Science.gov

Sample records for subthalamic deep brain

  1. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  2. Differential impact of thalamic versus subthalamic deep brain stimulation on lexical processing.

    PubMed

    Krugel, Lea K; Ehlen, Felicitas; Tiedt, Hannes O; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2014-10-01

    Roles of subcortical structures in language processing are vague, but, interestingly, basal ganglia and thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation can go along with reduced lexical capacities. To deepen the understanding of this impact, we assessed word processing as a function of thalamic versus subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation. Ten essential tremor patients treated with thalamic and 14 Parkinson׳s disease patients with subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation performed an acoustic Lexical Decision Task ON and OFF stimulation. Combined analysis of task performance and event-related potentials allowed the determination of processing speed, priming effects, and N400 as neurophysiological correlate of lexical stimulus processing. 12 age-matched healthy participants acted as control subjects. Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation prolonged word decisions and reduced N400 potentials. No comparable ON-OFF effects were present in patients with subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation. In the latter group of patients with Parkinson' disease, N400 amplitudes were, however, abnormally low, whether under active or inactive Deep Brain Stimulation. In conclusion, performance speed and N400 appear to be influenced by state functions, modulated by thalamic, but not subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation, compatible with concepts of thalamo-cortical engagement in word processing. Clinically, these findings specify cognitive sequels of Deep Brain Stimulation in a target-specific way.

  3. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  4. Weight gain following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Le Jeune, Florence; Drapier, Sophie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain weight gain after deep brain stimulation (DBS), but none provides a fully satisfactory account of this adverse effect. We analyzed the correlation between changes in brain metabolism (using positron emission tomography [PET] imaging) and weight gain after bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease. Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose 3 months before and 4 months after the start of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. Motor complications (United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]-IV scores) and dopaminergic medication were included in the analysis to control for their possible influence on brain metabolism. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) body mass index increased significantly by 0.8 ± 1.5 kg/m(2) (P = 0.03). Correlations were found between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in limbic and associative areas, including the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann areas [BAs] 10 and 11), lateral and medial parts of the temporal lobe (BAs 20, 21, 22,39 and 42), anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32), and retrosplenial cortex (BA 30). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in sensorimotor areas. These findings suggest that changes in associative and limbic processes contribute to weight gain after subthalamic nucleus DBS in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Parkinson's disease progression at 30 years: a study of subthalamic deep brain-stimulated patients.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Zibetti, Maurizio; Angrisano, Serena; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Artusi, Carlo A; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario G; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-07-01

    Clinical findings in Parkinson's disease suggest that most patients progressively develop disabling non-levodopa-responsive symptoms during the course of the disease. Nevertheless, several heterogeneous factors, such as clinical phenotype, age at onset and genetic aspects may influence the long-term clinical picture. In order to investigate the main features of long-term Parkinson's disease progression, we studied a cohort of 19 subjects treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation after >20 years of disease, reporting clinical and neuropsychological data up to a mean of 30 years from disease onset. This group of patients was characterized by an early onset of disease, with a mean age of 38.63 years at Parkinson's disease onset, which was significantly lower than in the other long-term subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation follow-up cohorts reported in the literature. All subjects were regularly evaluated by a complete Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, a battery of neuropsychological tests and a clinical interview, intended to assess the rate of non-levodopa-responsive symptom progression. Clinical data were available for all patients at presurgical baseline and at 1, 3 and 5 years from the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgical procedure, while follow-up data after >7 years were additionally reported in a subgroup of 14 patients. The clinical and neuropsychological performance progressively worsened during the course of follow-up; 64% of patients gradually developed falls, 86% dysphagia, 57% urinary incontinence and 43% dementia. A progressive worsening of motor symptoms was observed both in 'medication-ON' condition and in 'stimulation-ON' condition, with a parallel reduction in the synergistic effect of 'medication-ON/stimulation-ON' condition. Neuropsychological data also showed a gradual decline in the performances of all main cognitive domains, with an initial involvement of executive functions, followed by the impairment

  6. Mood Response to Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Meghan C.; Black, Kevin J.; Weaver, Patrick M.; Lugar, Heather M.; Videen, Tom O.; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) improves motor function but has variable effects on mood. Little is known about the relationship between electrode contact location and mood response. We identified the anatomical location of electrode contacts and measured mood response to stimulation with the Visual Analog Scale in 24 STN DBS PD patients. Participants reported greater positive mood, decreased anxiety and apathy with bilateral and unilateral stimulation. Left DBS improved mood more than right DBS. Right DBS-induced increase in positive mood was related to more medial and dorsal contact locations. These results highlight the functional heterogeneity of the STN. PMID:22450611

  7. Addiction in Parkinson's disease: impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Henry, Jean Marc; Delfini, Marie; Regis, Jean; Cherif, André Ali; Peragut, Jean Claude; Azulay, Jean Philippe

    2005-08-01

    In Parkinson's disease, dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is characterized by severe dopamine addiction and behavioral disorders such as manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling, and mood swings. Here, we describe the case of 2 young parkinsonian patients suffering from disabling motor fluctuations and dyskinesia associated with severe DDS. In addition to alleviating the motor disability in both patients, subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation greatly reduced the behavioral disorders as well as completely abolished the addiction to dopaminergic treatment. Dopaminergic addiction in patients with Parkinson's disease, therefore, does not constitute an obstacle to high-frequency STN stimulation, and this treatment may even cure the addiction.

  8. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  9. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  10. Predicting quality of life outcomes after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Scott E.; Griffith, Sandra D.; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine disease, treatment, cognitive, and psychological factors associated with quality of life (QoL) before and after surgery and assess the ability to predict QoL outcomes. Methods: We identified a retrospective, cross-sectional sample of 85 patients with Parkinson disease who underwent subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS). Patients' QoL was categorized as “improved” and “stable/worsened” using reliable change indices. Univariate correlational analyses identified relationships between Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire–39 ratings and disease (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale–III [UPDRS-III] motor scores on and off medications, disease duration), treatment (medication burden, unilateral vs bilateral DBS), cognitive (neuropsychological battery), and psychological (depression) variables. Step-wise multiple linear regression and logistic regression models included selected preoperative variables to predict change in QoL ratings and QoL outcome after surgery. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients reported clinically significant improvements in QoL while 47% reported stable QoL and 2% worsened. Motor scores (UPDRS-III) were not relevant to QoL changes, potentially because of the rarity of poor motor outcomes, while single-trial learning and depression scores were the most important variables in predicting QoL changes. There was a subtle additional benefit to undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS. Conclusions: The findings provide greater insight into the nonmotor features that contribute to the success of subthalamic nucleus DBS procedures from the patient's perspective and raise questions about the treatment focus and emphasis on symptom profiles in DBS candidacy evaluations. PMID:25274851

  11. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation affects distractor interference in auditory working memory.

    PubMed

    Camalier, Corrie R; Wang, Alice Y; McIntosh, Lindsey G; Park, Sohee; Neimat, Joseph S

    2017-03-01

    Computational and theoretical accounts hypothesize the basal ganglia play a supramodal "gating" role in the maintenance of working memory representations, especially in preservation from distractor interference. There are currently two major limitations to this account. The first is that supporting experiments have focused exclusively on the visuospatial domain, leaving questions as to whether such "gating" is domain-specific. The second is that current evidence relies on correlational measures, as it is extremely difficult to causally and reversibly manipulate subcortical structures in humans. To address these shortcomings, we examined non-spatial, auditory working memory performance during reversible modulation of the basal ganglia, an approach afforded by deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We found that subthalamic nucleus stimulation impaired auditory working memory performance, specifically in the group tested in the presence of distractors, even though the distractors were predictable and completely irrelevant to the encoding of the task stimuli. This study provides key causal evidence that the basal ganglia act as a supramodal filter in working memory processes, further adding to our growing understanding of their role in cognition.

  12. Evidence of Subthalamic PGO-like Waves During REM Sleep in Humans: A Deep Brain Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mendoza, Julio; Lozano, Beatriz; Seijo, Fernando; Santamarta-Liébana, Elena; Ramos-Platón, Maria José; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Fernández-González, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine whether the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a role in the transmission of PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans. Design: Simultaneous recordings from deep brain electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs), and standard polysomnography to ascertain sleep/wake states. Setting: Main Hospital, department of clinical neurophysiology sleep laboratory. Participants: 12 individuals with Parkinson's disease, with electrodes implanted in the STN; and, as a control for localization purposes, 4 cluster headache patients with electrodes implanted in the posterior hypothalamus. Interventions: All subjects underwent functional neurosurgery for implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. Results: Sharp, polarity-reversed LFPs were recorded within the STN during REM sleep in humans. These subthalamic PGO-like waves (2–3 Hz, 80–200 μV, and 300–500 msec) appeared during REM epochs as singlets or in clusters of 3–13 waves. During the pre-REM period, subthalamic PGO-like waves were temporally related to drops in the submental electromyogram and/or onset of muscular atonia. Clusters of PGO-like waves occurred typically before and during the bursts of rapid eye movements and were associated with an enhancement in fast (15–35 Hz) subthalamic oscillatory activity. Conclusion: Subthalamic PGO-like waves can be recorded during pre-REM and REM sleep in humans. Our data suggest that the STN may play an active role in an ascending activating network implicated in the transmission of PGO waves during REM sleep in humans. Citation: Fernández-Mendoza J; Lozano B; Seijo F; Santamarta-Liébana E; Ramos-Platón MJ; Vela-Bueno A; Fernández-González F. Evidence of subthalamic PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans: a deep brain polysomnographic study. SLEEP 2009;32(9):1117-1126. PMID:19750916

  13. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Christina; Macoir, Joël; Langlois, Mélanie; Cantin, Léo; Prud'homme, Michel; Monetta, Laura

    2015-02-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) on different language abilities are still controversial and its impact on high-level language abilities such as metaphor comprehension has been overlooked. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of STN electrical stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities such as lexical and semantic capacities. Eight PD individuals with bilateral STN-DBS were first evaluated OFF-DBS and, at least seven weeks later, ON-DBS. Performance on metaphor comprehension, lexical decision, word association and verbal fluency tasks were compared ON and OFF-DBS in addition to motor symptoms evaluation. STN stimulation had a significant beneficial effect on motor symptoms in PD. However, this stimulation did not have any effect on metaphor comprehension or any other cognitive ability evaluated in this study. These outcomes suggest that STN stimulation may have dissociable effects on motor and language functions.

  14. Treatment of dysarthria following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripoliti, Elina; Strong, Laura; Hickey, Freya; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Candelario, Joseph; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Speech impairment is a frequent side effect of the surgery. This study examined the efficacy of an intensive speech treatment (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, LSVT) on dysarthria after STN-DBS. The LSVT was administered in ten patients with STN-DBS (surgical group) and ten patients without (medical group). Patients were assessed before, immediately after and six months following the speech treatment using sustained phonation, a speech intelligibility scale and monologue. Vocal loudness, speech intelligibility and perceptual ratings were the primary outcome measures. Vocal loudness and perceptual scores improved significantly across tasks for the medical group only. Speech intelligibility did not significantly change for either group. Results in the surgical group were variable with some patients deteriorating. Treatment of dysarthria following STN-DBS needs further investigation due to the variable response to LSVT. PMID:21953693

  15. Parkinson's disease patients with bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation gain weight.

    PubMed

    Macia, Frédéric; Perlemoine, Caroline; Coman, Irène; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre; Cuny, Emmanuel; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent; Tison, François

    2004-02-01

    Weight, body mass index (BMI) and energy expenditure/energy intake (EE/EI) was studied in 19 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients after subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) versus 14 nonoperated ones. Operated patients had a significant weight gain (WG, + 9.7 +/- 7 kg) and BMI increase (+ 4.7 kg/m2). The fat mass was higher after STN-DBS. Resting EE (REE; offdrug/ON stimulation) was significantly decreased in STN-DBS patients, while their daily energy expenditure (DEI) was not significantly different. A significant correlation was found among WG, BMI increase, and pre-operative levodopa-equivalent daily dose, their reduction after STN-DBS, and the differential REE related to stimulation and the REE in the offdrug/OFF stimulation condition. In conclusion, STN-DBS in PD induces a significant WG associated with a reduction in REE without DEI adjustment.

  16. Current steering to activate targeted neural pathways during deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic region

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Foutz, Thomas J.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has steadily evolved into an established surgical therapy for numerous neurological disorders, most notably Parkinson’s disease (PD). Traditional DBS technology relies on voltage-controlled stimulation with a single source; however, recent engineering advances are providing current-controlled devices with multiple independent sources. These new stimulators deliver constant current to the brain tissue, irrespective of impedance changes that occur around the electrode, and enable more specific steering of current towards targeted regions of interest. In this study, we examined the impact of current steering between multiple electrode contacts to directly activate three distinct neural populations in the subthalamic region commonly stimulated for the treatment of PD: projection neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus internus (GPi) fibers of the lenticular fasiculus, and internal capsule (IC) fibers of passage. We used three-dimensional finite element electric field models, along with detailed multi-compartment cable models of the three neural populations to determine their activations using a wide range of stimulation parameter settings. Our results indicate that selective activation of neural populations largely depends on the location of the active electrode(s). Greater activation of the GPi and STN populations (without activating any side-effect related IC fibers) was achieved by current steering with multiple independent sources, compared to a single current source. Despite this potential advantage, it remains to be seen if these theoretical predictions result in a measurable clinical effect that outweighs the added complexity of the expanded stimulation parameter search space generated by the more flexible technology. PMID:22277548

  17. Reduced Verbal Fluency following Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation: A Frontal-Related Cognitive Deficit?

    PubMed Central

    Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Le Jeune, Florence; Dondaine, Thibaut; Esquevin, Aurore; Robert, Gabriel Hadrien; Péron, Julie; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Sophie; Jannin, Pierre; Lozachmeur, Clément; Argaud, Soizic; Duprez, Joan; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective The decrease in verbal fluency in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) undergoing subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is usually assumed to reflect a frontal lobe-related cognitive dysfunction, although evidence for this is lacking. Methods To explore its underlying mechanisms, we combined neuropsychological, psychiatric and motor assessments with an examination of brain metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, in 26 patients with PD, 3 months before and after surgery. We divided these patients into two groups, depending on whether or not they exhibited a postoperative deterioration in either phonemic (10 patients) or semantic (8 patients) fluency. We then compared the STN-DBS groups with and without verbal deterioration on changes in clinical measures and brain metabolism. Results We did not find any neuropsychological change supporting the presence of an executive dysfunction in patients with a deficit in either phonemic or semantic fluency. Similarly, a comparison of patients with or without impaired fluency on brain metabolism failed to highlight any frontal areas involved in cognitive functions. However, greater changes in cognitive slowdown and apathy were observed in patients with a postoperative decrease in verbal fluency. Conclusions These results suggest that frontal lobe-related cognitive dysfunction could play only a minor role in the postoperative impairment of phonemic or semantic fluency, and that cognitive slowdown and apathy could have a more decisive influence. Furthermore, the phonemic and semantic impairments appeared to result from the disturbance of distinct mechanisms. PMID:26448131

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates sensitivity to decision outcome value in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Ben; Barbe, Michael; Dayan, Peter; Shiner, Tamara; Dolan, Ray; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson’s disease is known to cause a subtle but important adverse impact on behaviour, with impulsivity its most widely reported manifestation. However, precisely which computational components of the decision process are modulated is not fully understood. Here we probe a number of distinct subprocesses, including temporal discount, outcome utility, instrumental learning rate, instrumental outcome sensitivity, reward-loss trade-offs, and perseveration. We tested 22 Parkinson’s Disease patients both on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), while they performed an instrumental learning task involving financial rewards and losses, and an inter-temporal choice task for financial rewards. We found that instrumental learning performance was significantly worse following stimulation, due to modulation of instrumental outcome sensitivity. Specifically, patients became less sensitive to decision values for both rewards and losses, but without any change to the learning rate or reward-loss trade-offs. However, we found no evidence that DBS modulated different components of temporal impulsivity. In conclusion, our results implicate the subthalamic nucleus in a modulation of outcome value in experience-based learning and decision-making in Parkinson’s disease, suggesting a more pervasive role of the subthalamic nucleus in the control of human decision-making than previously thought. PMID:27624437

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates sensitivity to decision outcome value in Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Ben; Barbe, Michael; Dayan, Peter; Shiner, Tamara; Dolan, Ray; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson’s disease is known to cause a subtle but important adverse impact on behaviour, with impulsivity its most widely reported manifestation. However, precisely which computational components of the decision process are modulated is not fully understood. Here we probe a number of distinct subprocesses, including temporal discount, outcome utility, instrumental learning rate, instrumental outcome sensitivity, reward-loss trade-offs, and perseveration. We tested 22 Parkinson’s Disease patients both on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), while they performed an instrumental learning task involving financial rewards and losses, and an inter-temporal choice task for financial rewards. We found that instrumental learning performance was significantly worse following stimulation, due to modulation of instrumental outcome sensitivity. Specifically, patients became less sensitive to decision values for both rewards and losses, but without any change to the learning rate or reward-loss trade-offs. However, we found no evidence that DBS modulated different components of temporal impulsivity. In conclusion, our results implicate the subthalamic nucleus in a modulation of outcome value in experience-based learning and decision-making in Parkinson’s disease, suggesting a more pervasive role of the subthalamic nucleus in the control of human decision-making than previously thought.

  20. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency of the Subthalamic Nucleus Affects Phonemic and Action Fluency in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Aline Nunes; Beber, Bárbara Costa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to a decline in verbal fluency. The decline can be attributed to surgical effects, but the relative contributions of the stimulation parameters are not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the frequency of STN-DBS on the performance of verbal fluency tasks in patients with PD. Methods. Twenty individuals with PD who received bilateral STN-DBS were evaluated. Their performances of verbal fluency tasks (semantic, phonemic, action, and unconstrained fluencies) upon receiving low-frequency (60 Hz) and high-frequency (130 Hz) STN-DBS were assessed. Results. The performances of phonemic and action fluencies were significantly different between low- and high-frequency STN-DBS. Patients showed a decrease in these verbal fluencies for high-frequency STN-DBS. Conclusion. Low-frequency STN-DBS may be less harmful to the verbal fluency of PD patients. PMID:28050309

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency of the Subthalamic Nucleus Affects Phonemic and Action Fluency in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Valéria de Carvalho; Rieder, Carlos R M; da Cruz, Aline Nunes; Beber, Bárbara Costa; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to a decline in verbal fluency. The decline can be attributed to surgical effects, but the relative contributions of the stimulation parameters are not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the frequency of STN-DBS on the performance of verbal fluency tasks in patients with PD. Methods. Twenty individuals with PD who received bilateral STN-DBS were evaluated. Their performances of verbal fluency tasks (semantic, phonemic, action, and unconstrained fluencies) upon receiving low-frequency (60 Hz) and high-frequency (130 Hz) STN-DBS were assessed. Results. The performances of phonemic and action fluencies were significantly different between low- and high-frequency STN-DBS. Patients showed a decrease in these verbal fluencies for high-frequency STN-DBS. Conclusion. Low-frequency STN-DBS may be less harmful to the verbal fluency of PD patients.

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: All that glitters isn't gold?

    PubMed

    Galati, Salvatore; Stefani, Alessandro

    2015-04-15

    With the silver anniversary of deep brain stimulation (DBS) behind us, this would seem to be a good juncture to consider its successes and unanswered questions. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation has changed the clinical perspective of several thousand Parkinson's disease (PD) patients worldwide. A recent reappraisal animates the field with strong arguments in favor of an anticipation of the stereotactic approach in patients with as little as 5 to 6 years of disease history if they manifest motor complications. From what was once a no-choice option, STN-DBS is now becoming more and more attractive to neurologists dealing with movement disorders. Despite the development of new pharmacological treatment and renewed rehabilitation programs able to modify the severity of drug-related complications, a resurgence of stimulation therapy reminiscent of an old era of medicine with an attendant blinkered mindset has emerged. Yet, the DBS-mediated effects are modest on critical aspects such as gait impairment and extremely variable depending on the clinical phenotype and individual clinical profile. Hence, the indication for DBS should become more, and not less, individually tailored. Those physicians considering deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a therapeutic option need to evaluate results beyond short-term quality of life, giving the correct weight to the direct and indirect costs over the longer term as well as to life prognosis. Unequivocal recourse to early-stimulation surgery necessitates investigations not limited to a mere comparative assessment versus drug-mediated benefits, but instead showing evidence of a clear degree of disease-modifying effect or a rescue of basal ganglia plasticity.

  4. No Effect of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Intertemporal Decision-Making in Parkinson Patients123

    PubMed Central

    Wojtecki, Lars; Storzer, Lena; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). DBS or pharmacological treatment is believed to modulate the tendency to, or reverse, impulse control disorders. Several brain areas involved in impulsivity and reward valuation, such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum, are linked to the STN, and activity in these areas might be affected by STN-DBS. To investigate the effect of STN-DBS on one type of impulsive decision-making—delay discounting (i.e., the devaluation of reward with increasing delay until its receipt)—we tested 40 human PD patients receiving STN-DBS treatment and medication for at least 3 months. Patients were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of four groups to test the effects of DBS on/off states as well as medication on/off states on delay discounting. The delay-discounting task consisted of a series of choices among a smaller. sooner or a larger, later monetary reward. Despite considerable effects of DBS on motor performance, patients receiving STN-DBS did not choose more or less impulsively compared with those in the off-DBS group, as well as when controlling for risk attitude. Although null results have to be interpreted with caution, our findings are of significance to other researchers studying the effects of PD treatment on impulsive decision-making, and they are of clinical relevance for determining the therapeutic benefits of using STN-DBS. PMID:27257622

  5. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    PubMed

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  6. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases premature responding in a rat gambling task.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Lily R; Creed, Meaghan C; Fletcher, Paul J; Lobo, Daniela S S; Hamani, Clement; Nobrega, José N

    2013-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, several recent studies have found an association between STN-DBS and increased impulsivity. Currently, it is not clear whether the observed increase in impulsivity results from STN-DBS per se, or whether it involves an interaction with the underlying PD neuropathology and/or intake of dopaminergic drugs. We investigated the effects of STN-DBS on performance of intact rats on two tasks measuring impulsive responding: a novel rat gambling task (rGT) and a differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL20s) schedule. Following initial behavioural training, animals received electrode implantation into the STN (n=24) or sham surgery (n=24), and were re-tested on their assigned behavioural task, with or without STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS administered for two hours immediately prior to testing, had no effects on rGT choice behaviour or on DRL response inhibition (p>0.05). However, STN-DBS significantly increased premature responding in the rGT task (p=0.0004), an effect that took several sessions to develop and persisted in subsequent trials when no stimulation was given. Consistent with the notion of distinct facets of impulsivity with unique neurochemical underpinnings, we observed differential effects of STN-DBS in the two tasks employed. These results suggest that STN-DBS in the absence of parkinsonism may not lead to a general loss of inhibitory control, but may instead affect impulsivity under specific conditions.

  7. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation impacts language in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew; Ullman, Michael T; Charles, P David

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated.

  8. Early versus delayed bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation for parkinson's disease: a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Vaughan, Jennifer E; Marras, Connie; Fowler, Rob; Eckman, Mark H

    2010-07-30

    The long-term benefits of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) applied earlier in the disease course, before significant disability accumulates, remain to be determined. We developed a Markov state transition decision analytic model to compare effectiveness in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of STN DBS applied to patients with PD at an "early" ("off time" 10-20%) versus "delayed" stage ("off time" >40%). A lifelong time horizon and societal perspective were assumed. Probabilities and rates were obtained from literature review; utilities were derived using the time trade-off technique and a computer-assisted utility assessment software tool applied to a cohort of 22 STN-DBS and 21 non-STN-DBS PD patients. Uncertainty was assessed through one- and two-way sensitivity analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analysis using second-order Monte Carlo simulations. Early STN DBS was preferred with a quality-adjusted life expectancy of 22.3 QALYs, a gain of 2.5 QALYs over those with delayed surgery (19.8 QALYs). Early STN DBS was preferred in 69% of 5,000 Monte Carlo simulations. Early surgery was robustly favored through most sensitivity analyses. Delayed STN DBS afforded greater QALYs when using utility estimates exclusively from non-STN-DBS patients and, for the entire group, if the rate of motor progression were to exceed 25% per year. Although decision modeling requires assumptions and simplifications, our exploratory analysis suggests that STN DBS performed in early PD may convey greater quality-adjusted life expectancy when compared to a delayed procedure. These findings support further evaluation of early STN DBS in a controlled clinical trial.

  9. Low-frequency subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for axial symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; Walsh, Richard; Meaney, Christopher; Poon, Y Y; Fallis, Melanie; Moro, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Axial symptoms such as freezing of gait and falls are common manifestations of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and are partially responsive to medical treatment. High-frequency (≥130 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is highly efficacious in ameliorating appendicular symptoms in PD. However, it is typically less effective in improving axial symptomatology, especially in the long term. We have studied the effects of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) (≤80 Hz) for improving speech, gait and balance dysfunction in the largest patient population to date. PD patients with bilateral STN-DBS and resistant axial symptoms were switched from chronic 130 Hz stimulation to LFS and followed up to 4 years. Primary outcome measures were total motor UPDRS scores, and axial and gait subscores before and after LFS. Bivariate analyses and correlation coefficients were calculated for the different conditions. Potential predictors of therapeutic response were also investigated. Forty-five advanced PD patients who had high frequency stimulation (HFS) for 39.5 ± 27.8 consecutive months were switched to LFS. LFS was kept on for a median period of 111.5 days before the assessment. There was no significant improvement in any of the primary outcomes between HFS and LFS, although a minority of patients preferred to be maintained on LFS for longer periods of time. No predictive factors of response could be identified. There was overall no improvement from LFS in axial symptoms. This could be partly due to some study limitations. Larger prospective trials are warranted to better clarify the impact of stimulation frequency on axial signs.

  10. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Impacts Language in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A.; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated. PMID:22880117

  11. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Camptocormia is known as “bent spine syndrome” and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). Case Description: We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. Conclusion: The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition. PMID:26958425

  12. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease: From history to the interaction with the monoaminergic systems.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, E; Benazzouz, A

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the manifestation of motor symptoms, which are mainly attributed to the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the pars compacta of substantia nigra. Based on advancements in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, especially in animal models, the subthalamic nucleus has been pointed as a major target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of motor symptoms, first developed in non-human primate and then successfully transfered to parkinsonian patients. Nevertheless, despite the focus on motor deficits, Parkinson's disease is also characterized by the manifestation of non-motor symptoms, which can be due to the additional degeneration of norepinephrine, serotonin and cholinergic systems. The pathophysiology of the non-motor symptoms is under studied and consequently not well treated. Furthermore, data from the literature about the impact of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on non-motor disorders are controversial and still under debate. Similarly, the risk of mood disorders post-deep brain stimulation surgery remains also controversial. Here, we review the clinical and experimental data of this neurosurgical approach on motor and non-motor behaviors and provide evidence for its interaction with the monoaminergic systems.

  13. Verbal fluency in patients receiving bilateral versus left-sided deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Rickard L; Lidman, Elin; Häggström, Björn; Hariz, Marwan I; Linder, Jan; Fredricks, Anna; Blomstedt, Patric

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of unilateral (left-sided) versus bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on verbal fluency. To do this, 10 Parkinson's disease patients with predominantly bilateral motor symptoms who received bilateral STN DBS were compared with 6 patients suffering from predominantly unilateral symptoms who received STN DBS on the left side only. The results suggest that unilateral STN DBS of the speech dominant hemisphere is associated with significantly less declines in measures of verbal fluency as compared to bilateral stimulation.

  14. Capgras Syndrome in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Stahl, Mark C.; Eslinger, Paul; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) which can be seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as Lewy body dementia and, to a lesser extent, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old man with a history of idiopathic PD who developed Capgras syndrome following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation. As the risk of DMS has been related to deficits in executive, memory, and visuospatial function preoperatively, this case highlights the importance of continuing to improve patient selection for DBS surgery. Capgras syndrome is a rare potential complication of DBS surgery in PD patients with preexisting cognitive decline. PMID:26078747

  15. Motor responses of muscles supplied by cranial nerves to subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimuli.

    PubMed

    Costa, João; Valls-Solé, Josep; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Rumià, Jordi; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of human corticobulbar motor excitatory and inhibitory output is not fully understood. In particular, it is unclear whether the pattern of innervation is the same for upper and lower facial muscles, and what is the motor cortical area giving rise to such innervation. We used electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease to activate motor tracts at a subcortical level. We examined the excitatory and inhibitory effects of unilateral single STN deep brain stimulation (sSTN-DBS) in 14 patients by taking recordings from facial, cervical and upper limb muscles on both sides. We measured the latency and amplitude of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), and the latency and duration of the silent periods, and compared ipsilateral with contralateral responses and responses obtained in different muscles. Unilateral sSTN-DBS induced strictly contralateral MEPs in the trapezius, deltoid, biceps and thenar muscles. The same stimulus always induced bilateral MEPs in the orbicularis oculi, orbicularis oris, masseter and sternocleidomastoid at a mean latency in the range 6.0-9.1 ms. MEP latencies in the orbicularis oculi and orbicularis oris were significantly longer than in the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (P < 0.01). A short latency small action potential was recorded in the ipsilateral orbicularis oculi that was likely generated by activation of extraocular muscles. During sustained voluntary muscle contraction, a silent period was recorded at similar onset latency on both sides. This period was significantly shorter in orbicularis oculi than in masseter, and in the ipsilateral side for both muscles (P < 0.01). sSTN-DBS is able to activate the descending projecting fibres in the corticobulbar tract eliciting bilateral MEPs and silent periods in facial and cranial muscles. This suggests that fibres to both ipsi- and contralateral motor nuclei descend together at the level of the STN. These findings are relevant in

  16. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  17. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  18. Older Candidates for Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease Have a Higher Incidence of Psychiatric Serious Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Cozac, Vitalii V.; Ehrensperger, Michael M.; Gschwandtner, Ute; Hatz, Florian; Meyer, Antonia; Monsch, Andreas U.; Schuepbach, Michael; Taub, Ethan; Fuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of serious adverse events (SAE) of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We investigated a group of 26 patients with PD who underwent STN-DBS at mean age 63.2 ± 3.3 years. The operated patients from the EARLYSTIM study (mean age 52.9 ± 6.6) were used as a comparison group. Incidences of SAE were compared between these groups. Results: A higher incidence of psychosis and hallucinations was found in these elderly patients compared to the younger patients in the EARLYSTIM study (p < 0.01). Conclusions: The higher incidence of STN-DBS-related psychiatric complications underscores the need for comprehensive psychiatric pre- and postoperative assessment in older DBS candidates. However, these psychiatric SAE were transient, and the benefits of DBS clearly outweighed its adverse effects. PMID:27375478

  19. Perceived articulatory precision in patients with Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and caudal zona incerta.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Elisabeth; Qvist, Johanna; Sandström, Lena; Viklund, Fanny; Van Doorn, Jan; Karlsson, Fredrik

    2015-02-01

    The effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and caudal zona incerta (cZi) on speech articulation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) was investigated. Read speech samples were collected from nine patients with STN-DBS and 10 with cZi-DBS. The recordings were made pre-operatively and 12 months post-operatively with stimulator on and off (on medication). Blinded, randomised, repeated perceptual assessments were performed on words and isolated fricatives extracted from the recordings to assess (1) overall articulatory quality ratings, (2) frequency of occurrence of misarticulation patterns and (3) fricative production. Statistically significant worsening of articulatory measures on- compared with off-stimulation occurred in the cZi-DBS group, with deteriorated articulatory precision ratings, increased presence of misarticulations (predominately altered realisations of plosives and fricatives) and a reduced accuracy in fricative production. A similar, but not significant, trend was found for the STN-DBS group.

  20. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson's Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2016-12-13

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in "on" and "off" medication and "on" and "off" stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the "off" medication state. The "off" medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The "off" medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications.

  1. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson’s Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V.

    2016-01-01

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in “on” and “off” medication and “on” and “off” stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the “off” medication state. The “off” medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The “off” medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications. PMID:27983589

  2. Resonant antidromic cortical circuit activation as a consequence of high-frequency subthalamic deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Arbuthnott, G W; Jutras, M J; Goldberg, J A; Jaeger, D

    2007-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) for many patients. The most effective stimulation consists of high-frequency biphasic stimulation pulses around 130 Hz delivered between two active sites of an implanted depth electrode to the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). Multiple studies have shown that a key effect of STN-DBS that correlates well with clinical outcome is the reduction of synchronous and oscillatory activity in cortical and basal ganglia networks. We hypothesized that antidromic cortical activation may provide an underlying mechanism responsible for this effect, because stimulation is usually performed in proximity to cortical efferent pathways. We show with intracellular cortical recordings in rats that STN-DBS did in fact lead to antidromic spiking of deep layer cortical neurons. Furthermore, antidromic spikes triggered a dampened oscillation of local field potentials in cortex with a resonant frequency around 120 Hz. The amplitude of antidromic activation was significantly correlated with an observed suppression of slow wave and beta band activity during STN-DBS. These findings were seen in ketamine-xylazine or isoflurane anesthesia in both normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Thus antidromic resonant activation of cortical microcircuits may make an important contribution toward counteracting the overly synchronous and oscillatory activity characteristic of cortical activity in PD.

  3. Functional MRI reveals frequency-dependent responses during deep brain stimulation at the subthalamic nucleus or internal globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Younce, John R; Albaugh, Daniel L; Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a widely used therapeutic tool for the symptomatic treatment of movement disorders, most commonly Parkinson's disease (PD). High frequency stimulation at both the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) has been used with great success for the symptomatic treatment of PD, although the therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. To better understand how DBS at these target sites modulates neural circuitry, the present study used functional blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map global brain responses to DBS at the STN and GPi of the rat. Robust activation centered in the ipsilateral motor cortex was observed during high frequency stimulation at either target site, with peak responses observed at a stimulation frequency of 100Hz. Of note, frequency tuning curves were generated, demonstrating that cortical activation was maximal at clinically-relevant stimulation frequencies. Divergent responses to stimulation were noted in the contralateral hemisphere, with strong cortical and striatal negative BOLD signal during stimulation of the GPi, but not STN. The frequency-dependence of the observed motor cortex activation at both targets suggests a relationship with the therapeutic effects of STN and GPi DBS, with both DBS targets being functionally connected with motor cortex at therapeutic stimulation frequencies.

  4. A functionally relevant and long-term model of deep brain stimulation of the rat subthalamic nucleus: advantages and considerations.

    PubMed

    Spieles-Engemann, A L; Collier, T J; Sortwell, C E

    2010-10-01

    In this review we outline some relevant considerations with regards to the rat model of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). In order to optimize the rat STN DBS model in terms of predictive validity for the clinical situation we propose that the STN stimulation experimental design parameters in rodents should incorporate the following features: (i) stimulation parameters that demonstrate functional alleviation of symptoms induced by nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) denervation; (ii) stimulation duration that is relatively long-term and continuous; (iii) stimulation that is initiated at a time when the denervation status of the nigrostriatal system is known to be partial and progressing; (iv) stimulation current spread that is minimized and optimized to closely approximate the clinical situation; (v) the appropriate control conditions are included; and (vi) implantation to the STN target is verified post-mortem. Further research that examines the effect of long-term STN DBS on the neurophysiology and neurochemistry of STN circuitry is warranted. The rat model of functionally relevant long-term STN DBS provides a most favorable preclinical experimental platform in which to conduct these studies.

  5. The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goelz, Lisa C; David, Fabian J; Sweeney, John A; Vaillancourt, David E; Poizner, Howard; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease improves skeletomotor function assessed clinically, and bilateral STN DBS improves motor function to a significantly greater extent. It is unknown whether unilateral STN DBS improves oculomotor function and whether bilateral STN DBS improves it to a greater extent. Further, it has also been shown that bilateral, but not unilateral, STN DBS is associated with some impaired cognitive-motor functions. The current study compared the effect of unilateral and bilateral STN DBS on sensorimotor and cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Patients performed prosaccade and antisaccade tasks during no stimulation, unilateral stimulation, and bilateral stimulation. There were three sets of findings. First, for the prosaccade task, unilateral STN DBS had no effect on prosaccade latency and it reduced prosaccade gain; bilateral STN DBS reduced prosaccade latency and increased prosaccade gain. Second, for the antisaccade task, neither unilateral nor bilateral stimulation had an effect on antisaccade latency, unilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain, and bilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain to a greater extent. Third, bilateral STN DBS induced an increase in prosaccade errors in the antisaccade task. These findings suggest that while bilateral STN DBS benefits spatiotemporal aspects of oculomotor control, it may not be as beneficial for more complex cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Our findings are discussed considering the strategic role the STN plays in modulating information in the basal ganglia oculomotor circuit.

  6. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation restores automatic response activation and increases susceptibility to impulsive behavior in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Plessow, Franziska; Fischer, Rico; Volkmann, Jens; Schubert, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Repeatedly reported deficits of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in selecting an appropriate action in the face of competing response alternatives has led to the conclusion of a basal ganglia (BG) involvement in response selection and impulse control. Despite capacious research, it remains elusive how BG dysfunction affects processes subserving goal-directed behavior. Even more problematically, since PD pathology transcends a BG dysfunction due to dopamine depletion in the nigrostriatal DA system (by also comprising alterations in extrastriatal dopamine availability and other neurotransmitter systems), it is not yet clear which aspects of these deficits are actually caused by BG dysfunction. To address this question, the present study investigated 13 off-medication PD patients with bilateral therapeutic subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) both with and without stimulation (DBSON and DBSOFF, respectively) and 26 healthy controls. All participants performed a task that tests the relation between automatic response impulses and goal-directed action selection. Results show an improvement of automatic response activation under DBSON, increasing the susceptibility to impulsive responses, and a reduced impact of automatic response activation under DBSOFF. We argue that the BG determine the efficiency of the regulation and transmission of stimulus-driven bottom-up response activation required for efficient response selection.

  7. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin J.; Sheppard, Daylan T.; Huynh, Rachel; Anderson, Daria Nesterovich; Polar, Christian A.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian (hPD) onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms. PMID:26217192

  8. Cognitive Changes following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Meng, Xiangyu; Xiao, Jinsong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nowadays, it has been largely acknowledged that deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) can alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but its effects on cognitive function remain unclear, which are not given enough attention by many clinical doctors and researchers. To date, 3 existing meta-analyses focusing on this issue included self-control studies and have not drawn consistent conclusions. The present study is the first to compare effect sizes of primary studies that include control groups, hoping to reveal the net cognitive outcomes after STN DBS and the clinical significance. Methods. A structured literature search was conducted using strict criteria. Only studies with control group could be included. Data on age, duration of disease, levodopa equivalent dosage (LED), and multiple cognitive scales were collected and pooled. Results. Of 172 articles identified, 10 studies (including 3 randomized controlled trials and 7 nonrandomized controlled studies) were eligible for inclusion. The results suggest that STN DBS results in decreased global cognition, memory, verbal fluency, and executive function compared with control group. No significant difference is found in other cognitive domains. Conclusions. STN DBS seems relatively safe with respect to cognitive function, and further studies should focus on the exact mechanisms of possible verbal deterioration after surgery in the future.

  9. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Collin J; Sheppard, Daylan T; Huynh, Rachel; Anderson, Daria Nesterovich; Polar, Christian A; Dorval, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian (hPD) onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects on Diadochokinetic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Unger, Elin; Wahlgren, Sofia; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; Zafar, Hamayun; van Doorn, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The hypokinetic dysarthria observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects the range, speed, and accuracy of articulatory gestures in patients, reducing the perceived quality of speech acoustic output in continuous speech. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) and of the caudal zona incerta (cZi-DBS) are current surgical treatment options for PD. This study aimed at investigating the outcome of STN-DBS (7 patients) and cZi-DBS (7 patients) in two articulatory diadochokinesis tasks (AMR and SMR) using measurements of articulation rate and quality of the plosive consonants (using the percent measurable VOT metric). The results indicate that patients receiving STN-DBS increased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition in the AMR task only, with no effect on production quality. Patients receiving cZi-DBS decreased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition and further showed a reduction in production quality. The data therefore suggest that cZi-DBS is more detrimental for extended articulatory movements than STN-DBS. PMID:22007342

  11. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson’s disease following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intensive voice therapy (LSVT®LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes for surgical subjects were comparable to non-surgical cohorts. Methods Eight subjects with PD (four with STN-DBS and four without) received LSVT LOUD four times a week for four weeks. Four additional subjects with PD remained untreated. Voice intensity (SPL), Vowel Articulation Index (VAI), the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and a structured interview were evaluated before and after treatment and again six months later. Results Both treated groups showed significant increases in SPL from pre to post and six-month follow up. VAI was significantly higher for the treated groups compared to the untreated subjects at follow up. Several treated individuals had significant clinical improvement in VHI scores, particularly within the LSVT-DBS group. Treated individuals reported improvements in voice and speech in structured interviews; however, answers suggest more variable long-term maintenance within the LSVT-DBS group. The untreated group exhibited no significant changes in any measure throughout the study. Conclusions Results support LSVT LOUD for treating voice and speech in individuals with PD following STN-DBS surgery. However, modifications may be required to maintain functional improvements. PMID:21724193

  12. Characteristic laryngoscopic findings in Parkinson's disease patients after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and its correlation with voice disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Speech and voice disorders are one of the most common adverse effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). However, the pathophysiology of voice and laryngeal dysfunction after STN-DBS remains unclear. We assessed 47 PD patients (22 treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 25 treated medically (PD-Med); all patients in both groups matched by age, sex, disease duration, and motor and cognitive function) using the objective and subjective voice assessment batteries (GRBAS scale and Voice Handicap Index), and laryngoscopy. Laryngoscopic examinations revealed that PD-DBS patients showed a significantly higher incidence of incomplete glottal closure (77 vs 48 %; p = 0.039), hyperadduction of the false vocal folds (73 vs 44 %; p = 0.047), anteroposterior hypercompression (50 vs 20 %; p = 0.030) and asymmetrical glottal movement (50 vs 16 %; p = 0.002) than PD-Med patients. On- and off-stimulation assessment revealed that STN-DBS could induce or aggravate incomplete glottal closure, hyperadduction of the false vocal folds, anteroposterior hypercompression, and asymmetrical glottal movement. Incomplete glottal closure and hyperadduction of the false vocal folds significantly correlated with breathiness and strained voice, respectively (r = 0.590 and 0.539). We should adjust patients' DBS settings in consideration of voice and laryngeal functions as well as motor function.

  13. Interleaved programming of subthalamic deep brain stimulation to avoid adverse effects and preserve motor benefit in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Kahn, Max; Campbell, Joannalee; DeLaCruz, Priscilla; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2015-03-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common surgical treatment for managing motor complications in Parkinson's disease (PD). Ultimately, outcomes depend on a variety of factors including lead location, access and expertize in programming and PD medical management. Nevertheless, achieving ideal programming settings can be difficult in certain patients, leading to suboptimal control of symptoms and stimulation-induced side effects, notably dysarthria and dyskinesia. Interleaved stimulation (ILS) is a newer programming technique that attempts to optimize the stimulation field, improving control of symptoms while minimizing stimulation-induced adverse effects. A retrospective chart review was performed on PD patients receiving STN DBS over the past 12 months. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patients identified as having received ILS. The rationale and clinical efficacy of ILS was analyzed. Nine patients received ILS due to incomplete PD symptom control or stimulation-induced side effects after attempting multiple programming options. Appropriate lead location was confirmed with postoperative MRI except in one case. Following ILS, patients reported improvement in symptoms and resolution of side effects, while preserving adequate control in Parkinsonism with a mean improvement in UPDRS-MOTOR scores of 51.2 %. ILS continues to emerge as a safe and effective programming strategy for maximizing symptom control in PD while diminishing stimulation-induced side effects.

  14. A new biomarker for subthalamic deep brain stimulation for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease—a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmel, Gerrit E.; Hamilton, Tara J.; Obradovic, Milan; Gorman, Robert B.; Single, Peter S.; Chenery, Helen J.; Coyne, Terry; Silburn, Peter A.; Parker, John L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the standard treatment for advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other motor disorders. Although the surgical procedure has improved in accuracy over the years thanks to imaging and microelectrode recordings, the underlying principles that render DBS effective are still debated today. The aim of this paper is to present initial findings around a new biomarker that is capable of assessing the efficacy of DBS treatment for PD which could be used both as a research tool, as well as in the context of a closed-loop stimulator. Approach. We have used a novel multi-channel stimulator and recording device capable of measuring the response of nervous tissue to stimulation very close to the stimulus site with minimal latency, rejecting most of the stimulus artefact usually found with commercial devices. We have recorded and analyzed the responses obtained intraoperatively in two patients undergoing DBS surgery in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced PD. Main results. We have identified a biomarker in the responses of the STN to DBS. The responses can be analyzed in two parts, an initial evoked compound action potential arising directly after the stimulus onset, and late responses (LRs), taking the form of positive peaks, that follow the initial response. We have observed a morphological change in the LRs coinciding with a decrease in the rigidity of the patients. Significance. These initial results could lead to a better characterization of the DBS therapy, and the design of adaptive DBS algorithms that could significantly improve existing therapies and help us gain insights into the functioning of the basal ganglia and DBS.

  15. Effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and levodopa on energy production rate and substrate oxidation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Perlemoine, Caroline; Macia, Frédéric; Tison, François; Coman, Isabelle; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre; Cuny, Emmanuel; Baillet, Laurence; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent

    2005-02-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often lose weight, but after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), they gain weight. We compared daily energy intake (DEI), resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate oxidation rates (measured by indirect calorimetry) in nineteen STN-DBS-treated patients (Group S), thirteen others on pharmacologic treatment by levodopa (Group L) and eight control subjects. We also determined the acute effects of STN-DBS and levodopa on REE and substrate oxidation rates. STN-DBS treated patients gained 9.7 (SEM 7.1) kg after surgery, whereas patients on pharmacologic treatment lost 3.8 (SEM 10.0) kg since diagnosis. In STN-DBS-treated patients, REE (-16.5 %; P<0.001), lipid oxidation (-27 %; P<0.05) and protein oxidation (-46 %; P<0.05) were decreased, whereas glucose oxidation was elevated (+81 %; P<0.05) as compared to patients on pharmacologic treatment. Levodopa acutely reduced REE (-8.3 %; P<0.05) and glucose oxidation (-37 %; P<0.01) with a slight hyperglycaemic effect (after levodopa challenge: 5.6 (SEM 0.8) v. before levodopa challenge: 5.3 (SEM 0.6) mmol/l; P<0.01). Switching 'on' STN-DBS acutely reduced REE (-17.5 %; P<0.01) and lipid oxidation (-24 %; P<0.001) 30 min after starting stimulation. Fasting glycaemia was slightly but significantly reduced (5.4 (SEM 1.4) v. 5.5 (SEM 1.3) mmol/l; P<0.01). After STN-DBS, the normalization of REE and the reduction in lipid and protein oxidation contribute to the restoration of weight. As levodopa decreases glucose oxidation, the reduction in daily dose of levodopa in STN-DBS-treated patients helps prevent the effect of weight gain on glycaemia.

  16. Interleaving subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation to avoid side effects while achieving satisfactory motor benefits in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Zhou, Peizhi; Jiang, Shu; Wang, Wei; Li, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD). However, achieving ideal outcomes by conventional programming can be difficult in some patients, resulting in suboptimal control of PD symptoms and stimulation-induced adverse effects. Interleaving stimulation (ILS) is a newer programming technique that can individually optimize the stimulation area, thereby improving control of PD symptoms while alleviating stimulation-induced side effects after conventional programming fails to achieve the desired results. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed PD patients who received DBS programming during the previous 4 years in our hospital. We collected clinical and demographic data from 12 patients who received ILS because of incomplete alleviation of PD symptoms or stimulation-induced adverse effects after conventional programming had proven ineffective or intolerable. Appropriate lead location was confirmed with postoperative reconstruction images. The rationale and clinical efficacy of ILS was analyzed. Results: We divided our patients into 4 groups based on the following symptoms: stimulation-induced dysarthria and choreoathetoid dyskinesias, gait disturbance, and incomplete control of parkinsonism. After treatment with ILS, patients showed satisfactory improvement in PD symptoms and alleviation of stimulation-induced side effects, with a mean improvement in Unified PD Rating Scale motor scores of 26.9%. Conclusions: ILS is a newer choice and effective programming strategy to maximize symptom control in PD while decreasing stimulation-induced adverse effects when conventional programming fails to achieve satisfactory outcome. However, we should keep in mind that most DBS patients are routinely treated with conventional stimulation and that not all patients benefit from ILS. ILS is not recommended as the first choice of programming, and it is recommended only when patients have

  17. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Molinari, Anna L.; Tramontana, Michael G.; Finder, Stuart G.; Gill, Chandler E.; Bliton, Mark J.; Kao, Chris C.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M.; Cannard, Kevin R.; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Methods Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50–75, on medication ≥ 6 months but < 4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n=15) or DBS+ODT (n=15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. Results As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. The DBS+ODT group took less medication at all time points, and this reached maximum difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS+ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. Conclusions This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. PMID:24768120

  18. Neural Circuit Modulation During Deep Brain Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus for Parkinson's Disease: What Have We Learned from Neuroimaging Studies?

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents a powerful clinical tool for the alleviation of many motor symptoms that are associated with Parkinson's disease. Despite its extensive use, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of STN-DBS remain poorly understood. In the present review, we integrate and discuss recent literature examining the network effects of STN-DBS for Parkinson's disease, placing emphasis on neuroimaging findings, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. These techniques enable the noninvasive detection of brain regions that are modulated by DBS on a whole-brain scale, representing a key experimental strength given the diffuse and far-reaching effects of electrical field stimulation. By examining these data in the context of multiple hypotheses of DBS action, generally developed through clinical and physiological observations, we define a multitude of consistencies and inconsistencies in the developing literature of this rapidly moving field. PMID:24147633

  19. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for refractory total body dystonia secondary to metabolic autopallidotomy in a 4-year-old boy with infantile methylmalonic acidemia: case report.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Santo; Hasegawa, Harutomo; Lumsden, Daniel E; Ali, Wisam; Kaminska, Margaret; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2013-10-01

    The methylmalonic acidemias (MMAs) are a group of inborn errors of metabolism resulting in the accumulation of methylmalonic acid in body tissues and fluids. A recognized complication of MMA is bilateral liquefaction of the globus pallidi, resulting in a fulminant total body dystonia of childhood often refractory to medical treatment. This case of total body dystonia due to MMA in a 4-year-old boy had been medically refractory for 15 months. Complete metabolic destructive liquefaction of the pallidi, that is, autopallidotomy, necessitated an alternative, bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) with a marked improvement in dystonia and reduction in pain. The case illustrates the efficacy of STN DBS in this condition and the technical challenges in targeting the STN in a small child.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation for early motor complications in Parkinson's disease-the EARLYSTIM trial: early is not always better.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Tiago A; Espay, Alberto J; Marras, Connie; Eckman, Mark H; Pollak, Pierre; Lang, Anthony E

    2014-12-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) has revolutionized the management of disabling motor complications in Parkinson's disease. The EARLYSTIM trial applied this treatment to patients who had been experiencing motor complications for less than three years. STN-DBS significantly improved all primary and secondary outcome measures while best medical therapy failed to provide any improvement at the two-year follow-up time point. On face value these results strongly favor the application of STN-DBS far earlier than is currently applied, when patients are just beginning to experience problems with motor complications. Here we review the application of early DBS and the EARLYSTIM trial from the perspectives of clinical issues, health economics and study design and patient expectation of benefit. We conclude that the most relevant issue is not when to operate but on whom and that early is not always better. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. The organization of prefrontal-subthalamic inputs in primates provides an anatomical substrate for both functional specificity and integration: implications for basal ganglia models and deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, William I. A.; Haber, Suzanne N.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of a hyperdirect cortico-subthalamic nucleus connection highlighted the important role of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in regulating behavior. However, this pathway was shown primarily from motor areas. Hyperdirect pathways associated with cognitive and motivational cortical regions are particularly relevant given recent data from deep brain stimulation, both for neurological and psychiatric disorders. Our experiments were designed to: demonstrate the existence and organization of prefrontal-STN projections, help delineate the ‘limbic’ STN, and determine whether convergence between cortico-STN fibers from functionally diverse cortical areas exists in the STN. We injected anterograde tracers in the ventromedial prefrontal, orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate and dorsal prefrontal cortices of Macaca nemestrina & M. fascicularis to analyze the organization of terminals and passing fibers in the STN. Results show a topographically organized prefrontal hyperdirect pathway in primates. Limbic areas project to the medial tip of the nucleus, straddling its border and extending into the lateral hypothalamus. Associative areas project to the medial half, motor areas to the lateral half. Limbic projections terminated primarily rostrally and motor projections more caudally. The extension of limbic projections into the lateral hypothalamus, suggests that this region be included in the STN. A high degree of convergence exists between projections from functionally diverse cortical areas, creating potentially important interfaces between terminal fields. Taken together, the results provide an anatomical substrate to extend the role of the hyperdirect pathway in models of basal ganglia function, and new keys for understanding deep brain stimulation effects on cognitive and motivational aspects of behavior. PMID:23486951

  2. Statistical Power of Studies Examining the Cognitive Effects of Subthalamic Nucleaus Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson’s disease. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology , 19, 165–181. 36 STEVEN PAUL WOODS ET AL. Patel...Formulae, illustrative numerical examples, and heuristic interpretation of effect size analyses for neuropsychological researchers. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology , 16, 653–667. 38 STEVEN PAUL WOODS ET AL.

  3. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Asahina, Masato; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is effective in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), its physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Because STN-DBS is effective in patients with PD whose motor symptoms are dramatically alleviated by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, the higher preoperative catecholamine levels might be related to the better clinical outcome after surgery. We aimed to examine the correlation between the preoperative catecholamine levels and postoperative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The effectiveness of STN-DBS in the patient who responded well to dopaminergic medication suggest the causal link between the dopaminergic system and STN-DBS. We also examined how catecholamine levels were modulated after subthalamic stimulation. Methods In total 25 patients with PD were enrolled (Mean age 66.2 ± 6.7 years, mean disease duration 11.6 ± 3.7 years). Mean levodopa equivalent doses were 1032 ± 34.6 mg before surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma catecholamine levels were measured an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs before surgery. The mean Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores (UPDRS) and the Parkinson’s disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) were obtained before and after surgery. Of the 25 patients, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were collected an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs during on stimulation at follow up in 11 patients. Results Mean levodopa equivalent doses significantly decreased after surgery with improvement in motor functions and quality of life. The preoperative catecholamine levels had basically negative correlations with postoperative motor scores and quality of life, suggesting that higher preoperative catecholamine levels were related to better outcome after STN-DBS. The preoperative plasma levels of L-DOPA had significantly negative correlations with

  4. Are Two Leads Always Better Than One: An Emerging Case for Unilateral Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, J. L.; Hass, C.J.; Vitek, J. L.; Okun, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides significant symptom relief for the majority of well-screened patients suffering with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Implantation of stimulating electrodes bilaterally in a single session has become standard in most operating theaters worldwide. There is, however, limited evidence-based support for this approach. Although bilateral surgical procedures have been shown, using standardized clinical ratings, to provide greater motor benefits compared to unilateral procedures, bilateral procedures are more likely to be associated with increased acute and long- term complications including post-operative confusion, speech difficulties and cognitive dysfunction. Unilateral stimulation has been shown to provide significant benefits for appendicular and axial symptoms. The relative benefit of implanting one versus two sides and whether the degree of benefit associated with the second side is worth the potential risk of doing so have not been examined systematically. The relative magnitude of benefit associated with unilateral versus bilateral procedures is likely to vary from patient to patient, particularly in those patients with asymmetric symptomatology. As such, there are likely subsets of patients who do not require and therefore should not be exposed to the potential complications associated with bilateral simultaneous implantation. This review and commentary will outline our current understanding of the benefits associated with unilateral and bilateral STN DBS and discuss the role of unilateral or staged unilateral procedures as an alternative surgical approach for patients with advanced PD. PMID:18718469

  5. Effects of different electrical parameter settings on the intelligibility of speech in patients with Parkinson's disease treated with subthalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Törnqvist, Anna Lena; Schalén, Lucyna; Rehncrona, Stig

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of different electrical parameter settings on the intelligibility of speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) bilaterally treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Ten patients treated with DBS for 15 +/- 5 months (mean, SD) with significant (P < 0.01) symptom reduction (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III) were included. In the medication off condition, video laryngostroboscopy was performed and then, in random order, 11 DBS parameter settings were tested. Amplitude was increased and decreased by 25%, frequency was varied in the range 70 to 185 pps, and each of the contacts was tested separately as a cathode. The patients read a standard running text and five nonsense sentences per setting. A listener panel transcribed the nonsense sentences as perceived and valued the quality of speech on a visual analogue scale. With the patients' normally used settings, there was no significant (P = 0.058) group difference between DBS OFF and ON, but in four patients the intelligibility deteriorated with DBS ON. The higher frequencies or increased amplitude caused significant (P < 0.02) impairments of intelligibility, whereas changing the polarity between the separate contacts did not. The settings of amplitude and frequency have a major influence on the intelligibility of speech, emphasizing the importance of meticulous parameter adjustments when programming DBS to minimize side effects related to speech.

