geochemical regimes, carbon substrates and temperature gradients under which microbial life can generate energy and sustain itself. In this theory and hypothesis article, we make the case for the hydrothermally heated sediments of Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California as a suitable model system where extensive temperature and geochemical gradients create distinct niches for active microbial populations in the hydrothermally influenced sedimentary subsurface that in turn intercept and process hydrothermally generated carbon sources. We synthesize the evidence for high-temperature microbial methane cycling and sulfate reduction at Guaymas Basin – with an eye on sulfate-dependent oxidation of abundant alkanes – and demonstrate the energetic feasibility of these latter types of deep subsurface life in previously drilled Guaymas Basin locations of Deep-Sea Drilling Project 64. PMID:25132832

  11. Monitoring subsurface microbial and nutrient transport to assess treatment capability of at- grade septic system designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cey, E.; Motz, E.; Chu, A.; Ryan, C.

    2009-05-01

    By design, septic systems release pathogenic microbes, nutrients and other chemical contaminants into the subsurface and have the potential to adversely impact groundwater quality. Newer at-grade septic system designs discharge wastewater effluent on the soil surface, however, relatively little research has been conducted on transport processes and treatment efficacy for these systems. The objective of this study was to investigate physical, biological, and chemical processes beneath two at-grade wastewater treatment systems. Secondary treated effluent from the Fish Creek wastewater treatment plant in Calgary is being applied to soil through the two at-grade systems in volumes equivalent to a three-bedroom household. A dye tracer was also introduced with the effluent to aid in the evaluation of subsurface flow patterns and the identification of soil sampling locations. An extensive vadose zone monitoring system, consisting of suction lysimeters, tensiometers, time domain reflectometry probes, thermistors, and soil vapour probes, was installed to track the effluent through the soil profile. Fecal coliform, total coliform, and E. Coli, as well as other physical and chemical parameters, are being monitored in-situ. Soil samples for microbial and chemical analysis have also been obtained by excavating portions of the infiltration area beneath the two systems. Chemical and dye tracers showed relatively rapid migration of effluent to depths of up to 1.5 m below surface. Preliminary pathogen results indicate an approximately four log reduction in E. Coli concentrations at 10 cm depth and six log reduction at 60 cm depth. Continued monitoring of these pilot systems will provide valuable data on subsurface pathogen migration and the suitability of at-grade systems for treating wastewater and reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  12. An architecture of the simulation and prediction system of the drainage based on neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yaqi; Zeng, Bi

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the development of the system of the simulation is mainly to establish the prediction model of the pipe network of urban and the real-time simulation system based on neural network. Before the prediction model of pipe network which is based on neural network of city is created, the pump station of pipe network, the parameters needed for modeling and the sample data needed for modeling are needed to choose. The way achieves to get rid of the means of traditional manual participation in calculation and operation, and improves the precision of the selection of drainage path. That way also realize the qualitative leap in efficiency.

  13. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Procurement of Pumping Systems for the New Orleans Drainage Canals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-23

    Engineers’ Procurement of Pumping Systems for the New Orleans Drainage Canals Dear Madam Chairman: To avoid flooding in New Orleans after a rain...storm, the city’s Sewerage and Water Board pumps rainwater from the city into three drainage canals at 17th Street, London Avenue, and Orleans... drainage canals is 10,500 cubic feet per second (cfs) at the 17th Street Canal, 7,980 cfs at the London Avenue Canal, and 2,690 cfs at the Orleans Avenue

  14. A Cloud Based Framework For Monitoring And Predicting Subsurface System Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Rodzianko, A.; Johnson, D. V.; Soltanian, M. R.; Dwivedi, D.; Dafflon, B.; Tran, A. P.; Versteeg, O. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface system behavior is driven and controlled by the interplay of physical, chemical, and biological processes which occur at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Capabilities to monitor, understand and predict this behavior in an effective and timely manner are needed for both scientific purposes and for effective subsurface system management. Such capabilities require three elements: Models, Data and an enabling cyberinfrastructure, which allow users to use these models and data in an effective manner. Under a DOE Office of Science funded STTR award Subsurface Insights and LBNL have designed and implemented a cloud based predictive assimilation framework (PAF) which automatically ingests, controls quality and stores heterogeneous physical and chemical subsurface data and processes these data using different inversion and modeling codes to provide information on the current state and evolution of subsurface systems. PAF is implemented as a modular cloud based software application with five components: (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data assimilation and processing, (4) visualization and result delivery and (5) orchestration. Serverside PAF uses ZF2 (a PHP web application framework) and Python and both open source (ODM2) and in house developed data models. Clientside PAF uses CSS and JS to allow for interactive data visualization and analysis. Client side modularity (which allows for a responsive interface) of the system is achieved by implementing each core capability of PAF (such as data visualization, user configuration and control, electrical geophysical monitoring and email/SMS alerts on data streams) as a SPA (Single Page Application). One of the recent enhancements is the full integration of a number of flow and mass transport and parameter estimation codes (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, PHT3D, TOUGH, PFLOTRAN) in this framework. This integration allows for autonomous and user controlled modeling of hydrological and geochemical processes. In

  15. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  16. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  17. Partition behaviour of alkylphenols in crude oil/brine systems under subsurface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, B.; Larter, S. R.

    1997-10-01

    Partition of organic solutes between oils and water in the subsurface is an important geochemical process occurring during petroleum migration and reservoiring, during water washing, and during petroleum production. Currently no data exists on the quantitative aspects of the partition process at subsurface conditions for solutes such as phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons which are major components of both oils and waters. We have constructed an equilibration device for oils and waters based on flow injection analysis principles to measure partition coefficients of alkylphenols in crude oil/brine systems under reservoir conditions. Concentrations of C 0C 2 alkylphenols in waters and solid phase extracts of crude oils produced in the device were determined by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (RP-HPLC-ED), partition coefficients being measured as a function of pressure (25-340 bar), temperature (25-150°C), and water salinity (0-100,000 mg/L sodium chloride) for a variety of oils. Partition coefficients for all compounds decreased with increasing temperature, increased with water salinity and crude oil bulk NSO content, and showed little change with varying pressure. These laboratory measurements, determined under conditions close to those typically encountered in petroleum reservoirs, suggest temperature, water salinity, and crude oil bulk NSO content will have important influence on oil-water partition processes in the subsurface during migration and water washing.

  18. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness.

  19. Some ecological mechanisms to generate habitability in planetary subsurface areas by chemolithotrophic communities: the Río Tinto subsurface ecosystem as a model system.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Remolar, David C; Gómez, Felipe; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Schelble, Rachel T; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2008-02-01

    Chemolithotrophic communities that colonize subsurface habitats have great relevance for the astrobiological exploration of our Solar System. We hypothesize that the chemical and thermal stabilization of an environment through microbial activity could make a given planetary region habitable. The MARTE project ground-truth drilling campaigns that sampled cryptic subsurface microbial communities in the basement of the Río Tinto headwaters have shown that acidic surficial habitats are the result of the microbial oxidation of pyritic ores. The oxidation process is exothermic and releases heat under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These microbial communities can maintain the subsurface habitat temperature through storage heat if the subsurface temperature does not exceed their maximum growth temperature. In the acidic solutions of the Río Tinto, ferric iron acts as an effective buffer for controlling water pH. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron is the oxidant used by microbes to decompose pyrite through the production of sulfate, ferrous iron, and protons. The integration between the physical and chemical processes mediated by microorganisms with those driven by the local geology and hydrology have led us to hypothesize that thermal and chemical regulation mechanisms exist in this environment and that these homeostatic mechanisms could play an essential role in creating habitable areas for other types of microorganisms. Therefore, searching for the physicochemical expression of extinct and extant homeostatic mechanisms through physical and chemical anomalies in the Mars crust (i.e., local thermal gradient or high concentration of unusual products such as ferric sulfates precipitated out from acidic solutions produced by hypothetical microbial communities) could be a first step in the search for biological traces of a putative extant or extinct Mars biosphere.

  20. Some Ecological Mechanisms to Generate Habitability in Planetary Subsurface Areas by Chemolithotrophic Communities: The Ro Tinto Subsurface Ecosystem as a Model System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Gómez, Felipe; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Schelble, Rachel T.; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amiols, Ricardo

    2008-02-01

    Chemolithotrophic communities that colonize subsurface habitats have great relevance for the astrobiological exploration of our Solar System. We hypothesize that the chemical and thermal stabilization of an environment through microbial activity could make a given planetary region habitable. The MARTE project ground-truth drilling campaigns that sampled cryptic subsurface microbial communities in the basement of the Ro Tinto headwaters have shown that acidic surficial habitats are the result of the microbial oxidation of pyritic ores. The oxidation process is exothermic and releases heat under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These microbial communities can maintain the subsurface habitat temperature through storage heat if the subsurface temperature does not exceed their maximum growth temperature. In the acidic solutions of the Ro Tinto, ferric iron acts as an effective buffer for controlling water pH. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron is the oxidant used by microbes to decompose pyrite through the production of sulfate, ferrous iron, and protons. The integration between the physical and chemical processes mediated by microorganisms with those driven by the local geology and hydrology have led us to hypothesize that thermal and chemical regulation mechanisms exist in this environment and that these homeostatic mechanisms could play an essential role in creating habitable areas for other types of microorganisms. Therefore, searching for the physicochemical expression of extinct and extant homeostatic mechanisms through physical and chemical anomalies in the Mars crust (i.e., local thermal gradient or high concentration of unusual products such as ferric sulfates precipitated out from acidic solutions produced by hypothetical microbial communities) could be a first step in the search for biological traces of a putative extant or extinct Mars biosphere.

  1. An Evaluation of ENSO Asymmetry in the Community Climate System Models: A View from the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tao; Sun, De-Zheng; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.

    2009-12-11

    The asymmetry between El Nino and La Nina is a key aspect of ENSO, and needs to be simulated well by models in order to fully capture the role of ENSO in the climate system. Here we evaluate the asymmetry between the two phases of ENSO in five successive versions of Community Climate System Model (CCSM1, CCSM2, CCSM3 at T42 resolution, CCSM3 at T85 resolution, and the latest CCSM3+NR with Neale and Richter convection scheme). Different from the previous studies, we not only examine the surface signature of ENSO asymmetry, but also its subsurface signature. We attempt to understand the causes of the ENSO asymmetry by comparing the differences among these models as well as the differences between models and the observations. An underestimate of the ENSO asymmetry is noted in all the models, but the latest version with the Neale and Richter scheme (CCSM3+NR) is getting much closer to the observations than the earlier versions. The net surface heat flux is found to damp the asymmetry in the SST field in both models and observations, but the damping effect in the models is weaker than in observations, thus excluding a role of the surface heat fluxe in contributing to the weaker asymmetry in the SST anomalies associated with ENSO. Examining the subsurface signatures of ENSO - the thermocline depth and the associated subsurface temperature for the western and eastern Pacific - reveals the same 3 bias - the asymmetry in the models is weaker than in the observations. The weaker asymmetry in the subsurface signatures in the models is related to the lack of asymmetry in the zonal wind stress over the central Pacific which is in turn due to a lack of sufficient asymmetry in deep convection (i.e., the nonlinear dependence of the deep convection on SST). CCSM3+NR has the best simulation of ENSO asymmetry among the five models. It is suggested that the better performance of CCSM3+NR is linked to an enhanced convection over the eastern Pacific during the warm phase of ENSO. An

  2. Experimental validation of a sub-surface model of solar power for distributed marine sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Gregory G.; Cantin, Heather P.; Shafer, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    The capabilities of distributed sensor systems such as marine wildlife telemetry tags could be significantly enhanced through the integration of photovoltaic modules. Photovoltaic cells could be used to supplement the primary batteries for wildlife telemetry tags to allow for extended tag deployments, wherein larger amounts of data could be collected and transmitted in near real time. In this article, we present experimental results used to validate and improve key aspects of our original model for sub-surface solar power. We discuss the test methods and results, comparing analytic predictions to experimental results. In a previous work, we introduced a model for sub-surface solar power that used analytic models and empirical data to predict the solar irradiance available for harvest at any depth under the ocean's surface over the course of a year. This model presented underwater photovoltaic transduction as a viable means of supplementing energy for marine wildlife telemetry tags. The additional data provided by improvements in daily energy budgets would enhance the temporal and spatial comprehension of the host's activities and/or environments. Photovoltaic transduction is one method that has not been widely deployed in the sub-surface marine environments despite widespread use on terrestrial and avian species wildlife tag systems. Until now, the use of photovoltaic cells for underwater energy harvesting has generally been disregarded as a viable energy source in this arena. In addition to marine telemetry systems, photovoltaic energy harvesting systems could also serve as a means of energy supply for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), as well as submersible buoys for oceanographic data collection.

  3. Evaluation of urban drainage network based geographycal information system (GIS) in Sumenep City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrianto, F.; Hadiani, R.; Purwana, Y. M.

    2017-02-01

    Sumenep City frequently hit by floods. Drainage network conditions greatly affect the performance of her maid, especially those aspects that affect the capacity of the drainage channel. Aspects that affect the capacity of the drainage channel in the form of sedimentation rate and complementary buildings on drainage channels, for example, the presence of street inlet and trash rack. The method used is a drainage channel capacity level approach that level assessment of each segment drainage network conditions by calculating the ratio of the channel cross-sectional area that is filled with sediment to the total cross-sectional area wet and the existence of complementary buildings. Having obtained the condition index value of each segment, the subsequent analysis is spatial analysis using ArcGIS applications to obtain a map of the drainage network information. The analysis showed that the level condition of drainage network in the city of Sumenep in 2016 that of the total 428 drainage network there are 43 sections belonging to the state level “Good”, 198 drainage network belong to the state level “Enough”, 115 drainage network belong to the state “Mild Damaged”, 50 sections belonging to the state “Heavy Damage” and 22 drainage network belong to the state of “Dysfunction”.

  4. Metabolic consequences of pancreatic systemic or portal venous drainage in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Petruzzo, P; Badet, L; Lefrançois, N; Berthillot, C; Dorel, S Bin; Martin, X; Laville, M

    2006-06-01

    The aim was to investigate pancreatic B-cell function and insulin sensitivity in simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) recipients with systemic or portal venous drained pancreas allograft using simple and easy tests. The study included 44 patients with Type 1 diabetes and end-stage renal disease who had undergone SPK transplantation: 20 recipients received a pancreas allograft with systemic venous drainage (S-SPK) and 24 with portal venous drainage (P-SPK). We studied only recipients with functioning grafts, with normal serum glucose, HbA(1c) and serum creatinine values, on a stable drug regimen. The subjects were studied at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after transplantation. Insulin sensitivity and B-cell function indices were derived from blood samples and oral glucose tolerance tests. All patients from both groups had normal fasting glucose, body mass index and HbA(1c) values by selection. The homeostatic model (HOMA) beta-cell index was significantly lower in P-SPK recipients at several points of the follow-up. HOMA-IR was significantly higher in S-SPK recipients at 6 and 24 months after transplantation and was positively correlated with fasting insulin values, but never exceeded 3.2. There was no significant difference in QUICKI index values between the two groups. Although all patients from both groups always had normal glucose tolerance, the area under the insulin curve was higher in the S-SPK group. Cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides were higher in the P-SPK group. The results suggest sustained long-term endocrine function in both groups and show that portal venous drainage does not offer major metabolic advantages.

  5. Geochemical processes controlling fate and transport of arsenic in acid mine drainage (AMD) and natural systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan; Luo, Jian; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Jianfu

    2009-06-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is often accompanied with elevated concentrations of arsenic, in the forms of arsenite, As(III), and/or arsenate, As(V), due to the high affinity of arsenic for sulfide mineral ores. This review summarizes the major geochemical processes controlling the release, speciation, fate, and distribution of inorganic arsenic in mine drainage and natural systems. Arsenic speciation depends highly on redox potential and pH of the solution, and arsenite can be oxidized to the less toxic arsenate form. Homogeneous oxidation of arsenite occurs rather slowly while its heterogeneous oxidation on mineral surfaces can greatly enhance the reaction rates. Little evidence suggests that precipitation reaction limits the concentrations of arsenic in natural water, while co-precipitation may lead to rapid arsenic removal when large amount of iron hydroxides precipitate out of the aqueous phase upon neutralization of the mine drainage. Both arsenate and arsenite adsorb on common metal oxides and clay minerals through formation of inner-sphere and/or outer-sphere complexes, controlling arsenic concentration in natural water bodies. Arsenite adsorbs less strongly than arsenate in the typical pH range of natural water and is more mobile. Part of the adsorbed arsenic species can be exchanged by common anions (e.g., PO(4)(3-) and SO(4)(2-)), especially phosphate, which leads to their re-mobilization. Understanding the geochemistry of arsenic is helpful for predicting its mobility and fate in AMD and natural systems, and for designing of cost-effective remediation/treatment strategies to reduce the occurrence and risk of arsenic contamination.

  6. Performance of stormwater detention tanks for urban drainage systems in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Todeschini, Sara; Papiri, Sergio; Ciaponi, Carlo

    2012-06-30

    The performance of stormwater detention tanks with alternative design configurations (insertion in the storm sewer network; volume per impervious hectare) and operating conditions (continuous and intermittent emptying rules) have been evaluated according to an integrated approach. Various performance indices have been adopted to describe the mitigation of the pollution impact to the natural environment, the reduction of the management and maintenance charges for the urban drainage system, the preservation of the normal purification efficiency, and the limitation of the costs at the treatment plant. The US EPA Storm Water Management Model has been used to simulate the rainfall-runoff process and the pollutant dynamics on theoretical catchments and storm sewer networks for an individual event, as well as for a continuous run of events and inter event periods of one year recorded at the rain gauge of Cascina Scala (Pavia, northern Italy). Also the influence of the main characteristics of the urban catchment and the drainage system (area of the catchment and slope of the network) on the performance of alternative design and operating solutions has been examined. Stormwater detention tanks combined with flow regulators demonstrated good performance with respect to environmental pollution: satisfactory performance indicators can be obtained with fairly low flow rates of flow regulators (0.5-1 L/s per hectare of impervious area) and tank volumes of about 35-50 m(3) per impervious hectare. Continuous emptying guaranteed the lowest number and duration of overflows, while an intermittent operation minimised the volume sent for purification reducing the costs and the risks of impairment in the normal treatment efficiency of the plant. Overall, simulation outcomes revealed that the performance indexes are scarcely affected by the area of the catchment and the slope of the drainage network. The result of this study represents a key issue for the implementation of

  7. Fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage system, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongshan; Li, Zongmeng; Pan, Baotian; Liu, Fenliang; Liu, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    As a drainage system located in arid western China, the Shiyang River, combined with considerable fluvial strata and landform information, provides an environmental context within which to investigate fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change. Sedimentological analysis and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating enabled us to reconstruct the processes and fluvial styles of three sedimentary sequences of the Shagou and Hongshui rivers in the Shiyang drainage system. Our results present a variety of river behaviors during the late Quaternary in these areas. In the upstream Shiyang River, Zhangjiadazhuang (ZJDZ) profile of the Shagou was dominated by aggradation and a meandering channel pattern at 10.6-4.2 ka, while a noticeable channel incision occurred at ~ 4.2 ka followed by lateral channel migration. In the downstream Shiyang River, Datugou (DTG) profile of the Hongshui was an aggrading meandering river from 39.7 to 7.2 ka while channel incision occurred at 7.2 ka. Another downstream profile, Wudunwan (WDW) of the Hongshui was also characterized by aggradation from 22.4 to 4.8 ka; however, its channel pattern shifted from braided to meandering at ~ 13 ka. A discernable downcutting event occurred at ~ 4.8 ka, followed by three channel aggradation and incision episodes prior to 1.8 ka. The last 1.8 ka has been characterized by modern channel and floodplain development. The fluvial processes and styles investigated have a close correlation with late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage. During cold phases, the WDW reach was dominated by aggradation with a braided channel pattern. During warm phases, the rivers that we investigated were also characterized by aggradation but with meandering channel patterns. Channel incision events and changes of fluvial style occurred mainly during climate transitions.

  8. Investigation of denitrifying microbial communities within an agricultural drainage system fitted with low-grade weirs.

    PubMed

    Baker, Beth H; Kröger, Robert; Brooks, John P; Smith, Renotta K; Czarnecki, Joby M Prince

    2015-12-15

    Enhancing wetland characteristics in agricultural drainage ditches with the use of low-grade weirs, has been identified as a best management practice (BMP) to mitigate nutrient runoff from agriculture landscapes. A major objective of utilizing low-grade weirs as a BMP includes fostering environments suitable for the biogeochemical removal of nitrogen via denitrification. This study examined the spatial resolution of microbial communities involved in denitrification in agricultural drainage systems fitted with low-grade weirs. Appropriate sampling scales of microbial communities were investigated using 16S rRNA and denitrification functional genes nosZ, nirS, and nirK via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. Genes 16S rRNA, nosZ, and nirS were all successfully detected in soil samples, while nirK was below the detection limit throughout the study. Utilizing a combination of three sampling regimes (management, reach, catchment) was found to be effective in capturing microbial community patterns, as ANOVA results revealed nosZ gene abundance was significantly greater at the management rather than reach scale (p = 0.045; F = 3.311), although, no significant differences were observed in 16S rRNA or nirS between sampling scales (p > 0.05). A Pearson correlation matrix confirmed that 16S rRNA and nosZ gene abundances were positively correlated with soil carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and moisture, while nirS abundance was only positively correlated with soil C and soil moisture. This highlights the potential for wetland-like characteristics to be recovered in agricultural drainage systems, as weir proximity is observed to enhance soil moisture and conditions for N remediation. This study provides the basis for additional investigations of these unique environments in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and a starting point for adaptive management to enhance agricultural drainage systems for microbial

  9. Airborne multisensor remote sensing systems for subsurface feature detection in littoral zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes low altitude mobile imaging of near coastal waters in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. A suite of mobile multispectral and hyperspectral sensors were flown between ~1,000m to ~3000m altitudes in order detect subsurface features in nearby wetlands and littoral zone areas following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In this paper techniques used to develop, integrate and calibrate the airborne sensors are described. The sensors include a multispectral digital frame camera system, a traditional photogrammetric camera, and a small custom hyperspectral imaging system with custom software. Ancillary sensors include include multiple differential GPS and inertial motion unit (IMU) sensing systems and twin high definition video cameras for parallax related estimations. The correction of hyperspectral pushbroom imagery that utilizes Kalman filtering and smoothing is described and examples of georeferenced imagery is presented. The ability to image subsurface features is described and demonstrates not only the hyperspectral imaging system, but the value of utilizing simultaneous multisensor mobile sensing systems for environmental monitoring and surveillance of shorelines, water and nearby vegetation environments in littoral zones.

  10. Roles of dextrans on improving lymphatic drainage for liposomal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linglin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Min; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chenyu; Gu, Bing; Liu, Yu; Wei, Gang; Zhong, Gaoren; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a novel liposomal drug delivery system containing dextrans to reduce undesirable retention of antineoplastic agents and thus alleviate local tissue damage. At the cell level, diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DEAE-Dx) showed the strongest inhibiting effect on liposome uptake by macrophages among tested dextrans. The distribution of radiolabeled liposomes mixed with dextrans in injection site and draining lymph node was investigated in rats after subcutaneous injection. DEAE-Dx substantially reduced the undesired local retention and promoted the draining of liposome into lymphatics, which was further confirmed by confocal microscopy images revealing the substantial prevention of rhodamine B-labelled liposome sequestration by macrophages in normal lymph node in rats. Pharmacokinetic data indicated the accelerated drainage of liposome through lymphatics back to systemic circulation by mixing with DEAE-Dx. In the toxicological study in rabbits, DEAE-Dx alleviated the local tissue damage caused by liposomal doxorubicin. In conclusion, dextrans, particularly DEAE-Dx, could efficiently enhanced liposomes drainage into lymphatics, which proves themselves as promising adjuvants for lymphatic-targeted liposomal drug delivery system.

  11. Effect of alternative surface inlet designs on sediment and phosphorus drainage losses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Open surface inlets that connect to subsurface tile drainage systems provide a direct pathway for sediment, nutrients, and agrochemicals to surface waters. This study was conducted to determine whether modifying open inlets by burying them in gravel capped with 30 cm of sandy clay loam soil or in ve...

  12. Geomorphological analysis of the drainage system on the active convergent system in Azerbaijan, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh Firouz, Amaneh; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Giachetta, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Rivers are important landforms to reconstruct recent tectonic history because they are sensitive to surface movements, especially uplift and tilting. The most important drainage basins of NW Iran are, from north to south, the Arax River, the Urmia Lake and the Ghezel Ozan River catchment. The morphology of the two adjacent catchments draining into the Caspian Sea, the Arax and Ghezel Ozan were studied to better understand the active tectonics and the effect of fault activity on morphology and erosion rate of NW Iran. We performed a quantitative analysis of channel steepness and concavity, from slope-area plots calculated from digital elevation model. This information has been combined with GPS velocity vectors and seismicity. Both catchments developed under uniform climate conditions. Results show that the two rivers are in morphological disequilibrium; they exhibit profiles with prominent convexities and knickpoints. The Arax River shows higher channel steepness and concavity index in downstream part of the profile. Distribution of knickpoints show scattered elevation between 700m and 3000m. GPS rates display shortening 10 ± 2 mma-1 and 14 ± 2 mma-1 in upstream and downstream, respectively. The river profiles of Ghezel Ozan River and its tributaries reveal more disequilibrium downstream where channel steepness and concavity index are higher than upstream. Most knickpoints occur between 1000m and 2000m. The amount of shortening by GPS measurement changes from upstream 13 ± 2 mma-1to downstream 14 ± 2 mma-1. Recorded earthquakes, such as Rudbar earthquake (Mw=7.3, 1990), are more frequent downstream. The Urmia Lake is surrounded by many small and large catchments. Only major catchments were considered for the analysis. One of the most active faults, the north Tabriz fault, corresponds to a major knickpoints on the Talkhe rud River. Concordance between river profile analysis, GPS and seismotectonic records suggests that the characteristics of the river profiles

  13. Effects of tillage and application rate on atrazine transport to subsurface drainage: Evaluation of RZWQM using a six-year field study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Well-tested agricultural system models can improve our understanding of the water quality effects of management practices under different conditions. The Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) has been tested under a variety of conditions. However, the current model’s ability to simulate pesticide tr...

  14. Guidelines for Design, Construction, and Evaluation of Airport Pavement Drainage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Cedergren et. al. (11) have indicated that subsurface drainage may not be needed in pavement systems where the average annual precipitation is less...contributes water flow to each crack or joint (2). These are several ways in which the surface infiltration rate can be determined. Cedergren (3,4) has...Calculation Modules The program performs the following calculations: 5.5.7.1 Water Sources Surface infiltration (user selectable) Ridgeway procedure Cedergren

  15. Subsurface Feature Mapping of Mars using a High Resolution Ground Penetrating Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. S.; Persaud, D. M.; Preudhomme, M. A.; Jurg, M.; Smith, M. K.; Buckley, H.; Tarnas, J.; Chalumeau, C.; Lombard-Poirot, N.; Mann, B.

    2015-12-01

    As the closest Earth-like, potentially life-sustaining planet in the solar system, Mars' future of human exploration is more a question of timing than possibility. The Martian surface remains hostile, but its subsurface geology holds promise for present or ancient astrobiology and future habitation, specifically lava tube (pyroduct) systems, whose presence has been confirmed by HiRISE imagery.The location and characterization of these systems could provide a basis for understanding the evolution of the red planet and long-term shelters for future manned missions on Mars. To detect and analyze the subsurface geology of terrestrial bodies from orbit, a novel compact (smallsat-scale) and cost-effective approach called the High-resolution Orbiter for Mapping gEology by Radar (HOMER) has been proposed. Adapting interferometry techniques with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to a ground penetrating radar system, a small satellite constellation is able to achieve a theoretical resolution of 50m from low-Mars orbit (LMO). Alongside this initial prototype design of HOMER, proposed data processing methodology and software and a Mars mission design are presented. This project was developed as part of the 2015 NASA Ames Academy for Space Exploration.

  16. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrate, Ammonium, and Phosphate Fluxes to Subsurface Drains In the Eastern Cornbelt: N Source and Rotation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Subsurface drainage systems in cropland create pathways for nutrient and contaminant movement into surface water, but the relative contribution of diverse cropping practices to the nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), and orthophosphate (PO43-) fluxes is still not well documented. This study was conduct...

  18. WATER DRAINAGE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Case

    2000-05-30

    The drainage of water from the emplacement drift is essential for the performance of the EBS. The unsaturated flow properties of the surrounding rock matrix and fractures determine how well the water will be naturally drained. To enhance natural drainage, it may be necessary to introduce engineered drainage features (e.g. drilled holes in the drifts), that will ensure communication of the flow into the fracture system. The purpose of the Water Drainage Model is to quantify and evaluate the capability of the drift to remove water naturally, using the selected conceptual repository design as a basis (CRWMS M&O, 1999d). The analysis will provide input to the Water Distribution and Removal Model of the EBS. The model is intended to be used to provide postclosure analysis of temperatures and drainage from the EBS. It has been determined that drainage from the EBS is a factor important to the postclosure safety case.

