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Sample records for successive solar minima

  1. Geocoronal hydrogen observations spanning three solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Haffner, L. M.; Reynolds, R. J.; Woodward, R. C.

    2008-11-01

    The 11-year solar cycle is a dominant source of natural variability in the upper atmosphere, and its effect on atomic hydrogen distributions and emissions must be understood to investigate possible signs of longer-term climatic trends in this region. We present midlatitude geocoronal hydrogen Balmer α observations from solar cycle 23 (1997-2006) and three solar minimum periods, 1985, 1997, and 2006. The 1997 through 2006 observations were taken with the Wisconsin H-α Mapper Fabry-Perot (WHAM), a ground-based CCD-annular summing instrument that began observations at the Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona in 1997. The 1985 observations were made with a similarly designed "pre-WHAM" Fabry-Perot Interferometer utilizing photomultiplier detection and located in Wisconsin. WHAM has consistently observed higher column emission intensities during solar maximum periods than during solar minimum conditions, with the ratio dependent upon the viewing geometry. The observations from three solar minimum periods agree to within 18% uncertainties over most of the shadow altitude range. An analysis of recent Fabry-Perot observations of upper atmospheric hydrogen during solar cycle 23 and during three solar minima (1985, 1997, 2006) established a reference data set of highly precise, consistently calibrated, thermospheric plus exospheric hydrogen column emission observations from northern midlatitudes that can be used to compare with future observations.

  2. Solar Twins and Stellar Maunder Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    2012-05-01

    In 1966, Olin C. Wilson undertook an answer to the question “Does the chromospheric activity of main-sequence stars vary with time, and if so, how?”, initiating the so-called HK Project at Mount Wilson Observatory, which resulted in a magnificent 43-year data set and which has spawned a number of complementary synoptic programs in both hemispheres. Subsequent developments, in particular the realization that activity controls angular momentum evolution in the stars and Sun, that solar activity modulates irradiance, and that there was a pronounced response of terrestrial climate to the Maunder Minimum, spurred efforts to identify solar twins, stars that Giusa Cayrel de Strobel required to possess “fundamental physical parameters very similar, if not identical to those of the Sun.” Non-cycling states appear to occur in the Mount Wilson stars and in other synoptic data with about the same frequency that the Sun’s grand minima occur in the long-term proxy record, suggesting that stellar analogs of the Maunder Minimum may be used to guide understanding of the Sun’s state in the late seventeenth century and, as appears possible given the extended Cycle 23/24 minimum, in the near future. However, the magnitude limits of the existing surveys have kept the sample of solar twins small and long-term monitoring programs have only recently begun to accumulate good time-domain data beyond the canonical HK-index. Addressing these and other issues toward understanding prolonged stellar minima is therefore a key area of inquiry in solar-stellar connection work for the next decade. I will summarize the state of the field and the most promising lines of work for the immediate future. I and my colleagues Wes Lockwood and Brian Skiff sincerely appreciate the National Science Foundation’s long-time support of stellar cycles work at Lowell Observatory.

  3. GRAND MINIMA AND NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRY OF SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olemskoy, S. V.; Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2013-11-01

    A solar-type dynamo model in a spherical shell is developed with allowance for random dependence of the poloidal field generation mechanism on time and latitude. The model shows repeatable epochs of a strongly decreased amplitude of magnetic cycles similar to the Maunder minimum of solar activity. Random dependence of dynamo parameters on latitude breaks the equatorial symmetry of generated fields. The model shows the correlation of the occurrence of grand minima with deviations in the dynamo field from dipolar parity. An increased north-south asymmetry of magnetic activity can, therefore, be an indicator of transitions to grand minima. Qualitative interpretation of this correlation is suggested. Statistics of grand minima in the model are close to the Poisson random process, indicating that the onset of a grand minimum is statistically independent of preceding minima.

  4. Connection between solar activity cycles and grand minima generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Lepreti, F.; Laurenza, M.; Alberti, T.; Carbone, V.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The revised dataset of sunspot and group numbers (released by WDC-SILSO) and the sunspot number reconstruction based on dendrochronologically dated radiocarbon concentrations have been analyzed to provide a deeper characterization of the solar activity main periodicities and to investigate the role of the Gleissberg and Suess cycles in the grand minima occurrence. Methods: Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) has been used to isolate the time behavior of the different solar activity periodicities. A general consistency among the results from all the analyzed datasets verifies the reliability of the EMD approach. Results: The analysis on the revised sunspot data indicates that the highest energy content is associated with the Schwabe cycle. In correspondence with the grand minima (Maunder and Dalton), the frequency of this cycle changes to longer timescales of 14 yr. The Gleissberg and Suess cycles, with timescales of 60-120 yr and 200-300 yr, respectively, represent the most energetic contribution to sunspot number reconstruction records and are both found to be characterized by multiple scales of oscillation. The grand minima generation and the origin of the two expected distinct types of grand minima, Maunder and longer Spörer-like, are naturally explained through the EMD approach. We found that the grand minima sequence is produced by the coupling between Gleissberg and Suess cycles, the latter being responsible for the most intense and longest Spörer-like minima (with typical duration longer than 80 yr). Finally, we identified a non-solar component, characterized by a very long scale oscillation of 7000 yr, and the Hallstatt cycle ( 2000 yr), likely due to the solar activity. Conclusions: These results provide new observational constraints on the properties of the solar cycle periodicities, the grand minima generation, and thus the long-term behavior of the solar dynamo.

  5. SOLAR ROTATION EFFECTS ON THE HELIOSHEATH FLOW NEAR SOLAR MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Sergey N.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2012-05-01

    The interaction between fast and slow solar wind (SW) due to the Sun's rotation creates corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which further interact with each other creating complex plasma structures at large heliospheric distances. We investigate the global influence of CIRs on the SW flow in the inner heliosheath between the heliospheric termination shock (TS) and the heliopause. The stream interaction model takes into account the major global effects due to slow-fast stream interaction near solar minima. The fast and slow wind parameters are derived from the Ulysses observations. We investigate the penetration of corotating structures through the TS and their further propagation through the heliosheath. It is shown that the heliosheath flow structure may experience substantial modifications, including local decreases in the radial velocity component observed by Voyager 1.

  6. Dynamical characterization of the last prolonged solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo Gustavo; Compagnucci, Rosa Hilda

    2012-11-01

    The planetary hypothesis of the solar cycle is an old idea in which the gravitational influence of the planets has a non-negligible effect on the causes of the solar magnetic cycle. The advance of this hypothesis is based on phenomenological correlations between dynamical parameters of the Sun's movement around the barycentre of the Solar System and sunspots time series; and more especially, identifying relationships linking solar barycentric dynamics with prolonged minima (especially Grand Minima events). However, at present there is no clear physical mechanism relating these phenomena. The possible celestial influence on solar cycle modulation is of great importance not only in solar physics but also in Earth sciences, because prolonged solar minima have associated important climatic and telluric variations, in particular, during the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. In this work we looked for a possible causal link in relation with solar barycentric dynamics and prolonged minima events. We searched for particular changes in the Sun's acceleration and concentrated on long-term variations of the solar cycle. We show how the orbital angular momentum of the Sun evolves and how the inclination of the solar barycentric orbit varies during the epochs of orbital retrogressions. In particular, at these moments, the radial component of the Sun's acceleration (i.e., in the barycentre-Sun direction) had an exceptional magnitude. These radial impulses occurred at the very beginning of the Maunder Minimum, during the Dalton Minimum and also at the maximum of cycle 22 before the present extended minimum. We also found a strong correlation between the planetary torque and the observed sunspots international number around that maximum. We apply our results in a novel theory of Sun-planets interaction that it is sensitive to Sun barycentric dynamics and found a very important effect on the Sun's capability of storing hypothetical reservoirs of potential energy that could be released by

  7. All Solar Minima are not Alike: Consequences at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Gibson, S. E.; de Toma, G.; Emery, B. A.; Onsager, T. G.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, B. J.

    2009-05-01

    New observations that were collected as part of the IHY Whole Heliosphere Campaign are changing our present understanding of solar quiet intervals and the solar minimum sun-Earth system. These observations indicate that significant differences in coronal hole distribution can occur at the Sun from one solar minimum to the next. The high-speed coronal hole wind is the primary source of space weather disturbances that perturb the Earth's upper atmosphere and create reactive species. The broad low-latitude coronal holes that developed this solar minimum produced strong, long-lived and recurring high-speed streams. This is in contrast to the weaker and more sporadic streams last solar minimum produced by narrow equatorward extensions from polar coronal holes. Since the speed, duration and southward magnetic field component determine the severity of space weather effects, the geospace environment responds quite differently to these two coronal hole distributions. Despite the fact that the present solar minimum is exceptionally quiet with sunspot numbers the lowest in 75 years, solar wind density and IMF strength at the lowest values ever observed and with geomagnetic indices and solar EUV fluxes the lowest in three solar cycles, magnetic activity at Earth is showing new features and has remained surprisingly strong. The details of newly discovered geospace and upper atmospheric effects are described and possible reasons behind them discussed. What these new data sets demonstrate is that the distribution of low-latitude open magnetic flux on the Sun is a key factor in determining how the Earth will respond to a given solar minimum. If the low sunspot conditions of solar minima have analogies to conditions during solar "grand minima" (where sunspots all but disappear for extended periods), then these new results imply that high-speed solar wind streams may introduce complexities to the Earth's response during these times as well.