  6. Increase in body weight is a non-motor side effect of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Lucie; Ruzicka, Evzen; Jech, Robert; Serranova, Tereza; Dusek, Petr; Urgosik, Dusan

    2007-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS STN) is an effective treatment method in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) providing marked improvement of its major motor symptoms. In addition, non-motor effects have been reported including weight gain in PD patients after DBS STN. Using retrospective survey, we aimed to evaluate weight changes in our patients with advanced PD treated with DBS STN. We inquired 25 PD patients (16 men, 9 women), of mean age 55 (42-65) years, mean PD duration 15 (9-21) years, who previously received bilateral DBS STN. We obtained valid data from 23 patients. In the first survey, 1 to 45 months after DBS, weight gain was found in all patients comparing to pre-DBS period. The mean increase was 9.4 kg (from 1 to 25 kg). The patients' mean body mass index (BMI) increased from 23.7 to 27.0 kg/m2, i.e. by 3.3 kg/m2 (+2 to +6.1 kg/m2). In the repeated survey one year later, in 12 of the patients body weight moderately decreased, 3 did not change, and 6 patients further increased their weight. Possible explanations of body weight gain after DBS STN include a reduction of energy output related to elimination of dyskinesias, improved alimentation or direct influence on function of lateral hypothalamus by DBS STN.

  7. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus modulates neuronal hyperactivity and enhanced beta oscillatory activity of the subthalamic nucleus in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine model.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mesbah; Heissler, Hans E; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) area has been introduced as a novel surgical therapy for dopamine refractory gait problems, freezing and postural instability in the late stage of Parkinson's disease (PD). Lesions of the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPTg) nucleus, the equivalent of the PPN in rodents, were shown to reduce the elevated discharge rate of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. In order to further elucidate the modulatory effect of the PPTg on the STN we examined the effect of 25 Hz low frequency PPTg stimulation on neuronal single unit activity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs) of the STN, and on the electrocorticogram (ECoG) of the primary motor cortex region in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA induced nigrostriatal lesions. Stimulation of the PPTg reduced the enhanced firing rate in the STN, without affecting the firing pattern or approximate entropy (ApEn). It also reduced the activity in the beta band (15-30 Hz) of the STN, which is elevated in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, without affecting beta activity in the motor cortex. We showed a modulatory effect of PPTg stimulation on altered neuronal STN activity in the PD 6-OHDA rat model, indicating that PPTg DBS may alter activity of the basal ganglia circuitry at least partially. It remains unclear, however, how these changes are exactly mediated and whether they are relevant with regard to the descending PPTg projections in the lower brainstem.

  8. Hemisphere-Specific Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Speaking Rate and Articulatory Accuracy of Syllable Repetitions in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Emily Q; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A E; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that left versus right deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) would have differential effects on speech. Twenty right-handed individuals with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) underwent unilateral STN DBS. Ten were operated on the right and 10 on the left hemisphere as indicated by severity of nonspeech motor function. Speech was evaluated before surgery and 3 to 6 months after surgery with stimulator-off and with stimulator-on, with all participants off anti-parkinsonian medication for 12 hours before evaluation. Evaluators and patient speakers were blinded to the stimulator status at the postsurgery evaluations. Motor performance was assessed with UPDRS-III. Each participant produced three samples of diadochokinetic syllables. Syllable rate, syllable and vowel duration, VOT, and F0 were obtained. The diadochokinetic syllables were rated for articulatory accuracy and speaking rate. Twenty graduate clinicians served as judges. The samples were randomly presented via headphones. A mixed ANOVA with repeated measures was used to assess the significance of the changes in UPRS-III scores and speech measures. The results indicated that unilateral STN DBS produced improvement in nonspeech motor function regardless of the side of stimulation. In contrast, the changes in articulatory accuracy and syllable rate associated with the STN DBS were hemisphere specific.

  9. Dominant efficiency of nonregular patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a data-driven computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Deligiannis, Nick G.; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; David, Olivier; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Polychronaki, Georgia E.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Almost 30 years after the start of the modern era of deep brain stimulation (DBS), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) still constitutes a standard stimulation target for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the use of STN-DBS is also now supported by level I clinical evidence for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Disruption of neural synchronization in the STN has been suggested as one of the possible mechanisms of action of standard and alternative patterns of STN-DBS at a local level. Meanwhile, recent experimental and computational modeling evidence has signified the efficiency of alternative patterns of stimulation; however, no indications exist for treatment-refractory OCD. Here, we comparatively simulate the desynchronizing effect of standard (regular at 130 Hz) versus temporally alternative (in terms of frequency, temporal variability and the existence of bursts or pauses) patterns of STN-DBS for PD and OCD, by means of a stochastic dynamical model and two microelectrode recording (MER) datasets. Approach. The stochastic model is fitted to subthalamic MERs acquired during eight surgical interventions for PD and eight surgical interventions for OCD. For each dynamical system simulated, we comparatively assess the invariant density (steady-state phase distribution) as a measure inversely related to the desynchronizing effect yielded by the applied patterns of stimulation. Main results. We demonstrate that high (130 Hz)—and low (80 Hz)—frequency irregular patterns of stimulation, and low-frequency periodic stimulation interrupted by bursts of pulses, yield in both pathologic conditions a significantly stronger desynchronizing effect compared with standard STN-DBS, and distinct alternative patterns of stimulation. In PD, values of the invariant density measure are proven to be optimal at the dorsolateral oscillatory region of the STN including sites with the optimal therapeutic window. Significance. In addition to providing

  10. Betting on DBS: Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Risk-Taking and Decision-Making in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Jason; Rogerson, Mark; Al-Joudi, Haya; Reckess, Gila; Shpritz, Barnett; Umeh, Chizoba C.; Aljehani, Noha; Mills, Kelly; Mari, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Concerns persist that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD) increases impulsivity and/or induces excessive reward-seeking. We report here the performance of PD patients with implanted subthalamic nucleus electrodes, with stimulation on and off, on three laboratory tasks of risk-taking and decision-making. They are compared to PD patients maintained on medication and normal control subjects. Methods and Results In the Game of Dice Task, a test of “risky” decision-making, PD patients with or without DBS made highest-risk bets more often, and ended up with less money, than normal controls. There was a trend for DBS stimulation to ameliorate this effect. Deal or No-Deal is an “ambiguous” decision-making task that assessed preference for risk (holding on to one’s briefcase) over a “sure thing” (accepting the banker’s offer). Here, DBS patients were more conservative with stimulation on than off. They accepted smaller offers from the banker and won less money in the DBS-on condition. Overall, the two PD groups won less money than healthy participants. The Framing Paradigm assessed willingness to gamble on a fixed (unambiguous) prize depending on whether the reward was “framed” as a loss or a gain. Nonsurgical PD patients tended to be more risk-averse than normal subjects, whereas DBS patients were more willing to gamble for gains as well as losses both on and off stimulation. Conclusions On “risky” decision-making tasks, DBS patients were more risk-taking than normal, but stimulation may temper this tendency. In contrast, in an “ambiguous risk” situation, DBS patients were more risk-averse (conservative) than normal, and this tendency was greatest with stimulation. PMID:25486385

  11. Predictive timing functions of cortical beta oscillations are impaired in Parkinson's disease and influenced by L-DOPA and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gulberti, A.; Moll, C.K.E.; Hamel, W.; Buhmann, C.; Koeppen, J.A.; Boelmans, K.; Zittel, S.; Gerloff, C.; Westphal, M.; Schneider, T.R.; Engel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-basal ganglia circuits participate in motor timing and temporal perception, and are important for the dynamic configuration of sensorimotor networks in response to exogenous demands. In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) induces motor performance benefits. Hitherto, little is known concerning contributions of the basal ganglia to sensory facilitation and cortical responses to RAS in PD. Therefore, we conducted an EEG study in 12 PD patients before and after surgery for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) and in 12 age-matched controls. Here we investigated the effects of levodopa and STN-DBS on resting-state EEG and on the cortical-response profile to slow and fast RAS in a passive-listening paradigm focusing on beta-band oscillations, which are important for auditory–motor coupling. The beta-modulation profile to RAS in healthy participants was characterized by local peaks preceding and following auditory stimuli. In PD patients RAS failed to induce pre-stimulus beta increases. The absence of pre-stimulus beta-band modulation may contribute to impaired rhythm perception in PD. Moreover, post-stimulus beta-band responses were highly abnormal during fast RAS in PD patients. Treatment with levodopa and STN-DBS reinstated a post-stimulus beta-modulation profile similar to controls, while STN-DBS reduced beta-band power in the resting-state. The treatment-sensitivity of beta oscillations suggests that STN-DBS may specifically improve timekeeping functions of cortical beta oscillations during fast auditory pacing. PMID:26594626

  12. In Parkinson's disease on a probabilistic Go/NoGo task deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus only interferes with withholding of the most prepotent responses.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Dejan; Dirnberger, Georg; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    The evidence on the impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on action restraint on Go/NoGO reaction time (RT) tasks in Parkinson's disease (PD) is inconsistent; with some studies reporting no effect and others finding that STN stimulation interferes with withholding of responses and results in more commission errors relative to STN-DBS off. We used a task in which the probability of Go stimuli varied from 100% (simple RT task) to 80, 50 and 20% (probabilistic Go/NoGo RT task), thus altering the prepotency of the response and the difficulty in withholding it on NoGo trials. Twenty PD patients with STN-DBS, ten unoperated PD patients and ten healthy controls participated in the study. All participants were tested twice; the order of on versus off stimulation for STN-DBS PD patients was counterbalanced. Both STN-DBS and unoperated PD patients were tested on medication. The results indicated that STN-DBS selectively decreased discriminability when the response was most prepotent (high--80%, as compared to low Go probability trials--50 and 20%). Movement times were faster with STN stimulation than with DBS off across different Go probability levels. There was neither an overall nor a selective effect of STN-DBS on RTs depending on the level of Go probability. Furthermore, compared to healthy controls, both STN-DBS and unoperated PD patients were more prone to making anticipatory errors; which was not influenced by STN stimulation. The results provide evidence for 'load-dependent' effects of STN stimulation on action restraint as a function of the prepotency of the Go response.

  13. Cognition and Depression Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Folley, Bradley S; Berry, David T R; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Han, Dong Y; Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Walls, Brittany D; van Horne, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Individuals experience predominantly extrapyramidal symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait abnormalities, cognitive impairment, depression, and neurobehavioral concerns. Cognitive impairments associated with PD are diverse, including difficulty with attention, processing speed, executive functioning, memory recall, visuospatial functions, word-retrieval, and naming. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) is FDA approved and has been shown to be effective in reducing motor symptoms of PD. Studies have found that stimulating STN and GPi are equally effective at improving motor symptoms and dyskinesias; however, there has been discrepancy as to whether the cognitive, behavioral, and mood symptoms are affected differently between the two targets. The present study used random-effects meta-analytic models along with a novel p-curve analytic procedure to compare the potential cognitive and emotional impairments associated with STN-DBS in the current literature to those associated with GPi-DBS. Forty-one articles were reviewed with an aggregated sample size of 1622 patients. Following STN-DBS, small declines were found in psychomotor speed, memory, attention, executive functions, and overall cognition; and moderate declines were found in both semantic and phonemic fluency. However, GPi-DBS resulted in fewer neurocognitive declines than STN-DBS (small declines in attention and small-moderate declines in verbal fluency). With regards to its effect on depression symptomatology, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS resulted in lower levels of depressive symptoms post-surgery. From a neurocognitive standpoint, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS produce subtle cognitive declines but appears to be relatively well tolerated.

  14. Probabilistic versus deterministic tractography for delineation of the cortico-subthalamic hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mikkel V; Lund, Torben E; Sunde, Niels; Frandsen, Jesper; Rosendal, Frederikke; Juul, Niels; Østergaard, Karen

    2016-07-08

    OBJECTIVE Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and tractography allows noninvasive mapping of the structural connections of the brain, and may provide important information for neurosurgical planning. The hyperdirect pathway, connecting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) with the motor cortex, is assumed to play a key role in mediating the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS), which is an effective but poorly understood treatment for Parkinson disease. This study aimed to apply recent methodological advances in DWI acquisition and analysis to the delineation of the hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for surgery. METHODS High spatial and angular resolution DWI data were acquired preoperatively from 5 patients with Parkinson disease undergoing DBS. The authors compared the delineated hyperdirect pathways and associated STN target maps generated by 2 different tractography methods: a tensor-based deterministic method, typically available in clinical settings, and an advanced probabilistic method based on constrained spherical deconvolution. In addition, 10 high-resolution data sets with the same scanning parameters were acquired from a healthy control participant to assess the robustness of the tractography results. RESULTS Both tractography approaches identified connections between the ipsilateral motor cortex and the STN. However, the 2 methods provided substantially different target regions in the STN, with the target center of gravity differing by > 1.4 mm on average. The probabilistic method (based on constrained spherical deconvolution) plausibly reconstructed a continuous set of connections from the motor cortex, terminating in the dorsolateral region of the STN. In contrast, the tensor-based method reconstructed a comparatively sparser and more variable subset of connections. Furthermore, across the control scans, the probabilistic method identified considerably more consistent targeting regions within the STN compared with the deterministic

  15. Deep brain stimulation of pallidal versus subthalamic for patients with Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fan; Ma, Wenbin; Huang, Yongmin; Qiu, Zhihai; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects many people every year. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective nonpharmacological method to treat PD motor symptoms. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS versus globus pallidus internus (GPi)-DBS in treating advanced PD. Methods Controlled clinical trials that compared STN-DBS to GPi-DBS for short-term treatment of PD in adults were researched up to November 2015. The primary outcomes were the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Section (UPDRS) III score and the levodopa-equivalent dosage (LED) after DBS. The secondary outcomes were the UPDRS II score and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Results Totally, 13 studies containing 1,148 PD patients were included in this meta-analysis to compare STN-DBS versus GPi-DBS. During the off-medication state, the pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) of UPDRS III and II scores were −2.18 (95% CI =−5.11 to 0.74) and −1.96 (95% CI =−3.84 to −0.08), respectively. During the on-medication state, the pooled WMD of UPDRS III and II scores were 0.15 (95% CI =−1.14 to 1.44) and 1.01 (95% CI =0.12 to 1.89), respectively. After DBS, the pooled WMD of LED and BDI were −254.48 (95% CI =−341.66) and 2.29 (95% CI =0.83 to 3.75), respectively. Conclusion These results indicate that during the off-medication state, the STN-DBS might be superior to GPi-DBS in improving the motor function and activities of daily living for PD patients; but during the on-medication state, the opposite result is observed. Meanwhile, the STN-DBS is superior at reducing the LED, whereas the GPi-DBS shows a significantly greater reduction in BDI score after DBS. PMID:27382286

  16. Reversible improvement in severe freezing of gait from Parkinson's disease with unilateral interleaved subthalamic brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Stephanie N; Gonzalez, Christopher L; Shuresh, Joshita; Walker, Harrison C

    2015-12-01

    Freezing of gait causes considerable morbidity in patients with Parkinson's disease and is often refractory to conventional treatments. In this double-blind, randomized evaluation, unilateral interleaved deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus/substantia nigra pars reticulata region significantly improved freezing of gait in a patient with advanced Parkinson's disease.

  17. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the

  18. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson’s disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus–cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise

  19. Three-dimensional SPACE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery at 3 T to improve subthalamic nucleus lead placement for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Senova, Suhan; Hosomi, Koichi; Gurruchaga, Jean-Marc; Gouello, Gaëtane; Ouerchefani, Naoufel; Beaugendre, Yara; Lepetit, Hélène; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Badin, Romina Aron; Dauguet, Julien; Jan, Caroline; Hantraye, Philippe; Brugières, Pierre; Palfi, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for motor symptoms in patients with pharmacoresistant Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the procedure, which requires multimodal perioperative exploration such as imaging, electrophysiology, or clinical examination during macrostimulation to secure lead positioning, remains challenging because the STN cannot be reliably visualized using the gold standard, T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) at 1.5 T. Thus, there is a need to improve imaging tools to better visualize the STN, optimize DBS lead implantation, and enlarge DBS diffusion. METHODS Gradient-echo sequences such as those used in T2WI suffer from higher distortions at higher magnetic fields than spin-echo sequences. First, a spin-echo 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions) FLAIR sequence at 3 T was designed, validated histologically in 2 nonhuman primates, and applied to 10 patients with PD; their data were clinically compared in a double-blind manner with those of a control group of 10 other patients with PD in whom STN targeting was performed using T2WI. RESULTS Overlap between the nonhuman primate STNs segmented on 3D-histological and on 3D-SPACE-FLAIR volumes was high for the 3 most anterior quarters (mean [± SD] Dice scores 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.74 ± 0.06, and 0.60 ± 0.09). STN limits determined by the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence were more consistent with electrophysiological edges than those determined by T2WI (0.9 vs 1.4 mm, respectively). The imaging contrast of the STN on the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence was 4 times higher (p < 0.05). Improvement in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III score (off medication, on stimulation) 12 months after the operation was higher for patients who underwent 3D-SPACE-FLAIR-guided implantation than for those in whom T2WI was used (62.2% vs 43.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). The total electrical energy

  20. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson׳s disease has no significant effect on perceptual timing in the hundreds of milliseconds range

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Thomas E.; Grube, Manon; Mandal, Arnab; Cooper, Freya E.; Brechany, Una; Burn, David J.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral, high-frequency stimulation of the basal ganglia (STN-DBS) is in widespread use for the treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). We present here the first psychophysical investigation of the effect of STN-DBS upon perceptual timing in the hundreds of milliseconds range, with both duration-based (absolute) and beat-based (relative) tasks; 13 patients with PD were assessed with their STN-DBS ‘on’, ‘off’, and then ‘on’ again. Paired parametric analyses revealed no statistically significant differences for any task according to DBS status. We demonstrate, from the examination of confidence intervals, that any functionally relevant effect of STN-DBS on relative perceptual timing is statistically unlikely. For absolute, duration-based timing, we demonstrate that the activation of STN-DBS may either worsen performance or have no effect, but that it is unlikely to lead to significant improvement. Although these results are negative they have important implications for our understanding of perceptual timing and its relationship to motor functions within the timing network of the brain. They imply that the mechanisms involved in the perceptual processing of temporal information are likely to be functionally independent from those that underpin movement. Further, they suggest that the connections between STN and the subtantia nigra and globus pallidus are unlikely to be critical to beat-based perceptual timing. PMID:24613477

  1. Deep brain stimulation modulates effects of motivation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Eusebio, Alexandre; Vandenberghe, Wim; Nuttin, Bart; Brown, Peter

    2009-04-22

    It is unclear how motivation leads to improved motor performance. Here we test the hypothesis that motivation interacts with behavioural performance in the basal ganglia. We recorded trial-to-trial performance in a bimanual motor task in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease with electrodes chronically implanted in the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation. Motivation-associated improvements in trial-to-trial performance were contrasted with and without stimulation at high frequency. Motivation and stimulation improved trial-to-trial performance, but the effect of motivation was halved during stimulation. We conclude that the subthalamic area is mechanistically important in those processes linking motivation to improvement in motor performance. This finding may be relevant to some of the cognitive and emotional changes associated with bilateral subthalamic stimulation.

  2. Deep brain light stimulation effects on glutamate and dopamine concentration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Lin, Shih-Shian; Liu, Janelle; Chen, Shih-How; Chio, Chung-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Compared to deep brain electrical stimulation, which has been applied to treating pathological brain diseases, little work has been done on the effect of deep brain light stimulation. A fiber-coupled laser stimulator at 840 nm wavelength and 130 Hz pulse repetition rate is developed in this work for deep brain light stimulation in a rat model. Concentration changes in glutamate and dopamine in the striatum are observed using a microdialysis probe when the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is stimulated at various optical power levels. Experimental results show that light stimulation causes the concentration of glutamate to decrease while that of dopamine is increased. This suggests that deep brain light stimulation of the STN is a promising therapeutic strategy for dopamine-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The stimulator developed for this work is useful for deep brain light stimulation in biomedical research.

  3. Chaotic Desynchronization as the Therapeutic Mechanism of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Charles J.; Beverlin, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden

    2011-01-01

    High frequency deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (deep brain stimulation, DBS) relieves many of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in humans and animal models. Although the treatment has seen widespread use, its therapeutic mechanism remains paradoxical. The subthalamic nucleus is excitatory, so its stimulation at rates higher than its normal firing rate should worsen the disease by increasing subthalamic excitation of the globus pallidus. The therapeutic effectiveness of DBS is also frequency and intensity sensitive, and the stimulation must be periodic; aperiodic stimulation at the same mean rate is ineffective. These requirements are not adequately explained by existing models, whether based on firing rate changes or on reduced bursting. Here we report modeling studies suggesting that high frequency periodic excitation of the subthalamic nucleus may act by desynchronizing the firing of neurons in the globus pallidus, rather than by changing the firing rate or pattern of individual cells. Globus pallidus neurons are normally desynchronized, but their activity becomes correlated in Parkinson's disease. Periodic stimulation may induce chaotic desynchronization by interacting with the intrinsic oscillatory mechanism of globus pallidus neurons. Our modeling results suggest a mechanism of action of DBS and a pathophysiology of Parkinsonism in which synchrony, rather than firing rate, is the critical pathological feature. PMID:21734868

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bronstein, Jeff M.; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L.; Lozano, Andres M.; Volkmann, Jens; Stefani, Alessandro; Horak, Fay B.; Okun, Michael S.; Foote, Kelly D.; Krack, Paul; Pahwa, Rajesh; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Hariz, Marwan I.; Bakay, Roy A.; Rezai, Ali; Marks, William J.; Moro, Elena; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Weaver, Frances M.; Gross, Robert E.; DeLong, Mahlon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide recommendations to patients, physicians, and other health care providers on several issues involving deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD). Data Sources and Study Selection An international consortium of experts organized, reviewed the literature, and attended the workshop. Topics were introduced at the workshop, followed by group discussion. Data Extraction and Synthesis A draft of a consensus statement was presented and further edited after plenary debate. The final statements were agreed on by all members. Conclusions (1) Patients with PD without significant active cognitive or psychiatric problems who have medically intractable motor fluctuations, intractable tremor, or intolerance of medication adverse effects are good candidates for DBS. (2) Deep brain stimulation surgery is best performed by an experienced neurosurgeon with expertise in stereotactic neurosurgery who is working as part of a interprofessional team. (3) Surgical complication rates are extremely variable, with infection being the most commonly reported complication of DBS. (4) Deep brain stimulation programming is best accomplished by a highly trained clinician and can take 3 to 6 months to obtain optimal results. (5) Deep brain stimulation improves levodopa-responsive symptoms, dyskinesia, and tremor; benefits seem to be long-lasting in many motor domains. (6) Subthalamic nuclei DBS may be complicated by increased depression, apathy, impulsivity, worsened verbal fluency, and executive dysfunction in a subset of patients. (7) Both globus pallidus pars interna and subthalamic nuclei DBS have been shown to be effective in addressing the motor symptoms of PD. (8) Ablative therapy is still an effective alternative and should be considered in a select group of appropriate patients. PMID:20937936

  5. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson's disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on 'effective' connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl; Foltynie, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both 'action' and 'resting' motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the 'effective' connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network-disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses.

  6. Reversing cognitive-motor impairments in Parkinson's disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming.

    PubMed

    Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive-motor performance in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual-task conditions, force

  7. Posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion for dropped head syndrome after deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A C; Wilson-MacDonald, J; Green, A L; Aziz, T Z; Cadoux-Hudson, T A D

    2010-04-01

    We describe dropped head syndrome in a patient with Parkinson's disease receiving subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). Posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion after transarticular screw fixation of an odontoid fracture is shown and its rationale explained. Pedunculopontine nucleus DBS as treatment for fall-predominant Parkinson's disease, and globus pallidus interna DBS for dystonia-predominant Parkinson's disease, are discussed.

  8. Deep brain stimulation for refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mandat, Tomasz; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Koziara, Henryk; Nauman, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a method of treatment utilized to control medically refractory epilepsy (RE). Patients with medically refractory epilepsy who do not achieve satisfactory control of seizures with pharmacological treatment or surgical resection of the epileptic focus and those who do not qualify for surgery could benefit from DBS. The most frequently used stereotactic targets for DBS are the anterior thalamic nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, central-medial thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum. The DBS is believed to be an effective method of treatment for various types of epilepsy among adults and adolescents. Side effects may be associated with implantation of electrodes and with the stimulation itself. An increasing number of publications and growing interest in DBS application for RE may result in standardization of the qualification and treatment protocol for RE with DBS. PMID:23185188

  9. Movement disorders induced by deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation represents a major advance in the treatment of several types of movement disorders. However, during stimulation new movement disorders may emerge, thus limiting the positive effects of this therapy. These movement disorders may be induced by: 1) stimulation of the targeted nucleus, 2) stimulation of surrounding tracts and nuclei, and 3) as a result of dose adjustment of accompanying medications, such as reduction of dopaminergic drugs in patients with Parkinson's disease. Various dyskinesias, blepharospasm, and apraxia of eyelid opening have been described mainly with subthalamic nucleus stimulation, whereas hypokinesia and freezing of gait have been observed with stimulation of the globus pallidus internus. Other deep brain stimulation-related movement disorders include dyskinesias associated with stimulation of the globus pallidus externus and ataxic gait as a side effect of chronic bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus. These movement disorders are generally reversible and usually resolved once the stimulation is reduced or turned off. This, however, typically leads to loss of benefit of the underlying movement disorder which can be re-gained by using different contacts, changing targets or stimulation parameters, and adjusting pharmacological therapy. New and innovative emerging technologies and stimulation techniques may help to prevent or overcome the various deep brain stimulation-induced movement disorders. In this review we aim to describe the clinical features, frequency, pathophysiology, and strategies for treatment of these iatrogenic movement disorders.

  10. The subthalamic nucleus influences visuospatial attention in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmalbach, Barbara; Günther, Veronika; Raethjen, Jan; Wailke, Stefanie; Falk, Daniela; Deuschl, Günther; Witt, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    Spatial attention is a lateralized feature of the human brain. Whereas the role of cortical areas of the nondominant hemisphere on spatial attention has been investigated in detail, the impact of the BG, and more precisely the subthalamic nucleus, on signs and symptoms of spatial attention is not well understood. Here we used unilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus to reversibly, specifically, and intraindividually modify the neuronal BG outflow and its consequences on signs and symptoms of visuospatial attention in patients suffering from Parkinson disease. We tested 13 patients with Parkinson disease and chronic deep brain stimulation in three stimulation settings: unilateral right and left deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus as well as bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. In all three stimulation settings, the patients viewed a set of pictures while an eye-tracker system recorded eye movements. During the exploration of the visual stimuli, we analyzed the time spent in each visual hemispace, as well as the number, duration, amplitude, peak velocity, acceleration peak, and speed of saccades. In the unilateral left-sided stimulation setting, patients show a shorter ipsilateral exploration time of the extrapersonal space, whereas number, duration, and speed of saccades did not differ between the different stimulation settings. These results demonstrated reduced visuospatial attention toward the side contralateral to the right subthalamic nucleus that was not being stimulated in a unilateral left-sided stimulation. Turning on the right stimulator, the reduced visuospatial attention vanished. These results support the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in modulating spatial attention. Therefore, the subthalamic nucleus is part of the subcortical network that subserves spatial attention.

  11. In vivo Exploration of the Connectivity between the Subthalamic Nucleus and the Globus Pallidus in the Human Brain Using Multi-Fiber Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Sonia; Cabeen, Ryan; Sébille, Sophie B.; Yelnik, Jérôme; François, Chantal; Fernandez Vidal, Sara; Karachi, Carine; Zhao, Yulong; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Jannin, Pierre; Kikinis, Ron; Bardinet, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The basal ganglia is part of a complex system of neuronal circuits that play a key role in the integration and execution of motor, cognitive and emotional function in the human brain. Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological disorder of the motor circuit characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movement. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus pars interna provides an efficient treatment to reduce symptoms and levodopa-induced side effects in Parkinson’s disease patients. While the underlying mechanism of action of DBS is still unknown, the potential modulation of white matter tracts connecting the surgical targets has become an active area of research. With the introduction of advanced diffusion MRI acquisition sequences and sophisticated post-processing techniques, the architecture of the human brain white matter can be explored in vivo. The goal of this study is to investigate the white matter connectivity between the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus. Two multi-fiber tractography methods were used to reconstruct pallido-subthalamic, subthalamo-pallidal and pyramidal fibers in five healthy subjects datasets of the Human Connectome Project. The anatomical accuracy of the tracts was assessed by four judges with expertise in neuroanatomy, functional neurosurgery, and diffusion MRI. The variability among subjects was evaluated based on the fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of the tracts. Both multi-fiber approaches enabled the detection of complex fiber architecture in the basal ganglia. The qualitative evaluation by experts showed that the identified tracts were in agreement with the expected anatomy. Tract-derived measurements demonstrated relatively low variability among subjects. False-negative tracts demonstrated the current limitations of both methods for clinical decision-making. Multi-fiber tractography methods combined with state-of-the-art diffusion MRI data have the

  12. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Larson, Paul S

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an implanted electrical device that modulates specific targets in the brain resulting in symptomatic improvement in a particular neurologic disease, most commonly a movement disorder. It is preferred over previously used lesioning procedures due to its reversibility, adjustability, and ability to be used bilaterally with a good safety profile. Risks of DBS include intracranial bleeding, infection, malposition, and hardware issues, such migration, disconnection, or malfunction, but the risk of each of these complications is low--generally ≤ 5% at experienced, large-volume centers. It has been used widely in essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia when medical treatment becomes ineffective, intolerable owing to side effects, or causes motor complications. Brain targets implanted include the thalamus (most commonly for essential tremor), subthalamic nucleus (most commonly for Parkinson's disease), and globus pallidus (Parkinson's disease and dystonia), although new targets are currently being explored. Future developments include brain electrodes that can steer current directionally and systems capable of "closed loop" stimulation, with systems that can record and interpret regional brain activity and modify stimulation parameters in a clinically meaningful way. New, image-guided implantation techniques may have advantages over traditional DBS surgery.

  13. Cortico-muscular coherence increases with tremor improvement after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Hame; Kim, June Sic; Paek, Sun Ha; Jeon, Beom Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Chung, Chun Kee

    2009-10-28

    Deep brain stimulation on the subthalamic nucleus has been used to relieve Parkinsonian motor symptoms. However, the underlying physiological mechanism has not been fully understood. Beta-band cortico-muscular coherence increases when healthy humans perform isometric contraction. We hypothesized that this might be a measure of symptomatic improvement in motor performance after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Here, we measured the beta-band cortico-muscular coherence with magnetoencephalography from three Parkinson's disease patients. We then compared the coherence values for stimulator on-state and off-state. We found that when the stimulator is on, the beta cortico-muscular coherence elevates significantly for the tremorous hand compared with that when the stimulator is off. This suggests that deep brain stimulation resulted in better cortico-muscular coordination.

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xiong, Y.Y.; Xu, G.L.; Liu, X.F.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable therapeutic benefits for people with a variety of neurological disorders. Despite the uncertainty of the precise mechanisms underlying its efficacy, DBS is clinically effective in improving motor function of essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and primary dystonia and in relieving obsessive-compulsive disorder. Recently, this surgical technique has continued to expand to other numerous neurological diseases with encouraging results. This review highlighted the current and potential future clinical applications of DBS. PMID:25187779

  15. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M.; Tan, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson’s disease, elevations in beta activity (13–35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson’s disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this

  16. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-02-13

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  17. [Functional imaging of deep brain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hilker, R

    2010-10-01

    Functional brain imaging allows the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the living human brain to be investigated. In patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), positron emission tomography (PET) studies were undertaken at rest as well as under motor, cognitive or behavioral activation. DBS leads to a reduction of abnormal PD-related network activity in the motor system, which partly correlates with the improvement of motor symptoms. The local increase of energy consumption within the direct target area suggests a predominant excitatory influence of the stimulation current on neuronal tissue. Remote effects of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on frontal association cortices indicate an interference of stimulation energy with associative and limbic basal ganglia loops. Taken together, functional brain imaging provides very valuable data for advancement of the DBS technique in PD therapy.

  18. Cortical effects of deep brain stimulation: implications for pathogenesis and treatment of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Arbuthnott, Gordon W; Ke, Ya; Yung, Wing-Ho

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation that targets the subthalamic nucleus has proved to be beneficial in alleviating the motor symptoms in many patients with Parkinson disease. The mechanism of action for this paradigm of deep brain stimulation is still not fully understood, and this is, in part, attributed to the fact that there are diverse cellular elements at the stimulation site that could bring about local and distal effects. Recent studies in both human and animal models strongly suggest that the activity in the cortex, especially in the motor cortical areas, is directly altered by deep brain stimulation by signals traveling in an antidromic fashion from the subthalamic nucleus. Herein, we discuss the evidence for this proposition, as well as the mechanism by which antidromic activation desynchronizes motor cortical activity. The implications of these new findings for the pathogenesis and treatment of Parkinson disease are highlighted.

  19. Body weight gain and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Isabelle; Derost, Philippe; Ulla, Miguel; Marques, Ana; Debilly, Bérangère; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Chéreau, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jean Jacques; Boirie, Yves; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Durif, Franck

    2011-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical technique that has now been available for some 25 years. It is used in the treatment of various motor disorders, e.g. Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor and dystonia, and neuropsychiatric illnesses, e.g. obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome. The surgical targets of DBS include the thalamic ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim), the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and more recently the subthalamic nucleus (STN), currently considered as the reference target in the treatment of PD. In the last ten years, most studies in PD patients have described a rapid and marked weight gain in the months following DBS of the STN. This weight gain sometimes induces obesity and can have metabolic repercussions. The physiopathological mechanisms responsible for the weight gain are multifactorial (changes in energy metabolism and eating behaviour, reduction of motor complications, etc.). This review reports current knowledge concerning weight changes in patients treated by DBS with different surgical targets. It also describes the mechanisms responsible for weight gain and the health outcome for the patients.

  20. Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groiss, S. J.; Wojtecki, L.; Südmeyer, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the last 15 years deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as a highly-effective therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Patient selection, stereotactic implantation, postoperative stimulator programming and patient care requires a multi-disciplinary team including movement disorders specialists in neurology and functional neurosurgery. To treat medically refractory levodopa-induced motor complications or resistant tremor the preferred target for high-frequency DBS is the subthalamic nucleus (STN). STN-DBS results in significant reduction of dyskinesias and dopaminergic medication, improvement of all cardinal motor symptoms with sustained long-term benefits, and significant improvement of quality of life when compared with best medical treatment. These benefits have to be weighed against potential surgery-related adverse events, device-related complications, and stimulus-induced side effects. The mean disease duration before initiating DBS in PD is currently about 13 years. It is presently investigated whether the optimal timing for implantation may be at an earlier disease-stage to prevent psychosocial decline and to maintain quality of life for a longer period of time. PMID:21180627

  1. [Abscess at the implant site following apical parodontitis. Hardware-related complications of deep brain stimulation].

    PubMed

    Sixel-Döring, F; Trenkwalder, C; Kappus, C; Hellwig, D

    2006-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an important treatment option for advanced stages of idiopathic Parkinson's disease, leading to significant improvement of motor symptoms in suited patients. Hardware-related complications such as technical malfunction, skin erosion, and infections however cause patient discomfort and additional expense. The patient presented here suffered a putrid infection of the impulse generator site following only local dental treatment of apical parodontitis. Therefore, prophylactic systemic antibiotic treatment is recommended for patients with implanted deep brain stimulation devices in case of operations, dental procedures, or infectious disease.

  2. Modulation of motor inhibition by subthalamic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kibleur, A; Gras-Combe, G; Benis, D; Bastin, J; Bougerol, T; Chabardès, S; Polosan, M; David, O

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can be used to treat severe obsessive-compulsive disorders that are refractory to conventional treatments. The mechanisms of action of this approach possibly rely on the modulation of associative-limbic subcortical–cortical loops, but remain to be fully elucidated. Here in 12 patients, we report the effects of high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on behavior, and on electroencephalographic responses and inferred effective connectivity during motor inhibition processes involved in the stop signal task. First, we found that patients were faster to respond and had slower motor inhibition processes when stimulated. Second, the subthalamic stimulation modulated the amplitude and delayed inhibition-related electroencephalographic responses. The power of reconstructed cortical current densities decreased in the stimulation condition in a parietal–frontal network including cortical regions of the inhibition network such as the superior parts of the inferior frontal gyri and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Finally, dynamic causal modeling revealed that the subthalamic stimulation was more likely to modulate efferent connections from the basal ganglia, modeled as a hidden source, to the cortex. The connection from the basal ganglia to the right inferior frontal gyrus was significantly decreased by subthalamic stimulation. Beyond motor inhibition, our study thus strongly suggests that the mechanisms of action of high-frequency subthalamic stimulation are not restricted to the subthalamic nucleus, but also involve the modulation of distributed subcortical–cortical networks. PMID:27754484

  3. Freezing and hypokinesia of gait induced by stimulation of the subthalamic region.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Giorgio; Lopiano, Leonardo; Zibetti, Maurizio; Cinquepalmi, Annina; Fronda, Chiara; Bergamasco, Bruno; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2007-07-15

    We report a case of a Parkinson's disease patient treated by bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, who developed freezing and hypokinesia of gait induced by stimulation through a left-side misplaced electrode which was more antero-medial than the planned trajectory. Subsequently, correct repositioning of the left electrode afforded complete relief of gait disturbances. Freezing and hypokinesia of gait may be side effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic region due to current spreading antero-medially to the subthalamic nucleus. These side effects are not subject to habituation and restrict any increase in stimulation parameters. We hypothesize that pallidal projections to the pedunculopontine nucleus could be responsible for these gait disturbances in our patient.

  4. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of uncommon tremor syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a standard therapy for the treatment of select cases of medication refractory essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease however the effectiveness and long-term outcomes of DBS in other uncommon and complex tremor syndromes has not been well established. Traditionally, the ventralis intermedius nucleus (VIM) of the thalamus has been considered the main target for medically intractable tremors; however alternative brain regions and improvements in stereotactic techniques and hardware may soon change the horizon for treatment of complex tremors. Areas covered: In this article, we conducted a PubMed search using different combinations between the terms ‘Uncommon tremors’, ‘Dystonic tremor’, ‘Holmes tremor’ ‘Midbrain tremor’, ‘Rubral tremor’, ‘Cerebellar tremor’, ‘outflow tremor’, ‘Multiple Sclerosis tremor’, ‘Post-traumatic tremor’, ‘Neuropathic tremor’, and ‘Deep Brain Stimulation/DBS’. Additionally, we examined and summarized the current state of evolving interventions for treatment of complex tremor syndromes. Expert c ommentary: Recently reported interventions for rare tremors include stimulation of the posterior subthalamic area, globus pallidus internus, ventralis oralis anterior/posterior thalamic subnuclei, and the use of dual lead stimulation in one or more of these targets. Treatment should be individualized and dictated by tremor phenomenology and associated clinical features. PMID:27228280

  5. Low-frequency deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Great expectation or false hope?

    PubMed

    di Biase, Lazzaro; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    The long-term efficacy of subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease is not always retained, and many patients lose the improvement achieved during the "second honeymoon" following surgery. Deep brain stimulation is a versatile tool, as stimulation parameters may undergo a fine-tuning depending on clinical needs. Among them, frequency is the parameter that leads to more complex scenarios because there is no generalizable relationship between its modulation and the overall clinical response, which also depends on the specific considered sign. High-frequency stimulation (>100 Hz) has shown to be effective in improving most parkinsonian signs, particularly the levodopa-responsive ones. However, its effect on axial signs (such as balance, gait, speech, or swallowing) may not be sustained, minimal, or even detrimental. For these reasons, several studies have explored the effectiveness of low-frequency stimulation (generally 60 or 80 Hz). Methods, results, and especially interpretations of these studies are quite variable. Although the use of low-frequency stimulation certainly opens new avenues in the field of deep brain stimulation, after having gathered all the available evidence in patients with subthalamic implants, our conclusion is that it might be clinically useful mainly when it lessens the detrimental effects of high-frequency stimulation. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Pallidal deep brain stimulation relieves camptocormia in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hagenacker, Tim; Gerwig, Marcus; Gasser, Thomas; Miller, Dorothea; Kastrup, Oliver; Jokisch, Daniel; Sure, Ulrich; Frings, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Camptocormia, characterised by a forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine may occur in various movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease or in primary dystonia. In severe cases, patients with camptocormia are unable to walk. While treatment options are limited, deep brain stimulation (DBS) with bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus (GPi) has been proposed as a therapeutic option in refractory cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we present two patients with severe camptocormia as an isolated form of dystonia and as part of generalised dystonia, respectively, which were both treated with bilateral stimulation of the GPi. Symptoms of dystonia were assessed using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFM) before and during deep brain stimulation. In both patients there was a significant functional improvement following long-term bilateral GPi stimulation and both patients gained ability to walk. In the first patient with an isolated dystonic camptocormia the BFM motor subscore for the truncal flexion improved by 75 %. The total BFM motor score in the second patient with a camptocormia in generalised dystonia improved by 45 %, while the BFM score for truncal flexion improved by 87 %. In both patients the effect of the bilateral GPi stimulation on camptocormia was substantial, independent of generalisation of dystonia. Therefore, GPi DBS is a possible treatment option for this rare disease.

  7. Predicting acute affective symptoms after deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Frank; Reske, Martina; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Wojtecki, Lars; Timmermann, Lars; Brosig, Timo; Backes, Volker; Amir-Manavi, Atoosa; Sturm, Volker; Habel, Ute; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate predictive markers for acute symptoms of depression and mania following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fourteen patients with PD (7 males) were included in a prospective longitudinal study. Neuropsychological tests, psychopathology scales and tests of motor functions were administered at several time points prior to and after neurosurgery. Pre-existing psychopathological and motor symptoms predicted postoperative affective side effects of DBS surgery. As these can easily be assessed, they should be considered along with other selection criteria for DBS surgery.

  8. High incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loizon, Marine; Laurencin, Chloé; Vial, Christophe; Danaila, Teodor; Thobois, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    We observed several cases of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) revealed after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). 115 consecutive PD patients who underwent STN-DBS between 2010 and 2014 at the Neurological Hospital in Lyon were retrospectively included. CTS was accepted as the diagnosis only if clinical examination and ENMG both confirmed it. Nine patients (7.8 %) developed CTS in the 2 years following surgery, which is far beyond the 2.7/1000 incidence in the general population. The present study shows an overrepresentation of CTS occurrence after STN-DBS in PD.

  9. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation and somatosensory temporal discrimination in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Modugno, Nicola; Lena, Francesco; Dispenza, Sabrina; Gandolfi, Barbara; Iezzi, Ennio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2010-09-01

    Whereas numerous studies document the effects of dopamine medication and deep brain stimulation on motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease, few have investigated deep brain stimulation-induced changes in sensory functions. In this study of 13 patients with Parkinson's disease, we tested the effects of deep brain stimulation on the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold. To investigate whether deep brain stimulation and dopaminergic medication induce similar changes in somatosensory discrimination, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were acquired under four experimental conditions: (i) medication ON/deep brain stimulation on; (ii) medication ON/deep brain stimulation off; (iii) medication OFF/deep brain stimulation on; and (iv) medication OFF/deep brain stimulation off. Patients also underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluations during each experimental session. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values obtained in patients were compared with 13 age-matched healthy subjects. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were significantly higher in patients than in healthy subjects. In patients, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were significantly lower when patients were studied in medication ON than in medication OFF conditions. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values differed significantly between deep brain stimulation on and deep brain stimulation off conditions only when the patients were studied in the medication ON condition and were higher in the deep brain stimulation on/medication ON than in the deep brain stimulation off/medication ON condition. Dopamine but not subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation restores the altered somatosensory temporal discrimination in patients with Parkinson's disease. Deep brain stimulation degrades somatosensory temporal discrimination by modifying central somatosensory processing whereas dopamine restores the

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications

    PubMed Central

    TEKRIWAL, Anand; BALTUCH, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  11. Patient-Specific Model-Based Investigation of Speech Intelligibility and Movement during Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Åström, Mattias; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I.; Zrinzo, Ludvic U.; Martinez-Torres, Irene; Limousin, Patricia; Wårdell, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used to treat motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical aspects of the electric field in relation to effects on speech and movement during DBS in the subthalamic nucleus. Methods Patient-specific finite element models of DBS were developed for simulation of the electric field in 10 patients. In each patient, speech intelligibility and movement were assessed during 2 electrical settings, i.e. 4 V (high) and 2 V (low). The electric field was simulated for each electrical setting. Results Movement was improved in all patients for both high and low electrical settings. In general, high-amplitude stimulation was more consistent in improving the motor scores than low-amplitude stimulation. In 6 cases, speech intelligibility was impaired during high-amplitude electrical settings. Stimulation of part of the fasciculus cerebellothalamicus from electrodes positioned medial and/or posterior to the center of the subthalamic nucleus was recognized as a possible cause of the stimulation-induced dysarthria. Conclusion Special attention to stimulation-induced speech impairments should be taken in cases when active electrodes are positioned medial and/or posterior to the center of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:20460952

  12. Impact of deep brain stimulation on upper limb akinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, R G; Dowsey, P L; Brown, P; Jahanshahi, M; Pollak, P; Benabid, A L; Rodriguez-Oroz, M C; Obeso, J; Rothwell, J C

    1999-04-01

    Recent pathophysiological models of Parkinson's disease have led to new surgical approaches to treatment including deep brain stimulation (DBS) and lesioning of basal ganglia structures. Various measures of upper limb akinesia were assessed in 6 patients with bilateral DBS of the internal pallidum and 6 with DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Stimulation improved a number of aspects of motor function, and particularly movement time, and force production. Time to initiate movements, and to perform repetitive movements also improved but less dramatically. Processes indicating preparatory motor processes showed no significant change. Few significant differences were found between the internal pallidum and subthalamic nucleus groups. In general, the effects of DBS closely parallel previous reports of the effects of dopaminergic medication. It is suggested that disrupted pallidal output in Parkinson's disease interferes with the rate, level, and coordination of force production but has little effect on preparatory processes. The similarity of the effects of subthalamic nucleus and internal pallidum stimulation suggests this disrupted outflow is the most important determinant of upper limb akinesia in Parkinson's disease. The effects of DBS were similar to the effects of unilateral pallidal lesions reported elsewhere.

  13. Automated 3-Dimensional Brain Atlas Fitting to Microelectrode Recordings from Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Luján, J. Luis; Noecker, Angela M.; Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries commonly rely on brain atlases and microelectrode recordings (MER) to help identify the target location for electrode implantation. We present an automated method for optimally fitting a 3-dimensional brain atlas to intraoperative MER and predicting a target DBS electrode location in stereotactic coordinates for the patient. Methods We retrospectively fit a 3-dimensional brain atlas to MER points from 10 DBS surgeries targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN). We used a constrained optimization algorithm to maximize the MER points correctly fitted (i.e., contained) within the appropriate atlas nuclei. We compared our optimization approach to conventional anterior commissure-posterior commissure (AC/PC) scaling, and to manual fits performed by four experts. A theoretical DBS electrode target location in the dorsal STN was customized to each patient as part of the fitting process and compared to the location of the clinically defined therapeutic stimulation contact. Results The human expert and computer optimization fits achieved significantly better fits than the AC/PC scaling (80, 81, and 41% of correctly fitted MER, respectively). However, the optimization fits were performed in less time than the expert fits and converged to a single solution for each patient, eliminating interexpert variance. Conclusions and Significance DBS therapeutic outcomes are directly related to electrode implantation accuracy. Our automated fitting techniques may aid in the surgical decision-making process by optimally integrating brain atlas and intraoperative neurophysiological data to provide a visual guide for target identification. PMID:19556832

  14. Decisional impulsivity and the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder: stimulation and connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Droux, Fabien; Morris, Laurel; Chabardes, Stephan; Bougerol, Thierry; David, Olivier; Krack, Paul; Polosan, Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Why do we make hasty decisions for short-term gain? Rapid decision-making with limited accumulation of evidence and delay discounting are forms of decisional impulsivity. The subthalamic nucleus is implicated in inhibitory function but its role in decisional impulsivity is less well-understood. Here we assess decisional impulsivity in subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder who have undergone deep brain stimulation of the limbic and associative subthalamic nucleus. We show that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is causally implicated in increasing decisional impulsivity with less accumulation of evidence during probabilistic uncertainty and in enhancing delay discounting. Subthalamic stimulation shifts evidence accumulation in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder towards a functional less cautious style closer to that of healthy controls emphasizing its adaptive nature. Thus, subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder on subthalamic stimulation may be less likely to check for evidence (e.g. checking that the stove is on) with no difference in subjective confidence (or doubt). In a separate study, we replicate in humans (154 healthy controls) using resting state functional connectivity, tracing studies conducted in non-human primates dissociating limbic, associative and motor frontal hyper-direct connectivity with anterior and posterior subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. We show lateralization of functional connectivity of bilateral ventral striatum to right anterior ventromedial subthalamic nucleus consistent with previous observations of lateralization of emotionally evoked activity to right ventral subthalamic nucleus. We use a multi-echo sequence with independent components analysis, which has been shown to have enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, thus optimizing visualization of small subcortical structures. These findings in healthy controls converge with the effective contacts in obsessive compulsive disorder patients localized within the

  15. Decisional impulsivity and the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder: stimulation and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Droux, Fabien; Morris, Laurel; Chabardes, Stephan; Bougerol, Thierry; David, Olivier; Krack, Paul; Polosan, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    Why do we make hasty decisions for short-term gain? Rapid decision-making with limited accumulation of evidence and delay discounting are forms of decisional impulsivity. The subthalamic nucleus is implicated in inhibitory function but its role in decisional impulsivity is less well-understood. Here we assess decisional impulsivity in subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder who have undergone deep brain stimulation of the limbic and associative subthalamic nucleus. We show that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is causally implicated in increasing decisional impulsivity with less accumulation of evidence during probabilistic uncertainty and in enhancing delay discounting. Subthalamic stimulation shifts evidence accumulation in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder towards a functional less cautious style closer to that of healthy controls emphasizing its adaptive nature. Thus, subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder on subthalamic stimulation may be less likely to check for evidence (e.g. checking that the stove is on) with no difference in subjective confidence (or doubt). In a separate study, we replicate in humans (154 healthy controls) using resting state functional connectivity, tracing studies conducted in non-human primates dissociating limbic, associative and motor frontal hyper-direct connectivity with anterior and posterior subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. We show lateralization of functional connectivity of bilateral ventral striatum to right anterior ventromedial subthalamic nucleus consistent with previous observations of lateralization of emotionally evoked activity to right ventral subthalamic nucleus. We use a multi-echo sequence with independent components analysis, which has been shown to have enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, thus optimizing visualization of small subcortical structures. These findings in healthy controls converge with the effective contacts in obsessive compulsive disorder patients localized within the

  16. Elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Jianxin; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xueen

    2016-11-01

    Corresponding to pre-puncture and post-puncture insertion, elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation are investigated, respectively. Elastic mechanical properties in pre-puncture are investigated through pre-puncture needle insertion experiments using whole porcine brains. A linear polynomial and a second order polynomial are fitted to the average insertion force in pre-puncture. The Young's modulus in pre-puncture is calculated from the slope of the two fittings. Viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues in post-puncture insertion are investigated through indentation stress relaxation tests for six interested regions along a planned trajectory. A linear viscoelastic model with a Prony series approximation is fitted to the average load trace of each region using Boltzmann hereditary integral. Shear relaxation moduli of each region are calculated using the parameters of the Prony series approximation. The results show that, in pre-puncture insertion, needle force almost increases linearly with needle displacement. Both fitting lines can perfectly fit the average insertion force. The Young's moduli calculated from the slope of the two fittings are worthy of trust to model linearly or nonlinearly instantaneous elastic responses of brain tissues, respectively. In post-puncture insertion, both region and time significantly affect the viscoelastic behaviors. Six tested regions can be classified into three categories in stiffness. Shear relaxation moduli decay dramatically in short time scales but equilibrium is never truly achieved. The regional and temporal viscoelastic mechanical properties in post-puncture insertion are valuable for guiding probe insertion into each region on the implanting trajectory.

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Activation Volumes Generated During Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient’s primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs. PMID:20974269

  18. Probabilistic analysis of activation volumes generated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2011-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient's primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs.

  19. In vivo impedance spectroscopy of deep brain stimulation electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Johnson, Matthew D; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a powerful clinical technology, but a systematic characterization of the electrical interactions between the electrode and the brain is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the in vivo changes in the DBS electrode impedance that occur after implantation and during clinically relevant stimulation. Clinical DBS devices typically apply high-frequency voltage-controlled stimulation, and as a result, the injected current is directly regulated by the impedance of the electrode-tissue interface. We monitored the impedance of scaled-down clinical DBS electrodes implanted in the thalamus and subthalamic nucleus of a rhesus macaque using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements ranging from 0.5 Hz to 10 kHz. To further characterize our measurements, equivalent circuit models of the electrode-tissue interface were used to quantify the role of various interface components in producing the observed electrode impedance. Following implantation, the DBS electrode impedance increased and a semicircular arc was observed in the high-frequency range of the EIS measurements, commonly referred to as the tissue component of the impedance. Clinically relevant stimulation produced a rapid decrease in electrode impedance with extensive changes in the tissue component. These post-operative and stimulation-induced changes in impedance could play an important role in the observed functional effects of voltage-controlled DBS and should be considered during clinical stimulation parameter selection and chronic animal research studies.

  20. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease prior to L-dopa treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Servello, Domenico; Saleh, Christian; Bona, Alberto R.; Zekaj, Edvin; Zanaboni, Carlotta; Porta, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leva-dopa (L-dopa) is the gold-standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation is generally reserved for patients who become refractory to l-dopa treatment. Case Description: We present a male patient with a 9-year course of PD who at 53 years of age preferred deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus over initial l-dopa treatment. The patient argued that he wanted to avoid the serious adverse effects of l-dopa, which would have presented within his time of full professional activity. DBS resulted in significant motor improvement lasting for 6 years without l-dopa treatment. Conclusion: Large multicentre-based international trials with long follow-ups are needed to answer the effectiveness of early DBS in PD. PMID:27990314

  1. A PC-based system for predicting movement from deep brain signals in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Constantinos; Brown, Peter

    2012-07-01

    There is much current interest in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). This type of surgery has enabled unprecedented access to deep brain signals in the awake human. In this paper we present an easy-to-use computer based system for recording, displaying, archiving, and processing electrophysiological signals from the STN. The system was developed for predicting self-paced hand-movements in real-time via the online processing of the electrophysiological activity of the STN. It is hoped that such a computerised system might have clinical and experimental applications. For example, those sites within the STN most relevant to the processing of voluntary movement could be identified through the predictive value of their activities with respect to the timing of future movement.

  2. Accurate CT-MR image registration for deep brain stimulation: a multi-observer evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Derksen, Alexander; Heldmann, Stefan; Hallmann, Marc; Meine, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Since the first clinical interventions in the late 1980s, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has evolved into a very effective treatment option for patients with severe Parkinson's disease. DBS entails the implantation of an electrode that performs high frequency stimulations to a target area deep inside the brain. A very accurate placement of the electrode is a prerequisite for positive therapy outcome. The assessment of the intervention result is of central importance in DBS treatment and involves the registration of pre- and postinterventional scans. In this paper, we present an image processing pipeline for highly accurate registration of postoperative CT to preoperative MR. Our method consists of two steps: a fully automatic pre-alignment using a detection of the skull tip in the CT based on fuzzy connectedness, and an intensity-based rigid registration. The registration uses the Normalized Gradient Fields distance measure in a multilevel Gauss-Newton optimization framework and focuses on a region around the subthalamic nucleus in the MR. The accuracy of our method was extensively evaluated on 20 DBS datasets from clinical routine and compared with manual expert registrations. For each dataset, three independent registrations were available, thus allowing to relate algorithmic with expert performance. Our method achieved an average registration error of 0.95mm in the target region around the subthalamic nucleus as compared to an inter-observer variability of 1.12 mm. Together with the short registration time of about five seconds on average, our method forms a very attractive package that can be considered ready for clinical use.

  3. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  4. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target.