  19. Analysing connectivity through landslide-channel geomorphic coupling in a large drainage system of Southern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurchescu, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Unlike creep, splash erosion and linear erosion which sometimes are called "continuous" slope processes, since they are perceived as causing relatively continuous erosion on slopes and a rather rapid transport towards river channels, mass movement processes, excepting flows, have a discontinuous behavior, manifesting stochastically on time intervals ranging from one year to tens of years, while the displaced material can remain suspended in different parts of the slope forming sediment stores. It is obviously why estimating the sediment delivered to the river network by landslides becomes a difficult task. Landslide control on channel dynamics is just one of the several forms of hillslope-channel coupling. Landslide-channel connectivity is relevant for understanding the way landslides are contributing to the sediment flux within catchments and how their study should be integrated in the estimation of sediment budgets. This paper explores the geomorphic coupling of landslides with river channels based on an extensive landslide inventory. The study area is a large drainage basin (> 2400 km2) in southern Romania encompassing four different geomorphic units (mountains, hills, piedmont and plain). The region is highly affected by a wide range of geomorphic processes which contribute to supplying sediments to the drainage network. The presence of a reservoir at the river outlet emphasizes the importance of estimating sediment budgets, the first stage of which consists in studying sediment sources. High sediment transport is associated to flash floods, a fraction of which is due to the slope failures occurring in response to the undercutting of river channels. Nominal classification systems as well as quantitative measures available in the connectivity literature are adopted here to describe the landslides-channels contact zones. Characteristics of the geomorphic coupling interfaces are further linked to the resulting geomorphic effects of landslides on the drainage

  20. [Evaluation index system of swamp degradation in Zoige Plateau of Sichuan, Southwest China under drainage stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Xing; Li, Kei; Yang, Yang

    2013-07-01

    The evaluation index system of swamp degradation is one of the key scientific issues in the frontier field of international wetland science research. On the basis of long-term swamp field reconnaissance, and according to the fixed position ecological investigation of plant communities and the analysis of soil samples in 20 swamp plots in three belt transects of swamp degradation research under the stress of drainage in 2009, the swamps in the Zoige Plateau of Sichuan were classified into three groups with seven swamp communities, i. e., undisturbed (A type), disturbed by long-term and weak drainage (B-D type), and disturbed by short-term and strong drainage (E-G type), according to the species importance value and by Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis (TWINSPAN). The degradation degree of the swamps was graded by the method of Principal Components Analysis (PCA), and the swamp vegetation evaluation index (SVEI) and soil evaluation index (SSEI) were developed. Based on the SVEI, the swamps were classified as pristine swamp, lightly degraded swamp, moderately degraded swamp, and severely degraded swamp. Based on the SSEI, the swamps in Hongyuan County were divided into three grades, i. e. pristine swamp, lightly degraded swamp, and severely degraded swamp, while those in Ruoergai County were divided into lightly degraded swamp, moderately degraded swamp, and severely degraded swamp. The similarity of TWINSPAN classification results and SVEI/SSEI evaluation results was above 70%, indicating that both SVEI and SSEI were effective for the swamp degradation grading, and different classification methods should be combined to comprehensively evaluate the swamps in the Plateau.

  1. Digital reconstruction of the Song Dynasty Ganzhou drainage system based on AR technology and its’ application in the new urban area planning and revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H. L.; Chen, Y. L.; Tao, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    Water-logging problem is a common problem in modern city. The urban built-up area of Zhangjiang new district in Ganzhou has the same water-logging problem, however, the old urban area of Ganzhou was praised as “Millennium no flood”. The drainage system of the old urban area of Ganzhou—Fushougou, which is not flooded for hundreds years because of the perfect drainage system. It’s valuable to be referenced to the modern city drainage and waterproof comprehensive planning. In order to explore the mystery of “Millennium no flood” of old urban area of Ganzhou, at the same time to provide directive opinion to the sustainability of Zhangjiang new urban area drainage system, this paper attempts to digital reconstruct the drainage system in old urban area of Ganzhou by augmented reality(AR). It will provide a new technological means and ways to evaluate the sustainability of urban underground drainage system under the surface feature changes in the landscape. On the basis of digital reconstruction of the drainage system in the old urban area of Ganzhou, the sustainability evaluation index of drainage system is studied by analyzing and contrasting with Zhangjiang new urban area drainage system, to guide the revision of comprehensive planning about city drainage and water-logging in the new urban area of Zhangjiang.

  2. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Hydrology, Drainage, and Valley Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Analysis of Orientation Dependence of Martian Gullies; 2) A Preliminary Relationship between the Depth of Martian Gullies and the Abundance of Hydrogen on Near-Surface Mars; 3) Water Indicators in Sirenum Terra and around the Argyre Impact Basin, Mars; 4) The Distribution of Gullies and Tounge-shaped Ridges and Their Role in the Degradation of Martian Craters; 5) A Critical Evaluation of Crater Lake Systems in Memnonia Quadrangle, Mars; 6) Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at Gusev Crater: Implications for the Spirit Mission; 7) Characterization of the Distributary Fan in Holden NE Crater using Stereo Analysis; 8) Computational Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars: Appraising the Drainage Density; 9) Hypsometric Analyses of Martian Basins: A Comparison to Terrestrial, Lunar, and Venusian Hypsometry; 10) Morphologic Development of Harmakhis Vallis, Mars; 11) Mangala Valles, Mars: Investigations of the source of Flood Water and Early Stages of Flooding; 12) The Formation of Aromatum Chaos and the Water Discharge Rate at Ravi Vallis; 13) Inferring Hydraulics from Geomorphology for Athabasca Valles, Mars; 14) The Origin and Evolution of Dao Vallis: Formation and Modification of Martian Channels by Structural Collapse and Glaciation; 15) Snowmelt and the Formation of Valley Networks on Martian Volcanoes; 16) Extent of Floating Ice in an Ancient Echus Chasma/Kasei Valley System, Mars.

  3. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Hydrology, Drainage, and Valley Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Analysis of Orientation Dependence of Martian Gullies; 2) A Preliminary Relationship between the Depth of Martian Gullies and the Abundance of Hydrogen on Near-Surface Mars; 3) Water Indicators in Sirenum Terra and around the Argyre Impact Basin, Mars; 4) The Distribution of Gullies and Tounge-shaped Ridges and Their Role in the Degradation of Martian Craters; 5) A Critical Evaluation of Crater Lake Systems in Memnonia Quadrangle, Mars; 6) Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at Gusev Crater: Implications for the Spirit Mission; 7) Characterization of the Distributary Fan in Holden NE Crater using Stereo Analysis; 8) Computational Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars: Appraising the Drainage Density; 9) Hypsometric Analyses of Martian Basins: A Comparison to Terrestrial, Lunar, and Venusian Hypsometry; 10) Morphologic Development of Harmakhis Vallis, Mars; 11) Mangala Valles, Mars: Investigations of the source of Flood Water and Early Stages of Flooding; 12) The Formation of Aromatum Chaos and the Water Discharge Rate at Ravi Vallis; 13) Inferring Hydraulics from Geomorphology for Athabasca Valles, Mars; 14) The Origin and Evolution of Dao Vallis: Formation and Modification of Martian Channels by Structural Collapse and Glaciation; 15) Snowmelt and the Formation of Valley Networks on Martian Volcanoes; 16) Extent of Floating Ice in an Ancient Echus Chasma/Kasei Valley System, Mars.

  4. Open top culverts as an alternative drainage system to minimize ecological effects in earth roads.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Jose L.; Elorrieta, Jose; Robredo, Jose C.; García, Ricardo; García, Fernando; Gimenez, Martin C.

    2013-04-01

    During the last fifteen years a research team from School of Forestry at the Technical University of Madrid (Spain) has developed several competitive research projects regarding forest roads and open top culverts. A first approach was established with a prototype of 7 meters length in a hydraulic channel at the laboratory determining main parameters of different open top culverts in relation to different sizes of gravels and the self washing properties relationship with different slopes up to 8 %. The curves obtained may help to properly install these drainage systems avoiding maintenance costs. In addition more targeted pilot studies were developed in different forest earth roads in center and north Spain. The construction of the stations under study was financed by the U.P.M and the R&D National Plan. The main outcomes relates the low variation of humidity in a 20 m. wide range at both sides of the open top culverts and several considerations relating the angle of installation, the spacing of such drainage systems and the benefits against rilling along the roads. Also the erosion produced downhill was established and some construction methods to avoid adverse ecological effects. The diffusion of results includes congresses and a small booklet with a great acceptance in forestry services. Also a patent (ES 2 262 437) of an advanced model has been registered.

  5. Water balance: case study of a constructed wetland as part of the bio-ecological drainage system (BIOECODS).

    PubMed

    Ayub, Khairul Rahmah; Zakaria, Nor Azazi; Abdullah, Rozi; Ramli, Rosmaliza

    2010-01-01

    The Bio-ecological Drainage System, or BIOECODS, is an urban drainage system located at the Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It consists of a constructed wetland as a part of the urban drainage system to carry storm water in a closed system. In this closed system, the constructed wetland was designed particularly for further treatment of storm water. For the purpose of studying the water balance of the constructed wetland, data collection was carried out for two years (2007 and 2009). The results show that the constructed wetland has a consistent volume of water storage compared to the outflow for both years with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.99 in 2007 and 0.86 in 2009.

  6. The intelligent operation of an urban drainage system using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F.; Chiang, Y.; Tsai, M.; Wang, Y.; Chang, L.

    2009-12-01

    The pumping stations are the major hydraulic facilities for the elimination of flood in metropolitan area and therefore play an important role in urban drainage systems. Nevertheless, the time of concentration in such highly developed cities is quite short and usually results in great damage due to the un-functional pumping station that caused by flash flood. Current operation strategy used in Taiwan during typhoon periods depends on the human experience, and thus is necessary for further investigation to increase the operating reliability of pumping station. In view of the characteristic of Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), the model was applied in this study for extracting superior operations/rules from torrential rainfall events. Historical records contain information of rainfall amounts, inner water levels, and pump and gate operating records. The results indicate that the ANFIS has an efficient learning ability to construct an intelligent operating strategy and has the potential ability to automatically operate the flood control system.

  7. Adaption to extreme rainfall with open urban drainage system: an integrated hydrological cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a cross-disciplinary framework for assessment of climate change adaptation to increased precipitation extremes considering pluvial flood risk as well as additional environmental services provided by some of the adaptation options. The ability of adaptation alternatives to cope with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas. The framework was applied to the northern part of the city of Aarhus, Denmark. We investigated four adaptation strategies that encompassed laissez-faire, larger sewer pipes, local infiltration units, and open drainage system in the urban green structure. We found that when taking into account environmental amenity effects, an integration of open drainage basins in urban recreational areas is likely the best adaptation strategy, followed by pipe enlargement and local infiltration strategies. All three were improvements compared to the fourth strategy of no measures taken.

  8. Review of operation of urban drainage systems in cold weather: water quality considerations.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, J; Oberts, G; Exall, K; Viklander, M

    2003-01-01

    Cold climate imposes special requirements on urban drainage systems, arising from extended storage of precipitation and pollutants in the catchment snowpack, processes occurring in the snowpack, and changes in catchment surface and transport network by snow and ice. Consequently, the resulting catchment response and runoff quantity differ from those experienced in snow- and ice-free seasons. Sources of pollutants entering urban snowpacks include airborne fallout, pavement and roadside deposits, and applications of de-icing and anti-skid agents. In the snowpack, snow, water and chemicals are subject to various processes, which affect their movement through the pack and eventual release during the melting process. Soluble constituents are flushed from the snowpack early during the melt; hydrophobic substances generally stay in the pack until the very end of melt and coarse solids with adsorbed pollutants stay on the ground after the melt is finished. The impacts of snowmelt on receiving waters have been measured mostly by the snowmelt chemical composition and inferences about its environmental significance. Recently, snowmelt has been tested by standard bioassays and often found toxic. Toxicity was attributed mostly to chloride and trace metals, and contributed to reduced diversity of benthic and plant communities. Thus, snowmelt and winter runoff discharged from urban drainage threaten aquatic ecosystems in many locations and require further studies with respect to advancing their understanding and development of best management practices.

  9. Fate of nitrogen for subsurface drip dispersal of effluent from small wastewater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, R. A.; Hills, D. J.; Tchobanoglous, G.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-09-01

    Subsurface drip irrigation systems apply effluent from onsite wastewater systems in a more uniform manner at a lower rate than has been possible with other effluent dispersal methods. The effluent is dispersed in a biologically active part of the soil profile for optimal treatment and where the water and nutrients can be utilized by landscape plants. Container tests were performed to determine the fate of water and nitrogen compounds applied to packed loamy sand, sandy loam, and silt loam soils. Nitrogen removal rates measured in the container tests ranged from 63 to 95% despite relatively low levels of available carbon. A Hydrus 2D vadose zone model with nitrification and denitrification rate coefficients calculated as a function of soil moisture content fit the container test results reasonably well. Model results were sensitive to the denitrification rate moisture content function. Two-phase transport parameters were needed to model the preferential flow conditions in the finer soils. Applying the model to generic soil types, the greatest nitrogen losses (30 to 70%) were predicted for medium to fine texture soils and soils with restrictive layers or capillary breaks. The slow transport with subsurface drip irrigation enhanced total nitrogen losses and plant nitrogen uptake opportunity.

  10. Fate of nitrogen for subsurface drip dispersal of effluent from small wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Beggs, R A; Hills, D J; Tchobanoglous, G; Hopmans, J W

    2011-09-25

    Subsurface drip irrigation systems apply effluent from onsite wastewater systems in a more uniform manner at a lower rate than has been possible with other effluent dispersal methods. The effluent is dispersed in a biologically active part of the soil profile for optimal treatment and where the water and nutrients can be utilized by landscape plants. Container tests were performed to determine the fate of water and nitrogen compounds applied to packed loamy sand, sandy loam, and silt loam soils. Nitrogen removal rates measured in the container tests ranged from 63 to 95% despite relatively low levels of available carbon. A Hydrus 2D vadose zone model with nitrification and denitrification rate coefficients calculated as a function of soil moisture content fit the container test results reasonably well. Model results were sensitive to the denitrification rate moisture content function. Two-phase transport parameters were needed to model the preferential flow conditions in the finer soils. Applying the model to generic soil types, the greatest nitrogen losses (30 to 70%) were predicted for medium to fine texture soils and soils with restrictive layers or capillary breaks. The slow transport with subsurface drip irrigation enhanced total nitrogen losses and plant nitrogen uptake opportunity.

  11. A remote characterization system for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Mapping of buried objects and regions of chemical and radiological contamination is required at US Department of Energy (DOE) buried waste sites. The DOE Office of Technology Development Robotics Integrated Program has initiated a project to develop and demonstrate a remotely controlled subsurface sensing system, called the Remote Characterization System (RCS). This project, a collaborative effort by five of the National Laboratories, involves the development of a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for non-invasive inspection of the surface and subsurface. To minimize interference with on-board sensors, the survey vehicle has been constructed predominatantly of non-metallic materials. The vehicle is self-propelled and will be guided by an operator located at a remote base station. The RCS sensors will be environmentally sealed and internally cooled to preclude contamination during use. Ground-penetrating radar, magnetometers, and conductivity devices are planned for geophysical surveys. Chemical and radiological sensors will be provided to locate hot spots and to provide isotopic concentration data.

  12. Fiber optic/cone penetrometer system for subsurface heavy metals detection

    SciTech Connect

    Saggese, S.; Greenwell, R.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an integrated fiber optic sensor/cone penetrometer system to analyze the heavy metals content of the subsurface. This site characterization tool will use an optical fiber cable assembly which delivers high power laser energy to vaporize and excite a sample in-situ and return the emission spectrum from the plasma produced for chemical analysis. The chemical analysis technique, often referred to as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), has recently shown to be an effective method for the quantitative analysis of contaminants soils. By integrating the fiber optic sensor with the cone penetrometer, we anticipate that the resultant system will enable in-situ, low cost, high resolution, real-time subsurface characterization of numerous heavy metal soil contaminants simultaneously. There are several challenges associated with the integration of the LIBS sensor and cone penetrometer. One challenge is to design an effective means of optically accessing the soil via the fiber probe in the penetrometer. A second challenge is to develop the fiber probe system such that the resultant emission signal is adequate for quantitative analysis. Laboratory techniques typically use free space delivery of the laser to the sample. The high laser powers used in the laboratory cannot be used with optical fibers, therefore, the effectiveness of the LIBS system at the laser powers acceptable to fiber delivery must be evaluated. The primary objectives for this project are: (1) Establish that a fiber optic LIBS technique can be used to detect heavy metals to the required concentration levels; (2) Design and fabricate a fiber optic probe for integration with the penetrometer system for the analysis of heavy metals in soil samples; (3) Design, fabricate, and test an integrated fiber/penetrometer system; (4) Fabricate a rugged, field deployable laser source and detection hardware system; and (6) Demonstrate the prototype in field deployments.

  13. Drainage Studies Using Pore-Scale Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. B.; Reed, A. H.; Hilpert, M.

    2007-12-01

    The process of drainage has wide spread applications in soil hydrology, irrigation, and the remediation of contaminants in the subsurface. In this paper, we present the comparison of experimental and pore-scale modeling results for drainage. Using a HD-500 microCT system, X-ray tomographic images (21 micron voxels) of saturation during a drainage experiment were obtained in a porous medium consisting of 20/30 mesh (590- 840 microns) Accusand. Utilizing the segmented microtomographic images of the pore space, we modeled drainage using two pore-scale approaches: (1) the pore-morphology-based simulator (PMBS) developed by Hilpert and Miller (2001), and (2) a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model. Invasion pathways and pressure-saturation relations obtained from both the PMBS and the LB model were compared with those obtained from experiments. The results of PMBS modeling displayed good agreement with experimental observations, except at high suction and low water saturation values, where both CT resolution and model assumptions become an issue. The LB model is currently being refined, and the results of these simulations will also be presented.

  14. Shallow subsurface storm flow in a forested headwater catchment: Observations and modeling using a modified TOPMODEL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, T.M.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Hornberger, G.M.; Clapp, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Transient, perched water tables in the shallow subsurface are observed at the South Fork Brokenback Run catchment in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Crest piezometers installed along a hillslope transect show that the development of saturated conditions in the upper 1.5 m of the subsurface is controlled by total precipitation and antecedent conditions, not precipitation intensity, although soil heterogeneities strongly influence local response. The macroporous subsurface storm flow zone provides a hydrological pathway for rapid runoff generation apart from the underlying groundwater zone, a conceptualization supported by the two-storage system exhibited by hydrograph recession analysis. A modified version of TOPMODEL is used to simulate the observed catchment dynamics. In this model, generalized topographic index theory is applied to the subsurface storm flow zone to account for logarithmic storm flow recessions, indicative of linearly decreasing transmissivity with depth. Vertical drainage to the groundwater zone is required, and both subsurface reservoirs are considered to contribute to surface saturation.

  15. Multicenter international randomized comparison of objective and subjective outcomes between electronic and traditional chest drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Cecilia; Detterbeck, Frank; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Sihoe, Alan; Vachlas, Kostas; Maxfield, Mark W; Lim, Henry C; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of digital versus traditional drainage devices on chest tube removal and patient satisfaction. A randomized trial of digital versus traditional devices after lobectomy/segmentectomy was conducted at 4 international centers (United Kingdom, Europe, Asia, United States). Patients were managed with overnight suction followed by gravity drainage. Chest tubes were removed when an air leak was not evident anymore and the drained fluid was less than 400 mL/d. The groups (digital, 191 patients; traditional, 190 patients) were well matched for baseline and surgical characteristics. There were 325 lobectomies/bilobectomies and 56 segmentectomies, 308 of which were performed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Patients randomized to digital systems had a significantly shorter air leak duration (1.0 versus 2.2 days; p=0.001), duration of chest tube placement (3.6 versus 4.7 days; p=0.0001), and postoperative length of stay (4.6 versus 5.6 days; p<0.0001). Subjective end points revealed a perceived improved ability to arise from bed (p=0.008), system convenience for patients and personnel (p=0.02), and the potential for being comfortable when discharged home with the device (p=0.06). A mean difference of 2.6 days from air leak cessation to tube removal was observed, which was similar in the 2 groups (p=0.7). Multivariable regression analysis showed that duration of chest tube placement after air leak cessation was directly associated with the amount of fluid drained during the first 48 hours (p=0.01) and the duration of air leak (p=0.008), independent of hospital location. Patients managed with digital drainage systems experienced a shorter duration of chest tube placement, shorter hospital stays, and higher satisfaction scores compared with those managed with traditional devices. ( NCT01747889.). Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in down-flow limestone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.

    1997-12-31

    Passive down-flow systems, consisting of compost and/or limestone layers, may be well suited for treatment of acidic mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. Two columns were constructed and operated in the laboratory. The first column simulated a downward, vertical-flow anaerobic wetland, also referred to as successive alkalinity-producing systems (SAPS), and has received mine drainage for 97 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column was vertically oriented and (from bottom to top) consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 0.91 m of free standing water. Water flowed vertically downward through the system. A second column, filled with only limestone, received water from the same source as the first column. This limestone column contained a 1.06-m thick layer of limestone and 0.91 m of free standing water and has received water for 55 weeks. Actual acid mine drainage (pH = 3.1, acidity = 200 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 600 mg/L, Total Fe = 10 mg/L, Mn = 14 mg/L, and Al = 18 mg/L) was collected every two weeks from a nearby abandoned deep mine and applied to these columns at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. For the compost/limestone column, effluent pH remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9); however, pH at a depth of 0.38 m in the compost (halfway) dropped to < 4 after 28 weeks (net acidic). At the bottom of the compost pH remained > 4.5 for all 97 weeks. Alkalinity was generated by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. Over the 97 week period, the column generated an average of 330 mg/L of alkalinity, mostly due to limestone dissolution. Bacterial sulfate reduction displayed an ever decreasing trend, initially accounting for more than 200 mg/L of alkalinity and after 40 weeks only accounting for about 50 mg/L.

  17. Impact of thawing ground on subsurface water flow and transport in a modelled permafrost system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Long-term simulations representing warming temperature trends in cold regions indicate that the temporal and seasonal variability characteristics of groundwater and its discharges into surface waters is expected to decrease in a warming climate. A compelling question for waterborne transport of substances relevant for climate feedbacks, biogeochemical cycling and/or water pollution is how different scenarios of hydro-climatic change influence permafrost formation and degradation dynamics and through that also the residence times of subsurface water, from land surface recharge to surface water discharge. In this contribution, heat transport and water flow in permafrost systems which include the active layer are simulated and changes in water fluxes and associated travel times of water parcels through the subsurface are investigated. Initial results indicate that the geological setting can notably impact the spread and change in travel time distributions during warming. Also, for all cases investigated the median and minimum travel times of solute transport consistently increase, indicating longer flow pathways and greater attenuation potential as permafrost thaws. Possible related effects on carbon transport and subsequent climatic feedbacks are highlighted.

  18. The impacts of climate change and urbanisation on drainage in Helsingborg, Sweden: Combined sewer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semadeni-Davies, Annette; Hernebring, Claes; Svensson, Gilbert; Gustafsson, Lars-Göran

    2008-02-01

    SummaryAssessment of the potential impact of climate change on water systems has been an essential part of hydrological research over the last couple of decades. However, the notion that such assessments should also include technological, demographic and land use changes is relatively recent. In this study, the potential impacts of climate change and continued urbanisation on waste and stormwater flows in the combined sewer of central Helsingborg, South Sweden, have been assessed using a series of DHI MOUSE simulations run with present conditions as well as two climate change scenarios and three progressive urbanisation storylines. At present, overflows of untreated wastewater following heavy rainfalls are a major source of pollution to the coastal receiving waters and there is a worry that increased rainfall could exacerbate the problem. Sewer flows resulting from different urbanisation storylines were simulated for two 10-year periods corresponding to present (1994-2003) and future climates (nominally 2081-2090). In all, 12 simulations were made. Climate change was simulated by altering a high-resolution rainfall record according to the climate-change signal derived from a regional climate model. Urbanisation was simulated by altering model parameters to reflect current trends in demographics and water management. It was found that city growth and projected increases in precipitation, both together and alone, are set to worsen the current drainage problems. Conversely, system renovation and installation of sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS) has a positive effect on the urban environment in general and can largely allay the adverse impacts of both urbanisation and climate change.

  19. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  20. The System and Implementation Aspects of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, R.; Biccari, D.; Bombaci, O.; Gurnett, D.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Kirchner, D.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.; Safaeinili, A.

    2001-01-01

    MARSIS is a radar sounder operating in the HF frequency range to sound the surface of Mars, which will operate from the ESA Mars Express spacecraft. It is scheduled for launch from Baikonour, Russia in June 2003 and arrives in orbit around Mars in early 2004 for a two-year mission. This system is the result of an international collaboration between NASA, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and European Space Agency (ESA). The MARSIS instrument is a 17 Kilogram total mass sounder consisting of a 40 meter tip-to-tip dipole antenna, a 7 meter long monopole antenna and the electronics module. This design of MARSIS is a tradeoff between the expected penetration into the Martian subsurface that is proportional to the wavelength of the system and the desire to operate at a short wavelength in order to minimize the effects of the ionosphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Carbon dioxide insufflation for chronic subdural haematoma: a simple addition to burr-hole irrigation and closed-system drainage.

    PubMed

    Kubo, S; Takimoto, H; Nakata, H; Yoshimine, T

    2003-12-01

    Burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage is a common surgical method used for chronic subdural haematoma. However, the subdural space with air that entered during surgery sometimes remains for a prolonged period after surgery and may hamper uncomplicated healing of the subdural space. We combined a simple procedure, insufflation of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subdural space through a drainage catheter, with conventional burr-hole irrigation and closed-system drainage. By this additional procedure, both the subdural space and the gas within the space decreased rapidly, and the subdural drain could be removed within 24 h. By promoting obliteration of the subdural space, this simple combined technique may contribute to early recovery and discharge of patients, and to a reduction in the recurrence rate of the disease.

  2. Mars penetrator: Subsurface science mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    A penetrator system to emplace subsurface science on the planet Mars is described. The need for subsurface science is discussed, and the technologies for achieving successful atmospheric entry, Mars penetration, and data retrieval are presented.

  3. Study of diffuse source pollution management for land use and drainage system planning.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Funaki, T; Honda, S; Sugihara, M

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the mass balance of pollutants during both dry periods and storm events and to discuss the effects of some strategies such as pollutant removal, land use planning and new drainage systems by simulation. Three subjects are discussed in this paper. First, the amount of pollutants entering Lake Biwa from an urban area have been roughly estimated by using data collected by the local government. Second, many additional samples were collected from road surfaces, house roofs and parking lots to consider the role of land use in pollutant runoff. Third, some ongoing BMP projects in an urban area are introduced. As a result, some ideas on how to solve the problem of diffuse pollution in urban areas have been obtained.

  4. A framework to support decision making in the selection of sustainable drainage system design alternatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Sweetapple, Chris; Fu, Guangtao; Farmani, Raziyeh; Butler, David

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a new framework for decision making in sustainable drainage system (SuDS) scheme design. It integrates resilience, hydraulic performance, pollution control, rainwater usage, energy analysis, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and costs, and has 12 indicators. The multi-criteria analysis methods of entropy weight and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) were selected to support SuDS scheme selection. The effectiveness of the framework is demonstrated with a SuDS case in China. Indicators used include flood volume, flood duration, a hydraulic performance indicator, cost and resilience. Resilience is an important design consideration, and it supports scheme selection in the case study. The proposed framework will help a decision maker to choose an appropriate design scheme for implementation without subjectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Decision support for sustainable urban drainage system management: a case study of Jijel, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Benzerra, Abbas; Cherrared, Marzouk; Chocat, Bernard; Cherqui, Frédéric; Zekiouk, Tarik

    2012-06-30

    This paper aims to develop a methodology to support the sustainable management of Urban Drainage Systems (UDSs) in Algeria. This research is motivated by the various difficulties that the National Sanitation Office (ONA) has in managing this complex infrastructure. The method mainly consists of two approaches: the top-down approach and the bottom-up approach. The former facilitates the identification of factors related to a sustainable UDS, the development priorities and the criteria available to managers. The latter assesses UDS performance using the weighted sum method to aggregate indicators or criteria weighted using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). The method is demonstrated through its application to the UDS in the city of Jijel, Algeria.

  6. An initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Bachichi, Thiago; Holanda, Caio; Rizzo, Luiz Augusto Lucas Martins De

    2016-01-01

    To report an initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery. This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive patients, ≤ 14 years of age, treated at a pediatric thoracic surgery outpatient clinic, for whom pulmonary resection (lobectomy or segmentectomy via muscle-sparing thoracotomy) was indicated. The parameters evaluated were air leak (as quantified with the digital system), biosafety, duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, and complications. The digital system was used in 11 children (mean age, 5.9 ± 3.3 years). The mean length of hospital stay was 4.9 ± 2.6 days, the mean duration of drainage was 2.5 ± 0.7 days, and the mean drainage volume was 270.4 ± 166.7 mL. The mean maximum air leak flow was 92.78 ± 95.83 mL/min (range, 18-338 mL/min). Two patients developed postoperative complications (atelectasis and pneumonia, respectively). The use of this digital system facilitated the decision-making process during the postoperative period, reducing the risk of errors in the interpretation and management of air leaks. Relatar a experiência inicial com um sistema de drenagem digital no pós-operatório de cirurgia torácica pediátrica. Estudo observacional e prospectivo envolvendo pacientes consecutivos do ambulatório de cirurgia torácica pediátrica da instituição, com idade até 14 anos, e com indicação de ressecção pulmonar (lobectomia e/ou segmentectomia através de toracotomia poupadora muscular). Os parâmetros avaliados foram perda aérea (quantificada com o sistema digital), biossegurança, tempo de drenagem, tempo de internação e complicações. O sistema digital foi utilizado em 11 crianças, com média de idade de 5,9 ± 3,3 anos. A média do tempo de internação foi de 4,9 ± 2,6 dias, a de tempo de drenagem foi de 2,5 ± 0,7 dias, e a de volume de drenagem foi de 270,4 ± 166,7 ml. A média da perda aérea máxima foi de 92,78 ± 95,83 ml

  7. Basal drainage system response to increasing surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Meierbachtol, T; Harper, J; Humphrey, N

    2013-08-16

    Surface meltwater reaching the bed of the Greenland ice sheet imparts a fundamental control on basal motion. Sliding speed depends on ice/bed coupling, dictated by the configuration and pressure of the hydrologic drainage system. In situ observations in a four-site transect containing 23 boreholes drilled to Greenland's bed reveal basal water pressures unfavorable to water-draining conduit development extending inland beneath deep ice. This finding is supported by numerical analysis based on realistic ice sheet geometry. Slow meltback of ice walls limits conduit growth, inhibiting their capacity to transport increased discharge. Key aspects of current conceptual models for Greenland basal hydrology, derived primarily from the study of mountain glaciers, appear to be limited to a portion of the ablation zone near the ice sheet margin.