  8. Grand minima of solar activity and sociodynamics of culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirsky, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Indices of creative productivity introduced by C. Murrey were used to verify S. Ertel's conclusion about a global increase in creative productivity during the prolonged minimum of solar activity in 1640-1710. It was found that these indices for mathematicians, philosophers, and scientists increase in the Maunder era by factor of 1.6 in comparison with intervals of the same length before and after the minimum. A similar effect was obtained for mathematicians and philosophers for five earlier equitype minima in total (an increase by a factor of 1.9). The regularity that is revealed is confirmed by the fact that the most important achievements of high-ranking mathematicians and philosophers during the whole time period (2300 years) considered in this study fall on epochs of reduced levels of solar activity. The rise in the probability of the generation of rational ideas during grand minima is reflected also in the fact that they precede the appearance of written language and farming. Ultra-low-frequency electromagnetic fields appear to serve as a physical agent stimulating the activity of the brain's left hemisphere during the epochs of minima.

  9. Comparative analysis of solar minima with EUV tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloveras, D. G.; Nuevo, F. A.; Vásquez, A. M.; Frazin, R. A.

    2016-08-01

    Due to the dynamo mechanism of the Sun, the magnetic activity of its atmosphere presents a periodic cycle about 11 years long. The last three solar cycles have shown a systematic decrease of activity, with the last minimum (2008/2009) being considerably more quiet than the previous one (1996), as well as magnetically weaker. We present a comparative analysis of three--dimensional thermodynamical structure of the lower corona for last two minimima, based on differential emission measure tomography. The study is combined with potential extrapolations of the coronal magnetic field. To study the minima of 1996 and 2009 we use data taken by the instruments EIT/SOHO y EUVI/STEREO, respectively. The aim of the work is to establish if there were systematic thermodynamical differences in the lower corona during the two minima.

  10. The supercenturial solar minima and their preceding phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, Boris P.

    The main aim of this study is to find different observational characteristics of sunspot cycles, which could be used as precursors of forthcoming supercenturial solar minima. A data set of indirect records for solar activity (so called Schove's series) between 214 BC - AD 2000 has been analyzed. Two potential precursors of the further behaviour of the solar activity have been pointed out - the violation of Gnevyshev-Ohl's rule in even-odd numbered pairs of Schwabe-Wolf's cycles and the increasing of the cycles duration. A third method for prediction, based on two-factor regression model has been applied too. In this method the magnitudes of both even-odd sunspot cycles are used as predictors. On the base of the actual data for the current pair of the Zurich cycles No.22 and 23 a prediction for a relatively weak sunspot cycle No. 24 with expected maximum about AD 2012/13 and Wolf's index W_{max}≈ 90 was made. A prediction of forthcoming supercenturial solar minimum in the period AD 2030-2080, like the Dalton minimum in AD 1795-1830, is given also. Some climatic effects may be expected in the period of the supercenturial solar minimum. As a result a "global cooling" climatic effect in the range of 0.4-0.7° C could be expected.

  11. Polar Magnetic Fields Observed During the Last Four Solar Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    The Sun's polar fields during the current minimum are the weakest in at least four solar cycles. The field strengths are fairly symmetric, unlike at least the two previous minima. We compare data from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to follow the polar field changes since 1976. The polar field is never observed well from Earth because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator, and each year the view of the north (south) is completely hidden for several months around March 7 (September 7). Analysis of the most favorably oriented MDI synoptic maps each year allows us to derive the fairly slowly evolving large-scale polar magnetic field pattern from 1996 to the present. We account for differential rotation and other geometric effects. The analysis allows us to provide a useful interpolated or extrapolated correction that can be smoothly incorporated into the global synoptic or synchronic maps above about 70 degrees latitude. The polar field is important in modeling the large-scale coronal and heliospheric field, particularly at minimum. Even though there has been extremely little solar activity over the last several months, at the current solar minimum the structure of the corona is much less equatorial than usual, in part because the polar fields are relatively weak.

  12. Relativistic electrons in the magnetospheric tail during solar activity minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibog, Elena; Kecskemety, Karoly; Logachev, Yurii

    Measurements of energetic particle fluxes in the Earth magnetosphere at large distances from the Earth (10 Re and more) are still sparse, and registering instruments usually have high background, that does not permit to determine low particle fluxes accurately, in particular those of subrelativistic electrons. Information on these fluxes and their dynamics are very important for understanding the structure of the magnetosphere, direction of particle drifts, mechanisms of the penetration of solar particles into the magnetosphere and other details of particle-field interaction. The orbit and instrumentation of the Earth satellite IMP-8 allows to fill up this gap to some extent. IMP-8 had a nearly circular orbit with a radius of about 35 Re. The orbital period was 12 days, of which 4 days was spent in the magnetospheric tail. The fluxes of 0.2-10 MeV electrons between 1974 and 2001 are analyzed in different parts of the IMP-8 orbit: at the entrance-exit from the magnetosphere, outside of the magnetosphere and in the near- magnetospheric space. It is shown that during quite periods of solar activity, even during solar minima, electron flux enhancements in the magnetospheric tail were observed due to acceleration mechanisms in the magnetosphere, penetration of solar particles and electrons from the Jovian magnetosphere.

  13. INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FLUX DEPLETION DURING PROTRACTED SOLAR MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Connick, David E.; Smith, Charles W.; Schwadron, Nathan A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu

    2011-01-20

    We examine near-Earth solar wind observations as assembled within the Omni data set over the past 15 years that constitute the latest solar cycle. We show that the interplanetary magnetic field continues to be depleted at low latitudes throughout the protracted solar minimum reaching levels below previously predicted minima. We obtain a rate of flux removal resulting in magnetic field reduction by 0.5 nT yr{sup -1} at 1 AU when averaged over the years 2005-2009 that reduces to 0.3 nT yr{sup -1} for 2007-2009. We show that the flux removal operates on field lines that follow the nominal Parker spiral orientation predicted for open field lines and are largely unassociated with recent ejecta. We argue that the field line reduction can only be accomplished by ongoing reconnection of nominally open field lines or very old closed field lines and we contend that these two interpretations are observationally equivalent and indistinguishable.

  14. Coronal Transient Events During Two Solar Minima: Their Solar Source Regions and Interplanetary Counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Mandrini, C. H.; Dasso, S.

    2011-12-01

    In the frame of two coordinated observational and research efforts, two full solar rotations were investigated in the times of two distinct solar minima. These two campaigns were dubbed Whole Sun Month (WSM; 10 August - 8 September 1996) and Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI; 20 March - 16 April 2008). The nearly uninterrupted gathering of solar coronal data since the beginning of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) era offers the exceptional possibility of comparing two solar minima for the first time, with regard to the coronal transient aspect. This study characterizes the variety of outward-traveling transients observed in the solar corona during both time intervals, from very narrow jet-like events to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Their solar source regions and ensuing interplanetary structures were identified and characterized as well, toward a global-scale description of their role in determining the heliosphere’s conditions. Multi-wavelength images provided by the space missions SOHO, Yohkoh (only WSM), and Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO; only WHI) and ground-based observatories were analyzed for coronal ejecta and their solar sources, while data registered by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft were inspected for interplanetary CMEs and magnetic clouds. Notable differences arise from the analysis of the detailed survey of events: more (fewer) ejecta during WHI (WSM), 12% (40%) were produced by active regions during WHI (WSM), and nearly no (high) deflection from the radial direction was observed during WHI (WSM). Instrumental aspects such as dissimilar resolution, cadence, and fields of view are considered in order to discern instrumentally driven disparities from inherent differences between solar minima.

  15. Coronal transients during two solar minima: their source regions and interplanetary counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Hebe; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Dasso, Sergio

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated two full solar rotations belonging to two distinct solar minima, in the frame of two coordinated observational and research campaigns. The nearly uninterrupted gathering of solar coronal data since the beginning of the SOHO era offers the exceptional possibility of comparing two solar minima for the first time, with regard to coronal transients. This study characterizes the variety of outward-travelling transients observed in the solar corona during both time intervals, from very narrow jet-like events to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Their solar source regions and ensuing interplanetary structures were identified and characterized. Multi-wavelength images from the space missions SOHO, Yohkoh and STEREO, and ground-based observatories were studied for coronal ejecta and their solar sources, while in situ data registered by the ACE spacecraft were inspected for interplanetary CMEs and magnetic clouds. Instrumental aspects such as dissimilar resolution, cadence, and fields of view are considered in order to discern instrumentally-driven disparities from inherent differences between solar minima.

  16. Solar Cycle Variability and Grand Minima Induced by Joy's Law Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark S.

    2017-08-01

    The strength of the solar cycle varies from one cycle to another in an irregular manner and the extreme example of this irregularity is the Maunder minimum when Sun produced only a few spots for several years. We explore the cause of these variabilities using a 3D Babcock--Leighton dynamo. In this model, based on the toroidal flux at the base of the convection zone, bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) are produced with flux, tilt angle, and time of emergence all obtain from their observed distributions. The dynamo growth is limited by a tilt quenching.The randomnesses in the BMR emergences make the poloidal field unequal and eventually cause an unequal solar cycle. When observed fluctuations of BMR tilts around Joy's law, i.e., a standard deviation of 15 degrees, are considered, our model produces a variation in the solar cycle comparable to the observed solar cycle variability. Tilt scatter also causes occasional Maunder-like grand minima, although the observed scatter does not reproduce correct statistics of grand minima. However, when we double the tilt scatter, we find grand minima consistent with observations. Importantly, our dynamo model can operate even during grand minima with only a few BMRs, without requiring any additional alpha effect.