  5. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target. PMID:27070317

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Eric S; Zhang, Michael; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Azagury, Dan E; Bohon, Cara; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now the third leading cause of preventable death in the US, accounting for 216,000 deaths annually and nearly 100 billion dollars in health care costs. Despite advancements in bariatric surgery, substantial weight regain and recurrence of the associated metabolic syndrome still occurs in almost 20-35% of patients over the long-term, necessitating the development of novel therapies. Our continually expanding knowledge of the neuroanatomic and neuropsychiatric underpinnings of obesity has led to increased interest in neuromodulation as a new treatment for obesity refractory to current medical, behavioral, and surgical therapies. Recent clinical trials of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in chronic cluster headache, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of targeting the hypothalamus and reward circuitry of the brain with electrical stimulation, and thus provide the basis for a neuromodulatory approach to treatment-refractory obesity. In this study, we review the literature implicating these targets for DBS in the neural circuitry of obesity. We will also briefly review ethical considerations for such an intervention, and discuss genetic secondary-obesity syndromes that may also benefit from DBS. In short, we hope to provide the scientific foundation to justify trials of DBS for the treatment of obesity targeting these specific regions of the brain. PMID:26180683

  7. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jennifer J.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used for the treatment of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia and, to a lesser extent, certain treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Rather than a single unifying mechanism, DBS likely acts via several, nonexclusive mechanisms including local and network-wide electrical and neurochemical effects of stimulation, modulation of oscillatory activity, synaptic plasticity, and, potentially, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. These different mechanisms vary in importance depending on the condition being treated and the target being stimulated. Here we review each of these in turn and illustrate how an understanding of these mechanisms is inspiring next-generation approaches to DBS. PMID:26510756

  8. Deep brain stimulation: postoperative issues.

    PubMed

    Deuschl, Günther; Herzog, Jan; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Kubu, Cynthia; Lozano, Andres M; Lyons, Kelly E; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Tamma, Filippo; Tröster, Alexander I; Vitek, Jerrold L; Volkmann, Jens; Voon, Valerie

    2006-06-01

    Numerous factors need to be taken into account when managing a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) after deep brain stimulation (DBS). Questions such as when to begin programming, how to conduct a programming screen, how to assess the effects of programming, and how to titrate stimulation and medication for each of the targeted sites need to be addressed. Follow-up care should be determined, including patient adjustments of stimulation, timing of follow-up visits and telephone contact with the patient, and stimulation and medication conditions during the follow-up assessments. A management plan for problems that can arise after DBS such as weight gain, dyskinesia, axial symptoms, speech dysfunction, muscle contractions, paresthesia, eyelid, ocular and visual disturbances, and behavioral and cognitive problems should be developed. Long-term complications such as infection or erosion, loss of effect, intermittent stimulation, tolerance, and pain or discomfort can develop and need to be managed. Other factors that need consideration are social and job-related factors, development of dementia, general medical issues, and lifestyle changes. This report from the Consensus on Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease, a project commissioned by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the Movement Disorder Society, outlines answers to a series of questions developed to address all aspects of DBS postoperative management and decision-making with a systematic overview of the literature (until mid-2004) and by the expert opinion of the authors. The report has been endorsed by the Scientific Issues Committee of the Movement Disorder Society and the American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery.

  9. Orientation selective deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri J.; Slopsema, Julia P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Shatillo, Artem; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Mangia, Silvia; Sierra, Alejandra; Low, Walter C.; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Target selectivity of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is critical, as the precise locus and pattern of the stimulation dictates the degree to which desired treatment responses are achieved and adverse side effects are avoided. There is a clear clinical need to improve DBS technology beyond currently available stimulation steering and shaping approaches. We introduce orientation selective neural stimulation as a concept to increase the specificity of target selection in DBS. Approach. This concept, which involves orienting the electric field along an axonal pathway, was tested in the corpus callosum of the rat brain by freely controlling the direction of the electric field on a plane using a three-electrode bundle, and monitoring the response of the neurons using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Computational models were developed to further analyze axonal excitability for varied electric field orientation. Main results. Our results demonstrated that the strongest fMRI response was observed when the electric field was oriented parallel to the axons, while almost no response was detected with the perpendicular orientation of the electric field relative to the primary fiber tract. These results were confirmed by computational models of the experimental paradigm quantifying the activation of radially distributed axons while varying the primary direction of the electric field. Significance. The described strategies identify a new course for selective neuromodulation paradigms in DBS based on axonal fiber orientation.

  10. Personality Changes after Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Uyen; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Skogseid, Inger-Marie; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Andersson, Stein; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit; Aarsland, Dag; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a recognized therapy that improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about its impact on personality. To address this topic, we have assessed personality traits before and after STN-DBS in PD patients. Methods. Forty patients with advanced PD were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): the Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance, Sensation Seeking impulsive behaviour scale (UPPS), and the Neuroticism and Lie subscales of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-N, EPQ-L) before surgery and after three months of STN-DBS. Collateral information obtained from the UPPS was also reported. Results. Despite improvement in motor function and reduction in dopaminergic dosage patients reported lower score on the TCI Persistence and Self-Transcendence scales, after three months of STN-DBS, compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P = 0.024). Relatives reported significantly increased scores on the UPPS Lack of Premeditation scale at follow-up (P = 0.027). Conclusion. STN-DBS in PD patients is associated with personality changes in the direction of increased impulsivity. PMID:25705545

  11. Customizing Deep Brain Stimulation to the Patient Using Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Cameron C.; Frankenmolle, Anneke; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD); however declines in cognitive function have been associated with this procedure. The aim of this study was to assess cognitive-motor performance of 10 PD patients implanted with STN DBS systems during either clinically determined stimulation settings or settings derived from a computational model. Cicerone DBS software was used to define the model parameters such that current spread to non-motor areas of the STN was minimized. Clinically determined and model defined parameters were equally effective in improving motor scores on the traditional clinical rating scale (UPDRS-III). Under modest dual-task conditions, cognitive-motor performance was worse with clinically determined compared to model derived parameters. In addition, the model parameters provided a 33% reduction in power consumption. These results indicate that the cognitivemotor declines associated with bilateral STN can be mitigated, without compromising motor benefits, utilizing stimulation parameters that minimize current spread into non-motor regions of the STN. PMID:19965023

  12. Personality changes after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pham, Uyen; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Skogseid, Inger-Marie; Toft, Mathias; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Andersson, Stein; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit; Aarsland, Dag; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a recognized therapy that improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about its impact on personality. To address this topic, we have assessed personality traits before and after STN-DBS in PD patients. Methods. Forty patients with advanced PD were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): the Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance, Sensation Seeking impulsive behaviour scale (UPPS), and the Neuroticism and Lie subscales of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-N, EPQ-L) before surgery and after three months of STN-DBS. Collateral information obtained from the UPPS was also reported. Results. Despite improvement in motor function and reduction in dopaminergic dosage patients reported lower score on the TCI Persistence and Self-Transcendence scales, after three months of STN-DBS, compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P = 0.024). Relatives reported significantly increased scores on the UPPS Lack of Premeditation scale at follow-up (P = 0.027). Conclusion. STN-DBS in PD patients is associated with personality changes in the direction of increased impulsivity.

  13. Weight change following deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Cartwright, Michael S; Passmore, Leah V; Ellis, Thomas L; Tatter, Stephen B; Siddiqui, Mustafa S

    2010-08-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) tend to lose weight progressively over years. Weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for treatment of PD has been documented in several studies that were limited by small sample size and exclusive focus on PD patients with STN stimulation. The current study was undertaken to examine weight change in a large sample of movement disorder patients following DBS. A retrospective review was undertaken of 182 patient charts following DBS of the STN, ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), and globus pallidus internus (GPi). Weight was collected preoperatively and postoperatively up to 24 months following surgery. Data were adjusted for baseline weight and multivariate linear regression was performed with repeated measures to assess weight change. Statistically significant mean weight gain of 1.8 kg (2.8% increase from baseline, p = 0.0113) was observed at a rate of approximately 1 kg per year up to 24 months following surgery. This gain was not predicted by age, gender, diagnosis, or stimulation target in a multivariate model. Significant mean weight gain of 2.3 kg (p = 0.0124) or 4.2% was observed in our PD patients. Most patients with PD and ET gain weight following DBS, and this gain is not predicted by age, gender, diagnosis, or stimulation target.

  14. The impact of deep brain stimulation on tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Jasper V.; Janssen, Marcus L. F.; Engelhard, Malou; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Schuurman, P. Richard; Contarino, Maria F.; Mosch, Arne; Temel, Yasin; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tinnitus is a disorder of the nervous system that cannot be adequately treated with current therapies. The effect of neuromodulation induced by deep brain stimulation (DBS) on tinnitus has not been studied well. This study investigated the effect of DBS on tinnitus by use of a multicenter questionnaire study. Methods: Tinnitus was retrospectively assessed prior to DBS and at the current situation (with DBS). From the 685 questionnaires, 443 were returned. A control group was one-to-one matched to DBS patients who had tinnitus before DBS (n = 61). Tinnitus was assessed by the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and visual analog scales (VAS) of loudness and burden. Results: The THI decreased significantly during DBS compared to the situation prior to surgery (from 18.9 to 15.1, P < .001), which was only significant for DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The THI in the control group (36.9 to 35.5, P = 0.50) and other DBS targets did not change. The VAS loudness increased in the control group (5.4 to 6.0 P < .01). Conclusion: DBS might have a modulatory effect on tinnitus. Our study suggests that DBS of the STN may have a beneficial effect on tinnitus, but most likely other nuclei linked to the tinnitus circuitry might be even more effective. PMID:27994936

  15. Deep brain stimulation activation volumes and their association with neurophysiological mapping and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maks, Christopher B.; Butson, Christopher R.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Despite the clinical success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD), little is known about the electrical spread of the stimulation. The primary goal of this study was to integrate neuroimaging, neurophysiology, and neurostimulation data sets from 10 PD patients, unilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS electrodes, to identify the theoretical volume of tissue activated (VTA) by clinically defined therapeutic stimulation parameters. Methods Each patient-specific model was created with a series of five steps: 1) definition of the neurosurgical stereotactic coordinate system within the context of pre-operative imaging data; 2) entry of intra-operative microelectrode recording locations from neurophysiologically defined thalamic, subthalamic, and substantia nigra neurons into the context of the imaging data; 3) fitting a 3D brain atlas to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the patient; 4) positioning the DBS electrode in the documented stereotactic location, verified by post-operative imaging data; and 5) calculation of the VTA using a diffusion tensor based finite element neurostimulation model. Results The patient-specific models show that therapeutic benefit was achieved with direct stimulation of a wide range of anatomical structures in the subthalamic region. Interestingly, of the 5 patients exhibiting a greater than 40% improvement in their unified PD rating scale (UPDRS), all but one had the majority of their VTA outside the atlas defined borders of the STN. Further, of the 5 patients with less than 40% UPDRS improvement all but one had the majority of their VTA inside the STN. Conclusions Our results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that therapeutic benefit is associated with electrode contacts near the dorsal border of the STN, and provide quantitative estimates of the electrical spread of the stimulation in a clinically relevant context. PMID:18403440

  16. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  17. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia.

    PubMed

    Vidailhet, Marie; Jutras, Marie-France; Grabli, David; Roze, Emmanuel

    2013-09-01

    The few controlled studies that have been carried out have shown that bilateral internal globus pallidum stimulation is a safe and long-term effective treatment for hyperkinetic disorders. However, most recent published data on deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia, applied to different targets and patients, are still mainly from uncontrolled case reports (especially for secondary dystonia). This precludes clear determination of the efficacy of this procedure and the choice of the 'good' target for the 'good' patient. We performed a literature analysis on DBS for dystonia according to the expected outcome. We separated those with good evidence of favourable outcome from those with less predictable outcome. In the former group, we review the main results for primary dystonia (generalised/focal) and highlight recent data on myoclonus-dystonia and tardive dystonia (as they share, with primary dystonia, a marked beneficial effect from pallidal stimulation with good risk/benefit ratio). In the latter group, poor or variable results have been obtained for secondary dystonia (with a focus on heredodegenerative and metabolic disorders). From this overview, the main results and limits for each subgroup of patients that may help in the selection of dystonic patients who will benefit from DBS are discussed.

  18. [Deep brain stimulation and neuroethics].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yoichi; Fukaya, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for mental disorders has been discussed in Japan from the viewpoint of ethical problems. Trials of experimental therapies require a basis of sound scientific rationale. New standard therapy emerges from such trials through detailed analysis of the outcome and side effects. Long-suffering patients with intractable symptoms may desperately seek an experimental therapy even though it has not yet been accepted as standard therapy. The ethical committee of each institution evaluates the level of scientific rationale and the expected level of benefits on the bias of the reported data, and decides whether the patients can receive the experimental therapy. However, the use of DBS for mental disorders is not based on sound scientific rational, since the disease mechanisms involved are far from understood. The data reported from the previous trials are insufficient for assuring the satisfactory results for mental disoder patients. Most institutions in Japan do not accept such levels of scientific rationale and expected benefits. Furthermore, from the cultural perspective, strong skepticism exists in Japan with regard to surgical interventions for mental disorders. Such an attitude is unexpectedly in harmony with many of the subjects currently discussed in the field of neuroethics. For example, who has the right to control DBS? How does someone decide the level of control of mental function by DBS? These questions are related to the discussion on how human society is formed and how the ethics are decided by considering both scientific rationale and human society.

  19. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K.; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Even simple behaviour requires us to make decisions based on combining multiple pieces of learned and new information. Making such decisions requires both learning the optimal response to each given stimulus as well as combining probabilistic information from multiple stimuli before selecting a response. Computational theories of decision making predict that learning individual stimulus–response associations and rapid combination of information from multiple stimuli are dependent on different components of basal ganglia circuitry. In particular, learning and retention of memory, required for optimal response choice, are significantly reliant on dopamine, whereas integrating information probabilistically is critically dependent upon functioning of the glutamatergic subthalamic nucleus (computing the ‘normalization term’ in Bayes’ theorem). Here, we test these theories by investigating 22 patients with Parkinson’s disease either treated with deep brain stimulation to the subthalamic nucleus and dopaminergic therapy or managed with dopaminergic therapy alone. We use computerized tasks that probe three cognitive functions—information acquisition (learning), memory over a delay and information integration when multiple pieces of sequentially presented information have to be combined. Patients performed the tasks ON or OFF deep brain stimulation and/or ON or OFF dopaminergic therapy. Consistent with the computational theories, we show that stopping dopaminergic therapy impairs memory for probabilistic information over a delay, whereas deep brain stimulation to the region of the subthalamic nucleus disrupts decision making when multiple pieces of acquired information must be combined. Furthermore, we found that when participants needed to update their decision on the basis of the last piece of information presented in the decision-making task, patients with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus region did not slow down appropriately to revise their

  20. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Elizabeth J; Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L

    2012-12-01

    Even simple behaviour requires us to make decisions based on combining multiple pieces of learned and new information. Making such decisions requires both learning the optimal response to each given stimulus as well as combining probabilistic information from multiple stimuli before selecting a response. Computational theories of decision making predict that learning individual stimulus-response associations and rapid combination of information from multiple stimuli are dependent on different components of basal ganglia circuitry. In particular, learning and retention of memory, required for optimal response choice, are significantly reliant on dopamine, whereas integrating information probabilistically is critically dependent upon functioning of the glutamatergic subthalamic nucleus (computing the 'normalization term' in Bayes' theorem). Here, we test these theories by investigating 22 patients with Parkinson's disease either treated with deep brain stimulation to the subthalamic nucleus and dopaminergic therapy or managed with dopaminergic therapy alone. We use computerized tasks that probe three cognitive functions-information acquisition (learning), memory over a delay and information integration when multiple pieces of sequentially presented information have to be combined. Patients performed the tasks ON or OFF deep brain stimulation and/or ON or OFF dopaminergic therapy. Consistent with the computational theories, we show that stopping dopaminergic therapy impairs memory for probabilistic information over a delay, whereas deep brain stimulation to the region of the subthalamic nucleus disrupts decision making when multiple pieces of acquired information must be combined. Furthermore, we found that when participants needed to update their decision on the basis of the last piece of information presented in the decision-making task, patients with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus region did not slow down appropriately to revise their plan, a

  1. Progressive gait ataxia following deep brain stimulation for essential tremor: adverse effect or lack of efficacy?

    PubMed

    Reich, Martin M; Brumberg, Joachim; Pozzi, Nicolò G; Marotta, Giorgio; Roothans, Jonas; Åström, Mattias; Musacchio, Thomas; Lopiano, Leonardo; Lanotte, Michele; Lehrke, Ralph; Buck, Andreas K; Volkmann, Jens; Isaias, Ioannis U

    2016-09-21

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation is a mainstay treatment for severe and drug-refractory essential tremor, but postoperative management may be complicated in some patients by a progressive cerebellar syndrome including gait ataxia, dysmetria, worsening of intention tremor and dysarthria. Typically, this syndrome manifests several months after an initially effective therapy and necessitates frequent adjustments in stimulation parameters. There is an ongoing debate as to whether progressive ataxia reflects a delayed therapeutic failure due to disease progression or an adverse effect related to repeated increases of stimulation intensity. In this study we used a multimodal approach comparing clinical stimulation responses, modelling of volume of tissue activated and metabolic brain maps in essential tremor patients with and without progressive ataxia to disentangle a disease-related from a stimulation-induced aetiology. Ten subjects with stable and effective bilateral thalamic stimulation were stratified according to the presence (five subjects) of severe chronic-progressive gait ataxia. We quantified stimulated brain areas and identified the stimulation-induced brain metabolic changes by multiple (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography performed with and without active neurostimulation. Three days after deactivating thalamic stimulation and following an initial rebound of symptom severity, gait ataxia had dramatically improved in all affected patients, while tremor had worsened to the presurgical severity, thus indicating a stimulation rather than disease-related phenomenon. Models of the volume of tissue activated revealed a more ventrocaudal stimulation in the (sub)thalamic area of patients with progressive gait ataxia. Metabolic maps of both patient groups differed by an increased glucose uptake in the cerebellar nodule of patients with gait ataxia. Our data suggest that chronic progressive gait ataxia in essential tremor is a reversible cerebellar

  2. Effects of dopaminergic and subthalamic stimulation on musical performance.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Floris T; Schüpbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jérôme; Hälbig, Thomas D

    2013-05-01

    Although subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an efficient treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on fine motor functions are not clear. We present the case of a professional violinist with PD treated with STN-DBS. DBS improved musical articulation, intonation and emotional expression and worsened timing relative to a timekeeper (metronome). The same effects were found for dopaminergic treatment. These results suggest that STN-DBS, mimicking the effects of dopaminergic stimulation, improves fine-tuned motor behaviour whilst impairing timing precision.

  3. Neuropsychological outcomes from constant current deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Joseph; Tagliati, Michele; Peichel, DeLea; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the neurobehavioral safety of constant‐current subthalamic deep brain stimulation and to compare the neuropsychological effects of stimulation versus electrode placement alone. Methods A total of 136 patients with Parkinson's disease underwent bilateral subthalamic device implantation in this randomized trial. Patients received stimulation either immediately after device implantation (n = 101; active stimulation) or beginning 3 months after surgery (n = 35; delayed activation control). Patients were administered neuropsychological tests before, 3, and 12 months after device implantation. Results Neuropsychological change in stimulation and control groups were comparable. Within‐group analyses revealed declines in category and switching verbal fluency in both groups, but only the stimulation group had letter verbal fluency and Stroop task declines. Depression symptom improvements occurred in both groups, but more often in the stimulation group. Letter fluency declines were associated with worse Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire Communication subscale scores. Baseline and 12‐month comparisons (in the combined group) revealed gains in verbal and visual delayed recall scores and improvement in depression symptoms, but decrements in verbal fluency and Stroop scores. Conclusions Constant‐current bilateral subthalamic stimulation had a good cognitive safety profile except for decrements in verbal fluency and on the Stroop task. These abnormalities are related to device implantation, but stimulation likely had an additive effect. One year after surgery, the cognitive changes did not exert a detrimental effect on quality of life, although letter fluency declines were associated with communication dissatisfaction at 12 months. Improvement in depressive symptom severity appears dependent on stimulation and not placebo or lesion effects. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley

  4. Deep brain stimulation and sleep-wake functions in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Lukas; Bargiotas, Panagiotis; Bassetti, Claudio L; Michael Schuepbach, W M

    2016-11-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances (SWD) are common nonmotor symptoms (NMS) and have a great impact on quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment in PD. While the beneficial effects of DBS on cardinal PD motor symptoms are indisputable, the data for several NMS, including sleep-wake functions, are limited and often controversial. Our primary objective was to review the literature on the impact of DBS on sleep-wake functions in patients with PD. A systematic review of articles, published in PubMed between January 1st, 2000 and December 31st, 2015 was performed to identify studies addressing the evolution of sleep-wake functions after DBS in patients with PD. Only 38 of 208 studies, involving a total of 1443 subjects, met the inclusion criteria. Most of them reported a positive effect of subthalamic DBS on sleep quality and consequently on quality of life. Seven studies used polysomnography to objectively assess sleep parameters. The data concerning subthalamic DBS and wake functions are controversial and studies using objective, laboratory-based measures for the assessment of wake functions are lacking. Very few studies assessed the impact of other DBS targets (e.g. pallidal stimulation) on SWD. Further prospective observational DBS studies assessing subjectively and objectively specific sleep-wake parameters in patients with PD are needed.

  5. Nonmotor outcomes in Parkinson’s disease: is deep brain stimulation better than dopamine replacement therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Kandadai, Rukmini Mridula; Jabeen, Afshan; Kannikannan, Meena A.

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms are an integral part of Parkinson’s disease and cause significant morbidity. Pharmacological therapy helps alleviate the disease but produces nonmotor manifestations. While deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as the treatment of choice for motor dysfunction, the effect on nonmotor symptoms is not well known. Compared with pharmacological therapy, bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS or globus pallidum interna (GPi)-DBS has significant beneficial effects on pain, sleep, gastrointestinal and urological symptoms. STN-DBS is associated with a mild worsening in verbal fluency while GPi-DBS has no effect on cognition. STN-DBS may improve cardiovascular autonomic disturbances by reducing the dose of dopaminergic drugs. Because the motor effects of STN-DBS and GPi-DBS appear to be similar, nonmotor symptoms may determine the target choice in surgery of future patients. PMID:22276074

  6. Automatic target and trajectory identification for deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic surgical target and trajectory identification technique for planning deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures. The probabilistic functional maps, constructed from population-based actual stimulating field information and intra-operative electrophysiological activities, were integrated into a neurosurgical visualization and navigation system to facilitate the surgical planning and guidance. In our preliminary studies, we compared the actual surgical target locations and trajectories established by an experienced stereotactic neurosurgeon with those automatically planned using our probabilistic functional maps on 10 subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS procedures. The average displacement between the surgical target locations in both groups was 1.82mm with a standard deviation of 0.77mm. The difference between the surgical trajectories was 3.1 degrees and 2.3 degrees in the lateral-to-medial and anterior-to-posterior orientations respectively.

  7. Cross validation of experts versus registration methods for target localization in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Castro, F Javier; Pollo, Claudio; Meuli, Reto; Maeder, Philippe; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    In the last five years, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has become the most popular and effective surgical technique for the treatent of Parkinson's disease (PD). The Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) is the usual target involved when applying DBS. Unfortunately, the STN is in general not visible in common medical imaging modalities. Therefore, atlas-based segmentation is commonly considered to locate it in the images. In this paper, we propose a scheme that allows both, to perform a comparison between different registration algorithms and to evaluate their ability to locate the STN automatically. Using this scheme we can evaluate the expert variability against the error of the algorithms and we demonstrate that automatic STN location is possible and as accurate as the methods currently used.

  8. Brittle Dyskinesia Following STN but not GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Ashok; Foote, Kelly D.; Oyama, Genko; Kwak, Joshua; Zeilman, Pam R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of difficult to manage dyskinesia associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS). A small subset of STN DBS patients experience troublesome dyskinesia despite optimal programming and medication adjustments. This group of patients has been referred to by some practitioners as brittle STN DBS-induced dyskinesia, drawing on comparisons with brittle diabetics experiencing severe blood sugar regulation issues and on a single description by McLellan in 1982. We sought to describe, and also to investigate how often the “brittle” phenomenon occurs in a relatively large DBS practice. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved patient database was reviewed, and all STN and globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS patients who had surgery at the University of Florida from July 2002 to July 2012 were extracted for analysis. Results There were 179 total STN DBS patients and, of those, four STN DBS (2.2%) cases were identified as having dyskinesia that could not be managed without the induction of an “off state,” or by the precipitation of a severe dyskinesia despite vigorous stimulation and medication adjustments. Of 75 GPi DBS cases reviewed, none (0%) was identified as having brittle dyskinesia. One STN DBS patient was successfully rescued by bilateral GPi DBS. Discussion Understanding the potential risk factors for postoperative troublesome and brittle dyskinesia may have an impact on the initial surgical target selection (STN vs. GPI) in DBS therapy. Rescue GPi DBS therapy may be a viable treatment option, though more cases will be required to verify this observation. PMID:24932426

  9. Atlas-based segmentation of deep brain structures using non-rigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Mewes, Klaus; Gross, Robert E.; Škrinjar, Oskar

    2008-03-01

    Deep brain structures are frequently used as targets in neurosurgical procedures. However, the boundaries of these structures are often not visible in clinically used MR and CT images. Techniques based on anatomical atlases and indirect targeting are used to infer the location of these targets intraoperatively. Initial errors of such approaches may be up to a few millimeters, which is not negligible. E.g. subthalamic nucleus is approximately 4x6 mm in the axial plane and the diameter of globus pallidus internus is approximately 8 mm, both of which are used as targets in deep brain stimulation surgery. To increase the initial localization accuracy of deep brain structures we have developed an atlas-based segmentation method that can be used for the surgery planning. The atlas is a high resolution MR head scan of a healthy volunteer with nine deep brain structures manually segmented. The quality of the atlas image allowed for the segmentation of the deep brain structures, which is not possible from the clinical MR head scans of patients. The subject image is non-rigidly registered to the atlas image using thin plate splines to represent the transformation and normalized mutual information as a similarity measure. The obtained transformation is used to map the segmented structures from the atlas to the subject image. We tested the approach on five subjects. The quality of the atlas-based segmentation was evaluated by visual inspection of the third and lateral ventricles, putamena, and caudate nuclei, which are visible in the subject MR images. The agreement of these structures for the five tested subjects was approximately 1 to 2 mm.

  10. Modulation of gait coordination by subthalamic stimulation improves freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herzog, Jan; Seifert, Elena; Stolze, Henning; Falk, Daniela; Reese, René; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther

    2011-04-01

    The effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on gait coordination and freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease is incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which modulation of symmetry and coordination between legs by subthalamic deep brain stimulation alters the frequency and duration of freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease. We recruited 13 post-subthalamic deep brain stimulation patients with Parkinson's disease with off freezing of gait and evaluated them in the following 4 conditions: subthalamic deep brain stimulation on (ON) and stimulation off (OFF), 50% reduction of stimulation voltage for the leg with shorter step length (worse side reduction) and for the leg with longer step length (better side reduction). Gait analysis was performed on a treadmill and recorded by an optoelectronic analysis system. We measured frequency and duration of freezing of gait episodes. Bilateral coordination of gait was assessed by the Phase Coordination Index, quantifying the ability to generate antiphase stepping. From the OFF to the ON state, freezing of gait improved in frequency (2.0 ± 0.4 to 1.4 ± 0.5 episodes) and duration (12.2 ± 2.6 to 2.6 ± 0.8 seconds; P = .005). Compared with the ON state, only better side reduction further reduced freezing of gait frequency (0.2 ± 0.2) and duration of episodes (0.2 ± 0.2 seconds; P = .03); worse side reduction did not change frequency (1.3 ± 0.4) but increased freezing of gait duration (5.2 ± 2.1 seconds). The better side reduction-associated improvements were accompanied by normalization of gait coordination, as measured by phase coordination index (16.5% ± 6.0%), which was significantly lower than in the other 3 conditions. Reduction of stimulation voltage in the side contralateral to the leg with longer step length improves frequency and duration of freezing of gait through normalization of gait symmetry and coordination in subthalamic deep brain

  11. Pallidotomy after chronic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bulluss, Kristian J; Pereira, Erlick A; Joint, Carole; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2013-11-01

    Recent publications have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease still exerts beneficial effects on tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia for up to 10 years after implantation of the stimulator. However with the progression of Parkinson's disease, features such as cognitive decline or "freezing" become prominent, and the presence of an implanted and functioning deep brain stimulator can impose a profound burden of care on the clinical team and family. The authors describe their experience in treating 4 patients who underwent removal of the implanted device due to either progressive dementia requiring full-time nursing or due to infection, and who subsequently underwent a unilateral pallidotomy.

  12. Neuronal activity correlated with checking behaviour in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Pierre; Clair, Anne-Hélène; Langbour, Nicolas; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Goillandeau, Michel; Michelet, Thomas; Bardinet, Eric; Chéreau, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; Fontaine, Denys; Magnié-Mauro, Marie-Noelle; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bataille, Benoît; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Baup, Nicolas; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cornu, Philippe; Pelissolo, Antoine; Arbus, Christophe; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Yelnik, Jérôme; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Doubt, and its behavioural correlate, checking, is a normal phenomenon of human cognition that is dramatically exacerbated in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation in the associative-limbic area of the subthalamic nucleus, a central core of the basal ganglia, improved obsessive-compulsive disorder. To understand the physiological bases of symptoms in such patients, we recorded the activity of individual neurons in the therapeutic target during surgery while subjects performed a cognitive task that gave them the possibility of unrestricted repetitive checking after they had made a choice. We postulated that the activity of neurons in this region could be influenced by doubt and checking behaviour. Among the 63/87 task-related neurons recorded in 10 patients, 60% responded to various combinations of instructions, delay, movement or feedback, thus highlighting their role in the integration of different types of information. In addition, task-related activity directed towards decision-making increased during trials with checking in comparison with those without checking. These results suggest that the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus plays a role in doubt-related repetitive thoughts. Overall, our results not only provide new insight into the role of the subthalamic nucleus in human cognition but also support the fact that subthalamic nucleus modulation by deep brain stimulation reduced compulsive behaviour in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  13. Subthalamic nucleus phase–amplitude coupling correlates with motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Bernadette C.M.; Beudel, Martijn; Jha, Ashwani; Oswal, Ashwini; Foltynie, Tom; Hariz, Marwan I.; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Green, Alexander L.; Brown, Peter; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Objective High-amplitude beta band oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus are frequently associated with Parkinson’s disease but it is unclear how they might lead to motor impairments. Here we investigate a likely pathological coupling between the phase of beta band oscillations and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations around 300 Hz. Methods We analysed an extensive data set comprising resting-state recordings obtained from deep brain stimulation electrodes in 33 patients before and/or after taking dopaminergic medication. We correlated mean values of spectral power and phase–amplitude coupling with severity of hemibody bradykinesia/rigidity. In addition, we used simultaneously recorded magnetoencephalography to look at functional interactions between the subthalamic nucleus and ipsilateral motor cortex. Results Beta band power and phase–amplitude coupling within the subthalamic nucleus correlated positively with severity of motor impairment. This effect was more pronounced within the low-beta range, whilst coherence between subthalamic nucleus and motor cortex was dominant in the high-beta range. Conclusions We speculate that the beta band might impede pro-kinetic high-frequency activity patterns when phase–amplitude coupling is prominent. Furthermore, results provide evidence for a functional subdivision of the beta band into low and high frequencies. Significance Our findings contribute to the interpretation of oscillatory activity within the cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:26971483

  14. Subthalamic Neurons Encode Both Single- and Multi-Limb Movements in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tankus, Ariel; Strauss, Ido; Gurevich, Tanya; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Fried, Itzhak; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the main target for neurosurgical treatment of motor signs of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Despite the therapeutic effect on both upper and lower extremities, its role in motor control and coordination and its changes in Parkinson’s disease are not fully clear. We intraoperatively recorded single unit activity in ten patients with PD who performed repetitive feet or hand movements while undergoing implantation of a deep brain stimulator. We found both distinct and overlapping representations of upper and lower extremity movement kinematics in subthalamic units and observed evidence for re-routing to a multi-limb representation that participates in limb coordination. The well-known subthalamic somatotopy showed a large overlap of feet and hand representations in the PD patients. This overlap and excessive amounts of kinematics or coordination units may reflect pathophysiology or compensatory mechanisms. Our findings thus explain, at the single neuron level, the important subthalamic role in motor control and coordination and indicate the effect of PD on the neuronal representation of movement. PMID:28211850

  15. Cortical magnetoencephalography of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of postural tremor.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Allison T; Bajwa, Jawad A; Johnson, Matthew D

    2012-10-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on motor cortex circuitry in Essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are not well understood, in part, because most imaging modalities have difficulty capturing and localizing motor cortex dynamics on the same temporal scale as motor symptom expression. Here, we report on the use of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to characterize sources of postural tremor activity within the brain of an ET/PD patient and the effects of bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS on these sources. Recordings were performed during unilateral and bilateral DBS at stimulation amplitudes of 0 V, 1 V, and 3 V corresponding to no therapy, subtherapeutic, and therapeutic configurations, respectively. Dipole source localization in reference to the postural tremor frequency recorded with electromyography (EMG) showed prominent sources in both right and left motor cortices when no therapy was provided. These sources dissipated as the amplitude of stimulation increased to a therapeutic level (P = 0.0062). Coherence peaks between the EMG and MEG recordings were seen at both 4 Hz, postural tremor frequency, and at 8 Hz, twice the tremor frequency, with no therapy. Both peaks were reduced with therapeutic DBS. These results demonstrate the capabilities of MEG to record cortical dynamics of tremor during deep brain stimulation and suggest that MEG could be used to examine DBS in the context of motor symptoms of PD and of ET.

  16. Deep brain stimulation mechanisms: beyond the concept of local functional inhibition.

    PubMed

    Deniau, Jean-Michel; Degos, Bertrand; Bosch, Clémentine; Maurice, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    Deep brain electrical stimulation has become a recognized therapy in the treatment of a variety of motor disorders and has potentially promising applications in a wide range of neurological diseases including neuropsychiatry. Behavioural observation that electrical high-frequency stimulation of a given brain area induces an effect similar to a lesion suggested a mechanism of functional inhibition. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as per operative recordings in patients have revealed a variety of effects involving local changes of neuronal excitability as well as widespread effects throughout the connected network resulting from activation of axons, including antidromic activation. Here we review current data regarding the local and network activity changes induced by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus and discuss this in the context of motor restoration in Parkinson's disease. Stressing the important functional consequences of axonal activation in deep brain stimulation mechanisms, we highlight the importance of developing anatomical knowledge concerning the fibre connections of the putative therapeutic targets.

  17. Ultra-High Field MRI Post Mortem Structural Connectivity of the Human Subthalamic Nucleus, Substantia Nigra, and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Roebroeck, Alard; Kemper, Valentin G.; Uludağ, Kâmil; Melse, Maartje; Mai, Jürgen; Kuijf, Mark L.; Herrler, Andreas; Jahanshahi, Ali; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Temel, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus, three nuclei of the human basal ganglia, play an important role in motor, associative, and limbic processing. The network of the basal ganglia is generally characterized by a direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathway. This study aims to investigate the mesoscopic nature of these connections between the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus and their surrounding structures. Methods: A human post mortem brain specimen including the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus was scanned on a 7 T MRI scanner. High resolution diffusion weighted images were used to reconstruct the fibers intersecting the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. The course and density of these tracks was analyzed. Results: Most of the commonly established projections of the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus were successfully reconstructed. However, some of the reconstructed fiber tracks such as the connections of the substantia nigra pars compacta to the other included nuclei and the connections with the anterior commissure have not been shown previously. In addition, the quantitative tractography approach showed a typical degree of connectivity previously not documented. An example is the relatively larger projections of the subthalamic nucleus to the substantia nigra pars reticulata when compared to the projections to the globus pallidus internus. Discussion: This study shows that ultra-high field post mortem tractography allows for detailed 3D reconstruction of the projections of deep brain structures in humans. Although the results should be interpreted carefully, the newly identified connections contribute to our understanding of the basal ganglia. PMID:27378864

  18. The subthalamic nucleus modulates the early phase of probabilistic classification learning.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Lam, Judith M; Breit, Sorin; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Krüger, Rejko; Luft, Andreas R; Wächter, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    Previous models proposed that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is critical in the early phase of skill acquisition. We hypothesized that subthalamic deep brain stimulation modulates the learning curve in early classification learning. Thirteen idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (iPD) with subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), 9 medically treated iPD, and 21 age-matched healthy controls were tested with a probabilistic classification task. STN-DBS patients were tested with stimulation OFF and ON, and medically treated patients with medication OFF and ON, respectively. Performance and reaction time were analyzed on the first 100 consecutive trials as early learning phase. Moreover, data were separated for low and high-probability patterns, and more differentiated strategy analyses were used. The major finding was a significant modulation of the learning curve in DBS patients with stimulation ON: although overall learning was similar to healthy controls, only the stimulation ON group showed a transient significant performance dip from trials '41-60' that rapidly recovered. Further analysis indicated that this might be paralleled by a modulation of the learning strategy, particularly on the high-probability patterns. The reaction time was unchanged during the dip. Our study supports that the STN serves as a relay in early classification learning and directs attention toward unacquainted content. The STN might play a role in balancing the short-term success against strategy optimization for improved long-term outcome.

  19. Microelectrode targeting of the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Erwin B

    2012-09-15

    Though microelectrode recordings likely increase the risks and costs of DBS, incremental improvement in accuracy may translate into improved outcomes that justify these risks and costs. Clinically based, controlled studies to resolve these issues are problematic. Until such studies are reported, physicians must rely on indirect evidence. The spatial variability of physiologically defined optimal targets, as determined by microelectrode recording (MER), necessary for targeting the STN was calculated. Study of the effectiveness of a MER algorithm was based on the number of penetrations required. The radius of the volume with a 99% chance of including the physiologically defined optimal target, based on 108 cases, was 4.5 mm. This is larger than the estimated radius of the DBS effect, which is variously estimated to be 2 to 3.9 mm. The 99% confidence radius in the plane orthogonal to the lead was 3.2 mm. In 70% of cases, the imaging-based trajectories corresponded to the physiologically defined optimal target. For the remaining 30% of cases, 70% required only a single additional MER tract. The radii of the 99% confidence volume and area may be larger than the effective radius of stimulation. Surveying within those volumes or areas is therefore necessary to assure that at least 99% of cases will cover the physiologically defined target. The MER algorithm was robust in detecting the physiologically defined optimal target. However, there are significant caveats in interpretation of the data.

  20. Predicting the effects of deep brain stimulation with diffusion tensor based electric field models.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of movement disorders, and has shown promising results for the treatment of a wide range of other neurological disorders. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of DBS or the volume of brain tissue affected by stimulation. We have developed methods that use anatomical and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) data to predict the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during DBS. We co-register the imaging data with detailed finite element models of the brain and stimulating electrode to enable anatomically and electrically accurate predictions of the spread of stimulation. One critical component of the model is the DTI tensor field that is used to represent the 3-dimensionally anisotropic and inhomogeneous tissue conductivity. With this system we are able to fuse structural and functional information to study a relevant clinical problem: DBS of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of Parkinsons disease (PD). Our results show that inclusion of the tensor field in our model caused significant differences in the size and shape of the VTA when compared to a homogeneous, isotropic tissue volume. The magnitude of these differences was proportional to the stimulation voltage. Our model predictions are validated by comparing spread of predicted activation to observed effects of oculomotor nerve stimulation in a PD patient. In turn, the 3D tissue electrical properties of the brain play an important role in regulating the spread of neural activation generated by DBS.

  1. Relation of lead trajectory and electrode position to neuropsychological outcomes of subthalamic neurostimulation in Parkinson's disease: results from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Witt, Karsten; Granert, Oliver; Daniels, Christine; Volkmann, Jens; Falk, Daniela; van Eimeren, Thilo; Deuschl, Günther

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves motor functions in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease but in some patients, it is also associated with a mild decline in cognitive functioning about one standard deviation from the preoperative state. We assessed the impact of the cortical lead entry point, the subcortical electrode path and the position of the active electrode contacts on neuropsychological changes after subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation compared to a control group of patients receiving best medical treatment. Sixty-eight patients with advanced Parkinson's disease were randomly assigned to have subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation or best medical treatment for Parkinson's disease. All patients had a blinded standardized neuropsychological exam (Mattis Dementia Rating scale, backward digit span, verbal fluency and Stroop task performance) at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Patients with subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation were defined as impaired according to a mild decline of one or more standard deviations compared to patients in the best medical treatment group. The cortical entry point of the electrodes, the electrode trajectories and the position of the active electrode contact were transferred into a normalized brain volume by an automated, non-linear registration algorithm to allow accurate statistical group analysis using pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging data. Data of 31 patients of the subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation group and 31 patients of the best medical treatment group were analysed. The subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation group showed impaired semantic fluency compared with the best medical treatment group 6 months after surgery (P = 0.02). Electrode trajectories intersecting with caudate nuclei increased the risk of a decline in global cognition and working memory performance. Statistically, for every 0.1 ml overlap with a caudate nucleus

  2. Optogenetics and deep brain stimulation neurotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Kowalski, Marek Mateusz; Roberts, Erik Andrew; Han, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Brain neural network is composed of densely packed, intricately wired neurons whose activity patterns ultimately give rise to every behavior, thought, or emotion that we experience. Over the past decade, a novel neurotechnique, optogenetics that combines light and genetic methods to control or monitor neural activity patterns, has proven to be revolutionary in understanding the functional role of specific neural circuits. We here briefly describe recent advance in optogenetics and compare optogenetics with deep brain stimulation technology that holds the promise for treating many neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  3. A Novel Lead Design for Modulation and Sensing of Deep Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Allison T.; Vetter, Rio J.; Hetke, Jamille F.; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Pellinen, David S.; Anderson, David J.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Goal Develop and characterize the functionality of a novel thin-film probe technology with a higher density of electrode contacts than are currently available with commercial deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead technology. Such technology has potential to enhance the spatial precision of DBS and enable a more robust approach to sensing local field potential activity in the context of adaptive DBS strategies. Methods Thin-film planar arrays were microfabricated and then assembled on a cylindrical carrier to achieve a lead with 3D conformation. Using an integrated and removable stylet, the arrays were chronically implanted in the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus in two parkinsonian non-human primates. Results This study provides the first in vivo data from chronically implanted DBS arrays for translational non-human primate studies. Stimulation through the arrays induced a decrease in parkinsonian rigidity, and directing current around the lead showed an orientation dependency for eliciting motor capsule side effects. The array recordings also showed that oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia is heterogeneous at a smaller scale than detected by current DBS lead technology. Conclusion These 3D DBS arrays provide an enabling tool for future studies that seek to monitor and modulate deep brain activity through chronically implanted leads. Significance DBS lead technology with a higher density of electrode contacts have potential to enable sculpting DBS current flow and sensing biomarkers of disease and therapy. PMID:26529747

  4. Randomized trial of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease: thirty-six-month outcomes; turning tables: should GPi become the preferred DBS target for Parkinson disease?

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Erwin B

    2013-01-08

    Weaver et al. and Tagliati mistakenly infer clinical equivalence between globus pallidus interna vs subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation based on failure to demonstrate statistically significant differences. A clinically meaningful-not statistically significant-difference in outcome should be decided a priori, after which the sample size necessary to have a reasonable probability of detecting the difference could be determined. (4) Fortunately, the study by Weaver et al. had sufficient sample size to demonstrate a 1-point difference in motor outcomes. However, such comparisons presume optimal management so as not to produce a "ceiling effect" that would obscure differences.

  5. Deep brain stimulation of CM/PF of thalamus could be the new elective target for tremor in advanced Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Peppe, A; Gasbarra, A; Stefani, A; Chiavalon, C; Pierantozzi, M; Fermi, E; Stanzione, P; Caltagirone, C; Mazzone, P

    2008-08-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate whether Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the Centre Median Nucleus/Parafascicular (CM/PF) Complex is useful in reducing extrapyramidal symptoms in advanced Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. In particular, we compared the action of CM/PF and subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on resting hand tremor using EMG surface of ulnar and radial right-hand muscles. Our results show that C/M DBS is very effective in reducing tremor, indicating this complex as a new target in advanced PD patients.

  6. Balancing the Brain: Resting State Networks and Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kringelbach, Morten L.; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu Z.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last three decades, large numbers of patients with otherwise treatment-resistant disorders have been helped by deep brain stimulation (DBS), yet a full scientific understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms is still missing. We have previously proposed that efficacious DBS works by restoring the balance of the brain's resting state networks. Here, we extend this proposal by reviewing how detailed investigations of the highly coherent functional and structural brain networks in health and disease (such as Parkinson's) have the potential not only to increase our understanding of fundamental brain function but of how best to modulate the balance. In particular, some of the newly identified hubs and connectors within and between resting state networks could become important new targets for DBS, including potentially in neuropsychiatric disorders. At the same time, it is of essence to consider the ethical implications of this perspective. PMID:21577250

  7. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life.

  8. Effect of deep brain stimulation and L-Dopa on electrocortical rhythms related to movement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Devos, D; Defebvre, L

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), impaired motor preparation has been related to a decrease in the latency of mu rhythm event-related desynchronisation (ERD) compared with control subjects, suggesting hypo activation of the contralateral, primary sensorimotor (PSM) cortex. Following movement, a decrease in amplitude of beta rhythm ERS was observed over the same region and thought to be related to impairment in cortical deactivation. By monitoring ERD/ERS, we aimed (i) to extend to advanced PD the observations made in less-advanced parkinsonism and (ii) to test the effect of acute L-Dopa, internal pallidal or subthalamic stimulation on these abnormalities. For the clinical evaluation the motor score of UPDRS decreased by about 60% under subthalamic stimulation and following acute L-Dopa administration and by 40% under internal pallidal stimulation. The following concurrent ERD/ERS changes under subthalamic stimulation and L-Dopa were observed: a marked increase in mu ERD latency during movement preparation over contralateral central region; an increase in mu ERD during movement execution over bilateral central regions; a decrease in mu ERD latency over bilateral frontocentral region and an increase in beta ERS over contralateral central region after movement. On the contrary, mu ERD latency was not improved under internal pallidal stimulation. Changes of mu and beta rhythm parameters seemed to be inversely correlated with bradykinesia. Mu rhythm ERD latency and the beta ERS amplitude further decreased in advanced PD compared with early stages, suggesting greater impairment of cortical activation/deactivation as the disease progresses and a partial restoration in relation to clinical improvement under treatments. Consequently, it appears that L-Dopa and deep brain stimulation partially restored the normal patterns of cortical oscillatory activity in PD, possibly by decreasing the low frequency hyper synchronisation at rest. This mechanism could be

  9. A multicentre study on suicide outcomes following subthalamic stimulation for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Krack, Paul; Lang, Anthony E.; Lozano, Andres M.; Dujardin, Kathy; Schüpbach, Michael; D’Ambrosia, James; Thobois, Stephane; Tamma, Filippo; Herzog, Jan; Speelman, Johannes D.; Samanta, Johan; Kubu, Cynthia; Rossignol, Helene; Poon, Yu-Yan; Saint-Cyr, Jean A.; Ardouin, Claire; Moro, Elena

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves motor symptoms and quality of life in advanced Parkinson's disease. As after other life-altering surgeries, suicides have been reported following deep brain stimulation for movement disorders. We sought to determine the suicide rate following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease by conducting an international multicentre retrospective survey of movement disorder and surgical centres. We further sought to determine factors associated with suicide attempts through a nested case-control study. In the survey of suicide rate, 55/75 centres participated. The completed suicide percentage was 0.45% (24/5311) and attempted suicide percentage was 0.90% (48/5311). Observed suicide rates in the first postoperative year (263/100 000/year) (0.26%) were higher than the lowest and the highest expected age-, gender- and country-adjusted World Health Organization suicide rates (Standardized Mortality Ratio for suicide: SMR 12.63–15.64; P < 0.001) and remained elevated at the fourth postoperative year (38/100 000/year) (0.04%) (SMR 1.81–2.31; P < 0.05). The excess number of deaths was 13 for the first postoperative year and one for the fourth postoperative year. In the case-control study of associated factors, 10 centres participated. Twenty-seven attempted suicides and nine completed suicides were compared with 70 controls. Postoperative depression (P < 0.001), being single (P = 0.007) and a previous history of impulse control disorders or compulsive medication use (P = 0.005) were independent associated factors accounting for 51% of the variance for attempted suicide risk. Attempted suicides were also associated (P < 0.05) with being younger, younger Parkinson's disease onset and a previous suicide attempt. Completed suicides were associated with postoperative depression (P < 0.001). Postoperative depression remained a significant factor associated with attempted and completed suicides after

  10. Network effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Alhourani, Ahmad; McDowell, Michael M.; Randazzo, Michael J.; Wozny, Thomas A.; Kondylis, Efstathios D.; Lipski, Witold J.; Beck, Sarah; Karp, Jordan F.; Ghuman, Avniel S.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentially alter specific brain functions via deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a monumental advance in clinical neuroscience, as well as within medicine as a whole. Despite the efficacy of DBS in the treatment of movement disorders, for which it is often the gold-standard therapy when medical management becomes inadequate, the mechanisms through which DBS in various brain targets produces therapeutic effects is still not well understood. This limited knowledge is a barrier to improving efficacy and reducing side effects in clinical brain stimulation. A field of study related to assessing the network effects of DBS is gradually emerging that promises to reveal aspects of the underlying pathophysiology of various brain disorders and their response to DBS that will be critical to advancing the field. This review summarizes the nascent literature related to network effects of DBS measured by cerebral blood flow and metabolic imaging, functional imaging, and electrophysiology (scalp and intracranial electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography) in order to establish a framework for future studies. PMID:26269552

  11. Design, Fabrication, Simulation and Characterization of a Novel Dual-Sided Microelectrode Array for Deep Brain Recording and Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zongya; Gong, Ruxue; Huang, Hongen; Wang, Jue

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, a novel dual-sided microelectrode array is specially designed and fabricated for a rat Parkinson's disease (PD) model to study the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The fabricated microelectrode array can stimulate the subthalamic nucleus and simultaneously record electrophysiological information from multiple nuclei of the basal ganglia system. The fabricated microelectrode array has a long shaft of 9 mm and each planar surface is equipped with three stimulating sites (diameter of 100 μm), seven electrophysiological recording sites (diameter of 20 μm) and four sites with diameter of 50 μm used for neurotransmitter measurements in future work. The performances of the fabricated microelectrode array were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the stimulating effects of the fabricated microelectrode were evaluated by finite element modeling (FEM). Preliminary animal experiments demonstrated that the designed microelectrode arrays can record spontaneous discharge signals from the striatum, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus interna. The designed and fabricated microelectrode arrays provide a powerful research tool for studying the mechanisms of DBS in rat PD models.

  12. Algorithmic design of a noise-resistant and efficient closed-loop deep brain stimulation system: A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Karamintziou, Sofia D; Custódio, Ana Luísa; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stéphan; Stathis, Pantelis G; Tagaris, George A; Sakas, Damianos E; Polychronaki, Georgia E; Tsirogiannis, George L; David, Olivier; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the field of closed-loop neuromodulation call for analysis and modeling approaches capable of confronting challenges related to the complex neuronal response to stimulation and the presence of strong internal and measurement noise in neural recordings. Here we elaborate on the algorithmic aspects of a noise-resistant closed-loop subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation system for advanced Parkinson's disease and treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, ensuring remarkable performance in terms of both efficiency and selectivity of stimulation, as well as in terms of computational speed. First, we propose an efficient method drawn from dynamical systems theory, for the reliable assessment of significant nonlinear coupling between beta and high-frequency subthalamic neuronal activity, as a biomarker for feedback control. Further, we present a model-based strategy through which optimal parameters of stimulation for minimum energy desynchronizing control of neuronal activity are being identified. The strategy integrates stochastic modeling and derivative-free optimization of neural dynamics based on quadratic modeling. On the basis of numerical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the presented modeling approach to identify, at a relatively low computational cost, stimulation settings potentially associated with a significantly higher degree of efficiency and selectivity compared with stimulation settings determined post-operatively. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that model-based control strategies are crucial for the design of novel stimulation protocols at the backstage of clinical applications.

  13. Algorithmic design of a noise-resistant and efficient closed-loop deep brain stimulation system: A computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Custódio, Ana Luísa; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stéphan; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Polychronaki, Georgia E.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; David, Olivier; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the field of closed-loop neuromodulation call for analysis and modeling approaches capable of confronting challenges related to the complex neuronal response to stimulation and the presence of strong internal and measurement noise in neural recordings. Here we elaborate on the algorithmic aspects of a noise-resistant closed-loop subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation system for advanced Parkinson’s disease and treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, ensuring remarkable performance in terms of both efficiency and selectivity of stimulation, as well as in terms of computational speed. First, we propose an efficient method drawn from dynamical systems theory, for the reliable assessment of significant nonlinear coupling between beta and high-frequency subthalamic neuronal activity, as a biomarker for feedback control. Further, we present a model-based strategy through which optimal parameters of stimulation for minimum energy desynchronizing control of neuronal activity are being identified. The strategy integrates stochastic modeling and derivative-free optimization of neural dynamics based on quadratic modeling. On the basis of numerical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the presented modeling approach to identify, at a relatively low computational cost, stimulation settings potentially associated with a significantly higher degree of efficiency and selectivity compared with stimulation settings determined post-operatively. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that model-based control strategies are crucial for the design of novel stimulation protocols at the backstage of clinical applications. PMID:28222198

  14. Design, Fabrication, Simulation and Characterization of a Novel Dual-Sided Microelectrode Array for Deep Brain Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zongya; Gong, Ruxue; Huang, Hongen; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel dual-sided microelectrode array is specially designed and fabricated for a rat Parkinson’s disease (PD) model to study the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The fabricated microelectrode array can stimulate the subthalamic nucleus and simultaneously record electrophysiological information from multiple nuclei of the basal ganglia system. The fabricated microelectrode array has a long shaft of 9 mm and each planar surface is equipped with three stimulating sites (diameter of 100 μm), seven electrophysiological recording sites (diameter of 20 μm) and four sites with diameter of 50 μm used for neurotransmitter measurements in future work. The performances of the fabricated microelectrode array were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the stimulating effects of the fabricated microelectrode were evaluated by finite element modeling (FEM). Preliminary animal experiments demonstrated that the designed microelectrode arrays can record spontaneous discharge signals from the striatum, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus interna. The designed and fabricated microelectrode arrays provide a powerful research tool for studying the mechanisms of DBS in rat PD models. PMID:27314356

  15. Use of brain MRI after deep brain stimulation hardware implantation.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro, Jules M; Lyons, Kelly E; Wetzel, Louis H; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experience with and safety of brain 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) patients. This was a retrospective review of brain MRI scanning performed on DBS patients at the University of Kansas Medical Center between January 1995 and December 2007. A total of 249 DBS patients underwent 445 brain 1.5 T MRI scan sessions encompassing 1,092 individual scans using a transmit-receive head coil, representing the cumulative scanning of 1,649 DBS leads. Patients with complete implanted DBS systems as well as those with externalized leads underwent brain imaging. For the majority of scans, specific absorption rates localized to the head (SAR(H)) were estimated and in all cases SAR(H) were higher than that specified in the present product labeling. There were no clinical or hardware related adverse events secondary to brain MRI scanning. Our data should not be extrapolated to encourage MRI scanning beyond the present labeling. Rather, our data may contribute to further defining safe MRI scanning parameters that might ultimately be adopted in future product labeling as more centers report in detail their experiences.

  16. [Deep brain stimulation in psychiatry: ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulf J; Bogerts, Bernhard; Voges, Jürgen; Galazky, Imke; Kohl, Sina; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kuhn, Jens; Steiner, Johann

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be an efficacious treatment for many neurological conditions and has thus been expanded to psychiatric diseases as well. Following an introduction on the history of DBS in psychiatry, this review summarizes commonly raised ethical concerns and questions on clinical trial design, selection of patients, informed consent and concerns about the possible impact of DBS on an individual's personality. Finally, it highlights the fact that critique on DBS in psychiatry is probably not selectively based on scientific concerns about potential risks; instead, the neurobiological origin of specific psychiatric disorders has been questioned.

  17. Deep Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Revell, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Disruption in the interaction between the central nervous system, nerves, and muscles cause movement disorders. These disorders can negatively affect quality of life. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been identified as a therapy for Parkinson disease and essential tremor that has significant advantages compared with medicinal therapies. Surgical intervention for these disorders before DBS included ablative therapies such as thalamotomy and pallidotomy. These procedures were not reversible and did not allow for treatment adjustments. The advent of DBS progressed therapies for significant movement disorders into the realm of being reversible and adjustable based on patient symptoms.

  18. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Gregory, Ralph

    2010-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation is now considered a routine treatment option for selected patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, primary segmental and generalised dystonia, and essential tremor. The neurosurgeon is responsible for the accurate and safe placement of the electrodes and the neurologist for the careful selection of patients and titration of medication against the effects of stimulation. A multidisciplinary team approach involving specialist nurses, neuropsychologists and neurophysiologists is required for a successful outcome. In this article we will summarise the key points in patient selection, provide an overview of the surgical technique, and discuss the beneficial and adverse outcomes that can occur.