  8. Tile Drainage Density Reduces Groundwater Travel Times and Compromises Riparian Buffer Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; Isenhart, Thomas M; Schultz, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Strategies to reduce nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) pollution delivered to streams often seek to increase groundwater residence time to achieve measureable results, yet the effects of tile drainage on residence time have not been well documented. In this study, we used a geographic information system groundwater travel time model to quantify the effects of artificial subsurface drainage on groundwater travel times in the 7443-ha Bear Creek watershed in north-central Iowa. Our objectives were to evaluate how mean groundwater travel times changed with increasing drainage intensity and to assess how tile drainage density reduces groundwater contributions to riparian buffers. Results indicate that mean groundwater travel times are reduced with increasing degrees of tile drainage. Mean groundwater travel times decreased from 5.6 to 1.1 yr, with drainage densities ranging from 0.005 m (7.6 mi) to 0.04 m (62 mi), respectively. Model simulations indicate that mean travel times with tile drainage are more than 150 times faster than those that existed before settlement. With intensive drainage, less than 2% of the groundwater in the basin appears to flow through a perennial stream buffer, thereby reducing the effectiveness of this practice to reduce stream nitrate loads. Hence, strategies, such as reconnecting tile drainage to buffers, are promising because they increase groundwater residence times in tile-drained watersheds.

  9. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier.

  10. Modelling Napl Dissolution from Lens and Pools Under Varying Flowfields in Heterogeneous Subsurface Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, P.; Nambi, I. M.

    2011-12-01

    Non- Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) such as chlorinated organic solvents are major sources of groundwater contamination throughout the world. The non-uniform distribution of these contaminants as NAPL pools and residual NAPL zones introduce additional spatial heterogeneity in the hydrological parameters such as porosity and permeability. Bench scale dissolution studies were carried out and a conceptual contaminant transport model was developed to predict the downstream NAPL concentrations in aqueous phase. The dissolution studies were carried out in a bench scale 2-D sand tank reactor for multiple NAPL configurations and various initial NAPL saturations. A complex heterogeneous subsurface system mimicking NAPL as residuals, NAPL as lens and NAPL as pools was created by embedding more than one NAPL contaminated zone of coarse sand within a clean NAPL free zone of fine sand. Dissolved NAPL concentrations were measured along the downstream of NAPL source zone. A 2-D conceptual contaminant transport model was developed and validated which successfully accounts for NAPL interphase mass transfer limitation under varying flow fields in a saturated heterogeneous subsurface systems. The analysis of multiple lens experimental data revealed that initial NAPL saturations and relative permeability have significant effect in altering mass transfer characteristics which affects the efficacy of any remedial effort to decontaminate groundwater. Non equilibrium concentrations of NAPL were observed near the source zone during dissolution from high initial NAPL saturations, whereas tailing concentrations with steep decline from equilibrium state were seen at later times. The rate limited conditions occurred much earlier under heterogeneous soil conditions when compared to those observed by researchers under homogeneous soil conditions. This behavior was attributed to the large changes in aqueous permeability fields occurring with the progress of dissolution process. Mathematical

  11. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment by Perlite Nanomineral, Batch and Continuous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Kumars Seifpanahi; Ardejani, Faramarz Doulati; Badii, Khshayar; Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the adsorption activity of perlite nanoparticles for removal of Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions at Iran Sarcheshmeh copper acid mine drainage was discussed. Thus, raw perlite that provided from internal resource was modified and prepared via particles size reduction to nano scale and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transforms infrared and BET specific surface area analysis. The results of acid mine drainage show that pH of acid mine drainage is 5.1 and Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions are 10.5, 4.1 and 8.3 ppm, respectively. Firstly in the batch system the influence of adsorbent dose and temperature parameters were considered and then isothermal and kinetic models were investigated. According to the results the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetic model showed better correlation with the experimental data than other isotherm and kinetic models. Obtained thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° show that the Cu2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions adsorption from acid mine drainage is spontaneous and endothermic. Finally, perlite nanoparticles adsorbent was packed inside a glass column and used for the removal of heavy metals in 1, 3, 5 ml/min acid mine drainage flow rates, the breakthrough curves show that the column was saturated at 180, 240 and 315 min for different flow rates, respectively. According to the obtained results, this abundant, locally available and cheap silicate mineral showed a great efficiency for the removal of heavy metal pollutants from acid mine drainage and can be utilized for much volume of acid mine drainage or industrial scale. W pracy omówiono zdolności adsorpcyjne nano-cząsteczek perlitu wykorzystywanych o usuwania jonów Cu2+, Fe2+ i Mn2+ z kwaśnych wód kopalniach w kopalni miedzi w Sarcheshmeh w Iranie. Surowy perlit pozyskiwany ze źródeł własnych został zmodyfikowany i odpowiednio spreparowany poprzez zre-dukowanie cz

  12. Optimization of Engineering Design of Subsurface Environmental Remediation Systems: Development and Testing of Community Benchmark Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2003-12-01

    It is well established that the design of economically efficient subsurface remediation systems can benefit from the joint use of formal optimization and simulation models. It is also well known that obtaining the optimal solution for such designs is usually difficult and computationally expensive, due to the characteristic nonlinear, nonconvex nature of the solution spaces. We believe that more rapid progress on optimal design methods might result from both improved methods of evaluation and comparison of existing methods on realistic problems and from the investigation of novel methods not yet studied in subsurface remediation field. This work responds to these needs. We have designed a set of systematic test problems to be attacked by the engineering and mathematics community, as a means for benchmarking and comparing optimization approaches. The test problems pose many of the difficulties anticipated in solving real-world problems such as (a) mixed continuous and integer, nonlinear objective functions, (b) the combination of boundary conditions and system parameters gives rise to complex relationships between the objective function, the decision variables, the constraints, and the state variables, (c) evaluation of the objective function is based on solving model equations that are difficult to solve accurately and quickly; and (d) the number and range of decision variables is potentially enormous. The physical problems include water supply design problems in freshwater and freshwater-saltwater systems, a contaminant plume capture zone design problem, and a contaminant plume pump-and-treat design problem. Problem domains are specified in terms of hydraulic conductivity distributions- from homogeneous domains to spatially-correlated random fields- and in terms of confined vs. unconfined conditions. Each problem is specified completely in mathematical and numerical terms, but sufficient flexibility is allowed to provide for a wide range of problem solution

  13. Separation of drainage runoff during rainfall-runoff episodes using the stable isotope method and drainage water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Kvítek, Tomáš; Pomije, Tomáš

    2014-05-01

    Stabile isotopes of 2H 18O and drainage water temperature were used as natural tracers for separation rainfall-runoff event hydrograph on several tile drained catchments located in Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic. Small agricultural catchments with drainage systems built in slopes are typical for foothill areas in the Czech and Moravian highland. Often without permanent surface runoff, the drainage systems represent an important portion of runoff and nitrogen leaching out of the catchment. The knowledge of the drainage runoff formation and the origin of its components are prerequisites for formulation of measures leading to improvement of the drainage water quality and reduction of nutrient leaching from the drained catchments. The results have proved presence of event water in the drainage runoff during rainfall-runoff events. The proportion of event water observed in the drainage runoff varied between 15 - 60 % in the summer events and 0 - 50 % in winter events, while the sudden water temperature change was between 0,1 - 4,2 °C (2 - 35 %). The comparison of isotope separation of the drainage runoff and monitoring the drainage water temperature have demonstrated that in all cases of event water detected in the runoff, a rapid change in the drainage water temperature was observed as well. The portion of event water in the runoff grows with the growing change in water temperature. Using component mixing model, it was demonstrated that water temperature can be successfully used at least as a qualitative and with some degree of inaccuracy as a quantitative tracer as well. The drawback of the non-conservative character of this tracer is compensated by both its economic and technical accessibility. The separation results also resemble results of separations at small streams. Together with a similarly high speed of the discharge reaction to beginning of precipitation, it is obvious that the mechanism of surface runoff formation and drainage runoff formation

  14. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Song [Fort Collins, CO; Fallgren, Paul H [Laramie, WY; Morris, Jeffrey M [Laramie, WY

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  15. Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Calle

    2000-11-01

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

  16. 2D subglacial drainage system model applied to a catchment of the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werder, M. A.; Joughin, I. R.; Hewitt, I.; Bamber, J. L.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Flowers, G. E.; Schoof, C.; Shean, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from a 2D glacial drainage system model (GlaDS, see last paragraph for model details) applied to a 3000 km2 catchment of the Greenland ice sheet in the vicinity of the lake studied by Das et al. (2008). We run the model for the 2009 and 2010 melt seasons using new bed and surface DEMs and force it with input from a distributed surface mass balance model driven with RACMO data (van den Broeke et al., 2009). The water is routed to the subglacial system either through crevasses, moulins or lakes as determined from satellite imagery. The model calculates subglacial water pressure which is fed into a sliding law and used as a proxy for ice flow speed. We compare these modelled ice flow speeds to measurements of speed derived from TerraSAR-X at 11-day intervals. The model produces a switch from a inefficient distributed system in winter to an efficient and arborescent channelized system as surface water input increases. Channels form predominately where water input to the bed is large and localized, i.e. at moulins and lakes. High subglacial water pressures accompany this winter-summer switch causing a speedup of ice flow. Diurnal variations in water input lead to variations of water pressure in the vicinity of channels, the size of the area affected being dependent on storage and conductivity of the distributed system. We compare the model results to the measured data and discuss their agreements and discrepancies. The GlaDS model is a new two dimensional numerical model of glacier hydrology which combines distributed and channelized drainage at the ice-bed interface coupled to an englacial water routing and storage component (Hewitt et al., 2012). Notably the model determines the location of the channels as part of the solution by allowing R-channels to form on any of the edges of the used, unstructured triangular grid. The distributed system is represented by a water sheet which is a continuum description of a linked-cavity system and exchanges

  17. System analysis to estimate subsurface flow: From global level to the State of Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shmagin, B.A.; Kanivetsky, R.

    2002-01-01

    Stream runoff data globally and in the state of Minnesota were used to estimate subsurface water flow. This system approach is based, in principal, on unity of groundwater and surface water systems, and it is in stark contrast to the traditional deterministic approach based on modeling. In coordination with methodology of system analysis, two levels of study were used to estimate subsurface flow. First, the global stream runoff data were assessed to estimate the temporal-spatial variability of surface water runoff. Factor analysis was used to study the temporal-spatial variability of global runoff for the period from 1918 to 1967. Results of these analysis demonstrate that the variability of global runoff could be represented by seven major components (factor scores) that could be grouped into seven distinct independent grouping from the total of 18 continental slopes on the Earth. Computed variance value in this analysis is 76% and supports such analysis. The global stream runoff for this period is stationary, and is more closely connected with the stream flow of Asia to the Pacific Ocean as well as with the stream runoff of North America towards the Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The second level examines the distribution of river runoff (annual and for February) for various landscapes and the hydrogeological conditions in the State of Minnesota (218,000 km2). The annual and minimal monthly rate of stream runoff for 115 gauging stations with a period of observation of 47 years (1935-1981) were used to characterize the spatio-temporal distribution of stream runoff in Minnesota. Results of this analysis demonstrate that the annual stream runoff rate changes from 6.3, towards 3.95, and then to 2.09 1 s-1 km-2 (the difference is significant based on Student's criteria). These values in Minnesota correspond to ecological provinces from a mixed forest province towards the broadleaf forest and to prairie province, respectively. The distribution of minimal monthly stream

  18. Controls of subsurface temperature variability in a western boundary upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belem, Andre L.; Castelao, Renato M.; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza

    2013-04-01

    The mechanisms controlling subsurface temperature variability on the outer shelf in a western boundary upwelling system are quantified using observations from a mooring deployed off Cabo Frio, Brazil. Results from a multiple linear regression analysis reveal that, in addition to low-frequency variations associated with the seasonal evolution of temperature, the dominant mechanisms controlling temperature variability are wind stress curl-driven upwelling, cross-isobath transport, the proximity of the Brazil Current to the shelf break, and perhaps changes in the strength of tidal mixing associated with the spring-neap cycle. The influence of the proximity of the Brazil Current decreases strongly with depth, being restricted to the top 80 m. Regression coefficients indicate that the relative contributions from the different forcings are roughly similar and that no single process has a dominant role explaining temperature variability near the shelf break. These suggest that successful modeling efforts in the region must adequately represent each of those processes.

  19. DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

    2003-05-21

    Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I

  20. Review of habitat classification schemes appropriate to streams, rivers, and connecting channels in the Great Lakes drainage system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Griffiths, R.W.; Wheaton, T.J.; Busch, W.-Dieter N.; Sly, Peter G.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of lotic classification, zonation, and distribution carried out since the turn of the century were reviewed for their use in developing a habitat classification scheme for flowing water in the Great Lakes drainage basin. Seventy papers, dealing mainly with fish but including benthos, were organized into four somewhat distinct groups. A heirarchical scale of habitat measurements is suggested, and sources of data and inventory methods, including statistical treatment, are reviewed. An outline is also provided for developing a classification system for riverine habitat in the Great Lakes drainage basin.

  1. Minimizing contamination hazards to waterbirds using agricultural drainage evaporation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, David F.; Smith, Lynda A.; Drezner, Deborah S.; Shoemaker, J. David

    1991-11-01

    In much of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, inadequate drainage of applied irrigation water and accumulating salts in the soil have necessitated the installation of subsurface tile drainage systems to preserve crop productivity. At present, these subsurface drainage waters are disposed of by means of evaporation ponds or discharges into the San Joaquin River. Unfortunately, most of these agricultural drainage waters contain high concentrations of salts and naturally occurring trace elements, such as selenium, and recent evidence indicates that substantial numbers of waterbirds are exposed to contamination by selenium in the evaporation ponds. In order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate the adverse impacts on wildlife using the ponds, alternative pond management methods must be identified and evaluated for implementation. A number of methods have the potential to be cost-effective in significantly reducing the contamination hazard to birds using agricultural evaporation ponds. Twenty general methods were evaluated in this study, and four methods are recommended for implementation: remove levee vegetation, remove windbreaks, deepen the ponds, and haze birds. A number of other methods are recommended for further consideration because they appear to have good prospects for reducing the contamination hazard: steepen interior levee slopes, apply herbicides and insecticides, place netting on pond shorelines, and provide freshwater habitat adjacent to evaporation ponds. It may be necessary to use a combination of methods to effectively control selenium contamination of aquatic birds because it is unlikely that a single affordable pond management method will be able to entirely eliminate the contamination hazard.

  2. Widespread surface meltwater drainage in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingslake, J.; Ely, J.; Das, I.; Bell, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Surface meltwater is thought to cause ice-shelf disintegration, which accelerates the contribution of ice sheets to sea-level rise. Antarctic surface melting is predicted to increase and trigger further ice-shelf disintegration during this century. These climate-change impacts could be modulated by an active hydrological network analogous to the one in operation in Greenland. Despite some observations of Antarctic surface and sub-surface hydrological systems, large-scale active surface drainage in Antarctica has rarely been studied. We use satellite imagery and aerial photography to reveal widespread active hydrology on the surface of the Antarctic Ice Sheet as far south as 85o and as high as 1800 m a.s.l., often near mountain peaks that protrude through the ice (nunataks) and relatively low-albedo `blue-ice areas'. Despite predominantly sub-zero regional air temperatures, as simulated by a regional climate model, Antarctic active drainage has persisted for decades, transporting water through surface streams and feeding vast melt ponds up to 80 km long. Drainage networks (the largest are over 100 km in length) form on flat ice shelves, steep outlet glaciers and ice-sheet flanks across the West and East Antarctica Ice Sheets. Motivated by the proximity of many drainage systems to low-albedo rock and blue-ice areas, we hypothesize a positive feedback between exposed-rock extent, BIA formation, melting and ice-sheet thinning. This feedback relies on drainage moving water long distances from areas near exposed rock, across the grounding line onto and across ice shelves - a process we observe, but had previously thought to be unlikely in Antarctica. This work highlights previously-overlooked processes, not captured by current regional-scale models, which may accelerate the retreat of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  3. Broadband sensor system and technique for detection and classification of targets and subsurface targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Gee-In

    1999-10-01

    In this paper, the author discusses a Broadband Bionic Sonar Sensor System and a signal processing technique for detection and identification of underwater targets. This bionic sonar system with the resonance detection technique for detection and identification of underwater objects appears to mimic a dolphin's sensory system. The dolphin's sonar system transmits a very short broadband pulse. It detects and classifies a target by processing the modulation of the echo's (back scattering) broadband spectrum. This spectral modulation is directly related to the target's natural resonance. Using the G-Transform technique, the author has successfully showed that target resonance exists and it is unique to target size, shape, structure and material composition. Furthermore, this natural resonance exists in both (active sonar) acoustic echoes, back scattering and (passive sonar) acoustic scattering in acoustic noise background. Using trained neural networks, these targets' resonances/signatures can be correctly identified for the respective targets. It is conceivable that a broadband radar system, similar to a dolphin's sonar system, can be developed for targets and subsurface targets.

  4. A study of subsurface wastewater infiltration systems for distributed rural sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Dou, Junfeng; Ding, Aizhong; Xie, En; Zheng, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Three types of subsurface wastewater infiltration systems (SWIS) were developed to study the efficiency of organic pollutant removal from distributed rural sewage under various conditions. Of the three different layered substrate systems, the one with the greatest amount of decomposed cow dung (5%) and soil (DCDS) showed the highest removal efficiency with respect to total nitrogen (TN), where the others showed no significant difference. The TN removal efficiency was increased with an increasing filling height of DCDS. Compared with the TN removal efficiency of 25% in the system without DCDS, the removal efficiency of the systems in which DCDS filled half and one fourth of the height was increased by 72% and 31%, respectively. Based on seasonal variations in the discharge of the typical rural family, the SWIS were run at three different hydraulic loads of 6.5, 13 and 20 cm/d. These results illustrated that SWIS could perform well at any of the given hydraulic loads. The results of trials using different inlet configurations showed that the effluent concentration of the contaminants in the system operating a multiple-inlet mode was much lower compared with the system operated under single-inlet conditions. The effluent concentration ofa pilot-scale plant achieved the level III criteria specified by the Surface Water Quality Standard at the initial stage.

  5. Implementation of an Expert System for Design of Single-Point Subsurface Oceanographic Moorings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    POINT SUBSURFACE OCEANOGRAPHIC MOORINGS by Santhosh Kumaran and Richard A. Skop December 1988 Approved for public release. Distribution unlimited...Single-(PltSubsurface Oceanographic Moorings !Z. PERSONAL ALITHOR(S) i Santhosh Kuraran and Richard A. Skop 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 1i4

  6. Subsurface flow pathway dynamics in the active layer of coupled permafrost-hydrogeological systems under seasonal and annual temperature variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the active layer in order to better understand permafrost-hydrological-carbon feedbacks, in particular with regards to how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface terrestrial arctic water systems under climate change. Studying solute transport in arctic systems is also relevant in the context of anthropogenic pollution which may increase due to increased activity in cold region environments. In this contribution subsurface solute transport subject to ground surface warming causing permafrost thaw and active layer change is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The timing of the start of increase in travel time depends on heterogeneity structure, combined with the rate of permafrost degradation that also depends on material thermal and hydrogeological properties. These travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport velocities due to a shift from horizontal saturated groundwater flow near the surface to vertical water percolation deeper into the subsurface, and pathway length increase and temporary immobilization caused by cryosuction-induced seasonal freeze cycles. The impact these change mechanisms have on solute and dissolved substance transport is further analysed by integrating pathway analysis with a Lagrangian approach, incorporating considerations for both dissolved organic and inorganic

  7. Subcuticular absorbable suture with subcutaneous drainage system prevents incisional SSI after hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Eiji; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Takeishi, Kazuki; Matsuyama, Ayumi; Tsutsui, Shin-Ichi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Ishida, Teruyoshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-07-01

    The effectiveness of subcuticular absorbable suture with subcutaneous drainage to decrease the risk of postoperative incisional surgical site infection (SSI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients was evaluated. A total of 149 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy (Hx) were retrospectively investigated. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients with subcuticular suture combined with subcutaneous drainage (the drainage group; 61 patients) and the patients with nylon suture without subcutaneous drainage (the nylon group; 88 patients). After the operations, the complication rate of postoperative incisional SSI was analyzed and compared between the two groups. In the drainage group the rate of incisional SSI was significantly lower compared to the nylon group: 14-3 % (p = 0.033), respectively. Patients with incisional SSI needed significantly longer postoperative hospital care than the patients without incisional SSI: 28 versus 15 days (p < 0.005). Multivariate analysis revealed that subcuticular absorbable suture with subcutaneous drainage significantly reduced the occurrence of incisional SSI (odds ratio; 0.15; p = 0.034). We have demonstrated that the subcuticular suture with subcutaneous drainage is effective in preventing incisional SSI in patients undergoing Hx for HCC.

  8. A Tower-based Prototype VHF/UHF Radar for Subsurface Sensing: System Description and Data Inversion Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Pierce, Leland; Tabatabaeenejad, Alireza; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of subsurface characteristics such as permittivity variations and layering structure could provide a breakthrough in many terrestrial and planetary science disciplines. For Earth science, knowledge of subsurface and subcanopy soil moisture layers can enable the estimation of vertical flow in the soil column linking surface hydrologic processes with that in the subsurface. For planetary science, determining the existence of subsurface water and ice is regarded as one of the most critical information needs for the study of the origins of the solar system. The subsurface in general can be described as several near-parallel layers with rough interfaces. Each homogenous rough layer can be defined by its average thickness, permittivity, and rms interface roughness assuming a known surface spectral distribution. As the number and depth of layers increase, the number of measurements needed to invert for the layer unknowns also increases, and deeper penetration capability would be required. To nondestructively calculate the characteristics of the rough layers, a multifrequency polarimetric radar backscattering approach can be used. One such system is that we have developed for data prototyping of the Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (MOSS) mission concept. A tower-mounted radar makes backscattering measurements at VHF, UHF, and L-band frequencies. The radar is a pulsed CW system, which uses the same wideband antenna to transmit and receive the signals at all three frequencies. To focus the beam at various incidence angles within the beamwidth of the antenna, the tower is moved vertically and measurements made at each position. The signals are coherently summed to achieve focusing and image formation in the subsurface. This requires an estimate of wave velocity profiles. To solve the inverse scattering problem for subsurface velocity profile simultaneously with radar focusing, we use an iterative technique based on a forward numerical solution of

  9. A Tower-based Prototype VHF/UHF Radar for Subsurface Sensing: System Description and Data Inversion Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Pierce, Leland; Tabatabaeenejad, Alireza; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of subsurface characteristics such as permittivity variations and layering structure could provide a breakthrough in many terrestrial and planetary science disciplines. For Earth science, knowledge of subsurface and subcanopy soil moisture layers can enable the estimation of vertical flow in the soil column linking surface hydrologic processes with that in the subsurface. For planetary science, determining the existence of subsurface water and ice is regarded as one of the most critical information needs for the study of the origins of the solar system. The subsurface in general can be described as several near-parallel layers with rough interfaces. Each homogenous rough layer can be defined by its average thickness, permittivity, and rms interface roughness assuming a known surface spectral distribution. As the number and depth of layers increase, the number of measurements needed to invert for the layer unknowns also increases, and deeper penetration capability would be required. To nondestructively calculate the characteristics of the rough layers, a multifrequency polarimetric radar backscattering approach can be used. One such system is that we have developed for data prototyping of the Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (MOSS) mission concept. A tower-mounted radar makes backscattering measurements at VHF, UHF, and L-band frequencies. The radar is a pulsed CW system, which uses the same wideband antenna to transmit and receive the signals at all three frequencies. To focus the beam at various incidence angles within the beamwidth of the antenna, the tower is moved vertically and measurements made at each position. The signals are coherently summed to achieve focusing and image formation in the subsurface. This requires an estimate of wave velocity profiles. To solve the inverse scattering problem for subsurface velocity profile simultaneously with radar focusing, we use an iterative technique based on a forward numerical solution of

  10. Root system stabilization of sugarcane fertigated by subsurface drip using a minirhizotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukitaka Pessinatti Ohashi, Augusto; Célia de Matos Pires, Regina; Barros de Oliveira Silva, Andre Luiz; Vasconcelos Ribeiro, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    To improve the efficiency of water use in irrigation practices and to provide information for modeling the knowledge of plants root system becomes necessary. The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficits conditions. The SDI provides better water use efficiency, due to the water and nutrients application in root zone plants. However, despite of the agronomic importance, few studies about the root system of sugarcane were performed. The use of root scanner is an alternative to the evaluation of the root system, which enables the continuous study of the roots throughout the cycle and for many years, but data about the use of this method for sugarcane are still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the time required for stabilization of the root system growth of sugarcane cultivar IACSP-5000 around the access tube in which images were captured. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. The fertigation was applied by a subsurface drip system.. The soil moisture was monitored by capacitance probes. The pH and electrical conductivity of the soil solution were monitored through solution extractor. Two access tubes with 1.05 m length were used, with 7 days difference between installations. The images were captured at 110, 128, 136, 143 and 151 days after harvest cane-plant, in the second cycle (1st cane ratoon), with the Root Scanner CI-600 ™ and were analyzed the number of roots and root length in each layer in different depths in the soil profile by software RootSnap! ™. The results show that the highest rates of increase in the number and length of roots were observed in the first 27 days. Absolute growth rates of up to 81 mm day-1 and 38 mm day-1 were presented in 0-20 and 20-40 cm layer respectively. The number of roots stabilized from 27 days after installation of the tube, while

  11. Fate of hydrocarbon pollutants in source and non-source control sustainable drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Roinas, Georgios; Mant, Cath; Williams, John B

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable drainage (SuDs) is an established method for managing runoff from developments, and source control is part of accepted design philosophy. However, there are limited studies into the contribution source control makes to pollutant removal, especially for roads. This study examines organic pollutants, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in paired source and non-source control full-scale SuDs systems. Sites were selected to cover local roads, trunk roads and housing developments, with a range of SuDs, including porous asphalt, swales, detention basins and ponds. Soil and water samples were taken bi-monthly over 12 months to assess pollutant loads. Results show first flush patterns in storm events for solids, but not for TPH. The patterns of removal for specific PAHs were also different, reflecting varying physico-chemical properties. The potential of trunk roads for pollution was illustrated by peak runoff for TPH of > 17,000 μg/l. Overall there was no significant difference between pollutant loads from source and non-source control systems, but the dynamic nature of runoff means that longer-term data are required. The outcomes of this project will increase understanding of organic pollutants behaviour in SuDs. This will provide design guidance about the most appropriate systems for treating these pollutants.

  12. Microbiological monitoring of acid mine drainage treatment systems and aquatic surroundings using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Han, J S; Kim, C G

    2009-01-01

    In general, acid mine drainage (AMD) causes low pH and high metal concentrations in mining areas and surroundings. The aim of this research was to achieve microbiological monitoring for AMD and to assess whether mine water outflows have any ecological effects on the aqueous ecosystem receiving effluents from different types of treatment system. The water quality of aquatic sample was analyzed and the molecular biological diversity of the samples was assessed using 16S rRNA methods, which were implemented to determine which bacteria existed throughout various unit processes for different AMD treatment systems and their receiving water environments. Acidiphilium cryptum, a heterotrophic acidophile, was found at the AMD sites, and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, which can reduce iron using insoluble Fe(III) as an electron acceptor, was detected at many AMD treatment facilities and downstream of the treatment processes. Subsequently, quantitative real-time PCR was conducted on specific genes of selected bacteria. Surprisingly, obvious trends were observed in the relative abundance of the various bacteria that corresponded to the water quality analytical results. The copy number of Desulfosporosinus orientus, a sulfate reducing bacteria, was also observed to decrease in response to decreases in metals according to the downstream flow of the AMD treatment system.

  13. Role of sulfur-reducing bacteria in a wetland system treating acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Riefler, R Guy; Krohn, Jeremy; Stuart, Ben; Socotch, Cheryl

    2008-05-15

    This report describes a twenty month case study of a successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) treating a strong acid mine drainage (AMD) source in Coshocton County, Ohio. Prior to the commencement of the project, a large volume of black amorphous sludge had accumulated in several of the constructed wetlands. The sludge was found to be 43% organic, with very high concentrations of sulfur, iron, aluminum, and acidity. Based on several biological, physical, and chemical analyses, the sludge was determined to be an anaerobic biofilm with a large population of sulfur-reducing bacteria and a high mineral content due to the formation of iron sulfide and aluminum precipitates. On average the system performed well, generating 26 kg CaCO3/d of alkalinity and capturing 5.0 kg/d of iron and 1.7 kg/d of aluminum. Several simple performance analysis tools were presented in this work. By comparing the pollutant influent and effluent loading, it was determined that the SAPS was performing at capacity and over the past year increased effluent concentrations were due to increased influent loadings and not system deterioration. Further, by performing a detailed cell-by-cell loading analysis of multiple chemical components, the alkalinity generated by limestone dissolution and by sulfate reduction was determined. Interestingly, 61% of the alkalinity generation in the vertical flow wetlands was due to sulfur-reducing bacteria activity, indicating that sulfur-reducing bacteria may play a more significant role in SAPS than expected.

  14. Final Environmental Assessment Airfield Storm Drainage System Repair Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, MD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    successfully meet its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit conditions and comply with state and federal water quality regulations. The...during project implementation would generate minor amounts of air pollutant emissions and noise, and project traffic would be generated on local roads...effectiveness of JBA’s airfield stormwater drainage system, helping JBA meet existing National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit conditions

  15. Can subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) be a competitive irrigation system in the Great Plains region for commodity crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) as with all microirrigation systems is typically only used on crops with greater value. In the U.S. Great Plains region, the typical irrigated crops are the cereal and oil seed crops and cotton. These crops have less economic revenue than typical microirrigated cro...

  16. The chemistry of conventional and alternative treatment systems for the neutralization of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kalin, Margarete; Fyson, Andrew; Wheeler, William N

    2006-08-01

    The oxidation of pyritic mining waste is a self-perpetuating corrosive process which generates acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent for centuries or longer. The chemical neutralization of these complex, buffered effluents result in unstable, metal-laden sludges, which require disposal to minimize long-term environmental consequences. A variety of passive treatment systems for AMD, developed in the past two decades, combine limestone and organic substrates in constructed wetlands. These systems work well initially but over the longer term fail due to clogging with and the depletion of available organic carbon. However, some ecologically engineered systems, which exploit the activities of acid reducing microbes in the sediment, rely on photosynthesis in the water column as a source of organic matter. The primary productivity in the water column, which also generates some alkalinity, provides electron donors for the microbial reduction processes in the sediment. In its consideration of 'passive' systems, the literature has placed undue emphasis on sulphate reduction; thermodynamical iron reduction is equally important as is the need to prevent iron oxidation. Secondary precipitates of iron play a significant role in sediment-driven biomineralization processes, which affect the anaerobic degradation of organic matter and the stability of the resulting metal sulfides. One such passive system, which utilized a floating root mass as a source of organic carbon, is described. An extensive review of the literature and the chemical and biogeochemical reactions of AMD treatment systems, lead to the conclusion, that sediment based ecological systems offer the greatest potential for the sustainable treatment of AMD.