  17. Polar and equatorial coronal hole winds at solar minima: From the heliosphere to the inner corona

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-02-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  18. 3D Electron Density Distributions in the Solar Corona during Solar Minima: Assessment for More Realistic Solar Wind Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Patoul, Judith; Foullon, Claire; Riley, Pete

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996-1997 and 2008-2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. The goals are to derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method and to compare the results between the two solar minima and with two magnetohydrodynamic models. First, we confirm that the values of the density distribution in thermodynamic models are more realistic than in polytropic ones. The tomography provides more accurate distributions in the polar regions, and we find that the density in tomographic and thermodynamic solutions varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We deduce that tomography offers reliable density distributions in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how they are magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  19. 3D ELECTRON DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA DURING SOLAR MINIMA: ASSESSMENT FOR MORE REALISTIC SOLAR WIND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Patoul, Judith de; Foullon, Claire; Riley, Pete E-mail: c.foullon@exeter.ac.uk

    2015-11-20

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996–1997 and 2008–2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. The goals are to derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method and to compare the results between the two solar minima and with two magnetohydrodynamic models. First, we confirm that the values of the density distribution in thermodynamic models are more realistic than in polytropic ones. The tomography provides more accurate distributions in the polar regions, and we find that the density in tomographic and thermodynamic solutions varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We deduce that tomography offers reliable density distributions in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how they are magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  20. Properties of Supergranulation During the Solar Minima of Cycles 22/23 and 23/24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter E.; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2011-01-01

    The solar minimum at the transition from cycle 23 to 24 was notable for its low level of activity and its extended duration. Among the various fields of study, the evolution of the solar convection zone may provide insight into the causes and consequences of this recent minimum. This study continues previous investigations of the characteristics of solar supergranulation, a convection component strongly linked to the structure of the magnetic field, namely the time-evolution of the global mean of supergranule cell size, determined from spectral analysis of MDI Dopplergrams from the two previous solar minima. Analyses of the global mean of supergranule sizes show a quasi-oscillatory nature to the evolution of this particular supergranule characteristic. Performing similar analyses on realistic, synthetic Doppler images show similar time-dependent characteristics. We conclude that the observed fluctuations are not observational artifacts, and that an underlying trend exists within the evolution of the supergranulation network.

  1. Short-Term Variations of Cosmic-Ray Intensity During the Recent Deep Solar Minimum and the Previous Four Solar Minima: A Wavelet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2015-10-01

    The recent, unusual solar cycle and solar minima between Cycles 23 and 24 have been studied extensively. Wavelet analysis of hourly cosmic-ray intensity during the last five solar minima reveals a number of short-term variations with few temporal shifts in the periods. This study suggests that deviations with a one-solar-rotation period and its harmonics are small during the recent minimum. However, deviations are considerably larger during the other minima. Analysis also demonstrates that the behavior of active regions is nearly the same during the minima of Cycles 19, 20, 21, and 22. The results also suggest that regions outside the streamer stalk are significantly larger in the recent solar minimum as opposed to the other minima.

  2. Annual ionospheric variations of the critical frequency foF2 at the equatorial stations during the solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed annual ionospheric variations of the critical frequency foF2 at the equatorial stations during the solar minima. There are essential distinctions between the global TEC (total electron content) and foF2 annual variations during the last two solar minima. Many authors concluded that the annual means of foF2 and the global TEC were reduced, while others investigations no found essential variations as compared with the previous solar minimum. Most if not all of authors suppose that the possible source of this phenomenon is the low level of the EUV (extreme ultraviolet) during the solar minima. The aim of our paper is to amplify these conclusions or to propose new factor which can change ionosphere parameters during the solar minima. We calculated annual variations of foF2 at the equatorial stations and compared these data with Dst annual variations. We found that in addition to low level of the EUV during the solar minima, geomagnetic storms effects have to be included as the influencing factor on annual ionospheric variations.

  3. SOHO/CELIAS Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) Absolute Solar EUV Irradiance Measurements Spanning Two Solar Minima (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D.

    2010-12-01

    The SOHO/CELIAS Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) has measured absolute EUV solar irradiance nearly continuously over a 15 year period that includes both the cycle 22/23 (1996) and cycle 23/24 (2008) solar minima. These measurements indicate that irradiance in the 26-34 nm spectral range, including the dominant He II 30.4 nm spectral line, was about 15% ± 6% lower during the more recent minimum compared to the previous minimum. The SEM data have been verified against measurements from seven sounding rocket calibration underflights that included a NIST calibrated SEM clone instrument as well as a Rare Gas Ionization Cell (RGIC) absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) detector. Additionally, the SEM measurements are in good agreement with measurements from the EUV Spectrophotomer (ESP) part of the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on SDO. ESP measurements from the EVE sounding rocket flight (2008) confirmed the very low solar EUV irradiance observed during the 23/24 minimum. A comparison of SEM and ESP data in the 30.4 nm spectral windows is presented.

  4. 3D electron density distributions in the solar corona during solar minima: assessment for more realistic solar wind modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Patoul, J.; Foullon, C.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling, and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996-1997 and 2008-2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. We derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method. First we compare the density distributions obtained from tomography with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solutions. The tomography provides more accurate distributions of electron densities in the polar regions, and we find that the observed density varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We conclude that tomography offers reliable density distribution in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how it is magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in-situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. This research combined with the MHD coronal modeling efforts has the potential to increase the reliability for future space weather forecasting.

  5. Depth-dose equivalent relationship for cosmic rays at various solar minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) pose a serious radiation hazard for long-duration missions. In designing a lunar habitat or a Mars transfer vehicle, the radiation exposure determines the GCR shielding thickness, and hence the weight of spacecraft. Using the spherically symmetric diffusion theory of the solar modulation of GCR, and data on the differential energy spectra of H, He, O, and Fe, from 1965 to 1989, it has been shown that (1) the flux is determined by the diffusion parameter which is a function of the time in the solar cycle, and (2) the fluxes in the 1954 and 1976-1977 solar minima were similar and higher than those in 1965. In this paper, we have extended the spherical solar modulation theory back to 1954. The 1954-1955 GCR flux was nearly the same as that from 1976 to 1977; the 1965 flux values were nearly the same as those in 1986. Using this theory we have obtained the GCR spectra for all the nuclei, and calculated the depth dose as a function of Al thickness. It is shown that the shielding required to stay below 0.5 Sv is 17.5 -3/+8 g/sq cm of Al, and 9 -1.5/+5 g/sq cm to stay below 0.6 Sv. The calculated dose equivalent using the ICRP 60 values for quality factors is about 15 percent higher than that calculated using the ICRP 26 value.

  6. Is the Sun heading for another Maunder Minimum? - Precursors of the grand solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, H.; Kitazawa, K.; Nagaya, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Masuda, K.; Nakamura, T.; Muraki, Y.

    2010-06-01

    The Sun shows a quasi-periodic ~200-year cycle of activity that causes sporadic intervals of minimal sunspot activity and prolonged sunspot absence lasting for several decades. Such long-term sunspot absence may influence global climate and appears to be associated with periods of global cooling and little ice ages. Long-lasting sunspot absences since the 13th century are specifically linked to periods of increased glaciation and colder temperatures world wide and the development of "Little Ice Ages". These include the Wolf (AD 1282-342), Spoerer (AD 1416-534), Maunder (AD 1645-1715), and Dalton (AD 1795-1825) periods of sunspot minima. By contrast, increased solar activity may be linked to periods of global warming. Consequently, it is important to establish a methodology that enables predictions of near-future, long-term reductions in solar activity. However, it remains difficult to predict even the timing of onset and amplitude of the next 11-year solar cycle. To address this problem, we examined the features of precursory solar cycles related to three prolonged intervals of sunspot absence that occurred during the past ~600 years. Carbon-14 based analyses of the evolution of solar cycles around the onset of two prolonged periods of sunspot absence, the Maunder Minimum and the Spoerer Minimum, reveal that at least the two preceding solar cycles were longer than usual by several years, as were the cycles during the periods of sunspot absence. The solar cycle is likely to show characteristic precursory features leading up to intervals of sunspot absence, and which can be differentiated by events of different durations.

  7. Comparative study of the equatorial ionosphere over Jicamarca during recent two solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Yang, Jun; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding; Wan, Weixing; Lee, Chien-Chih

    2012-01-01

    It is a critical issue that whether or not the extremely deep solar minimum of solar cycle 23/24 brought serious influences on the Earth's space environment. In this study, we collected and manually scaled the ionograms recorded by a DPS ionosonde at Jicamarca (12.0°S, 283.2°E) to retrieve F layer parameters and electron density (Ne) profiles. A comparative study is performed to evaluate the equatorial ionosphere in solar minima of cycle 22/23 (1996-1997) and 23/24 (2008-2009). The seasonal median values of the critical frequency of F2 layer (foF2) were remarkably reduced in four seasons during the deep solar minimum, compared to those in 1996-1997. It is the first time to find that lower values prevail at most times in 2008-2009 in the F2 layer peak height (hmF2) and Chapman scale height (Hm). The bottomside profile thickness (B0) shows higher values in 2008-2009 than that in 1996-1997 at some daytime intervals, although it also becomes smaller during the rest times. Furthermore, the ionosphere in 2008-2009 is contracted strongly at altitudes above hmF2 and more perceptible in the afternoon hours. The decrease in Ne is strongest in September equinox and weakest in June solstice. The ionospheric responses from solar minimum to minimum are mainly caused by the reduction in solar extreme ultraviolet intensity, and the contribution from dynamical processes competes and is variable. Analysis reveals that semiannual and longer-scale components are certainly reduced during the deep solar minimum, while shorter scale (e.g., 4 month) components may disrupt the decline picture at some times.