  19. COMMUNICATION: Toward closed-loop optimization of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: concepts and lessons from a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-jiang; Greenwald, Brian; Rabitz, Herschel; Shea-Brown, Eric; Kosut, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus with periodic, high-frequency pulse trains is an increasingly standard therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease. Here, we propose that a closed-loop global optimization algorithm may identify novel DBS waveforms that could be more effective than their high-frequency counterparts. We use results from a computational model of the Parkinsonian basal ganglia to illustrate general issues relevant to eventual clinical or experimental tests of such an algorithm. Specifically, while the relationship between DBS characteristics and performance is highly complex, global search methods appear able to identify novel and effective waveforms with convergence rates that are acceptably fast to merit further investigation in laboratory or clinical settings.

  20. Effects of deep brain stimulation and medication on strength, bradykinesia, and electromyographic patterns of the ankle joint in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Prodoehl, Janey; Sturman, Molly M; Bakay, Roy A E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the control of movement in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after they received surgically implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The experiment studied ankle strength, movement velocity, and the associated electromyographic patterns in PD patients, six of whom had tremor at the ankle. The patients were studied off treatment, ON STN deep brain stimulation (DBS), on medication, and on medication plus STN DBS. Twelve matched control subjects were also examined. Medication alone and STN DBS alone increased patients' ankle strength, ankle velocity, agonist muscle burst amplitude, and agonist burst duration, while reducing the number of agonist bursts during movement. These findings were similar for PD patients with and without tremor. The combination of medication plus STN DBS normalized maximal strength at the ankle joint, but ankle movement velocity and electromyographic patterns were not normalized. The findings are the first to demonstrate that STN DBS and medication increase strength and movement velocity at the ankle joint.

  1. Current Steering to Control the Volume of Tissue Activated During Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Christopher R.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a recognized and effective clinical therapy for numerous neurological conditions. Since its inception, clinical DBS technology has progressed at a relatively slow rate; however, advances in neural engineering research have the potential to improve DBS systems. One such advance is the concept of current steering, or the use of multiple stimulation sources to direct current flow through targeted regions of brain tissue. Objective The goals of this study were to develop a theoretical understanding of the effects of current steering in the context of DBS, and use that information to evaluate the potential utility of current steering during stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. Methods We used finite element electric field models, coupled to multi-compartment cable axon models, to predict the volume of tissue activated (VTA) by DBS as a function of the stimulation parameter settings. Results Balancing current flow through adjacent cathodes increased the VTA magnitude, relative to monopolar stimulation, and current steering enabled us to sculpt the shape of the VTA to fit a given anatomical target. Conclusions These results provide motivation for the integration of current steering technology into clinical DBS systems, thereby expanding opportunities to customize DBS to individual patients, and potentially enhancing therapeutic efficacy. PMID:19142235

  2. Deep brain stimulation or thalamotomy in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome? Case report.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Gertrúd; Kovács, Norbert; Varga, Noémi Ágnes; Barsi, Péter; Erőss, Loránd; Molnár, Mária Judit; Balás, István

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 66-year-old man who has been treated for essential tremor since the age of 58. He developed mild cerebellar gait ataxia seven years after tremor onset. Moderate, global brain atrophy was identified on MRI scans. At the age of 68, only temporary tremor relief could be achieved by bilateral deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermedius nucleus of the thalamus. Bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus also resulted only in transient improvement. In the meantime, progressive gait ataxia and tetraataxia developed accompanied by other cerebellar symptoms, such as nystagmus and scanning speech. These correlated with progressive development of bilateral symmetric hyperintensity of the middle cerebellar peduncles on T2 weighted MRI scans. Genetic testing revealed premutation of the FMR1 gene, establishing the diagnosis of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. Although this is a rare disorder, it should be taken into consideration during preoperative evaluation of essential tremor. Postural tremor ceased two years later after thalamotomy on the left side, while kinetic tremor of the right hand also improved.

  3. Origin and Evolution of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Vittorio A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how the electrical stimulation, used since antiquity to modulate the nervous system, has been a fundamental tool of neurophysiologic investigation in the second half of the eighteenth century and was subsequently used by the early twentieth century, even for therapeutic purposes. In mid-twentieth century the advent of stereotactic procedures has allowed the drift from lesional to stimulating technique of deep nuclei of the brain for therapeutic purposes. In this way, deep brain stimulation (DBS) was born, that, over the last two decades, has led to positive results for the treatment of medically refractory Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. In recent years, the indications for therapeutic use of DBS have been extended to epilepsy, Tourette’s syndrome, psychiatric diseases (depression, obsessive–compulsive disorder), some kinds of headache, eating disorders, and the minimally conscious state. The potentials of the DBS for therapeutic use are fascinating, but there are still many unresolved technical and ethical problems, concerning the identification of the targets for each disease, the selection of the patients and the evaluation of the results. PMID:21887135

  4. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

  5. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation reverses mediofrontal influence over decision threshold.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Wiecki, Thomas V; Cohen, Michael X; Figueroa, Christina M; Samanta, Johan; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2011-09-25

    It takes effort and time to tame one's impulses. Although medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is broadly implicated in effortful control over behavior, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is specifically thought to contribute by acting as a brake on cortico-striatal function during decision conflict, buying time until the right decision can be made. Using the drift diffusion model of decision making, we found that trial-to-trial increases in mPFC activity (EEG theta power, 4-8 Hz) were related to an increased threshold for evidence accumulation (decision threshold) as a function of conflict. Deep brain stimulation of the STN in individuals with Parkinson's disease reversed this relationship, resulting in impulsive choice. In addition, intracranial recordings of the STN area revealed increased activity (2.5-5 Hz) during these same high-conflict decisions. Activity in these slow frequency bands may reflect a neural substrate for cortico-basal ganglia communication regulating decision processes.

  6. Combined pallidal and subthalamic nucleus stimulation in sporadic dystonia-parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Wöhrle, Johannes C; Blahak, Christian; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Fogel, Wolfgang; Bäzner, Hansjoerg; Krauss, Joachim K

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a new technique that has been introduced recently. A 39-year-old man with dystonia-parkinsonism underwent the simultaneous implantation of subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS electrodes. While bilateral STN DBS controlled the parkinsonian symptoms well and allowed for a reduction in levodopa, the improvement of dystonia was only temporary. Additional GPi DBS also alleviated dystonic symptoms. Formal assessment at the 1-year follow-up showed that both the parkinsonian symptoms and the dystonia were markedly improved via continuous bilateral combined STN and GPi stimulation. Sustained benefit was achieved at 3 years postoperatively.

  7. Embedded Ultrathin Cluster Electrodes for Long-Term Recordings in Deep Brain Centers

    PubMed Central

    Thorbergsson, Palmi Thor; Ekstrand, Joakim; Friberg, Annika; Granmo, Marcus; Pettersson, Lina M. E.; Schouenborg, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Neural interfaces which allow long-term recordings in deep brain structures in awake freely moving animals have the potential of becoming highly valuable tools in neuroscience. However, the recording quality usually deteriorates over time, probably at least partly due to tissue reactions caused by injuries during implantation, and subsequently micro-forces due to a lack of mechanical compliance between the tissue and neural interface. To address this challenge, we developed a gelatin embedded neural interface comprising highly flexible electrodes and evaluated its long term recording properties. Bundles of ultrathin parylene C coated platinum electrodes (N = 29) were embedded in a hard gelatin based matrix shaped like a needle, and coated with Kollicoat™ to retard dissolution of gelatin during the implantation. The implantation parameters were established in an in vitro model of the brain (0.5% agarose). Following a craniotomy in the anesthetized rat, the gelatin embedded electrodes were stereotactically inserted to a pre-target position, and after gelatin dissolution the electrodes were further advanced and spread out in the area of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The performance of the implanted electrodes was evaluated under anesthesia, during 8 weeks. Apart from an increase in the median-noise level during the first 4 weeks, the electrode impedance and signal-to-noise ratio of single-units remained stable throughout the experiment. Histological postmortem analysis confirmed implantation in the area of STN in most animals. In conclusion, by combining novel biocompatible implantation techniques and ultra-flexible electrodes, long-term neuronal recordings from deep brain structures with no significant deterioration of electrode function were achieved. PMID:27159159

  8. Deep Brain Electrical Stimulation in Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luisa L.

    2008-11-01

    The deep brain electrical stimulation has been used for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, depression and epilepsy. Studies carried out in human brain indicate that the application of high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz in limbic structures of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy abolished clinical seizures and significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes at focus. The anticonvulsant effects of HFS seem to be more effective in patients with less severe epilepsy, an effect associated with a high GABA tissue content and a low rate of cell loss. In addition, experiments using models of epilepsy indicate that HFS (pulses of 60 μs width at 130 Hz at subthreshold current intensity) of specific brain areas avoids the acquisition of generalized seizures and enhances the postictal seizure suppression. HFS is also able to modify the status epilepticus. It is concluded that the effects of HFS may be a good strategy to reduce or avoid the epileptic activity.

  9. Comparison of weight gain and energy intake after subthalamic versus pallidal stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Leray, Emmanuelle; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Drapier, Sophie; Drapier, Dominique; Blanchard, Sophie; Drillet, Gwenolla; Péron, Julie; Vérin, Marc

    2009-10-30

    To compare body mass index (BMI) and daily energy intake (DEI) after subthalamic versus pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). Weight gain following DBS in Parkinson's disease patients remains largely unexplained and no comparison of subthalamic and pallidal (GPi) stimulation has yet been performed. BMI and DEI, dopaminergic drug administration and motor scores were recorded in 46 patients with PD before STN (n = 32) or GPi (n = 14) DBS and 3 and 6 months after. At M6, BMI had increased by an average of 8.4% in the STN group and 3.2% in the GPi group. BMI increased in 28 STN and 9 GPi patients. This increase was significantly higher in the STN group (P < 0.048) and the difference remained significant after adjustment for reduced dopaminergic medication; 28.6% of GPi patients were overweight at 6 months (14.3% preoperatively) versus 37.5% of STN patients (21.9% preoperatively). Changes in BMI were negatively correlated with changes in dyskinesia in the GPi-DBS group. Food intake did not change in the two groups, either quantitatively or qualitatively. Frequent weight gain, inadequately explained by motor improvement or reduced dopaminergic drug dosage, occurred in subthalamic DBS patients. The difference between groups suggests additional factors in the STN group, such as homeostatic control center involvement.

  10. Chronic stress-like syndrome as a consequence of medial site subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Filip; Jech, Robert; Nováková, Lucie; Urgošík, Dušan; Bezdíček, Ondřej; Vymazal, Josef; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-02-01

    Considering the functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), we hypothesized that subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease might have a differential impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in relation to the position of active stimulating contact within the STN. In addition, we searched for any STN-DBS-related morning plasma cortisol changes in association with postoperative anxiety and weight gain. A plasma cortisol measurement was performed on the day of initiation of bilateral STN-DBS and repeated after 1 and 17 months in twenty patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The body weight change and anxiety scores following the implantation were assessed as well. The electrode positions in the STN were determined on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. After initiation of stimulation, cortisol levels significantly decreased and the cortisol changes after 1 and 17 months strongly correlated with the position of active contact in the subthalamic area. Patients with at least one contact located more medially in the STN experienced a significantly greater decrease of cortisol than those with one or both active contacts more laterally. Furthermore, the lower cortisol levels were strongly associated with higher trait anxiety and weight gain. These changes mimicked the effects of chronic stress and suggest the disturbing impact of STN-DBS on limbic and motivational systems.

  11. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Mayberg, Helen S.

    2015-01-01

    Medications, psychotherapy, and other treatments are effective for many patients with psychiatric disorders. However, with currently available interventions, a substantial number of patients experience incomplete resolution of symptoms, and relapse rates are high. In the search for better treatments, increasing interest has focused on focal neuromodulation. This focus has been driven by improved neuroanatomical models of mood, thought, and behavior regulation, as well as by more advanced strategies for directly and focally altering neural activity. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most invasive focal neuromodulation techniques available; data have supported its safety and efficacy in a number of movement disorders. Investigators have produced preliminary data on the safety and efficacy of DBS for several psychiatric disorders, as well. In this review, we describe the development and justification for testing DBS for various psychiatric disorders, carefully consider the available clinical data, and briefly discuss potential mechanisms of action. PMID:21692660

  13. Analysis of electrodes' placement and deformation in deep brain stimulation from medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Maroua; Lalys, Florent; Maumet, Camille; Haegelen, Claire; Jannin, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to reduce the motor symptoms such as rigidity or bradykinesia, in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) has emerged as prime target of DBS in idiopathic PD. However, DBS surgery is a difficult procedure requiring the exact positioning of electrodes in the pre-operative selected targets. This positioning is usually planned using patients' pre-operative images, along with digital atlases, assuming that electrode's trajectory is linear. However, it has been demonstrated that anatomical brain deformations induce electrode's deformations resulting in errors in the intra-operative targeting stage. In order to meet the need of a higher degree of placement accuracy and to help constructing a computer-aided-placement tool, we studied the electrodes' deformation in regards to patients' clinical data (i.e., sex, mean PD duration and brain atrophy index). Firstly, we presented an automatic algorithm for the segmentation of electrode's axis from post-operative CT images, which aims to localize the electrodes' stimulated contacts. To assess our method, we applied our algorithm on 25 patients who had undergone bilateral STNDBS. We found a placement error of 0.91+/-0.38 mm. Then, from the segmented axis, we quantitatively analyzed the electrodes' curvature and correlated it with patients' clinical data. We found a positive significant correlation between mean curvature index of the electrode and brain atrophy index for male patients and between mean curvature index of the electrode and mean PD duration for female patients. These results help understanding DBS electrode' deformations and would help ensuring better anticipation of electrodes' placement.

  14. Deep brain stimulation for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Sandra G J; Pereira, Erlick A C; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical intervention popularised in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, and also reported to improve symptoms of epilepsy, Tourette's syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorders and cluster headache. Since the 1950s, DBS has been used as a treatment to relieve intractable pain of several aetiologies including post stroke pain, phantom limb pain, facial pain and brachial plexus avulsion. Several patient series have shown benefits in stimulating various brain areas, including the sensory thalamus (ventral posterior lateral and medial), the periaqueductal and periventricular grey, or, more recently, the anterior cingulate cortex. However, this technique remains "off label" in the USA as it does not have Federal Drug Administration approval. Consequently, only a small number of surgeons report DBS for pain using current technology and techniques and few regions approve it. Randomised, blinded and controlled clinical trials that may use novel trial methodologies are desirable to evaluate the efficacy of DBS in patients who are refractory to other therapies. New imaging techniques, including tractography, may help optimise electrode placement and clinical outcome.

  15. Brain tumor segmentation with Deep Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Havaei, Mohammad; Davy, Axel; Warde-Farley, David; Biard, Antoine; Courville, Aaron; Bengio, Yoshua; Pal, Chris; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Larochelle, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic brain tumor segmentation method based on Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). The proposed networks are tailored to glioblastomas (both low and high grade) pictured in MR images. By their very nature, these tumors can appear anywhere in the brain and have almost any kind of shape, size, and contrast. These reasons motivate our exploration of a machine learning solution that exploits a flexible, high capacity DNN while being extremely efficient. Here, we give a description of different model choices that we've found to be necessary for obtaining competitive performance. We explore in particular different architectures based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), i.e. DNNs specifically adapted to image data. We present a novel CNN architecture which differs from those traditionally used in computer vision. Our CNN exploits both local features as well as more global contextual features simultaneously. Also, different from most traditional uses of CNNs, our networks use a final layer that is a convolutional implementation of a fully connected layer which allows a 40 fold speed up. We also describe a 2-phase training procedure that allows us to tackle difficulties related to the imbalance of tumor labels. Finally, we explore a cascade architecture in which the output of a basic CNN is treated as an additional source of information for a subsequent CNN. Results reported on the 2013 BRATS test data-set reveal that our architecture improves over the currently published state-of-the-art while being over 30 times faster.

  16. Computational analysis of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Butson, Christopher R

    2007-09-01

    Chronic, high-frequency electrical stimulation of subcortical brain structures (deep brain stimulation [DBS]) is an effective clinical treatment for several medically refractory neurological disorders. However, the clinical successes of DBS are tempered by the limited understanding of the response of neurons to applied electric fields and scientific definition of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS remains elusive. In addition, it is presently unclear which electrode designs and stimulation parameters are optimal for maximum therapeutic benefit and minimal side effects. Detailed computer modeling of DBS has recently emerged as a powerful technique to enhance our understanding of the effects of DBS and to create a virtual testing ground for new stimulation paradigms. This review summarizes the fundamentals of neurostimulation modeling and provides an overview of some of the scientific contributions of computer models to the field of DBS. We then provide a prospective view on the application of DBS-modeling tools to augment the clinical utility of DBS and to design the next generation of DBS technology.

  17. Effects of deep brain stimulation on vocal fold immobility in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Arocho-Quinones, Elsa V.; Hammer, Michael J.; Bock, Jonathan M.; Pahapill, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vocal fold (VF) immobility is a rare, potentially fatal complication of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous reports suggest that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) may influence laryngeal function, yet the role of STN-DBS on VF immobility remains unexplored. Case Description: We report a case of a patient with advanced PD and bilateral VF immobility ultimately requiring a tracheostomy. To assess the effects of STN-DBS on vocal cord function and to correlate these effects with peripheral motor symptoms at different stimulation settings, the patient was evaluated before and after initiation of bilateral STN-DBS. Measures included direct observation of VF mobility via transnasal laryngoscopy, levodopa equivalent dose of anti-PD medication, and motor scores. High frequency (150 Hz) STN-DBS resulted in improved motor scores, reduced medication requirement, and modestly improved right VF abduction although insufficient for safe decannulation. Low frequency (60 Hz) stimulation resulted in lower motor scores, but without worsening VF abduction. Conclusions: STN-DBS may play an important role in the neuromodulation of PD-induced laryngeal dysfunction, including VF mobility. Characterization of these axial symptoms is important when programming and evaluating responsiveness to DBS. PMID:28303202

  18. Reduction of influence of task difficulty on perceptual decision making by STN deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Green, Nikos; Bogacz, Rafal; Huebl, Julius; Beyer, Ann-Kristin; Kühn, Andrea A; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2013-09-09

    Neurocomputational models of optimal decision making ascribe a crucial role-the computation of conflict between choice alternatives-to the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Specifically, these models predict that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN will diminish the influence of decision conflict on decision making. In this work, patients with Parkinson's disease judged the direction of motion in random dot stimuli while ON and OFF DBS. To induce decision conflict, we varied the task difficulty (motion coherence), leading to increased reaction time (RT) in trials with greater task difficulty in healthy subjects. Results indicate that DBS significantly influences performance for perceptual decisions under high decision conflict. RT increased substantially OFF DBS as the task became more difficult, and a diffusion model best accounted for behavioral data. In contrast, ON DBS, the influence of task difficulty on RT was significantly reduced and a race model best accounted for the observed data. Individual data fits of evidence accumulation models demonstrate different information processing under distinct DBS states. Furthermore, ON DBS, speed-accuracy tradeoffs affected the magnitude of decision criterion adjustment significantly less compared to OFF DBS. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role for the STN in adjusting decision making during high-conflict trials in perceptual decision making.

  19. Deep brain stimulation and medication for parkinsonian tremor during secondary tasks.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Molly M; Vaillancourt, David E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Sierens, Diane K; Bakay, Roy A E; Corcos, Daniel M

    2007-06-15

    This study examined the efficacy of subthalamic nucleus (STN), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and medication for resting tremor during performance of secondary tasks. Hand tremor was recorded using accelerometry and electromyography (EMG) from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and ten matched control subjects. The PD subjects were examined off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. In the first experiment, tremor was recorded in a quiet condition and during a cognitive task designed to enhance tremor. In the second experiment, tremor was recorded in a quiet condition and during isometric finger flexion (motor task) with the contralateral limb at 5% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) that was designed to suppress tremor. Results showed that: (1) STN DBS and medication reduced tremor during a cognitive task that exacerbated tremor, (2) STN DBS normalized tremor frequency in both the quiet and cognitive task conditions, whereas tremor amplitude was only normalized in the quiet condition, (3) a secondary motor task reduced tremor in a similar manner to STN DBS. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS still suppresses tremor in the presence of a cognitive task. Furthermore, a secondary motor task of the opposite limb suppresses tremor to levels comparable to STN DBS.

  20. Influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue conductivity on electric field distribution in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to quantify the influence of heterogeneous isotropic and heterogeneous anisotropic tissue on the spatial distribution of the electric field during deep brain stimulation (DBS). Three finite element tissue models were created of one patient treated with DBS. Tissue conductivity was modelled as (I) homogeneous isotropic, (II) heterogeneous isotropic based on MRI, and (III) heterogeneous anisotropic based on diffusion tensor MRI. Modelled DBS electrodes were positioned in the subthalamic area, the pallidum, and the internal capsule in each tissue model. Electric fields generated during DBS were simulated for each model and target-combination and visualized with isolevels at 0.20 (inner), and 0.05 V mm(-1) (outer). Statistical and vector analysis was used for evaluation of the distribution of the electric field. Heterogeneous isotropic tissue altered the spatial distribution of the electric field by up to 4% at inner, and up to 10% at outer isolevel. Heterogeneous anisotropic tissue influenced the distribution of the electric field by up to 18 and 15% at each isolevel, respectively. The influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue on the electric field may be clinically relevant in anatomic regions that are functionally subdivided and surrounded by multiple fibres of passage.

  1. Body weight gain rate in patients with Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Barichella, Michela; Marczewska, Agnieszka M; Mariani, Claudio; Landi, Andrea; Vairo, Antonella; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2003-11-01

    We evaluated body weight changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in relation to clinical improvement. Thirty PD patients who received STN DBS were included (22 men, 8 women; mean age, 60.0 +/- 7.1 years; mean PD duration, 13.5 +/- 3.7 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 21.6 +/- 3.0 kg/m2). Body weight, physical activity, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores were noted before and 3 and 12 months after the procedure. Significant weight gain occurred in 29 patients; the mean increase was 14.8 +/- 9.8% of initial body weight in 1 year. Of the patients, 46.5% reported weight gain in the first 3 months, 21.4% gradual weight gain in the first 6 months, and 32.1% a slow increase for 1 year. Mean BMI increased up to 24.7 +/- 3.7 kg/m2. After 1 year, mean UPDRS motor score improved significantly in off and in on; and therapy complications improved by 91.0 +/- 17.0%. BMI changes at 3 and 12 months were significantly correlated to dyskinesia score changes, and levodopa dosage was not. In PD, STN DBS produces not only symptom control, but also weight gain. DBS candidates should be given nutritional counseling before the intervention to prevent rapid and/or excessive weight gain.

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders of Basal Ganglia Origin: Restoring Function or Functionality?

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Thomas; DeLong, Mahlon R

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is highly effective for both hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. The clinical use of DBS is, in part, empiric, based on the experience with prior surgical ablative therapies for these disorders, and, in part, driven by scientific discoveries made decades ago. In this review, we consider anatomical and functional concepts of the basal ganglia relevant to our understanding of DBS mechanisms, as well as our current understanding of the pathophysiology of two of the most commonly DBS-treated conditions, Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Finally, we discuss the proposed mechanism(s) of action of DBS in restoring function in patients with movement disorders. The signs and symptoms of the various disorders appear to result from signature disordered activity in the basal ganglia output, which disrupts the activity in thalamocortical and brainstem networks. The available evidence suggests that the effects of DBS are strongly dependent on targeting sensorimotor portions of specific nodes of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit, that is, the subthalamic nucleus and the internal segment of the globus pallidus. There is little evidence to suggest that DBS in patients with movement disorders restores normal basal ganglia functions (e.g., their role in movement or reinforcement learning). Instead, it appears that high-frequency DBS replaces the abnormal basal ganglia output with a more tolerable pattern, which helps to restore the functionality of downstream networks.

  3. Deep brain stimulation amplitude alters posture shift velocity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthi, Narayanan; Mulligan, Stefani; Mahant, Padma; Samanta, Johan; Abbas, James J

    2012-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now widely used to alleviate symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). The specific aim of this study was to identify posture control measures that may be used to improve selection of DBS parameters in the clinic and this was carried out by changing the DBS stimulation amplitude. A dynamic posture shift paradigm was used to assess posture control in 4 PD STN-DBS subjects. Each subject was tested at 4 stimulation amplitude settings. Movements of the center of pressure and the position of the pelvis were monitored and several quantitative indices were calculated. The presence of any statistically significant changes in several normalized indices due to reduced/no stimulation was tested using the one-sample t test. The peak velocity and the average movement velocity during the initial and mid phases of movement towards the target posture were substantially reduced. These results may be explained in terms of increased akinesia and bradykinesia due to altered stimulation conditions. Thus, the dynamic posture shift paradigm may be an effective tool to quantitatively characterize the effects of DBS on posture control and should be further investigated as a tool for selection of DBS parameters in the clinic.

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation and Cognitive Decline in Parkinson’s Disease: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Massano, João; Garrett, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a common and often debilitating disorder, with a growing prevalence accompanying global population aging. Current drug therapy is not satisfactory enough for many patients, especially after a few years of symptom progression. This is mainly due to the motor complications that frequently emerge as disease progresses. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a useful therapeutic option in carefully selected patients that significantly improves motor symptoms, functional status, and quality of life. However, cognitive impairment may limit patient selection for DBS, as patients need to have sufficient mental capabilities in order to understand the procedure, as well as its benefits and limitations, and cooperate with the medical team throughout the process of selection, surgery, and postsurgical follow-up. On the other hand it has been observed that certain aspects of cognitive performance may decline after DBS, namely when the therapeutic target is the widely used subthalamic nucleus. These are important pieces of information for patients, their families, and health care professionals. This manuscript reviews these aspects and their clinical implications. PMID:22557991

  5. System Identification of Local Field Potentials under Deep Brain Stimulation in a Healthy Primate

    PubMed Central

    Pedoto, Gilda; Santaniello, Sabato; Montgomery, Erwin B.; Gale, John T.; Fiengo, Giovanni; Glielmo, Luigi; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2013-01-01

    High frequency (HF) Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in the Sub-Thalamic Nucleus (STN) is a clinically recognized therapy for the treatment of motor disorders in Parkinson Disease (PD). The underlying mechanisms of DBS and how it impacts neighboring nuclei, however, are not yet completely understood. Electrophysiological data has been collected in PD patients and primates to better understand the impact of DBS on STN and the entire Basal Ganglia (BG) motor circuit. We use single unit recordings from Globus Pallidus, both pars interna and externa segments (GPi and GPe) in the BG, in a normal primate before and after DBS to reconstruct Local Field Potentials (LFPs) in the region. We then use system identification techniques to understand how GPe LFP activity and the DBS signal applied to STN influence GPi LFP activity. Our models suggest that when no stimulation is applied, the GPe LFPs have an inhibitory effect on GPi LFPs with a 2-3 ms delay, as is the case for single unit neuronal activity. On the other hand, when DBS is ON the models suggest that stimulation has a dominant effect on GPi LFPs which mask the inhibitory effects of GPe. PMID:21096635

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation Significantly Decreases Disability from Low Back Pain in Patients with Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather; Gee, Lucy; Kumar, Vignessh; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Durphy, Jennifer; Hanspal, Era; Barba, Anne; Molho, Eric; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of Parkinson's patients suffer from low back pain (LBP) during the course of their disease. How LBP affects daily functional status and how to manage this aspect of PD has not been adequately explored. Methods We examined sixteen patients undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) who met inclusion criteria for moderate disability from LBP, as classified by the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index (OLBPD). Results Thirteen of 16 patients had attempted additional treatments for LBP including medical management, massage, chiropractic, epidural steroid injections and/or surgery and with minimal relief. Following DBS, there was a significant improvement in OLBPD at both the 6-month and 1-year time points (p < 0.02, p < 0.005 respectively). A mean improvement of 31.7% on OLBPD score was noted. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) similarly decreased significantly at 1 year (p = 0.015). There was no correlation between OLBPD score and other measures including UPDRS, age, and other non-motor symptoms. Conclusion Given the prevalent yet undertreated disability associated with LBP in PD, these results are novel in that they show STN DBS has a significant positive effect on disability associated with LBP. PMID:25895600

  7. Post-operative assessment in Deep Brain Stimulation based on multimodal images: registration workflow and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalys, Florent; Haegelen, Claire; Abadie, Alexandre; Jannin, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Object Movement disorders in Parkinson disease patients may require functional surgery, when medical therapy isn't effective. In Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) electrodes are implanted within the brain to stimulate deep structures such as SubThalamic Nucleus (STN). This paper describes successive steps for constructing a digital Atlas gathering patient's location of electrodes and contacts for post operative assessment. Materials and Method 12 patients who had undergone bilateral STN DBS have participated to the study. Contacts on post-operative CT scans were automatically localized, based on black artefacts. For each patient, post operative CT images were rigidly registered to pre operative MR images. Then, pre operative MR images were registered to a MR template (super-resolution Collin27 average MRI template). This last registration was the combination of global affine, local affine and local non linear registrations, respectively. Four different studies were performed in order to validate the MR patient to template registration process, based on anatomical landmarks and clinical scores (i.e., Unified Parkinson's disease rating Scale). Visualisation software was developed for displaying into the template images the stimulated contacts represented as cylinders with a colour code related to the improvement of the UPDRS. Results The automatic contact localization algorithm was successful for all the patients. Validation studies for the registration process gave a placement error of 1.4 +/- 0.2 mm and coherence with UPDRS scores. Conclusion The developed visualization tool allows post-operative assessment for previous interventions. Correlation with additional clinical scores will certainly permit to learn more about DBS and to better understand clinical side-effects.

  8. Deep brain stimulation for obesity: past, present, and future targets.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Tomycz, Nestor; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald

    2015-06-01

    The authors review the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients for treating obesity, describe current DBS targets in the brain, and discuss potential DBS targets and nontraditional stimulation parameters that may improve the effectiveness of DBS for ameliorating obesity. Deep brain stimulation for treating obesity has been performed both in animals and in humans with intriguing preliminary results. The brain is an attractive target for addressing obesity because modulating brain activity may permit influencing both sides of the energy equation--caloric intake and energy expenditure.

  9. Theoretical analysis of the local field potential in deep brain stimulation applications.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common therapy for treating movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), and provides a unique opportunity to study the neural activity of various subcortical structures in human patients. Local field potential (LFP) recordings are often performed with either intraoperative microelectrodes or DBS leads and reflect oscillatory activity within nuclei of the basal ganglia. These LFP recordings have numerous clinical implications and might someday be used to optimize DBS outcomes in closed-loop systems. However, the origin of the recorded LFP is poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to theoretically analyze LFP recordings within the context of clinical DBS applications. This goal was achieved with a detailed recording model of beta oscillations (∼20 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus. The recording model consisted of finite element models of intraoperative microelectrodes and DBS macroelectrodes implanted in the brain along with multi-compartment cable models of STN projection neurons. Model analysis permitted systematic investigation into a number of variables that can affect the composition of the recorded LFP (e.g. electrode size, electrode impedance, recording configuration, and filtering effects of the brain, electrode-electrolyte interface, and recording electronics). The results of the study suggest that the spatial reach of the LFP can extend several millimeters. Model analysis also showed that variables such as electrode geometry and recording configuration can have a significant effect on LFP amplitude and spatial reach, while the effects of other variables, such as electrode impedance, are often negligible. The results of this study provide insight into the origin of the LFP and identify variables that need to be considered when analyzing LFP recordings in clinical DBS applications.

  10. Theoretical Analysis of the Local Field Potential in Deep Brain Stimulation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lempka, Scott F.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common therapy for treating movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), and provides a unique opportunity to study the neural activity of various subcortical structures in human patients. Local field potential (LFP) recordings are often performed with either intraoperative microelectrodes or DBS leads and reflect oscillatory activity within nuclei of the basal ganglia. These LFP recordings have numerous clinical implications and might someday be used to optimize DBS outcomes in closed-loop systems. However, the origin of the recorded LFP is poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to theoretically analyze LFP recordings within the context of clinical DBS applications. This goal was achieved with a detailed recording model of beta oscillations (∼20 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus. The recording model consisted of finite element models of intraoperative microelectrodes and DBS macroelectrodes implanted in the brain along with multi-compartment cable models of STN projection neurons. Model analysis permitted systematic investigation into a number of variables that can affect the composition of the recorded LFP (e.g. electrode size, electrode impedance, recording configuration, and filtering effects of the brain, electrode-electrolyte interface, and recording electronics). The results of the study suggest that the spatial reach of the LFP can extend several millimeters. Model analysis also showed that variables such as electrode geometry and recording configuration can have a significant effect on LFP amplitude and spatial reach, while the effects of other variables, such as electrode impedance, are often negligible. The results of this study provide insight into the origin of the LFP and identify variables that need to be considered when analyzing LFP recordings in clinical DBS applications. PMID:23555799

  11. Closing the loop of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Romain; Chaillet, Antoine; Filipchuk, Anton; Pasillas-Lépine, William; Hammond, Constance

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation is used to treat a wide range of brain disorders, like Parkinson's disease. The stimulated networks usually share common electrophysiological signatures, including hyperactivity and/or dysrhythmia. From a clinical perspective, HFS is expected to alleviate clinical signs without generating adverse effects. Here, we consider whether the classical open-loop HFS fulfills these criteria and outline current experimental or theoretical research on the different types of closed-loop DBS that could provide better clinical outcomes. In the first part of the review, the two routes followed by HFS-evoked axonal spikes are explored. In one direction, orthodromic spikes functionally de-afferent the stimulated nucleus from its downstream target networks. In the opposite direction, antidromic spikes prevent this nucleus from being influenced by its afferent networks. As a result, the pathological synchronized activity no longer propagates from the cortical networks to the stimulated nucleus. The overall result can be described as a reversible functional de-afferentation of the stimulated nucleus from its upstream and downstream nuclei. In the second part of the review, the latest advances in closed-loop DBS are considered. Some of the proposed approaches are based on mathematical models, which emphasize different aspects of the parkinsonian basal ganglia: excessive synchronization, abnormal firing-rate rhythms, and a deficient thalamo-cortical relay. The stimulation strategies are classified depending on the control-theory techniques on which they are based: adaptive and on-demand stimulation schemes, delayed and multi-site approaches, stimulations based on proportional and/or derivative control actions, optimal control strategies. Some of these strategies have been validated experimentally, but there is still a large reservoir of theoretical work that may point to ways of improving practical treatment. PMID:24391555

  12. Analysis of simultaneous MEG and intracranial LFP recordings during Deep Brain Stimulation: a protocol and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Oswal, Ashwini; Jha, Ashwani; Neal, Spencer; Reid, Alphonso; Bradbury, David; Aston, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Brown, Peter; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for several neurological and psychiatric disorders. In order to gain insights into the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS and to advance future therapies a better understanding of the effects of DBS on large-scale brain networks is required. New method In this paper, we describe an experimental protocol and analysis pipeline for simultaneously performing DBS and intracranial local field potential (LFP) recordings at a target brain region during concurrent magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurement. Firstly we describe a phantom setup that allowed us to precisely characterise the MEG artefacts that occurred during DBS at clinical settings. Results Using the phantom recordings we demonstrate that with MEG beamforming it is possible to recover oscillatory activity synchronised to a reference channel, despite the presence of high amplitude artefacts evoked by DBS. Finally, we highlight the applicability of these methods by illustrating in a single patient with Parkinson's disease (PD), that changes in cortical-subthalamic nucleus coupling can be induced by DBS. Comparison with existing approaches To our knowledge this paper provides the first technical description of a recording and analysis pipeline for combining simultaneous cortical recordings using MEG, with intracranial LFP recordings of a target brain nucleus during DBS. PMID:26698227

  13. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-11-18

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55-90 Hz) and beta (13-30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces.

  14. Tremor-correlated neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Amtage, Florian; Henschel, Kathrin; Schelter, Björn; Vesper, Jan; Timmer, Jens; Lücking, Carl Hermann; Hellwig, Bernhard

    2008-09-19

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD) is generated by an oscillatory neuronal network consisting of cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) which is part of the basal ganglia is of particular interest, since deep brain stimulation of the STN is an effective treatment for PD including Parkinsonian tremor. It is controversial if and how the STN contributes to tremor generation. In this study, we analyze neuronal STN activity in seven patients with Parkinsonian rest tremor who underwent stereotactic surgery for deep brain stimulation. Surface EMG was recorded from the wrist flexors and extensors. Simultaneously, neuronal spike activity was registered in different depths of the STN using an array of five microelectrodes. After spike-sorting, spectral coherence was analyzed between spike activity of STN neurons and tremor activity. Significant coherence at the tremor frequency was detected between EMG and neuronal STN activity in 76 out of 145 neurons (52.4%). In contrast, coherence in the beta band occurred only in 10 out of 145 neurons (6.9%). Tremor-coherent STN activity was widely distributed over the STN being more frequent in its dorsal parts (70.8-88.9%) than in its ventral parts (25.0-48.0%). Our results suggest that synchronous neuronal STN activity at the tremor frequency contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinsonian tremor. The wide-spread spatial distribution of tremor-coherent spike activity argues for the recruitment of an extended network of subthalamic neurons for tremor generation.

  15. Stochastic Phase Resetting: a Theory for Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, Peter A.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic approach to phase resetting in clusters of interacting oscillators is presented. This theory explains how a stimulus, especially a single pulse, induces synchronization and desynchronization processes. The theory is used to design a new technique for deep brain stimulation in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease or essential tremor that do no longer respond to drug therapy. This stimulation mode is a feedback controlled single pulse stimulation. The feedback signal is registered with the deep brain electrode, and the desynchronizing pulses are administered via the same electrode. The stochastic phase resetting theory is used as a starting point of a model based design of intelligent and gentle deep brain stimulation techniques.

  16. Effects of deep brain stimulation on balance and gait in patients with Parkinson's disease: A systematic neurophysiological review.

    PubMed

    Collomb-Clerc, A; Welter, M-L

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an efficient treatment for the alleviation of motor signs in patients with Parkinson's disease. The effects of DBS on gait and balance disorders are less successful and may even lead to an aggravation of freezing of gait and imbalance. The identification of a substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr)-mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) network in the control of locomotion and postural control and of its dysfunction/lesion in PD patients with gait and balance disorders led to suggestion that DBS should be targeting the SNr and the pedunculopontine nucleus (part of the MLR) for PD patients with these disabling axial motor signs. However, the clinical results to date have been disappointing. In this review, we discuss the effects of DBS of these basal ganglia and brainstem structures on the neurophysiological parameters of gait and balance control in PD patients. Overall, the data suggest that both STN and GPi-DBS improve gait parameters and quiet standing postural control in PD patients, but have no effect or may even aggravate dynamic postural control, in particular with STN-DBS. Conversely, DBS of the SNr and PPN has no effect on gait parameters but improves anticipatory postural adjustments and gait postural control.

  17. A direct relationship between oscillatory subthalamic nucleus-cortex coupling and rest tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, Jan; Hartmann, Christian J; Butz, Markus; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Ozkurt, Tolga E; Elben, Saskia; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-12-01

    Electrophysiological studies suggest that rest tremor in Parkinson's disease is associated with an alteration of oscillatory activity. Although it is well known that tremor depends on cortico-muscular coupling, it is unclear whether synchronization within and between brain areas is specifically related to the presence and severity of tremor. To tackle this longstanding issue, we took advantage of naturally occurring spontaneous tremor fluctuations and investigated cerebral synchronization in the presence and absence of rest tremor. We simultaneously recorded local field potentials from the subthalamic nucleus, the magnetoencephalogram and the electromyogram of forearm muscles in 11 patients with Parkinson's disease (all male, age: 52-74 years). Recordings took place the day after surgery for deep brain stimulation, after withdrawal of anti-parkinsonian medication. We selected epochs containing spontaneous rest tremor and tremor-free epochs, respectively, and compared power and coherence between subthalamic nucleus, cortex and muscle across conditions. Tremor-associated changes in cerebro-muscular coherence were localized by Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources. Subsequently, cortico-cortical coupling was analysed by computation of the imaginary part of coherency, a coupling measure insensitive to volume conduction. After tremor onset, local field potential power increased at individual tremor frequency and cortical power decreased in the beta band (13-30 Hz). Sensor level subthalamic nucleus-cortex, cortico-muscular and subthalamic nucleus-muscle coherence increased during tremor specifically at tremor frequency. The increase in subthalamic nucleus-cortex coherence correlated with the increase in electromyogram power. On the source level, we observed tremor-associated increases in cortico-muscular coherence in primary motor cortex, premotor cortex and posterior parietal cortex contralateral to the tremulous limb. Analysis of the imaginary part of coherency revealed

  18. "Asleep" deep brain stimulation for essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsinsue; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Chapple, Kristina; Lambert, Margaret; Dhall, Rohit; Ponce, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Deep brain stimulation (DBS) performed under general anesthesia ("asleep" DBS) has not been previously reported for essential tremor. This is in part due to the inability to visualize the target (the ventral intermediate nucleus [VIM]) on MRI. The authors evaluate the efficacy of this asleep technique in treating essential tremor by indirect VIM targeting. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed consecutive cases of initial DBS for essential tremor performed by a single surgeon. DBS was performed with patients awake (n = 40, intraoperative test stimulation without microelectrode recording) or asleep (n = 17, under general anesthesia). Targeting proceeded with standardized anatomical coordinates on preoperative MRI. Intraoperative CT was used for stereotactic registration and lead position confirmation. Functional outcomes were evaluated with pre- and postoperative Bain and Findley Tremor Activities of Daily Living scores. RESULTS A total of 29 leads were placed in asleep patients, and 60 were placed in awake patients. Bain and Findley Tremor Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire scores were not significantly different preoperatively for awake versus asleep cohorts (p = 0.2). The percentage of postoperative improvement was not significantly different between asleep (48.6%) and awake (45.5%) cohorts (p = 0.35). Euclidean error (mm) was higher for awake versus asleep patients (1.7 ± 0.8 vs 1.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.01), and radial error (mm) trended higherfor awake versus asleep patients (1.3 ± 0.8 vs 0.9 ± 0.5, p = 0.06). There were no perioperative complications. CONCLUSIONS In the authors' initial experience, asleep VIM DBS for essential tremor without intraoperative test stimulation can be performed safely and effectively.

  19. Moving forward: advances in the treatment of movement disorders with deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, Terry K; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Lee, Kendall H

    2011-01-01

    The modern era of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery has ushered in state of the art technologies for the treatment of movement disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD), tremor, and dystonia. After years of experience with various surgical therapies, the eventual shortcomings of both medical and surgical treatments, and several serendipitous discoveries, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has risen to the forefront as a highly effective, safe, and reversible treatment for these conditions. Idiopathic advanced PD can be treated with thalamic, globus pallidus internus (GPi), or subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS. Thalamic DBS primarily relieves tremor while GPi and STN DBS alleviate a wide range of Parkinsonian symptoms. Thalamic DBS is also used in the treatment of other types of tremor, particularly essential tremor, with excellent results. Both primary and various types of secondary dystonia can be treated very effectively with GPi DBS. The variety of anatomical targets for these movement disorders is indicative of the network-level dysfunction mediating these movement disturbances. Despite an increasing understanding of the clinical benefits of DBS, little is known about how DBS can create such wide sweeping neuromodulatory effects. The key to improving this therapeutic modality and discovering new ways to treat these and other neurologic conditions lies in better understanding the intricacies of DBS. Here we review the history and pertinent clinical data for DBS treatment of PD, tremor, and dystonia. While multiple regions of the brain have been targeted for DBS in the treatment of these movement disorders, this review article focuses on those that are most commonly used in current clinical practice. Our search criteria for PubMed included combinations of the following terms: DBS, neuromodulation, movement disorders, PD, tremor, dystonia, and history. Dates were not restricted.

  20. Deep brain stimulation and cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease: The predictive value of electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Markser, A; Maier, Franziska; Lewis, C J; Dembek, T A; Pedrosa, D; Eggers, C; Timmermann, L; Kalbe, E; Fink, G R; Burghaus, Lothar

    2015-10-01

    Some Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) develop new-onset cognitive decline. We examined whether clinical EEG recordings can be used to predict cognitive deterioration in PD patients undergoing STN-DBS. In this retrospective study, we used the Grand Total EEG (GTE)-score (short and total) to evaluate pre- and postoperative EEGs. In PD patients undergoing STN-DBS (N = 30), cognitive functioning was measured using Mini-Mental State Test and DemTect before and after surgery. Severity of motor impairment was assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III. Patients were classified into patients with or without cognitive decline after STN-DBS surgery. Epidemiological data, pre- and postoperative EEG recordings as well as neuropsychological and neurological data, electrode positions and the third ventricle width were compared. A logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of cognitive decline. Motor deficits significantly improved from pre- to post-surgery, while the mean GTE-scores increased significantly. Six patients developed cognitive deterioration 4-12 months postoperatively. These patients had significantly higher preoperative GTE-scores than patients without cognitive deterioration, although preoperative cognitive functioning was comparable. Electrode positions, brain atrophy and neurological data did not differ between groups. Logistic regression analysis identified the GTE-score as a significant predictor of postoperative cognitive deterioration. Data suggest that the preoperative GTE-score can be used to identify PD patients that are at high risk for developing cognitive deterioration after STN-DBS surgery even though their preoperative cognitive state was normal.

  1. Analysis of Gene Expression Changes in the Rat Hippocampus After Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Tharakeswari; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Tierney, Travis

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery, targeting various regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia, thalamus, and subthalamic regions, is an effective treatment for several movement disorders that have failed to respond to medication. Recent progress in the field of DBS surgery has begun to extend the application of this surgical technique to other conditions as diverse as morbid obesity, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Despite these expanding indications, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms that facilitate the beneficial effects of DBS surgery. One approach to this question is to perform gene expression analysis in neurons that receive the electrical stimulation. Previous studies have shown that neurogenesis in the rat dentate gyrus is elicited in DBS targeting of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus1. DBS surgery targeting the ATN is used widely for treatment refractory epilepsy. It is thus of much interest for us to explore the transcriptional changes induced by electrically stimulating the ATN. In this manuscript, we describe our methodologies for stereotactically-guided DBS surgery targeting the ATN in adult male Wistar rats. We also discuss the subsequent steps for tissue dissection, RNA isolation, cDNA preparation and quantitative RT-PCR for measuring gene expression changes. This method could be applied and modified for stimulating the basal ganglia and other regions of the brain commonly clinically targeted. The gene expression study described here assumes a candidate target gene approach for discovering molecular players that could be directing the mechanism for DBS. PMID:25867749

  2. Do Stable Patients With a Premorbid Depression History Have a Worse Outcome After Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Michael S.; Wu, Samuel S.; Foote, Kelly D.; Bowers, Dawn; Gogna, Shilpa; Price, Catherine; Malaty, Irene; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Jacobson, Charles E.; Ward, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been associated with mood sequelae in a subset of patients operated on in either the subthalamic nucleus or the globus pallidus internus for the treatment of Parkinson disease. OBJECTIVE To compare mood and motor outcomes in those with and without a presurgical history of depression. METHODS Unilateral subthalamic nucleus or unilateral globus pallidus internus DBS patients followed up for a minimum of 6 months were included. All patients underwent a comprehensive outpatient psychiatric evaluation by a board-certified psychiatrist. Psychiatric diagnoses were based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition, text revision, nomenclature (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Motor and mood outcomes were compared. RESULTS A total of 110 patients were included. There were no significant differences in baseline variables between the 2 groups. Those with a preoperative history of depression had significantly higher Beck Depression Inventory scores than the nondepression group after DBS (8.97 ± 7.55 vs 5.92 ± 5.71; P = .04). Patients with a depression history had less improvement (11.6%) in pre/post-DBS change when Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor scores were compared (P = .03) after adjustment for stimulation site and baseline demographic and clinical variables. Patients with a higher levodopa equivalent dose had a worse clinical motor outcome. CONCLUSION Patients with a preoperative depression history had higher Beck Depression Inventory scores after DBS and significantly less (albeit small) improvement in pre/post-DBS change in Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor scores than patients without a history of depression. PMID:21415789

  3. Encoding of sequence boundaries in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Herrojo Ruiz, María; Rusconi, Marco; Brücke, Christof; Haynes, John-Dylan; Schönecker, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-10-01

    Sequential behaviour is widespread not only in humans but also in animals, ranging in different degrees of complexity from locomotion to birdsong or music performance. The capacity to learn new motor sequences relies on the integrity of basal ganglia-cortical loops. In Parkinson's disease the execution of habitual action sequences as well as the acquisition of novel sequences is impaired partly due to a deficiency in being able to generate internal cues to trigger movement sequences. In addition, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have difficulty initiating or terminating a self-paced sequence of actions. Direct recordings from the basal ganglia in these patients show an increased level of beta (14-30 Hz) band oscillatory activity associated with impairment in movement initiation. In this framework, the current study aims to evaluate in patients with Parkinson's disease the neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus related to the encoding of sequence boundaries during the explicit learning of sensorimotor sequences. We recorded local field potential activity from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients who underwent deep brain stimulation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease, while the patients in their usual medicated state practiced sequences of finger movements on a digital piano with corresponding auditory feedback. Our results demonstrate that variability in performance during an early phase of sequence acquisition correlates across patients with changes in the pattern of subthalamic beta-band oscillations; specifically, an anticipatory suppression of beta-band activity at sequence boundaries is linked to better performance. By contrast, a more compromised performance is related to attenuation of beta-band activity before within-sequence elements. Moreover, multivariate pattern classification analysis reveals that differential information about boundaries and within-sequence elements can be decoded at least 100 ms before the keystroke

  4. The human subthalamic nucleus encodes the subjective value of reward and the cost of effort during decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Zénon, Alexandre; Duclos, Yann; Carron, Romain; Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Régis, Jean; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Peter; Eusebio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour entails the capacity to select actions as a function of their energy cost and expected value and the disruption of this faculty is now viewed as a possible cause of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Indirect evidence points to the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus—the most common target for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease—in cost-benefit computation. However, this putative function appears at odds with the current view that the subthalamic nucleus is important for adjusting behaviour to conflict. Here we tested these contrasting hypotheses by recording the neuronal activity of the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson’s disease during an effort-based decision task. Local field potentials were recorded from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (mean age 63.8 years ± 6.8; mean disease duration 9.4 years ± 2.5) both OFF and ON levodopa while they had to decide whether to engage in an effort task based on the level of effort required and the value of the reward promised in return. The data were analysed using generalized linear mixed models and cluster-based permutation methods. Behaviourally, the probability of trial acceptance increased with the reward value and decreased with the required effort level. Dopamine replacement therapy increased the rate of acceptance for efforts associated with low rewards. When recording the subthalamic nucleus activity, we found a clear neural response to both reward and effort cues in the 1–10 Hz range. In addition these responses were informative of the subjective value of reward and level of effort rather than their actual quantities, such that they were predictive of the participant’s decisions. OFF levodopa, this link with acceptance was weakened. Finally, we found that these responses did not index conflict, as they did not vary as a function of the distance from indifference in the acceptance decision. These findings show

  5. The human subthalamic nucleus encodes the subjective value of reward and the cost of effort during decision-making.

    PubMed

    Zénon, Alexandre; Duclos, Yann; Carron, Romain; Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Régis, Jean; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Peter; Eusebio, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Adaptive behaviour entails the capacity to select actions as a function of their energy cost and expected value and the disruption of this faculty is now viewed as a possible cause of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Indirect evidence points to the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus-the most common target for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease-in cost-benefit computation. However, this putative function appears at odds with the current view that the subthalamic nucleus is important for adjusting behaviour to conflict. Here we tested these contrasting hypotheses by recording the neuronal activity of the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease during an effort-based decision task. Local field potentials were recorded from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (mean age 63.8 years ± 6.8; mean disease duration 9.4 years ± 2.5) both OFF and ON levodopa while they had to decide whether to engage in an effort task based on the level of effort required and the value of the reward promised in return. The data were analysed using generalized linear mixed models and cluster-based permutation methods. Behaviourally, the probability of trial acceptance increased with the reward value and decreased with the required effort level. Dopamine replacement therapy increased the rate of acceptance for efforts associated with low rewards. When recording the subthalamic nucleus activity, we found a clear neural response to both reward and effort cues in the 1-10 Hz range. In addition these responses were informative of the subjective value of reward and level of effort rather than their actual quantities, such that they were predictive of the participant's decisions. OFF levodopa, this link with acceptance was weakened. Finally, we found that these responses did not index conflict, as they did not vary as a function of the distance from indifference in the acceptance decision. These findings show that low

  6. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, A M; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-10-15

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13-20 Hz) and high-beta (20-35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing.

  7. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, AM; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-01-01

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13–20 Hz) and high-beta (20–35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing. PMID:16123109

  8. Movement-related modulation of neural activity in human basal ganglia and its L-DOPA dependency: recordings from deep brain stimulation electrodes in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Priori, A; Foffani, G; Pesenti, A; Bianchi, A; Chiesa, V; Baselli, G; Caputo, E; Tamma, F; Rampini, P; Egidi, M; Locatelli, M; Barbieri, S; Scarlato, G

    2002-09-01

    Through electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation in three patients (5 sides) with Parkinson's disease, we recorded the electrical activity from the human basal ganglia before, during and after voluntary contralateral finger movements, before and after L-DOPA. We analysed the movement-related spectral changes in the electroencephalographic signal from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and from the internal globus pallidus (GPi). Before, during and after voluntary movements, signals arising from the human basal ganglia contained two main frequencies: a high beta (around 26 Hz), and a low beta (around 18 Hz). The high beta (around 26 Hz) power decreased in the STN and GPi, whereas the low beta (around 18 Hz) power decrease was consistently found only in the GPi. Both frequencies changed their power with a specific temporal modulation related to the different movement phases. L-DOPA specifically and selectively influenced the spectral power changes in these two signal bands.

  9. Assessment of individual cognitive changes after deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson's disease using the Neuropsychological Test Battery Vienna short version.

    PubMed

    Foki, Thomas; Hitzl, Daniela; Pirker, Walter; Novak, Klaus; Pusswald, Gisela; Auff, Eduard; Lehrner, Johann

    2017-02-07

    Long-term therapy of Parkinson's disease with L‑DOPA is associated with a high risk of developing motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can improve these motor complications. Although the positive effect on motor symptoms has been proven, postoperative cognitive decline has been documented. To tackle the impact of DBS on cognition, 18 DBS patients were compared to 25 best medically treated Parkinson's patients, 24 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 12 healthy controls using the Neuropsychological Test Battery Vienna short version (NTBV-short) for cognitive outcome 12 months after the first examination. Reliable change index methodology was used. Roughly 10% of DBS patients showed cognitive decline mainly affecting the domains attention and executive functioning (phonemic fluency). Further research is needed to identify the mechanisms that lead to improvement or deterioration of cognitive functions in individual cases.

  10. Tissue Response to Deep Brain Stimulation and Microlesion: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran‐Shoraka, Massoud; Reynolds, Brent A.; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used for a variety of movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease. There are several theories regarding the biology and mechanisms of action of DBS. Previously, we observed an up‐regulation of neural progenitor cell proliferation in post‐mortem tissue suggesting that DBS can influence cellular plasticity in regions beyond the site of stimulation. We wanted to support these observations and investigate the relationship if any, between DBS, neural progenitor cells, and microglia. Methods We used naïve rats in this study for DBS electrode implantation, stimulation, and microlesions. We used immunohistochemistry techniques for labeling microglial and progenitor cells, and fluorescence microscopy for viewing and quantification of labeled cells. Results We present data that demonstrates a reciprocal relationship of microglia and neural precursor cells in the presence of acute high frequency stimulation. In our hands, stimulated animals demonstrate significantly lower numbers of activated microglia (p = 0.026) when compared to microlesion and sham animals. The subthalamic region surrounding the DBS stimulating electrode reveals a significant increase in the number of neural precursor cells expressing cell cycle markers, plasticity and precursor cell markers (Ki67; p = 0.0013, MCM2; p = 0.0002). Interpretation We conclude that in this animal model, acute DBS results in modest local progenitor cell proliferation and influenced the total number of activated microglia. This could be of clinical significance in patients with PD, as it is thought to progress via neuroinflammatory processes involving microglia, cytokines, and the complement system. Further studies are required to comprehend the behavior of microglia in different activation states and their ability to regulate adult neurogenesis under physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:27018335

  11. An automated approach towards detecting complex behaviours in deep brain oscillations.

    PubMed

    Mace, Michael; Yousif, Nada; Naushahi, Mohammad; Abdullah-Al-Mamun, Khondaker; Wang, Shouyan; Nandi, Dipankar; Vaidyanathan, Ravi

    2014-03-15

    Extracting event-related potentials (ERPs) from neurological rhythms is of fundamental importance in neuroscience research. Standard ERP techniques typically require the associated ERP waveform to have low variance, be shape and latency invariant and require many repeated trials. Additionally, the non-ERP part of the signal needs to be sampled from an uncorrelated Gaussian process. This limits methods of analysis to quantifying simple behaviours and movements only when multi-trial data-sets are available. We introduce a method for automatically detecting events associated with complex or large-scale behaviours, where the ERP need not conform to the aforementioned requirements. The algorithm is based on the calculation of a detection contour and adaptive threshold. These are combined using logical operations to produce a binary signal indicating the presence (or absence) of an event with the associated detection parameters tuned using a multi-objective genetic algorithm. To validate the proposed methodology, deep brain signals were recorded from implanted electrodes in patients with Parkinson's disease as they participated in a large movement-based behavioural paradigm. The experiment involved bilateral recordings of local field potentials from the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) and pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) during an orientation task. After tuning, the algorithm is able to extract events achieving training set sensitivities and specificities of [87.5 ± 6.5, 76.7 ± 12.8, 90.0 ± 4.1] and [92.6 ± 6.3, 86.0 ± 9.0, 29.8 ± 12.3] (mean ± 1 std) for the three subjects, averaged across the four neural sites. Furthermore, the methodology has the potential for utility in real-time applications as only a single-trial ERP is required.