  17. Subsurface storage of liquids in the Floridan aquifer system in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system in south Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the Floridian aquifer system generally occurs at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 ft, and the average thickness is about 3,000 ft. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units that include Upper Floridan aquifer, the middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, westward to the Gulf of Mexico, and, to a much lesser extent, southward. Injection of nontoxic liquid wastes into deep, saline parts of the Floridan aquifer system as a pollution-control measure began in 1943 with injection of oilfield brine in southwest Florida. Since then, the practice has quickly expanded, and many high capacity municipal and industrial injection wells are now in operation in southeast Florida. The principal use of the Floridan aquifer system in south Florida is for subsurface storage of liquid waste. The Boulder Zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is extensively used as a receptacle for injected treated municipal wastewater, oilfield brine and, to a lesser extent, industrial wastewater. Pilot studies indicate a potential for cyclic storage of freshwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer in south Florida. (USGS)

  18. Paleotopographic Reconstruction of the Tharsis Magmatic Complex Reveals Potential Ancient Drainage Basin/Aquifer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Ferris, J.; Anderson, R. C.; Baker, V.; Hare, T.; Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.; Tanaka, K. L.; Scott, D. H.

    2001-01-01

    Paleotopographic reconstructions reveal the potential existence of an enormous Noachian drainage basin in the eastern part of the Tharsis region of significant geologic and paleohydrologic implications. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Paleotopographic Reconstruction of the Tharsis Magmatic Complex Reveals Potential Ancient Drainage Basin/Aquifer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Ferris, J.; Anderson, R. C.; Baker, V.; Hare, T.; Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.; Tanaka, K. L.; Scott, D. H.

    2001-01-01

    Paleotopographic reconstructions reveal the potential existence of an enormous Noachian drainage basin in the eastern part of the Tharsis region of significant geologic and paleohydrologic implications. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements and Yttrium from Passive-Remediation Systems of Acid Mine Drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayora, Carlos; Macías, Francisco; Torres, Ester; Lozano, Alba; Carrero, Sergio; Nieto, José-Miguel; Pérez-López, Rafael; Fernández-Martínez, Alejandro; Castillo-Michel, Hiram

    2016-08-02

    Rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) are raw materials of increasing importance for modern technologies, and finding new sources has become a pressing need. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is commonly considered an environmental pollution issue. However, REY concentrations in AMD can be several orders of magnitude higher than in naturally occurring water bodies. With respect to shale standards, the REY distribution pattern in AMD is enriched in intermediate and valuable REY, such as Tb and Dy. The objective of the present work is to study the behavior of REY in AMD passive-remediation systems. Traditional AMD passive remediation systems are based on the reaction of AMD with calcite-based permeable substrates followed by decantation ponds. Experiments with two columns simulating AMD treatment demonstrate that schwertmannite does not accumulate REY, which, instead, are retained in the basaluminite residue. The same observation is made in two field-scale treatments from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest Spain). On the basis of the amplitude of this process and on the extent of the IPB, our findings suggest that the proposed AMD remediation process can represent a modest but suitable REY source. In this sense, the IPB could function as a giant heap-leaching process of regional scale in which rain and oxygen act as natural driving forces with no energy investment. In addition to having environmental benefits of its treatment, AMD is expected to last for hundreds of years, and therefore, the total reserves are practically unlimited.

  1. Corrosion control when using passively treated abandoned mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Li, Heng; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-09-01

    Passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of abandoned mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloramine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

  2. Baffled duck weed pond system for treatment of agricultural drainage water containing pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Bassuney, Doaa; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2017-02-03

    The aim of the study is to assess the efficiency of a novel bioremediation system namely baffled duck weed pond (BDWP) system for treatment of agricultural drainage water containing pharmaceuticals at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The removal efficiencies of acetaminophen (ACT), amoxicillin (AMX) and ampicillin (AMP) increased from 69.3±8.6 to 87.3 ±3.5%, from 52.9±9.4 to 82.9±5.2% and from 55.3±7.9 to 90.6±2.8% at increasing the HRT from 6 to 8 d., respectively. However, ACT, AMX and AMP removal efficiencies were slightly improved at increasing the HRT from 8 to 12 d. Diclofenac (DFC) removal efficiencies amounted to 56.6 ±11.6, 55.7±11.9 and 28.3 ±12.9% at an HRTs of 12, 8 and 6d., respectively. The results showed no relationship between the uptake / absorption of pharmaceuticals fractions and BOD5/COD ratio except ACT where R(2) was 0.84. The effect of COD/ N ratio on the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals fractions was slight. Additional removal of pharmaceuticals fractions and nitrification was occurred in carrier sponge media situated in the last compartment of the BDWP.

  3. Development of Wireless Subsurface Microsensors for Health Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallix, Joan; Milos, Frank; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space is a primary goal for both NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry. Integrated subsystem health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles (RLVS) in order to reduce life cycle costs, increase safety margins and improve mission reliability. A number of efforts are underway to use existing and emerging technologies to establish new methods for vehicle health monitoring on operational vehicles as well as X-vehicles. This paper summarizes a joint effort between several NASA centers and industry partners to develop rapid wireless diagnostic tools for failure management and long-term TPS performance monitoring of thermal protection systems (TPS) on future RLVS. An embedded wireless microsensor suite is being designed to allow rapid subsurface TPS health monitoring and damage assessment. This sensor suite will consist of both passive overlimit sensors and sensors for continuous parameter monitoring in flight. The on-board diagnostic system can be used to radio in maintenance requirements before landing and the data could also be used to assist in design validation for X-vehicles. For a 3rd generation vehicle, wireless diagnostics should be at a stage of technical development that will allow use for intelligent feedback systems for guidance and navigation control applications and can also serve as feedback for TPS that can intelligently adapt to its environment.

  4. Performance of a vertical subsurface flow (VSF) wetland treatment system using woodchips to treat livestock stormwater.

    PubMed

    Niu, Siping; Guerra, Heidi B; Chen, Yaoping; Park, Kisoo; Kim, Youngchul

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to develop a vertical subsurface flow (VSF) wetland remediation system packed with woodchips to control stormwater pollution arising from livestock agriculture. Three lab-scale VSF wetlands were operated with recirculation during the interval (Δ) between storms as 2, 4 and 8 days, respectively. The fed water was 100% recirculated one time per 24 h; the recirculation frequency was 1, 3 and 7 times at Δ of 2, 4 and 8 days, respectively. The constructed wetland systems proved to be effective in reducing total suspended solid (TSS), but also had potential for increasing TSS in the effluent due to the properties of the woodchips. The release of organic matter, especially in the dissolved form, occurred during the initial 60 days. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) were 26.2%, 34.1% and 50.0% at Δ of 2, 4 and 8 days, respectively. Nitrification was promoted by the abundant oxygen supplied when the water in wetland was recirculated and fed into the wetland. Denitrification was stable and effective due to the availability of carbon sources. The influent total phosphorus (TP) was reduced from an average of 2.05 mg L(-1) to 1.79 mg L(-1), 1.36 mg L(-1) and 0.86 mg L(-1) at Δ as 2, 4 and 8 days, respectively. The result shows that woodchips can be used as substrate material for VSF wetland treatment systems to control nutrient influx from livestock stormwater.

  5. Residence times in subsurface hydrological systems, introduction to the Special Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dreuzy, J.-R.; Ginn, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    Interest in the residence time distribution (RTD) as a comprehensive measure of subsurface hydrologic systems is growing. This focus is resulting from recognition that diverse vadose zone, groundwater flows, and transfer between hydrological compartments, are fundamentally related to the system RTD. Furthermore, transport of chemical or biological species and the biogeochemical activities that govern their fate, is principally reflected by the system RTD. Thus the RTD is used in geochemical interpretation of environmental tracers, in direct reactive transport approaches, and ultimately for sustainability and protection assessments in the consideration of transient boundary flows due to climate change or other causes, anthropogenic and/or natural. The RTD has been handled in the past primarily as a byproduct of models. It is now increasingly viewed as an integrative characteristic for which shape-free and generic distributions are developed, that links conceptual hydrology, characterization data, and mathematical models. Intermediary between mechanistic modeling, geochemical data and predictions, the role for residence time distribution is to represent consistently the flow, transport and reactivity processes while reaching the objective of biogeochemical interpretation and sustainability assessment. After some outline of the scientific context, we introduce the contributions of this special issue and conclude with the emerging challenges.

  6. A Remote Characterization System and a fault-tolerant tracking system for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W. ); Martinson, L. ); Bingham, D.N.; Anderson, A.A. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper describes two closely related projects that will provide new technology for characterizing hazardous waste burial sites. The first project, a collaborative effort by five of the national laboratories, involves the development and demonstration of a remotely controlled site characterization system. The Remote Characterization System (RCS) includes a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for noninvasive inspection of the surface and subsurface. The second project, conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), involves the development of a position sensing system that can track a survey vehicle or instrument in the field. This system can coordinate updates at a rate of 200/s with an accuracy better than 0.1% of the distance separating the target and the sensor. It can employ acoustic or electromagnetic signals in a wide range of frequencies and can be operated as a passive or active device.

  7. A Remote Characterization System and a fault-tolerant tracking system for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W.; Martinson, L.; Bingham, D.N.; Anderson, A.A.

    1992-08-01

    This paper describes two closely related projects that will provide new technology for characterizing hazardous waste burial sites. The first project, a collaborative effort by five of the national laboratories, involves the development and demonstration of a remotely controlled site characterization system. The Remote Characterization System (RCS) includes a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for noninvasive inspection of the surface and subsurface. The second project, conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), involves the development of a position sensing system that can track a survey vehicle or instrument in the field. This system can coordinate updates at a rate of 200/s with an accuracy better than 0.1% of the distance separating the target and the sensor. It can employ acoustic or electromagnetic signals in a wide range of frequencies and can be operated as a passive or active device.

  8. Foam drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Transient drainage from a column of persistent foam has been analyzed theoretically. Gravity-driven flow was assumed to occur through an interconnected network of Plateau borders that define the edges of foam cells taken to be regular pentagonal dodecahedrons. A small liquid volume fraction and monodisperse cell size distribution were assumed. In the basic model, it is assumed that all liquid is contained in Plateau borders that are bounded by rigid gas-liquid interfaces. The predicted half life, the time required for one half of the liquid to drain from the foam, is inversely proportional to the square of the cell diameter, illustrating the importance of foam structure in drainage. Liquid hold up in the films separating adjacent cells, nonuniform initial liquid volume fraction distribution and interfacial mobility are explored. Border suction due to reduced pressure in the Plateau borders provides a mechanism for film drainage. Simultaneous film drainage and flow through the Plateau borders are analyzed. Sufficient conditions for neglecting film drainage kinetics are obtained. The results indicate that improved foam stability is related to small cells, liquid hold up in the films and slow film drainage kinetics.

  9. Integration of the Gila River drainage system through the Basin and Range province of southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, William R.

    2015-05-01

    The Gila River and its tributaries in southern Arizona and adjoining states incorporate several dozen individual extensional basins of the central Basin and Range province into a single integrated drainage network. Forty basins in the Gila domain contain more than 1000 m (maximum ~ 3500 m) of post-12 Ma basin fill. Subsurface evaporites in many basins document internal drainages terminating in isolated playa lakes during early phases of basin history. The nature of intrabasinal and interbasinal divides and of eroded or sedimented stream passages through mountain ranges intervening between the basins reveal the geomorphic mechanisms that achieved drainage integration over late Miocene to early Pleistocene time. Drainage integration accompanied by headward erosion eastward toward Gila headwaters was a response to Miocene opening of the Gulf of California, into which the Gila River debouched directly before the Pliocene (< 5 Ma) lower course of the Colorado River was established. Residual basins of internal drainage where headward erosion has not yet penetrated into basin fill are most common in the easternmost Gila domain but also persist locally farther west. Most basin fill was dissected during drainage integration within the upstream Gila domain but continued accumulation of undissected basin fill by sediment aggradation is dominant in the downstream Gila domain. Basin dissection was initiated by Pliocene time in the central Gila domain but was delayed until Pleistocene time farther east. In the westernmost Gila domain, interaction with erosional and depositional episodes along the Colorado River influenced the development of Quaternary landscapes along the tributary Gila River. The sedimentary history of the Gila drainage network illustrates the means by which trunk rivers can establish courses across corrugated topography produced by the extensional rupture of continental blocks.

  10. Influences of specific ions in groundwater on concrete degradation in subsurface engineered barrier system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Li, Ming-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    Many disposal concepts currently show that concrete is an effective confinement material used in engineered barrier systems (EBS) at a number of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites. Cement-based materials have properties for the encapsulation, isolation, or retardation of a variety of hazardous contaminants. The reactive chemical transport model of HYDROGEOCHEM 5.0 was applied to simulate the effect of hydrogeochemical processes on concrete barrier degradation in an EBS which has been proposed to use in the LLW disposal site in Taiwan. The simulated results indicated that the main processes that are responsible for concrete degradation are the species induced from hydrogen ion, sulfate, and chloride. The EBS with the side ditch drainage system effectively discharges the infiltrated water and lowers the solute concentrations that may induce concrete degradation. The redox processes markedly influence the formations of the degradation materials. The reductive environment in the EBS reduces the formation of ettringite in concrete degradation processes. Moreover, the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers maintain an alkaline condition after 300 years in the proposed LLW repository. This study provides a detailed picture of the long-term evolution of the hydrogeochemical environment in the proposed LLW disposal site in Taiwan.

  11. Characterization of Manganese Oxide Precipitates from Appalachian Coal Mine Mine Drainage Treatment Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.; Zhang, G; Heaney, P; Webb, S; Burgos, W

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD) by chemical addition/active treatment can significantly increase treatment costs. Passive treatment for Mn removal involves promotion of biological oxidative precipitation of manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}). Manganese(II) removal was studied in three passive treatment systems in western Pennsylvania that differed based on their influent Mn(II) concentrations (20-150 mg/L), system construction ({+-}inoculation with patented Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria), and bed materials (limestone vs. sandstone). Manganese(II) removal occurred at pH values as low as 5.0 and temperatures as low as 2 C, but was enhanced at circumneutral pH and warmer temperatures. Trace metals such as Zn, Ni and Co were removed effectively, in most cases preferentially, into the MnO{sub x} precipitates. Based on synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and Mn K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, the predominant Mn oxides at all sites were poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite, triclinic birnessite and todorokite. The surface morphology of the MnOx precipitates from all sites was coarse and 'sponge-like' composed of nm-sized lathes and thin sheets. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), MnO{sub x} precipitates were found in close proximity to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The greatest removal efficiency of Mn(II) occurred at the one site with a higher pH in the bed and a higher influent total organic C (TOC) concentration (provided by an upstream wetland). Biological oxidation of Mn(II) driven by heterotrophic activity was most likely the predominant Mn removal mechanism in these systems. Influent water chemistry and Mn(II) oxidation kinetics affected the relative distribution of MnOx mineral assemblages in CMD treatment systems.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A DATA EVALUATION/DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsurface contamination frequently originates from spatially distributed sources of multi-component nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Such chemicals are typically persistent sources of ground-water contamination that are difficult to characterize. This work addresses the feasi...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A DATA EVALUATION/DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsurface contamination frequently originates from spatially distributed sources of multi-component nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Such chemicals are typically persistent sources of ground-water contamination that are difficult to characterize. This work addresses the feasi...

  14. Accounting for sensor calibration, data validation, measurement and sampling uncertainties in monitoring urban drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Bertrand-Krajewski, J L; Bardin, J P; Mourad, M; Béranger, Y

    2003-01-01

    Assessing the functioning and the performance of urban drainage systems on both rainfall event and yearly time scales is usually based on online measurements of flow rates and on samples of influent effluent for some rainfall events per year. In order to draw pertinent scientific and operational conclusions from the measurement results, it is absolutely necessary to use appropriate methods and techniques in order to i) calibrate sensors and analytical methods, ii) validate raw data, iii) evaluate measurement uncertainties, iv) evaluate the number of rainfall events to sample per year in order to determine performance indicator with a given uncertainty. Based an previous work, the paper gives a synthetic review of required and techniques, and illustrates their application to storage and settling tanks. Experiments show that, controlled and careful experimental conditions, relative uncertainties are about 20% for flow rates in sewer pipes, 6-10% for volumes, 25-35% for TSS concentrations and loads, and 18-276% for TSS removal rates. In order to evaluate the annual pollutant interception efficiency of storage and settling tanks with a given uncertainty, efforts should first be devoted to decrease the sampling uncertainty by increasing the number of sampled events.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation of interactions between above and below ground drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Slobodan; Saul, Adrian J; Tabor, Gavin R; Blanksby, John; Galambos, Istvan; Sabtu, Nuridah; Sailor, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the experimental and numerical investigation of interactions between surface flood flow in urban areas and the flow in below ground drainage systems (sewer pipes and manholes). An experimental rig has been set up at the Water Engineering Laboratory at the University of Sheffield. It consists of a full scale gully structure with inlet grating, which connects the 8 m(2) surface area with the pipe underneath that can function as an outfall and is also further connected to a tank so that it can come under surcharging conditions and cause outflow from the gully. A three-dimensional CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model has been set up to investigate the hydraulic performance of this type of gully inlet during the interactions between surface flood flow and surcharged pipe flow. Preliminary results show that the numerical model can replicate various complex 3D flow features observed in laboratory conditions. This agreement is overall better in the case of water entering the gully than for the outflow conditions. The influence of the surface transverse slope on flow characteristics has been demonstrated. It is shown that re-circulation zones can form downstream from the gully. The number and size of these zones is influenced by the transverse terrain slope.

  16. Local effects of global climate change on the urban drainage system of Hamburg.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Klaus; Kuchenbecker, Andreas; Hüffmeyer, Nina; Verworn, Hans-Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The Hamburg Water Group owns and operates a sewer network with a total length of more than 5,700 km. There has been increasing attention paid to the possible impacts of predicted changes in precipitation patterns on the sewer network infrastructure. The primary objective of the work presented in this paper is an estimation of the hydraulic impacts of climate change on the Hamburg drainage system. As a first step, simulated rainfalls based on the regional climate model REMO were compared and validated with long-term precipitation measurements. In the second step, the hydraulic effects on the sewer network of Hamburg have been analyzed based on simulated long-term rainfall series for the period of 2000-2100. Simulation results show a significant increase in combined sewer overflows by 50% as well as an increase in surcharges of storm sewer manholes. However, there is still a substantial amount of uncertainty resulting from model uncertainty and unknown development of future greenhouse gas emissions. So far, there seems to be no sound basis for the implementation of an overall climate factor for sewer dimensioning for the Hamburg region. Nevertheless, possible effects of climate change should be taken into account within the planning process for major sewer extensions or modifications.

  17. Spectral masking of goethite in abandoned mine drainage systems: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Selby; Cravotta, Charles A.; Klinges, Julia Grace; Weeks, Chloe

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing studies of the surface of Mars use visible- to near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy to identify hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, which can be used to constrain past environmental conditions on the surface of Mars. However, due to differences in optical properties, some hydrated phases can mask others in VNIR spectra, complicating environmental interpretations. Here, we examine the role of masking in VNIR spectra of natural precipitates of ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, and goethite from abandoned mine drainage (AMD) systems in southeastern Pennsylvania. Mixtures of ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, and goethite were identified in four AMD sites by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and their XRD patterns compared to their VNIR spectra. We find that both ferrihydrite and schwertmannite can mask goethite in VNIR spectra of natural AMD precipitates. These findings suggest that care should be taken in interpreting environments on Mars where ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, or goethite are found, as the former two may be masking the latter. Additionally, our findings suggest that outcrops on Mars with both goethite and ferrihydrite/schwertmannite VNIR signatures may have high relative abundances of goethite, or the goethite may exist in a coarsely crystalline phase.

  18. Influence of biofilms on heavy metal immobilization in sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS).

    PubMed

    Feder, Marnie; Phoenix, Vernon; Haig, Sarah; Sloan, William; Dorea, Caetano; Haynes, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper physically and numerically models the influence of biofilms on heavy metal removal in a gravel filter. Experimental flow columns were constructed to determine the removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by gabbro and dolomite gravel lithologies with and without natural biofilm from sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS). Breakthrough experiments showed that, whilst abiotic gravel filters removed up to 51% of metals, those with biofilms enhanced heavy metal removal by up to a further 29%, with Cu removal illustrating the greatest response to biofilm growth. An advection-diffusion equation successfully modelled metal tracer transport within biofilm columns. This model yielded a permanent loss term (k) for metal tracers of between 0.01 and 1.05, correlating well with measured data from breakthrough experiments. Additional 16S rRNA clone library analysis of the biofilm indicated strong sensitivity of bacterial community composition to the lithology of the filter medium, with gabbro filters displaying Proteobacteria dominance (54%) and dolomite columns showing Cyanobacteria dominance (47%).

  19. Hydrochemical data for the Truckee River drainage system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, L.V.

    1984-01-01

    Surface-water samples were collected from the Truckee River drainage system during 1975, 1976, and 1981. Data resulting from chemical analyses of these samples, as well as certain other previously unpublished data, are tabulated in this report. The report contains the following hydrochemical data: (1) chemical composition of 21 tributaries to Lake Tahoe and the Truckee River upstream from Farad, California (May and October 1971, and June 1972); (2) chemical composition of the Truckee River at Tahoe City (January 1968 to January 1975) and at Farad, California (January 1968 to June 1980), and of the Little Truckee River upstream from Stampede Reservoir, California (January 1968 to April 1980); (3) chemical composition of the Truckee River at 11 sites from Tahoe City, California, to Nixon, Nevada (June 4 and September 3, 1975); (4) historical chemical analyses of water from Pyramid Lake, Nevada (1882 to 1973); (5) chemical composition (November 1975 to December 1976), water temperature (January 1976 to November 1977), and dissolved oxygen (January 1976 to November 1977) at various depths in Pyramid Lake, Nevada; (6) chemical composition of pore fluids from and carbonate mineralogy of sediment greater than 2 micrometers in five cores, Pyramid Lake, Nevada; (7) chemical composition of the Truckee River at Farad, California (January to July 1981); and (8) chemical composition of tufa from the Pyramid Lake basin. 9 references, 3 figures, 14 tables.

  20. Spectral masking of goethite in abandoned mine drainage systems: implications for Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cull, Selby; Cravotta, Charles A.; Klinges, Julia Grace; Weeks, Chloe

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing studies of the surface of Mars use visible- to near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy to identify hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, which can be used to constrain past environmental conditions on the surface of Mars. However, due to differences in optical properties, some hydrated phases can mask others in VNIR spectra, complicating environmental interpretations. Here, we examine the role of masking in VNIR spectra of natural precipitates of ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, and goethite from abandoned mine drainage (AMD) systems in southeastern Pennsylvania. Mixtures of ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, and goethite were identified in four AMD sites by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and their XRD patterns compared to their VNIR spectra. We find that both ferrihydrite and schwertmannite can mask goethite in VNIR spectra of natural AMD precipitates. These findings suggest that care should be taken in interpreting environments on Mars where ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, or goethite are found, as the former two may be masking the latter. Additionally, our findings suggest that outcrops on Mars with both goethite and ferrihydrite/schwertmannite VNIR signatures may have high relative abundances of goethite, or the goethite may exist in a coarsely crystalline phase.

  1. An Investigation of Water Level Prediction in Urban Drainage System Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F.; Chiang, Y.; Chiu, Y.; Ho, Y.; Chang, L.; Wang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The pumping stations are the major hydraulic facilities for the elimination of flood in highly developed cities and therefore play an important role in flood mitigation in metropolitan area. Accurate predictions of inner water level in urban drainage systems are necessary and important for successful operation of pumping stations. In view of the characteristics of artificial neural networks (ANNs), the model was introduced in this study for extracting rainfall-water level patterns from torrential rain events. The Yu-Cheng pumping station, Taipei city, is used as a case study, where historical records which contain information of rainfall amounts and inner water levels are used to train and verify the ANN's performance. First, we directly construct the ANN for multistep ahead water level predictions by using 11 storm events at gauging sites. The optimal structure and parameters are then tested via 3 different events. Second, the storm water management model (SWMM) was utilized for the purpose of generating data at un-gauged sites. Data generated from SWMM were further used to train the ANN. Finally, a comparison of water level prediction between SWMM and ANN are given. Our preliminary results show that the ANN is capable of constructing accurate and reliable water level prediction. The results also exemplify the need for a detailed investigation on SWMM-derived error that could propagate the input error into the ANN models.

  2. Optimization of hydrometric monitoring network in urban drainage systems using information theory.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, J

    2017-10-01

    Regular and continuous monitoring of urban runoff in both quality and quantity aspects is of great importance for controlling and managing surface runoff. Due to the considerable costs of establishing new gauges, optimization of the monitoring network is essential. This research proposes an approach for site selection of new discharge stations in urban areas, based on entropy theory in conjunction with multi-objective optimization tools and numerical models. The modeling framework provides an optimal trade-off between the maximum possible information content and the minimum shared information among stations. This approach was applied to the main surface-water collection system in Tehran to determine new optimal monitoring points under the cost considerations. Experimental results on this drainage network show that the obtained cost-effective designs noticeably outperform the consulting engineers' proposal in terms of both information contents and shared information. The research also determined the highly frequent sites at the Pareto front which might be important for decision makers to give a priority for gauge installation on those locations of the network.

  3. A preliminary study of a Mars penetrator system for subsurface exobiological exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Byron L.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Carle, Glenn C.

    1987-01-01

    The earth seems to stand alone among the planets of the solar system in that its surface, atmosphere, and hydrosphere provide an environment conducive to the maintenance of life. At one time, Mars was also considered to have the potential to harbor life. However, the absence of detectable organic molecules at the two Viking landing sites and the absence of liquid water anywhere on the surface seems to indicate that life is not present on Mars now. There are, however, many indications that the surface of Mars was less hostile in the distant past and the possibility that life may have existed on primordial Mars or that prebiotic chemistry may have occurred can not be excluded. The search for the organic evidence of this prebiotic or biotic activity will require a subsurface study of possible sediments at several sites. The purpose of this paper is to propose and describe a device termed a penetrator to emplant the required instrumentation beneath the surface (2-4 m) at likely sites to search for the evidence of biogenic organic material. The paper examines, in detail, the rationale for the scientific activity, any issues of technical feasibility, and describes the associated system requirements.

  4. A Wide-Band Electromagnetic Impedance Profiling System forNon-Invasive Subsurface Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2004-12-17

    A non-invasive, wide-band electromagnetic (EM) impedance difference system for shallow subsurface electrical structure characterization in environmental and engineering problems has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Electrical parameters of interest are electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity that are deduced from the impedance difference data. The prototype system includes a magnetic loop transmitter, which operates between 0.1 MHz and 100 MHz, an electrical dipole antenna for observing the electric field, and a loop antenna for measuring the magnetic field.All antennas are mounted on a cart made of non-metallic material for easy movement of the whole array for profiling. Surface EM impedance difference is obtained by taking the difference of the ratios of the electric fields to the magnetic fields at selected frequencies at two different levels. Numerical simulations will be presented to verify this new approach. A set of the impedance difference data acquired at the University of California's Richmond Field Station compares reasonably well with simulation results based on a model obtained with the resistivity method and in situ TDR (time domain reflectometry)measurements.

  5. A preliminary study of a Mars penetrator system for subsurface exobiological exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Byron L.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Carle, Glenn C.

    1987-01-01

    The earth seems to stand alone among the planets of the solar system in that its surface, atmosphere, and hydrosphere provide an environment conducive to the maintenance of life. At one time, Mars was also considered to have the potential to harbor life. However, the absence of detectable organic molecules at the two Viking landing sites and the absence of liquid water anywhere on the surface seems to indicate that life is not present on Mars now. There are, however, many indications that the surface of Mars was less hostile in the distant past and the possibility that life may have existed on primordial Mars or that prebiotic chemistry may have occurred can not be excluded. The search for the organic evidence of this prebiotic or biotic activity will require a subsurface study of possible sediments at several sites. The purpose of this paper is to propose and describe a device termed a penetrator to emplant the required instrumentation beneath the surface (2-4 m) at likely sites to search for the evidence of biogenic organic material. The paper examines, in detail, the rationale for the scientific activity, any issues of technical feasibility, and describes the associated system requirements.

  6. Evaluation of nutrient removal efficiency and microbial enzyme activity in a baffled subsurface-flow constructed wetland system

    Treesearch

    Lihua Cui; Ying Ouyang; Wenjie Gu; Weozhi Yang; Qiaoling. Xu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the enzyme activities and their relationships to domestic wastewater purification are investigated in four different types of subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (CWs), namely the traditional horizontal subsurface-flow, horizontal baffled subsurface-flow, vertical baffled subsurface-flow, and composite baffled subsurface-flow CWs. Results showed that...

  7. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  8. Shallow Subsurface Geology, Geomorphology and Limited Cultural Resource Investigations of the Meredosia Village and Meredosia Lake Levee and Drainage Districts, Scott, Morgan, and Cass Counties, Illinois. St. Louis District Resource Management Report Number 17

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    ST. LOUIS DISTRICT . LTURALRESOURCE MANAGEMENTREV)RT UMBER 17 AD-A2 4 5 724 SHALLOW SUBSURFACE GEOLOGY, GEOMORPHOLOGY AND LIMITED CULTURAL RESOURCE...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (anud Subtle) SALW UTURFACL GEOLOGY, 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED GEOMORPHOLOGY AND LIMITED CULTURAL RESOURCE...RESOURCE MANAGEMENT REPORT NUMBER 17 Shallow Subsurface Geology, Geomorphology and Limited Cultural Resource Investigations of the Meredosia Village and

  9. Comparison of short-term rainfall forecasts for model-based flow prediction in urban drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Thorndahl, Søren; Poulsen, Troels Sander; Bøvith, Thomas; Borup, Morten; Ahm, Malte; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Grum, Morten; Rasmussen, Michael R; Gill, Rasphall; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2013-01-01

    Forecast-based flow prediction in drainage systems can be used to implement real-time control of drainage systems. This study compares two different types of rainfall forecast - a radar rainfall extrapolation-based nowcast model and a numerical weather prediction model. The models are applied as input to an urban runoff model predicting the inlet flow to a waste water treatment plant. The modelled flows are auto-calibrated against real-time flow observations in order to certify the best possible forecast. Results show that it is possible to forecast flows with a lead time of 24 h. The best performance of the system is found using the radar nowcast for the short lead times and the weather model for larger lead times.