  8. Solar activity during the Holocene: the Hallstatt cycle and its consequence for grand minima and maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Gallet, Y.; Lopes, F.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Hulot, G.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Cosmogenic isotopes provide the only quantitative proxy for analyzing the long-term solar variability over a centennial timescale. While essential progress has been achieved in both measurements and modeling of the cosmogenic proxy, uncertainties still remain in the determination of the geomagnetic dipole moment evolution. Here we aim at improving the reconstruction of solar activity over the past nine millennia using a multi-proxy approach. Methods: We used records of the 14C and 10Be cosmogenic isotopes, current numerical models of the isotope production and transport in Earth's atmosphere, and available geomagnetic field reconstructions, including a new reconstruction relying on an updated archeo- and paleointensity database. The obtained series were analyzed using the singular spectrum analysis (SSA) method to study the millennial-scale trends. Results: A new reconstruction of the geomagnetic dipole field moment, referred to as GMAG.9k, is built for the last nine millennia. New reconstructions of solar activity covering the last nine millennia, quantified in terms of sunspot numbers, are presented and analyzed. A conservative list of grand minima and maxima is also provided. Conclusions: The primary components of the reconstructed solar activity, as determined using the SSA method, are different for the series that are based on 14C and 10Be. This shows that these primary components can only be ascribed to long-term changes in the terrestrial system and not to the Sun. These components have therefore been removed from the reconstructed series. In contrast, the secondary SSA components of the reconstructed solar activity are found to be dominated by a common ≈2400-year quasi-periodicity, the so-called Hallstatt cycle, in both the 14C and 10Be based series. This Hallstatt cycle thus appears to be related to solar activity. Finally, we show that the grand minima and maxima occurred intermittently over the studied period, with clustering near lows and highs

  9. A Change in the Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure as an Indicator of the Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Gurman, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Solar activity during 2007 - 2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +/- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycle 22/23 minimum when a yearly running-mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a higher concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008 - 2011.We interpret this higher concentration of spatial power in the transition region's global network structure as a larger number of larger-area features on the solar disk. These changes in the global network structure during solar minima may characterize, in part, the geo-effectiveness of the solar He II EUV irradiance in addition to the estimations based on its absolute levels.

  10. Comparison of the extended solar minimum of 2006-2009 with the Spoerer, Maunder, and Dalton Grand Minima in solar activity in the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, K. G.; Beer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We use cosmic radiation records (neutron monitor and the cosmogenic radionuclides, 10Be and 14C) as a proxy to compare the solar activity during the extended solar minimum 2006-2009, with that during the Grand Solar Minima and Maxima that occurred between 1391 and 2010. The inferred cosmic ray intensities during the Spoerer, Maunder, and Dalton Grand Minima were significantly greater than those during 2006-2009. The onset phases of the three Grand Minima extended over between two and five Schwabe (sunspot) cycles, the cosmic ray intensity at the Schwabe minima increasing from a value approximating that of 2006-2009, to substantially higher values later in the Grand Minimum. The minimum estimated strengths of the heliospheric magnetic field near Earth during the Grand Minima were 2.4 nT (Spoerer), <2.0 nT (Maunder), and 2.6 nT (Dalton), compared to 3.9 nT in 2009. We conclude that the periods of highest solar activity during the Maunder Minimum approximated those near the sunspot minima between 1954 and 1996. The average ratio of the maximum to minimum estimated HMF in the six Schwabe cycles in the Maunder Minimum is 1.54 (range 1.30-1.85) compared to 1.52 (1.31-1.63) for the modern epoch suggesting similar operation of the solar dynamo in both intervals. The onset phase of the Maunder Minimum extending over five Schwabe cycles, and the large increase in cosmic ray flux (and decrease in estimated heliospheric magnetic field), leads us to speculate that the magnetohydrodynamic amplification in the solar dynamo exhibits a relaxation time well in excess of the 11 year period of the Schwabe cycle.

  11. A phenomenological study of the timing of solar activity minima of the last millennium through a physical modeling of the Sun-Planets Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo Gustavo; Soon, Willie

    2015-01-01

    We numerically integrate the Sun’s orbital movement around the barycenter of the solar system under the persistent perturbation of the planets from the epoch J2000.0, backward for about one millennium, and forward for another millennium to 3000 AD. Under the Sun-Planets Interaction (SPI) framework and interpretation of Wolff and Patrone (2010), we calculated the corresponding variations of the most important storage of the specific potential energy (PE) within the Sun that could be released by the exchanges between two rotating, fluid-mass elements that conserve its angular momentum. This energy comes about as a result of the roto-translational dynamics of the cell around the solar system barycenter. We find that the maximum variations of this PE storage correspond remarkably well with the occurrences of well-documented Grand Minima (GM) solar events throughout the available proxy solar magnetic activity records for the past 1000 yr. It is also clear that the maximum changes in PE precede the GM events in that we can identify precursor warnings to the imminent weakening of solar activity for an extended period. The dynamical explanation of these PE minima is connected to the minima of the Sun’s position relative to the barycenter as well as the significant amount of time the Sun’s inertial motion revolving near and close to the barycenter. We presented our calculation of PE forward by another 1000 yr until 3000 AD. If the assumption of the solar activity minima corresponding to PE minima is correct, then we can identify quite a few significant future solar activity GM events with a clustering of PE minima pulses starting at around 2150 AD, 2310 AD, 2500 AD, 2700 AD and 2850 AD.

  12. Solar success in Chicago

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.

    1996-09-01

    The Woods home is not only an example of sound basic passive solar design, but also of airtight construction combined with exceptional air quality. If you`ve every flown through Chicago in the winter and been delayed by snow or fog, you`ve seen first-hand the challenge to solar energy design this climate presents. It`s the kind of challenge that Naperville architect Ken Woods relishes, has risen to, and loves to talk about. Ken `s ranch-style 3-bedroom home in Naperville, a suburb of Chicago, is a living, {open_quotes}breathing{close_quotes} testament to the effectiveness of passive solar design, even in a cold, cloudy winter climate. The energy-saving, money-saving design of Woods` house is both figuratively and literally {open_quotes}a breath of fresh air{close_quotes}. The Woods home is not only an example of sound basic passive solar design, but also of airtight construction combined with exceptional air quality.

  13. HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRIES IN THE POLAR SOLAR WIND OBSERVED BY ULYSSES NEAR THE MINIMA OF SOLAR CYCLES 22 AND 23

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2013-05-10

    We examined solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observations from Ulysses' first and third orbits to study hemispheric differences in the properties of the solar wind and IMF originating from the Sun's large polar coronal holes (PCHs) during the declining and minimum phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. We identified hemispheric asymmetries in several parameters, most notably {approx}15%-30% south-to-north differences in averages for the solar wind density, mass flux, dynamic pressure, and energy flux and the radial and total IMF magnitudes. These differences were driven by relatively larger, more variable solar wind density and radial IMF between {approx}36 Degree-Sign S-60 Degree-Sign S during the declining phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. These observations indicate either a hemispheric asymmetry in the PCH output during the declining and minimum phase of solar cycles 22 and 23 with the southern hemisphere being more active than its northern counterpart, or a solar cycle effect where the PCH output in both hemispheres is enhanced during periods of higher solar activity. We also report a strong linear correlation between these solar wind and IMF parameters, including the periods of enhanced PCH output, that highlight the connection between the solar wind mass and energy output and the Sun's magnetic field. That these enhancements were not matched by similar sized variations in solar wind speed points to the mass and energy responsible for these increases being added to the solar wind while its flow was subsonic.

  14. Major geophysical events and transitions of heliospheric magnetic field in the beginning, middle and end phase of the Maunder solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Michele; Straser, Valentino; Feron, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades we are moving towards the hypothesis that electromagnetic (EM) processes inside the solar system (not yet fully understood from a physical point of view), may be linked with the energy released during major geophysical events (energy expressed in magnitude or Volcanic Explosivity Index). This research has focused on analysis of the temporal relationship between EM processes inside the solar system and major geophysical events around the crucial phase of the Maunder solar minima (1645-1715). To carry out this study thirty-five limit values of the heliospheric magnetic field strength HMF (minimum and/or maximum) were compared, in terms of time, with twenty-one major geophysical events which occurred between 1600 and 1729. In the solar-terrestrial interaction, the concomitant conditions necessary for the amplification of the energy of the geophysical event, are two: i. low solar activity during a long period (from decades to centuries), for example, the historical solar minima: Wolf, Sporer, Maunder, Dalton, etc. and ii. fast and impulsive EM solar dynamo reorganizations in the short-term (one year or two years), are characteristic in the two periods of the solar cycle border, the incoming or outgoing of the solar minima or solar maximum. The reconstructed intensity of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) was the main set of data used to carry out the present study. HMF evaluated by the annual cosmogenic 10Be ice core data from Dye 3 and North GRIP, in Greenland [McCracken;Beer,Sol.Phys.,2015 in press]. Analysis of the data shows that all the major geophysical events, with magnitude and volcanic explosivity index: 8.7solar minimum, is confirmed by taking into account the comparison of the dates of major

  15. NmF2 trends at low and mid latitudes for the recent solar minima and comparison with IRI-2012 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, L.; Pezzopane, M.; Ezquer, R.; Cabrera, M.; Baskaradas, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    The ionospheric electron density peak (NmF2) is analyzed for the recent minima of solar activity for two mid-latitude stations, Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E, geomagnetic latitude 41.7°N, Italy) and Gibilmanna (37.9°N, 14.0°E, geomagnetic latitude 37.6°N, Italy), and for the low-latitude station of Tucumán (26.9°S, 294.6°E, geomagnetic latitude 17.2°S, Argentina), located in the south ridge of the equatorial ionization anomaly. An inter-minima comparison reveals that from an ionospheric point of view the last minimum of solar activity (minimum 23/24) was peculiar, with values of NmF2 lower than those recorded during the previous minima for all the stations and all the hours of the day. A more pronounced decrease is observed at Tucumán than at Rome and Gibilmanna. The study of the winter and semi-annual anomaly shows that at mid-latitude stations the winter anomaly is not visible only for the years 2008 and 2009, which represent the deeper part of the prolonged and anomalous last solar minimum. The same is for the semi-annual anomaly. A comparison with the version 2012 of the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI) is also carried out. The results reveal that for low solar activity the model works better at mid latitudes than at low latitudes, confirming the problems of IRI in correctly representing the low-latitude ionosphere. Nevertheless, using as input updated values of the solar and geomagnetic indices, no loss of accuracy is detected in the IRI performances for the last solar minimum with respect to the previous ones, both at mid and low latitudes.