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Recent Trends and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    FUKAYA, Chikashi; YAMAMOTO, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has already been performed on more than 120,000 patients worldwide and in more than 7,000 patients in Japan. However, fundamental understanding of DBS effects on the pathological neural circuitry remains insufficient. Recent studies have specifically shown the importance of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) loops, which were identified as functionally and anatomically discrete units. Three main circuits exist in the CSTC loops, namely, the motor, associative, and limbic circuits. From these theoretical backgrounds, it is determined that DBS sometimes influences not only motor functions but also the cognitive and affective functions of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The main targets of DBS for PD are subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi). Ventralis intermedius (Vim)-DBS was found to be effective in improving tremor. However, Vim-DBS cannot sufficiently improve akinesia and rigidity. Therefore, Vim-DBS is seldom carried out for the treatment of PD. In this article, we review the present state of DBS, mainly STN-DBS and GPi-DBS, for PD. In the first part of the article, appropriate indications and practical effects established in previous studies are discussed. The findings of previous investigations on the complications caused by the surgical procedure and on the adverse events induced by DBS itself are reviewed. In the second part, we discuss target selection (GPi vs. STN) and the effect of DBS on nonmotor symptoms. In the final part, as issues that should be resolved, the suitable timing of surgery, symptoms unresponsive to DBS such as on-period axial symptoms, and the related postoperative programing of stimulation parameters, are discussed. PMID:25925761

  13. Role of electrode design on the volume of tissue activated during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Christopher R.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2006-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established clinical treatment for a range of neurological disorders. Depending on the disease state of the patient, different anatomical structures such as the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), the subthalamic nucleus or the globus pallidus are targeted for stimulation. However, the same electrode design is currently used in nearly all DBS applications, even though substantial morphological and anatomical differences exist between the various target nuclei. The fundamental goal of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of the impact of changes in the DBS electrode contact geometry on the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during stimulation. Finite element models of the electrodes and surrounding medium were coupled to cable models of myelinated axons to predict the VTA as a function of stimulation parameter settings and electrode design. Clinical DBS electrodes have cylindrical contacts 1.27 mm in diameter (d) and 1.5 mm in height (h). Our results show that changes in contact height and diameter can substantially modulate the size and shape of the VTA, even when contact surface area is preserved. Electrode designs with a low aspect ratio (d/h) maximize the VTA by providing greater spread of the stimulation parallel to the electrode shaft without sacrificing lateral spread. The results of this study provide the foundation necessary to customize electrode design and VTA shape for specific anatomical targets, and an example is presented for the VIM. A range of opportunities exist to engineer DBS systems to maximize stimulation of the target area while minimizing stimulation of non-target areas. Therefore, it may be possible to improve therapeutic benefit and minimize side effects from DBS with the design of target-specific electrodes.

  14. A Fuzzy Inference System for Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Camara, Carmen; Warwick, Kevin; Bruña, Ricardo; Aziz, Tipu; del Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Parkinsons disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder for which patients present many symptoms, tremor being the main one. In advanced stages of the disease, Deep Brain Stimulation is a generalized therapy which can significantly improve the motor symptoms. However despite its beneficial effects on treating the symptomatology, the technique can be improved. One of its main limitations is that the parameters are fixed, and the stimulation is provided uninterruptedly, not taking into account any fluctuation in the patients state. A closed-loop system which provides stimulation by demand would adjust the stimulation to the variations in the state of the patient, stimulating only when it is necessary. It would not only perform a more intelligent stimulation, capable of adapting to the changes in real time, but also extending the devices battery life, thereby avoiding surgical interventions. In this work we design a tool that learns to recognize the principal symptom of Parkinsons disease and particularly the tremor. The goal of the designed system is to detect the moments the patient is suffering from a tremor episode and consequently to decide whether stimulation is needed or not. For that, local field potentials were recorded in the subthalamic nucleus of ten Parkinsonian patients, who were diagnosed with tremor-dominant Parkinsons disease and who underwent surgery for the implantation of a neurostimulator. Electromyographic activity in the forearm was simultaneously recorded, and the relation between both signals was evaluated using two different synchronization measures. The results of evaluating the synchronization indexes on each moment represent the inputs to the designed system. Finally, a fuzzy inference system was applied with the goal of identifying tremor episodes. Results are favourable, reaching accuracies of higher 98.7% in 70% of the patients.

  15. Body weight gain in patients with bilateral deep brain stimulation for dystonia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Lütjens, Götz; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K; Blahak, Christian

    2016-03-01

    In patients with Parkinson's disease, significant weight gain following chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported. Recently, relevant weight gain could be demonstrated also following subthalamic nucleus DBS in patients with primary cervical dystonia. Prospective analyses of body weight changes following DBS in patients with dystonia, however, have not been published so far. We aimed to analyse the changes of body weight following DBS in patients with dystonia. The body mass index (BMI) of 17 consecutive patients with segmental or generalised dystonia (mean age 54.6 ± 16.1 years) treated with bilateral DBS of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) (n = 14) or the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (n = 3) was measured preoperatively (pre-OP) and at three follow-up (FU) time points post-DBS surgery (FU1 = 7 months, FU2 = 17 months, FU3 = 72 months). All patients benefited from marked improvement in their dystonia. The mean BMI pre-OP (SD) was 22.5 (±3.7) kg/m(2) and increased stepwise to 24.0 (±3.3) kg/m(2) at FU1, 24.4 (±3.7) kg/m(2) at FU2 and 24.9 (±3.7) kg/m(2) at FU3 (p < 0.05 at all three FUs compared to pre-OP). Relative BMI increase and improvement of dystonia were correlated (p = 0.025). Chronic bilateral GPi DBS in patients with dystonia is associated with significant body weight gain, in particular during the first 6 months post-OP. This probably is a result of improvement of dystonic motor symptoms and recovery of eating dysfunction rather than a target-specific phenomenon.

  16. Quantitative analysis of axonal fiber activation evoked by deep brain stimulation via activation density heat maps

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christian J.; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Lujan, J. Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cortical modulation is likely to be involved in the various therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, it is currently difficult to predict the changes of cortical modulation during clinical adjustment of DBS. Therefore, we present a novel quantitative approach to estimate anatomical regions of DBS-evoked cortical modulation. Methods: Four different models of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS were created to represent variable electrode placements (model I: dorsal border of the posterolateral STN; model II: central posterolateral STN; model III: central anteromedial STN; model IV: dorsal border of the anteromedial STN). Axonal fibers of passage near each electrode location were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography and modeled using multi-compartment cable models. Stimulation-evoked activation of local axon fibers and corresponding cortical projections were modeled and quantified. Results: Stimulation at the border of the STN (models I and IV) led to a higher degree of fiber activation and associated cortical modulation than stimulation deeply inside the STN (models II and III). A posterolateral target (models I and II) was highly connected to cortical areas representing motor function. Additionally, model I was also associated with strong activation of fibers projecting to the cerebellum. Finally, models III and IV showed a dorsoventral difference of preferentially targeted prefrontal areas (models III: middle frontal gyrus; model IV: inferior frontal gyrus). Discussion: The method described herein allows characterization of cortical modulation across different electrode placements and stimulation parameters. Furthermore, knowledge of anatomical distribution of stimulation-evoked activation targeting cortical regions may help predict efficacy and potential side effects, and therefore can be used to improve the therapeutic effectiveness of individual adjustments in DBS patients. PMID:25713510

  17. Understanding the impact of deep brain stimulation on ambulatory activity in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Lynn; Chastin, Sebastien Francois Martin; Lord, Sue; Baker, Katherine; Burn, David John

    2012-06-01

    Whilst deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), its effect on daily activity is unknown. We aimed to quantify changes in ambulatory activity following DBS-STN in advanced PD using novel accelerometry based measures that describe changes to the volume and pattern of walking. Seventeen participants with advanced PD were measured over a 7-day period using an activPAL (™) activity monitor. Data were collected 6 weeks before and 6 months after surgery and included measures that describe the volume and pattern of ambulatory activity (number of steps per day, accumulation, diversity and variability of walking time), alongside standard measures for disease severity, freezing of gait, gait speed, and extended activities of daily living. Activity outcomes were compared pre- and 6 months post-surgery using linear mixed models and correlated with standard outcomes. The results of this study are despite significant improvements in motor symptoms after surgery, the volume of ambulatory activity (total number of steps per day) did not change (P = 0.468). However, significant increases in length and variability of walking bouts emerged, suggesting improvements in diversity and flexibility of walking patterns. Motor severity and extended activities of daily living scores were significantly correlated with walking bout variability but not with volume of walking. Thus, the conclusions are reduction in motor symptom severity after DBS-STN translated into selective improvements in daily activity. Novel measures derived from accelerometry provide a discrete measure of performance and allow closer interpretation of the impact of DBS-STN on real-world activity.

  18. Effect of low-frequency deep brain stimulation on sensory thresholds in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Belasen, Abigail; Rizvi, Khizer; Gee, Lucy E; Yeung, Philip; Prusik, Julia; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Hanspal, Era; Paiva, Priscilla; Durphy, Jennifer; Argoff, Charles E; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Chronic pain is a major distressing symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that is often undertreated. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) delivers high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to patients with PD and has been effective in pain relief in a subset of these patients. However, up to 74% of patients develop new pain concerns while receiving STN DBS. Here the authors explore whether altering the frequency of STN DBS changes pain perception as measured through quantitative sensory testing (QST). METHODS Using QST, the authors measured thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds in 19 patients undergoing DBS via HFS, low-frequency stimulation (LFS), and off conditions in a randomized order. Testing was performed in the region of the body with the most pain and in the lower back in patients without chronic pain. RESULTS In the patients with chronic pain, LFS significantly reduced heat detection thresholds as compared with thresholds following HFS (p = 0.029) and in the off state (p = 0.010). Moreover, LFS resulted in increased detection thresholds for mechanical pressure (p = 0.020) and vibration (p = 0.040) compared with these thresholds following HFS. Neither LFS nor HFS led to changes in other mechanical thresholds. In patients without chronic pain, LFS significantly increased mechanical pain thresholds in response to the 40-g pinprick compared with thresholds following HFS (p = 0.032). CONCLUSIONS Recent literature has suggested that STN LFS can be useful in treating nonmotor symptoms of PD. Here the authors demonstrated that LFS modulates thermal and mechanical detection to a greater extent than HFS. Low-frequency stimulation is an innovative means of modulating chronic pain in PD patients receiving STN DBS. The authors suggest that STN LFS may be a future option to consider when treating Parkinson's patients in whom pain remains the predominant complaint.

  19. Quantifying the Neural Elements Activated and Inhibited by Globus Pallidus Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) is an effective therapy option for controlling the motor symptoms of medication-refractory Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Despite the clinical successes of GPi DBS, the precise therapeutic mechanisms are unclear and questions remain on the optimal electrode placement and stimulation parameter selection strategies. In this study, we developed a three-dimensional computational model of GPi-DBS in nonhuman primates to investigate how membrane channel dynamics, synaptic inputs, and axonal collateralization contribute to the neural responses generated during stimulation. We focused our analysis on three general neural elements that surround GPi-DBS electrodes: GPi somatodendritic segments, GPi efferent axons, and globus pallidus pars externa (GPe) fibers of passage. During high-frequency electrical stimulation (136 Hz), somatic activity in the GPi showed interpulse excitatory phases at 1–3 and 4–5.5 ms. When including stimulation-induced GABAA and AMPA receptor dynamics into the model, the somatic firing patterns continued to be entrained to the stimulation, but the overall firing rate was reduced (78.7 to 25.0 Hz, P < 0.001). In contrast, axonal output from GPi neurons remained largely time-locked to each pulse of the stimulation train. Similar entrainment was also observed in GPe efferents, a majority of which have been shown to project through GPi en route to the subthalamic nucleus. The models suggest that pallidal DBS may have broader network effects than previously realized and the modes of therapy may depend on the relative proportion of GPi and/or GPe efferents that are directly affected by the stimulation. PMID:18768645

  20. Supporting clinical decision making during deep brain stimulation surgery by means of a stochastic dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. During deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), microelectrode recording (MER) in conjunction with functional stimulation techniques are commonly applied for accurate electrode implantation. However, the development of automatic methods for clinical decision making has to date been characterized by the absence of a robust single-biomarker approach. Moreover, it has only been restricted to the framework of MER without encompassing intraoperative macrostimulation. Here, we propose an integrated series of novel single-biomarker approaches applicable to the entire electrophysiological procedure by means of a stochastic dynamical model. Approach. The methods are applied to MER data pertinent to ten DBS procedures. Considering the presence of measurement noise, we initially employ a multivariate phase synchronization index for automatic delineation of the functional boundaries of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and determination of the acceptable MER trajectories. By introducing the index into a nonlinear stochastic model, appropriately fitted to pre-selected MERs, we simulate the neuronal response to periodic stimuli (130 Hz), and examine the Lyapunov exponent as an indirect indicator of the clinical effectiveness yielded by stimulation at the corresponding sites. Main results. Compared with the gold-standard dataset of annotations made intraoperatively by clinical experts, the STN detection methodology demonstrates a false negative rate of 4.8% and a false positive rate of 0%, across all trajectories. Site eligibility for implantation of the DBS electrode, as implicitly determined through the Lyapunov exponent of the proposed stochastic model, displays a sensitivity of 71.43%. Significance. The suggested comprehensive method exhibits remarkable performance in automatically determining both the acceptable MER trajectories and the optimal stimulation sites, thereby having the potential to accelerate precise

  1. Facilitating effects of deep brain stimulation on feedback learning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Sarah Nadine; Südmeyer, Martin; Keitel, Ariane; Pollok, Bettina; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-10-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) provides an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms. However, findings of effects on cognitive function such as feedback learning remain controversial and rare. The aim of the present study was to gain a better understanding of cognitive alterations associated with STN-DBS. Therefore, we investigated effects of STN-DBS on active and observational feedback learning in PD. 18 PD patients with STN-DBS and 18 matched healthy controls completed active and observational feedback learning tasks. Patients were investigated ON and OFF STN-DBS. Tasks consisted of learning (with feedback) and test phases (without feedback). STN-DBS improved active learning during feedback trials and PD patients ON (but not OFF) STN-DBS showed comparable performance patterns as healthy controls. No STN-DBS effect was found when assessing performance during active test trials without feedback. In this case, however, STN-DBS effects were found to depend on symptom severity. While more impaired patients benefited from STN-DBS, stimulation had no facilitating effect on patients with less severe symptoms. Along similar lines, the severity of motor symptoms tended to be significantly correlated with differences in active test performance due to STN-DBS. For observational feedback learning, there was a tendency for a positive STN-DBS effect with patients reaching the performance level of healthy controls only ON STN-DBS. The present data suggest that STN-DBS facilitates active feedback learning in PD patients. Furthermore, they provide first evidence that STN-DBS might not only affect learning from own but also from observed actions and outcomes.

  2. Role of electrode design on the volume of tissue activated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established clinical treatment for a range of neurological disorders. Depending on the disease state of the patient, different anatomical structures such as the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), the subthalamic nucleus or the globus pallidus are targeted for stimulation. However, the same electrode design is currently used in nearly all DBS applications, even though substantial morphological and anatomical differences exist between the various target nuclei. The fundamental goal of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of the impact of changes in the DBS electrode contact geometry on the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during stimulation. Finite element models of the electrodes and surrounding medium were coupled to cable models of myelinated axons to predict the VTA as a function of stimulation parameter settings and electrode design. Clinical DBS electrodes have cylindrical contacts 1.27 mm in diameter (d) and 1.5 mm in height (h). Our results show that changes in contact height and diameter can substantially modulate the size and shape of the VTA, even when contact surface area is preserved. Electrode designs with a low aspect ratio (d/h) maximize the VTA by providing greater spread of the stimulation parallel to the electrode shaft without sacrificing lateral spread. The results of this study provide the foundation necessary to customize electrode design and VTA shape for specific anatomical targets, and an example is presented for the VIM. A range of opportunities exist to engineer DBS systems to maximize stimulation of the target area while minimizing stimulation of non-target areas. Therefore, it may be possible to improve therapeutic benefit and minimize side effects from DBS with the design of target-specific electrodes.

  3. Stochastic Phase Resetting: A Theory for Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, P. A.

    The basic principles of a stochastic approach to phase resetting in populations of interacting phase oscillators are presented in this article. This theory explains how synchronization and desynchronization processes are caused by a pulsatile stimulus. It is a central goal of this approach to establish a theoretical basis for the design of efficient and intelligent new deep brain stimulation techniques. Accordingly, the theory is used to design a new deep brain stimulation technique with feedback control in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease or essential tremor.

  4. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology - Deep brain stimulation (DBS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Vocal Tremor: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Choudhri, Omar; Sung, C Kwang; DiRenzo, Elizabeth E; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-03-01

    Essential vocal tremor (EVT) is the presence of a tremulous voice that is commonly associated with essential tremor. Patients with EVT often report a necessary increase in vocal effort that significantly worsens with stress and anxiety and can significantly impact quality of life despite optimal medical and behavioral treatment options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an effective therapy for vocal tremor, but very few studies exist in the literature that comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of DBS for specifically addressing EVT. We present a technical report on our multidisciplinary, comprehensive operative methodology for treatment of EVT with frameless, awake deep brain stimulation (DBS).

  6. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology – Deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders. PMID:26779322

  7. Red and NIR light dosimetry in the human deep brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitzschke, A.; Lovisa, B.; Seydoux, O.; Zellweger, M.; Pfleiderer, M.; Tardy, Y.; Wagnières, G.

    2015-04-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) appears promising to treat the hallmarks of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in cellular or animal models. We measured light propagation in different areas of PD-relevant deep brain tissue during transcranial, transsphenoidal illumination (at 671 and 808 nm) of a cadaver head and modeled optical parameters of human brain tissue using Monte-Carlo simulations. Gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, ventricles, thalamus, pons, cerebellum and skull bone were processed into a mesh of the skull (158 × 201 × 211 voxels; voxel side length: 1 mm). Optical parameters were optimized from simulated and measured fluence rate distributions. The estimated μeff for the different tissues was in all cases larger at 671 than at 808 nm, making latter a better choice for light delivery in the deep brain. Absolute values were comparable to those found in the literature or slightly smaller. The effective attenuation in the ventricles was considerably larger than literature values. Optimization yields a new set of optical parameters better reproducing the experimental data. A combination of PBM via the sphenoid sinus and oral cavity could be beneficial. A 20-fold higher efficiency of light delivery to the deep brain was achieved with ventricular instead of transcranial illumination. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to illuminate deep brain tissues transcranially, transsphenoidally and via different application routes. This opens therapeutic options for sufferers of PD or other cerebral diseases necessitating light therapy.

  8. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Li; Chao, Yu; Ling, Lin; C-Y Lu, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulators, often called `pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS.

  9. Subthalamic local field potentials in Parkinson's disease and isolated dystonia: An evaluation of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Doris D; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman E; Miller, Andrew M; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; San Luciano, Marta; Starr, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Local field potentials (LFP) recorded from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate prominent oscillations in the beta (13-30 Hz) frequency range, and reduction of beta band spectral power by levodopa and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is correlated with motor symptom improvement. Several features of beta activity have been theorized to be specific biomarkers of the parkinsonian state, though these have rarely been studied in non-parkinsonian conditions. To compare resting state LFP features in PD and isolated dystonia and evaluate disease-specific biomarkers, we recorded subthalamic LFPs from 28 akinetic-rigid PD and 12 isolated dystonia patients during awake DBS implantation. Spectral power and phase-amplitude coupling characteristics were analyzed. In 26/28 PD and 11/12 isolated dystonia patients, the LFP power spectrum had a peak in the beta frequency range, with similar amplitudes between groups. Resting state power did not differ between groups in the theta (5-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), broadband gamma (50-200 Hz), or high frequency oscillation (HFO, 250-350 Hz) bands. Analysis of phase-amplitude coupling between low frequency phase and HFO amplitude revealed significant interactions in 19/28 PD and 6/12 dystonia recordings without significant differences in maximal coupling or preferred phase. Two features of subthalamic LFPs that have been proposed as specific parkinsonian biomarkers, beta power and coupling of beta phase to HFO amplitude, were also present in isolated dystonia, including focal dystonias. This casts doubt on the utility of these metrics as disease-specific diagnostic biomarkers.

  10. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  11. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in advanced Parkinson's disease: five year follow-up at a Portuguese center.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana; Andrade, Carlos; Rosas, Maria J; Linhares, Paulo; Massano, João; Vaz, Rui; Garrett, Carolina

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. La estimulacion cerebral profunda (ECP) del nucleo subtalamico (NST) en la enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) es segura y eficaz: en la mayoria de series se describen respuestas motoras duraderas y estables. Objetivo. Informar sobre el desenlace a largo plazo de la ECP del NST en pacientes con EP avanzada atendidos en un centro hospitalario portugues. Pacientes y metodos. El estado motor se valoro con la escala unificada de valoracion de la enfermedad de Parkinson, parte III, antes de la intervencion quirurgica –en dos situaciones: sin efecto de la medicacion (off) y bajo el mejor efecto (on)–, en el postoperatorio y al cabo de cinco años (medicacion y estimulacion en on). Se cuantificaron las puntuaciones de cada sintoma axial. La incapacidad se evaluo con la escala de Rankin modificada (mRS). La aparicion de demencia se valoro seis meses y cinco años despues de la ECP. Resultados. Setenta y uno de los 183 pacientes sometidos a la ECP del NST concluyeron los cinco años de seguimiento. Diez de ellos quedaron excluidos: dos por fallecimiento (cancer e infarto de miocardio), cinco por perdida de seguimiento y tres por la retirada del sistema de estimulacion. La funcion motora manifesto una mejora del 78% en el postoperatorio y del 66% a los cinco años. En el postoperatorio se aprecio mejoria de los sintomas axiales, pero al cabo de los cinco años habian empeorado de manera significativa (p < 0,001). Las puntuaciones de la mRS tambien mejoraron en el postoperatorio, pero a los cinco años tambien habian disminuido, pese a que la mayoria (88,5%) conservaba la capacidad ambulatoria (mRS < 4). Un paciente (1,6%) manifesto demencia a los seis meses, mientras que otros 19 (31,2%) la manifestaron al cabo de los cinco años. La edad de los pacientes dementes era notablemente mayor (56,5 ± 7,8 frente a 63,7 ± 5,9 años; p < 0,001). Conclusiones. En esta serie de casos, la ECP del NST demostro su eficacia en la mejora de los sintomas motores, aunque habian transcurrido cinco años desde la implantacion. En ese periodo hubo un deterioro de los sintomas axiales y de la incapacidad, y surgieron casos de demencia, pero el posible papel de la ECP del NST como factor causal resta pendiente de concretar.

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Tractographic Versus Traditional (DISTINCT): Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Reinacher, Peter Christoph; Jenkner, Carolin; Piroth, Tobias; Kätzler, Jürgen; Urbach, Horst; Coenen, Volker Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Background Essential tremor is a movement disorder that can result in profound disability affecting the quality of life. Medically refractory essential tremor can be successfully reduced by deep brain stimulation (DBS) traditionally targeting the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim). Although this structure can be identified with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging nowadays, Vim-DBS electrodes are still implanted in the awake patient with intraoperative tremor testing to achieve satisfactory tremor control. This can be attributed to the fact that the more effective target of DBS seems to be the stimulation of fiber tracts rather than subcortical nuclei like the Vim. There is evidence that current coverage of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRT) results in good tremor control in Vim-DBS. Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) tractography-assisted stereotactic surgery targeting the DRT would therefore not rely on multiple trajectories and intraoperative tremor testing in the awake patient, bearing the potential of more patient comfort and reduced operation-related risks. This is the first randomized controlled trial comparing DTI tractography-assisted stereotactic surgery targeting the DRT in general anesthesia with stereotactic surgery of thalamic/subthalamic region as conventionally used. Objective This clinical pilot trial aims at demonstrating safety of DTI tractography-assisted stereotactic surgery in general anesthesia and proving its equality compared to conventional stereotactic surgery with intraoperative testing in the awake patient. Methods The Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Tractographic Versus Traditional (DISTINCT) trial is a single-center investigator-initiated, randomized, controlled, observer-blinded trial. A total of 24 patients with medically refractory essential tremor will be randomized to either DTI tractography-assisted stereotactic surgery targeting the DRT in general anesthesia or stereotactic surgery of the thalamic/subthalamic region as

  13. Comparison of oscillatory activity in subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease and dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yin; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter; Wang, Shouyan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been successfully used to treat both Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia. Local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the STN of PD patients demonstrate prominent beta frequency band activity. It is unclear whether such activity occurs in the STN in dystonia, and, if not, whether dystonia has another distinctive neural population activity in the STN. Methods Twelve patients with PD, and eight patients with dystonia underwent DBS electrode implantation targeting the STN. Seven dystonia patients were off medication and one was on aripiprazole and clonazepam. LFPs were recorded from the DBS electrodes in PD in the on/off medication states and in dystonia. Power spectra and temporal dynamics measured by the with Lempel-Ziv complexity of the LFPs were compared among these states. Results Normalised power spectra and Lempel-Ziv complexity of subthalamic LFPs differed between dystonia off and PD on/off, and between PD off and on over the low frequency, beta and high gamma bands. Patients with dystonia and off medication had lower beta power but higher low frequency and high gamma power than PD. Spectral power in the low beta frequency (11–20 Hz) range was attenuated in medicated PD. Conclusion The results suggest that dystonia and PD are characterized by different patterns of oscillatory activities even within the same nucleus, and exaggerated beta activity may relate to hypo-dopaminergic status. PMID:27940307

  14. Activity Parameters of Subthalamic Nucleus Neurons Selectively Predict Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulberti, Alessandro; Zittel, Simone; Tudor Jones, Adam A.; Fickel, Ulrich; Münchau, Alexander; Köppen, Johannes A.; Gerloff, Christian; Westphal, Manfred; Buhmann, Carsten; Hamel, Wolfgang; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a heterogeneous disorder that leads to variable expression of several different motor symptoms. While changes in firing rate, pattern, and oscillation of basal ganglia neurons have been observed in PD patients and experimental animals, there is limited evidence linking them to specific motor symptoms. Here we examined this relationship using extracellular recordings of subthalamic nucleus neurons from 19 PD patients undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation. For each patient, ≥10 single units and/or multi-units were recorded in the OFF medication state. We correlated the proportion of neurons displaying different activities with preoperative Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale subscores (OFF medication). The mean spectral power at sub-beta frequencies and percentage of units oscillating at beta frequencies were positively correlated with the axial and limb rigidity scores, respectively. The percentage of units oscillating at gamma frequency was negatively correlated with the bradykinesia scores. The mean intraburst rate was positively correlated with both bradykinesia and axial scores, while the related ratio of interspike intervals below/above 10 ms was positively correlated with these symptoms and limb rigidity. None of the activity parameters correlated with tremor. The grand average of all the significantly correlated subthalamic nucleus activities accounted for >60% of the variance of the combined bradykinetic-rigid and axial scores. Our results demonstrate that the occurrence of alterations in the rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons could partly underlie the variability in parkinsonian phenotype. PMID:24790198

  15. Activity parameters of subthalamic nucleus neurons selectively predict motor symptom severity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharott, Andrew; Gulberti, Alessandro; Zittel, Simone; Tudor Jones, Adam A; Fickel, Ulrich; Münchau, Alexander; Köppen, Johannes A; Gerloff, Christian; Westphal, Manfred; Buhmann, Carsten; Hamel, Wolfgang; Engel, Andreas K; Moll, Christian K E

    2014-04-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a heterogeneous disorder that leads to variable expression of several different motor symptoms. While changes in firing rate, pattern, and oscillation of basal ganglia neurons have been observed in PD patients and experimental animals, there is limited evidence linking them to specific motor symptoms. Here we examined this relationship using extracellular recordings of subthalamic nucleus neurons from 19 PD patients undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation. For each patient, ≥ 10 single units and/or multi-units were recorded in the OFF medication state. We correlated the proportion of neurons displaying different activities with preoperative Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale subscores (OFF medication). The mean spectral power at sub-beta frequencies and percentage of units oscillating at beta frequencies were positively correlated with the axial and limb rigidity scores, respectively. The percentage of units oscillating at gamma frequency was negatively correlated with the bradykinesia scores. The mean intraburst rate was positively correlated with both bradykinesia and axial scores, while the related ratio of interspike intervals below/above 10 ms was positively correlated with these symptoms and limb rigidity. None of the activity parameters correlated with tremor. The grand average of all the significantly correlated subthalamic nucleus activities accounted for >60% of the variance of the combined bradykinetic-rigid and axial scores. Our results demonstrate that the occurrence of alterations in the rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons could partly underlie the variability in parkinsonian phenotype.

  16. A Non-Invasive Imaging Approach to Understanding Speech Changes following Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Shalini; Jacks, Adam; Robin, Donald A.; Poizner, Howard; Zhang, Wei; Franklin, Crystal; Liotti, Mario; Vogel, Deanie; Fox, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To explore the use of non-invasive functional imaging and “virtual” lesion techniques to study the neural mechanisms underlying motor speech disorders in Parkinson’s disease. Here, we report the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explain exacerbated speech impairment following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in a patient with Parkinson’s disease. Method Perceptual and acoustic speech measures as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF) during speech as measured by PET were obtained with STN-DBS on and off. TMS was applied to a region in the speech motor network found to be abnormally active during DBS. Speech disruption by TMS was compared both perceptually and acoustically with that resulting from DBS on. Results Speech production was perceptually inferior and acoustically less contrastive during left STN stimulation compared to no stimulation. Increased neural activity in left dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) was observed during DBS on. “Virtual” lesioning of this region resulted in speech characterized by decreased speech segment duration, increased pause duration, and decreased intelligibility. Conclusions This case report provides evidence that impaired speech production accompanying STN-DBS may be resulting from unintended activation of PMd. Clinical application of functional imaging and TMS may lead to optimizing the delivery of STN-DBS to improve outcomes for speech production as well as general motor abilities. PMID:19029533

  17. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: Influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R.; Lempka, Scott F.; Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson’s disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation. PMID:20607090

  18. Axonal and synaptic failure suppress the transfer of firing rate oscillations, synchrony and information during high frequency deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Zimnik, Andrew; Zheng, Fang; Turner, Robert S; Alzheimer, Christian; Doiron, Brent; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2014-02-01

    High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its effects on neural activity in basal ganglia circuits are not fully understood. DBS increases the excitation of STN efferents yet decouples STN spiking patterns from the spiking patterns of STN synaptic targets. We propose that this apparent paradox is resolved by recent studies showing an increased rate of axonal and synaptic failures in STN projections during DBS. To investigate this hypothesis, we combine in vitro and in vivo recordings to derive a computational model of axonal and synaptic failure during DBS. Our model shows that these failures induce a short term depression that suppresses the synaptic transfer of firing rate oscillations, synchrony and rate-coded information from STN to its synaptic targets. In particular, our computational model reproduces the widely reported suppression of parkinsonian β oscillations and synchrony during DBS. Our results support the idea that short term depression is a therapeutic mechanism of STN DBS that works as a functional lesion by decoupling the somatic spiking patterns of STN neurons from spiking activity in basal ganglia output nuclei.

  19. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R; Lempka, Scott F; Cooper, Scott E; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson's disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation.

  20. Frequency-selectivity of a thalamocortical relay neuron during Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Meijer, Hil G E; van Gils, Stephan A; Krupa, Martin; Heida, Tjitske; Rudolph, Michelle; Wadman, Wytse J; Martens, Hubert C F

    2009-10-01

    In this computational study, we investigated (i) the functional importance of correlated basal ganglia (BG) activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms by analysing the effects of globus pallidus internum (GPi) bursting frequency and synchrony on a thalamocortical (TC) relay neuron, which received GABAergic projections from this nucleus; (ii) the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the response of the TC relay neuron to synchronized GPi oscillations; and (iii) the functional basis of the inverse relationship that has been reported between DBS frequency and stimulus amplitude, required to alleviate PD motor symptoms [A. L. Benabid et al. (1991)Lancet, 337, 403-406]. The TC relay neuron selectively responded to and relayed synchronized GPi inputs bursting at a frequency located in the range 2-25 Hz. Input selectivity of the TC relay neuron is dictated by low-threshold calcium current dynamics and passive membrane properties of the neuron. STN-DBS prevented the TC relay neuron from relaying synchronized GPi oscillations to cortex. Our model indicates that DBS alters BG output and input selectivity of the TC relay neuron, providing an explanation for the clinically observed inverse relationship between DBS frequency and stimulus amplitude.

  1. Neurosurgery of the future: Deep brain stimulations and manipulations.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Stylianos

    2017-04-01

    Important advances are afoot in the field of neurosurgery-particularly in the realms of deep brain stimulation (DBS), deep brain manipulation (DBM), and the newly introduced refinement "closed-loop" deep brain stimulation (CLDBS). Use of closed-loop technology will make both DBS and DBM more precise as procedures and will broaden their indications. CLDBS utilizes as feedback a variety of sources of electrophysiological and neurochemical afferent information about the function of the brain structures to be treated or studied. The efferent actions will be either electric, i.e. the classic excitatory or inhibitory ones, or micro-injection of such things as neural proteins and transmitters, neural grafts, implants of pluripotent stem cells or mesenchymal stem cells, and some variants of gene therapy. The pathologies to be treated, beside Parkinson's disease and movement disorders, include repair of neural tissues, neurodegenerative pathologies, psychiatric and behavioral dysfunctions, i.e. schizophrenia in its various guises, bipolar disorders, obesity, anorexia, drug addiction, and alcoholism. The possibility of using these new modalities to treat a number of cognitive dysfunctions is also under consideration. Because the DBS-CLDBS technology brings about a cross-fertilization between scientific investigation and surgical practice, it will also contribute to an enhanced understanding of brain function.

  2. Long-range correlation properties in timing of skilled piano performance: the influence of auditory feedback and deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Herrojo Ruiz, María; Hong, Sang Bin; Hennig, Holger; Altenmüller, Eckart; Kühn, Andrea A.

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional timing deviations during musical performance can be conceived of as timing errors. However, recent research on humanizing computer-generated music has demonstrated that timing fluctuations that exhibit long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) are preferred by human listeners. This preference can be accounted for by the ubiquitous presence of LRTC in human tapping and rhythmic performances. Interestingly, the manifestation of LRTC in tapping behavior seems to be driven in a subject-specific manner by the LRTC properties of resting-state background cortical oscillatory activity. In this framework, the current study aimed to investigate whether propagation of timing deviations during the skilled, memorized piano performance (without metronome) of 17 professional pianists exhibits LRTC and whether the structure of the correlations is influenced by the presence or absence of auditory feedback. As an additional goal, we set out to investigate the influence of altering the dynamics along the cortico-basal-ganglia-thalamo-cortical network via deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the LRTC properties of musical performance. Specifically, we investigated temporal deviations during the skilled piano performance of a non-professional pianist who was treated with subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) due to severe Parkinson's disease, with predominant tremor affecting his right upper extremity. In the tremor-affected right hand, the timing fluctuations of the performance exhibited random correlations with DBS OFF. By contrast, DBS restored long-range dependency in the temporal fluctuations, corresponding with the general motor improvement on DBS. Overall, the present investigations demonstrate the presence of LRTC in skilled piano performances, indicating that unintentional temporal deviations are correlated over a wide range of time scales. This phenomenon is stable after removal of the auditory feedback, but is altered by STN-DBS, which suggests that cortico

  3. Subthalamic stimulation influences postmovement cortical somatosensory processing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Devos, D; Labyt, E; Cassim, F; Bourriez, J L; Reyns, N; Touzet, G; Blond, S; Guieu, J D; Derambure, P; Destée, A; Defebvre, L

    2003-10-01

    In Parkinson's disease, poor motor performance (resulting primarily from abnormal cortical activation during movement preparation and execution) may also be due to impaired sensorimotor integration and defective cortical activity termination of the ongoing movement, thus delaying preparation of the following one. Reduced movement-related synchronization of the beta rhythm in Parkinson's disease compared to controls has been put forward as evidence for impaired postmovement cortical deactivation. We assessed the effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation and l-dopa on beta rhythm synchronization over the premotor and primary sensorimotor cortex. Ten advanced patients performed self-paced wrist flexion in four conditions according to the presence or not of stimulation and l-dopa. Compared to without treatment, the motor score improved by approximately 60%; the beta synchronization was present over the contralateral frontocentral region and increased significantly over the contralateral central region under stimulation and under l-dopa, with a maximal effect when both treatments were associated. Our advanced patients displayed very focused and attenuated beta rhythm synchronization which, under stimulation, increased over the contralateral premotor and primary sensorimotor cortex. Stimulation and l-dopa both partly restored postmovement cortical deactivation in advanced Parkinson's disease, although the respective mechanisms probably differ. They may improve bradykinesia and cortical deactivation by reestablishing movement-related somatosensory processing at the end of the movement through the basal ganglia into the cortex.

  4. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain.

  5. Inhibiting subthalamic nucleus decreases cocaine demand and relapse: therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Bentzley, Brandon S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2016-03-03

    Preclinical evidence indicates that inactivation of subthalamic nucleus (STN) may be effective for treating cocaine addiction, and therapies that target STN, e.g. deep brain stimulation, are available indicating that this may have clinical promise. Here, we assessed the therapeutic potential of STN inactivation using a translationally relevant economic approach that quantitatively describes drug-taking behavior, and tested these results with drug-seeking tasks. Economic demand for cocaine was assessed in rats (n = 11) using a within-session threshold procedure in which cocaine price (responses/mg cocaine) was sequentially increased throughout the session. Cocaine demand was assessed in this manner immediately after bilateral microinfusions into STN of either vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) or the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. A separate group of animals (n = 8) was tested for changes in cocaine seeking either during extinction or in response to cocaine-associated cues. Muscimol-induced inhibition of STN significantly attenuated cocaine consumption at high prices, drug seeking during extinction and cued reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In contrast, STN inhibition did not reduce cocaine consumption at low prices or locomotor activity. Thus, STN inactivation reduced economic demand for cocaine and multiple measures of drug seeking during extinction. In view of the association between economic demand and addiction severity in both rat and human, these results indicate that STN inactivation has substantial clinical potential for treatment of cocaine addiction.

  6. Optimal control of directional deep brain stimulation in the parkinsonian neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Denggui; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Qingyun

    2016-07-01

    The effect of conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) on debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease can be limited because it can only yield the spherical field. And, some side effects are clearly induced with influencing their adjacent ganglia. Recent experimental evidence for patients with Parkinson's disease has shown that a novel DBS electrode with 32 independent stimulation source contacts can effectively optimize the clinical therapy by enlarging the therapeutic windows, when it is applied on the subthalamic nucleus (STN). This is due to the selective activation in clusters of various stimulation contacts which can be steered directionally and accurately on the targeted regions of interest. In addition, because of the serious damage to the neural tissues, the charge-unbalanced stimulation is not typically indicated and the real DBS utilizes charge-balanced bi-phasic (CBBP) pulses. Inspired by this, we computationally investigate the optimal control of directional CBBP-DBS from the proposed parkinsonian neuronal network of basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit. By appropriately tuning stimulation for different neuronal populations, it can be found that directional steering CBBP-DBS paradigms are superior to the spherical case in improving parkinsonian dynamical properties including the synchronization of neuronal populations and the reliability of thalamus relaying the information from cortex, which is in a good agreement with the physiological experiments. Furthermore, it can be found that directional steering stimulations can increase the optimal stimulation intensity of desynchronization by more than 1 mA compared to the spherical case. This is consistent with the experimental result with showing that there exists at least one steering direction that can allow increasing the threshold of side effects by 1 mA. In addition, we also simulate the local field potential (LFP) and dominant frequency (DF) of the STN neuronal population induced by the activation

  7. STN vs. GPi Deep Brain Stimulation: Translating the Rematch into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nolan R.; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    When formulating a deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment plan for a patient with Parkinson’s disease (PD), two critical questions should be addressed: 1- Which brain target should be chosen to optimize this patient’s outcome? and 2- Should this patient’s DBS operation be unilateral or bilateral? Over the past two decades, two targets have emerged as leading contenders for PD DBS; the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus internus (GPi). While the GPi target does have a following, most centers have uniformly employed bilateral STN DBS for all Parkinson’s disease cases (Figure 1). This bilateral STN “one-size-fits-all” approach was challenged by an editorial entitled “STN vs. GPi: The Rematch,” which appeared in the Archives of Neurology in 2005. Since 2005, a series of well designed clinical trials and follow-up studies have addressed the question as to whether a more tailored approach to DBS therapy might improve overall outcomes. Such a tailored approach would include the options of targeting the GPi, or choosing a unilateral operation. The results of the STN vs. GPi ‘rematch’ studies support the conclusion that bilateral STN DBS may not be the best option for every Parkinson’s disease surgical patient. Off period motor symptoms and tremor improve in both targets, and with either unilateral or bilateral stimulation. Advantages of the STN target include more medication reduction, less frequent battery changes, and a more favorable economic profile. Advantages of GPi include more robust dyskinesia suppression, easier programming, and greater flexibility in adjusting medications. In cases where unilateral stimulation is anticipated, the data favor GPi DBS. This review summarizes the accumulated evidence regarding the use of bilateral vs. unilateral DBS and the selection of STN vs. GPi DBS, including definite and possible advantages of different targets and approaches. Based on this evidence, a more patient-tailored, symptom specific

  8. Pedunculopontine nucleus evoked potentials from subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Bogdan; Tsang, Eric; Mazzella, Filomena; Hamani, Clement; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Chen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on the pedunculopontine nucleus area (PPNR) evoked activities were examined in two patients with Parkinson's disease. The patients had previously undergone bilateral STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) and subsequently received unilateral DBS electrodes in the PPNR. Evoked potentials were recorded from the local field potentials (LFP) from the PPNR with STN stimulation at different frequencies and bipolar contacts. Ipsilateral and contralateral short latency (<2ms) PPNR responses were evoked from left but not from right STN stimulation. In both patients, STN stimulation evoked contralateral PPNR responses at medium latencies between 41 and 45ms. Cortical evoked potentials to single pulse STN stimulation were observed at latencies between 18 and 27ms. These results demonstrate a functional connection between the STN and the PPNR. It likely involves direct projections between the STN and PPNR or polysynaptic pathways with thalamic or cortical relays.

  9. Imaging Impulsivity in Parkinson's Disease and the Contribution of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicola; Antonelli, Francesca; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2011-01-01

    Taking risks is a natural human response, but, in some, risk taking is compulsive and may be detrimental. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is thought to play a large role in our ability to inhibit responses. Differences between individuals' ability to inhibit inappropriate responses may underlie both the normal variation in trait impulsivity in the healthy population, as well as the pathological compulsions experienced by those with impulse control disorders (ICDs). Thus, we review the role of the STN in response inhibition, with a particular focus on studies employing imaging methodology. We also review the latest evidence that disruption of the function of the STN by deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease can increase impulsivity. PMID:21765999

  10. Analyzing the tradeoff between electrical complexity and accuracy in patient-specific computational models of deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Bryan; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an adjunctive therapy that is effective in treating movement disorders and shows promise for treating psychiatric disorders. Computational models of DBS have begun to be utilized as tools to optimize the therapy. Despite advancements in the anatomical accuracy of these models, there is still uncertainty as to what level of electrical complexity is adequate for modeling the electric field in the brain and the subsequent neural response to the stimulation. Approach. We used magnetic resonance images to create an image-based computational model of subthalamic DBS. The complexity of the volume conductor model was increased by incrementally including heterogeneity, anisotropy, and dielectric dispersion in the electrical properties of the brain. We quantified changes in the load of the electrode, the electric potential distribution, and stimulation thresholds of descending corticofugal (DCF) axon models. Main results. Incorporation of heterogeneity altered the electric potentials and subsequent stimulation thresholds, but to a lesser degree than incorporation of anisotropy. Additionally, the results were sensitive to the choice of method for defining anisotropy, with stimulation thresholds of DCF axons changing by as much as 190%. Typical approaches for defining anisotropy underestimate the expected load of the stimulation electrode, which led to underestimation of the extent of stimulation. More accurate predictions of the electrode load were achieved with alternative approaches for defining anisotropy. The effects of dielectric dispersion were small compared to the effects of heterogeneity and anisotropy. Significance. The results of this study help delineate the level of detail that is required to accurately model electric fields generated by DBS electrodes.

  11. Subthalamic nucleus involvement in executive functions with increased cognitive load: a subthalamic nucleus and anterior cingulate cortex depth recording study.

    PubMed

    Aulická, Stefania Rusnáková; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Daniel, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Baláž, Marek; Bočková, Martina; Chrastina, Jan; Rektor, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    We studied the appearance of broadband oscillatory changes (ranging 2-45 Hz) induced by a cognitive task with two levels of complexity. The event-related de/synchronizations (ERD/S) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were evaluated in an executive function test. Four epilepsy surgery candidates with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the ACC and three Parkinson's disease patients with externalized deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted in the STN participated in the study. A Flanker test (FT) with visual stimuli (arrows) was performed. Subjects reacted to four types of stimuli presented on the monitor by pushing the right or left button: congruent arrows to the right or left side (simple task) and incongruent arrows to the right or left side (more difficult complex task). We explored the activation of STN and the activation of the ACC while processing the FT. Both conditions, i.e. congruent and incongruent, induced oscillatory changes in the ACC and also STN with significantly higher activation during incongruent trial. At variance with the ACC, in the STN not only the ERD beta but also the ERD alpha activity was significantly more activated by the incongruent condition. In line with our earlier studies, the STN appears to be involved in activities linked with increased cognitive load. The specificity and complexity of task-related activation of the STN might indicate the involvement of the STN in processes controlling human behaviour, e.g. in the selection and inhibition of competing alternatives.

  12. MRI-induced heating of deep brain stimulation leads.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Syed A; Sheikh, Noor M; Saeed, Usman

    2008-10-21

    The radiofrequency (RF) field used in magnetic resonance imaging is scattered by medical implants. The scattered field of a deep brain stimulation lead can be very intense near the electrodes stimulating the brain. The effect is more pronounced if the lead behaves as a resonant antenna. In this paper, we examine the resonant length effect. We also use the finite element method to compute the near field for (i) the lead immersed in inhomogeneous tissue (fat, muscle, and brain tissues) and (ii) the lead connected to an implantable pulse generator. Electric field, specific absorption rate and induced temperature rise distributions have been obtained in the brain tissue surrounding the electrodes. The worst-case scenario has been evaluated by neglecting the effect of blood perfusion. The computed values are in good agreement with in vitro measurements made in the laboratory.

  13. Basal ganglia dysfunction in OCD: subthalamic neuronal activity correlates with symptoms severity and predicts high-frequency stimulation efficacy.

    PubMed

    Welter, M-L; Burbaud, P; Fernandez-Vidal, S; Bardinet, E; Coste, J; Piallat, B; Borg, M; Besnard, S; Sauleau, P; Devaux, B; Pidoux, B; Chaynes, P; Tézenas du Montcel, S; Bastian, A; Langbour, N; Teillant, A; Haynes, W; Yelnik, J; Karachi, C; Mallet, L

    2011-05-03

    Functional and connectivity changes in corticostriatal systems have been reported in the brains of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, the relationship between basal ganglia activity and OCD severity has never been adequately established. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a central basal ganglia nucleus, improves OCD. Here, single-unit subthalamic neuronal activity was analysed in 12 OCD patients, in relation to the severity of obsessions and compulsions and response to STN stimulation, and compared with that obtained in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). STN neurons in OCD patients had lower discharge frequency than those in PD patients, with a similar proportion of burst-type activity (69 vs 67%). Oscillatory activity was present in 46 and 68% of neurons in OCD and PD patients, respectively, predominantly in the low-frequency band (1-8 Hz). In OCD patients, the bursty and oscillatory subthalamic neuronal activity was mainly located in the associative-limbic part. Both OCD severity and clinical improvement following STN stimulation were related to the STN neuronal activity. In patients with the most severe OCD, STN neurons exhibited bursts with shorter duration and interburst interval, but higher intraburst frequency, and more oscillations in the low-frequency bands. In patients with best clinical outcome with STN stimulation, STN neurons displayed higher mean discharge, burst and intraburst frequencies, and lower interburst interval. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of a dysfunction in the associative-limbic subdivision of the basal ganglia circuitry in OCD's pathophysiology.

  14. Successful thalamic deep brain stimulation for orthostatic tremor.

    PubMed

    Guridi, Jorge; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Arbizu, Javier; Alegre, Manuel; Prieto, Elena; Landecho, Ignacio; Manrique, Miguel; Artieda, Julio; Obeso, Jose A

    2008-10-15

    We report a patient with severe orthostatic tremor (OT) unresponsive to pharmacological treatments that was successfully controlled with thalamic (Vim, ventralis intermedius nucleus) deep brain stimulation (DBS) over a 4-year period. Cortical activity associated with the OT revealed by EEG back-averaging and fluoro-deoxi-glucose PET were also suppressed in parallel with tremor arrest. This case suggests that Vim-DBS may be a useful therapeutic approach for patients highly disabled by OT.

  15. A Network Analysis of 15O-H2O PET Reveals Deep Brain Stimulation Effects on Brain Network of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Park, Bumhee; Kim, Hae Yu; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Kim, Joong Il; Yoon, Misun; Lee, Jong Doo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose As Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered a network abnormality, the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) need to be investigated in the aspect of networks. This study aimed to examine how DBS of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) affects the motor networks of patients with idiopathic PD during motor performance and to show the feasibility of the network analysis using cross-sectional positron emission tomography (PET) images in DBS studies. Materials and Methods We obtained [15O]H2O PET images from ten patients with PD during a sequential finger-to-thumb opposition task and during the resting state, with DBS-On and DBS-Off at STN. To identify the alteration of motor networks in PD and their changes due to STN-DBS, we applied independent component analysis (ICA) to all the cross-sectional PET images. We analysed the strength of each component according to DBS effects, task effects and interaction effects. Results ICA blindly decomposed components of functionally associated distributed clusters, which were comparable to the results of univariate statistical parametric mapping. ICA further revealed that STN-DBS modifies usage-strengths of components corresponding to the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits in PD patients by increasing the hypoactive basal ganglia and by suppressing the hyperactive cortical motor areas, ventrolateral thalamus and cerebellum. Conclusion Our results suggest that STN-DBS may affect not only the abnormal local activity, but also alter brain networks in patients with PD. This study also demonstrated the usefulness of ICA for cross-sectional PET data to reveal network modifications due to DBS, which was not observable using the subtraction method. PMID:25837179

  16. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: where we are now.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Ozpinar, Alp; Raslan, Ahmed M; Ko, Andrew L

    2015-06-01

    Fossil records showing trephination in the Stone Age provide evidence that humans have sought to influence the mind through physical means since before the historical record. Attempts to treat psychiatric disease via neurosurgical means in the 20th century provided some intriguing initial results. However, the indiscriminate application of these treatments, lack of rigorous evaluation of the results, and the side effects of ablative, irreversible procedures resulted in a backlash against brain surgery for psychiatric disorders that continues to this day. With the advent of psychotropic medications, interest in invasive procedures for organic brain disease waned. Diagnosis and classification of psychiatric diseases has improved, due to a better understanding of psychiatric patho-physiology and the development of disease and treatment biomarkers. Meanwhile, a significant percentage of patients remain refractory to multiple modes of treatment, and psychiatric disease remains the number one cause of disability in the world. These data, along with the safe and efficacious application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders, in principle a reversible process, is rekindling interest in the surgical treatment of psychiatric disorders with stimulation of deep brain sites involved in emotional and behavioral circuitry. This review presents a brief history of psychosurgery and summarizes the development of DBS for psychiatric disease, reviewing the available evidence for the current application of DBS for disorders of the mind.

  17. Effects of deep brain stimulation and medication on bradykinesia and muscle activation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Prodoehl, Janey; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Bakay, Roy A; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and antiparkinsonian medication (Meds) have proved to be effective therapies for treating bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease. However, it is not currently known how or to what extent STN stimulation alters the control signals to agonist and antagonist muscles to change movement speed. Our objective was to investigate movement speed along with the amplitude and temporal features of EMG activity to determine how and to what extent these parameters are changed by DBS and medication. Nine patients with Parkinson's disease were studied following neurosurgery that implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the STN. The experiments for the patients were performed in each of four treatment conditions: (i) OFF treatment; (ii) STN DBS; (iii) Meds; and (iv) Meds plus STN DBS. Also, a group of age- and gender-matched control subjects were examined. Medication and DBS had similar effects in that both treatments increased movement speed, increased the amplitude of the first agonist burst, increased burst duration, reduced the number of agonist bursts, reduced cocontraction, increased the size of the antagonist EMG, and reduced the centroid time of the antagonist EMG. When DBS and medication were combined, only temporal measures of burst duration and the number of agonist bursts were different from the medication alone condition. There was a positive association between the level of bradykinesia OFF treatment and the level of bradykinesia following DBS and medication. The movement speed of neurologically normal control subjects' was over 40% higher during both flexion and extension movements when compared with the patients during Meds plus STN DBS. The changes in the muscle activation patterns provide a mechanism of action for the pharmacological and surgical interventions used to treat bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease. However, despite the success of medication and DBS at improving bradykinesia in patients

  18. Association of Deep Brain Stimulation Washout Effects With Parkinson Disease Duration

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Fernandez, Hubert H.; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), including bradykinesia. When stimulation ceases abruptly, bradykinesia returns gradually. The duration of the gradual, slow washout varies across patients, and although the origin of this variability is unclear, it is hypothesized to be related to 1 or more clinical characteristics of patients. Objective To determine if a correlation exists between clinical characteristics of patients with Parkinson disease (age, age at disease onset, disease severity, disease duration, medication dose, or time since surgery) and the washout rate for bradykinesia when STN DBS is discontinued. Design Serial quantitative assessments of bradykinesia were performed during a defined period following cessation of STN DBS. Setting Academic research. Patients Twenty-four patients with Parkinson disease who underwent STN DBS were enrolled in the study. Patients were assessed while off medication (medication had been discontinued 10½ to 16½ hours before testing), and stimulator settings were unchanged for a mean (median) of 20 (14) months. Main Outcome Measures We measured bradykinesia in the dominant hand by assessing finger tapping (item 23 on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale), which was quantified using an angular velocity transducer strapped on the index finger. Finger tapping was assessed every 2 minutes for 20 seconds at a time. This was performed during a 20-minute period with DBS on (baseline period), during a 50-minute period following discontinuation of STN DBS for the dominant hand, and again during a 20-minute period after turning on the device. Results When STN DBS was turned off, an initial fast but partial loss of benefit was observed, which was followed by a further slow washout of the residual therapeutic effect. The half-life of the slow washout phase varied significantly across patients, and this variation was strongly related to disease

  19. An active contour-based atlas registration model applied to automatic subthalamic nucleus targeting on MRI: method and validation.

    PubMed

    Duay, Valérie; Bresson, Xavier; Castro, Javier Sanchez; Pollo, Claudio; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new non parametric atlas registration framework, derived from the optical flow model and the active contour theory, applied to automatic subthalamic nucleus (STN) targeting in deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. In a previous work, we demonstrated that the STN position can be predicted based on the position of surrounding visible structures, namely the lateral and third ventricles. A STN targeting process can thus be obtained by registering these structures of interest between a brain atlas and the patient image. Here we aim to improve the results of the state of the art targeting methods and at the same time to reduce the computational time. Our simultaneous segmentation and registration model shows mean STN localization errors statistically similar to the most performing registration algorithms tested so far and to the targeting expert's variability. Moreover, the computational time of our registration method is much lower, which is a worthwhile improvement from a clinical point of view.