  10. Effects of drainage and water table control on groundwater and surface water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Chescheir, G.M.; Skaggs, R.W.; Gilliam, J.W.; Breve, M.A.; Munster, C.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of the research project were to: conduct field experiments to measure and evaluate the effects of drainage, controlled drainage, and subirrigation of the following hydrologic and water quality variables: Movement and fate of fertilizer nutrients and sediment in surface runoff, shallow groundwater and subsurface drainage waters; and loss of pesticides in surface and subsurface drainage waters and their movement into shallow groundwaters; test the reliability of selected models for predicting the movement of pesticides and fertilizer nutrients to shallow groundwater and the losses of these pollutants via surface and subsurface drainage waters; and modify and further develop these existing models to improve their reliability.

  11. Does the usage of digital chest drainage systems reduce pleural inflammation and volume of pleural effusion following oncologic pulmonary resection?-A prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Michèle; Agzarian, John; Hanna, Waël C; Schieman, Colin; Finley, Christian J; Macri, Joseph; Schneider, Laura; Schnurr, Terri; Farrokhyar, Forough; Radford, Katherine; Nair, Parameswaran; Shargall, Yaron

    2017-06-01

    Prolonged air leak and high-volume pleural drainage are the most common causes for delays in chest tube removal following lung resection. While digital pleural drainage systems have been successfully used in the management of post-operative air leak, their effect on pleural drainage and inflammation has not been studied before. We hypothesized that digital drainage systems (as compared to traditional analog continuous suction), using intermittent balanced suction, are associated with decreased pleural inflammation and postoperative drainage volumes, thus leading to earlier chest tube removal. One hundred and three [103] patients were enrolled and randomized to either analog (n=50) or digital (n=53) drainage systems following oncologic lung resection. Chest tubes were removed according to standardized, pre-defined protocol. Inflammatory mediators [interleukin-1B (IL-1B), 6, 8, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)] in pleural fluid and serum were measured and analysed. The primary outcome of interest was the difference in total volume of postoperative fluid drainage. Secondary outcome measures included duration of chest tube in-situ, prolonged air-leak incidence, length of hospital stay and the correlation between pleural effusion formation, degree of inflammation and type of drainage system used. There was no significant difference in total amount of fluid drained or length of hospital stay between the two groups. A trend for shorter chest tube duration was found with the digital system when compared to the analog (P=0.055). Comparison of inflammatory mediator levels revealed no significant differences between digital and analog drainage systems. The incidence of prolonged post-operative air leak was significantly higher when using the analog system (9 versus 2 patients; P=0.025). Lobectomy was associated with longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) and increased fluid drainage when compared to sub-lobar resection (P<0.001), regardless of drainage system. Use of post

  12. Airborne ground-penetrating radar system to detect surface and subsurface land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Thomas G.; Nunnally, William C.; VanKirk, Nate B.

    1998-09-01

    Research progress on the design, construction, and operation of a novel, airborne ground penetrating radar system to detect surface and subsurface landmines is presented. The landmine detection system is unique in that active, electronic projectiles are shot into the ground from an airborne platform to create high power, monopulse radar signals. Intimate contact between the projectile and the ground reduces the amount of reflected radar energy at the air-soil interface and ensures that maximum radar energy is propagated into the surrounding ground. The end result is that the reflected radar signal is of higher energy and possesses a higher signal-to- noise ratio allowing enhanced detectability. The high power, monopulse signal that is reflected off the landmine is received at the airborne platform via scanned antenna array. In comparison, conventional ground penetrating radar systems typically use chirped or long pulse signals and horn type antennas located close to the ground limiting their usefulness in this application. To generate electrical energy, two types of projectiles are used and are based on the principle of magnetic flux compression or by the principle of piezoelectric compression. The performance results of these two projectile types as well as the models used to predict their behavior are presented and discussed. To evaluate the overall performance of the system, a sub-scale radar test range was also constructed. The radar test range consists of a large dirt- filled tank containing a high power impulse source, several targets that simulate buried landmines, and a post scanned antenna array located above the dirt-filled tank. The high power impulse source simulates the radar signal generated when the projectiles impact the ground. The radar cross-sectional data generated in the test range is presented and discussed.

  13. Water use efficiency of different sugarcane genotypes irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. L. B. O.; Pires, R. C. M.; Ribeiro, R. V.; Machado, E. C.; Rolim, G. S.; Magalhães Filho, J. R.; Marchiori, P. E. R.

    2012-04-01

    The biofuel production is a growing concern on modern society due to the agricultural sustainability, in which both food and energy supplying should be take into account. The agroclimatic zoning indicates that sugarcane expansion in Brazil can only take place in marginal lands, where water deficit occurs and irrigation is necessary. The aim of this work was to evaluate water consumption and the water use efficiency of two sugarcane genotypes irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas SP Brazil, with IACSP95-5000 and SP79-1011 varieties. Those varieties have different canopy characteristics and development, with IACSP95-5000 being more responsive to soil water availability and presenting higher light interception when compared to SP79-1011. Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) was calculated through field water balance from August 2010 to March 2011. Soil water content was evaluated by using a capacitance probe, sampling different depths in soil profile until 1-m. IACSP95-5000 had higher water consumption than SP79-1011. The mean ETc value of IACSP95-5000 was 5.0 mm day-1, whereas SP79-1011 showed 3.7 mm day-1. ETc values were positively correlated to biomass production, with IACSP95-5000 exhibiting higher growth and water use efficiency than SP79-1011.

  14. Depositional systems and Karst geology of the Ellenburger group (lower ordovician), subsurface West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerans, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Ellenburger Group of Texas contains estimated reserves of 1.15 billion barrels of oil and 2.2 billion barrels of oil equivalent. Despite its economic significance, comparatively little is known about the subsurface Ellenburger in West Texas; thus, this book presents a regional model of Ellenburger deposition and diagenesis. Using associations of lithologies and sedimentary structures observed in core, the author identified six depositional systems in the Ellenburger: fan delta-marginal marine, lower tidal flat, high-energy restricted shelf, low-energy restricted shelf, upper tidal flat, and open shallow water shelf. Diagenesis was dominated by three major styles of dolomitization: very fine crystalline dolomite (5-20 {mu}m), in tidal-flat facies; fine to medium crystalline dolomite (20-100 {mu}m), widespread in all facies; and coarse crystalline replacement mosaic dolomite and saddle dolomite cement, which formed in a burial setting after pre-Simpson karst formation and before Pennsylvanian faulting, uplift, and erosion. Other diagenetic events were karst-related dissolution episodes associated with repeated uplift and exposure and subsequent dedolomitization of the Ellenburger platform.

  15. Effect of COD/N ratio on removal performances in two subsurface wastewater infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Fei Jing Pan Deli Tong Linli Huang Long Yu Yafei Sun Shiyue Qi Yaoyao Huang, Hexin

    2017-01-24

    Dissolved oxygen (DO), removal of COD, TP and nitrogen in subsurface wastewater infiltration systems (SWISs)with/without intermittent aeration under different influent COD/N ratios were investigated. Aerobic conditions were effectively developed in 50 cm depth of the matrix and anoxic or anaerobic conditions were not changed in 80 and 110 cm depth by intermittent aeration, which encouraged nitrification. Increased influent COD/N ratio led to lower COD and nitrogen removal in conventional SWISs. Sufficient carbon source in high COD/N ratio influent promoted denitrification with intermittent aeration. High removal rates of COD (95.68±0.21%), TP (92.02±0.28%), NH4+-N (99.33±0.05%) and TN (89.65±0.6%) were obtained with influent COD/N ratio of 12 in aerated SWISs. Under the COD/N ratio of 12 and 18, intermittent aeration boosted the growth and reproduction of nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria. Meanwhile, nitrate and nitrite reductase activities with intermittent aeration were higher than that without aeration in 80 and 110 cm depth.

  16. Multisensor monitoring system for assessment of locust hazard risk in the Lake Balkhash drainage basin.

    PubMed

    Propastin, Pavel

    2012-12-01

    Satellite and ground-based data were combined in a monitoring system to quantify the link between climate conditions and the risk of locust infestations in the southern part of Lake Balkhash's drainage basin in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In this monitoring system, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived from the SPOT-VGT satellite, was used for mapping potential locust habitats and monitoring their area throughout 1998 to 2007. TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason 1 altimeter data were used to track the interannual dynamics of water level in Balkhash Lake. Climate conditions were represented by weather records for air temperature and precipitation during the same period. The classification procedure, based on an analysis of multitemporal dynamics of SPOT-VGT NDVI values observed by individual vegetation classes, generated annual areas of ten land-cover types, which were then categorized as areas with low, medium, and high risk for locust infestation. Statistical analyses showed significant influences of the climatic parameters and the Balkhash Lake hydrological regime on the spatial extend of annual areas of potential locust habitats. The results also indicate that the linkages between locust infestation risk and environmental factors are characterized by time lags. The expansion of locust risk areas are usually preceded by dry, hot years and lower water levels in Balkhash Lake when larger areas of reed grass are free from seasonal flooding. Years with such conditions are favourable for locust outbreaks due to expansion of the habitat areas suitable for locust oviposition and nymphal development. In contrast, years with higher water levels in Balkhash Lake and lower temperature decrease the potential locust habitat area.

  17. Initial experience with the world's first digital drainage system. The benefits of recording air leaks with graphic representation.

    PubMed

    Dernevik, Leif; Belboul, Ali; Rådberg, Göran

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a new digital drainage system, the DigiVent Chest Drainage System that gives accurate measurements of air leakage and pleural pressures and can display those measurements over time. The DigiVent Chest Drainage System was tested in three steps: Step 1; first clinical use in five patients, Step 2; management and acceptance in further 15 patients and Step 3; reliability in routine use in 50 patients. The results from Steps 1 and 2 showed that the system was good enough for extended use. The results from Step 3 showed excellent clinical performance, however, we experienced device malfunctions in four cases without any consequences for the patients. The cause of the malfunctions was identified and steps taken to prevent their further occurrence. The ability of the DigiVent to measure airflow and present mean values for 1, 3 and 6h proved to be very practical. The ability to save data and present curves for the entire course of treatment will be an advantage for research in the field of lung surgery.

  18. Ancient drainage basin of the Tharsis region, Mars: Potential source for outflow channel systems and putative oceans or paleolakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Ferris, J.C.; Baker, V.R.; Anderson, R.C.; Hare, T.M.; Strom, R.G.; Barlow, N.G.; Tanaka, K.L.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Scott, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    Paleotopographic reconstructions based on a synthesis of published geologic information and high-resolution topography, including topographic profiles, reveal the potential existence of an enormous drainage basin/aquifer system in the eastern part of the Tharsis region during the Noachian Period. Large topographic highs formed the margin of the gigantic drainage basin. Subsequently, lavas, sediments, and volatiles partly infilled the basin, resulting in an enormous and productive regional aquifer. The stacked sequences of water-bearing strata were then deformed locally and, in places, exposed by magmatic-driven uplifts, tectonic deformation, and erosion. This basin model provides a potential source of water necessary to carve the large outflow channel systems of the Tharsis and surrounding regions and to contribute to the formation of putative northern-plains ocean(s) and/or paleolakes. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Evolution of closed urinary drainage systems use and associated factors in Spanish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Allepuz-Palau, A; Rosselló-Urgell, J; Vaqué-Rafart, J; Hermosilla-Pérez, E; Arribas-Llorente, J L; Sánchez-Payá, J; Lizán-García, M

    2004-08-01

    Although closed urinary drainage systems (CUDS) reduce the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), open systems are still used in Spain. The object of this work was to describe the progress of CUDS use and factors associated with the drainage system type used in Spanish hospitals. The databases of the EPINE study (Study of Prevalence of Nosocomial Infections in Spain) from 1990 to 2000 were used. The EPINE study includes hospitalized patients of all ages in acute-care Spanish hospitals. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and eighty-eight catheterized patients were studied, and the whole database was used for the trend analysis of global hospital-acquired infection (HAI). The patient and the hospital were the two units of observation used in the analysis. Full implementation was defined as 90% CUDS use. A logistic regression model was applied to study factors influencing the use of CUDS and to determine prevalence trend. An odds ratio (OR) >1 indicates an incremental trend. The Pearson correlation coefficient between annual percentage of CUDS use and CAUTI prevalence was calculated. Variables for the year 2000 were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test between hospitals with and without full implementation. The prevalence of urinary catheterized patients in Spain increased from 12.4% in 1990 to 15.2% in 2000 (OR 1.019, 95% CI 1.016-1.021). The proportion of CUDS used increased from 50.6% in 1990 to 70% in 2000 (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.095-1.104) and correlated with a significant decrease of UTIs (r = 0.65, P = 0.03). In 1990, 28.5% of hospitals had full implementation of CUDS and by 2000 this had risen to 40.3% (OR 1.093, 95% CI 1.06-1.127). Patients in medium (200-500 beds) and large (>500 beds) hospitals, as well as those with three of more diagnoses and two or more intrinsic risk factors had an increased probability of having a CUDS, whereas being hospitalized in areas other than intensive care, being male and less than 65 years old were

  20. Process-Based Characterizations of Subsurface Fluid Pressures for a Devil's Slide-like System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M.; Loague, K.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal margins commonly host slope stability hazards that are influenced by hydrologic, geologic, and / or anthropogenic perturbations. A firm foundation for rigorously understanding the component contributions and process-based linkages among hydrologic and geomorphic response is comprehensive physics-based simulation. This study is motivated by the hydrologically-driven, creeping and episodic deep-seated bedrock slides that intersect a former section of the Pacific Coast Highway in the active landslide zone at Devil's Slide near Pacifica, California. For this study, deterministic-conceptual hydrogeologic simulation was employed to estimate fluid pressures for saturated three-dimensional (3D) subsurface systems. One-dimensional (1D) vertical, transient, variably-saturated simulations were conducted to establish the position of the water table (i.e., the upper boundary condition) for the 3D steady-state saturated problems which encode the geologic information for heterogeneous and anisotropic systems. The concept-development effort undertaken here demonstrates that, for a Devil's Slide-like system: (i) specific climatic conditions facilitate variable lag times associated with water-table dynamics, (ii) recharge is the most sensitive parameter to establish risk-averse estimates of fluid pressure, (iii) nuances in the 3D flow field related to fault zone characteristics markedly influence fluid pressures, and (iv) it is unlikely that seasonal fluctuations in the regional water table account for severe failure modes. The simulated fluid pressures encourage new interdisciplinary data discovery to investigate the spatial and temporal persistence of perched water in the study area. To capture event-driven failures for the Devil's Slide site, future efforts should develop characterizations of the unsaturated near surface with a rigor similar to the treatment of the saturated zone demonstrated by this study.

  1. Drainage beneath ice sheets: groundwater-channel coupling, and the origin of esker systems from former ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, G. S.; Hagdorn, M.; Maillot, P. B.; Zatsepin, S.

    2009-04-01

    The nature of the drainage system beneath ice sheets is crucial to their dynamic behaviour but remains problematic. An experimentally based theory of coupling between groundwater and major channel systems is applied to the esker systems in the area occupied the last ice sheet in Europe, which we regard as a fossil imprint of major longitudinal drainage channels. We conclude that the large-scale distribution and spacing of major eskers is consistent with the theory of groundwater control, in which esker spacing is partly controlled by the transmissivity of the bed. It is concluded that esker patterns reflect the large-scale organisation of the subglacial drainage pattern in which channel development is coupled to groundwater flow and to the ice sheet's dynamic regime. The theory is then used to deduce: basal meltwater recharge rates and their spatial variability from esker spacing in an area in which the ice sheet was actively streaming during its final retreat; patterns of palaeo-groundwater flow and head distribution; and the seasonally varying magnitude of discharge from stream tunnels at the retreating ice sheet margin. Major channel/esker systems appear to have been stable at least over several hundred of years during the retreat of the ice sheet, although major dynamic events are demonstrably associated with major shifts in the hydraulic regime. Modelling suggests: that glaciation can stimulate deep groundwater circulation cells that are spatially linked to channel locations, with groundwater flow predominantly transverse to ice flow; that the circulation pattern has the potential to create large-scale anomalies in groundwater chemistry; and that the spacing of channels will change through the glacial cycle, influencing water pressures in stream tunnels, subglacial hydraulic gradients and effective pressure. If the latter is reduced sufficiently, it could trigger enhanced bed deformation, thus coupling drainage to ice sheet movement. It suggests the

  2. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in systems containing compost and limestone: Laboratory and field results

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.; Pappas, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Passive, down-flow systems, consisting of compost and limestone layers, termed successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS), may be well suited for treatment of mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. A column, simulating a SAPS, has been operated in the laboratory for 52 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost and 0.91 m of free standing water. Actual AMD (pH = 3.02, acidity = 218 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4} = 600 mg/L, Fe = 16.0 mg/L, Mn = 12.1 mg/L, and Al = 17.1 mg/L) was applied to the column at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. Effluent pH has remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9) in the column system. A SAPS located in Jefferson County, PA has been monitored for the past 4.5 years. The SAPS has an approximate area of 1000 m{sup 2} and contains a 0.4-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.2-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 1.5 m of free standing water. Mine water (acidity = 335 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4} = 1270 mg/L, Fe = 246 mg/L, Mn = 38.4 mg/L, and Al = <0.2 mg/L) flowed into the SAPS at a rate of 140 L/min. Water samples from the field and laboratory systems have been collected at strategic locations on a regular basis and analyzed for pH, alkalinity, acidity, Fe{sup 2+}, total Fe, Mn, Al, SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, Na, Co, Ni, and Zn. Alkalinity has been generated in both field and laboratory systems by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. The column generated an average of 378 mg/L of alkalinity; 74% due to limestone dissolution and 26% due to bacterial reduction of sulfate. The field SAPS generated an average of 231 mg/L of alkalinity and exhibited seasonal trends.

  3. Impact of Acid Mine Drainage on the hydrogeological system at Sia, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen; Malpas, John

    2013-04-01

    Discontinued mining of the volcanogenic massive sulphide ore bodies of Cyprus has left significant environmental concerns including Acid Mine Drainage. Remnant sulphide ore and tailings in waste dumps react with oxygenated rainwater to produce sulphuric acid, a process which is multiplied when metal-loving acidophilic bacteria are present. Given that Cyprus has a Mediterranean climate, characterized by its warm and dry summers and cool and wet winters, the low pH effluent with high levels of trace elements, particularly metals, is leached out of the waste tips particularly during the wet season. The Sia site includes an open mine-pit lake, waste rock and tailings dumps, a river leading to a downstream dam-lake, and a localised groundwater system. The study intends to: identify the point source and nature of contamination; analyze the mechanism and results of local acid generation; and understand how the hydrogeological system responds to seasonal variations. During two sampling campaigns, in the wet and dry seasons of 2011, water samples were collected from the mine pit lake, from upstream of the adjacent river down to the dam catchment, and from various boreholes close to the sulphide mine. The concentration of ions in waters varies between wet and dry seasons but, in both, relative amounts are directly related to pH. In the mine-pit lake, Fe, Mn, Mg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co and Cd are found in higher concentrations in the dry season, as a result of substantial evaporation of water. The Sia River runs continuously in the wet season, and waters collected close to the waste tips have pH as low as 2.5 and higher concentrations of Al, Cu, Fe and Zn. Further downstream there is a significant decrease in trace metal contents with a concomitant rise of pH. Al and Fe dominate total cation content when pH is lower than 4. Al is derived from the weathering of clay minerals, especially during the wet season. Fe is derived from the oxidation of pyrite. Once pH's exceed 4, a white

  4. Drainage systems of Lonar Crater, India: Contributions to Lonar Lake hydrology and crater degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Goro; Senthil Kumar, P.; Goto, Kazuhisa; Sekine, Yasuhito; Giri, Chaitanya; Matsui, Takafumi

    2014-05-01

    Lonar, a 1.8-km-diameter impact crater in India, is a rare example of terrestrial impact craters formed in basaltic bedrock. The estimated age of the crater ranges widely from less than 12 ka to over 600 ka, but the crater preserves a relatively pristine morphology. We conducted a study of various drainage systems of Lonar Crater. The crater floor hosts a shallow 5-m-deep lake, which fluctuates seasonally. Our investigation reveals that the lake level is influenced by surface runoff that is active during the monsoon and groundwater input effective during both the rainy and the dry seasons. The groundwater discharge is observed as springs on the inner rim walls corresponding to weathered vesicular basalt and/or proximal ejecta, which are underlain by thick massive basalt layers. This observation indicates that groundwater movement is lithologically controlled: it passes preferentially through permeable vesicular basalt or proximal ejecta but is hindered in less permeable massive basalt. It is hypothesized that groundwater is also structurally controlled by dipping of basalt layers, interconnectivity of the permeable lithologic units through fractures, and preferential pathways such as fractures within the permeable lithologic units. Investigation on hydrological processes at Lonar Crater and its lake could provide useful insights into purported paleo-crater lakes presumably formed in the basaltic crust of Mars. The Lonar Crater interior shows signs of degradation in the forms of gullies and debris flows, and the Dhar valley incising in the rim leading to form a fan delta. The ejecta surface is characterized by the presence of channels, originating from the rim area and extending radially away from the crater center. The channels probably resulted from surface runoff, and its erosion contributes to the removal of the ejecta. Lonar Crater is a valuable analog site for studying degradation processes with potential application to impact craters occurring on

  5. Decision making for urban drainage systems under uncertainty caused by weather radar rainfall measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qiang; Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    With the rapidly growth of urbanization and population, the decision making for managing urban flood risk has been a significant issue for most large cities in China. A high-quality measurement of rainfall at small temporal but large spatial scales is of great importance to urban flood risk management. Weather radar rainfall, with its advantage of short-term predictability and high spatial and temporal resolutions, has been widely applied in the urban drainage system modeling. It is recognized that weather radar is subjected to many uncertainties and many studies have been carried out to quantify these uncertainties in order to improve the quality of the rainfall and the corresponding outlet flow. However, considering the final action in urban flood risk management is the decision making such as flood warning and whether to build or how to operate a hydraulics structure, some uncertainties of weather radar may have little or significant influence to the final results. For this reason, in this study, we aim to investigate which characteristics of the radar rainfall are the significant ones for decision making in urban flood risk management. A radar probabilistic quantitative rainfall estimated scheme is integrated with an urban flood model (Storm Water Management Model, SWMM) to make a decision on whether to warn or not according to the decision criterions. A number of scenarios with different storm types, synoptic regime and spatial and temporal correlation are designed to analyze the relationship between these affected factors and the final decision. Based on this, parameterized radar probabilistic rainfall estimation model is established which reflects the most important elements in the decision making for urban flood risk management.

  6. Capabilities of seismic and georadar 2D/3D imaging of shallow subsurface of transport route using the Seismobile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilecki, Zenon; Isakow, Zbigniew; Czarny, Rafał; Pilecka, Elżbieta; Harba, Paulina; Barnaś, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the capabilities of the Seismobile system for shallow subsurface imaging of transport routes, such as roads, railways, and airport runways, in different geological conditions were presented. The Seismobile system combines the advantages of seismic profiling using landstreamer and georadar (GPR) profiling. It consists of up to four seismic measuring lines and carriage with a suspended GPR antenna. Shallow subsurface recognition may be achieved to a maximum width of 10.5 m for a distance of 3.5 m between the measurement lines. GPR measurement is performed in the axis of the construction. Seismobile allows the measurement time, labour and costs to be reduced due to easy technique of its installation, remote data transmission from geophones to accompanying measuring modules, automated location of the system based on GPS and a highly automated method of seismic wave excitation. In this paper, the results of field tests carried out in different geological conditions were presented. The methodologies of acquisition, processing and interpretation of seismic and GPR measurements were broadly described. Seismograms and its spectrum registered by Seismobile system were compared to the ones registered by Geode seismograph of Geometrix. Seismic data processing and interpretation software allows for the obtaining of 2D/3D models of P- and S-wave velocities. Combined seismic and GPR results achieved sufficient imaging of shallow subsurface to a depth of over a dozen metres. The obtained geophysical information correlated with geological information from the boreholes with good quality. The results of performed tests proved the efficiency of the Seismobile system in seismic and GPR imaging of a shallow subsurface of transport routes under compound conditions.

  7. Implementation of a multi-modal mobile sensor system for surface and subsurface assessment of roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming; Birken, Ralf; Shahini Shamsabadi, Salar

    2015-03-01

    There are more than 4 million miles of roads and 600,000 bridges in the United States alone. On-going investments are required to maintain the physical and operational quality of these assets to ensure public's safety and prosperity of the economy. Planning efficient maintenance and repair (M&R) operations must be armed with a meticulous pavement inspection method that is non-disruptive, is affordable and requires minimum manual effort. The Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors (VOTERS) project developed a technology able to cost- effectively monitor the condition of roadway systems to plan for the right repairs, in the right place, at the right time. VOTERS technology consists of an affordable, lightweight package of multi-modal sensor systems including acoustic, optical, electromagnetic, and GPS sensors. Vehicles outfitted with this technology would be capable of collecting information on a variety of pavement-related characteristics at both surface and subsurface levels as they are driven. By correlating the sensors' outputs with the positioning data collected in tight time synchronization, a GIS-based control center attaches a spatial component to all the sensors' measurements and delivers multiple ratings of the pavement every meter. These spatially indexed ratings are then leveraged by VOTERS decision making modules to plan the optimum M&R operations and predict the future budget needs. In 2014, VOTERS inspection results were validated by comparing them to the outputs of recent professionally done condition surveys of a local engineering firm for 300 miles of Massachusetts roads. Success of the VOTERS project portrays rapid, intelligent, and comprehensive evaluation of tomorrow's transportation infrastructure to increase public's safety, vitalize the economy, and deter catastrophic failures.

  8. Removal of sulphates acidity and iron from acid mine drainage in a bench scale biochemical treatment system.

    PubMed

    Prasad, D; Henry, J G

    2009-02-01

    The focus of this study was to develop a simple biochemical system to treat acid mine drainage for its safe disposal. Recovery and reuse of the metals removed were not considered. A three-step process for the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD), proposed earlier, separates sulphate reducing activity from metal precipitation units and from a pH control system. Following our earlier work on the first step (biological reactor), this paper examines the second step (i.e. chemical reactor). The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the increase in pH and the reduction of iron in the chemical reactor for different proportions of simulated AMD, and (2) to assess the capability of the chemical reactor. A series of experiments was conducted to study the effects of addition of alkaline sulphidogenic liquor (ASL) derived from a batch sulphidogenic biological reactor (operating with activated sludge and a COD/SO4 ratio of 1.6) on the simulated AMD characteristics. At 60-minute contact time, addition of 30% ASL (pH of 7.60-7.76) to the chemical reactor with 70% AMD (pH of 1.65-2.02), increased the pH of the AMD to 6.57 and alkalinity from 0 to 485 mg l(-1) as CaCO3, respectively and precipitated about 97% of the iron present in the simulated AMD. Others have demonstrated that metals in mine drainage can be precipitated by bacterial sulphate reduction. In this study, iron, a common and major component of mine drainage was used as a surrogate for metals in general. The results indicate the feasibility of treating AMD by an engineered sulphidogenic anaerobic reactor followed by a chemical reactor and that our three-step biochemical process has important advantages over other conventional AMD treatment systems.

  9. Improved regional groundwater flow modeling using drainage features: a case study of the central northern karst aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2016-09-01

    In northern Puerto Rico (USA), subsurface conduit networks with unknown characteristics, and surface features such as springs, rivers, lagoons and wetlands, drain the coastal karst aquifers. In this study, drain lines connecting sinkholes and springs are used to improve the developed regional model by simulating the drainage effects of conduit networks. Implemented in an equivalent porous media (EPM) approach, the model with drains is able to roughly reproduce the spring discharge hydrographs in response to rainfall. Hydraulic conductivities are found to be scale dependent and significantly increase with higher test radius, indicating scale dependency of the EPM approach. Similar to other karst regions in the world, hydraulic gradients are steeper where the transmissivity is lower approaching the coastline. This study enhances current understanding of the complex flow patterns in karst aquifers and suggests that using a drainage feature improves modeling results where available data on conduit characteristics are minimal.

  10. Phosphorus removal in laboratory-scale unvegetated vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland systems using alum sludge as main substrate.

    PubMed

    Babatunde, A O; Zhao, Y Q

    2009-01-01

    This research has two eventual goals: (1) To optimize performance of subsurface constructed wetlands for removal of phosphorus (P) (2) To demonstrate that dewatered alum sludge (a by-product), can be reused as a constructed wetland substrate. To achieve these, alum sludge from a water treatment plant was characterized and used as main substrate in four experimental vertical sub-surface flow constructed wetland systems treating dairy farm wastewater. Results show that the alum sludge has suitable hydraulic characteristics (uniformity coefficient = 3.6) for use as a substrate, and in the batch studies, up to 48.6 mg-P was removed by 1 g of the alum sludge at a P concentration of 360 mg-P/l and a dosage of 5 g/l. Results from the experimental systems highlight the significant P removal ability of the alum sludge. However, the inclusion of pea gravel at the infiltrative surface of some of the systems had a negative effect on the P removal performance. Sequential P-fractionation results show that there was no significant increase in the easily extractable P, but for total P, there was significant increase, although this was found to decrease with depth. This study shows that the novel use of dewatered alum sludge can bring about high P removal in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland systems.

  11. VALUING ACID MINE DRAINAGE REMEDIATION IN WEST VIRGINIA: A HEDONIC MODELING APPROACH INCORPORATING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    States with active and abandoned mines face large private and public costs to remediate damage to streams and rivers from acid mine drainage (AMD). Appalachian states have an especially large number of contaminated streams and rivers, and the USGS places AMD as the primary source...

  12. VALUING ACID MINE DRAINAGE REMEDIATION IN WEST VIRGINIA: A HEDONIC MODELING APPROACH INCORPORATING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    States with active and abandoned mines face large private and public costs to remediate damage to streams and rivers from acid mine drainage (AMD). Appalachian states have an especially large number of contaminated streams and rivers, and the USGS places AMD as the primary source...