  16. North west area of Tuscany, Italy : Are the solar maximum and solar minima a particular period for increased frequency of floods and local geological destabilization ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Michele; Straser, Valentino; Feron, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    river since 1939 (Data provided by Serchio River Authority and Aauthority and Magra Interregional River Authority), we observe that floods and/or local seismic events occur more frequently when there are solar maximum and solar minima.

  17. A successful solar cooking introduction model

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, W.F.

    1992-12-31

    The author reviews the process he has undertaken to introduce solar cooking in Central America. A slow but increasingly successful acceptance rate is attributed to the following factors: the adaptation of the physical design of the cooker to local conditions; the determination of essential accessories for successful cooking; preliminary assessment of the probability for successful solar cooking; the structure of the oven building workshops; the follow-up program for those who have built their solar ovens. The follow-up program is the emphasis of his current research. The program can be divided into two categories. One is physical maintenance, repair and upgrade needs. The second is education in solar cooking. Another is orientation in the physical use of the oven. While these measures are expected to increase utilization, subsidies will be needed if solar cookers are expected to compete with highly subsidized fuel alternatives such as natural gas and electricity.

  18. Collection of minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Uhlar, R.; Kucakova, H.; Svoboda, P.

    2011-12-01

    We present CCD times of minima for selected eclipsing binaries. Besides our own data as obtained at various observatories, also the photometric surveys (ASAS, SuperWASP, NSVS), as well as space telescopes (COROT, OMC) were used. The discovery of pulsations in V887 Aql, SU Aqr and V389 Cas and eccentric orbit in KO Nor are announced.

  19. National solar data network success stories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Three of the most successful applications in the MASEC reporting region are described. The three sites are the Scattergood School site in West Branch, Iowa; the South Dakota School of Mines site located at the Mount Rushmore Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota, and the Telex Communications site in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The first is a school recreation center, the second a park recreation center, and the third a business. All three are active systems and each exhibits a variety of approaches to providing space and domestic water heating. The major success of each is that a substantial portion of the heating load was provided by solar energy. The success of the NSDN program is that it indicates the approaches and parts of the systems that seem to work best, so that conclusions can be made about which applications are appropriate in varying circumstances. A brief report is presented for each system explaining the system, the energy flow through the system, the total cost, and the energy saved per year.

  20. National solar data network success stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Three of the most successful applications in the MASEC reporting region are described. The three sites are the Scattergood School site in West Branch, Iowa; the South Dakota School of Mines site located at the Mount Rushmore Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota, and the Telex Communications site in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The first is a school recreation center, the second a park recreation center, and the third a business. All three are active systems and each exhibits a variety of approaches to providing space and domestic water heating. The major success of each is that a substantial portion of the heating load was provided by solar energy. The success of the NSDN program is that it indictes the approaches and parts of the systems that seem to work best, so that conclusions can be made about which applications are appropriate in varying circumstances. A brief report is presented for each system explaining the system, the energy flow through the system, the total cost, and the energy saved per year.

  1. Seeking Global Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajuddin, Wan Ahmad

    1994-02-01

    Ease in finding the configuration at the global energy minimum in a symmetric neural network is important for combinatorial optimization problems. We carry out a comprehensive survey of available strategies for seeking global minima by comparing their performances in the binary representation problem. We recall our previous comparison of steepest descent with analog dynamics, genetic hill-climbing, simulated diffusion, simulated annealing, threshold accepting and simulated tunneling. To this, we add comparisons to other strategies including taboo search and one with field-ordered updating.

  2. Radiochemical Solar Neutrino Experiments - Successful and Otherwise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,R.L.

    2008-05-25

    Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ({sup 37}Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ({sup 71}Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled.

  3. OUT Success Stories: Solar Trough Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.

    2000-08-05

    The Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) plants use parabolic-trough solar collectors to capture the sun's energy and convert it to heat. The SEGS plants range in capacity from 13.8 to 80 MW, and they were constructed to meet Southern California Edison Company's periods of peak power demand.

  4. OUT Success Stories: Solar Trough Power Plants

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.

    2000-08-01

    The Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) plants use parabolic-trough solar collectors to capture the sun's energy and convert it to heat. The SEGS plants range in capacity from 13.8 to 80 MW, and they were constructed to meet Southern California Edison Company's periods of peak power demand.

  5. Solar Success Story at Moanalua Terrace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    Solar systems prove to be the environmentally and economically sound choice for heating water in U.S. Navy housing at Moanalua Terrace in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hawaii is a perfect environment for solar water heating,'' according to Alan Ikeda, a Housing Management Specialist with the Pacific Naval Facility Engineering Command Housing Department in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ''The sun shines most of the time, we don't have to worry about freezing, the state offers a 35% solar tax credit, and our local utility supports the purchase and installation of solar systems with generous rebates.'' The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction helped persuade the Navy to take advantage of Hawaii's solar resource and install solar water heaters on family housing units. At Moanalua Terrace, the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which they are rebuilding in four phases. Designers decided to use the opportunity to give the solar systems a try. When the 100 homes in Phase I were built, money was not available for solar water heaters. However, Ikeda subsequently secured a $130,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to retrofit the Phase I homes with solar systems. In retrofit applications, HECO rebates $800 per unit ($80,000 total) on approved equipment, and Pearl Harbor Family Housing will pay the difference of the estimated $340,000 total cost, or about $130,000. The 136 units built during Phase II of the Moanalua Terrace project included solar systems in their specifications, so the Navy was able to take advantage of the $1,500 per system HECO rebate for approved solar water heaters in new construction. The Navy chose direct (open-loop) active systems that circulate potable water through flat-plate collectors coated with a black chrome selective surface. Each system consists of a 4-foot by 8-foot (1.2-m by 2.4-m) collector made by American

  6. OUT Success Stories: Solar Hot Water Technology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Clyne, R.

    2000-08-01

    Solar hot water technology was made great strides in the past two decades. Every home, commercial building, and industrial facility requires hot water. DOE has helped to develop reliable and durable solar hot water systems. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors. Flat-plate collectors are commonly used in residential hot water systems and can be integrated into the architectural design of the building.

  7. Solar Two: A successful power tower demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    REILLY,HUGH E.; PACHECO,JAMES E.

    2000-03-02

    Solar Two, a 10MWe power tower plant in Barstow, California, successfully demonstrated the production of grid electricity at utility-scale with a molten-salt solar power tower. This paper provides an overview of the project, from inception in 1993 to closure in the spring of 1999. Included are discussions of the goals of the Solar Two consortium, the planned-vs.-actual timeline, plant performance, problems encountered, and highlights and successes of the project. The paper concludes with a number of key results of the Solar Two test and evaluation program.

  8. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joanne M.; Wales, David J.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric

    2016-02-07

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  9. Bromine enrichment in marsh sediments as a marker of environmental changes driven by Grand Solar Minima and anthropogenic activity (Caminha, NW of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Moreno, J; Fatela, F; Leorri, E; Araújo, M F; Moreno, F; De la Rosa, J; Freitas, M C; Valente, T; Corbett, D R

    2015-02-15

    A sediment core collected in Caminha tidal marsh, NW Portugal, was used to assess bromine (Br) signal over the last ca. 1,700 years. The Br temporal variability reflects its close relationship with soil/sediment organic matter (OM) and also alterations in Br biogeochemical recycling in marsh environment. The highest Br enrichment in sediments was found during the Maunder Solar Minimum, a major solar event characterized by lower irradiance (TSI) and temperature, increased cloudiness and albedo. The obtained results suggest that those climate-induced changes weakened the natural mechanisms that promote Br biochemical transformations, driven by both living plants metabolism and plant litter degradation, with the ensuing generation of volatile methyl bromide (CH3Br). It seems that the prevailing climate conditions during the Maunder favoured the retention of more Br in marsh ecosystem, ultimately decreasing the biogenic Br emissions to the atmosphere. During the 20th century, the Br pattern in sediments appears to mirror likewise anthropogenic sources. The significant correlation (p<0.05) between Br/OM ratios and Pb contents in sediments after 1934 suggests a common source. This is most probably related with the rise, massive consumption and prohibition of leaded gasoline, where ethylene dibromide was added as lead scavenger to antiknock mixtures. More regionally, the concerted use of flame retardants on forest fire management, covering the 1980s through mid-1990s in the north of Portugal and Galicia, could be responsible for the observed increase of sediment Br (relatively to Pb) pool of this tidal marsh. Although man-made brominated compounds are being phased-out since the inception of the 1992 Montreal Protocol, the Caminha tidal marsh sedimentary record showed that Br levels only started to decline after 2002.