  20. Fiber tractography of the axonal pathways linking the basal ganglia and cerebellum in Parkinson disease: implications for targeting in deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Jennifer A.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Gunalan, Kabilar; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Mcintyre, Cameron C.; Miller, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Object Stimulation of white matter pathways near targeted structures may contribute to therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Two tracts linking the basal ganglia and cerebellum have been described in primates: the subthalamopontocerebellar tract (SPCT) and the dentatothalamic tract (DTT). The authors used fiber tractography to evaluate white matter tracts that connect the cerebellum to the region of the basal ganglia in patients with PD who were candidates for DBS. Methods Fourteen patients with advanced PD underwent 3-T MRI, including 30-directional diffusion-weighted imaging sequences. Diffusion tensor tractography was performed using 2 regions of interest: ipsilateral subthalamic and red nuclei, and contralateral cerebellar hemisphere. Nine patients underwent subthalamic DBS, and the course of each tract was observed relative to the location of the most effective stimulation contact and the volume of tissue activated. Results In all patients 2 distinct tracts were identified that corresponded closely to the described anatomical features of the SPCT and DTT, respectively. The mean overall distance from the active contact to the DTT was 2.18 ± 0.35 mm, and the mean proportional distance relative to the volume of tissue activated was 1.35 ± 0.48. There was a nonsignificant trend toward better postoperative tremor control in patients with electrodes closer to the DTT. Conclusions The SPCT and the DTT may be related to the expression of symptoms in PD, and this may have implications for DBS targeting. The use of tractography to identify the DTT might assist with DBS targeting in the future. PMID:24484226

  1. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gabran, S R I; Saad, J H; Salama, M M A; Mansour, R R

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the electromagnetic modeling and simulation of an implanted Medtronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The model is developed using Empire XCcel and represents the electrode surrounded with brain tissue assuming homogenous and isotropic medium. The model is created to study the parameters influencing the electric field distribution within the tissue in order to provide reference and benchmarking data for DBS and intra-cortical electrode development.

  2. Effect of unilateral versus bilateral electrostimulation in subthalamic nucleus on speech in Parkinsons disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Emily; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Bakay, Roy; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan

    2004-05-01

    Previously, it was found that 16 right-handed patients with idiopathic Parkinsons disease who underwent unilateral implantation of deep brain stimulator in subthalamic nucleus (STN) showed significant improvement in their nonspeech motor functions. Eight of the 16 patients had stimulator in the left STN and eight in the right STN. In contrast, their speech function showed very mild improvement that was limited to the respiratory/phonotory subsystems. Further, there seemed a trend that the patients with right STN stimulation did better than those with left STN stimulation. It was speculated that the difference might be due to a micro lesion caused by the surgical procedure to the corticobulbar fibers run in the left internal capsule. This paper reports speech changes associated with bilateral DBS in STN in four of the 16 subjects who elected to have deep brain stimulator implanted in STN on the opposite side of the brain at a later time. Results show negative changes in speech after bilateral DBS in STN. The changes were not limited to the micro lesion effect due to the surgery itself, but also related to the active stimulation on the dominant hemisphere for speech processing. [Work supported by NIH.

  3. Effect of unilateral versus bilateral electrostimulation in subthalamic nucleus on speech in Parkinsons disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Emily; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Bakay, Roy; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan

    2001-05-01

    Previously, it was found that 16 right-handed patients with idiopathic Parkinsons disease who underwent unilateral implantation of deep brain stimulator in subthalamic nucleus (STN) showed significant improvement in their nonspeech motor functions. Eight of the 16 patients had stimulator in the left STN and eight in the right STN. In contrast, their speech function showed very mild improvement that was limited to the respiratory/phonotory subsystems. Further, there seemed a trend that the patients with right STN stimulation did better than those with left STN stimulation. It was speculated that the difference might be due to a micro lesion caused by the surgical procedure to the corticobulbar fibers run in the left internal capsule. This paper reports speech changes associated with bilateral DBS in STN in four of the 16 subjects who elected to have deep brain stimulator implanted in STN on the opposite side of the brain at a later time. Results show negative changes in speech after bilateral DBS in STN. The changes were not limited to the micro lesion effect due to the surgery itself, but also related to the active stimulation on the dominant hemisphere for speech processing. [Work supported by NIH.

  4. Functional anatomy of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Koller, Jonathan M.; Black, Kathleen D.; Campbell, Meghan C.; Lugar, Heather M.; Ushe, Mwiza; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Hershey, Tamara; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Black, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We developed a novel method to map behavioral effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) across a 3D brain region and to assign statistical significance after stringent Type I error correction. This method was applied to behavioral changes in Parkinson disease (PD) induced by subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS to determine whether these responses depended on anatomical location of DBS. Method Fifty-one PD participants with STN DBS were evaluated off medication, with DBS off and during unilateral STN DBS with clinically optimized settings. Dependent variables included DBS-induced changes in Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) subscores, kinematic measures of bradykinesia and rigidity, working memory, response inhibition, mood, anxiety, and akathisia. Weighted t-tests at each voxel produced p images showing where DBS most significantly affected each dependent variable based on outcomes of participants with nearby DBS. Finally, a permutation test computed the probability that this p image indicated significantly different responses based on stimulation site. Results Most motor variables improved with DBS anywhere in the STN region, but several motor, cognitive and affective responses significantly depended on precise location stimulated, with peak p values in superior STN/zona incerta (quantified bradykinesia), dorsal STN (mood, anxiety), and inferior STN/substantia nigra (UPDRS tremor, working memory). Interpretation Our method identified DBS-induced behavioral changes that depended significantly on DBS site. These results do not support complete functional segregation within STN, since movement improved with DBS throughout, and mood improved with dorsal STN DBS. Rather, findings support functional convergence of motor, cognitive and limbic information in STN. PMID:24953991

  5. Deep brain photoreceptors control light seeking behavior in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, António M.; Fero, Kandice; Arrenberg, Aristides B.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Driever, Wolfgang; Burgess, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most vertebrates process visual information using elaborately structured photosensory tissues including the eyes and pineal. However there is strong evidence that other tissues can detect and respond to photic stimuli [1, 2, 3]. Many reports suggest that photosensitive elements exist within the brain itself and influence physiology and behavior, however a long standing puzzle has been the identity of the neurons and photoreceptor molecules involved [4, 5]. We tested whether light cues influence behavior in zebrafish larvae through deep brain photosensors. We found that larvae lacking eyes and pineal perform a simple light-seeking behavior triggered by loss of illumination (`dark photokinesis'). Neuroanatomical considerations prompted us to test orthopedia (otpa) deficient fish which showed a profound reduction in dark photokinesis. Using targeted genetic ablations, we narrowed the photosensitive region to neurons in the preoptic area. Neurons in this region express several photoreceptive molecules, but expression of the melanopsin opn4a is selectively lost in otpa mutants, suggesting that opn4a mediates dark photokinesis. Our findings shed light on the identity and function of deep brain photoreceptors and suggest that otpa specifies an ancient population of sensory neurons that mediate behavioral responses to light. PMID:23000151

  6. Anesthesia for deep brain stimulation in traumatic brain injury-induced hemidystonia.

    PubMed

    Jani, Jill M; Oluigbo, Chima O; Reddy, Srijaya K

    2015-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation in an awake patient presents several unique challenges to the anesthesiologist. It is important to understand the various stages of the procedure and the complexities of anesthetic management in order to have a successful surgical outcome and provide a safe environment for the patient.

  7. Current Topics in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    UMEMURA, Atsushi; OYAMA, Genko; SHIMO, Yasushi; NAKAJIMA, Madoka; NAKAJIMA, Asuka; JO, Takayuki; SEKIMOTO, Satoko; ITO, Masanobu; MITSUHASHI, Takumi; HATTORI, Nobutaka; ARAI, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of surgical treatment for Parkinson disease (PD). After pioneering trials and errors, the current primary surgical treatment for PD is deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS is a promising treatment option for patients with medically refractory PD. However, there are still many problems and controversies associated with DBS. In this review, we discuss current issues in DBS for PD, including patient selection, clinical outcomes, complications, target selection, long-term outcomes, management of axial symptoms, timing of surgery, surgical procedures, cost-effectiveness, and new technology. PMID:27349658

  8. The Use of Deep Brain Stimulation in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akbarian-Tefaghi, Ladan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Foltynie, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood neurobehavioural disorder, characterised by the presence of motor and vocal tics, typically starting in childhood but persisting in around 20% of patients into adulthood. In those patients who do not respond to pharmacological or behavioural therapy, deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be a suitable option for potential symptom improvement. This manuscript attempts to summarise the outcomes of DBS at different targets, explore the possible mechanisms of action of DBS in TS, as well as the potential of adaptive DBS. There will also be a focus on the future challenges faced in designing optimized trials. PMID:27548235

  9. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  10. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Autonomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Basiago, Adam; Binder, Devin K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of the development of deep brain stimulation (DBS) into a well-established therapy for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia, its utility as a potential treatment for autonomic dysfunction has emerged. Dysfunction of autonomic processes is common in neurological diseases. Depending on the specific target in the brain, DBS has been shown to raise or lower blood pressure, normalize the baroreflex, to alter the caliber of bronchioles, and eliminate hyperhidrosis, all through modulation of the sympathetic nervous system. It has also been shown to improve cortical control of the bladder, directly induce or inhibit the micturition reflex, and to improve deglutition and gastric emptying. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the relevant available studies describing these effects of DBS on autonomic function, which vary greatly in character and magnitude with respect to stimulation target. PMID:27537920

  11. Diffusion Tractography in Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is believed to exert its therapeutic effects through modulation of brain circuitry, yet conventional preoperative planning does not allow direct targeting or visualization of white matter pathways. Diffusion MRI tractography (DT) is virtually the only non-invasive method of visualizing structural connectivity in the brain, leading many to suggest its use to guide DBS targeting. DT-guided DBS not only has the potential to allow direct white matter targeting for established applications [e.g., Parkinson’s disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), dystonia], but may also aid in the discovery of new therapeutic targets for a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Despite these exciting opportunities, DT lacks standardization and rigorous anatomic validation, raising significant concern for the use of such data in stereotactic brain surgery. This review covers the technical details, proposed methods, and initial clinical data for the use of DT in DBS surgery. Rather than focusing on specific disease applications, this review focuses on methods that can be applied to virtually any DBS target. PMID:27199677

  12. Computational modeling of an endovascular approach to deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Connolly, Allison T.; Bajwa, Jawad A.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy currently relies on a transcranial neurosurgical technique to implant one or more electrode leads into the brain parenchyma. In this study, we used computational modeling to investigate the feasibility of using an endovascular approach to target DBS therapy. Approach. Image-based anatomical reconstructions of the human brain and vasculature were used to identify 17 established and hypothesized anatomical targets of DBS, of which five were found adjacent to a vein or artery with intraluminal diameter ≥1 mm. Two of these targets, the fornix and subgenual cingulate white matter (SgCwm) tracts, were further investigated using a computational modeling framework that combined segmented volumes of the vascularized brain, finite element models of the tissue voltage during DBS, and multi-compartment axon models to predict the direct electrophysiological effects of endovascular DBS. Main results. The models showed that: (1) a ring-electrode conforming to the vessel wall was more efficient at neural activation than a guidewire design, (2) increasing the length of a ring-electrode had minimal effect on neural activation thresholds, (3) large variability in neural activation occurred with suboptimal placement of a ring-electrode along the targeted vessel, and (4) activation thresholds for the fornix and SgCwm tracts were comparable for endovascular and stereotactic DBS, though endovascular DBS was able to produce significantly larger contralateral activation for a unilateral implantation. Significance. Together, these results suggest that endovascular DBS can serve as a complementary approach to stereotactic DBS in select cases.

  13. Target Selection Recommendations Based on Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries on Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Lin; Sperry, Laura; Olichney, John; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Chang, Norika Malhado; Liu, Ying; Wang, Su-Ping; Wang, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) has extensive impact on nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Data Sources: We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to September, 2015, using various search terms and their combinations including PD, NMSs, DBS, globus pallidus internus (GPi), subthalamic nucleus (STN), and ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus. Study Selection: We included data from peer-reviewed journals on impacts of DBS on neuropsychological profiles, sensory function, autonomic symptoms, weight changes, and sleep disturbances. For psychological symptoms and cognitive impairment, we tried to use more reliable proofs: Random, control, multicenter, large sample sizes, and long period follow-up clinical studies. We categorized the NMSs into four groups: those that would improve definitively following DBS; those that are not significantly affected by DBS; those that remain controversial on their surgical benefit; and those that can be worsened by DBS. Results: In general, it seems to be an overall beneficial effect of DBS on NMSs, such as sensory, sleep, gastrointestinal, sweating, cardiovascular, odor, urological symptoms, and sexual dysfunction, GPi-DBS may produce similar results; Both STN and Gpi-DBS are safe with regard to cognition and psychology over long-term follow-up, though verbal fluency decline is related to DBS; The impact of DBS on behavioral addictions and dysphagia is still uncertain. Conclusions: As the motor effects of STN-DBS and GPi-DBS are similar, NMSs may determine the target choice in surgery of future patients. PMID:26668154

  14. Compensatory stepping in Parkinson's disease is still a problem after deep brain stimulation randomized to STN or GPi

    PubMed Central

    St George, R. J.; Carlson-Kuhta, P.; King, L. A.; Burchiel, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on balance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. This study examined whether DBS randomized to the subthalamic nucleus (STN; n = 11) or globus pallidus interna (GPi; n = 10) improved compensatory stepping to recover balance after a perturbation. The standing surface translated backward, forcing subjects to take compensatory steps forward. Kinematic and kinetic responses were recorded. PD-DBS subjects were tested off and on their levodopa medication before bilateral DBS surgery and retested 6 mo later off and on DBS, combined with off and on levodopa medication. Responses were compared with PD-control subjects (n = 8) tested over the same timescale and 17 healthy control subjects. Neither DBS nor levodopa improved the stepping response. Compensatory stepping in the best-treated state after surgery (DBS+DOPA) was similar to the best-treated state before surgery (DOPA) for the PD-GPi group and the PD-control group. For the PD-STN group, there were more lateral weight shifts, a delayed foot-off, and a greater number of steps required to recover balance in DBS+DOPA after surgery compared with DOPA before surgery. Within the STN group five subjects who did not fall during the experiment before surgery fell at least once after surgery, whereas the number of falls in the GPi and PD-control groups were unchanged. DBS did not improve the compensatory step response needed to recover from balance perturbations in the GPi group and caused delays in the preparation phase of the step in the STN group. PMID:26108960

  15. Expectation modulates the effect of deep brain stimulation on motor and cognitive function in tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Ariane; Ferrea, Stefano; Südmeyer, Martin; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Expectation contributes to placebo and nocebo responses in Parkinson's disease (PD). While there is evidence for expectation-induced modulations of bradykinesia, little is known about the impact of expectation on resting tremor. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves cardinal PD motor symptoms including tremor whereas impairment of verbal fluency (VF) has been observed as a potential side-effect. Here we investigated how expectation modulates the effect of STN-DBS on resting tremor and its interaction with VF. In a within-subject-design, expectation of 24 tremor-dominant PD patients regarding the impact of STN-DBS on motor symptoms was manipulated by verbal suggestions (positive [placebo], negative [nocebo], neutral [control]). Patients participated with (MedON) and without (MedOFF) antiparkinsonian medication. Resting tremor was recorded by accelerometry and bradykinesia of finger tapping and diadochokinesia were assessed by a 3D ultrasound motion detection system. VF was quantified by lexical and semantic tests. In a subgroup of patients, the effect of STN-DBS on tremor was modulated by expectation, i.e. tremor decreased (placebo response) or increased (nocebo response) by at least 10% as compared to the control condition while no significant effect was observed for the overall group. Interestingly, nocebo responders in MedON were additionally characterized by significant impairment in semantic verbal fluency. In contrast, bradykinesia was not affected by expectation. These results indicate that the therapeutic effect of STN-DBS on tremor can be modulated by expectation in a subgroup of patients and suggests that tremor is also among the parkinsonian symptoms responsive to placebo and nocebo interventions. While positive expectations enhanced the effect of STN-DBS by further decreasing the magnitude of tremor, negative expectations counteracted the therapeutic effect and at the same time exacerbated a side-effect often associated with STN

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Treatment Outcome and Predictors of Response

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Pino; Cuadras, Daniel; Gabriëls, Loes; Denys, Damiaan; Goodman, Wayne; Greenberg, Ben D.; Jimenez-Ponce, Fiacro; Kuhn, Jens; Lenartz, Doris; Mallet, Luc; Nuttin, Bart; Real, Eva; Segalas, Cinto; Schuurman, Rick; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Menchon, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an alternative to ablative neurosurgery for severe treatment-resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), although with partially discrepant results probably related to differences in anatomical targetting and stimulation conditions. We sought to determine the efficacy and tolerability of DBS in OCD and the existence of clinical predictors of response using meta-analysis. Methods We searched the literature on DBS for OCD from 1999 through January 2014 using PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We performed fixed and random-effect meta-analysis with score changes (pre-post DBS) on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) as the primary-outcome measure, and the number of responders to treatment, quality of life and acceptability as secondary measures. Findings Thirty-one studies involving 116 subjects were identified. Eighty-three subjects were implanted in striatal areas—anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral capsule and ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens and ventral caudate—27 in the subthalamic nucleus and six in the inferior thalamic peduncle. Global percentage of Y-BOCS reduction was estimated at 45.1% and global percentage of responders at 60.0%. Better response was associated with older age at OCD onset and presence of sexual/religious obsessions and compulsions. No significant differences were detected in efficacy between targets. Five patients dropped out, but adverse effects were generally reported as mild, transient and reversible. Conclusions Our analysis confirms that DBS constitutes a valid alternative to lesional surgery for severe, therapy-refractory OCD patients. Well-controlled, randomized studies with larger samples are needed to establish the optimal targeting and stimulation conditions and to extend the analysis of clinical predictors of outcome. PMID:26208305

  17. Emotion recognition in early Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation or dopaminergic therapy: a comparison to healthy participants.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Lindsey G; Mannava, Sishir; Camalier, Corrie R; Folley, Bradley S; Albritton, Aaron; Konrad, Peter E; Charles, David; Park, Sohee; Neimat, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is traditionally regarded as a neurodegenerative movement disorder, however, nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is also thought to disrupt non-motor loops connecting basal ganglia to areas in frontal cortex involved in cognition and emotion processing. PD patients are impaired on tests of emotion recognition, but it is difficult to disentangle this deficit from the more general cognitive dysfunction that frequently accompanies disease progression. Testing for emotion recognition deficits early in the disease course, prior to cognitive decline, better assesses the sensitivity of these non-motor corticobasal ganglia-thalamocortical loops involved in emotion processing to early degenerative change in basal ganglia circuits. In addition, contrasting this with a group of healthy aging individuals demonstrates changes in emotion processing specific to the degeneration of basal ganglia circuitry in PD. Early PD patients (EPD) were recruited from a randomized clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in early-staged PD. EPD patients were previously randomized to receive optimal drug therapy only (ODT), or drug therapy plus STN-DBS (ODT + DBS). Matched healthy elderly controls (HEC) and young controls (HYC) also participated in this study. Participants completed two control tasks and three emotion recognition tests that varied in stimulus domain. EPD patients were impaired on all emotion recognition tasks compared to HEC. Neither therapy type (ODT or ODT + DBS) nor therapy state (ON/OFF) altered emotion recognition performance in this study. Finally, HEC were impaired on vocal emotion recognition relative to HYC, suggesting a decline related to healthy aging. This study supports the existence of impaired emotion recognition early in the PD course, implicating an early disruption of fronto-striatal loops mediating emotional function.

  18. Manifold learning of brain MRIs by deep learning.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Manifold learning of medical images plays a potentially important role for modeling anatomical variability within a population with pplications that include segmentation, registration, and prediction of clinical parameters. This paper describes a novel method for learning the manifold of 3D brain images that, unlike most existing manifold learning methods, does not require the manifold space to be locally linear, and does not require a predefined similarity measure or a prebuilt proximity graph. Our manifold learning method is based on deep learning, a machine learning approach that uses layered networks (called deep belief networks, or DBNs) and has received much attention recently in the computer vision field due to their success in object recognition tasks. DBNs have traditionally been too computationally expensive for application to 3D images due to the large number of trainable parameters. Our primary contributions are (1) a much more computationally efficient training method for DBNs that makes training on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128 x 128 x 128 practical, and (2) the demonstration that DBNs can learn a low-dimensional manifold of brain volumes that detects modes of variations that correlate to demographic and disease parameters.

  19. Dynamics of Parkinsonian tremor during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titcombe, Michèle S.; Glass, Leon; Guehl, Dominique; Beuter, Anne

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which chronic, high frequency, electrical deep brain stimulation (HF-DBS) suppresses tremor in Parkinson's disease is unknown. Rest tremor in subjects with Parkinson's disease receiving HF-DBS was recorded continuously throughout switching the deep brain stimulator on (at an effective frequency) and off. These data suggest that the stimulation induces a qualitative change in the dynamics, called a Hopf bifurcation, so that the stable oscillations are destabilized. We hypothesize that the periodic stimulation modifies a parameter affecting the oscillation in a time dependent way and thereby induces a Hopf bifurcation. We explore this hypothesis using a schematic network model of an oscillator interacting with periodic stimulation. The mechanism of time-dependent change of a control parameter in the model captures two aspects of the dynamics observed in the data: (1) a gradual increase in tremor amplitude when the stimulation is switched off and a gradual decrease in tremor amplitude when the stimulation is switched on and (2) a time delay in the onset and offset of the oscillations. This mechanism is consistent with these rest tremor transition data and with the idea that HF-DBS acts via the gradual change of a network property.

  20. Deep Brain Stimulation: Current and Future Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has developed during the past 20 years as a remarkable treatment option for several different disorders. Advances in technology and surgical techniques have essentially replaced ablative procedures for most of these conditions. Stimulation of the ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus has clearly been shown to markedly improve tremor control in patients with essential tremor and tremor related to Parkinson disease. Symptoms of bradykinesia, tremor, gait disturbance, and rigidity can be significantly improved in patients with Parkinson disease. Because of these improvements, a decrease in medication can be instrumental in reducing the disabling features of dyskinesias in such patients. Primary dystonia has been shown to respond well to DBS of the globus pallidus internus. The success of these procedures has led to application of these techniques to multiple other debilitating conditions such as neuropsychiatric disorders, intractable pain, epilepsy, camptocormia, headache, restless legs syndrome, and Alzheimer disease. The literature analysis was performed using a MEDLINE search from 1980 through 2010 with the term deep brain stimulation, and several double-blind and larger case series were chosen for inclusion in this review. The exact mechanism of DBS is not fully understood. This review summarizes many of the current and potential future clinical applications of this technology. PMID:21646303

  1. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jonathan R. Jagid, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0559 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project aims to study electrical deep brain

  2. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55–90 Hz) and beta (13–30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19089.001 PMID:27855780

  3. Tourette syndrome deep brain stimulation: a review and updated recommendations.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Lauren E; Mink, Jonathan W; Woods, Douglas W; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Dominico; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Silburn, Peter A; Foltynie, Thomas; Walker, Harrison C; Shahed-Jimenez, Joohi; Savica, Rodolfo; Klassen, Bryan T; Machado, Andre G; Foote, Kelly D; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Ackermans, Linda; Temel, Yasin; Mari, Zoltan; Changizi, Barbara K; Lozano, Andres; Auyeung, M; Kaido, Takanobu; Agid, Yves; Welter, Marie L; Khandhar, Suketu M; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Walter, Benjamin L; Juncos, Jorge L; Gross, Robert E; Kuhn, Jens; Leckman, James F; Neimat, Joseph A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may improve disabling tics in severely affected medication and behaviorally resistant Tourette syndrome (TS). Here we review all reported cases of TS DBS and provide updated recommendations for selection, assessment, and management of potential TS DBS cases based on the literature and implantation experience. Candidates should have a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM V) diagnosis of TS with severe motor and vocal tics, which despite exhaustive medical and behavioral treatment trials result in significant impairment. Deep brain stimulation should be offered to patients only by experienced DBS centers after evaluation by a multidisciplinary team. Rigorous preoperative and postoperative outcome measures of tics and associated comorbidities should be used. Tics and comorbid neuropsychiatric conditions should be optimally treated per current expert standards, and tics should be the major cause of disability. Psychogenic tics, embellishment, and malingering should be recognized and addressed. We have removed the previously suggested 25-year-old age limit, with the specification that a multidisciplinary team approach for screening is employed. A local ethics committee or institutional review board should be consulted for consideration of cases involving persons younger than 18 years of age, as well as in cases with urgent indications. Tourette syndrome patients represent a unique and complex population, and studies reveal a higher risk for post-DBS complications. Successes and failures have been reported for multiple brain targets; however, the optimal surgical approach remains unknown. Tourette syndrome DBS, though still evolving, is a promising approach for a subset of medication refractory and severely affected patients.

  4. Neural Correlates of Decision Thresholds in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Herz, Damian M; Zavala, Baltazar A; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2016-04-04

    If humans are faced with difficult choices when making decisions, the ability to slow down responses becomes critical in order to avoid suboptimal choices. Current models of decision making assume that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates this function by elevating decision thresholds, thereby requiring more evidence to be accumulated before responding [1-9]. However, direct electrophysiological evidence for the exact role of STN during adjustment of decision thresholds is lacking. Here, we show that trial-by-trial variations in STN low-frequency oscillatory activity predict adjustments of decision thresholds before subjects make a response. The relationship between STN activity and decision thresholds critically depends on the subjects' level of cautiousness. While increased oscillatory activity of the STN predicts elevated decision thresholds during high levels of cautiousness, it predicts decreased decision thresholds during low levels of cautiousness. This context-dependent relationship may be mediated by increased influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-STN pathway on decision thresholds during high cautiousness. Subjects who exhibit a stronger increase in phase alignment of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mPFC and STN before making a response have higher decision thresholds and commit fewer erroneous responses. Together, our results demonstrate that STN low-frequency oscillatory activity and corresponding mPFC-STN coupling are involved in determining how much evidence subjects accumulate before making a decision. This finding might explain why deep-brain stimulation of the STN can impair subjects' ability to slow down responses and can induce impulsive suboptimal decisions.

  5. Neural Correlates of Decision Thresholds in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Damian M.; Zavala, Baltazar A.; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary If humans are faced with difficult choices when making decisions, the ability to slow down responses becomes critical in order to avoid suboptimal choices. Current models of decision making assume that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates this function by elevating decision thresholds, thereby requiring more evidence to be accumulated before responding [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. However, direct electrophysiological evidence for the exact role of STN during adjustment of decision thresholds is lacking. Here, we show that trial-by-trial variations in STN low-frequency oscillatory activity predict adjustments of decision thresholds before subjects make a response. The relationship between STN activity and decision thresholds critically depends on the subjects’ level of cautiousness. While increased oscillatory activity of the STN predicts elevated decision thresholds during high levels of cautiousness, it predicts decreased decision thresholds during low levels of cautiousness. This context-dependent relationship may be mediated by increased influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-STN pathway on decision thresholds during high cautiousness. Subjects who exhibit a stronger increase in phase alignment of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mPFC and STN before making a response have higher decision thresholds and commit fewer erroneous responses. Together, our results demonstrate that STN low-frequency oscillatory activity and corresponding mPFC-STN coupling are involved in determining how much evidence subjects accumulate before making a decision. This finding might explain why deep-brain stimulation of the STN can impair subjects’ ability to slow down responses and can induce impulsive suboptimal decisions. PMID:26996501

  6. The time course of the return of upper limb bradykinesia after cessation of subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Keresztenyi, Zoltan; Valkovic, Peter; Eggert, Thomas; Steude, Ulrich; Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Laczko, Jozsef; Bötzel, Kai

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the time span within which bradykinesia re-occurs, we registered movement parameters immediately after the termination of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in nine Parkinson patients with chronically implanted bilateral STN electrodes. Two repetitive movements were investigated: finger-tapping and forearm pronation-supination. When stimulation was switched off, the amplitude and velocity of the investigated movements significantly declined, but the frequency did not. The time course of this decline was modeled by an exponential function that yielded time constants between 15 and 30s. The effect of stimulation had completely disappeared within 1 min. These results suggest that it is necessary to wait at least for 1 min after the end of stimulation before performing further assessments.

  7. Structural and functional connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus during vocal emotion decoding

    PubMed Central

    Frühholz, Sascha; Ceravolo, Leonardo; Grandjean, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the role played by the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in human emotion has recently advanced with STN deep brain stimulation, a neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, the potential presence of several confounds related to pathological models raises the question of how much they affect the relevance of observations regarding the physiological function of the STN itself. This underscores the crucial importance of obtaining evidence from healthy participants. In this study, we tested the structural and functional connectivity between the STN and other brain regions related to vocal emotion in a healthy population by combining diffusion tensor imaging and psychophysiological interaction analysis from a high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging study. As expected, we showed that the STN is functionally connected to the structures involved in emotional prosody decoding, notably the orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, auditory cortex, pallidum and amygdala. These functional results were corroborated by probabilistic fiber tracking, which revealed that the left STN is structurally connected to the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. These results confirm, in healthy participants, the role played by the STN in human emotion and its structural and functional connectivity with the brain network involved in vocal emotions. PMID:26400857

  8. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of vegetative state.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Katayama, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazutaka; Oshima, Hideki; Fukaya, Chikashi; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    One hundred and seven patients in vegetative state (VS) were evaluated neurologically and electrophysiologically over 3 months (90 days) after the onset of brain injury. Among these patients, 21 were treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The stimulation sites were the mesencephalic reticular formation (two patients) and centromedian-parafascicularis nucleus complex (19 cases). Eight of the patients recovered from VS and were able to obey verbal commands at 13 and 10 months in the case of head trauma and at 19, 14, 13, 12, 12 and 8 months in the case of vascular disease after comatose brain injury, and no patients without DBS recovered from VS spontaneously within 24 months after brain injury. The eight patients who recovered from VS showed desynchronization on continuous EEG frequency analysis. The Vth wave of the auditory brainstem response and N20 of the somatosensory evoked potential could be recorded, although with a prolonged latency, and the pain-related P250 was recorded with an amplitude of > 7 μV. Sixteen (14.9%) of the 107 VS patients satisfied these criteria in our electrophysiological evaluation, 10 of whom were treated with DBS and six of whom were not treated with DBS. In these 16 patients, the recovery rate from VS was different between the DBS therapy group and the no DBS therapy group (P < 0.01, Fisher's exact probability test) These findings indicate that DBS may be useful for the recovery of patients from VS if the candidates are selected on the basis of electrophysiological criteria.

  9. Penfield’s Prediction: A Mechanism for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Murrow, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Despite its widespread use, the precise mechanism of action of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy remains unknown. The modern urgency to publish more and new data can obscure previously learned lessons by the giants who have preceded us and whose shoulders we now stand upon. Wilder Penfield extensively studied the effects of artificial electrical brain stimulation and his comments on the subject are still very relevant today. In particular, he noted two very different (and seemingly opposite) effects of stimulation within the human brain. In some structures, artificial electrical stimulation has an effect, which mimics ablation, while, in other structures, it produces a stimulatory effect on that tissue. Hypothesis: The hypothesis of this paper is fourfold. First, it proposes that some neural circuits are widely synchronized with other neural circuits, while some neural circuits are unsynchronized and operate independently. Second, it proposes that artificial high-frequency electrical stimulation of a synchronized neural circuit results in an ablative effect, but artificial high-frequency electrical stimulation of an unsynchronized neural circuit results in a stimulatory effect. Third, it suggests a part of the mechanism by which large-scale physiologic synchronization of widely distributed independently processed information streams may occur. This may be the neural mechanism underlying Penfield’s “centrencephalic system,” which he emphasized so many years ago. Fourth, it outlines the specific anatomic distribution of this physiologic synchronization, which Penfield has already clearly delineated as the distribution of his centrencephalic system. Evidence: This paper draws on a brief overview of previous theory regarding the mechanism of action of DBS and on historical, as well as widely known modern clinical data regarding the observed effects of stimulation delivered to various targets within the brain. Basic science investigations, which

  10. Authenticity and autonomy in deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Alistair

    2014-08-01

    Felicitas Kraemer draws on the experiences of patients undergoing deep-brain stimulation (DBS) to propose two distinct and potentially conflicting principles of respect: for an individual's autonomy (interpreted as mental competence), and for their authenticity. I argue instead that, according to commonly-invoked justifications of respect for autonomy, authenticity is itself in part constitutive of an analysis of autonomy worthy of respect; Kraemer's argument thus highlights the shortcomings of practical applications of respect for autonomy that emphasise competence while neglecting other important dimensions of autonomy such as authenticity, since it shows that competence alone cannot be interpreted as a reliable indicator of an individual's capacity for exercising autonomy. I draw from relational accounts to suggest how respect for a more expansive conception of autonomy might be interpreted for individuals undergoing DBS and in general.

  11. Engineering the Next Generation of Clinical Deep Brain Stimulation Technology

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Cameron C.; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Shamir, Reuben R.; Lempka, Scott F.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved into a powerful clinical therapy for a range of neurological disorders, but even with impressive clinical growth, DBS technology has been relatively stagnant over its history. However, enhanced collaborations between neural engineers, neuroscientists, physicists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons are beginning to address some of the limitations of current DBS technology. These interactions have helped to develop novel ideas for the next generation of clinical DBS systems. This review attempts collate some of that progress and with two goals in mind. First, provide a general description of current clinical DBS practices, geared toward educating biomedical engineers and computer scientists on a field that needs their expertise and attention. Second, describe some of the technological developments that are currently underway in surgical targeting, stimulation parameter selection, stimulation protocols, and stimulation hardware that are being directly evaluated for near term clinical application. PMID:25161150

  12. Vocal Tremor: Novel Therapeutic Target for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Vinod K.; Ho, Allen L.; Parker, Jonathon J.; Erickson-DiRenzo, Elizabeth; Halpern, Casey H.

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous voice is characteristically associated with essential tremor, and is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT). Current estimates suggest that up to 40% of individuals diagnosed with essential tremor also present with EVT, which is associated with an impaired quality of life. Traditional EVT treatments have demonstrated limited success in long-term management of symptoms. However, voice tremor has been noted to decrease in patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS) with the targeting of thalamic nuclei. In this study, we describe our multidisciplinary procedure for awake, frameless DBS with optimal stimulation targets as well as acoustic analysis and laryngoscopic assessment to quantify tremor reduction. Finally, we investigate the most recent clinical evidence regarding the procedure. PMID:27735866

  13. Neuronal Organization of Deep Brain Opsin Photoreceptors in Adult Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Chong Yee; Kitahashi, Takashi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological impacts of light beyond vision, i.e., non-visual functions of light, signify the need to better understand light detection (or photoreception) systems in vertebrates. Photopigments, which comprise light-absorbing chromophores bound to a variety of G-protein coupled receptor opsins, are responsible for visual and non-visual photoreception. Non-visual opsin photopigments in the retina of mammals and extra-retinal tissues of non-mammals play an important role in non-image-forming functions of light, e.g., biological rhythms and seasonal reproduction. This review highlights the role of opsin photoreceptors in the deep brain, which could involve conserved neurochemical systems that control different time- and light-dependent physiologies in in non-mammalian vertebrates including teleost fish. PMID:27199680

  14. Patient specific Parkinson's disease detection for adaptive deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ameer; Zamani, Majid; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Continuous deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients results in side effects and shortening of the pacemaker battery life. This can be remedied using adaptive stimulation. To achieve adaptive DBS, patient customized PD detection is required due to the inconsistency associated with biomarkers across patients and time. This paper proposes the use of patient specific feature extraction together with adaptive support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to create a patient customized detector for PD. The patient specific feature extraction is obtained using the extrema of the ratio between the PD and non-PD spectra bands of each patient as features, while the adaptive SVM classifier adjusts its decision boundary until a suitable model is obtained. This yields individualised features and classifier pairs for each patient. Datasets containing local field potentials of PD patients were used to validate the method. Six of the nine patient datasets tested achieved a classification accuracy greater than 98%. The adaptive detector is suitable for realization on chip.

  15. Deep brain stimulation for other tremors, myoclonus, and chorea.

    PubMed

    Starr, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well established treatment for essential tremor and for the tremor associated with Parkinson's disease. The efficacy of DBS in these common tremors has led some investigators to apply the technique to rarer tremors such as such as Holmes' tremor, posttraumatic tremor, orthostatic tremor, and the tremor associated with multiple sclerosis. Likewise, DBS of the thalamus and globus pallidus directly suppresses levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease, suggesting the application of DBS to other hyperkinetic states such as Huntington's disease, tardive dyskinesia, and hemiballism. Myoclonus has also been treated with DBS, especially in cases where it is associated with dystonia. This chapter reviews the reported results of DBS for these conditions. Due to the rarity of these indications, most of the literature reviewed takes the form of case reports or small single-center case series.

  16. Engineering the next generation of clinical deep brain stimulation technology.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Shamir, Reuben R; Lempka, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved into a powerful clinical therapy for a range of neurological disorders, but even with impressive clinical growth, DBS technology has been relatively stagnant over its history. However, enhanced collaborations between neural engineers, neuroscientists, physicists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons are beginning to address some of the limitations of current DBS technology. These interactions have helped to develop novel ideas for the next generation of clinical DBS systems. This review attempts collate some of that progress with two goals in mind. First, provide a general description of current clinical DBS practices, geared toward educating biomedical engineers and computer scientists on a field that needs their expertise and attention. Second, describe some of the technological developments that are currently underway in surgical targeting, stimulation parameter selection, stimulation protocols, and stimulation hardware that are being directly evaluated for near term clinical application.

  17. Carbon nanotube yarns for deep brain stimulation electrode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changqing; Li, Luming; Hao, Hongwei

    2011-12-01

    A new form of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode was proposed that was made of carbon nanotube yarns (CNTYs). Electrode interface properties were examined using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS). The CNTY electrode interface exhibited large charge storage capacity (CSC) of 12.3 mC/cm(2) which increased to 98.6 mC/cm(2) after acid treatment, compared with 5.0 mC/cm(2) of Pt-Ir. Impedance spectrum of both untreated and treated CNTY electrodes showed that finite diffusion process occurred at the interface due to their porous structure and charge was delivered through capacitive mechanism. To evaluate stability electrical stimulus was exerted for up to 72 h and CV and EIS results of CNTY electrodes revealed little alteration. Therefore CNTY could make a good electrode material for DBS.

  18. Anesthetic Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation: A Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Rajkalyan; Ghazanwy, Mahmood; Tewari, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Ablative intracranial surgery for Parkinson's disease has advanced to embedding electrodes into precise areas of the basal ganglia. Electrode implantation surgery, referred to as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is preferred in view of its reversibility, adjustability, and capability to be safely performed bilaterally. DBS is been increasingly used for other movement disorders, intractable tremors epilepsy, and sometimes chronic pain. Anesthesiologists need to amalgamate the knowledge of neuroanatomical structures and surgical techniques involved in placement of microelectrodes in defined cerebral target areas. Perioperative verbal communication with the patient during the procedure is quintessential and may attenuate the need for pharmacological agents. This review will endeavor to assimilate the present knowledge regarding the patient selection, available/practiced anesthesia regimens, and perioperative complications after our thorough search for literature published between 1991 and 2013. PMID:25210668

  19. Early application of deep brain stimulation: clinical and ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Woopen, Christiane; Pauls, K Amande M; Koy, Anne; Moro, Elena; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven to be a successful therapeutic approach in several patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Hitherto its application was mainly restricted to advanced disease patients resistant to medication or with severe treatment side effects. However, there is now growing interest in earlier application of DBS, aimed at improving clinical outcomes, quality of life, and avoiding psychosocial consequences of chronic disease-related impairments. We address the clinical and ethical aspects of two "early" uses of DBS, (1) DBS early in the course of the disease, and (2) DBS early in life (i.e. in children). Possible benefits, risks and burdens are discussed and thoroughly considered. Further research is needed to obtain a careful balance between exposing vulnerable patients to potential severe surgical risks and excluding them from a potentially good outcome.

  20. Use of deep brain stimulation for major affective disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Kuanqing

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of major affective disorders, such as major depression and bipolar disorder, poses a challenge for identification of effective treatments. In a substantial number of patients, psychopharmacologic treatment does not lead to effective continuous symptom relief. The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment-resistant patients is an investigational approach that has recently produced promising results. The recent development of safer stereotaxic neurosurgery, and the combination with functional neuroimaging to map the affected brain circuits, have led to the investigation of DBS as a potential strategy to treat major mood disorders. Several independent clinical studies have recently shown that chronic DBS treatment leads to remission of symptoms in a high number of treatment-resistant patients for major depression and bipolar disorder. In conclusion, the existing proof-of-principle that DBS can be an effective intervention for treatment-resistant depression opens new avenues for treatment. However, multicenter, randomized and blind trials need to confirm efficacy and be approved after the most recent failures. Patient selection and surgical-related improvements are key issues that remain to be addressed to help deliver more precise and customized treatment. PMID:27698736

  1. Deep brain stimulation for severe autism: from pathophysiology to procedure.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Saurabh; McGovern, Robert A; Sheth, Sameer A

    2015-06-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset impairment in social interaction and communication and by repetitive, restricted behaviors and interests. Because the degree of impairment may vary, a spectrum of clinical manifestations exists. Severe autism is characterized by complete lack of language development and potentially life-threatening self-injurious behavior, the latter of which may be refractory to medical therapy and devastating for affected individuals and their caretakers. New treatment strategies are therefore needed. Here, the authors propose deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) as a therapeutic intervention to treat severe autism. The authors review recent developments in the understanding of the pathophysiology of autism. Specifically, they describe the genetic and environmental alterations that affect neurodevelopment. The authors also highlight the resultant microstructural, macrostructural, and functional abnormalities that emerge during brain development, which create a pattern of dysfunctional neural networks involved in socioemotional processing. They then discuss how these findings implicate the BLA as a key node in the pathophysiology of autism and review a reported case of BLA DBS for treatment of severe autism. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding the pathophysiology of autism. The BLA represents a logical neurosurgical target for treating severe autism. Further study is needed that considers mechanistic and operative challenges.

  2. Deep brain stimulation in addiction due to psychoactive substance use.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Jens; Bührle, Christian P; Lenartz, Doris; Sturm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is one of the most challenging health problems. It is associated with enormous individual distress and tremendous socioeconomic consequences. Unfortunately, its underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, and pharmacological, psychological, or social interventions often fail to achieve long-lasting remission. Next to genetic, social, and contextual factors, a substance-induced dysfunction of the brain's reward system is considered a decisive factor for the establishment and maintenance of addiction. Due to its successful application and approval for several neurological disorders, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is known as a powerful tool for modulating dysregulated networks and has also been considered for substance addiction. Initial promising case reports of DBS in alcohol and heroin addiction in humans have recently been published. Likewise, results from animal studies mimicking different kinds of substance addiction point in a similar direction. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the published results on DBS in addiction, and to discuss whether these preliminary results justify further research, given the novelty of this treatment approach.

  3. Deep brain stimulation for movement and other neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Mahlon; Wichmann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was introduced as a treatment for patients with parkinsonism and other movement disorders in the early 1990s. The technique rapidly became the treatment of choice for these conditions, and is now also being explored for other diseases, including Tourette syndrome, gait disorders, epilepsy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression. Although the mechanism of action of DBS remains unclear, it is recognized that DBS works through focal modulation of functionally specific circuits. The fact that the same DBS parameters and targets can be used in multiple diseases suggests that DBS does not counteract the pathophysiology of any specific disorder, but acts to replace pathologic activities in disease-affected brain circuits with activity that is more easily tolerated. Despite the progress made in the use of DBS, much remains to be done to fully realize the potential of this therapy. We describe some of the most active areas of research in this field, both in terms of exploration of new targets and stimulation parameters, and in terms of new electrode or stimulator designs.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of a miniaturized Deep Brain Stimulation electrode lead.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B; McNeill, Peter M; Allison, Rachel K; Bibari, Olivier; Williams, Chris E; McDermott, Hugh J

    2015-01-01

    The effect of miniaturizing the electrode lead for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy was investigated in this work. A direct comparison was made between a miniature lead (0.65 mm diameter) and a lead of standard size (1.3 mm). Acute in vivo implantation in two cat brains was performed to evaluate surgical trauma and confirm capacity to target thalamic nuclei. Insertion into a homogeneous gel model of neural tissue was used to compare insertion forces while visualizing the process. The standard size cannula, used first to guide lead insertion, required substantially higher insertion force compared with the miniature version and produced a significantly larger region of tissue disruption. The characteristic hemorrhage and edema extended 119-352 μm from the implanted track surface of the miniature lead and cannula, while these extended 311-571 μm for the standard size lead and cannula. A miniature DBS implant can reduce the extent of trauma and could potentially help improve neural function preservation after functional neurosurgery.

  5. Optogenetically inspired deep brain stimulation: linking basic with clinical research.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Christian; Pollak, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, optogenetics has revolutionised the neurosciences. The technique, which allows for cell-type specific excitation and inhibition of neurons in the brain of freely moving rodents, has been used to tighten the links of causality between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics is also enabling an unprecedented characterisation of circuits and their dysfunction in a number of brain diseases, above all those conditions that are not caused by neurodegeneration. Notable progress has been made in addiction, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, as well as other anxiety disorders. By extension, the technique has also been used to propose blueprints for innovative rational treatment of these diseases. The goal is to design manipulations that disrupt pathological circuit function or restore normal activity. This can be achieved by targeting specific projections in order to apply specific stimulation protocols validated by ex-vivo analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction. In a number of cases, specific forms of pathological synaptic plasticity have been implicated. For example, addictive drugs via strong increase of dopamine trigger a myriad of alterations of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid transmission, also called drug-evoked synaptic plasticity. This opens the way to the design of optogenetic reversal protocols, which might restore normal transmission with the hope to abolish the pathological behaviour. Several proof of principle studies for this approach have recently been published. However, for many reasons, optogenetics will not be translatable to human applications in the near future. Here, we argue that an intermediate step is novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) protocols that emulate successful optogenetic approaches in animal models. We provide a roadmap for a translational path to rational, optogenetically inspired DBS protocols to refine existing approaches and expand to novel indications.

  6. Quantitative measurements of alternating finger tapping in Parkinson's disease correlate with UPDRS motor disability and reveal the improvement in fine motor control from medication and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Taylor Tavares, Ana Lisa; Jefferis, Gregory S X E; Koop, Mandy; Hill, Bruce C; Hastie, Trevor; Heit, Gary; Bronte-Stewart, Helen M

    2005-10-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the primary outcome measure in most clinical trials of Parkinson's disease (PD) therapeutics. Each subscore of the motor section (UPDRS III) compresses a wide range of motor performance into a coarse-grained scale from 0 to 4; the assessment of performance can also be subjective. Quantitative digitography (QDG) is an objective, quantitative assessment of digital motor control using a computer-interfaced musical keyboard. In this study, we show that the kinematics of a repetitive alternating finger-tapping (RAFT) task using QDG correlate with the UPDRS motor score, particularly with the bradykinesia subscore, in 33 patients with PD. We show that dopaminergic medication and an average of 9.5 months of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (B-STN DBS) significantly improve UPDRS and QDG scores but may have different effects on certain kinematic parameters. This study substantiates the use of QDG to measure motor outcome in trials of PD therapeutics and shows that medication and B-STN DBS both improve fine motor control.

  7. A cross validation study of deep brain stimulation targeting: from experts to atlas-based, segmentation-based and automatic registration algorithms.

    PubMed

    Castro, F Javier Sanchez; Pollo, Claudio; Meuli, Reto; Maeder, Philippe; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Validation of image registration algorithms is a difficult task and open-ended problem, usually application-dependent. In this paper, we focus on deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. DBS involves implantation of an electrode deep inside the brain to electrically stimulate specific areas shutting down the disease's symptoms. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has turned out to be the optimal target for this kind of surgery. Unfortunately, the STN is in general not clearly distinguishable in common medical imaging modalities. Usual techniques to infer its location are the use of anatomical atlases and visible surrounding landmarks. Surgeons have to adjust the electrode intraoperatively using electrophysiological recordings and macrostimulation tests. We constructed a ground truth derived from specific patients whose STNs are clearly visible on magnetic resonance (MR) T2-weighted images. A patient is chosen as atlas both for the right and left sides. Then, by registering each patient with the atlas using different methods, several estimations of the STN location are obtained. Two studies are driven using our proposed validation scheme. First, a comparison between different atlas-based and nonrigid registration algorithms with a evaluation of their performance and usability to locate the STN automatically. Second, a study of which visible surrounding structures influence the STN location. The two studies are cross validated between them and against expert's variability. Using this scheme, we evaluated the expert's ability against the estimation error provided by the tested algorithms and we demonstrated that automatic STN targeting is possible and as accurate as the expert-driven techniques currently used. We also show which structures have to be taken into account to accurately estimate the STN location.

  8. Comparison of frequencies of non motor symptoms in Indian Parkinson’s disease patients on medical management versus deep brain stimulation: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rukmini Mridula, Kandadai; Borgohain, Rupam; Jabeen, Shaik Afshan; Padmaja, Gaddamanugu; Bandaru, VCS Srinivasarao; Ankathi, Praveen; Kanikannan, Meena A; Ali Khan, Mohammed Shujath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non motor symptoms (NMS) of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a major cause of disability and recognition of these symptoms and treatment is important for comprehensive health care. Deep brain stimulation of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) has been shown to improve motor symptoms in PD and effects on NMS are unknown. To investigate the NMS among PD patients who underwent STN DBS. Methods: We recruited prospectively 56 patients with PD, who had undergone bilateral STN DBS and 53 age and duration of illness matched PD patients on dopaminergic therapy (controls). NMS were assessed using 30 item questionnaire NMS Quest. These questions evaluated 9 domains, gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, sexual, cognition (apathy/attention/memory), anxiety/depression, hallucinations/delusions, sleep and miscellaneous. Comparison was done on individual symptoms as well as in various domains. This study was carried at Nizam’s Institution of Medical Sciences and study period was from January 2011 to December 2012. Results: Patients who underwent STN DBS had a significantly lower mean total score on NMS quest (6.7 ± 3.8) compared to controls (8.4 ± 3.7) (P < 0.00100). Symptoms in the domains of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, sleep were significantly less frequent while sexual disturbances were significantly more frequent among patients compared to controls. On individual symptom analysis, nocturia  (P < 0.00010), unexplained pains (P < 0.00010), nausea and vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, depression, and insomnia were less prevalent, while sexual disturbances were significantly more common in STN DBS group compared to controls. Conclusion: Bilateral STN DBS not only improves the motor symptoms but also improves many NMS in PD patients. PMID:26056553

  9. A novel assistive method for rigidity evaluation during deep brain stimulation surgery using acceleration sensors.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashesh; Coste, Jérôme; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Schkommodau, Erik; Taub, Ethan; Guzman, Raphael; Derost, Philippe; Hemm, Simone

    2016-12-16

    OBJECTIVE Despite the widespread use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), the exact anatomical target responsible for the therapeutic effect is still a subject of research. Intraoperative stimulation tests by experts consist of performing passive movements of the patient's arm or wrist while the amplitude of the stimulation current is increased. At each position, the amplitude that best alleviates rigidity is identified. Intrarater and interrater variations due to the subjective and semiquantitative nature of such evaluations have been reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of an acceleration sensor attached to the evaluator's wrist to assess the change in rigidity, hypothesizing that such a change will alter the speed of the passive movements. Furthermore, the combined analysis of such quantitative results with anatomy would generate a more reproducible description of the most effective stimulation sites. METHODS To test the reliability of the method, it was applied during postoperative follow-up examinations of 3 patients. To study the feasibility of intraoperative use, it was used during 9 bilateral DBS operations in patients suffering from PD. Changes in rigidity were calculated by extracting relevant outcome measures from the accelerometer data. These values were used to identify rigidity-suppressing stimulation current amplitudes, which were statistically compared with the amplitudes identified by the neurologist. Positions for the chronic DBS lead implantation that would have been chosen based on the acceleration data were compared with clinical choices. The data were also analyzed with respect to the anatomical location of the stimulating electrode. RESULTS Outcome measures extracted from the accelerometer data were reproducible for the same evaluator, thus providing a reliable assessment of rigidity changes during intraoperative stimulation tests. Of the 188 stimulation sites

  10. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  11. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  12. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  13. The human subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus differentially encode reward during action control.

    PubMed

    Justin Rossi, Peter; Peden, Corinna; Castellanos, Oscar; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have recently been shown to encode reward, but few studies have been performed in humans. We investigated STN and GPi encoding of reward and loss (i.e., valence) in humans with Parkinson's disease. To test the hypothesis that STN and GPi neurons would change their firing rate in response to reward- and loss-related stimuli, we recorded the activity of individual neurons while participants performed a behavioral task. In the task, action choices were associated with potential rewarding, punitive, or neutral outcomes. We found that STN and GPi neurons encode valence-related information during action control, but the proportion of valence-responsive neurons was greater in the STN compared to the GPi. In the STN, reward-related stimuli mobilized a greater proportion of neurons than loss-related stimuli. We also found surprising limbic overlap with the sensorimotor regions in both the STN and GPi, and this overlap was greater than has been previously reported. These findings may help to explain alterations in limbic function that have been observed following deep brain stimulation therapy of the STN and GPi. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1952-1964, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prior pallidotomy reduces and modifies neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, A; Moran, A; Marjan, G; Bergman, H; Israel, Z

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with prior radio-frequency lesions in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi, pallidotomy), whose symptoms have deteriorated, may be candidates for further invasive treatment such as subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS). Six patients with prior pallidotomy (five unilaterally; one bilaterally) underwent bilateral STN DBS. The microelectrode recordings (MERs, used intraoperatively for STN verification), ipsilateral and contralateral to pallidotomy, and MERs from 11 matched PD patients who underwent bilateral STN DBS without prior pallidotomy were compared. For each trajectory, average, variance and mean successive difference (MSD, a measure of irregularity) of the root mean square (RMS) of the STN MER were calculated. The RMS in trajectories ipsilateral to pallidotomy showed significant reduction of the mean average and MSD of STN activity when compared with trajectories from patients without prior pallidotomy. The RMS parameters contralateral to pallidotomy tend to lie between those ipsilateral to pallidotomy and those without prior pallidotomy. The average STN power spectral density of oscillatory activity was notably lower ipsilateral to pallidotomy than contralateral, or without prior pallidotomy. The finding that pallidotomy reduces STN activity and changes firing characteristics, in conjunction with the effectiveness of STN DBS despite prior pallidotomy, calls for reappraisal and modification of the current model of the basal ganglia (BG) cortical network. It highlights the critical role of direct projections from the BG to brain-stem structures and suggests a possible GPi-STN reciprocal positive-feedback mechanism.

  15. Locations of movement-related cells in the human subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Marks, William J; Christine, Chadwick; Starr, Philip A

    2003-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an emerging target for deep brain stimulator (DBS) implantation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Understanding the somatotopic organization of the STN is important for surgical navigation within the nucleus. We analyzed intraoperative data obtained during 54 procedures for the implantation of STN stimulators to assess the locations of movement-related cells. Cells were considered movement-related if they exhibited modulation of the cell discharge during passive movement of the contralateral upper or lower extremity. Microelectrode track reconstructions were plotted on a human brain atlas, using the location of the DBS electrode from postoperative magnetic resonance images as a registration mark in reconstructing microelectrode track locations. Movement-related cells were predominantly located in the dorsal part of the nucleus. The majority of the cells were related to proximal joint manipulation. Arm-related cells were located laterally and at the rostral and caudal poles, whereas leg-related cells were located medially and centrally. The finding of three or more leg-related cells on a given microelectrode track was predictive of a medial localization within the motor area. Our findings are consistent with the small number of published studies on STN somatopy in the human and the nonhuman primate.