  13. Investigation of denitrifying microbe communities within an agricultural drainage system fitted with low-grade weirs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhancing wetland characteristics in agricultural drainage ditches with the use of low-grade weirs, has been identified as a potential best management practice (BMP) to mitigate nutrient runoff from agriculture landscapes. This study examined microbe community abundance and diversity involved in den...

  14. Use of natural and applied tracers to guide targeted remediation efforts in an acid mine drainage system, Colorado Rockies, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowie, Rory; Williams, Mark W.; Wireman, Mike; Runkel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Stream water quality in areas of the western United States continues to be degraded by acid mine drainage (AMD), a legacy of hard-rock mining. The Rico-Argentine Mine in southwestern Colorado consists of complex multiple-level mine workings connected to a drainage tunnel discharging AMD to passive treatment ponds that discharge to the Dolores River. The mine workings are excavated into the hillslope on either side of a tributary stream with workings passing directly under the stream channel. There is a need to define hydrologic connections between surface water, groundwater, and mine workings to understand the source of both water and contaminants in the drainage tunnel discharge. Source identification will allow targeted remediation strategies to be developed. To identify hydrologic connections we employed a combination of natural and applied tracers including isotopes, ionic tracers, and fluorescent dyes. Stable water isotopes (δ18O/δD) show a well-mixed hydrological system, while tritium levels in mine waters indicate a fast flow-through system with mean residence times of years not decades or longer. Addition of multiple independent tracers indicated that water is traveling through mine workings with minimal obstructions. The results from a simultaneous salt and dye tracer application demonstrated that both tracer types can be successfully used in acidic mine water conditions.

  15. Drainage systems associated with mid-ocean channels and submarine Yazoos: Alternative to submarine fan depositional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, R. )

    1989-12-01

    Submarine drainage systems associated with mid-ocean channels and Yazoo River-type tributaries in small ocean basins represent a contrast to deep-sea fan depositional systems. Deep-sea fans are diverging sediment-dispersal systems of distributary fan valleys. Deep-sea channel-submarine-yazoo systems, on the other hand, form centripetally converging patterns of tributaries and yazoo-type satellite channels that join a major basin-draining (mid-ocean) channel. The facies model for such systems is characterized by randomly stacked fining-upward, gravelly, and sandy channel-fill and submarine point-bar sequences of the main channel encased in fine-grained overbank deposits. Second-order channels contain sandy proximal overbank deposits, whereas the levees of the main channel are predominantly composed of silt and clay. Second-order channels may be braided and may broaden into braid plains. Morphology and surficial sediment distribution have been studied within the Northwest Atlantic Mid-Ocean Channel of the Labrador Sea and its associated levees and yazoo-type (and other) tributaries.

  16. Combination of Successive Alkalinity Producing System (SAPS) and Aeration for Passive Treatment of Highly Acidic Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, C.; Ji, S.

    2015-12-01

    Passive treatment system has been widely used for remediation of mine drainage since its advantage of low installation and maintenance cost. The system, however, has also a disadvantage in assuring remediation and management efficiency if the drainage is highly acidic mine drainage. To remediate acid mine drainage (AMD) especially showing high acidity, passive treatment system which consists of successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) and subsequent aeration pond was proposed and its mechanisms and efficiency was evaluated in this research. Target AMD was obtained from Waryong coal mine and showed typical characteristics of AMD having high metal concentration and low pH (acidity > 300 mg/L as CaCO3). Four experimental cases were conducted; untreated, treated with SAPS, treated with aeration, treated with SAPS and aeration to compare role and mechanism of each unit. Between organic matter and limestone layer which constitute SAPS, the former eliminated most of Fe(III) and Al in the AMD so that the latter was kept from being clogged by precipitates. Net acidity of the AMD rapidly decreased by supplement of alkalinity at the limestone layer. A primary function of SAPS, producing alkalinity constantly without clogging, was attained due to addition a portion of limestone particle into the organic matter layer. The discharge from SAPS had low ORP and DO values because of an anaerobic environment formed at the organic matter layer although its alkalinity was increased. This water quality was unfavorable for Fe(II) to be oxidized. Installation of aeration pond after SAPS, therefore, could be effective way of enhancing oxidation rate of Fe(II). Among the experimental cases, the combination of SAPS and aeration pond was only able to remediate the AMD. This concluded that to remediate highly acidic mine drainage with passive treatment system, three critical conditions were required; pre-precipitation of Fe(III) and Al at organic matter layer in SAPS, constant alkalinity

  17. Identifying (subsurface) anthropogenic heat sources that influence temperature in the drinking water distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Vera, Claudia M.; Blokker, Mirjam; de Kater, Henk; Lafort, Rob

    2017-09-01

    The water temperature in the drinking water distribution system and at customers' taps approaches the surrounding soil temperature at a depth of 1 m. Water temperature is an important determinant of water quality. In the Netherlands drinking water is distributed without additional residual disinfectant and the temperature of drinking water at customers' taps is not allowed to exceed 25 °C. In recent decades, the urban (sub)surface has been getting more occupied by various types of infrastructures, and some of these can be heat sources. Only recently have the anthropogenic sources and their influence on the underground been studied on coarse spatial scales. Little is known about the urban shallow underground heat profile on small spatial scales, of the order of 10 m × 10 m. Routine water quality samples at the tap in urban areas have shown up locations - so-called hotspots - in the city, with relatively high soil temperatures - up to 7 °C warmer - compared to the soil temperatures in the surrounding rural areas. Yet the sources and the locations of these hotspots have not been identified. It is expected that with climate change during a warm summer the soil temperature in the hotspots can be above 25 °C. The objective of this paper is to find a method to identify heat sources and urban characteristics that locally influence the soil temperature. The proposed method combines mapping of urban anthropogenic heat sources, retrospective modelling of the soil temperature, analysis of water temperature measurements at the tap, and extensive soil temperature measurements. This approach provided insight into the typical range of the variation of the urban soil temperature, and it is a first step to identifying areas with potential underground heat stress towards thermal underground management in cities.

  18. Hydrogeology, ground-water movement, and subsurface storage in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    saltwater in the Floridan aquifer system probably is connate or unflushed seawater from high stands of sea level. The principal use of the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida is for subsurface storage of liquid waste. The Boulder Zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is extensively used as a receptacle for injected treated municipal wastewater, oil field brine, and, to a lesser extent, industrial wastewater. Pilot studies indicate a potential for cyclic storage of freshwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer in southern Florida.

  19. Biogeochemistry of the compost bioreactor components of a composite acid mine drainage passive remediation system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie; Hallberg, Kevin B

    2005-02-01

    The compost bioreactor ("anaerobic cell") components of three composite passive remediation systems constructed to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) at the former Wheal Jane tin mine, Cornwall, UK were studied over a period of 16 months. While there was some amelioration of the preprocessed AMD in each of the three compost bioreactors, as evidenced by pH increase and decrease in metal concentrations, only one of the cells showed effective removal of the two dominant heavy metals (iron and zinc) present. With two of the compost bioreactors, concentrations of soluble (ferrous) iron draining the cells were significantly greater than those entering the reactors, indicating that there was net mobilisation (by reductive dissolution) of colloidal and/or solid-phase ferric iron compounds within the cells. Soluble sulfide was also detected in waters draining all three compost bioreactors which was rapidly oxidised, in contrast to ferrous iron. Oxidation and hydrolysis of iron, together with sulfide oxidation, resulted in reacidification of processed AMD downstream of the compost bioreactors in two of the passive treatment systems. The dominant cultivatable microorganism in waters draining the compost bioreactors was identified, via analysis of its 16S rRNA gene, as a Thiomonas sp. and was capable of accelerating the dissimilatory oxidation of both ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were also detected, although only in the bioreactor that was performing well were these present in significant numbers. This particular compost bioreactor had been shut down for 10 months prior to the monitoring period due to operational problems. This unforeseen event appears to have allowed more successful development of AMD-tolerant and other microbial populations with critical roles in AMD bioremediation, including neutrophilic SRB (nSRB), in this compost bioreactor than in the other two, where the throughput of AMD was not interrupted. This study has

  20. Surface and subsurface inspection of food safety and quality using a line-scan Raman system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents a line-scan Raman platform for food safety and quality research, which can be configured for Raman chemical imaging (RCI) mode for surface inspection and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) mode for subsurface inspection. In the RCI mode, macro-scale imaging was achieved u...

  1. Effect of surface inlet type on suspended sediment transported through a subsurface drain tile system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Throughout the Prairie Pothole Region, subsurface tile and surface inlets are used to remove water from low-lying or poorly-drained soils. Open inlets are being increasingly converted to buried inlets in which perforated tile is placed in a trench of rock (i.e., a French drain) and buried below a la...

  2. Alternative study of type and location of flood control infrastructure in the drainage system, Avfour Kelor channel, Tuban regency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabrang, Rangga Adi; Wardoyo, Wasis

    2017-06-01

    The topography of Tuban Regency which is close to the sea has both advantage and disadvantage. The advantage is the main channels of drainage can be directly discharged into the sea, while the disadvantage is the flow of the channels will be influenced by the sea tide. However, the absence of the channel capacity of drainage to load the runoff from the catchment area of Afvour Kelor channel led to inundations in the downstream and upstream. In addition, in the middle of the downstream and the upstream of Afvour Kelor channel, precisely in the Perbon Village, inundation frequently takes place particularly in the rainy season. It is allegedly caused by, the extreme runoff from the catchment area of Afvour Kelor channel, in addition to the influence of the sea tide. Due to the prevailing problem and the absence of the solution from the related institutions, the effort to manage drainage system in the area through the debit arrangement of runoff of Afvour Kelor cannel is urgently required. There were 3 (three) flood control scenarios that were simulated in this research. The scenarios in this research consisted of: to join the plan from the location of 7 (seven) ponds, 1 (one) pond at a predetermined location, and normalization of the channel. Subsequently, the most optimal scenario would be selected and reviewed based on the water surface profile in the cross section of the lowest Avfour Kelor channel.

  3. Numerical modelling on fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in an unsaturated subsurface system for varying source scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, M.; Vasudevan, M.; Kumar, G. Suresh; Nambi, Indumathi M.

    2015-04-01

    The vertical transport of petroleum hydrocarbons from a surface spill through an unsaturated subsurface system is of major concern in assessing the vulnerability of groundwater contamination. A realistic representation on fate and transport of volatile organic compounds at different periods after spill is quite challenging due to the variation in the source behaviour at the surface of spill as well as the variation in the hydrodynamic parameters and the associated inter-phase partitioning coefficients within the subsurface. In the present study, a one dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of benzene in an unsaturated subsurface system considering the effect of volatilization, dissolution, adsorption and microbial degradation of benzene for (i) constant continuous source, (ii) continuous decaying source, and (iii) residual source. The numerical results suggest that volatilization is the important sink for contaminant removal considering the soil air migration within the unsaturated zone. It is also observed that the coupled effect of dissolution and volatilization is important for the decaying source at the surface immediately after the spill, whereas rate-limited dissolution from residually entrapped source is responsible for the extended contamination towards later period.

  4. Metabolic Strategies in Energy-Limited Microbial Communities in the Anoxic Subsurface (Frasassi Cave System, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Jones, D. S.; Schaperdoth, I.; Steinberg, L.; Macalady, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Two major sources of energy, light and chemical potential, are available to microorganisms. However, energy is not always abundant and is often a limiting factor in microbial survival and replication. The anoxic, terrestrial subsurface offers a unique opportunity to study microorganisms and their potentially novel metabolic strategies that are relevant for understanding biogeochemistry and biosignatures as related to the non-photosynthetic, energy-limited environments on the modern and ancient Earth and elsewhere in the solar system. Geochemical data collected in a remote stratified lake 600 m below ground surface in the sulfidic Frasassi cave system (Italy) suggest that little redox energy is available for life, consistent with low signal from domain-specific FISH probes. The carbon isotope signatures of biofilms (-33‰) and DIC (-9‰) in the anoxic water suggest in situ production by lithoautotrophs using RuBisCO. 16S rDNA libraries constructed from the biofilm are dominated by diverse sulfate reducing bacteria. The remaining bacterial and archaeal clones affiliate with more than 11 major uncultivated or novel prokaryotic lineages. Diverse dsrAB gene sequences are consistent with high sulfate concentrations and undetectable or extremely low oxygen, nitrate, and iron concentrations. However, the electron donor for sulfate reduction is unclear. Methane is detectable in the anoxic water although no 16S rDNA sequences associated with known methanogens or anaerobic methane oxidizers were retrieved. mcrA gene sequences retrieved from the biofilm by cloning are not related to cultivated methanogens or to known anaerobic methane oxidizers. Non-purgable organic carbon (NPOC) is below detection limits (i.e. <42 μM acetate) suggesting that alternative electron donors or novel metabolisms may be important. A sample collected by cave divers in October 2009 was pyrosequenced at the Pennsylvania State University Genomics Core Facility using Titanium chemistry (454 Life

  5. Modeling Subsurface Heterogeneity and River Aquifer Interactions in an Alluvial Fan System - Implications for River Flow Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Niswonger, R.; Fogg, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Diminishing fall flows in the Cosumnes River in Sacramento County, California have led to declining fall runs of endangered Chinook salmon. Severe overdraft of the regional aquifer over the last 60 years has drawn down groundwater levels below the elevation of the channel over extended reaches of the river, practically eliminating baseflows. Efforts to restore Chinook salmon fall runs have led to investigations of river aquifer interactions along the lower Cosumnes River with the aim of building simulation models of river aquifer interactions that can guide the development of management strategies to restore fall flows. Simulations of regional groundwater flow indicate that large reductions in groundwater pumping over extended time periods would be necessary to reconnect the channel with the regional aquifer. Surface flow augmentation and artificial recharge could provide alternative short and long term measures to enhance fall flows. Field measurements suggest complex interactions between the river and the subsurface, including the formation of perched aquifers above the regional water table, that are not captured by the coarse regional model. Subsurface heterogeneities in the alluvial aquifer system, which is characterized by a large proportion of fine-grained sediments, seem to exert important local and intermediate scale controls on the exchange between the river and aquifer. Subsurface heterogeneities in a 420 sqkm area around the river, are simulated with a transition probability / Markov-Chain based three dimensional geostatistical model. Results from the geostatistical model are used as a basis for simulations of river aquifer interactions including variably saturated flow below the river channel. Results will quantify the role of subsurface heterogeneity on river aquifer exchange in a river aquifer system that is disconnected by an unsaturated zone and could provide guidelines for fall flow restoration in the Cosumnes River.

  6. The role of the lymphatic system in drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and aqueous humour.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, M W; Cole, D F

    1980-02-01

    1. The jugular lymphatic trunks were cannulated in anaesthetized rabbits and cats. Over 6-8 hr, the mean lymph flow was 2.3 microliters min-1 in the rabbit (one side only) and 5.0 microliters min-1 in the cat (sum of both sides). 2. After a single injection of radio-iodinated albumin into a lateral cerebral ventricle without significant rise in pressure, a mean of 14.4% of the radioactivity was recovered in deep cervical lymph of one side in the rabbit and of 12.9% in that of both sides in the cat. 3. During slow infusion of [125I]albumin and fluorescent dextran of 150,000 mol. wt. into a lateral ventricle of the cat at 20 microliters min-1, radioactivity and fluorescence reached plateaus in deep cervical lymph at 47.4 and 50.0% of their concentrations in cisternal c.s.f. respectively. 4. No significant radioactivity, other than from blood, was detected in superficial cervical lymph after intraventricular injection of radio-iodinated albumin in the cat. 5. No significant radioactivity, other than from blood, was detected in deep cervical lymph of the rabbit or in deep and superficial cervical lymph of the cat within 6 hr after injection of radio-iodinated albumin into the aqueous humour or orbital fat. 6. Gradients of radioactivity in tissues within the orbit suggested that there is a small flow of c.s.f., 0.05-0.15 microliters min-1 in the rabbit, passing centrifugally along the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve, through the posterior part of the globe and into the orbital tissue. Also a small proportion of aqueous humour, 1-2% or more, drains through the anterior sclera into the surrounding tissue. 7. A substantial quantity of cerebrospinal fluid drains into the deep cervical lymphatic system of the rabbit, 30% or more, and of the cat, 10-15% or more. The small component of aqueous humour drainage passing through the wall of the glove does not enter cervical lymph within 6 hr, if at all.

  7. Design, implementation and results of an autonomous hydrogeophysical monitoring system to monitor subsurface flow at the Hanford 300 area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Ward, A.

    2007-12-01

    Time lapse electrical data (both self potential and electrical resistivity data) can provide information on subsurface flow, and over the last several years there has been an increase in the interest of automating hydrogeophysical data acquisition systems. Such systems require both adaptations to hardware and system setup, and a well designed computational backend allowing for the management and processing of such data. The 300 area at Hanford is the location of multiple DOE Office of Science and Environmental Management funded research efforts which seek to understand the groundwater and contaminant behavior at this site. The groundwater head distribution and resulting flow at this site is known to be strongly influenced by the adjacent Columbia river, and there is an interest in mapping out the spatiotemporal flow directions at this site. The site has been extensively characterized using electrical resistivity measurements, and the geometries and resistivities of subsurface formations are well known both from borings and geophysical characterization efforts. In addition, the overall Hanford 300 area contains 8 continuously recording wells which monitor groundwater level and conductivity at the site at 15 minute intervals, as well as adjacent monitoring stations which record river stage. An autonomous, one hundred electrode SP system was installed at the Hanford 300 area over a 300 x 300 m sub part of the site. Data from both the hydrological sensors and geophysical systems is collected automatically, and transferred to a central database server located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Once data is arrived, data qa/qc and data reduction are run automatically to create time lapse maps of self potential values. We will discuss the design, implementation and results obtained with this system (including ongoing modeling and inversion efforts for the data collected with these systems) as well as the potential of these hydrogeophysical monitoring systems to provide

  8. Insights into the ancient Mississippi drainage system from detrital zircons analyses of the modern Mississippi deep-sea fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fildani, A.; McKay, M. P.; Stockli, D. F.; Clark, J. D.; Weislogel, A. L.; Dykstra, M.; Hessler, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The modern Mississippi deep-sea fan is a large-scale accumulation of Quaternary sediment deposited in the Gulf of Mexico by the modern Mississippi River via the Mississippi delta. The Mississippi River has a well-characterized drainage system extending across North America from the western Rocky Mountains to the Appalachians in the east. Deep-water sand samples of buried channel-fill and lobe deposits of the Mississippi fan from selected Sites of Leg 96 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and were integrated with USGS piston core samples from the most recent lobe for detrital zircon U-Pb isotopic analysis. Since the modern Mississippi River has a well-known catchment, the detrital zircon age 'signal' observed in the deep-water sediments can therefore be used as an actualistic study of the detrital zircon provenance signatures resulting from modern drainage patterns. Based on this approach, we compare this dataset with published data and observe minor variability in the detrital zircon signature through time. Populations sourced from the Western North American Cordillera are consistent through time in terms of ages, however Paleocene sediments are slightly enriched in Yavapai-Mazatzal zircons sourced from southwestern continental U.S.. Grenville- and Appalachian-derived zircons reflect minor variation in sediment input from the Appalachian Mountains and related deposits in the eastern Mississippi River catchment. When compared to published Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation detrital zircon data, the Paleocene published dataset and the newly acquired modern sands are partly depleted of Appalachian-derived zircons. This paucity in Appalachian age zircon in Paleocene-to-modern sediments suggests a reconfiguration of the Mississippi River drainage prior to Tertiary time. Since this realignment, the Mississippi River drainage has remained relatively unchanged. Piston core samples from the most recent lobe yielded zircons indicating a recent influx of Appalachian

  9. Drainage basins and channel incision on Mars.

    PubMed

    Aharonson, Oded; Zuber, Maria T; Rothman, Daniel H; Schorghofer, Norbert; Whipple, Kelin X

    2002-02-19

    Measurements acquired by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on board the Mars Global Surveyor indicate that large drainage systems on Mars have geomorphic characteristics inconsistent with prolonged erosion by surface runoff. We find the topography has not evolved to an expected equilibrium terrain form, even in areas where runoff incision has been previously interpreted. By analogy with terrestrial examples, groundwater sapping may have played an important role in the incision. Longitudinally flat floor segments may provide a direct indication of lithologic layers in the bedrock, altering subsurface hydrology. However, it is unlikely that floor levels are entirely due to inherited structures due to their planar cross-cutting relations. These conclusions are based on previously unavailable observations, including extensive piece-wise linear longitudinal profiles, frequent knickpoints, hanging valleys, and small basin concavity exponents.

  10. Drainage discharge impacts on hydrology and water quality of receiving streams in the wheatbelt of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Riasat; Silberstein, Richard; Byrne, John; Hodgson, Geoff

    2013-11-01

    The use of surface and subsurface drainage to manage waterlogging and salinity in dryland (rainfed) and irrigated agricultural systems is common throughout the world. The drainage systems often discharge into natural streams. The same is true for the wheatbelt drainage systems in south-western Australia, where 11,000 km (ABS 2003) of artificial drains have been constructed within the last two decades. Prior to this study, the likely impacts of this discharge on the streambed chemistry and water quality of receiving streams were largely unknown. The study evaluated these impacts in creeks receiving the drainage discharge from engineering options in four river systems in south-western Australia. This study clearly showed elevated levels of metals ions, EC and pH in the stream water at treated sites relative to their levels at untreated sites. At most sites, impacts of drainage discharge were observed on the streambed electrical conductivity (EC) and pH (both in 1:5 extract) in the receiving streams; however, there was little evidence of impact on metal ion content in the streambed soil. The study found no clear differences in the dynamics of the watertable adjacent to streams whether they received drainage discharge or not, irrespective of the size of the artificial drainage systems.

  11. Reconnecting tile drainage to riparian buffer hydrology for enhanced nitrate removal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Riparian buffers are a proven practice for removing NO3 from both overland flow and shallow groundwater. However, in landscapes with artificial subsurface (tile) drainage most of the subsurface flow leaving fields is passed through the buffers in drainage pipes leaving little opportunity for NO3 rem...

  12. Modeling Effects of Subsurface Heterogeneity on River Aquifer Interaction in an Alluvial Fan System - Implications for River Flow Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Suzuki, E.; Fogg, G. E.

    2001-12-01

    Decreasing fall flows in the Cosumnes River in Sacramento County, California have led to declining fish populations of endangered Chinook salmon. Severe overdraft of the regional aquifer over the last 70 years has resulted in a hydraulic disconnection between the groundwater system and extended reaches of the river, practically eliminating baseflows. Efforts to restore Chinook salmon fall runs have resulted in investigations of river aquifer interactions along the lower Cosumnes River. Aim of these investigations is to build simulation models of river aquifer interactions that can guide the development of management strategies to restore fall flows. Preliminary simulations of regional groundwater flow indicate that large reductions in groundwater pumping would be necessary to hydraulically reconnect the channel with the regional aquifer. However flow augmentation and artificial recharge could provide alternative short and long term measures to enhance fall flows. Field measurements of seepage losses from the river channel suggest complex interactions between the river and the subsurface that are not captured by the coarse regional model, which simulates river seepage through a uniform streambed layer into a homogeneous aquifer. It is rather assumed that subsurface heterogeneity including laterally extensive low conductivity layers above and below the groundwater table exerts important local controls on the exchange between the river and aquifer. Low conductivity layers, like paleosols and hardpans, are commonly found in the alluvial sediments forming the regional aquifer system and can decrease river seepage where they outcrop in the channel. Under certain conditions these layers can also perch water above the regional groundwater table and cause seepage into the river channel as suggested by influent seepage-meter measurements. To account for these phenomena in river aquifer exchange variably saturated flow simulations as well as a detailed representation of

  13. A geographic information system screening tool to tackle diffuse pollution through the use of sustainable drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Zorica; Breton, Neil P

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable drainage systems (SUDS) offer many benefits that traditional solutions do not. Traditional approaches are unable to offer a solution to problems of flood management and water quality. Holistic consideration of the wide range of benefits from SUDS can result in advantages such as improved flood resilience and water quality enhancement through consideration of diffuse pollution sources. Using a geographical information system (GIS) approach, diffuse pollutant sources and opportunities for SUDS are easily identified. Consideration of potential SUDS locations results in source, site and regional controls, leading to improved water quality (to meet Water Framework Directive targets). The paper will discuss two different applications of the tool, the first of which is where the pollutant of interest is known. In this case the outputs of the tool highlight and isolate the areas contributing the pollutants and suggest the adequate SUDS measures to meet the required criteria. The second application is where the tool identifies likely pollutants at a receiving location, and SUDS measures are proposed to reduce pollution with assessed efficiencies.

  14. Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

    2006-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

  15. Agricultural drainage water management: Potential impact and implementation strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The unique soil and climate of the Upper Mississippi River Basin (and the Lake Erie Basin) area provide the resources for bountiful agricultural production. Agricultural drainage (both surface and subsurface drainage) is essential for achieving economically viable crop production and management. Dra...

  16. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  17. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-11-16

    table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  18. Genomic comparisons of a bacterial lineage that inhabits both marine and terrestrial deep subsurface systems.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rappé, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that diverse, poorly characterized microorganisms reside deep within Earth's crust. One such lineage of deep subsurface-dwelling bacteria is an uncultivated member of the Firmicutes phylum that can dominate molecular surveys from both marine and continental rock fracture fluids, sometimes forming the sole member of a single-species microbiome. Here, we reconstructed a genome from basalt-hosted fluids of the deep subseafloor along the eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge flank and used a phylogenomic analysis to show that, despite vast differences in geographic origin and habitat, it forms a monophyletic clade with the terrestrial deep subsurface genome of "Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator" MP104C. While a limited number of differences were observed between the marine genome of "Candidatus Desulfopertinax cowenii" modA32 and its terrestrial relative that may be of potential adaptive importance, here it is revealed that the two are remarkably similar thermophiles possessing the genetic capacity for motility, sporulation, hydrogenotrophy, chemoorganotrophy, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and the ability to fix inorganic carbon via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for chemoautotrophic growth. Our results provide insights into the genetic repertoire within marine and terrestrial members of a bacterial lineage that is widespread in the global deep subsurface biosphere, and provides a natural means to investigate adaptations specific to these two environments.

  19. Genomic comparisons of a bacterial lineage that inhabits both marine and terrestrial deep subsurface systems

    PubMed Central

    Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that diverse, poorly characterized microorganisms reside deep within Earth’s crust. One such lineage of deep subsurface-dwelling bacteria is an uncultivated member of the Firmicutes phylum that can dominate molecular surveys from both marine and continental rock fracture fluids, sometimes forming the sole member of a single-species microbiome. Here, we reconstructed a genome from basalt-hosted fluids of the deep subseafloor along the eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge flank and used a phylogenomic analysis to show that, despite vast differences in geographic origin and habitat, it forms a monophyletic clade with the terrestrial deep subsurface genome of “Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator” MP104C. While a limited number of differences were observed between the marine genome of “Candidatus Desulfopertinax cowenii” modA32 and its terrestrial relative that may be of potential adaptive importance, here it is revealed that the two are remarkably similar thermophiles possessing the genetic capacity for motility, sporulation, hydrogenotrophy, chemoorganotrophy, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and the ability to fix inorganic carbon via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for chemoautotrophic growth. Our results provide insights into the genetic repertoire within marine and terrestrial members of a bacterial lineage that is widespread in the global deep subsurface biosphere, and provides a natural means to investigate adaptations specific to these two environments. PMID:28396823

  20. Genomic comparisons of a bacterial lineage that inhabits both marine and terrestrial deep subsurface systems

    DOE PAGES

    Jungbluth, Sean P.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G.; ...

    2017-04-06

    It is generally accepted that diverse, poorly characterized microorganisms reside deep within Earth’s crust. One such lineage of deep subsurface-dwelling bacteria is an uncultivated member of the Firmicutes phylum that can dominate molecular surveys from both marine and continental rock fracture fluids, sometimes forming the sole member of a single-species microbiome. Here, we reconstructed a genome from basalt-hosted fluids of the deep subseafloor along the eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge flank and used a phylogenomic analysis to show that, despite vast differences in geographic origin and habitat, it forms a monophyletic clade with the terrestrial deep subsurface genome of “Candidatusmore » Desulforudis audaxviator” MP104C. While a limited number of differences were observed between the marine genome of “Candidatus Desulfopertinax cowenii” modA32 and its terrestrial relative that may be of potential adaptive importance, here it is revealed that the two are remarkably similar thermophiles possessing the genetic capacity for motility, sporulation, hydrogenotrophy, chemoorganotrophy, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and the ability to fix inorganic carbon via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for chemoautotrophic growth. Finally, our results provide insights into the genetic repertoire within marine and terrestrial members of a bacterial lineage that is widespread in the global deep subsurface biosphere, and provides a natural means to investigate adaptations specific to these two environments.« less

  1. Morphotectonic evolution of the Alhama de Murcia strike-slip fault overprinting drainage systems inherited from Late Miocene extension (Western Mediterranean-Eastern Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater Gómez, Marta; Booth Rea, Guillermo; Azañón, José Miguel; Pérez Peña, José Vicente; Masana, Eulàlia

    2013-04-01

    The adaptation of drainage systems to the evolution of tectonic structures offers important clues to the tectonic regime present in an area and to the tectonic changes that have occurred. The development of new mountain fronts can produce the abandonment of earlier drainage networks by way of fluvial captures. He we analyse the response of a drainage network inherited from late Miocene extension to tectonic forcing associated to the growth and activity of the Alhama de Murcia sinistral strike-slip in a new transpressive tectonic setting. Rock uplift related to the Alhama de Murcia strike-slip fault and associated structures are conditioning the recent drainage network; overprinting the previous extensional related drainage. We carried out a structural and a qualitative and quantitative relief analysis to understand how the relief has evolved and which are the main active structures that currently control the drainage configuration. We identify river capture sites and we present a geomorphic index analysis using SLk anomalies, hypsometric curves, mountain front sinuosity, the comparison between longitudinal and projected river profiles with the SLk values and the position of active faults and folds, and a slope analysis of the area. The results show: 1) the reactivation of the ending part of the main basins by the current uplift of the Sierra de la Tercia, 2) progressive capture processes related to the growth of the Rambla de Lebor and Totana transverse drainages upon the previous drainage, evidenced by the presence of wind gaps, abrupt changes in flow direction, oblique relationship between current river direction and paleosurfaces maximum slope direction and changes in the lithologic composition of terraces, and 3) basin shapes controlled by the interference between an old NE-SW-directed drainage network controlled by extensional structures and another NW-SE one controlled by the sinistral Alhama de Murcia Fault.