  10. NREL Success Stories - Quest for Inexpensive Silicon Solar Cells

    ScienceCinema

    Branz, Howard

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) share their story about a successful partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Ampulse Corporation and how support from the US Department of Energy's Technology Commercialization & Deployment Fund has helped it and their silicon solar cell research thrive.

  11. Antileishmanial physalins from Physalis minima.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, M Iqbal; Yousaf, Sammer; Ahmed, Shakil; Yasmeen, Kauser

    2005-09-01

    Three new physalins (1-3) and a new withanolide 7 have been isolated from the whole plant of Physalis minima, along with three known physalins: physalin H (4), isophysalin B (5), and 5beta,6beta-epoxyphysalin B (6). Their structures were deduced on the basis of in-depth spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 1-6 showed significant in vitro leishmanicidal activities (0.92-19.4 microg/ml) against promastigotes of Leishmania major.

  12. The Earth's Climate at Minima of the Centennial Gleissberg Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Feynman, J.

    2016-12-01

    The recent extended and deep minimum of solar variability and the extended minima in the 19th and 20th centuries (1810-1830 and 1900-1920) are consistent with minima of the Centennial Gleissberg Cycle (CGC), a 90-100 year variation of the amplitude of the 11-year sunspot cycle observed on the Sun, solar wind, and at the Earth. The CGC has been identified in the Total Solar Irradiance reconstructed for over three centuries. The Earth's climate response to the prolonged low solar irradiance involves heat transfer to the deep ocean with a time lag longer than a decade. The CGC minima, sometimes coincidently in combination with volcanic forcing, are associated with severe weather extremes. Thus the 19th century CGC minimum, coexisted with volcanic eruptions, led to especially cold conditions in United States, Canada and Western Europe ("a year without summer"). Using the reconstructed solar forcing and modeled and reconstructed Earth's temperature data we identify the timing and spatial pattern of the Earth's climate response that allows distinguishing the solar forcing from other climate forcings.

  13. Recent Minima of 171 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for 171 eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO EB section. Times of minima from observations received by the author from March 2015 thru October 2015 are presented.

  14. Hinode: A Decade of Success in Capturing Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, S.; Elrod, S.; Deluca, E.; Doschek, G.; Tarbell, T.

    2017-01-01

    As the present solar cycle passes into its minimum phase, the Hinode mission marks its tenth year of investigating solar activity. Hinode's decade of successful observations have provided us with immeasurable insight into the solar processes that invoke space weather and thereby affect the interplanetary environment in which we reside. The mission's complementary suite of instruments allows us to probe transient, high energy events alongside long-term, cycle-dependent phenomena from magnetic fields at the Sun's surface out to highly thermalized coronal plasma enveloping active regions (ARs). These rich data sets have already changed the face of solar physics and will continue to provoke exciting research as new observational paradigms are pursued. Hinode was launched as part of the Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) Solar Terrestrial Probes Program in 2006. It is a sophisticated spacecraft equipped with a Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), and an X-Ray Telescope (XRT) (see x 4). With high resolution and sensitivity, Hinode serves as a microscope for the Sun, providing us with unique capabilities for observing magnetic fields near the smallest scales achievable, while also rendering full-Sun coronal context in the highest thermal regimes. The 2014 NASA SMD strategic goals objective to "Understand the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system, including space weather" forms the basis of three underlying Heliophysics Science Goals. While Hinode relates to all three, the observatory primarily addresses: Explore the physical processes in the space environment from the Sun to the Earth and through the solar system. Within the NASA National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey Priorities, Hinode targets: (a) Determine the origins of the Sun's activity and predict the variations of the space environment and (d) Discover and characterize fundamental processes that occur both within the heliosphere and

  15. Potential benefits from a successful solar thermal program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terasawa, K. L.; Gates, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy systems were investigated which complement nuclear and coal technologies as a means of reducing the U.S. dependence on imported petroleum. Solar Thermal Energy Systems (STES) represents an important category of solar energy technologies. STES can be utilized in a broad range of applications servicing a variety of economic sectors, and they can be deployed in both near-term and long-term markets. The net present value of the energy cost savings attributable to electric utility and IPH applications of STES were estimated for a variety of future energy cost scenarios and levels of R&D success. This analysis indicated that the expected net benefits of developing an STES option are significantly greater than the expected costs of completing the required R&D. In addition, transportable fuels and chemical feedstocks represent a substantial future potential market for STES. Due to the basic nature of this R&D activity, however, it is currently impossible to estimate the value of STES in these markets. Despite this fact, private investment in STES R&D is not anticipated due to the high level of uncertainty characterizing the expected payoffs.

  16. Potential benefits from a successful solar thermal program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terasawa, K. L.; Gates, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy systems were investigated which complement nuclear and coal technologies as a means of reducing the U.S. dependence on imported petroleum. Solar Thermal Energy Systems (STES) represents an important category of solar energy technologies. STES can be utilized in a broad range of applications servicing a variety of economic sectors, and they can be deployed in both near-term and long-term markets. The net present value of the energy cost savings attributable to electric utility and IPH applications of STES were estimated for a variety of future energy cost scenarios and levels of R&D success. This analysis indicated that the expected net benefits of developing an STES option are significantly greater than the expected costs of completing the required R&D. In addition, transportable fuels and chemical feedstocks represent a substantial future potential market for STES. Due to the basic nature of this R&D activity, however, it is currently impossible to estimate the value of STES in these markets. Despite this fact, private investment in STES R&D is not anticipated due to the high level of uncertainty characterizing the expected payoffs.

  17. NREL Policy Stacking Theory Correlates Key Indicators with Solar Market Success (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    NREL's Integrated Applications Group evaluated the time-dependent relationships between policy implementation and the success of solar markets using historical data for installed capacity of solar photovoltaic energy systems. This Science and Technology Highlights fact sheet summarizes their research.

  18. Potential energy stored by planets and grand minima events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo G.

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Wolff & Patrone (2010), have developed a simple but very interesting model by which the movement of the Sun around the barycentre of the Solar system could create potential energy that could be released by flows pre-existing inside the Sun. The authors claim that it is the first mechanism showing how planetary movements can modify internal structure in the Sun that can be related to solar cycle. In this work we point out limitations of mentioned mechanism (which is based on interchange arguments), which could be inapplicable to a real star. Then, we calculate the temporal evolution of potential energy stored in zones of Sun's interior in which the potential energy could be most efficiently stored taking into account detailed barycentric Sun dynamics. We show strong variations of potential energy related to Maunder Minimum, Dalton Minimum and the maximum of Cycle 22, around 1990. We discuss briefly possible implications of this putative mechanism to solar cycle specially Grand Minima events.

  19. PV technology and success of solar electricity in Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dung, T.Q.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1990 the PV Technology and the Solar electricity have been strongly developed in Vietnam. The PV experts of Solarlab have studied and set up an appropriate PV Technology responding to local Market needs. It has not only stood well but has been also transferred to Mali Republic and Lao P.D.R. The PV off grid systems of Solarlab demonstrate good efficiency and low prices. Over 60 solar stations and villages have been built to provide solar lighting for about 3000 families along the country in remote, mountainous areas and islands. 400 families are using stand-alone Solar Home Systems. The Solar electricity has been chosen for Rural Electrification and National Telecommunication Network in remote and mountainous regions. Many International projects in cooperation with FONDEM-France, SELF USA and Governmental PV projects have been realized by Solarlab. The experiences of maintenance, management and finance about PV development in Vietnam are also mentioned.

  20. Franck-Condon breakdown from Cooper minima.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. M.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Wang, K.; McKoy, V.

    1996-05-01

    We report Cooper minima-induced Franck-Condon breakdown for N2 2σ_u-1 photoionization. The measurements are over an extended energy range (230 eV), and we find that the v^+= 2/v^+= 0 and v^+= 1/v^+= 0 vibrational branching ratios vary strongly over a 100 eV range. This is a dramatic deviation from Franck-Condon predictions, and calculations show that this coupling between vibrational and electronic motion arises from a dependence of Cooper minima on molecular bond length. To our knowledge, this is the only example of a broad-range Franck-Condon breakdown due to a non-resonant mechanism, and is the broadest deviation from Franck-Condon behavior observed to date. The ubiquitous nature of Cooper minima suggests this effect to be common in molecular systems.

  1. Solar Successes: The Best of Today's Energy Efficient Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    This is a brochure developed specifically for residential home builders. It provides information on basic financial factors and additional resources to consider when incorporating solar technologies into building plans.