  16. Classification of CT brain images based on deep learning networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Hui, Rui; Tian, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    While computerised tomography (CT) may have been the first imaging tool to study human brain, it has not yet been implemented into clinical decision making process for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the other hand, with the nature of being prevalent, inexpensive and non-invasive, CT does present diagnostic features of AD to a great extent. This study explores the significance and impact on the application of the burgeoning deep learning techniques to the task of classification of CT brain images, in particular utilising convolutional neural network (CNN), aiming at providing supplementary information for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Towards this end, three categories of CT images (N = 285) are clustered into three groups, which are AD, lesion (e.g. tumour) and normal ageing. In addition, considering the characteristics of this collection with larger thickness along the direction of depth (z) (~3-5 mm), an advanced CNN architecture is established integrating both 2D and 3D CNN networks. The fusion of the two CNN networks is subsequently coordinated based on the average of Softmax scores obtained from both networks consolidating 2D images along spatial axial directions and 3D segmented blocks respectively. As a result, the classification accuracy rates rendered by this elaborated CNN architecture are 85.2%, 80% and 95.3% for classes of AD, lesion and normal respectively with an average of 87.6%. Additionally, this improved CNN network appears to outperform the others when in comparison with 2D version only of CNN network as well as a number of state of the art hand-crafted approaches. As a result, these approaches deliver accuracy rates in percentage of 86.3, 85.6 ± 1.10, 86.3 ± 1.04, 85.2 ± 1.60, 83.1 ± 0.35 for 2D CNN, 2D SIFT, 2D KAZE, 3D SIFT and 3D KAZE respectively. The two major contributions of the paper constitute a new 3-D approach while applying deep learning technique to extract signature information

  17. The Present Indication and Future of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    SUGIYAMA, Kenji; NOZAKI, Takao; ASAKAWA, Tetsuya; KOIZUMI, Shinichiro; SAITOH, Osamu; NAMBA, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The use of electrical stimulation to treat pain in human disease dates back to ancient Rome or Greece. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS) was initially applied for pain treatment in the 1960s, and was later used to treat movement disorders in the 1990s. After recognition of DBS as a therapy for central nervous system (CNS) circuit disorders, DBS use showed drastic increase in terms of adaptability to disease and the patient’s population. More than 100,000 patients have received DBS therapy worldwide. The established indications for DBS are Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia, whereas global indications of DBS expanded to other neuronal diseases or disorders such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy, and tinnitus. DBS is also experimentally used to manage cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette’s syndrome, and eating disorders. The importance of ethics and conflicts surrounding the regulation and freedom of choice associated with the application of DBS therapy for new diseases or disorders is increasing. These debates are centered on the use of DBS to treat new diseases and disorders as well as its potential to enhance ability in normal healthy individuals. Here we present three issues that need to be addressed in the future: (1) elucidation of the mechanisms of DBS, (2) development of new DBS methods, and (3) miniaturization of the DBS system. With the use of DBS, functional neurosurgery entered into the new era that man can manage and control the brain circuit to treat intractable neuronal diseases and disorders. PMID:25925757

  18. The epistemology of Deep Brain Stimulation and neuronal pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Erwin B

    2012-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a remarkable therapy succeeding where all manner of pharmacological manipulations and brain transplants fail. The success of DBS has resurrected the relevance of electrophysiology and dynamics on the order of milliseconds. Despite the remarkable effects of DBS, its mechanisms of action are largely unknown. There has been an expanding catalogue of various neuronal and neural responses to DBS or DBS-like stimulation but no clear conceptual encompassing explanatory scheme has emerged despite the technological prowess and intellectual sophistication of the scientists involved. Something is amiss. If the scientific observations are sound, then why has there not been more progress? The alternative is that it may be the hypotheses that frame the questions are at fault as well as the methods of inference (logic) used to validate the hypotheses. An analysis of the past and current notions of the DBS mechanisms of action is the subject in order to identify the presuppositions (premises) and logical fallacies that may be at fault. The hope is that these problems will be avoided in the future so the DBS can realize its full potential quickly. In this regard, the discussion of the methods of inference and presuppositions that underlie many current notions is no different then a critique of experimental methods common in scientific discussions and consequently, examinations of the epistemology and logic are appropriate. This analysis is in keeping with the growing appreciation among scientists and philosophers of science, the scientific observations (data) to not "speak for themselves" nor is the scientific method self-evidently true and that consideration of the underlying inferential methods is necessary.

  19. Deep brain stimulation in the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Delaloye, Sibylle; Holtzheimer, Paul E

    2014-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is a worldwide disease with debilitating effects on a patient's life. Common treatments include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and electroconvulsive therapy. Many patients do not respond to these treatments; this has led to the investigation of alternative therapeutic modalities. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of these modalities. It was first used with success for treating movement disorders and has since been extended to the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although DBS is still an emerging treatment, promising efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in preliminary trials in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Further, neuroimaging has played a pivotal role in identifying some DBS targets and remains an important tool for evaluating the mechanism of action of this novel intervention. Preclinical animal studies have broadened knowledge about the possible mechanisms of action of DBS for TRD, Given that DBS involves neurosurgery in patients with severe psychiatric impairment, ethical questions concerning capacity to consent arise; these issues must continue to be carefully considered.

  20. Deep brain stimulation for enhancement of learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Suthana, Nanthia; Fried, Itzhak

    2014-01-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a powerful technique to treat a host of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders from Parkinson's disease and dystonia, to depression, and obsessive compulsive disorder (Benabid et al., 1987; Lang and Lozano, 1998; Davis et al., 1997; Vidailhet et al., 2005; Mayberg et al., 2005; Nuttin et al., 1999). More recently, results suggest that DBS can enhance memory for facts and events that are dependent on the medial temporal lobe (MTL), thus raising the possibility for DBS to be used as a treatment for MTL- related neurological disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, temporal lobe epilepsy, and MTL injuries). In the following review, we summarize key results that show the ability of DBS or cortical surface stimulation to enhance memory. We also discuss current knowledge regarding the temporal specificity, underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of action, and generalization of stimulation's effects on memory. Throughout our discussion, we also propose several future directions that will provide the necessary insight into if and how DBS could be used as a therapeutic treatment for memory disorders.

  1. Rescue pallidotomy for dystonia through implanted deep brain stimulation electrode

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric; Taira, Takaomi; Hariz, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS), where removal of implants is indicated due to hardware related infections, are not candidates for later re-implantation. In these patients a rescue lesion through the DBS electrode has been suggested as an option. In this case report we present a patient where a pallidotomy was performed using the DBS electrode. Case Description: An elderly woman with bilateral Gpi DBS suffered an infection around the left burr hole involving the DBS electrode. A unilateral lesion was performed through the DBS electrode before it was removed. No side effects were encountered. Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) dystonia movement scale score was 39 before DBS. With DBS before lesioning BFM score was 2.5 points. The replacement of the left sided stimulation with a pallidotomy resulted in only a minor deterioration of the score to 5 points. Conclusions: In the case presented here a small pallidotomy performed with the DBS electrode provided a satisfactory effect on the patient's dystonic symptoms. Thus, rescue lesions through the DBS electrodes, although off-label, might be considered in patients with Gpi DBS for dystonia when indicated. PMID:27990311

  2. Deep brain stimulation for vocal tremor: a comprehensive, multidisciplinary methodology.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Erickson-Direnzo, Elizabeth; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Sung, Chih-Kwang; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-06-01

    Tremulous voice is a characteristic feature of a multitude of movement disorders, but when it occurs in individuals diagnosed with essential tremor, it is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT). For individuals with EVT, their tremulous voice is associated with significant social embarrassment and in severe cases may result in the discontinuation of employment and hobbies. Management of EVT is extremely difficult, and current behavioral and medical interventions for vocal tremor result in suboptimal outcomes. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic avenue for EVT, but few studies can be identified that have systematically examined improvements in EVT following DBS. The authors describe a case of awake bilateral DBS targeting the ventral intermediate nucleus for a patient suffering from severe voice and arm tremor. They also present their comprehensive, multidisciplinary methodology for definitive treatment of EVT via DBS. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time comprehensive intraoperative voice evaluation has been used to guide microelectrode/stimulator placement, as well as the first time that standard pre- and post-DBS assessments have been conducted, demonstrating the efficacy of this tailored DBS approach.

  3. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Foutz, TJ; McIntyre, CC

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian, and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms in both intracellular and extracellular stimulation. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64 % when compared to the standard 100 μs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 nJ and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50 % of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10 % when compared to the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation. PMID:21084732

  4. Longterm deep brain stimulation withdrawal: clinical stability despite electrophysiological instability.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Cif, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Gonzalez, Victoria; Vasques, Xavier; Coubes, Philippe; Rothwell, John C

    2014-07-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a powerful treatment option for movement disorders, including severe generalised dystonia. After several years of treatment, cases have been reported in which DBS has been stopped without any deterioration in clinical benefit. This might indicate that DBS can restore function in some cases. The mechanism of DBS induced clinical retention effects has been addressed before. Here, the question we asked was if such clinical stability is reflected at the underlying physiology level or whether there is indication to believe that a stand-still of symptoms might be at risk because of neurophysiological instability. We recorded patients with pre-intervention life-threatening or severe genetic dystonia with long lasting clinical benefit when turned off DBS. Despite clinical stability, our physiological studies revealed large changes in the excitability of excitatory and inhibitory motor circuits in the cortex, which exceed normal fluctuation. This discrepancy between instability in the motor network physiology caused by removal of DBS and clinical stability alerts as it potentially indicates a risk to fail and cause symptoms to return.

  5. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Levene, Michael J; Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Molloy, Raymond P; Webb, Watt W

    2004-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful tools in biology, its application to the intact animal has been limited to imaging several hundred micrometers below the surface. The rest of the animal has eluded investigation at the microscopic level without excising tissue or performing extensive surgery. However, the ability to image with subcellular resolution in the intact animal enables a contextual setting that may be critical for understanding proper function. Clinical applications such as disease diagnosis and optical biopsy may benefit from minimally invasive in vivo approaches. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses with needle-like dimensions can transfer high-quality images many centimeters from the object plane. Here, we show that multiphoton microscopy through GRIN lenses enables minimally invasive, subcellular resolution several millimeters in the anesthetized, intact animal, and we present in vivo images of cortical layer V and hippocampus in the anesthetized Thy1-YFP line H mouse. Microangiographies from deep capillaries and blood vessels containing fluorescein-dextran and quantum dot-labeled serum in wild-type mouse brain are also demonstrated.

  6. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foutz, Thomas J.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms for both intracellular and extracellular current-controlled stimulation conditions. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64% when compared with the standard 100 µs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50% of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10% when compared with the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation.

  7. Deep brain stimulation: a return journey from psychiatry to neurology.

    PubMed

    Ashkan, Keyoumars; Shotbolt, Paul; David, Anthony S; Samuel, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as an effective neurosurgical tool to treat a range of conditions. Its use in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, tremor and dystonia is now well established and has been approved by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The NICE does, however, emphasise the need for a multidisciplinary team to manage these patients. Such a team is traditionally composed of neurologists, neurosurgeons and neuropsychologists. Neuropsychiatrists, however, are increasingly recognised as essential members given many psychiatric considerations that may arise in patients undergoing DBS. Patient selection, assessment of competence to consent and treatment of postoperative psychiatric disease are just a few areas where neuropsychiatric input is invaluable. Partly driven by this close team working and partly based on the early history of DBS for psychiatric disorders, there is increasing interest in re-exploring the potential of neurosurgery to treat patients with psychiatric disease, such as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although the clinical experience and evidence with DBS in this group of patients are steadily increasing, many questions remain unanswered. Yet, the characteristics of optimal surgical candidates, the best choice of DBS target, the most effective stimulating parameters and the extent of postoperative improvement are not clear for most psychiatric conditions. Further research is therefore required to define how DBS can be best utilised to improve the quality of life of patients with psychiatric disease.

  8. Deep brain stimulation in the globus pallidus externa promotes sleep.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M H; Chen, M C; Wu, J; Nelson, D; Lu, J

    2016-05-13

    The basal ganglia, a network of subcortical structures, play a critical role in movements, sleep and mental behavior. Basal ganglia disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease affect sleep. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease can ameliorate sleep disturbances. Our series of previous studies lead the hypothesis that dopamine, acting on D2 receptors on the striatopallidal terminals, enhances activity in the globus pallidus externa (GPe) and promotes sleep. Here, we tested if DBS in the GPe promotes sleep in rats. We found that unilateral DBS (180 Hz at 100 μA) in the GPe in rats significantly increased both non-rapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep compared to sham DBS stimulation. The EEG power spectrum of sleep induced by DBS was similar to that of the baseline sleep, and sleep latency was not affected by DBS. The GPe is potentially a better site for DBS to treat both insomnia and motor disorders caused by basal ganglia dysfunction.

  9. Potential predictors for the amount of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datteri, Ryan; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; D'Haese, Pierre-François; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2011-03-01

    A number of groups have reported on the occurrence of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. This has a number of implications for the procedure including an increased chance of intra-cranial bleeding and complications due to the need for more exploratory electrodes to account for the brain shift. It has been reported that the amount of pneumocephalus or air invasion into the cranial cavity due to the opening of the dura correlates with intraoperative brain shift. Therefore, pre-operatively predicting the amount of pneumocephalus expected during surgery is of interest toward accounting for brain shift. In this study, we used 64 DBS patients who received bilateral electrode implantations and had a post-operative CT scan acquired immediately after surgery (CT-PI). For each patient, the volumes of the pneumocephalus, left ventricle, right ventricle, third ventricle, white matter, grey matter, and cerebral spinal fluid were calculated. The pneumocephalus was calculated from the CT-PI utilizing a region growing technique that was initialized with an atlas-based image registration method. A multi-atlas-based image segmentation method was used to segment out the ventricles of each patient. The Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software package was utilized to calculate the volumes of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), white matter and grey matter. The volume of individual structures had a moderate correlation with pneumocephalus. Utilizing a multi-linear regression between the volume of the pneumocephalus and the statistically relevant individual structures a Pearson's coefficient of r = 0.4123 (p = 0.0103) was found. This study shows preliminary results that could be used to develop a method to predict the amount of pneumocephalus ahead of the surgery.

  10. Material and physical model for evaluation of deep brain activity contribution to EEG recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yan; Li, Xiaoping; Wu, Tiecheng; Li, Zhe; Xie, Wenwen

    2015-12-01

    Deep brain activity is conventionally recorded with surgical implantation of electrodes. During the neurosurgery, brain tissue damage and the consequent side effects to patients are inevitably incurred. In order to eliminate undesired risks, we propose that deep brain activity should be measured using the noninvasive scalp electroencephalography (EEG) technique. However, the deeper the neuronal activity is located, the noisier the corresponding scalp EEG signals are. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate whether deep brain activity could be observed from EEG recordings. In the experiment, a three-layer cylindrical head model was constructed to mimic a human head. A single dipole source (sine wave, 10 Hz, altering amplitudes) was embedded inside the model to simulate neuronal activity. When the dipole source was activated, surface potential was measured via electrodes attached on the top surface of the model and raw data were recorded for signal analysis. Results show that the dipole source activity positioned at 66 mm depth in the model, equivalent to the depth of deep brain structures, is clearly observed from surface potential recordings. Therefore, it is highly possible that deep brain activity could be observed from EEG recordings and deep brain activity could be measured using the noninvasive scalp EEG technique.

  11. Power spectral density analysis of physiological, rest and action tremor in Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Observation of the signals recorded from the extremities of Parkinson’s disease patients showing rest and/or action tremor reveal a distinct high power resonance peak in the frequency band corresponding to tremor. The aim of the study was to investigate, using quantitative measures, how clinically effective and less effective deep brain stimulation protocols redistribute movement power over the frequency bands associated with movement, pathological and physiological tremor, and whether normal physiological tremor may reappear during those periods that tremor is absent. Methods The power spectral density patterns of rest and action tremor were studied in 7 Parkinson’s disease patients treated with (bilateral) deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. Two tests were carried out: 1) the patient was sitting at rest; 2) the patient performed a hand or foot tapping movement. Each test was repeated four times for each extremity with different stimulation settings applied during each repetition. Tremor intermittency was taken into account by classifying each 3-second window of the recorded angular velocity signals as a tremor or non-tremor window. Results The distribution of power over the low frequency band (<3.5 Hz – voluntary movement), tremor band (3.5-7.5 Hz) and high frequency band (>7.5 Hz – normal physiological tremor) revealed that rest and action tremor show a similar power-frequency shift related to tremor absence and presence: when tremor is present most power is contained in the tremor frequency band; when tremor is absent lower frequencies dominate. Even under resting conditions a relatively large low frequency component became prominent, which seemed to compensate for tremor. Tremor absence did not result in the reappearance of normal physiological tremor. Conclusion Parkinson’s disease patients continuously balance between tremor and tremor suppression or compensation expressed by power shifts between the low frequency band and

  12. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the

  13. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models, and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results The computational models predicted that: 1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with −3V monopolar cathodic stimulation; 2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; 3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3V); 4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral, or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at −3V); and, 5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS. PMID:23723145

  14. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Gollub, Randy L; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-08-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects' pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity.

  15. Perspective on the Economic Evaluation of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Emma Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an example of a disease area experiencing increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat symptoms. PD is a major cause of morbidity and has a substantial economic impact on the patients, their caregivers, the health service, and broader social and community services. The PDSURG Collaborators Group reported that DBS surgery for patients with advanced PD improves motor function and quality of life that medical therapy alone at 1 year but there are surgery related side effects in a minority (Williams et al., 2010). The aim of this paper however is to build upon the knowledge generated from evaluating DBS in PD and to provide a detailed perspective on the economic evaluation of DBS more generally with a view to providing a framework for informative design of DBS economic evaluations. This perspective will outline the key categories of resource use pertinent to DBS beyond the surgical scenario and into the broader aspects of follow-up care, adverse events, repeat procedures, social and community care, patient and carer costs, and will explore the importance of handling capital costs of DBS equipment appropriately as well as including costs occurring in the future. In addition, this perspective article will outline the importance of capturing broader aspects of “outcome” or benefits as compared to those traditional clinical measures used. The key message is the importance of employing a broad “perspective” on the measurement and valuation of costs and benefits as well as the importance of adopting the appropriate time horizon for evaluating the costs and benefits of DBS. In order to do this effectively it may be that alternative methods of economic evaluation in health care to the commonly used cost-effectiveness analysis may have to be used, such as cost-benefit analysis (McIntosh et al., 2010). PMID:21779238

  16. Uncommon Applications of Deep Brain Stimulation in Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kara M.; Spindler, Meredith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to the established indications of tremor and dystonia, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been utilized less commonly for several hyperkinetic movement disorders, including medication-refractory myoclonus, ballism, chorea, and Gilles de la Tourette (GTS) and tardive syndromes. Given the lack of adequate controlled trials, it is difficult to translate published reports into clinical use. We summarize the literature, draw conclusions regarding efficacy when possible, and highlight concerns and areas for future study. Methods A Pubmed search was performed for English-language articles between January 1980 and June 2014. Studies were selected if they focused primarily on DBS to treat the conditions of focus. Results We identified 49 cases of DBS for myoclonus-dystonia, 21 for Huntington's disease, 15 for choreacanthocytosis, 129 for GTS, and 73 for tardive syndromes. Bilateral globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS was the most frequently utilized procedure for all conditions except GTS, in which medial thalamic DBS was more common. While the majority of cases demonstrate some improvement, there are also reports of no improvement or even worsening of symptoms in each condition. The few studies including functional or quality of life outcomes suggest benefit. A limited number of studies included blinded on/off testing. There have been two double-blind controlled trials performed in GTS and a single prospective double-blind, uncontrolled trial in tardive syndromes. Patient characteristics, surgical target, stimulation parameters, and duration of follow-up varied among studies. Discussion Despite these extensive limitations, the literature overall supports the efficacy of DBS in these conditions, in particular GTS and tardive syndromes. For other conditions, the preliminary evidence from small studies is promising and encourages further study. PMID:25713746

  17. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  18. Particle swarm optimization for programming deep brain stimulation arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Edgar; Zhang, Simeng; Deyo, Steve; Xiao, YiZi; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy relies on both precise neurosurgical targeting and systematic optimization of stimulation settings to achieve beneficial clinical outcomes. One recent advance to improve targeting is the development of DBS arrays (DBSAs) with electrodes segmented both along and around the DBS lead. However, increasing the number of independent electrodes creates the logistical challenge of optimizing stimulation parameters efficiently. Approach. Solving such complex problems with multiple solutions and objectives is well known to occur in biology, in which complex collective behaviors emerge out of swarms of individual organisms engaged in learning through social interactions. Here, we developed a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to program DBSAs using a swarm of individual particles representing electrode configurations and stimulation amplitudes. Using a finite element model of motor thalamic DBS, we demonstrate how the PSO algorithm can efficiently optimize a multi-objective function that maximizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of interest (ROI, cerebellar-receiving area of motor thalamus), minimizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of avoidance (ROA, somatosensory thalamus), and minimizes power consumption. Main results. The algorithm solved the multi-objective problem by producing a Pareto front. ROI and ROA activation predictions were consistent across swarms (<1% median discrepancy in axon activation). The algorithm was able to accommodate for (1) lead displacement (1 mm) with relatively small ROI (⩽9.2%) and ROA (⩽1%) activation changes, irrespective of shift direction; (2) reduction in maximum per-electrode current (by 50% and 80%) with ROI activation decreasing by 5.6% and 16%, respectively; and (3) disabling electrodes (n  =  3 and 12) with ROI activation reduction by 1.8% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, comparison between PSO predictions and multi-compartment axon

  19. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0559 TITLE: Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation...Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain...as a method for treating pain and autonomic dysreflexia in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). It is collaboration between the

  20. Long-Latency Somatosensory Evoked Potentials of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trenado, Carlos; Elben, Saskia; Friggemann, Lena; Gruhn, Sonja; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Vesper, Jan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) are a viable way to measure processing of somatosensory information. SSEPs have been described at the scalp and the cortical level by electroencephalographic, magnetoencephalographic and intracranial cortical recordings focusing on short-latency (SL; latency<40 ms) and long-latency (LL; latency>40 ms) SSEPs as well as by deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode studies targeting SL-SSEPs. Unfortunately, LL-SSEPs have not been addressed at the subcortical level aside from the fact that studies targeting the characteristics and generators of SSEPs have been neglected for the last ten years. To cope with these issues, we investigated LL-SSEPs of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in twelve patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) that underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment. In a postoperative setting, LL-SSEPs were elicited by median nerve stimulation (MNS) to the patient’s wrists. Ipsilateral or contralateral MNS was applied with a 3 s inter-stimulus interval. Here, we report about four distinctive LL-SSEPs (“LL–complex” consisting of P80, N100, P140 and N200 component), which were recorded by using monopolar/bipolar reference and ipsi/contralateral MNS. Phase reversal and/or maximum amplitude provided support for the generation of such LL-SSEPs within the STN, which also underscores a role of this subcortical structure in sensory processing. PMID:28081139

  1. Inferring deep-brain activity from cortical activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Cui, Xu; Bryant, Daniel M; Glover, Gary H; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying brain function because it is non-invasive, non-irradiating and relatively inexpensive. Further, fNIRS potentially allows measurement of hemodynamic activity with high temporal resolution (milliseconds) and in naturalistic settings. However, in comparison with other imaging modalities, namely fMRI, fNIRS has a significant drawback: limited sensitivity to hemodynamic changes in deep-brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we developed a computational method to infer deep-brain activity using fNIRS measurements of cortical activity. Using simultaneous fNIRS and fMRI, we measured brain activity in 17 participants as they completed three cognitive tasks. A support vector regression (SVR) learning algorithm was used to predict activity in twelve deep-brain regions using information from surface fNIRS measurements. We compared these predictions against actual fMRI-measured activity using Pearson's correlation to quantify prediction performance. To provide a benchmark for comparison, we also used fMRI measurements of cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. When using fMRI-measured activity from the entire cortex, we were able to predict deep-brain activity in the fusiform cortex with an average correlation coefficient of 0.80 and in all deep-brain regions with an average correlation coefficient of 0.67. The top 15% of predictions using fNIRS signal achieved an accuracy of 0.7. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the feasibility of using cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. This new method has the potential to extend fNIRS applications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience research.

  2. Neuroethics of deep brain stimulation for mental disorders: brain stimulation reward in humans.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hideki; Katayama, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of some deep brain stimulation (DBS) trials undertaken in the early years was the phenomenon of "brain stimulation reward (BSR)," which was first identified in rats. The animals appeared to be rewarded by pleasure caused by the stimulation of certain brain regions (reward system), such as the septal area. "Self-stimulation" experiments, in which rats were allowed to stimulate their own brain by pressing a freely accessible lever, they quickly learned lever pressing and sometimes continued to stimulate until they exhausted themselves. BSR was also observed with DBS of the septal area in humans. DBS trials in later years were undertaken on other theoretical bases, but unexpected BSR was sometimes induced by stimulation of some areas, such as the locus coeruleus complex. When BSR was induced, the subjects experienced feelings that were described as "cheerful," "alert," "good," "well-being," "comfort," "relaxation," "joy," or "satisfaction." Since the DBS procedure is equivalent to a "self-stimulation" experiment, they could become "addicted to the stimulation itself" or "compulsive about the stimulation," and stimulate themselves "for the entire day," "at maximum amplitude" and, in some instances, "into convulsions." DBS of the reward system has recently been applied to alleviate anhedonia in patients with refractory major depression. Although this approach appears promising, there remains a difficult problem: who can adjust their feelings and reward-oriented behavior within the normal range? With a self-stimulation procedure, the BSR may become uncontrollable. To develop DBS to the level of a standard therapy for mental disorders, we need to discuss "Who has the right to control the mental condition?" and "Who makes decisions" on "How much control is appropriate?" in daily life.

  3. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of severe, medically refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sedrak, Mark; Wong, William; Wilson, Paul; Bruce, Diana; Bernstein, Ivan; Khandhar, Suketu; Pappas, Conrad; Heit, Gary; Sabelman, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a rapidly expanding therapy initially designed for the treatment of movement disorders and pain syndromes. The therapy includes implantation of electrodes in specific targets of the brain, delivering programmable small and safe electric impulses, like a pacemaker, that modulates both local and broad neurologic networks. The effects are thought to primarily involve a focus in the brain, probably inhibitory, which then restores a network of neural circuitry. Psychiatric diseases can be refractory and severe, leading to high medical costs, significant morbidity, and even death. Whereas surgery for psychiatric disease used to include destructive procedures, deep brain stimulation allows safe, reversible, and adjustable treatment that can be tailored for each patient. Deep brain stimulation offers new hope for these unfortunate patients, and the preliminary results are promising.

  4. Temporal profile of improvement of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Boulis, Nicholas; Willie, Jon T.; Freeman, Alan; Alexander, Garrett E.; Aia, Pratibha; Butefisch, Cathrine M.; Esper, Christine D.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several case reports and small series have indicated that tardive dystonia is responsive to globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. Whether different subtypes or distributions of tardive dystonia are associated with different outcomes remains unknown. Methods We assessed the outcomes and temporal profile of improvement of eight tardive dystonia patients who underwent globus pallidus deep brain stimulation over the past six years through record review. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, it was not blinded or placebo controlled. Results: Consistent with previous studies, deep brain stimulation improved the overall the Burkee–Fahn–Marsden motor scores by 85.1 ± 13.5%. The distributions with best responses in descending order were upper face, lower face, larynx/pharynx, limbs, trunk, and neck. Patients with prominent cervical dystonia demonstrated improvement in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale but improvements took several months. In four patients the effects of deep brain stimulation on improvement in Burke Fahn Marsden score was rapid, while in four cases there was partial rapid response of neck and trunk dystonia followed by was gradual resolution of residual symptoms over 48 months. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis shows excellent resolution of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. We found instantaneous response, except with neck and trunk dystonia where partial recovery was followed by further resolution at slower rate. Such outcome is encouraging for using deep brain stimulation in treatment of tardive dystonia. PMID:25465373

  5. Striatal Glutamate and GABA after High Frequency Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Shim, Insop; Sung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Jae Taek; Kim, Il sup; Cho, Chul Bum

    2017-01-01

    Objective High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is recognized as an effective treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. However, the neurochemical basis of its effects remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of STN HFS in intact and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model on changes of principal neurotransmitters, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the striatum. Methods The authors examined extracellular glutamate and GABA change in the striatum on sham group, 6-OHDA group, and 6-OHDA plus deep brain stimulation (DBS) group using microdialysis methods. Results High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to quantify glutamate and GABA. The results show that HFS-STN induces a significant increase of extracellular glutamate and GABA in the striatum of 6-OHDA plus DBS group compared with sham and 6-OHDA group. Conclusion Therefore, the clinical results of STN-HFS are not restricted to the direct STN targets but involve widespread adaptive changes within the basal ganglia. PMID:28264233

  6. Distinct populations of neurons respond to emotional valence and arousal in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Tomáš; Serranová, Tereza; Růžička, Filip; Vostatek, Pavel; Wild, Jiří; Šťastná, Daniela; Bonnet, Cecilia; Novák, Daniel; Růžička, Evžen; Urgošík, Dušan; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Both animal studies and studies using deep brain stimulation in humans have demonstrated the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in motivational and emotional processes; however, participation of this nucleus in processing human emotion has not been investigated directly at the single-neuron level. We analyzed the relationship between the neuronal firing from intraoperative microrecordings from the STN during affective picture presentation in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the affective ratings of emotional valence and arousal performed subsequently. We observed that 17% of neurons responded to emotional valence and arousal of visual stimuli according to individual ratings. The activity of some neurons was related to emotional valence, whereas different neurons responded to arousal. In addition, 14% of neurons responded to visual stimuli. Our results suggest the existence of neurons involved in processing or transmission of visual and emotional information in the human STN, and provide evidence of separate processing of the affective dimensions of valence and arousal at the level of single neurons as well. PMID:25713375

  7. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication on resting and postural tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Molly M; Vaillancourt, David E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A E; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and antiparkinsonian medication have proved to be effective treatments for tremor in Parkinson's disease. To date it is not known how and to what extent STN DBS alone and in combination with antiparkinsonian medication alters the pathophysiology of resting and postural tremor in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication on the neurophysiological characteristics of resting and postural hand tremor in Parkinson's disease. Resting and postural hand tremor were recorded using accelerometry and surface electromyography (EMG) from 10 Parkinson's disease patients and 10 matched control subjects. The Parkinson's disease subjects were examined under four treatment conditions: (i) off treatment; (ii) STN DBS; (iii) medication; and (iv) medication plus STN DBS. The amplitude, EMG frequency, regularity, and 1-8 Hz tremor-EMG coherence were analysed. Both STN DBS and medication reduced the amplitude, regularity and tremor-EMG coherence, and increased the EMG frequency of resting and postural tremor in Parkinson's disease. STN DBS was more effective than medication in reducing the amplitude and increasing the frequency of resting and postural tremor to healthy physiological levels. These findings provide strong evidence that effective STN DBS normalizes the amplitude and frequency of tremor. The findings suggest that neural activity in the STN is an important modulator of the neural network(s) responsible for both resting and postural tremor genesis in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Fear recognition is impaired by subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Biseul, Isabelle; Sauleau, Paul; Haegelen, Claire; Trebon, Pascale; Drapier, Dominique; Raoul, Sylvie; Drapier, Sophie; Lallement, François; Rivier, Isabelle; Lajat, Youenn; Verin, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Behavioural disturbances such as disorders of mood, apathy or indifference are often observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with chronic high frequency deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). Neuropsychological modifications causing these adverse events induced by STN DBS remain unknown, even if limbic disturbances are hypothesised. The limbic system supports neural circuits processing emotional information. The aim of this work is to evaluate changes of emotional recognition in PD patients induced by STN DBS. Thirty PD patients were assessed using a computerised paradigm of recognition of emotional facial expressions [Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1976). Pictures of facial affect. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press], 15 before STN DBS and 15 after. The two patients groups were compared to a group of 15 healthy control subjects. One series of 55 pictures of emotional facial expressions was presented to each patient. Patients had to classify the pictures according to seven basic emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, surprise, disgust, anger and no emotion). The intact ability to percept faces was firstly assured using the Benton Recognition Test. Recognition of fear expressions was significantly and selectively reduced in the post-operative group in comparison to both pre-operative and control groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time a selective reduction of recognition of facial expressions of fear by STN DBS. This impairment could be the first neuropsychological marker of a more general limbic dysfunction, thought to be responsible for the behavioural disorders reported after STN DBS.

  9. Lexical-semantic inhibitory mechanisms in Parkinson's disease as a function of subthalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castner, Joanna E; Copland, David A; Silburn, Peter A; Coyne, Terry J; Sinclair, Felicity; Chenery, Helen J

    2007-11-05

    Inhibitory control may be affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) due to impairment within the non-motor basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. The present study aimed to identify the effects of chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on lexical-semantic inhibitory control. Eighteen participants with PD who had undergone surgery for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN, completed a picture-word interference (PWI) task and the Hayling test in on and off stimulation conditions. The results of PD participants were compared with 21 non-neurologically impaired control participants. PD participants performed no differently from controls on the PWI task, and no significant differences between on and off stimulation conditions were revealed, therefore suggesting that PD participants are not impaired in lexical-semantic interference control. In contrast, in the off stimulation condition, PD participants had significantly delayed reaction times and increased errors on the inhibition section of the Hayling test compared with the STN stimulation condition and control participants. These results suggest that PD patients are impaired in aspects of inhibitory control that are dependent on behavioural inhibition (such as the suppression of prepotent responses) and selection from competing alternatives without the presence of external cues. Furthermore, STN stimulation acts to restore these behavioural inhibitory processes.

  10. Involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in engagement with behaviourally relevant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Eusebio, Alexandre; Thevathasan, Wesley; Yarrow, Kielan; Pogosyan, Alek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Aziz, Tipu; Vandenberghe, Wim; Nuttin, Bart; Brown, Peter

    2009-03-01

    In this study we investigate how the basal ganglia (BG) may process the behavioural relevance of environmental cues by recording local field potentials (LFPs) in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease who had undergone implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation. Fourteen patients were recorded as they performed a paradigm dissociating warning cue presentation from programming related to execution of specific tasks. Target and non-target warning cues of differing behavioural relevance were contrasted, and we evaluated if warning cue-evoked activities varied according to whether the eventual task to be performed was motor or cognitive and whether patients were receiving or withdrawn from dopaminergic therapy. Warning cues evoked a complex temporal sequence of activities with three epochs over the 760 ms following the onset of the warning cue. In contrast to the initial evoked LFP, evoked activities over two later periods were significantly influenced by behavioural relevance and by treatment state. The early activity was likely related to the initial orientating of attention induced by a novel target, while the delayed responses in our paradigm may reflect processing related to the non-motor resource implications of cues. The results suggest that the BG are intimately involved in the evaluation of changes in the environment and of their behavioural significance. The latter process is partly modulated by dopamine. Weakness in this function might contribute to the behavioural impairment that can follow BG lesions and surgery.

  11. Vocal emotion decoding in the subthalamic nucleus: An intracranial ERP study in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Renaud, Olivier; Haegelen, Claire; Tamarit, Lucas; Milesi, Valérie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul; Grandjean, Didier

    2017-01-12

    Using intracranial local field potential (LFP) recordings in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS), we explored the electrophysiological activity of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in response to emotional stimuli in the auditory modality. Previous studies focused on the influence of visual stimuli. To this end, we recorded LFPs within the STN in response to angry, happy, and neutral prosodies in 13 patients with PD who had just undergone implantation of DBS electrodes. We observed specific modulation of the right STN in response to anger and happiness, as opposed to neutral prosody, occurring at around 200-300ms post-onset, and later at around 850-950ms post-onset for anger and at around 3250-3350ms post-onset for happiness. Taken together with previous reports of modulated STN activity in response to emotional visual stimuli, the present results appear to confirm that the STN is involved in emotion processing irrespective of stimulus valence and sensory modality.

  12. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on characteristics of EMG activity underlying reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Hatice; Summerfield, Christopher; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) on characteristics of electromyographic (EMG) activity of the agonist muscle in 8 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients were examined during STN-DBS (ON), and 30 minutes after switching off both stimulators (OFF). They were asked to make a ballistic movement in paradigms of simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) tasks. Onset of movement (MOVonset) was measured as the latency of the initial displacement from baseline of the signal from an accelerometer attached to the dorsum of the hand. In the associated EMG activity, recorded from wrist extensor muscles, we measured onset latency (EMGonset), size of the first EMG burst (EMGsize), and number of EMG bursts (EMGbursts) counted between EMGonset and task execution. MOVonset and EMGonset were significantly shorter in ON than in OFF conditions in CRT. EMGsize was larger, EMGbursts were reduced, and peak of the acceleration profile was larger in ON compared with OFF conditions in both SRT and CRT. Our results indicate that STN-DBS induces a significant improvement in motor performance of reaction time tasks in PD patients. Such improvement is associated with a change in features of the EMG activity suggesting an increase in the excitability of the motor pathways engaged in ballistic movements.

  13. Pallidotomy suppresses beta power in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Bour, Lo J; Bot, Maarten; Van Den Munckhof, Pepijn; Speelman, Johannes D; Schuurman, P Richard; De Bie, Rob M A

    2011-04-01

    Parkinsonian patients, who have had a unilateral pallidotomy, may require bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), due to disease progression. The current model of the basal ganglia circuitry does not predict a direct effect of pallidotomy on the neuronal activity of the ipsilateral STN. To date, only three studies have investigated the effect of pallidotomy on overall activity of the STN or neuronal firing rate, but not on the spectral content of the neuronal oscillatory activity. Moreover, none of these studies attempted to differentiate the effects on the dorsal (sensory-motor) and ventral (associative-limbic) parts of the STN. We studied the effect of pallidotomy on spectral power in six frequency bands in the STN ipsilateral and contralateral to pallidotomy from seven patients and in 60 control nuclei of patients without prior functional neurosurgery, and investigated whether this effect is different on the dorsal and ventral STN. The data show that pallidotomy suppresses beta power (13-30 Hz) in the ipsilateral STN. This effect tends predominantly to be present in the dorsal part of the STN. In addition, spectral power in the frequency range 3-30 Hz is significantly higher in the dorsal part than in the ventral part. The effect of pallidotomy on STN neural activity is difficult to explain with the current model of basal ganglia circuitry and should be envisaged in the context of complex modulatory interactions in the basal ganglia.

  14. Human Subthalamic Nucleus Theta and Beta Oscillations Entrain Neuronal Firing During Sensorimotor Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Damera, Srikanth; Dong, Jian Wilson; Lungu, Codrin; Brown, Peter; Zaghloul, Kareem A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that prefrontal cortical structures may inhibit impulsive actions during conflict through activation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Consistent with this hypothesis, deep brain stimulation to the STN has been associated with altered prefrontal cortical activity and impaired response inhibition. The interactions between oscillatory activity in the STN and its presumably antikinetic neuronal spiking, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we simultaneously recorded intraoperative local field potential and spiking activity from the human STN as participants performed a sensorimotor action selection task involving conflict. We identified several STN neuronal response types that exhibited different temporal dynamics during the task. Some neurons showed early, cue-related firing rate increases that remained elevated longer during high conflict trials, whereas other neurons showed late, movement-related firing rate increases. Notably, the high conflict trials were associated with an entrainment of individual neurons by theta- and beta-band oscillations, both of which have been observed in cortical structures involved in response inhibition. Our data suggest that frequency-specific activity in the beta and theta bands influence STN firing to inhibit impulsivity during conflict. PMID:26494798

  15. Impact of Bilateral Subthalamic Stimulation on Motor/Cognitive Functions in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    ASAHI, Takashi; NAKAMICHI, Naomi; TAKAIWA, Akiko; KASHIWAZAKI, Daina; KOH, Masaki; DOUGU, Nobuhiro; TAKASHIMA, Shutaro; TANAKA, Kortaro; KURODA, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is still unclear whether deep brain stimulation targeted to the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) affects cognitive function in Parkinson's disease (PD). This prospective study was aimed to systemically evaluate the impact of bilateral STN-DBS on motor and cognitive functions in patients with PD. This study included totally 11 Japanese patients with medically intolerant PD. Neurological and cognitive status was precisely evaluated before and 1 year after bilateral STN-DBS, using unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), levodopa equivalent doses, mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Japanese adult reading test (JART), repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS), and Wechsler adult intelligence scale-revised (WAIS-R). Preoperative RBANS and WAIS-R identified cognitive dysfunction that could not be detected by MMSE and JART. Before surgery, PD patients had significantly impaired immediate memory and attention. Motor function significantly improved 1 year after bilateral STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS did not affect any score on cognitive examinations. However, postoperative improvements of total score on RBANS and performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) scores on WAIS-R were closely related to those of UPDRS part III off (R2 = 0.61, P < 0.01; R2 = 0.39, P < 0.05, respectively). These findings strongly suggest that bilateral STN-DBS may significantly improve cognitive function in a certain subgroup of patients whose therapeutic effects on motor function are prominent. PMID:24872253

  16. Subthalamic nucleus local field potential activity helps encode motor effort rather than force in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Cheeran, Binith; FitzGerald, James J; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Brown, Peter

    2015-04-15

    Local field potential (LFP) recordings from patients with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the basal ganglia have suggested that frequency-specific activities correlate with force or effort, but previous studies have not been able to disambiguate the two. Here, we dissociated effort from actual force generated by contrasting the force generation of different fingers while recording LFP activity from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease who had undergone functional surgery. Patients were studied while on their normal dopaminergic medication. We investigated the relationship between frequency-specific oscillatory activity in the STN and voluntary flexion of either the index or little finger at different effort levels. At each tested effort level (10%, 25%, and 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction force of each individual finger), the index finger generated larger force than the little finger. Movement-related suppression of beta-band power in the STN LFP was significantly modulated by effort, but not by which finger was used, suggesting that the beta suppression in the STN LFP during sustained contraction serves as a proxy for effort. The absolute force scaled with beta power suppression, but with the scaling determined by the maximal voluntary contraction force of the motor effector. Our results argue against the hypothesis that the basal ganglia are directly involved in the parameterization of force during movement and support a role of the STN in the control of motor effort to be attributed to a response.

  17. The modulatory role of subthalamic nucleus in cognitive functions - a viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Rektor, Ivan; Bočková, Martina; Chrastina, Jan; Rektorová, Irena; Baláž, Marek

    2015-04-01

    The modifications of electrophysiological activities of subthalamic nucleus (STN) by non-motor tasks, i.e. movement observation, emotional stimuli and impulse control, were reported repeatedly. Despite being a small structure, STN is apparently involved in a variety of functions. Based on our own electrophysiological recordings and results of other groups we believe that it acts as an indirect modulator which may be involved in tuning the functional systems. STN may modulate specific cognitive activities via contextual modulation of certain cortical areas. Our findings support the hypothesis of a cortical-STN bypass (via hyperdirect pathway) of "classical" basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuitry, at least during the processing of certain cognitive functions. The modulation of cognitive functions appears to be selective, probably determined by the involvement of cortical neuronal populations interconnected with STN. There could also exist a spatial overlap of areas within STN regulating various functions. That may explain the fact that some non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease may improve after deep brain stimulation of STN. These improvements are likely caused by combination of direct stimulation effect on non-motor function and overall beneficial effect of motor improvement on quality of life.

  18. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  19. Investigation of morphometric variability of subthalamic nucleus, red nucleus, and substantia nigra in advanced Parkinson's disease patients using automatic segmentation and PCA-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Jannin, Pierre; D'Albis, Tiziano; Guizard, Nicolas; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Vérin, Marc; Collins, D Louis

    2014-09-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective surgical therapy to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). Conventional methods employ standard atlas coordinates to target the STN, which, along with the adjacent red nucleus (RN) and substantia nigra (SN), are not well visualized on conventional T1w MRIs. However, the positions and sizes of the nuclei may be more variable than the standard atlas, thus making the pre-surgical plans inaccurate. We investigated the morphometric variability of the STN, RN and SN by using label-fusion segmentation results from 3T high resolution T2w MRIs of 33 advanced PD patients. In addition to comparing the size and position measurements of the cohort to the Talairach atlas, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire more intuitive and detailed perspectives of the measured variability. Lastly, the potential correlation between the variability shown by PCA results and the clinical scores was explored.

  20. Analysis of deep brain stimulation electrode characteristics for neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems have the potential to optimize treatment of movement disorders by enabling automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters based on a feedback signal. Evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the DBS electrode may serve as suitable closed-loop control signals. The objective of this study was to understand better the factors that influence ECAP and LFP recording, including the physical presence of the electrode, the geometrical dimensions of the electrode, and changes in the composition of the peri-electrode space across recording conditions. Approach. Coupled volume conductor-neuron models were used to calculate single-unit activity as well as ECAP responses and LFP activity from a population of model thalamic neurons. Main results. Comparing ECAPs and LFPs measured with and without the presence of the highly conductive recording contacts, we found that the presence of these contacts had a negligible effect on the magnitude of single-unit recordings, ECAPs (7% RMS difference between waveforms), and LFPs (5% change in signal magnitude). Spatial averaging across the contact surface decreased the ECAP magnitude in a phase-dependent manner (74% RMS difference), resulting from a differential effect of the contact on the contribution from nearby or distant elements, and decreased the LFP magnitude (25% change). Reductions in the electrode diameter or recording contact length increased signal energy and increased spatial sensitivity of single neuron recordings. Moreover, smaller diameter electrodes (500 µm) were more selective for recording from local cells over passing axons, with the opposite true for larger diameters (1500 µm). Changes in electrode dimensions had phase-dependent effects on ECAP characteristics, and generally had small effects on the LFP magnitude. ECAP signal energy and LFP magnitude decreased with tighter contact spacing (100 µm), compared to

  1. Analysis of deep brain stimulation electrode characteristics for neural recording

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems have the potential to optimize treatment of movement disorders by enabling automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters based on a feedback signal. Evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the DBS electrode may serve as suitable closed-loop control signals. The objective of this study was to understand better the factors that influence ECAP and LFP recording, including the physical presence of the electrode, the geometrical dimensions of the electrode, and changes in the composition of the peri-electrode space across recording conditions. Coupled volume conductor-neuron models were used to calculate single-unit activity as well as ECAP responses and LFP activity from a population of model thalamic neurons. Comparing ECAPs and LFPs measured with and without the presence of the highly conductive recording contacts, we found that the presence of these contacts had a negligible effect on the magnitude of single-unit recordings, ECAPs (7% RMS difference between waveforms), and LFPs (5% change in signal magnitude). Spatial averaging across the contact surface decreased the ECAP magnitude in a phase-dependent manner (74% RMS difference), resulting from a differential effect of the contact on the contribution from nearby or distant elements, and decreased the LFP magnitude (25% change). Reductions in the electrode diameter or recording contact length increased signal energy and increased spatial sensitivity of single neuron recordings. Moreover, smaller diameter electrodes (500 µm) were more selective for recording from local cells over passing axons, with the opposite true for larger diameters (1500 µm). Changes in electrode dimensions had phase-dependent effects on ECAP characteristics, and generally had small effects on the LFP magnitude. ECAP signal energy and LFP magnitude decreased with tighter contact spacing (100 µm), compared to the original dimensions (1500 µm

  2. Emerging subspecialties in neurology: deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Anhar; Okun, Michael S

    2013-01-29

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical therapy that involves the delivery of an electrical current to one or more brain targets. This technology has been rapidly expanding to address movement, neuropsychiatric, and other disorders. The evolution of DBS has created a niche for neurologists, both in the operating room and in the clinic. Since DBS is not always deep, not always brain, and not always simply stimulation, a more accurate term for this field may be electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM). Fellowships will likely in future years evolve their scope to include other technologies, and other nervous system regions beyond typical DBS therapy.

  3. [Mechanism of action for deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)].

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Oyama, Genko

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an important treatment option for carefully screened medication resistant neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. DBS therapy is not always applied deep to the brain; does not have to be applied exclusively to the brain; and the mechanism for DBS is not simply stimulation of structures. The applications and target locations for DBS devices are rapidly expanding, with many new regions of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and muscles now possibly accessed through this technology. We will review the idea of "electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)"; discuss the importance of the complex neural networks underpinning the effects of DBS; discuss the expansion of brain targets; discuss the use of fiber based targets; and discuss the importance of tailoring DBS therapy to the symptom, rather than the disease.

  4. Identification of target areas for deep brain stimulation in human basal ganglia substructures based on median nerve sensory evoked potential criteria

    PubMed Central

    Klostermann, F; Vesper, J; Curio, G

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In the interventional treatment of movement disorders, the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the most relevant electrode targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS). This study tested the value of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for the functional identification of VIM and STN. Methods: Median nerve SEP were recorded from the final stimulation electrodes targeted at STN and VIM. Throughout the stereotactic procedure SEP were recorded during short electrode stops above STN/VIM and within the presumed target areas. After digital filtering, high and low frequency SEP components were analysed separately to parameterise both the 1000 Hz SEP burst and low frequency (<100 Hz) components. Results: SEP recorded in the VIM target region could unequivocally be distinguished from SEP recorded in STN. The 1000 Hz burst signal was significantly larger in VIM than in STN without any overlap of amplitude values. In the low frequency band, a primary high amplitude negativity was obtained in VIM, contrasting with a low amplitude positivity in STN. SEP waveshapes in recordings above target positions resembled SEP obtained in STN. When entering VIM, a sharp amplitude increase was observed over a few millimetres only. Conclusions: Based on SEP criteria, the VIM target but not the STN region can be identified by typical SEP configuration changes, when penetrating the target zone. The approach is independent of the patient's cooperation and vigilance and therefore feasible in general anaesthesia. It provides an easy, reliable, and robust tool for the final assessment of electrode positions at the last instance during electrode implantation when eventual electrode revisions can easily be performed. PMID:12876229

  5. Cognitive and Psychiatric Effects of STN versus GPi Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Yun-Peng; Li, Ji-Ping; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus interna (GPi) can reduce motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and improve their quality of life. However, the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on cognitive functions and their psychiatric effects remain controversial. The present meta-analysis was therefore performed to clarify these issues. Methods We searched the PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Other sources, including internet-based clinical trial registries and grey literature sources, were also searched. After searching the literature, two investigators independently performed literature screens to assess the quality of the included trials and to extract the data. The outcomes included the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on multiple cognitive domains, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Results Seven articles related to four randomized controlled trials that included 521 participants were incorporated into the present meta-analysis. Compared with GPi DBS, STN DBS was associated with declines in selected cognitive domains after surgery, including attention, working memory and processing speed, phonemic fluency, learning and memory, and global cognition. However, there were no significant differences in terms of quality of life or psychiatric effects, such as depression and anxiety, between the two groups. Conclusions A selective decline in frontal-subcortical cognitive functions is observed after STN DBS in comparison with GPi DBS, which should not be ignored in the target selection for DBS treatment in PD patients. In addition, compared to GPi DBS, STN DBS does not affect depression, anxiety, and quality of life. PMID:27248139

  6. Emotion recognition in early Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation or dopaminergic therapy: a comparison to healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Lindsey G.; Mannava, Sishir; Camalier, Corrie R.; Folley, Bradley S.; Albritton, Aaron; Konrad, Peter E.; Charles, David; Park, Sohee; Neimat, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is traditionally regarded as a neurodegenerative movement disorder, however, nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is also thought to disrupt non-motor loops connecting basal ganglia to areas in frontal cortex involved in cognition and emotion processing. PD patients are impaired on tests of emotion recognition, but it is difficult to disentangle this deficit from the more general cognitive dysfunction that frequently accompanies disease progression. Testing for emotion recognition deficits early in the disease course, prior to cognitive decline, better assesses the sensitivity of these non-motor corticobasal ganglia-thalamocortical loops involved in emotion processing to early degenerative change in basal ganglia circuits. In addition, contrasting this with a group of healthy aging individuals demonstrates changes in emotion processing specific to the degeneration of basal ganglia circuitry in PD. Early PD patients (EPD) were recruited from a randomized clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in early-staged PD. EPD patients were previously randomized to receive optimal drug therapy only (ODT), or drug therapy plus STN-DBS (ODT + DBS). Matched healthy elderly controls (HEC) and young controls (HYC) also participated in this study. Participants completed two control tasks and three emotion recognition tests that varied in stimulus domain. EPD patients were impaired on all emotion recognition tasks compared to HEC. Neither therapy type (ODT or ODT + DBS) nor therapy state (ON/OFF) altered emotion recognition performance in this study. Finally, HEC were impaired on vocal emotion recognition relative to HYC, suggesting a decline related to healthy aging. This study supports the existence of impaired emotion recognition early in the PD course, implicating an early disruption of fronto-striatal loops mediating emotional function. PMID:25653616

  7. Deep brain stimulation, brain maps and personalized medicine: lessons from the human genome project.

    PubMed

    Fins, Joseph J; Shapiro, Zachary E

    2014-01-01

    Although the appellation of personalized medicine is generally attributed to advanced therapeutics in molecular medicine, deep brain stimulation (DBS) can also be so categorized. Like its medical counterpart, DBS is a highly personalized intervention that needs to be tailored to a patient's individual anatomy. And because of this, DBS like more conventional personalized medicine, can be highly specific where the object of care is an N = 1. But that is where the similarities end. Besides their differing medical and surgical provenances, these two varieties of personalized medicine have had strikingly different impacts. The molecular variant, though of a more recent vintage has thrived and is experiencing explosive growth, while DBS still struggles to find a sustainable therapeutic niche. Despite its promise, and success as a vetted treatment for drug resistant Parkinson's Disease, DBS has lagged in broadening its development, often encountering regulatory hurdles and financial barriers necessary to mount an adequate number of quality trials. In this paper we will consider why DBS-or better yet neuromodulation-has encountered these challenges and contrast this experience with the more successful advance of personalized medicine. We will suggest that personalized medicine and DBS's differential performance can be explained as a matter of timing and complexity. We believe that DBS has struggled because it has been a journey of scientific exploration conducted without a map. In contrast to molecular personalized medicine which followed the mapping of the human genome and the Human Genome Project, DBS preceded plans for the mapping of the human brain. We believe that this sequence has given personalized medicine a distinct advantage and that the fullest potential of DBS will be realized both as a cartographical or electrophysiological probe and as a modality of personalized medicine.

  8. Development of in situ Imaging Probe for Surgical Operation of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Toshihiko; Yi-Li, Pan; Tagawa, Ayato; Kobayashi, Takuma; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Hatanaka, Yumiko; Nakano, Naoki; Kato, Amami; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    A novel clinical medical tool for surgical operation of deep brain stimulation was fabricated and evaluated. Dedicated micro-CMOS image sensor was mounted on the tip of quite fine probe tube. The probe has the same diameter as a probe that is utilized in surgical operation. A light source LED was also mounted on the tip of probe. Imaging trial using a postmortem brain was performed with the fabricated probe. The probe can be inserted into a brain easily and take still images of the brain.

  9. Shaping reversibility? Long-term deep brain stimulation in dystonia: the relationship between effects on electrophysiology and clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Cif, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Gonzalez, Victoria; Vasques, Xavier; Hariz, Marwan I; Coubes, Philippe; Rothwell, John C

    2011-07-01

    Long-term results show that benefits from chronic deep brain stimulation in dystonia are maintained for many years. Despite this, the neurophysiological long-term consequences of treatment and their relationship to clinical effects are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation measures of abnormal long-term potentiation-like plasticity (paired associative stimulation) and GABAa-ergic inhibition (short-interval intracortical inhibition), which are seen in dystonia, normalize after several months of deep brain stimulation. In the present study, we examine the same measures in a homogenous group of 10 DYT1 gene-positive patients after long-term deep brain stimulation treatment for at least 4.5 years. Recordings were made 'on' deep brain stimulation and after stopping deep brain stimulation for 2 days. The results show that: (i) on average, prior to discontinuing deep brain stimulation, the paired associative stimulation response was almost absent and short-interval intracortical inhibition was reduced compared with normal. This pattern differs from that in both healthy volunteers and from the typical pattern of enhanced plasticity and reduced inhibition seen in deep brain stimulation-naïve dystonia. It is similar to that seen in untreated Parkinson's disease and may relate to thus far unexplained clinical phenomena like parkinsonian symptoms that have sometimes been observed in patients treated with deep brain stimulation. (ii) Overall, there was no change in average physiological or clinical status when deep brain stimulation was turned off for 2 days, suggesting that deep brain stimulation had produced long-term neural reorganization in the motor system. (iii) However, there was considerable variation between patients. Those who had higher levels of plasticity when deep brain stimulation was 'on', had the best retention of clinical benefit when deep brain stimulation was stopped and vice versa. This may indicate that

  10. Ethical brain stimulation - neuroethics of deep brain stimulation in research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jens

    2010-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a clinically established procedure for treating severe motor symptoms in patients suffering from end-stage Parkinson's disease, dystonia and essential tremor. Currently, it is tested for further indications including psychiatric disorders like major depression and a variety of other diseases. However, ethical issues of DBS demand continuing discussion. Analysing neuroethical and clinical literature, five major topics concerning the ethics of DBS in clinical practice were identified: thorough examination and weighing of risks and benefits; selecting patients fairly; protecting the health of children in paediatric DBS; special issues concerning patients' autonomy; and the normative impact of quality of life measurements. In exploring DBS for further applications, additionally, issues of research ethics have to be considered. Of special importance in this context are questions such as what additional value is generated by the research, how to realise scientific validity, which patients should be included, and how to achieve an acceptable risk-benefit ratio. Patients' benefit is central for ethical evaluation. This criterion can outweigh very serious side-effects, and can make DBS appropriate even in paediatrics. Because standard test procedures evade central aspects of patients' benefits, measuring quality of life should be supplemented by open in-depth interviews to provide a more adequate picture of patients' post-surgical situation. To examine its entire therapeutic potential, further research in DBS is needed. Studies should be based on solid scientific hypotheses and proceed cautiously to benefit severely suffering patients without putting them to undue risks.

  11. Deep brain stimulation: a new treatment in mood and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Velasques, Bruna; Diniz, Claudia; Teixeira, Silmar; Cartier, Consuelo; Peressutti, Caroline; Silva, Farmy; de Carvalho, Marcele; Novaes, Aline; Bittencourt, Juliana; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Cheniaux, Elie; Basile, Luis; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    This article considered already existing studies about Deep Brain Stimulation in Mood and Anxiety Disorders. In particular, articles regarding Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression were mostly analyzed, due to the lack of researches about other types of Mood and Anxiety Disorders. We have concentrated on the target areas where Deep Brain Stimulation was most commonly applied, and on the effects this measure had on treatment-refractory patients. The obtained results showed that the stimulation of the: nucleus accumbens, subgenual cingulate cortex and ventral capsule/ventral striatum, has a positive influence on the development of the disorders investigated, sometimes showing the complete remission of the symptoms. Although Deep Brain Stimulation was overall found to be a promising and safe treatment for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, there are not enough studies proving its efficacy in wide samples and in the presence of more complex variables.