  2. [Treatment of marine-aquaculture effluent by the multi-soil-layer (MSL) system and subsurface flow constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Huang, Yu-ting; Ge, Chuan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Zhi-jianz; Luo, An-cheng

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using multi-soil-layer (MSL) system and subsurface flow constructed wetland to treat the wastewater of marine cultured Penaeus vannamei and to determine the suitable process for the local aquaculture wastewater pollution characteristics. In this study, MSL system and four constructed wetland systems with Spartina anglica, Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia and unplanted system were evaluated for their potentials of pollutants removal capacity. The results showed the average removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), ammonia nitrogen (NH(4)+ -N) and nitrate (NO-(3) -N) by MSL system were 80. 38% ± 2. 14% , 68. 14% ± 3.51% , 40.79% ± 3. 10% , 42. 68% ± 2.90% and 54. 19% ± 5. 15% , respectively. Additionally, the ability of pollutants removal of other four wetland systems decreased in the order: Spartina anglica, Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia and unplanted system.

  3. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Johnson, T.M.; Tanji, K.K.; Gao, S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%o) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(O), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%o) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%o) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  4. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems.

    PubMed

    Herbel, Mitchell J; Johnson, Thomas M; Tanji, Kenneth K; Gao, Suduan; Bullen, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(0), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  5. Study on nitrogen removal enhanced by shunt distributing wastewater in a constructed subsurface infiltration system under intermittent operation mode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghua; Li, Haibo; Sun, Tieheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-05-15

    Subsurface wastewater infiltration system is an efficient and economic technology in treating small scattered sewage. The removal rates are generally satisfactory in terms of COD, BOD(5), TP and SS removal; while nitrogen removal is deficient in most of the present operating SWIS due to the different requirements for the presence of oxygen for nitrification and denitrification processes. To study the enhanced nitrogen removal technologies, two pilot subsurface wastewater infiltration systems were constructed in a village in Shenyang, China. The filled matrix was a mixture of 5% activated sludge, 65% brown soil and 30% coal slag in volume ratio for both systems. Intermittent operation mode was applied in to supply sufficient oxygen to accomplish the nitrification; meanwhile sewage was supplemented as the carbon source to the lower part in to denitrify. The constructed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems worked successfully under wetting-drying ratio of 1:1 with hydraulic loading of 0.081 m(3)/(m(2)d) for over 4 months. Carbon source was supplemented with shunt ratio of 1:1 and shunt position at the depth of 0.5m. The experimental results showed that intermittent operation mode and carbon source supplementation could significantly enhance the nitrogen removal efficiency with little influence on COD and TP removal. The average removal efficiencies for NH(3)-N and TN were 87.7 ± 1.4 and 70.1 ± 1.0%, increased by 12.5 ± 1.0 and 8.6 ± 0.7%, respectively.

  6. In situ bacterial selenate reduction in the agricultural drainage systems of western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Steinberg, N.A.; Presser, T.S.; Miller, L.G.

    1991-01-01

    Dissimilatory in situ selenate reduction to elemental selenium in sediments from irrigated agricultural drainage regions of western Nevada was measured at ambient Se oxyanion concentrations. Selenate reduction was rapid, with turnover rate constants ranging from 0.04 to 1.8 h-1 at total Se concentrations in pore water of 13 to 455 nM. Estimates of removal rates of selenium oxyanions were 14, 38, and 155 ??mol m-2 day-1 for South Lead Lake, Massie Slough, and Hunter Drain, respectively.

  7. Phosphorus fate, management, and modeling in artificially drained systems.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Peter J A; Smith, Douglas R; Bolster, Carl H; Easton, Zachary M

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) losses in agricultural drainage waters, both surface and subsurface, are among the most difficult form of nonpoint source pollution to mitigate. This special collection of papers on P in drainage waters documents the range of field conditions leading to P loss in drainage water, the potential for drainage and nutrient management practices to control drainage losses of P, and the ability of models to represent P loss to drainage systems. A review of P in tile drainage and case studies from North America, Europe, and New Zealand highlight the potential for artificial drainage to exacerbate watershed loads of dissolved and particulate P via rapid, bypass flow and shorter flow path distances. Trade-offs are identified in association with drainage intensification, tillage, cover crops, and manure management. While P in drainage waters tends to be tied to surface sources of P (soil, amendments or vegetation) that are in highest concentration, legacy sources of P may occur at deeper depths or other points along drainage flow paths. Most startling, none of the major fate-and-transport models used to predict management impacts on watershed P losses simulate the dominant processes of P loss to drainage waters. Because P losses to drainage waters can be so difficult to manage and to model, major investment are needed (i) in systems that can provide necessary drainage for agronomic production while detaining peak flows and promoting P retention and (ii) in models that can adequately describe P loss to drainage waters.

  8. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and

  9. Best Practice -- Subsurface Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott

    2010-03-01

    These best practices for Subsurface Survey processes were developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and later shared and formalized by a sub-committee, under the Electrical Safety Committee of EFCOG. The developed best practice is best characterized as a Tier II (enhanced) survey process for subsurface investigations. A result of this process has been an increase in the safety and lowering of overall cost, when utility hits and their related costs are factored in. The process involves improving the methodology and thoroughness of the survey and reporting processes; or improvement in tool use rather than in the tools themselves. It is hoped that the process described here can be implemented at other sites seeking to improve their Subsurface Investigation results with little upheaval to their existing system.

  10. Impact of a real-time controlled wastewater subsurface drip disposal system on the selected chemical properties of a vertisol.

    PubMed

    Hea, Jiajie; Dougherty, Mark; Arriaga, Francisco J; AbdelGadir, Abdelaziz H

    2013-01-01

    The operation of onsite septic effluent disposal without considering seasonal moisture changes in drain field conditions can be a major cause of the failure of conventional septic systems. This study addressed this issue from a soil hydraulic perspective by using real-time drain field soil moisture levels to limit septic effluent disposal in a vertisol via subsurface drip irrigation. A prototype system was field-tested in a Houston clay soil and results describe the subsequent impact on selected soil chemical properties. After one year of hydraulic dosing with a synthetic wastewater, soil total carbon and nitrogen concentrations increased, but no increase in soil total phosphorus concentration was observed. Soil NO3-N leaching potential was noted, but soil NH4-N concentrations decreased, which could be ascribed to NH4-N nitrification, fixation within clay sheets and NH3 volatilization. Soil K+, Mg2+ and Na+ concentrations increased in soil layers above the drip lines, but decreased in soil layers below drip lines. Soil electrical conductivity accordingly increased in soil layers above drip lines, but the range was significantly lower than the threshold for soil salinity. Although the moisture-controlled effluent disposal strategy successfully avoided hydraulic dosing during unfavourable wet drain field conditions and prevented accumulation of soil salts in the soil profile beneath the drip lines, soil salts tended to accumulate in top soil layers. These adverse effects warrant system corrections before large-scale implementation of subsurface drip irrigation of effluent in similar vertisols.

  11. Subsurface Electromagnetic Target Characterization and Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    B. Subsurface Electromagnetic Video Pulse Radar System 5 C. The Subsurface Targets 11 D. Raw Measured Waveforms 14 E. Processed Waveforms 15 III...259 r i. I .. . . .... .. . . . . .;. . . . .. .. o _ • v . . • • • -• -. . .. -"... .. . II II LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 The subsurface pulse ...7 3 Typical raw waveform received by the pulse radar system ..... ................... .i..... 9 4 Physical characteristics of the subsurface

  12. Surface, Subsurface and Atmosphere Exchanges on the Satellites of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Giese, B.; Hurford, T. A.; Lopes, R. M.; Nimmo, F.; Postberg, F.; Retherford, K. D.; Schmidt, J.; Spencer, J. R.; Tokano, T.; Turtle, E. P.

    2010-06-01

    The surface morphology of icy moons is affected by several processes implicating exchanges between their subsurfaces and atmospheres (if any). The possible exchange of material between the subsurface and the surface is mainly determined by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere, which isolates the deep, warm and ductile ice material from the cold surface conditions. Exchanges through this layer occur only if it is sufficiently thin and/or if it is fractured owing to tectonic stresses, melt intrusion or impact cratering. If such conditions are met, cryomagma can be released, erupting fresh volatile-rich materials onto the surface. For a very few icy moons (Titan, Triton, Enceladus), the emission of gas associated with cryovolcanic activity is sufficiently large to generate an atmosphere, either long-lived or transient. For those moons, atmosphere-driven processes such as cryovolcanic plume deposition, phase transitions of condensable materials and wind interactions continuously re-shape their surfaces, and are able to transport cryovolcanically generated materials on a global scale. In this chapter, we discuss the physics of these different exchange processes and how they affect the evolution of the satellites’ surfaces.

  13. A computational-grid based system for continental drainage network extraction using SRTM digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, David W.; Fielding, Eric J.; Pohl, Josef M.; Cheng, Tsan-Huei

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new effort for the computation of elevation derivatives using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) results. Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) SRTM has produced a near global database of highly accurate elevation data. The scope of this database enables computing precise stream drainage maps and other derivatives on Continental scales. We describe a computing architecture for this computationally very complex task based on NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), a distributed high performance computing network based on the GLOBUS infrastructure. The SRTM data characteristics and unique problems they present are discussed. A new algorithm for organizing the conventional extraction algorithms [1] into a cooperating parallel grid is presented as an essential component to adapt to the IPG computing structure. Preliminary results are presented for a Southern California test area, established for comparing SRTM and its results against those produced using the USGS National Elevation Data (NED) model.

  14. Learning from the operation, pathology and maintenance of a bioretention system to optimize urban drainage practices.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Marina Batalini; Rosa, Altair; do Lago, César Ambrogi Ferreira; Mendiondo, Eduardo Mario; de Souza, Vladimir Caramori Borges

    2017-09-13

    LID practices for runoff control are increasingly being used as an integrated solution in urban drainage, helping to achieve hydrological balance close to the pre-urbanized period and decrease the diffuse pollution transported to urban rivers. Regarding bioretention, there is already broad knowledge about the detention of peak flows and their treatment capacity for many pollutants. However, there are still few field studies in microdrainage scale, which analyze the actual operation of these devices and raise common problems found, especially in subtropical climate. Therefore, this study aims to show what was learnt from the field operation of a bioretention cell on a micro-drainage scale, located in an urban catchment of a Brazilian city, suggesting maintenance actions as adaptations to the pathologies found. Five rainy events were monitored during the dry season, in order to carry out a preliminary analysis for critical conditions in terms of maintenance and diffuse pollution accumulation. From the first water balance results, low storage and low infiltration capacity of the soil were found as main pathologies. They led to a great amount of runoff passing directly through the cell surface and at a high velocity, resulting in soil erosion and low water retention efficiency. To overcome these problems, some structural adaptations were made over the cell, highlighting the semi-direct injection. The maintenance and adaptations proposed were suitable to avoid the erosion process, increasing the storage and improving the water retention efficiency in bioretention. They should be considered from the very initial stages, to using sites with low permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems With Elevated Manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, H.; Zhang, G.; Burgos, W.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment samples were collected from two coal mine drainage treatment sites in western Pennsylvania. Both of the sites use constructed limestone beds to passively treat acidic coal mine drainage containing elevated manganese (Mn). Site #1 has influent manganese of 150 mg/L and effluent manganese between 40-100 mg/L. Site #2 has influent manganese of 20 mg/L and effluent manganese of less than 0.5 mg/L. Large quantities of black crusts were deposited throughout the beds at both sites. X-ray diffraction showed these crusts constituted of buserite, which is a layered structure manganese oxide mineral. Both culture-dependent and nucleic acid- based techniques were used to characterize the bacterial and fungal communities in these beds. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that bacterial communities were very diverse and included Cyanobacter, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidete, Planctomyceta, Acidobacter, Actinobacter and Gemmatimonade taxa. The archaeal diversity was lower and most sequences were related to uncultivated species. Two Mn-oxidizing fungi strains were isolated from one of the sites. One of the fungi is capable of oxidizing Mn(II) at both low and netural pH (3-7) while the other fungi can only oxidze Mn(II) at circumneutral pH. 18S rRNA gene analysis showed the low pH Mn-oxidizing fungus was closely related to Menispora tortuosa, Chaetosphaeria curvispora and Kionochaeta spissa, and the circumneutral Mn-oxidizing fungus was closely related to Myrothecium verrucaria, Didymostilbe echinofibrosa and Myrothecium roridum.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of Sulfur Modified Iron for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where subsurface drainage practices are employed, fertilizer nutrients and pesticides applied on farm fields and municipal locations are commonly intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged into local streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on these surface water bodies. On-site water filter treatment systems can be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. Sulfur modified iron is a relatively unknown industrial product that may have promise for use as a filter material to remove contaminants from subsurface drainage waters. Sulfur modified iron (SMI) is a high surface area iron powder (zero valent iron) that has been altered via chemical reaction with pure sulfur to produce a sulfur/iron surface coating on the iron particles. A laboratory investigation was conducted with contaminant removal batch tests, saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments to evaluate the feasibility for using SMI to treat subsurface drainage waters. Contaminant removal batch tests showed that three SMI samples were much more effective removing nitrate (> 94% nitrate removed) than three zero valent iron samples (< 10% nitrate removed). Batch test results additionally showed that SMI removed greater that 94% of dissolved phosphate, but was not particularly effective removing the pesticide, atrazine (< 37% atrazine removed). Hydraulic conductivity tests indicated that all three SMI samples that were evaluated had sufficient hydraulic conductivity, much greater than the 1 x 10-3 cm/s standard used for stormwater sand filters. The saturated solute transport tests confirmed that SMI can be effective removing nitrate and phosphate from drainage waters. Analysis of column effluent also showed that the large majority of nitrate removed by SMI was converted to ammonium. Consequently, these laboratory findings support the use of SMI in

  17. Subsurface thermal regime to delineate the paleo-groundwater flow system in an arid area, Al Kufra, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom El-Said

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the groundwater flow system in Al Kufra basin, Libya, as a case study of arid areas using subsurface temperature. The temperature-depth profiles and water levels were measured in eight boreholes in the area. Well 6 is considered a recharge type profile with low geothermal gradient (0.0068 °C/m) and an estimated paleo-temperature around 19.5 °C. The other profiles are of discharge type with higher geothermal gradient (0.0133 to 0.0166 °C/m). The constructed horizontal 2D distribution maps of the hydraulic heads and the subsurface temperature measurements reveal that the main recharge area is located to the south with low temperature while the main discharge area is located to the north with higher temperature. Vertical 2D distribution maps show that location of well 4 has low hydraulic heads and higher temperature indicating that the fault defined in the area may have affected the groundwater flow system. The estimated groundwater flux ranges from 0.001 to 0.1 mm/day for the recharge area and from -0.3 to -0.7 mm/day in average in the discharge area.

  18. Reactive Transport Modeling of Subsurface Arsenic Removal Systems in Rural Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, M.; Rahman, M. M.; van Breukelen, B. M.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in the groundwater of the shallow aquifers of Bangladesh are a major public health concern. Subsurface Arsenic Removal (SAR) is a relatively new treatment option that can potentially be a cost effective method for arsenic removal for community-based drinking water supplies. The basic idea of SAR is to extract water, aerate it, and re-inject it, after which groundwater with reduced arsenic concentrations may be extracted. The main process for As reduction is sorption to Hydrous Ferric Oxides (HFO) that forms after injection of the aerated water. The purpose of this poster is to investigate the major geochemical processes responsible for the (im)mobilization of As during SAR operation. SAR was applied at a test site in Muradnagar upazila in Comilla district about 100 km southeast of Dhaka in Bangladesh. Multiple extraction/aeration/re-injection cycles were performed and water samples were analyzed. A PHREEQC reactive transport model (RTM) was used in a radial flow setting to try to reproduce the measurements. Kinetic oxidation/dissolution reactions, cation exchange, and surface complexation were simulated. The simulation of different reactions enables the possibility to discern the reaction parameters involved in the im(mobilization) of As. The model fit has reasonable agreement with the observed data for major ions and trace elements. The model suggests an increasing sorption capacity due to the gradual development of HFO precipitates resulting from the injection phases. Modeled breakthrough curves of As, Fe(II), and Mn, match the measured increase of As, Fe(II), and Mn removal with successive cycles. The model illustrates that the pH of groundwater during SAR operation has a great impact on As sorption in the subsurface. The surface complexation modeling suggests that competitive displacement of As by H4SiO4 is an important factor limiting As removal during SAR operation.

  19. Acid Mine Drainage Research in Gauteng Highlighting Impacts on Infrastructure and Innovation of Concrete-Based Remedial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, S.; Ekolu, S.; Azene, F.

    2013-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is presently one of the most important environmental problems in in the densely populated Gauteng Province, South Africa. The threat of acid mine drainage has demanded short-term interventions (some of which are being implemented by government) but more importantly sustainable long-term innovative solutions. There have been moments of public apprehension with some media reports dubbing the current scenario as a future 'nightmare of biblical proportions' and 'South Africa's own Chernobyl' that could cause dissolving of concrete foundations of buildings and reinforcement steel, leading to collapse of structures. In response to the needs of local and provincial authorities, this research was conducted to (1) generate scientific understanding of the effects of AMD on infrastructure materials and structures, and (2) propose innovative long-term remedial systems based on cementitious materials for potential AMD treatment applications of engineering scale. Two AMD solutions from the goldfields and two others from the coalfields were used to conduct corrosion immersion tests on mild steel, stainless steel, mortars, pastes and concretes. Results show that AMD water from the gold mines is more corrosive than that from the coal mines, the corrosion rate of the former being about twice that of the latter. The functionality of metal components of mild steel can be expected to fail within one month of exposure to the mine water. The investigation has also led to development of a pervious concrete filter system of water-cement ratio = 0.27 and cement content = 360 kg/m3, to be used as a permeable reactive barrier for AMD treatment. Early results show that the system was effective in removing heavy metal contaminants with removal levels of 30% SO4, 99% Fe, 50-83% Mn, 85% Ca, and 30% TDS. Further work is on-going to improve and optimise the system prior to field demonstration studies.

  20. Evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system beneath the rapidly decaying Cordilleran Ice Sheet caused by ice-dammed lake drainage: implications for meltwater-induced ice acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Matthew J.; Brennand, Tracy A.; Perkins, Andrew J.

    2012-09-01

    A positive correlation between ice-dammed lake drainage and ice acceleration at Antarctic Ice Sheets (AIS) and land-terminating sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has been implicated in enhanced ice sheet decay. However, the paucity of direct measurements at the ice sheet bed restricts our understanding of subglacial drainage system evolution in response to transient water inputs. We present evidence that two meltwater corridors on the former bed of the thin (˜600 m at Last Glacial Maximum over the interior Plateaus of British Columbia) and rapidly decaying Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) were generated subglacially in response to the drainage of an ice-dammed lake and operated as canals (tunnel channels). Geomorphological, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data reveal a simple event sequence that includes initial propagation of a broad (at least 2.5 km wide) floodwave (inefficient drainage) from an ice-dammed lake, over relatively short (3-24 km) zones at the corridor heads that collapsed into efficient canals (large (up to 0.25-2.5 km wide) channels incised down into the sediment bed and up into the ice) downglacier. Canal formation on the southern Fraser Plateau involved synchronous (along the full canal length) system development, including elements of headward erosion and plunge pool formation. Our data suggest that ice-dammed lake drainage beneath a rapidly decaying thin ice mass that has an efficient antecedent drainage network is not conducive to large-scale ice acceleration. These data may aid better assessment of the role of ice-dammed lake drainage on the dynamics of former, as well as contemporary, ice sheets.

  1. USGS develops a drainage-based system to track ANS introductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Pam L.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program has tracked the distribution of introduced species for more than 20 years. This effort began with foreign fishes in Florida and later expanded to include aquatic nuisance species nationwide. The tracking database contains locational and temporal data for introductions and spread. This data is generally derived from literature, museum collections, state monitoring programs, and reports from professionals at state and federal agencies. Analysis of this data can be helpful in displaying any patterns that may be present in introductions of aquatic nuisance species and developing a management plan to prevent spread. To produce maps and perform analysis, all data are referenced geographically at the finest scale possible (state, county, drainage, waterbody, point). Data reported in the literature range from state or regional lists of introduced species to exact time, date, and location of collections or releases. Often, vague locality reports make it difficult to obtain accurate answers in fine-scale analysis.

  2. EOS7CA Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Gas Migration in Shallow Subsurface Porous Media Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2015-06-22

    EOS7CA is a TOUGH2 module for mixtures of a non-condensible gas (NCG) and air (with or without a gas tracer), an aqueous phase, and water vapor. The user can select the NCG as being CO2, N2, or CH4. EOS7CA uses a cubic equation of state with a multiphase version of Darcy’s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to shallow subsurface porous media systems. The limitation to shallow systems arises from the use of Henry’s Law for gas solubility which is appropriate for low pressures but begins to over-predict solubility starting at pressures greater than approximately 1 MPa (10 bar). The components modeled in EOS7CA are water, brine, NCG, gas tracer, air, and optional heat.

  3. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these

  4. A three-dimensional analysis of the endolymph drainage system in Ménière disease.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Pauna, Henrique F; Kwon, Geeyoun; Schachern, Patricia A; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2017-05-01

    To measure the volume of the endolymph drainage system in temporal bone specimens with Ménière disease, as compared with specimens with endolymphatic hydrops without vestibular symptoms and with nondiseased specimens STUDY DESIGN: Comparative human temporal bone analysis. We generated three-dimensional models of the vestibular aqueduct, endolymphatic sinus and duct, and intratemporal portion of the endolymphatic sac and calculated the volume of those structures. We also measured the internal and external aperture of the vestibular aqueduct, as well as the opening (if present) of the utriculoendolymphatic (Bast's) valve and compared the measurements in our three study groups. The volume of the vestibular aqueduct and of the endolymphatic sinus, duct, and intratemporal endolymphatic sac was significantly lower in the Ménière disease group than in the endolymphatic hydrops group (P <.05). The external aperture of the vestibular aqueduct was also smaller in the Ménière disease group. Bast's valve was open only in some specimens in the Ménière disease group. In temporal bones with Ménière disease, the volume of the vestibular aqueduct, endolymphatic duct, and intratemporal endolymphatic sac was lower, and the external aperture of the vestibular aqueduct was smaller as compared with bones from donors who had endolymphatic hydrops without vestibular symptoms and with nondiseased bones. The open status of the Bast's valve in the Ménière disease group could be secondary to higher retrograde endolymph pressures caused by smaller drainage systems. These anatomic findings could correlate with the reason that some patients with hydrops develop clinical symptoms, whereas others do not. N/A Laryngoscope, 127:E170-E175, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.; Thompson, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  6. An improved equilibrium-kinetics speciation algorithm for redox reactions in variably saturated subsurface flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Brimhall, George

    1999-07-01

    Reactive chemical transport occurs in a variety of geochemical environments, and over a broad range of space and time scales. Efficiency of the chemical speciation and water-rock-gas interaction calculations is important for modeling field-scale multidimensional reactive transport problems. An improved efficient model, REACT, for simulating water-rock-gas interaction under equilibrium and kinetic conditions, has been developed. In this model, equilibrium and kinetic reactions are solved simultaneously by Newton-Raphson iteration. The REACT speciation model was coupled with the multidimensional nonisothermal multiphase flow and mass transport code TOUGH2, resulting in the general purpose reactive chemical transport simulator TOUGHREACT. An application to supergene copper enrichment of a typical copper protore that includes the sulfide minerals pyrite (FeS 2) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) is presented. The efficiency and convergence of the present model is demonstrated from this numerically difficult application that involves very large variations in the concentrations of oxygen, and sulfide and sulfate species. TOUGHREACT provides a detailed description of water-rock-gas interactions during fully transient, multiphase, nonisothermal flow and transport in hydrologically and geochemically heterogeneous media. The code is helpful for assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, geothermal convection, waste disposal, contaminant transport and water quality.

  7. Tessaracoccus flavus sp. nov., isolated from the drainage system of a lindane-producing factory.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Schumann, Peter; Lal, Rup

    2016-04-01

    Strain RP1T, a Gram-stain-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, coccus-shaped bacterium, was isolated from drainage of India Pesticides Limited, a lindane-producing unit situated at Chinhat, Lucknow, India. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain RP1T belongs to the family Propionibacteriaceae and was closely related to the members of the genus Tessaracoccus with a similarity range of 95.4-97.6%. Strain RP1T was facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-negative, catalase-positive and capable of nitrate reduction. Strain RP1T contained peptidoglycan type A3γ', with ll-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and glycine at position 1 of the peptide subunit. The major cellular fatty acid of strain RP1T was anteiso-C15 : 0 but a significant amount of iso-C14:0 was also detected. MK-9(H4) was the major respiratory quinone and polyamines detected were spermine and spermidine. The polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two unknown glycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the DNA was 66.7 mol%. The levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between RP1T and Tessaracoccus lubricantis KSS-17SeT, Tessaracoccus oleiagri SL014B-20A1T and Tessaracoccus flavescens SST-39T were 49.8, 34.8 and 23.5%, respectively. Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic data presented, strain RP1T can be differentiated from previously described species of the genus Tessaracoccus, and thus represents a novel species, for which the name Tessaracoccus flavus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RP1T (=DSM 100159T=MCC 2769T=KCTC 39686T).

  8. Subsurface methane sources and migration pathways within a gas hydrate mound system, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rachel M.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Simonetti, Antonello; Lapham, Laura; Lutken, Carol; Sleeper, Ken; D'Emidio, Marco; Pizzi, Marco; Knapp, James; Chanton, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical profiles were coupled with seismic information to examine subsurface hydrocarbon source, migration, and fate at a Gulf of Mexico carbonate-gas hydrate mound (Woolsey Mound). Three seafloor features were investigated in detail: (1) major faults resulting from a rising salt body, (2) an acoustic backscatter anomaly, and (3) a pockmark associated with a major fault. We analyzed sulfate, chloride, dissolved inorganic carbon, and hydrocarbon concentrations, and carbon isotopes in pore water extracted from 20 m piston cores to characterize gas source and calculate methane flux. Dissolved biogenic methane dominated the off-fault sites, while the contribution of thermogenic methane increased near a major fault where thermogenic gas hydrates were recovered. Within the pockmark, methane concentrations were low and isotopes indicated a biogenic source. Since pockmarks are typically formed from expulsive fluid flow, this suggests that either the pockmark is the legacy of a conduit that has become plugged or that the expulsed fluid is confined within the fault walls. At the acoustic anomaly, nonsteady state sulfate profiles suggested temporal variability in methane flux. Estimates from >75 gravity cores collected across Woolsey Mound since 2002 were mapped to display the spatial variability in methane flux relative to the faults. Methane flux to the seafloor was generally low, but increased several fold near the faults suggesting that the faults may provide conduits for hydrocarbons to bypass the "microbial biofilter" and cross the sediment water interface.