  2. Variability of space climate and its extremes with successive solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Sandra; Hush, Phillip; Tindale, Elisabeth; Dunlop, Malcolm; Watkins, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Auroral geomagnetic indices coupled with in situ solar wind monitors provide a comprehensive data set, spanning several solar cycles. Space climate can be considered as the distribution of space weather. We can then characterize these observations in terms of changing space climate by quantifying how the statistical properties of ensembles of these observed variables vary between different phases of the solar cycle. We first consider the AE index burst distribution. Bursts are constructed by thresholding the AE time series; the size of a burst is the sum of the excess in the time series for each time interval over which the threshold is exceeded. The distribution of burst sizes is two component with a crossover in behaviour at thresholds ≈ 1000 nT. Above this threshold, we find[1] a range over which the mean burst size is almost constant with threshold for both solar maxima and minima. The burst size distribution of the largest events has a functional form which is exponential. The relative likelihood of these large events varies from one solar maximum and minimum to the next. If the relative overall activity of a solar maximum/minimum can be estimated, these results then constrain the likelihood of extreme events of a given size for that solar maximum/minimum. We next develop and apply a methodology to quantify how the full distribution of geomagnetic indices and upstream solar wind observables are changing between and across different solar cycles. This methodology[2] estimates how different quantiles of the distribution, or equivalently, how the return times of events of a given size, are changing. [1] Hush, P., S. C. Chapman, M. W. Dunlop, and N. W. Watkins (2015), Robust statistical properties of the size of large burst events in AE, Geophys. Res. Lett.,42 doi:10.1002/2015GL066277 [2] Chapman, S. C., D. A. Stainforth, N. W. Watkins, (2013) On estimating long term local climate trends , Phil. Trans. Royal Soc., A,371 20120287 DOI:10.1098/rsta.2012.0287

  3. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-08-20

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  4. Occurrence of Knudsen minima in diverging microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Hemadri, Vadiraj; Bhandarkar, Upendra; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-12-09

    Rarefied gas flow is gaining increasing importance with the emergence of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Knudsen minima is one of the characteristic feature of such rarefied flows and has been observed in uniform cross section channels such as plane channel, cylindrical tube and annulus. However, data pertaining to gaseous flow in varying cross section channel is relatively sparse. Channels of varying cross section are frequently encountered in MEMS devices and are fundamental to the design of micro-scale nozzles and micro-valves. In this context, rarefied gas flow through a diverging microchannel (divergence angle – 12 degree) is studied experimentally with three different gases (argon, nitrogen and oxygen). The experiments are performed over a wide range with the mean Knudsen number varying from slip to the transitional regime (0.07 to 1.2). It is found that the effect of molecular weight of the gas on the non-dimensional mass flow rate is negligible. The Knudsen minima is experimentally observed for the first time in microchannel of non-uniform cross section.

  5. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  6. New leishmanicidal physalins from Physalis minima.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, M Iqbal; Yousuf, Sammer; Samreen; Ahmed, Shakil; Atta-Ur-Rahman

    2007-08-01

    Two new physalins, 16,24-cyclo-13,14-secoergosta-2-ene-18,26-dioic acid-14 : 17,14 : 27-diepoxy-11beta,13,20,22-tetrahydroxy-5alpha-methoxy-1,15-dioxo-gamma-lactone delta-lactone (1), and 16,24-cyclo-13,14-secoergosta-2-ene-18,26-dioic acid-14 : 17,14 : 27-diepoxy-5alpha,11beta,13,20,22-pentahydroxy-1,6,15-trioxo-gamma-lactone delta-lactone (2), have been isolated from the whole plant of Physalis minima Linn. (var. indica). Their structures were deduced on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Both of these compounds have shown potent leishmanicidal activity against the promastigotes of Leishmania major.

  7. Ecology of common salvinia, Salvinia minima, in southern Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The floating macrophyte, Salvinia minima, grows in a variety of freshwater habitats in Florida. We conducted a 39-month study at four sites in southern Florida to elucidate the abiotic and biotic factors that influenced the density, nutritional profile, and size of S. minima. These factors include...

  8. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate weather...

  9. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate weather...

  10. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate weather...

  11. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate weather...

  12. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate weather...

  13. CCD Times of Minima of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejda, Miloslav

    2004-12-01

    682 CCD minima observations of 259 eclipsing binaries made mainly by author are presented. The observed stars were chosen mainly from catalogue BRKA of observing programme of BRNO-Variable Star Section of CAS.

  14. Taboo search: an approach to the multiple minima problem.

    PubMed

    Cvijovicacute, D; Klinowski, J

    1995-02-03

    Described here is a method, based on Glover's taboo search for discrete functions, of solving the multiple minima problem for continuous functions. As demonstrated by model calculations, the algorithm avoids entrapment in local minima and continues the search to give a near-optimal final solution. Unlike other methods of global optimization, this procedure is generally applicable, easy to implement, derivative-free, and conceptually simple.

  15. Taboo Search: An Approach to the Multiple Minima Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvijovic, Djurdje; Klinowski, Jacek

    1995-02-01

    Described here is a method, based on Glover's taboo search for discrete functions, of solving the multiple minima problem for continuous functions. As demonstrated by model calculations, the algorithm avoids entrapment in local minima and continues the search to give a near-optimal final solution. Unlike other methods of global optimization, this procedure is generally applicable, easy to implement, derivative-free, and conceptually simple.

  16. Tunable reflection minima of nanostructured antireflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, S. A.; Bagnall, D. M.

    2008-09-01

    Broadband antireflection schemes for silicon surfaces based on the moth-eye principle and comprising arrays of subwavelength-scale pillars are applicable to solar cells, photodetectors, and stealth technologies and can exhibit very low reflectances. We show that rigorous coupled wave analysis can be used to accurately model the intricate reflectance behavior of these surfaces and so can be used to explore the effects of variations in pillar height, period, and shape. Low reflectance regions are identified, the extent of which are determined by the shape of the pillars. The wavelengths over which these low reflectance regions operate can be shifted by altering the period of the array. Thus the subtle features of the reflectance spectrum of a moth-eye array can be tailored for optimum performance for the input spectrum of a specific application.

  17. NASA/JPL Solar System Educators Program: Twelve Years of Success and Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, K.; NASA/JPL Solar System Educators Program

    2011-12-01

    Since 1999, the NASA/JPL Solar System Educators Program (SSEP) has been the model of a successful master teacher volunteer program. Integrating nationwide volunteers in this professional development program helped optimize agency funding set aside for education. Through the efforts of these volunteers, teachers across the country became familiarized with NASA's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) educational materials, schools added these products to their curriculum and students benefitted. The years since 1999 have brought about many changes. There have been advancements in technology that allow more opportunities for telecon and web based learning methods. Along with those advancements have also come significant challenges. With NASA budgets for education shrinking, this already frugal program has become more spartan. Teachers face their own hardships with school budget cuts, limited classroom time and little support for professional development. In order for SSEP to remain viable in the face of these challenges, the program management, mission funders and volunteers themselves are working together to find ways of maintaining the quality that made the program a success and at the same time incorporate new, cost-effective methods of delivery. The group will also seek new partnerships to provide enhancements that will aid educators in advancing their careers at the same time as they receive professional development. By working together and utilizing the talent and experience of these master teachers, the Solar System Educators Program can enjoy a revitalization that will meet the needs of today's educators at the same time as renewing the enthusiasm of the volunteers.

  18. Study on the antibacterial potential of physalis minima linn.

    PubMed

    Patel, T; Shah, K; Jiwan, K; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima is an important medicinal plant of Indian System of Medicine. This plant is reported for its diuretic, laxative and antiinflammatory activities. However, the plant is not well scrutinized for its antimicrobial potential. The major chemical constituents reported from the plant are phenolics and alkaloids, which suggest that the plant may turn out to be a potent antiinfective agent. The aim of the study was to find out the antibacterial potential of mature berries of P. minima using streak plate, well diffusion, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and bioautographic methods against a battery of Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. Results of the study showed that methanol and chloroform extracts of P. minima exhibited potent inhibitory activity against all the bacterial strains tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration found out was 100 μg in both the extracts. Bioautography assay showed polar compounds present in the crude extract are responsible for the antimicrobial action.

  19. Study on the Antibacterial Potential of Physalis Minima Linn

    PubMed Central

    Patel, T.; Shah, K.; Jiwan, K.; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima is an important medicinal plant of Indian System of Medicine. This plant is reported for its diuretic, laxative and antiinflammatory activities. However, the plant is not well scrutinized for its antimicrobial potential. The major chemical constituents reported from the plant are phenolics and alkaloids, which suggest that the plant may turn out to be a potent antiinfective agent. The aim of the study was to find out the antibacterial potential of mature berries of P. minima using streak plate, well diffusion, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and bioautographic methods against a battery of Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. Results of the study showed that methanol and chloroform extracts of P. minima exhibited potent inhibitory activity against all the bacterial strains tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration found out was 100 μg in both the extracts. Bioautography assay showed polar compounds present in the crude extract are responsible for the antimicrobial action. PMID:22131635

  20. Solar cycle variation of the statistical distribution of the solar wind ɛ parameter and its constituent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, E.; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We use 20 years of Wind solar wind observations to investigate the solar cycle variation of the solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. For the first time, we use generalized quantile-quantile plots to compare the statistical distribution of four commonly used solar wind coupling parameters, Poynting flux, B2, the ɛ parameter, and vB, between the maxima and minima of solar cycles 23 and 24. We find the distribution is multicomponent and has the same functional form at all solar cycle phases; the change in distribution is captured by a simple transformation of variables for each component. The ɛ parameter is less sensitive than its constituent variables to changes in the distribution of extreme values between successive solar maxima. The quiet minimum of cycle 23 manifests only in lower extreme values, while cycle 24 was less active across the full distribution range.