  12. The treatment of Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulation: current issues

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Alexia-Sabine; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Elben, Saskia; Südmeyer, Martin; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has become a well-established symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease during the last 25 years. Besides improving motor symptoms and long-term motor complications, positive effects on patients’ mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being and health-related quality of life have been recognized. Apart from that, numerous clinical trials analyzed effects on non-motor symptoms and side effects of deep brain stimulation. Several technical issues and stimulation paradigms have been and are still being developed to optimize the therapeutic effects, minimize the side effects and facilitate handling. This review summarizes current therapeutic issues, i.e., patient and target selection, surgical procedure and programming paradigms. In addition it focuses on neuropsychological effects and side effects of deep brain stimulation. PMID:26330809

  13. A Low Power Micro Deep Brain Stimulation Device for Murine Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Tye, Susannah J.; Hosain, Md Kamal; Berk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has emerged as an effective medical procedure that has therapeutic efficacy in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Preclinical research involving laboratory animals is being conducted to study the principles, mechanisms, and therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation. A bottleneck is, however, the lack of deep brain stimulation devices that enable long term brain stimulation in freely moving laboratory animals. Most of the existing devices employ complex circuitry, and are thus bulky. These devices are usually connected to the electrode that is implanted into the animal brain using long fixed wires. In long term behavioral trials, however, laboratory animals often need to continuously receive brain stimulation for days without interruption, which is difficult with existing technology. This paper presents a low power and lightweight portable microdeep brain stimulation device for laboratory animals. Three different configurations of the device are presented as follows: 1) single piece head mountable; 2) single piece back mountable; and 3) two piece back mountable. The device can be easily carried by the animal during the course of a clinical trial, and that it can produce non-stop stimulation current pulses of desired characteristics for over 12 days on a single battery. It employs passive charge balancing to minimize undesirable effects on the target tissue. The results of bench, in-vitro, and in-vivo tests to evaluate the performance of the device are presented. PMID:27170861

  14. Deep brain stimulation effects in dystonia: time course of electrophysiological changes in early treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen; Hariz, Marwan I; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall P; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation to the internal globus pallidus is an effective treatment for primary dystonia. The optimal clinical effect often occurs only weeks to months after starting stimulation. To better understand the underlying electrophysiological changes in this period, we assessed longitudinally 2 pathophysiological markers of dystonia in patients prior to and in the early treatment period (1, 3, 6 months) after deep brain stimulation surgery. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to track changes in short-latency intracortical inhibition, a measure of excitability of GABA(A) -ergic corticocortical connections and long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity (as a response to paired associative stimulation). Deep brain stimulation remained on for the duration of the study. Prior to surgery, inhibition was reduced and plasticity increased in patients compared with healthy controls. Following surgery and commencement of deep brain stimulation, short-latency intracortical inhibition increased toward normal levels over the following months with the same monotonic time course as the patients' clinical benefit. In contrast, synaptic plasticity changed rapidly, following a nonmonotonic time course: it was absent early (1 month) after surgery, and then over the following months increased toward levels observed in healthy individuals. We postulate that before surgery preexisting high levels of plasticity form strong memories of dystonic movement patterns. When deep brain stimulation is turned on, it disrupts abnormal basal ganglia signals, resulting in the absent response to paired associative stimulation at 1 month. Clinical benefit is delayed because engrams of abnormal movement persist and take time to normalize. Our observations suggest that plasticity may be a driver of long-term therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation in dystonia.

  15. Calibration of clinical cerebellar and deep brain stimulation systems.

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, D L; Wright, G D; Renouf, F

    1981-01-01

    The increasing use of electrical stimulation of the brain for relief of pain, spasticity and epilepsy has introduced unfamiliar techniques into clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. In view of the evidence that excessive levels of stimulation can damage brain tissue, it is of great importance to monitor the dose of stimulation. A review of recent clinical papers suggests that many centres do not measure the dose accurately, relying on arbitrary dial settings on external transmitters. This paper reviews that factors that affect the dose received by the patient and suggests methods of measuring them, at operation and subsequently, which should routinely be employed by clinicians implanting stimulators. Images PMID:6973614

  16. A history of deep brain stimulation: Technological innovation and the role of clinical assessment tools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation involves using a pacemaker-like device to deliver constant electrical stimulation to problematic areas within the brain. It has been used to treat over 40,000 people with Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor worldwide and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a treatment for depression and obsessive–compulsive disorder. This article will provide an historical account of deep brain stimulation in order to illustrate the plurality of interests involved in the development and stabilization of deep brain stimulation technology. Using Latour’s notion of immutable mobiles, this article will illustrate the importance of clinical assessment tools in shaping technological development in the era of medical device regulation. Given that such tools can serve commercial and professional interests, this article suggests that it is necessary to scrutinise their application in research contexts to ensure that they capture clinical changes that are meaningful for patients and their families. This is particularly important in relation to potentially ethically problematic therapies such as deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders.

  17. A long-term follow-up of weight changes in subthalamic nucleus stimulated Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Foubert-Samier, A; Maurice, S; Hivert, S; Guelh, D; Rigalleau, V; Burbaud, P; Cuny, E; Meissner, W; Tison, F

    2012-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) constitutes the mainstay treatment in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) with motor fluctuations. Despite its efficacy on motor signs and quality of life, emergent adverse events have been recently reported. Among them, weight gain (WG) is a recognized adverse event of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Also, WG is poorly known at the long-term and predisposing factors have not yet been identified. We conducted a cross-sectional study of WG in 47 STN-DBS PD patients between 1999-2006. Data on disease history, motor status and dopaminergic drug treatment were retrospectively collected at surgery and 1 year post-surgery. Weight at disease diagnosis and at surgery, as well as the current weight and height were gathered by an autoquestionnaire. Moreover, the weight before surgery was obtained and verified in medical files in more than 90% of our patients. Sixty-six patients who underwent surgery between 1999-2006 were included, but six were deceased, four refused to participate and nine were lost for follow-up. So, 47 (71%) were retained in our analysis. A total of 78.7% of patients gained weight. On average 4.7 years follow up after surgery, the mean weight gain was +7.2±8.1kg compared to the preoperative assessment (p<0.001) and the mean BMI gain was +2.7±3.0kg/m(2) compared to pre-surgery values (p<0.001). The patients gained more weight after surgery than they had lost during disease evolution before surgery. Women and patients with a more severe UPDRS-III "off" drug score before surgery significantly gained more weight. Our study provides further evidence that the WG is a problem after STN-DBS and concerns a majority of patients at the long term. It may expose them to complications that should be considered for prevention and the patient's information before surgery.

  18. Asymmetric right/left encoding of emotions in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Renana; Shamir, Reuben R.; Linetsky, Eduard; Rosenbluh, Ovadya; Moshel, Shay; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Emotional processing is lateralized to the non-dominant brain hemisphere. However, there is no clear spatial model for lateralization of emotional domains in the basal ganglia. The subthalamic nucleus (STN), an input structure in the basal ganglia network, plays a major role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). This role is probably not limited only to the motor deficits of PD, but may also span the emotional and cognitive deficits commonly observed in PD patients. Beta oscillations (12–30 Hz), the electrophysiological signature of PD, are restricted to the dorsolateral part of the STN that corresponds to the anatomically defined sensorimotor STN. The more medial, more anterior and more ventral parts of the STN are thought to correspond to the anatomically defined limbic and associative territories of the STN. Surprisingly, little is known about the electrophysiological properties of the non-motor domains of the STN, nor about electrophysiological differences between right and left STNs. In this study, microelectrodes were utilized to record the STN spontaneous spiking activity and responses to vocal non-verbal emotional stimuli during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries in human PD patients. The oscillation properties of the STN neurons were used to map the dorsal oscillatory and the ventral non-oscillatory regions of the STN. Emotive auditory stimulation evoked activity in the ventral non-oscillatory region of the right STN. These responses were not observed in the left ventral STN or in the dorsal regions of either the right or left STN. Therefore, our results suggest that the ventral non-oscillatory regions are asymmetrically associated with non-motor functions, with the right ventral STN associated with emotional processing. These results suggest that DBS of the right ventral STN may be associated with beneficial or adverse emotional effects observed in PD patients and may relieve mental symptoms in other neurological and psychiatric

  19. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  20. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  1. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the subthalamic microlesion and stimulation effects in Parkinson's disease: Indications of a principal role of the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Holiga, Štefan; Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen; Schroeter, Matthias L; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During implantation of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes in the target structure, neurosurgeons and neurologists commonly observe a "microlesion effect" (MLE), which occurs well before initiating subthalamic DBS. This phenomenon typically leads to a transitory improvement of motor symptoms of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). Mechanisms behind MLE remain poorly understood. In this work, we exploited the notion of ranking to assess spontaneous brain activity in PD patients examined by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in response to penetration of DBS electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus. In particular, we employed a hypothesis-free method, eigenvector centrality (EC), to reveal motor-communication-hubs of the highest rank and their reorganization following the surgery; providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the direct impact of disrupting the PD motor circuitry in vivo without prior assumptions. Penetration of electrodes was associated with increased EC of functional connectivity in the brainstem. Changes in connectivity were quantitatively related to motor improvement, which further emphasizes the clinical importance of the functional integrity of the brainstem. Surprisingly, MLE and DBS were associated with anatomically different EC maps despite their similar clinical benefit on motor functions. The DBS solely caused an increase in connectivity of the left premotor region suggesting separate pathophysiological mechanisms of both interventions. While the DBS acts at the cortical level suggesting compensatory activation of less affected motor regions, the MLE affects more fundamental circuitry as the dysfunctional brainstem predominates in the beginning of PD. These findings invigorate the overlooked brainstem perspective in the understanding of PD and support the current trend towards its early diagnosis.

  2. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  3. The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mücke, Doris; Becker, Johannes; Barbe, Michael T.; Meister, Ingo; Liebhart, Lena; Roettger, Timo B.; Dembek, Till; Timmermann, Lars; Grice, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the…

  4. ["Psychosurgery" and deep brain stimulation with psychiatric indication. Current and historical aspects].

    PubMed

    Arends, M; Fangerau, H; Winterer, G

    2009-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a novel and reversible surgical intervention in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies in small samples of patients with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have come up with promising results. Neurosurgical interventions in psychiatric patients raise ethical questions in the context of historical experiences with traditional and irreversible psychosurgical procedures that need to be discussed.

  5. Cognitive Functioning in Children with Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration Undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Rachel; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cognitive functioning of young people with pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) after pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). PKAN is characterized by progressive generalized dystonia and has historically been associated with cognitive decline. With growing evidence that DBS can improve motor function in…

  6. Transmission in near-infrared optical windows for deep brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingyan; Sordillo, Laura A; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) radiation has been employed using one- and two-photon excitation of fluorescence imaging at wavelengths 650-950 nm (optical window I) for deep brain imaging; however, longer wavelengths in NIR have been overlooked due to a lack of suitable NIR-low band gap semiconductor imaging detectors and/or femtosecond laser sources. This research introduces three new optical windows in NIR and demonstrates their potential for deep brain tissue imaging. The transmittances are measured in rat brain tissue in the second (II, 1,100-1,350 nm), third (III, 1,600-1,870 nm), and fourth (IV, centered at 2,200 nm) NIR optical tissue windows. The relationship between transmission and tissue thickness is measured and compared with the theory. Due to a reduction in scattering and minimal absorption, window III is shown to be the best for deep brain imaging, and windows II and IV show similar but better potential for deep imaging than window I.

  7. Improvement of both dystonia and tics with 60 Hz pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hwynn, Nelson; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L; Limotai, Natlada; Zeilman, Pamela; Malaty, Irene A; Foote, Kelly D; Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized in both dystonia and in medication refractory Tourette syndrome. We present an interesting case of a patient with a mixture of disabling dystonia and Tourette syndrome whose coexistent dystonia and tics were successfully treated with 60 Hz-stimulation of the globus pallidus region.

  8. Review article: anesthetic management of patients undergoing deep brain stimulator insertion.

    PubMed

    Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Luciano, Michelle; Manninen, Pirjo

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation is used for the treatment of patients with neurologic disorders who have an alteration of function, such as movement disorders and other chronic illnesses. The insertion of the deep brain stimulator (DBS) is a minimally invasive procedure that includes the placement of electrodes into deep brain structures for microelectrode recordings and intraoperative clinical testing and connection of the DBS to an implanted pacemaker. The anesthetic technique varies depending on the traditions and requirements of each institution performing these procedures and has included monitored anesthesia with local anesthesia, conscious sedation, and general anesthesia. The challenges and demands for the anesthesiologist in the care of these patients relate to the specific concerns of the patients with functional neurologic disorders, the effects of anesthetic drugs on microelectrode recordings, and the requirements of the surgical procedure, which often include an awake and cooperative patient. The purpose of this review is to familiarize anesthesiologists with deep brain stimulation by discussing the mechanism, the effects of anesthetic drugs, and the surgical procedure of DBS insertion, and the perioperative assessment, preparation, intraoperative anesthetic management, and complications in patients with functional neurologic disorders.

  9. Eyelid apraxia associated with deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal gray area.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Srikandarajah, Nisaharan; Krahl, Scott E; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Behnke, Eric; Malkasian, Dennis; DeSalles, Antonio A F

    2014-09-01

    We report a patient with eyelid apraxia following deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal gray area. Based on the position of our electrode, we argue that the phenomenon is linked to inhibition of the nearby central caudal nucleus of the oculomotor nucleus by high frequency stimulation.

  10. Deep brain stimulation during early adolescence prevents microglial alterations in a model of maternal immune activation.

    PubMed

    Hadar, Ravit; Dong, Le; Del-Valle-Anton, Lucia; Guneykaya, Dilansu; Voget, Mareike; Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Schweibold, Regina; Djodari-Irani, Anais; Goetz, Thomas; Ewing, Samuel; Kettenmann, Helmut; Wolf, Susanne A; Winter, Christine

    2016-12-07

    In recent years schizophrenia has been recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder likely involving a perinatal insult progressively affecting brain development. The poly I:C maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent model is considered as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Using this model we and others demonstrated the association between neuroinflammation in the form of altered microglia and a schizophrenia-like endophenotype. Therapeutic intervention using the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline affected altered microglia activation and was successful in the adult offspring. However, less is known about the effect of preventive therapeutic strategies on microglia properties. Previously we found that deep brain stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex applied pre-symptomatically to adolescence MIA rats prevented the manifestation of behavioral and structural deficits in adult rats. We here studied the effects of deep brain stimulation during adolescence on microglia properties in adulthood. We found that in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, but not in the medial prefrontal cortex, microglial density and soma size were increased in MIA rats. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was unchanged in all brain areas before and after implantation and stimulation. Stimulation of either the medial prefrontal cortex or the nucleus accumbens normalized microglia density and soma size in main projection areas including the hippocampus and in the area around the electrode implantation. We conclude that in parallel to an alleviation of the symptoms in the rat MIA model, deep brain stimulation has the potential to prevent the neuroinflammatory component in this disease.

  11. Effects of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Koy, Anne; Hellmich, Martin; Pauls, K Amande M; Marks, Warren; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Fricke, Oliver; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Secondary dystonia encompasses a heterogeneous group with different etiologies. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause. Pharmacological treatment is often unsatisfactory. There are only limited data on the therapeutic outcomes of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The published literature regarding deep brain stimulation and secondary dystonia was reviewed in a meta-analysis to reevaluate the effect on cerebral palsy. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was chosen as the primary outcome measure. Outcome over time was evaluated and summarized by mixed-model repeated-measures analysis, paired Student t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Twenty articles comprising 68 patients with cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation assessed by the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale were identified. Most articles were case reports reflecting great variability in the score and duration of follow-up. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was 64.94 ± 25.40 preoperatively and dropped to 50.5 ± 26.77 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 23.6% (P < .001) at a median follow-up of 12 months. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale disability score was 18.54 ± 6.15 preoperatively and 16.83 ± 6.42 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 9.2% (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between severity of dystonia and clinical outcome (P < .05). Deep brain stimulation can be an effective treatment option for dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In view of the heterogeneous data, a prospective study with a large cohort of patients in a standardized setting with a multidisciplinary approach would be helpful in further evaluating the role of deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Regional anatomy of the pedunculopontine nucleus: relevance for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Gosselin, Marie-Pierre; Lipsman, Nir; Saint-Cyr, Jean A; Hamani, Clement; Lozano, Andres M

    2013-09-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is currently being investigated as a potential deep brain stimulation target to improve gait and posture in Parkinson's disease. This review examines the complex anatomy of the PPN region and suggests a functional mapping of the surrounding nuclei and fiber tracts that may serve as a guide to a more accurate placement of electrodes while avoiding potentially adverse effects. The relationships of the PPN were examined in different human brain atlases. Schematic representations of those structures in the vicinity of the PPN were generated and correlated with their potential stimulation effects. By providing a functional map and representative schematics of the PPN region, we hope to optimize the placement of deep brain stimulation electrodes, thereby maximizing safety and clinical efficacy.

  13. A Miniature, Fiber-Coupled, Wireless, Deep-Brain Optogenetic Stimulator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven T; Williams, Pete A; Braine, Catherine E; Lin, Da-Ting; John, Simon W M; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2015-07-01

    Controlled, wireless neuromodulation using miniature implantable devices is a long-sought goal in neuroscience. It will allow many studies and treatments that are otherwise impractical. Recent studies demonstrate advances in neuromodulation through optogenetics, but test animals are typically tethered, severely limiting experimental possibilities. Existing nontethered optical stimulators either deliver light through a cranial window limiting applications to superficial layers of the brain, are not widely accessible due to highly specialized fabrication techniques, or do not demonstrate robust and flexible control of the optical power emitted. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel, miniature, wireless, deep-brain, modular optical stimulator with controllable stimulation parameters for use in optogenetic experiments. We demonstrate its use in a behavioral experiment targeting a deep brain structure in freely behaving mice. To allow its rapid and widespread adoption, we developed this stimulator using commercially available components. The modular and accessible optogenetic stimulator presented advances the wireless toolset available for freely behaving animal experiments.

  14. Decoupling of the brain's default mode network during deep sleep.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Silvina G; Braun, Allen R; Carr, Walter S; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J; Fukunaga, Masaki; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-07-07

    The recent discovery of a circuit of brain regions that is highly active in the absence of overt behavior has led to a quest for revealing the possible function of this so-called default-mode network (DMN). A very recent study, finding similarities in awake humans and anesthetized primates, has suggested that DMN activity might not simply reflect ongoing conscious mentation but rather a more general form of network dynamics typical of complex systems. Here, by performing functional MRI in humans, it is shown that a natural, sleep-induced reduction of consciousness is reflected in altered correlation between DMN network components, most notably a reduced involvement of frontal cortex. This suggests that DMN may play an important role in the sustenance of conscious awareness.

  15. Spatio-spectral characterization of local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus via multitrack microelectrode recordings.

    PubMed

    Telkes, I; Ince, N F; Onaran, I; Abosch, A

    2015-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a highly effective treatment for motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, precise intraoperative localization of STN remains a procedural challenge. In the present study, local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from three tracks during microelectrode recording-based (MER) targeting of STN, in five patients. The raw LFP data were preprocessed in original recording setup and then data quality was compared to data with common average derivation. The depth-frequency maps were generated according to preprocessing results for each patient and spectral characteristics of LFPs were explored at each depth across different tracks and different subjects. Spatio-spectral analysis of LFP was investigated to see whether LFP activity can be used for optimal track selection and STN border identification. Analysis show that monopolar derivation suffer from various artifacts and/or power line noise which makes the interpretation of target localization very difficult in most of the subjects. Unlikely, bipolar derivation helps to recover the neurological signals and investigation of signal characteristics. The frequency-vs-depth maps using a modified Welch periodogram with robust statistics, demonstrated that a median-based spectrum estimation approach eliminates outliers pretty well by preserving band-specific LFP activity. The results indicate that there is a clear oscillatory beta activity around 20 Hz in all subjects. 1/f normalization reveals the high frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 200-to-350 Hz in two subjects. It's noted that the optimal track selection is not consistent with the track having highest beta band oscillations in two out of five subjects. In conclusion, microelectrode-derived LFP recordings may provide an alternative approach to single unit activity (SUA)-based MER, for localizing the target STN borders during DBS surgery. Despite the small number of subjects, the present study adds to

  16. Oscillatory subthalamic nucleus activity is modulated by dopamine during emotional processing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huebl, Julius; Spitzer, Bernhard; Brücke, Christof; Schönecker, Thomas; Kupsch, Andreas; Alesch, François; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Dopaminergic denervation in Parkinson's disease (PD) leads to motor deficits but also depression, lack of motivation and apathy. These symptoms can be reversed by dopaminergic treatment, which may even lead to an increased hedonic tone in some patients with PD. Here, we tested the effects of dopamine on emotional processing as indexed by changes in local field potential (LFP) activity of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 28 PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation. LFP activity from the STN was recorded after the administration of levodopa (ON group) or after overnight withdrawal of medication (OFF group) during presentation of an emotional picture-viewing task. Neutral and emotionally arousing pleasant and unpleasant stimuli were chosen from the International Affective Picture System. We found a double dissociation of the alpha band response depending on dopamine state and stimulus valence: dopamine enhanced the processing of pleasant stimuli, while activation during unpleasant stimuli was reduced, as indexed by the degree of desynchronization in the alpha frequency band. This pattern was reversed in the OFF state and more pronounced in the subgroup of non-depressed PD patients. Further, we found an early gamma band increase with unpleasant stimuli that occurred when ON but not OFF medication and was correlated with stimulus arousal. The late STN alpha band decrease is thought to represent active processing of sensory information. Our findings support the idea that dopamine enhances approach-related processes during late stimulus evaluation in PD. The early gamma band response may represent local encoding of increased attention, which varies as a function of stimulus arousal.

  17. Tremor reduction by subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Grips, Eva; Weigel, Ralf; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K

    2007-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has proved to be effective for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the recent studies used only clinical data to analyse tremor reduction. The objective of our study was to quantify tremor reduction by STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication in elderly PD patients using an objective measuring system. Amplitude and frequency of resting tremor and re-emergent resting tremor during postural tasks were analysed using an ultrasound-based measuring system and surface electromyography. In a prospective study design nine patients with advanced PD were examined preoperatively off and on medication, and twice postoperatively during four treatment conditions: off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. While both STN DBS and medication reduced tremor amplitude, STN DBS alone and the combination of medication and STN DBS were significantly superior to pre- and postoperative medication. STN DBS but not medication increased tremor frequency, and off treatment tremor frequency was significantly reduced postoperatively compared to baseline. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS is highly effective in elderly patients with advanced PD and moderate preoperative tremor reduction by medication. Thus, with regard to the advanced impact on the other parkinsonian symptoms, STN DBS can replace thalamic stimulation in this cohort of patients. Nevertheless, medication was still effective postoperatively and may act synergistically. The significantly superior efficacy of STN DBS on tremor amplitude and its impact on tremor frequency in contrast to medication might be explained by the influence of STN DBS on additional neural circuits independent from dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  18. Neuropsychological consequences of chronic bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Saint-Cyr, J A; Trépanier, L L; Kumar, R; Lozano, A M; Lang, A E

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine possible neuropsychological changes in patients with advanced idiopathic Parkinson's disease treated with bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Eleven patients (age = 67 +/- 8 years, years with Parkinson's disease = 15 +/- 3, verbal IQ = 114 +/- 12) were evaluated (in their best 'on state') with tests assessing processes reliant on the functional integrity of frontal striatal circuitry, prior to the procedure (n = 11), at 3-6 months (n = 11) and at 9-12 months (n =10) post-operatively. Six of these patients were older than 69 years. Despite clinical motor benefits at 3-6 months post-operative, significant declines were noted in working memory, speed of mental processing, bimanual motor speed and co-ordination, set switching, phonemic fluency, long-term consolidation of verbal material and the encoding of visuospatial material. Declines were more consistently observed in patients who were older than 69 years, leading to a mental state comparable with progressive supranuclear palsy. 'Frontal' behavioural dyscontrol without the benefit of insight was also reported by half (three of six) of the caregivers of the elderly subgroup. At 9-12 months postoperative, only learning based on multiple trials had recovered. Tasks reliant on the integrity of frontal striatal circuitry either did not recover or gradually worsened over time. Bilateral STN DBS can have a negative impact on various aspects of frontal executive functioning, especially in patients older than 69 years. Future studies will evaluate a larger group of patients and examine the possible reversibility of these effects by turning the DBS off.

  19. Dopaminergic therapy and subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease: a review of 5-year reports.

    PubMed

    Romito, Luigi M; Albanese, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of deep brain stimulation (DBS) implant for Parkinson's disease (PD) is described in several recent papers. This procedure has been reported to permit a stable reduction of dopaminergic therapy requirements for up to 5 years, although some expectation of deterioration in non-dopaminergic signs has been recently stated. Our aim is to perform a literature-based review of papers available describing long-term post-operative follow-up after a bilateral implant for subthalamic DBS (STN-DBS). Only peer-reviewed published papers with a post-operative follow-up of at least 5 years were considered. Clinical outcome, disease progression and side effects were assessed at baseline and 2 (or 3 years) and 5 years after surgery. Seven papers were included in the review. A total of 238 patients were analyzed. STN-DBS was confirmed to be an effective treatment for selected patients with PD. In all studies, off-related motor symptoms improved dramatically, compared with pre-implant, at 2 (or 3, according to the study) years and this result persisted at 5-year evaluations. Antiparkinsonian drug reductions, improvements in motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, functional measures and the progression of underlying PD were also reported in all series. Some axial scores, in particular postural stability and speech, improved transiently. Persisting adverse effects included eyelid opening apraxia, weight gain, psychiatric disorders, depression, dysarthria, dyskinesias, and apathy. The present review of the 5-year observations confirms that STN-DBS is a powerful method in the management of PD, but its long-term effects must be thoroughly assessed.

  20. Sixty Hertz Neurostimulation Amplifies Subthalamic Neural Synchrony in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Zack; Velisar, Anca; Miller Koop, Mandy; Hill, Bruce C.; Shreve, Lauren A.; Quinn, Emma J.; Kilbane, Camilla; Yu, Hong; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Brontë-Stewart, Helen

    2015-01-01

    High frequency subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves the cardinal motor signs of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and attenuates STN alpha/beta band neural synchrony in a voltage-dependent manner. While there is a growing interest in the behavioral effects of lower frequency (60 Hz) DBS, little is known about its effect on STN neural synchrony. Here we demonstrate for the first time that during intra-operative 60 Hz STN DBS, one or more bands of resting state neural synchrony were amplified in the STN in PD. We recorded intra-operative STN resting state local field potentials (LFPs) from twenty-eight STNs in seventeen PD subjects after placement of the DBS lead (model 3389, Medtronic, Inc.) before and during three randomized neurostimulation sets (130 Hz/1.35V, 130 Hz/2V, 60 Hz/2V). During 130 Hz/2V DBS, baseline (no DBS) STN alpha (8 – 12 Hz) and beta (13 – 35 Hz) band power decreased (N=14, P < 0.001 for both), whereas during 60 Hz/2V DBS, alpha band and peak frequency power increased (P = 0.012, P = 0.007, respectively). The effect of 60 Hz/2V DBS opposed that of power-equivalent (130 Hz/1.35V) DBS (alpha: P < 0.001, beta: P = 0.006). These results show that intra-operative 60 Hz STN DBS amplified whereas 130 Hz STN DBS attenuated resting state neural synchrony in PD; the effects were frequency-specific. We demonstrate that neurostimulation may be useful as a tool to selectively modulate resting state resonant bands of neural synchrony and to investigate its influence on motor and non-motor behaviors in PD and other neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:25807463

  1. MRI directed bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, N; Plaha, P; O'Sullivan, K; McCarter, R; Heywood, P; Gill, S

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Bilateral chronic high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has emerged as an appropriate therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease refractory to medical therapy. Advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiology have led to the development of varied targeting methods for the delivery of this treatment. Intraoperative neurophysiological and clinical monitoring is regarded by many to be mandatory for accurate STN localisation. We have examined efficacy of bilateral STN stimulation using a predominantly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-directed technique. Methods: DBS leads were stereotactically implanted into the STN using an MRI directed method, with intraoperative macrostimulation used purely for adjustment. The effects of DBS were evaluated in 16 patients followed up to 12 months, and compared with baseline assessments. Assessments were performed in both off and on medication states, and were based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and timed motor tests. Functional status outcomes were examined using the PDQ-39 quality of life questionnaire. A battery of psychometric tests was used to assess cognition. Results: After 12 months, stimulation in the off medication state resulted in significant improvements in Activities of Daily Living and Motor scores (UPDRS parts II and III) by 62% and 61% respectively. Timed motor tests were significantly improved in the off medication state. Motor scores (UPDRS part III) were significantly improved by 40% in the on medication state. Dyskinesias and off duration were significantly reduced and the mean dose of L-dopa equivalents was reduced by half. Psychometric test scores were mostly unchanged or improved. Adverse events were few. Conclusions: An MRI directed targeting method for implantation of DBS leads into the STN can be used safely and effectively, and results are comparable with studies using intraoperative microelectrode neurophysiological

  2. Automatic subthalamic nucleus detection from microelectrode recordings based on noise level and neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Dolan, Kevin; He, Xuan; Fiorella Contarino, Maria; Schuurman, Richard; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Wadman, Wytse J.; Bour, Lo; Martens, Hubert C. F.

    2011-08-01

    Microelectrode recording (MER) along surgical trajectories is commonly applied for refinement of the target location during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. In this study, we utilize automatically detected MER features in order to locate the subthalamic nucleus (STN) employing an unsupervised algorithm. The automated algorithm makes use of background noise level, compound firing rate and power spectral density along the trajectory and applies a threshold-based method to detect the dorsal and the ventral borders of the STN. Depending on the combination of measures used for detection of the borders, the algorithm allocates confidence levels for the annotation made (i.e. high, medium and low). The algorithm has been applied to 258 trajectories obtained from 84 STN DBS implantations. MERs used in this study have not been pre-selected or pre-processed and include all the viable measurements made. Out of 258 trajectories, 239 trajectories were annotated by the surgical team as containing the STN versus 238 trajectories by the automated algorithm. The agreement level between the automatic annotations and the surgical annotations is 88%. Taking the surgical annotations as the golden standard, across all trajectories, the algorithm made true positive annotations in 231 trajectories, true negative annotations in 12 trajectories, false positive annotations in 7 trajectories and false negative annotations in 8 trajectories. We conclude that our algorithm is accurate and reliable in automatically identifying the STN and locating the dorsal and ventral borders of the nucleus, and in a near future could be implemented for on-line intra-operative use.

  3. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  4. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia.

  5. Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation on Emotional Prosody Comprehension in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background Although impaired decoding of emotional prosody has frequently been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), to date only few reports have sought to explore the effect of Parkinson's treatment on disturbances of prosody decoding. In particular, little is known about how surgical treatment approaches such as high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) affect emotional speech perception in patients with PD. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on prosody processing. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end the performance of 13 PD patients on three tasks requiring the decoding of emotional speech was assessed and subsequently compared to the performance of healthy control individuals. To delineate the effect of STN-DBS, all patients were tested with stimulators turned on as well as with stimulators turned off. Results revealed that irrespective of whether assessments were made “on” or “off” stimulation, patients' performance was less accurate as compared to healthy control participants on all tasks employed in this study. However, while accuracy appeared to be unaffected by stimulator status, a facilitation of reactions specific to highly conflicting emotional stimulus material (i.e. stimulus material presenting contradicting emotional messages on a verbal and non-verbal prosodic level) was observed during “on” stimulation assessments. Conclusion In sum, presented results suggest that the processing of emotional speech is indeed modulated by STN-DBS. Observed alterations might, on the one hand, reflect a more efficient processing of highly conflicting stimulus material following DBS. However, on the other hand, given the lack of an improvement in accuracy, increased impulsivity associated with STN stimulation needs to be taken into consideration. PMID:21552518

  6. Effects of varying subthalamic nucleus stimulation on apraxia of lid opening in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Giorgio; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valérie; Pollak, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    Apraxia of lid opening (ALO) is a non-paralytic inability to open the eyes or sustain lid elevation at will. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the syndrome are still unknown. ALO has been reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS), suggesting a possible involvement of the basal ganglia. We aimed to assess the effects of varying STN stimulation voltage on ALO in PD patients. Seven out of 14 PD patients with bilateral STN stimulation consecutively seen in our centre presented with ALO. We progressively increased voltage on each STN, using either 130 Hz (high-frequency stimulation, HFS) or 2 or 3 Hz (low-frequency stimulation, LFS). In five patients, HFS induced ALO time-locked to stimulation in 7 out of 10 STNs at a voltage higher than that used for chronic stimulation. LFS induced myoclonus in the pretarsal orbicularis oculi muscle (pOOm) with a rhythm synchronous to the frequency. In the other two patients with ALO already present at the time of the study, HFS improved ALO in 3 out of 4 STNs. ALO recurred within minutes of stimulation arrest. Our findings show that STN-DBS can have opposite effects on ALO. On the one hand, ALO is thought to be a corticobulbar side effect due to lateral current spreading from the STN, in which case it is necessary to use voltages below the ALO-inducing threshold. On the other hand, ALO may be considered a form of off-phase focal dystonia possibly improved by increasing the stimulation voltages.

  7. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Nicolette M; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Twickler, Th B Marcel; de Bie, Rob M; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P Richard; La Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry, alters basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied 8 patients with PD treated with DBS STN, in the basal state and during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using a stable glucose isotope, in the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. We measured EGP, hepatic insulin sensitivity, peripheral insulin sensitivity (Rd), resting energy expenditure (REE), glucoregulatory hormones, and Parkinson symptoms, using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Basal plasma glucose and EGP did not differ between the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was similar in both conditions and there were no significant differences in Rd and plasma glucoregulatory hormones between DBS on and DBS off. UPDRS was significantly higher in the non-stimulated condition. DBS of the STN in patients with PD does not influence basal EGP or insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that acute modulation of the motor basal ganglia circuitry does not affect glucose metabolism in humans.

  8. Long-Term Task- and Dopamine-Dependent Dynamics of Subthalamic Local Field Potentials in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Sara J.; Nedrud, Joshua J.; Davidson, Bradley S.; Farris, Sierra; Giroux, Monique; Haug, Aaron; Mahoor, Mohammad H.; Silverman, Anne K.; Zhang, Jun Jason; Hebb, Adam Olding

    2016-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) local field potentials (LFP) are neural signals that have been shown to reveal motor and language behavior, as well as pathological parkinsonian states. We use a research-grade implantable neurostimulator (INS) with data collection capabilities to record STN-LFP outside the operating room to determine the reliability of the signals over time and assess their dynamics with respect to behavior and dopaminergic medication. Seven subjects were implanted with the recording augmented deep brain stimulation (DBS) system, and bilateral STN-LFP recordings were collected in the clinic over twelve months. Subjects were cued to perform voluntary motor and language behaviors in on and off medication states. The STN-LFP recorded with the INS demonstrated behavior-modulated desynchronization of beta frequency (13–30 Hz) and synchronization of low gamma frequency (35–70 Hz) oscillations. Dopaminergic medication did not diminish the relative beta frequency oscillatory desynchronization with movement. However, movement-related gamma frequency oscillatory synchronization was only observed in the medication on state. We observed significant inter-subject variability, but observed consistent STN-LFP activity across recording systems and over a one-year period for each subject. These findings demonstrate that an INS system can provide robust STN-LFP recordings in ambulatory patients, allowing for these signals to be recorded in settings that better represent natural environments in which patients are in a variety of medication states. PMID:27916831

  9. Selective left, right and bilateral stimulation of subthalamic nuclei in Parkinson's disease: differential effects on motor, speech and language function.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Geralyn M; Hosey, Lara A; Bradberry, Trent J; Stager, Sheila V; Lee, Li-Ching; Pawha, Rajesh; Lyons, Kelly E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Braun, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but may produce a worsening of speech and language performance at rates and amplitudes typically selected in clinical practice. The possibility that these dissociated effects might be modulated by selective stimulation of left and right STN has never been systematically investigated. To address this issue, we analyzed motor, speech and language functions of 12 patients implanted with bilateral stimulators configured for optimal motor responses. Behavioral responses were quantified under four stimulator conditions: bilateral DBS, right-only DBS, left-only DBS and no DBS. Under bilateral and left-only DBS conditions, our results exhibited a significant improvement in motor symptoms but worsening of speech and language. These findings contribute to the growing body of literature demonstrating that bilateral STN DBS compromises speech and language function and suggests that these negative effects may be principally due to left-sided stimulation. These findings may have practical clinical consequences, suggesting that clinicians might optimize motor, speech and language functions by carefully adjusting left- and right-sided stimulation parameters.

  10. Anatomo-clinical correlation of intraoperative stimulation-induced side-effects during HF-DBS of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tamma, F; Caputo, E; Chiesa, V; Egidi, M; Locatelli, M; Rampini, P; Cinnante, C; Pesenti, A; Priori, A

    2002-09-01

    The efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is dependent on the accuracy of targeting. In order to reduce the number of passes and, consequently, the duration of surgery and risk of bleeding, we have set up a new method based on direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) localisation of the STN. This procedure allows a short duration of the neurophysiological session (one or two initial tracks). Whenever a supplementary track is needed, the stimulation-induced side effects are analysed to choose from one of the remaining holes in Ben's gun. A good knowledge of anatomical structures surrounding the STN is mandatory to relate side effects to the actual position of the track. In our series of 11 patients (22 sides, 37 tracks), the most common and reproducible side effects were those characterised by motor, sensorial, oculomotor and vegetative signs and symptoms. Moreover, the therapeutic window (distance between the current intensity needed to obtain the best clinical effect and the intensity capable to induce side effects) predicted clinical efficacy in the long-term, and contributed to the choice of which among the examined tracks had to be implanted with the chronic macroelectrode.

  11. Effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation during exercise on the mesolimbocortical dopaminergic region in Parkinson's disease: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Takao; Sugiyama, Kenji; Yagi, Shunsuke; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Kanno, Toshihiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Ito, Tae; Terada, Tatsuhiro; Namba, Hiroki; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2013-03-01

    To elucidate the dynamic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during activity on the dopaminergic system, 12 PD patients who had STN-DBS operations at least 1 month prior, underwent two positron emission tomography scans during right-foot movement in DBS-off and DBS-on conditions. To quantify motor performance changes, the motion speed and mobility angle of the foot at the ankle were measured twice. Estimations of the binding potential of [(11)C]raclopride (BP(ND)) were based on the Logan plot method. Significant motor recovery was found in the DBS-on condition. The STN-DBS during exercise significantly reduced the [(11)C]raclopride BP(ND) in the caudate and the nucleus accumbens (NA), but not in the dorsal or ventral putamen. The magnitude of dopamine release in the NA correlated negatively with the magnitude of motor load, indicating that STN-DBS facilitated motor behavior more smoothly and at less expense to dopamine neurons in the region. The lack of dopamine release in the putamen and the significant dopamine release in the ventromedial striatum by STN-DBS during exercise indicated dopaminergic activation occurring in the motivational circuit during action, suggesting a compensatory functional activation of the motor loop from the nonmotor to the motor loop system.

  12. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved.

  13. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved. PMID:28317915

  14. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-03-20

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved.

  15. [Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury].

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinícius Trindade Gomes da; Iglesio, Ricardo; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: O risco de trombose venosa profunda encontra-se aumentado em doentes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico, mas a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda se confronta com o possível risco de piora de lesões hemorrágicas relacionados ao traumatismo cranioencefálico. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão crítica do tema e propomos um protocolo de profilaxia para estes doentes.Material e Métodos: Foi realizada uma pesquisa na base de dados Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, e Scielo de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2014 com a expressão de busca âÄúdeep venous thrombosis and prophylaxis and traumatic brain injuryâÄù. Foram encontrados 44 artigos usando os termos MeSH definidos. Destes foram selecionados 23 artigos, usando como critérios: publicação em inglês ou português, fase aguda do traumatismo cranioencefálico moderado e grave, profilaxia mecânica não invasiva ou química.Resultados: O traumatismo cranioencefálico é um fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. A chance de trombose venosa profunda é 2,59 vezes maior em doentes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. A prevalência de trombose venosa profunda e embolia pulmonar em doentes que sofreram traumatismo cranioencefálico é de 20%, podendo atingir 30% dos doentes em alguns estudos.Discussão e Conclusão: As diversas formas de traumatismo de forma isolada constituem fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. Ensaios clínicos são necessários para estabelecer a eficácia da profilaxia e o melhor momento de iniciar medicação para trombose venosa profunda em doentes com traumatismo craniencefálico.

  16. External trial deep brain stimulation device for the application of desynchronizing stimulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Roulet, J.-C.; Niederhauser, J. J.; Döll, W.; Kirlangic, M. E.; Lysyansky, B.; Krachkovskyi, V.; Bhatti, M. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Sasse, L.; Bührle, C. P.; Speckmann, E.-J.; Götz, M.; Sturm, V.; Freund, H.-J.; Schnell, U.; Tass, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the past decade deep brain stimulation (DBS)—the application of electrical stimulation to specific target structures via implanted depth electrodes—has become the standard treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. These diseases are characterized by pathological synchronized neuronal activity in particular brain areas. We present an external trial DBS device capable of administering effectively desynchronizing stimulation techniques developed with methods from nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics according to a model-based approach. These techniques exploit either stochastic phase resetting principles or complex delayed-feedback mechanisms. We explain how these methods are implemented into a safe and user-friendly device.

  17. Development of Demand-Controlled Deep Brain Stimulation Techniques Based on Stochastic Phase Resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, Peter A.

    2003-05-01

    Stimulation techniques are discussed here which make it possible to effectively desynchronize a synchronized cluster of globally coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. To this end composite stimuli are used which consist of a first, stronger stimulus followed by a second, weaker stimulus after a constant time delay. The first stimulus controls the dynamics of the cluster by resetting it, whereas the second stimulus desynchronizes the cluster by hitting it in a vulnerable state. The first, resetting stimulus can be a strong single pulse, a high-frequency pulse train or a low-frequency pulse train. The cluster's resynchronization can effectively be blocked by repeated administration of a composite stimulus. Demand controlled deep brain stimulation with these desynchronizing stimulation techniques is suggested for the therapy of patients suffering from tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease or essential tremor as a milder and more efficient therapy compared to the standard permanent high-frequency deep brain stimulation.

  18. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    PubMed

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  19. Deep Brain Stimulation in Huntington’s Disease—Preliminary Evidence on Pathophysiology, Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Wojtecki, Lars; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Hartmann, Christian Johannes; Elben, Saskia; Omlor, Sonja; Schnitzler, Alfons; Vesper, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is one of the most disabling degenerative movement disorders, as it not only affects the motor system but also leads to cognitive disabilities and psychiatric symptoms. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pallidum is a promising symptomatic treatment targeting the core motor symptom: chorea. This article gives an overview of preliminary evidence on pathophysiology, safety and efficacy of DBS in HD. PMID:27589813

  20. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson's disease. Preliminary experience at Oxford.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A; Muthusamy, K A; De Pennington, N; Joint, C A; Aziz, T Z

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a novel neurosurgical therapy developed to address symptoms of gait freezing and postural instability in Parkinson's disease and related disorders. Here, we summarize our non-human primate and neuroimaging research of relevance to our surgical targeting of the PPN. We also describe our clinical experience of PPN DBS with greatest motor improvements achieved by stimulation at low frequencies.

  1. Fiber-based tissue identification for electrode placement in deep brain stimulation neurosurgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaoli, Damon T.; Lapointe, Nicolas; Goetz, Laurent; Parent, Martin; Prudhomme, Michel; Cantin, Léo.; Galstian, Tigran; Messaddeq, Younès.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation's effectiveness relies on the ability of the stimulating electrode to be properly placed within a specific target area of the brain. Optical guidance techniques that can increase the accuracy of the procedure, without causing any additional harm, are therefore of great interest. We have designed a cheap optical fiber-based device that is small enough to be placed within commercially available DBS stimulating electrodes' hollow cores and that is capable of sensing biological information from the surrounding tissue, using low power white light. With this probe we have shown the ability to distinguish white and grey matter as well as blood vessels, in vitro, in human brain samples and in vivo, in rats. We have also repeated the in vitro procedure with the probe inserted in a DBS stimulating electrode and found the results were in good agreement. We are currently validating a second fiber optic device, with micro-optical components, that will result in label free, molecular level sensing capabilities, using CARS spectroscopy. The final objective will be to use this data in real time, during deep brain stimulation neurosurgery, to increase the safety and accuracy of the procedure.

  2. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5) mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development. PMID:21466694

  3. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole C; Ostrem, Jill L; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S; San Luciano, Marta; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; Starr, Philip A

    2015-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied for the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients, neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the beta rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as that of the reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive beta phase locking of motor cortex neurons.

  4. Temporally Coordinated Deep Brain Stimulation in the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum Synergistically Enhances Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Katnani, Husam A.; Patel, Shaun R.; Kwon, Churl-Su; Abdel-Aziz, Samer; Gale, John T.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2016-01-01

    The primate brain has the remarkable ability of mapping sensory stimuli into motor behaviors that can lead to positive outcomes. We have previously shown that during the reinforcement of visual-motor behavior, activity in the caudate nucleus is correlated with the rate of learning. Moreover, phasic microstimulation in the caudate during the reinforcement period was shown to enhance associative learning, demonstrating the importance of temporal specificity to manipulate learning related changes. Here we present evidence that extends upon our previous finding by demonstrating that temporally coordinated phasic deep brain stimulation across both the nucleus accumbens and caudate can further enhance associative learning. Monkeys performed a visual-motor associative learning task and received stimulation at time points critical to learning related changes. Resulting performance revealed an enhancement in the rate, ceiling, and reaction times of learning. Stimulation of each brain region alone or at different time points did not generate the same effect. PMID:26725509

  5. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole; Ostrem, Jill L.; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S.; Luciano, Marta San; Galifianakis, Nicholas; Starr, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied to the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here, we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the β rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive β phase locking of motor cortex neurons. PMID:25867121

  6. Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin; Höllig, Anke; Falkenburger, Björn; Tan, Sonny KH

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets. PMID:25914538

  7. Temporally Coordinated Deep Brain Stimulation in the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum Synergistically Enhances Associative Learning.

    PubMed

    Katnani, Husam A; Patel, Shaun R; Kwon, Churl-Su; Abdel-Aziz, Samer; Gale, John T; Eskandar, Emad N

    2016-01-04

    The primate brain has the remarkable ability of mapping sensory stimuli into motor behaviors that can lead to positive outcomes. We have previously shown that during the reinforcement of visual-motor behavior, activity in the caudate nucleus is correlated with the rate of learning. Moreover, phasic microstimulation in the caudate during the reinforcement period was shown to enhance associative learning, demonstrating the importance of temporal specificity to manipulate learning related changes. Here we present evidence that extends upon our previous finding by demonstrating that temporally coordinated phasic deep brain stimulation across both the nucleus accumbens and caudate can further enhance associative learning. Monkeys performed a visual-motor associative learning task and received stimulation at time points critical to learning related changes. Resulting performance revealed an enhancement in the rate, ceiling, and reaction times of learning. Stimulation of each brain region alone or at different time points did not generate the same effect.

  8. Hierarchical Neural Representation of Dreamed Objects Revealed by Brain Decoding with Deep Neural Network Features

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2017-01-01

    Dreaming is generally thought to be generated by spontaneous brain activity during sleep with patterns common to waking experience. This view is supported by a recent study demonstrating that dreamed objects can be predicted from brain activity during sleep using statistical decoders trained with stimulus-induced brain activity. However, it remains unclear whether and how visual image features associated with dreamed objects are represented in the brain. In this study, we used a deep neural network (DNN) model for object recognition as a proxy for hierarchical visual feature representation, and DNN features for dreamed objects were analyzed with brain decoding of fMRI data collected during dreaming. The decoders were first trained with stimulus-induced brain activity labeled with the feature values of the stimulus image from multiple DNN layers. The decoders were then used to decode DNN features from the dream fMRI data, and the decoded features were compared with the averaged features of each object category calculated from a large-scale image database. We found that the feature values decoded from the dream fMRI data positively correlated with those associated with dreamed object categories at mid- to high-level DNN layers. Using the decoded features, the dreamed object category could be identified at above-chance levels by matching them to the averaged features for candidate categories. The results suggest that dreaming recruits hierarchical visual feature representations associated with objects, which may support phenomenal aspects of dream experience. PMID:28197089

  9. Hierarchical Neural Representation of Dreamed Objects Revealed by Brain Decoding with Deep Neural Network Features.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2017-01-01

    Dreaming is generally thought to be generated by spontaneous brain activity during sleep with patterns common to waking experience. This view is supported by a recent study demonstrating that dreamed objects can be predicted from brain activity during sleep using statistical decoders trained with stimulus-induced brain activity. However, it remains unclear whether and how visual image features associated with dreamed objects are represented in the brain. In this study, we used a deep neural network (DNN) model for object recognition as a proxy for hierarchical visual feature representation, and DNN features for dreamed objects were analyzed with brain decoding of fMRI data collected during dreaming. The decoders were first trained with stimulus-induced brain activity labeled with the feature values of the stimulus image from multiple DNN layers. The decoders were then used to decode DNN features from the dream fMRI data, and the decoded features were compared with the averaged features of each object category calculated from a large-scale image database. We found that the feature values decoded from the dream fMRI data positively correlated with those associated with dreamed object categories at mid- to high-level DNN layers. Using the decoded features, the dreamed object category could be identified at above-chance levels by matching them to the averaged features for candidate categories. The results suggest that dreaming recruits hierarchical visual feature representations associated with objects, which may support phenomenal aspects of dream experience.

  10. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  11. Pre-operative DTI and probabilisitic tractography in four patients with deep brain stimulation for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Owen, S L F; Heath, J; Kringelbach, M; Green, A L; Pereira, E A C; Jenkinson, N; Jegan, T; Stein, J F; Aziz, T Z

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to examine, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), differences in electrode placement in four patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain of varying aetiology. A pre-operative DTI was obtained for each patient, who was then implanted with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the periventricular/periaqueductal grey area with good pain relief. Using seeds from the postoperative MRI scan, probabilistic tractography was performed from the pre-operative DTI.

  12. Deep ensemble learning of sparse regression models for brain disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies on brain imaging analysis witnessed the core roles of machine learning techniques in computer-assisted intervention for brain disease diagnosis. Of various machine-learning techniques, sparse regression models have proved their effectiveness in handling high-dimensional data but with a small number of training samples, especially in medical problems. In the meantime, deep learning methods have been making great successes by outperforming the state-of-the-art performances in various applications. In this paper, we propose a novel framework that combines the two conceptually different methods of sparse regression and deep learning for Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment diagnosis and prognosis. Specifically, we first train multiple sparse regression models, each of which is trained with different values of a regularization control parameter. Thus, our multiple sparse regression models potentially select different feature subsets from the original feature set; thereby they have different powers to predict the response values, i.e., clinical label and clinical scores in our work. By regarding the response values from our sparse regression models as target-level representations, we then build a deep convolutional neural network for clinical decision making, which thus we call 'Deep Ensemble Sparse Regression Network.' To our best knowledge, this is the first work that combines sparse regression models with deep neural network. In our experiments with the ADNI cohort, we validated the effectiveness of the proposed method by achieving the highest diagnostic accuracies in three classification tasks. We also rigorously analyzed our results and compared with the previous studies on the ADNI cohort in the literature.

  13. Human brain activity patterns beyond the isoelectric line of extreme deep coma.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Daniel; Florea, Bogdan; Amzica, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) reflects brain electrical activity. A flat (isoelectric) EEG, which is usually recorded during very deep coma, is considered to be a turning point between a living brain and a deceased brain. Therefore the isoelectric EEG constitutes, together with evidence of irreversible structural brain damage, one of the criteria for the assessment of brain death. In this study we use EEG recordings for humans on the one hand, and on the other hand double simultaneous intracellular recordings in the cortex and hippocampus, combined with EEG, in cats. They serve to demonstrate that a novel brain phenomenon is observable in both humans and animals during coma that is deeper than the one reflected by the isoelectric EEG, and that this state is characterized by brain activity generated within the hippocampal formation. This new state was induced either by medication applied to postanoxic coma (in human) or by application of high doses of anesthesia (isoflurane in animals) leading to an EEG activity of quasi-rhythmic sharp waves which henceforth we propose to call ν-complexes (Nu-complexes). Using simultaneous intracellular recordings in vivo in the cortex and hippocampus (especially in the CA3 region) we demonstrate that ν-complexes arise in the hippocampus and are subsequently transmitted to the cortex. The genesis of a hippocampal ν-complex depends upon another hippocampal activity, known as ripple activity, which is not overtly detectable at the cortical level. Based on our observations, we propose a scenario of how self-oscillations in hippocampal neurons can lead to a whole brain phenomenon during coma.

  14. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  15. Frameless Stereotactic Insertion of Viewsite Brain Access System with Microscope-Mounted Tracking Device for Resection of Deep Brain Lesions: Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Lall, Rohan; Fanous, Andrew A; Boockvar, John; Langer, David J

    2017-01-01

    The surgical management of deep brain tumors is often challenging due to the limitations of stereotactic needle biopsies and the morbidity associated with transcortical approaches. We present a novel microscopic navigational technique utilizing the Viewsite Brain Access System (VBAS) (Vycor Medical, Boca Raton, FL, USA) for resection of a deep parietal periventricular high-grade glioma as well as another glioma and a cavernoma with no related morbidity. The approach utilized a navigational tracker mounted on a microscope, which was set to the desired trajectory and depth. It allowed gentle continuous insertion of the VBAS directly to a deep lesion under continuous microscopic visualization, increasing safety by obviating the need to look up from the microscope and thus avoiding loss of trajectory. This technique has broad value for the resection of a variety of deep brain lesions. PMID:28331774

  16. Response to Deep Brain Stimulation in Three Brain Targets with Implications in Mental Disorders: A PET Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Casquero-Veiga, Marta; Hadar, Ravit; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Desco, Manuel; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate metabolic changes in brain networks by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and dorsomedial thalamus (DM) using positron emission tomography (PET) in naïve rats. Methods 43 male Wistar rats underwent stereotactic surgery and concentric bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes were bilaterally implanted into one of the three brain sites. [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-PET (18FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) scans were performed at the 7th (without DBS) and 9th day (with DBS) after surgery. Stimulation period matched tracer uptake period. Images were acquired with a small-animal PET-CT scanner. Differences in glucose uptake between groups were assessed with Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results DBS induced site-specific metabolic changes, although a common increased metabolic activity in the piriform cortex was found for the three brain targets. mPFC-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, temporal and amygdala, and reduced it in the cerebellum, brainstem (BS) and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). NAcc-DBS increased metabolic activity in the subiculum and olfactory bulb, and decreased it in the BS, PAG, septum and hypothalamus. DM-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, NAcc and thalamus and decreased it in the temporal and cingulate cortex. Conclusions DBS induced significant changes in 18FDG uptake in brain regions associated with the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Stimulation of mPFC, NAcc and DM induced different patterns of 18FDG uptake despite interacting with the same circuitries. This may have important implications to DBS research suggesting individualized target selection according to specific neural modulatory requirements. PMID:28033356

  17. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain.

  18. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain. PMID:27057543

  19. Paradoxical augmented relapse in alcohol-dependent rats during deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, R; Vengeliene, V; Barroeta Hlusicke, E; Canals, S; Noori, H R; Wieske, F; Rummel, J; Harnack, D; Heinz, A; Spanagel, R; Winter, C

    2016-01-01

    Case reports indicate that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens may be beneficial to alcohol-dependent patients. The lack of clinical trials and our limited knowledge of deep-brain stimulation call for translational experiments to validate these reports. To mimic the human situation, we used a chronic-continuous brain-stimulation paradigm targeting the nucleus accumbens and other brain sites in alcohol-dependent rats. To determine the network effects of deep-brain stimulation in alcohol-dependent rats, we combined electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and studied neurotransmitter levels in nucleus accumbens-stimulated versus sham-stimulated rats. Surprisingly, we report here that electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens led to augmented relapse behavior in alcohol-dependent rats. Our associated fMRI data revealed some activated areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and caudate putamen. However, when we applied stimulation to these areas, relapse behavior was not affected, confirming that the nucleus accumbens is critical for generating this paradoxical effect. Neurochemical analysis of the major activated brain sites of the network revealed that the effect of stimulation may depend on accumbal dopamine levels. This was supported by the finding that brain-stimulation-treated rats exhibited augmented alcohol-induced dopamine release compared with sham-stimulated animals. Our data suggest that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens enhances alcohol-lik