  9. Shallow subsurface morpho-tectonics at the Northern offshore Sumatra subduction system using high resolution reflection and refraction seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, D.; Dibakar Ghosal*, S. C. Singh, A. P. S. Chauhan, H. Carton, N. D. Hananto

    2011-12-01

    The oblique subduction of Indo-Australian plate below the Eurosian plate regulates the subsurface geology of the Sumatra subduction system from south to north. Although many geological, geophysical and geodetic studies have been carried over since several decades nevertheless a high resolution subsurface image describing the detailed structural features over the Northern Sumatra is still missing. To scrutinize the northern part of this subduction system we had carried out a multi channel seismic (MCS) and OBS survey using a 12 km long streamer and 56 ocean bottom seismometers in 2006 and procured a high resolution deep seismic reflection and refraction data over a 500 km long profile mapping the whole subduction setting from the subduction front, forearc high and basin, Sumatra platform, Sumatra fault and volcanic arc. The acoustic basement along the profile is very complex because of its extremities lies in a range of 300 m to 5000 m. In order to overcome the imaging-intricacies caused due to the abrupt changes of water depth, we have downward continued the 12 km streamer data to the seafloor, which provides refraction arrivals from near zero offsets to 12 km, and subsequently a high-resolution travel time tomography keeping node spacing of 50m x 50m has accomplished to procure a detail velocity structure along the profile. We have conducted our analysis in two important areas at northern offshore Sumatra: (1) subduction front and accretionary settings and (2) forearc high and West Anadman Fault. Our main goal lies to observe the nature of shallow subsurface velocity distribution over these regions. Tomographic result of the subduction front demonstrates the changes in velocity gradient along up-dip. The 1D velocity gradients become shallower toward the subduction trench inferring the fact of lithification of accreted sediments around the accretionary wedge. At the forearc high adjacent to the Aceh basin a pile of 1 km thick low velocity sediments is underlain by

  10. Plant development and yield of four sugarcane varieties irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system in Campinas, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, André Luiz Barros de O.; Célia de Matos Pires, Regina; Yukitaka Pessinati Ohashi, Augusto; Vasconcelos Ribeiro, Rafael; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Aparecida Creste Dias de Souza, Silvana

    2013-04-01

    The biofuel production is a growing concern on modern society due to the agricultural sustainability, in which both food and energy supply should be taken into account. The agroclimatic zoning indicates that sugarcane expansion in Brazil can only take place in marginal lands, where water deficit occurs and irrigation is necessary. The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficit conditions or to attain high yield and to increase longevity of plants. In this context it is necessary to investigate responses of different varieties to water supply. The aim of this work was to evaluate the plant development and yield of four sugarcane varieties irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system in Campinas, Brazil in the 1st cane ratoon cycle. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas SP Brazil, with IACSP95-5000, IACSP94-2094, IACSP94-2101 and SP79-1011 cultivars in the 1st cane ratoon cycle, from January (after the harvest of cane plant cycle) to October (harvest the 1st cane ratoon cycle). The plant spacing was 1.5 m between rows. Each cultivar was planted in an area of 0.4 hectares. The irrigation was done by a subsuperficial drip system with one drip line in each plant row installed at 0.25 m deep. During the 1st cane ratoon cycle the parameters were analysed on the 33rd, 123rd, 185th and 277th day. The analysed parameters were: plant yield (m), leaf area index (LAI) and yield (tons per hectare). According to the results from the second sampling (123rd day) the varieties IACSP95-5000 and IACSP94-2101 showed higher plant height when compared to the other varieties. However, from the third sampling (185th day) on the IACSP95-5000 variety grew considerably taller than the other varieties. The varieties SP79-1011and IACSP94-2101 presented lower values of LAI throughout the crop cycle when compared to other varieties. But on the

  11. Fluid Flow along Venous Adventitia in Rabbits: Is It a Potential Drainage System Complementary to Vascular Circulations?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-yi; Chen, Min; Yang, Jie-fu; Yang, Chong-qing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Fang; Tong, Jia-bin; Lv, You; Suonan, Caidan

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous research and other studies with radiotracers showed evidence of a centripetal drainage pathway, separate from blood or lymphatic vessels, that can be visualized when a small amount of low molecular weight tracer is injected subcutaneously into a given region on skin of humans. In order to further characterize this interesting biological phenomenon, animal experiments are designed to elucidate histological and physiologic characteristics of these visualized pathways. Methods Multiple tracers are injected subcutaneously into an acupuncture point of KI3 to visualize centripetal pathways by magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescein photography in 85 healthy rabbits. The pathways are compared with venography and indirect lymphangiography. Fluid flow through the pathways is observed by methods of altering their hydrated state, hydrolyzing by different collagenases, and histology is elucidated by optical, fluorescein and electron microscopy. Results Histological and magnetic imaging examinations of these visualized pathways show they consist of perivenous loose connective tissues. As evidenced by examinations of tracers’ uptake, they appear to function as a draining pathway for free interstitial fluid. Fluorescein sodium from KI3 is found in the pathways of hind limbs and segments of the small intestines, partial pulmonary veins and results in pericardial effusion, suggesting systematical involvement of this perivenous pathway. The hydraulic conductivity of these pathways can be compromised by the collapse of their fiber-rich beds hydrolyzed by either of collagenase type I, III, IV or V. Conclusions The identification of pathways comprising perivenous loose connective tissues with a high hydraulic conductivity draining interstitial fluid in hind limbs of a mammal suggests a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations. These findings may provide new insights into a systematically distributed collagenous connective tissue with

  12. Fluid flow along venous adventitia in rabbits: is it a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations?

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-yi; Chen, Min; Yang, Jie-fu; Yang, Chong-qing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Fang; Tong, Jia-bin; Lv, You; Suonan, Caidan

    2012-01-01

    Our previous research and other studies with radiotracers showed evidence of a centripetal drainage pathway, separate from blood or lymphatic vessels, that can be visualized when a small amount of low molecular weight tracer is injected subcutaneously into a given region on skin of humans. In order to further characterize this interesting biological phenomenon, animal experiments are designed to elucidate histological and physiologic characteristics of these visualized pathways. Multiple tracers are injected subcutaneously into an acupuncture point of KI3 to visualize centripetal pathways by magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescein photography in 85 healthy rabbits. The pathways are compared with venography and indirect lymphangiography. Fluid flow through the pathways is observed by methods of altering their hydrated state, hydrolyzing by different collagenases, and histology is elucidated by optical, fluorescein and electron microscopy. Histological and magnetic imaging examinations of these visualized pathways show they consist of perivenous loose connective tissues. As evidenced by examinations of tracers' uptake, they appear to function as a draining pathway for free interstitial fluid. Fluorescein sodium from KI3 is found in the pathways of hind limbs and segments of the small intestines, partial pulmonary veins and results in pericardial effusion, suggesting systematical involvement of this perivenous pathway. The hydraulic conductivity of these pathways can be compromised by the collapse of their fiber-rich beds hydrolyzed by either of collagenase type I, III, IV or V. The identification of pathways comprising perivenous loose connective tissues with a high hydraulic conductivity draining interstitial fluid in hind limbs of a mammal suggests a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations. These findings may provide new insights into a systematically distributed collagenous connective tissue with a circulatory function and their

  13. Present morphoclimate and morphodynamics in the boreal Homla drainage basin system (Trøndelag, middle Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2017-04-01

    It is generally accepted that ongoing and future climate change will cause major changes in Earth surface systems and environments. From a geomorphological point of view, it is accordingly of increasing importance to obtain a better understanding of the relationships between contemporary geomorphological processes and present-day climatic conditions to come to more reliable assessments of the possible geomorphological effects of climate change. Until recently, the present-day climate has often only been characterized by monthly and annual means or sum values of wind speed, air temperature and precipitation. As most geomorphological surface processes consist of discrete events which are only partly correlated to these meteorological means or sum values, there is an obvious need for an additional approach of statistical analysis of meteorological data. In this study the "morphoclimate" of the Homla drainage basin situated in a boreal environment in Trøndelag in middle Norway is analyzed. "Morphoclimate" according to Ahnert (e.g., 1982) is specially related to geomorphological needs and, in this sense, is defined as the totality of those climatic characteristics of an area that influence the type, frequency, duration and intensity of the exogenic geomorphologic processes in this area. The statistical method primarily used in this context is the magnitude-frequency analysis. Particular emphasis is on (i) the frequencies or recurrence intervals of meteorological events of given magnitudes, and (ii) the frequencies of geomorphologically important thresholds. Aspects of the current wind, temperature and precipitation regimes which control the type, frequency, duration and intensity of the contemporary denudational surface processes as well as the sedimentary budget in the selected study area are presented. Runoff in the boreal Homla drainage basin is occurring year-round and the contemporary morphodynamics are altogether characterized by a clear dominance of chemical

  14. Hydrological Modeling of Storm Water Drainage System due to Frequent and Intense Precipitation of Dhaka city using Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall induced flooding during rainy season is a regular phenomenon in Dhaka City. Almost every year a significant part of the city suffers badly with drainage congestion. There are some highly dense areas with lower ground elevation which submerge under water even with an intense precipitation of few hours. The higher areas also suffer with the drainage problem due to inadequate maintenance of the system and encroachment or illegal filling up of the drainage canals and lakes. Most part of the city suffered from long term urban flooding during historical extreme rainfall events in September 2004, 2007 and July 2009. The situation is likely to worsen in the future due to Climate Change, which may lead to more frequent and intense precipitation. To assess the major and minor drainage systems and elements of the urban basins using the hydrodynamic modelling and, through this, identifying the flooding events and areas, taking into account the current situation and future flood or drainage scenarios. Stormwater modeling has a major role in preventing issues such as flash floods and urban water-quality problems. Stormwater models of a lowered spatial resolution would thus appear valuable if only their ability to provide realistic results could be proved. The present scenario of urban morphology of Dhaka city and existing drainage system is complex for hydrological and hydrodynamic modeling. Furthermore limitations of background data and uncertain future urban scenarios may confine the potential outputs of a model. Although several studies were carried out including modeling for drainage master planning, a detail model for whole DAP (Detaile Area Plan) of Dhaka city area is not available. The model developed under this study is covering the existing drainage system in the study area as well as natural flows in the fringe area. A good number of models are available for hydrological and hydraulic analysis of urban areas. These are MIKE 11, MOUSE, HEC-RAS, HEC HMS and EPA

  15. Results of a Conceptual Systems Analysis of Systems for 200 m Deep Sampling of the Martian Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, J.; Dreesen, D.; Mockler, T.

    2000-01-01

    Recent robotic orbital and lander missions at Mars are part of a renewed campaign of exploration that seeks to build on the early successes of the Viking program. Current plans feature a vigorous series of orbital, surface and subsurface robotic missions with a probable return of a small number of atmosphere, rock and soil samples to Earth, and culminate in human exploration before the end of the second decade of the new millennium. The latest discoveries of this program are lending increasing support to models of a water-rich Martian history in which most of the remaining water is now thought to reside in the subsurface. Furthermore, the top-level goal of seeking evidence of extant or fossil life on Mars has evolved a strategy of "follow the water", since experience shows that life on Earth seems to require the presence of liquid water. In addition, water, if found, would be the most valuable in situ resource that could be developed to support manned exploration of Mars. These developments have led to a compelling argument for deep subsurface in situ measurements and sampling on Mars, a challenge never faced by planetary science on any body other than the Earth.

  16. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    PubMed Central

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0–100 MPa) and temperature (0–70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ13Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate. PMID

  17. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ(13)Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate.

  18. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) of subsurface hydrological connectivity controlling phosphorous transport in artificially drained agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, L. D.; Robinson, J.; Buda, A. R.; Shober, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Collick, A.; Clark, K.; Tingle, S.; Bryant, R.; Allen, A.

    2016-12-01

    The phosphorous (P) index is an applied assessment tool that identifies agricultural fields considered critical sources of P due to hydrologic connectivity between P sources and surface water. There is a need to improve the depiction of subsurface hydrological connectivity in P risk assessment tools in flat, artificially drained landscapes. Time-lapse ERI is an established near-surface geophysical technique that is useful for "visualizing" dynamic subsurface hydrological processes in space and time. We are applying time-lapse ERI in conjunction with salt tracers to a site on the Delmarva Peninsula (MD) that is drained by a dense network of open ditches. Our objectives are to examine the relative effects of soil properties, drainage intensity, and management factors on shallow lateral flow generation. As a proof of concept, a sodium chloride solution was spray-irrigated and continuously injected into two shallow wells (0.6 and 0.3 m deep) within a 23 m2 plot located directly adjacent to a small field drainage ditch. Time-lapse ERI in the region of spray-irrigation showed increased conductivity with some evidence of lateral surface migration. The injection well at 0.3 m depth exhibited increased conductivity during the tracer application and appeared to be hydraulically connected to an adjacent well 0.6 m away where no tracer was applied. Following this proof of concept study, we automated an ERI system of 192 electrodes within a 72m2 plot to monitor the application salt tracers from a 25 cm deep trench during natural rainfall events. This system, operational since September 2015, reveals the presence of tracer within and slightly below the trench suggesting only limited hydrological connectivity with drainage ditches during storms. Continual ERI monitoring over a wider range of storm intensities is likely to advance our understanding of shallow subsurface flows contributing to P transport and their potential connectivity with ditch drainage waters.

  19. Brine migration resulting from pressure increases in a layered subsurface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Nordbeck, Johannes; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Brine originating from the deep subsurface impairs parts of the freshwater resources in the North German Basin. Some of the deep porous formations (esp. Trias and Jurassic) exhibit considerable storage capacities for waste fluids (CO2, brine from oil production or cavern leaching), raising concerns among water providers that this type of deep subsurface utilization might impair drinking water supplies. On the one hand, overpressures induced by fluid injections and the geothermal gradient support brine migration from deep into shallow formations. On the other hand, the rising brine is denser than the surrounding less-saline formation waters and, therefore, tends to settle down. Aim of this work is to investigate the conditions under which pressurized formation brine from deep formations can reach shallow freshwater resources. Especially, the role of intermediate porous formations between the storage formation and the groundwater is studied. For this, complex thermohaline simulations using a coupled numerical process model are necessary and performed in this study, in which fluid density depends on fluid pressure, temperature and salt content and the governing partial differential equations are coupled. The model setup is 2D and contains a hypothetic series of aquifers and barriers, each with a thickness of 200 m. Formation pressure is increased at depths of about 2000 m in proximity to a salt wall and a permeable fault. The domain size reaches up to tens of kilometers horizontally to the salt wall. The fault connects the injection formation and the freshwater aquifer such that conditions can be considered as extremely favorable for induced brine migration (worst case scenarios). Brine, heat, and salt fluxes are quantified with reference to hydraulic permeabilities, storage capacities (in terms of domain size), initial salt and heat distribution, and operation pressures. The simulations reveal the development of a stagnation point in the fault region in each

  20. Nanoscale study of As biomineralization in an acid mine drainage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, K.; Morin, G.; Yoon, T. H.; Miot, J.; Tyliszczak, T.; Casiot, C.; Bruneel, O.; Farges, F.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-08-01

    Spatial and seasonal variations of the oxidation of Fe(II) and As(III) have been previously documented in the Carnoulès (Gard, France) Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) by bulk analyses. These variations may be correlated with the variations in the activity of indigenous As(III)- and Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria living in the As-rich Carnoulès water. The activity of these bacteria indeed plays an important role in the nature and composition of the solid phases that sequester arsenic at this site. In order to better understand the interactions of microbes with Fe and As in the Carnoulès AMD, we combined Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) to collect near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra at high spatial and energy resolution and to perform high spatial resolution imaging at the 30-50 nm scale. Spectromicroscopy was performed at the C K-edge, Fe L 2,3-edge, and As L 2,3-edge, which allowed us to locate living and/or mineralized bacterial cells and to characterize Fe and As oxidation states in the vicinity of those cells. TEM was used to image the same areas, providing higher resolution images and complementary crystallographic and compositional information through electron diffraction and EDXS analysis. This approach provides unique information on heterogeneous geochemical processes that occur in a complex microbial community in an AMD environment at the micrometer and submicrometer-scale. Bacterial cells in the Carnoulès AMD were frequently associated with mineral precipitates, and a variety of biomineralization patterns were observed. While many mineral precipitates were not associated with bacterial cells, they were associated with pervasive organic carbon. Finally, abundant biomineralized organic vesicles were observed in the Carnoulès AMD. Such vesicles may have been overlooked in highly mineralized extreme environments in the past and may represent an important component in a common

  1. Acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  2. Reactive transport modeling of subsurface arsenic removal systems in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Bakker, M; Patty, C H L; Hassan, Z; Röling, W F M; Ahmed, K M; van Breukelen, B M

    2015-12-15

    Subsurface Arsenic Removal (SAR) is a technique for in-situ removal of arsenic from groundwater. Extracted groundwater is aerated and re-injected into an anoxic aquifer, where the oxygen in the injected water reacts with ferrous iron in the aquifer to form hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Subsequent extraction of groundwater contains temporarily lower As concentrations, because As sorbs onto the HFO. Injection, storage, and extraction together is called a cycle. A reactive transport model (RTM) was developed in PHREEQC to determine the hydrogeochemical processes responsible for As (im)mobilization during experimental SAR operation performed in Bangladesh. Oxidation of Fe(II) and As(III) were modeled using kinetic-rate expressions. Cation exchange, precipitation of HFO, and surface complexation, were modeled as equilibrium processes. A best set of surface complexation reactions and corresponding equilibrium constants was adopted from previous studies to simulate all 20 cycles of a SAR experiment. The model gives a reasonable match with observed concentrations of different elements in the extracted water (e.g., the r(2) value of As was 0.59 or higher). As concentrations in the extracted water are governed by four major processes. First, As concentration decreases in response to the elevated pH of injection water and likewise increases when native neutral pH groundwater flows in. Second, the sorption capacity for As increases due to the gradual buildup of HFO. Third, As sorption is enhanced by preferential removal of As(V). Fourth, competitive sorption of Si limits the capacity of freshly precipitated HFO for As sorption. Transferability of the developed reactive transport model was demonstrated through successful application of the model, without further calibration, to two additional SAR sites in Bangladesh. This gives confidence that the model could be useful to assess potential SAR performance at locations in Bangladesh based on local hydrogeochemical conditions.

  3. Effectiveness of highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt, Route 25, southeastern Massachusetts; description of study area, data collection programs, and methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, P.E.; Armstrong, D.S.; Granato, G.E.; Stone, V.J.; Smith, K.P.; Provencher, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Four test sites along a 7-mile section of Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts, each representing a specific highway-drainage system, were instrumented to determine the effectiveness of the drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt. One of the systems discharges highway runoff onsite through local drainpipes. The other systems use trunkline drainpipes through which runoff from highway surfaces, shoulders, and median strips is diverted and discharged into either a local stream or a coastal waterway. Route 25 was completed and opened to traffic in the summer of 1987. Road salt was first applied to the highway in the winter of 1987-88. The study area is on a thick outwash plain composed primarily of sand and gravel. Water-table depths range from 15 to 60 feet below land surface at the four test sites. Ground-water flow is in a general southerly direction, approximately perpendicular to the highway. Streamflow in the study area is controlled primarily by ground-water discharge. Background concentrations of dissolved chloride, sodium, and calcium-the primary constituents of road salt-are similar in ground water and surface water and range from 5 to 20, 5 to 10, and 1 to 5 milligrams per liter, respectively. Data-collection programs were developed for monitoring the application of road salt to the highway, the quantity of road-salt water entering the ground water, diverted through the highway-drainage systems, and entering a local stream. The Massachusetts Highway Department monitored road salt applied to the highway and reported these data to the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. Geological Survey designed and operated the ground-water, highway- drainage, and surface-water data-collection programs. A road-salt budget will be calculated for each test site so that the effectiveness of the different highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt can be determined.

  4. Drainage Areas of Selected Streams in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Donald C.; Wiegand, Ute

    2006-01-01

    Drainage areas were determined for more than 1,600 basins in the three major river basins of Virginia -- the North Atlantic Slope, South Atlantic Slope, and Ohio River Basins. Drainage areas range from 0.004 square mile to 7,866 square miles. A geographic information system was used to digitize and store data associated with the drainage basins. Drainage divides were digitized from digital U.S. Geological Survey 7.5-minute, 1:24,000-scale, topographic quadrangles using procedures recommended by the Subcommittee on Hydrology, Federal Interagency River Basin Committee. Digital drainage basins were quality assured, polygons of the closed drainage basins were generated, and drainage areas were computed.

  5. Representing surface and subsurface hydrology at hyperresolution for Earth system models: Development of a hybrid 3-D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P. D.; Brunke, M.; Gochis, D. J.; Lawrence, D. M.; Niu, G. Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Zeng, X.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, LSMs for use in Earth system models (ESMs) only account for one-dimensional (1-D) vertical hydrological processes at very coarse resolutions (~100 km). Recently, there has been interest in simulating lateral exchange of surface and subsurface water, as the grid resolution of ESMs increases (currently towards ~20 km) due to advances in computational power.In the current work, we present a new physically-based hydrological model capable of simulating lateral flow at a hyperresolution (1 km pixels) coupled with the vertical soil column of the Community Land Model (CLM), which has a much coarser resolution. Our new approach also uses sub-pixel topographic information to represent small scale lateral-flow processes. As input to our model, we use 1 km data of required surface and subsurface information, such depth to bedrock, hillslope width functions, fractional coverage of hillslopes/wetlands/riparian zones within each 1 km pixel, and a river network. Such data are largely derived from higher-resolution (30 m) topographic data, and will be made available to the community as global products.We have tested our model against measurements over a well instrumented, artificial hillslope at the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 and found that both our approach and a full 3-D physically-based hydrological model can realistically simulate hydrological states and fluxes. However, computationally, our approach is 2 - 3 orders of magnitude faster than the latter. We are currently testing it for an ESM grid box that covers much of southeastern New York State, which includes the headwaters of the Delaware River, the Susquehana River, and parts of the Mohawk River Basin. Our approach improves upon the 1-D hydrological representation in CLM by representing the subgrid topographic and geomorphological variability in the grid box. The impact of representing such subgrid variability on surface water and energy fluxes will be discussed in our presentation.

  6. A New Automatic Subsurface Gas Monitoring System for Seismogeochemical Studies, Installed in Haruno Borehole, Shizuoka Prefecture, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Kazuya; Takama, Ruka; Kawabe, Iwao; Kariya, Shinnichi; Yamauchi, Tsuneo

    2010-12-01

    The results of subsurface gas monitoring by application of gas chromatography (GC) to the gas composition of bubbles associated with groundwater for seismogeochemical studies are reported. An automated gas monitoring system was used to determine gas compositions in a 500-m borehole at the Haruno Crustal Movement Observation Site (HOS), central Japan during period 1, from December 1999 to December 2000. The average ± two standard deviation (2SD) compositions of gases in this period were He = 82 ± 29 ppmV, H2 = 170 ± 62 ppmV, Ar = 0.05 ± 0.07%, N2 = 50 ± 8%, and CH4 = 45 ± 6%. A new automated gas monitoring system equipped with a micro-GC was installed in the borehole at the HOS, and gas bubbles from the borehole were monitored during period 2, from December 2006 to March 2007. The average ± two standard deviation (2SD) compositions of gases in this period were He = 8 ± 7 ppmV, H2 = 13 ± 15 ppmV, Ar = 0.6 ± 0.3%, N2 = 66 ± 7%, and CH4 = 14 ± 14%. The gas concentration ratios (He/Ar, H2/Ar, N2/Ar, and CH4/Ar) fluctuated significantly over time and repeatedly showed abrupt spike-like increases during period 2. The gas compositions obtained in period 1 and 2 were markedly different. Over the period from 2006 to 2007, the gas bubbles were depleted in He, H2, and CH4 of deep origin, but enriched in Ar and N2 of atmospheric origin. This difference can be interpreted as being due to an irreversible change of the aquifer/gas system. The present deep component in the HOS gas is estimated to have composition He = 63 ppmV, H2 = 37 ppmV, Ar = 0.17%, N2 = 63%, and CH4 = 37%. The new monitoring system is able to analyze the gas composition using a smaller volume of sample gas and with greater precision than the previous system. During the 3-month monitoring period 2, the separation capacity of the capillary column of the micro-GC was sufficiently maintained to determine gas-chromatographic peak areas for the five gaseous species examined. This study confirms that the

  7. Subsurface Ice Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael; Carsey, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The subsurface ice probe (SIPR) is a proposed apparatus that would bore into ice to depths as great as hundreds of meters by melting the ice and pumping the samples of meltwater to the surface. Originally intended for use in exploration of subsurface ice on Mars and other remote planets, the SIPR could also be used on Earth as an alternative to coring, drilling, and melting apparatuses heretofore used to sample Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets. The SIPR would include an assembly of instrumentation and electronic control equipment at the surface, connected via a tether to a compact assembly of boring, sampling, and sensor equipment in the borehole (see figure). Placing as much equipment as possible at the surface would help to attain primary objectives of minimizing power consumption, sampling with high depth resolution, and unobstructed imaging of the borehole wall. To the degree to which these requirements would be satisfied, the SIPR would offer advantages over the aforementioned ice-probing systems.

  8. Insurance data as way to evaluate the performance of a sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) in Augustenborg, Malmö

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörensen, Johanna; Emilsson, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) has been put forward as a concept to improve stormwater management in urban areas. The damage reduction due to reduced flooding and storm water detention during extreme events is one of many important features of SUDS. As extreme events are rare, few assessments have earlier been made to evaluate the risk reduction. So far, most assessments have been done by hydraulic modelling, rather than analyses based on data from real flood events. In 2014, Malmö was hit with an extreme rainfall event which led to severe flooding in most parts of the city. This event gave an opportunity to evaluate the efficiency of SUDS during extreme events. In this study, flood claim data were analysed to evaluate flood risk reduction by the SUDS system in Augustenborg. Flood claim data were collected from both an insurance company, as well as the water utility company of Malmö for 5 neighbourhoods in close proximity in Malmö. The study uses the Augustenborg neighbourhood as an example of a retrofitted neighbourhood with an open SUDS. Augustenborg (Malmö, Sweden) was retrofitted 15 years ago using a combination of hard infrastructure and naturebased solutions, to alleviate basement flooding, to reduce combined sewer overflows (CSO) and to increase the ecological and aesthetical values of the area. The introduction of ponds, channels and green roofs dramatically changed the appearance of the area and the more or less regular floods were stopped. Augustenborg and its sustainable drainage system was compared with five similar neighbourhoods nearby. The long-term development of reported insurance claims in the selected neighbourhoods showed a reduction of flooding in Augustenborg compared to the nearby areas. Pre- and post-installation data showed a direct effect of the refurbishment with SUDS. Even though a few properties were flooded in Augustenborg, it was shown that the SUDS performed successfully during the extreme storm event that was the most

  9. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  10. Drainage-system development in consecutive melt seasons at a polythermal, Arctic glacier, evaluated by flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation.

    PubMed

    Hodgkins, Richard; Cooper, Richard; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma

    2013-07-26

    [1] The drainage systems of polythermal glaciers play an important role in high-latitude hydrology, and are determinants of ice flow rate. Flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation of runoff time series are here used to evaluate seasonal and inter-annual variability in the drainage system of the polythermal Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, in 1999 and 2000. Linear-flow recessions are pervasive, with mean coefficients of a fast reservoir varying from 16 (1999) to 41 h (2000), and mean coefficients of an intermittent, slow reservoir varying from 54 (1999) to 114 h (2000). Drainage-system efficiency is greater overall in the first of the two seasons, the simplest explanation of which is more rapid depletion of the snow cover. Reservoir coefficients generally decline during each season (at 0.22 h d(-1) in 1999 and 0.52 h d(-1) in 2000), denoting an increase in drainage efficiency. However, coefficients do not exhibit a consistent relationship with discharge. Finsterwalderbreen therefore appears to behave as an intermediate case between temperate glaciers and other polythermal glaciers with smaller proportions of temperate ice. Linear-reservoir runoff simulations exhibit limited sensitivity to a relatively wide range of reservoir coefficients, although the use of fixed coefficients in a spatially lumped model can generate significant subseasonal error. At Finsterwalderbreen, an ice-marginal channel with the characteristics of a fast reservoir, and a subglacial upwelling with the characteristics of a slow reservoir, both route meltwater to the terminus. This suggests that drainage-system components of significantly contrasting efficiencies can coexist spatially and temporally at polythermal glaciers.

  11. Drainage-system development in consecutive melt seasons at a polythermal, Arctic glacier, evaluated by flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, Richard; Cooper, Richard; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma

    2013-01-01

    [1] The drainage systems of polythermal glaciers play an important role in high-latitude hydrology, and are determinants of ice flow rate. Flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation of runoff time series are here used to evaluate seasonal and inter-annual variability in the drainage system of the polythermal Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, in 1999 and 2000. Linear-flow recessions are pervasive, with mean coefficients of a fast reservoir varying from 16 (1999) to 41 h (2000), and mean coefficients of an intermittent, slow reservoir varying from 54 (1999) to 114 h (2000). Drainage-system efficiency is greater overall in the first of the two seasons, the simplest explanation of which is more rapid depletion of the snow cover. Reservoir coefficients generally decline during each season (at 0.22 h d−1 in 1999 and 0.52 h d−1 in 2000), denoting an increase in drainage efficiency. However, coefficients do not exhibit a consistent relationship with discharge. Finsterwalderbreen therefore appears to behave as an intermediate case between temperate glaciers and other polythermal glaciers with smaller proportions of temperate ice. Linear-reservoir runoff simulations exhibit limited sensitivity to a relatively wide range of reservoir coefficients, although the use of fixed coefficients in a spatially lumped model can generate significant subseasonal error. At Finsterwalderbreen, an ice-marginal channel with the characteristics of a fast reservoir, and a subglacial upwelling with the characteristics of a slow reservoir, both route meltwater to the terminus. This suggests that drainage-system components of significantly contrasting efficiencies can coexist spatially and temporally at polythermal glaciers. PMID:25598557

  12. A web accessible scientific workflow system for transparent and reproducible generation of information on subsurface processes from autonomously sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R.; Richardson, A.; Thomas, S.; Lu, B.; Neto, J.; Wheeler, M.; Rowe, T.; Parashar, M.; Ankeny, M.

    2005-12-01

    Information on subsurface processes is required for a broad range of applications, including site remediation, groundwater management, fossil fuel production and CO2 sequestration. Data on these processes is obtained from diverse sensor networks, includes physical, hydrological and chemical sensors and semi permanent geophysical sensors (mainly seismic and resistivity). Currently, processing is done by specialists through the use of commercial and research software packages such as numerical inverse and forward models, statistical data analysis software and visualization and data presentation packages. Information is presented to stakeholders as tables, images and reports. Processing steps, data and assumptions used for information generation are mostly opaque to endusers. As data migrates between applications the steps taken in each application (e.g. in data reduction)are often only partly documented, resulting in irreproducible results. In this approach, interactive tuning of data processing in a systematic way (e.g. changing model parameters, visualization parameters or data used) or using data processing as a discovery tool is de facto impossible. We implemented a web accessible scientific workflow system for subsurface performance monitoring. This system integrates distributed, automated data acquisition from autonomous sensor networks with server side data management and information visualization through flexible browser based data access tools. Webservices are used for communication with the sensor networks and interaction with applications. This system was originally developed for a monitoring network at the Gilt Edge Mine Superfund site, but has now been implemented for a range of different sensor networks of different complexity. The workflow framework allows for rapid and easy integration in a modular, transparent and reproducible manner of a multitude of existing applications for data analysis and processes. By embedding applications in webservice

  13. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Bass, Ronald Marshall; Kim, Dong Sub; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Stegemeier, George Leo; Keltner, Thomas Joseph; Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon

    2010-12-28

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  14. Abandoned mine drainage in the Swatara Creek Basin, southern anthracite coalfield, Pennsylvania, USA: 2. performance of treatment systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of passive and semi-passive treatment systems were constructed by state and local agencies to neutralize acidic mine drainage (AMD) and reduce the transport of dissolved metals in the upper Swatara Creek Basin in the Southern Anthracite Coalfield in eastern Pennsylvania. To evaluate the effectiveness of selected treatment systems installed during 1995–2001, the US Geological Survey collected water-quality data at upstream and downstream locations relative to each system eight or more times annually for a minimum of 3 years at each site during 1996–2007. Performance was normalized among treatment types by dividing the acid load removed by the size of the treatment system. For the limestone sand, open limestone channel, oxic limestone drain, anoxic limestone drain (ALD), and limestone diversion well treatment systems, the size was indicated by the total mass of limestone; for the aerobic wetland systems, the size was indicated by the total surface area of ponds and wetlands. Additionally, the approximate cost per tonne of acid treated over an assumed service life of 20 years was computed. On the basis of these performance metrics, the limestone sand, ALD, oxic limestone drain, and limestone diversion wells had similar ranges of acid-removal efficiency and cost efficiency. However, the open limestone channel had lower removal efficiency and higher cost per ton of acid treated. The wetlands effectively attenuated metals transport but were relatively expensive considering metrics that evaluated acid removal and cost efficiency. Although the water-quality data indicated that all treatments reduced the acidity load from AMD, the ALD was most effective at producing near-neutral pH and attenuating acidity and dissolved metals. The diversion wells were effective at removing acidity and increasing pH of downstream water and exhibited unique potential to treat modera