  1. Efficient spin-coating-free planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells fabricated with successive brush-painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Seok-Soon

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate fully brush-painted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (PeSCs), poly (3,4-ethylendioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole transport layer (HTL), CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite photoactive layer, and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) electron acceptor layer are successively brush-painted. In particular, correlation between morphology of perovskites and overall performance of PeSCs are investigated depending on the perovskites precursor. Devices with brush-painted perovskite using generally used N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent show poor performance and large deviation in cell-performance. However, PeSCs with brush-painted perovskite employing protic 2-Methoxyethanol (2-M) as DMF-alternative solvent exhibit comparable power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.08% to conventional spin-coated device and excellent reproducibility in device performance is observed as well. Furthermore, a fully brush-painted PeSC based on flexible substrates, showing PCE of 7.75%, is successfully demonstrated.

  2. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-05-01

    The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1-8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase.

  3. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  4. "Compressing liquid": an efficient global minima search strategy for clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, R L; Zhao, L Y; Pan, B C

    2009-07-21

    In this paper we present a new global search strategy named as "compressing liquid" for atomic clusters. In this strategy, a random fragment of liquid structure is adopted as a starting geometry, followed by iterative operations of "compressing" and Monte Carlo adjustment of the atom positions plus structural optimization. It exhibits fair efficiency when it is applied to seeking the global minima of Lennard-Jones clusters. We also employed it to search the low-lying candidates of medium silicon clusters Si(n)(n=40-60), where the global search is absent. We found the best candidates for most sizes. More importantly, we obtained non-fullerene-based structures for some sized clusters, which were not found from the endohedral-fullerene strategy. These results indicate that the "compressing-liquid" method is highly efficient for global minima search of clusters.

  5. B.R.N.O. Contributions #39 Times of minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkova, K.; Jurysek, J.; Lehky, M.; Smelcer, L.; Masek, M.; Mazanec, J.; Hanzl, D.; Urbanik, M.; Magris, M.; Vrastak, M.; Walter, F.; Hladik, B.; Medulka, T.; Bilek, F.; Trnka, J.; Jacobsen, J.; Benacek, J.; Kuchtak, B.; Audejean, M.; Ogmen, Y.; Zibar, M.; Fatka, P.; Marchi, F.; Poddany, S.; Quinones, C.; Tapia, L.; Scaggiante, F.; Zardin, D.; Corfini, G.; Hajek, P.; Lomoz, F.; Mravik, J.; Grnja, J.; Campos, F.; Caloud, J.; Esseiva, N.; Jaks, S.; Hornik, M.; Filip, J.; Uhlar, R.; Mina, F.; Artola, R.; Zalazar, J.; Muller, D.; Pintr, P.; Divisova, L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents 1463 times of minima for 455 objects acquired by 46 members and cooperating observers of the Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of the Czech Astronomical Society (B.R.N.O. Observing project). Observations were carried out between October 2013 - September 2014. Some neglected southern eclipsing binaries and newly discovered stars by the observers of project B.R.N.O. are included in the list.

  6. B.R.N.O. Contributions #40 Times of minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juryšek, J.; Hoňková, K.; Šmelcer, L.; Mašek, M.; Lehký, M.; Bílek, F.; Mazanec, J.; Hanžl, D.; Magris, M.; Nosál, P.; Bragagnolo, U.; Medulka, T.; Vraš&tacute; ák, M.; Urbaník, M.; Auer, R. F.; Sergey, I.; Jacobsen, J.; Alessandroni, M. R.; Andreatta, C.; Antonio, Ch. F.; Artola, R.; Audejean, M.; Balanzino, L.; Banfi, M.; Bazán, R. S.; Borgonovo, M.; Cagaš, P.; Čaloud, J.; Campos, F.; Čapková, H.; Černíková, V.; Červinka, L.; Chiavassa, A.; Dřevěný, R.; Durantini, L. H.; Ferraro, M. E.; Ferrero, G.; Girardini, C.; Gudmundsson, S.; Guzzo, P.; Guevara, N.; Hladík, B.; Horník, M.; Jakš, S.; Janoštiak, L.; Jelínek, M.; Kalášek, J.; Kalmbach, R.; Kubica, T.; Kučáková, H.; Liška, J.; Lomoz, F.; López, O. Ch.; Lovato, B. M.; Morero, S.; Mrllák, R.; Mrňák, P.; Persha, G.; Pignata, R.; Pintr, P.; Popov, A.; Portillo, L. F. T.; Quiñones, C.; Rodriguez, E.; Ruocco, N.; Scaggiante, F.; Scavuzzo, A.; Šebela, P.; Šimkovič, S.; Školník, V.; Skubák, P.; Smolka, M.; Špecián, M.; Šuchaň, J.; Tornatore, M.; Trnka, J.; Tylšar, M.; Walter, F.; Zardin, D.; Zejda, M.; Zíbar, M.; Ziková, A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents 3394 times of minima for 1096 objects acquired by 82 members and cooperating observers of the Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of the Czech Astronomical Society (B.R.N.O. Observing project). Observations were carried out between October 2014 and November 2016. Some newly discovered stars by the observers of project B.R.N.O. are included in the list.

  7. Efficient Accommodation of Local Minima in Watershed Model Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-02

    of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to...should notify the user of this, and of the fact that parameter estimates forthcom- ing from the calibration process are nonunique . Whether or not an...challenges posed by parameter nonuniqueness and local objective function minima will lead to the necessity to carry out more model runs than that

  8. Successful and long-lasting treatment of solar urticaria with ultraviolet A rush hardening therapy.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, E; Fukunaga, A; Kishigami, K; Jimbo, H; Nishioka, M; Uchimura, Y; Taguchi, K; Ohgou, N; Nishigori, C

    2012-07-01

    Solar urticaria (SU) is a photodermatosis that is thought to be caused through the effects of mast cell mediators released because of an altered chromophore, possibly a photoallergen recognized by IgE. Phototherapy for SU to induce a tolerant state appears to be most effective, but is often time consuming and provides only short-lived remission. Ultraviolet (UV) A rush hardening has been successful and less time consuming in serum factor-negative patients with SU. However, the mechanism of action and long-lasting effects of UVA rush hardening therapy remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate whether UVA rush hardening exhibits long-lasting therapeutic effects in serum factor-positive patients with SU and to examine the action mechanism of tolerance. Two serum factor-positive patients with SU were exposed to multiple UVA irradiations at 1-h intervals per day for 2 or 3 days. Intradermal injection of their in vitro-irradiated autologous serum or compound 48/80 and a prick test for histamine were performed before and after UVA rush hardening. The two serum factor-positive patients with SU benefited greatly from UVA rush hardening, as documented by a marked increase in minimal wealing dose, and remained symptom free without using sunscreen in their daily life. Intradermal injection of in vitro-irradiated autologous serum induced wealing before hardening, but not in tolerized skin after hardening. The responses to compound 48/80 and histamine were unaltered. UVA rush hardening is an effective and long-lasting treatment even in serum factor-positive patients with SU. The mechanism of tolerance may involve continued blockade of photoallergen binding to IgE on mast cells, rather than depletion of mast cell mediators or histamine tachyphylaxis. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. STUDY OF TWO SUCCESSIVE THREE-RIBBON SOLAR FLARES ON 2012 JULY 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda

    2014-01-20

    This Letter reports two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using Hα observations of 0.''1 resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing ''fish-bone-like'' morphology evidenced by both Hα images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in Hα apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.

  10. Solar Successes: The Best of Today's Energy Efficient Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-01-01

    This is a brochure developed specifically for residential home builders. It provides information on basic financial factors and additional resources to consider when incorporating solar technologies into building plans.

  11. B.R.N.O. Contributions #38 Times of minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoňková, K.; Juryšek, J.; Lehký, M.; Šmelcer, L.; Trnka, J.; Mašek, M.; Urbaník, M.; Auer, R.; Vrašták, M.; Kučáková, H.; Ruocco, N.; Magris, M.; Polák, J.; Brát, L.; Audejean, M.; Banfi, M.; Moudrá, M.; Lomoz, F.; Přibík, V.; Dřevěný, R.; Scaggiante, F.; Kocián, R.; Cagaš, P.; Poddaný, S.; Zíbar, M.; Jacobsen, J.; Marek, P.; Colazo, C.; Zardin, D.; Sobotka, P.; Starzomski, J.; Hladík, B.; Vincenzi, M.; Skarka, M.; Walter, F.; Chapman, A.; Díaz, N. D.; Aceti, P.; Singh, P.; Kalista, L.; Kamenec, M.; Zejda, M.; Marchi, F.; Bílek, R.; Guzzo, P.; Corfini, G.; Onderková, K.; Hečko, A.; Mina, F.; Vítek, M.; Barsa, R.; Quinones, C.; Taormina, M.; Melia, R.; Schneiter, M.; Scavuzzo, A.; Marcionni, N.; Ehrenberger, R.; Tapia, L.; Fasseta, G.; Suarez, N.; Scaggiante, D.; Artusi, E.; Garcia, R.; Grnja, J.; Fišer, A.; Hynek, T.; Vilášek, M.; Rozehnal, J.; Kalisch, T.; Lang, K.; Gorková, S.; Novysedlák, R.; Salvaggio, F.; Smyčka, T.; Spurný, M.; Wikander, T.; Mravik, J.; Šuchaň, J.; Čaloud, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents observations of eclipsing binaries acquired by members and cooperating observers of the Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of Czech Astronomical Society (B.R.N.O. observing project). Paper contains 3417 times of minima for 969 objects. It was obtained by 80 observers during 2011 ± 2013 period. Some neglected southern eclipsing binaries and newly discovered stars by the observers of project B.R.N.O. are included in the list. New accurate ephemerides have been found for 447 binary systems. Time of primary minimum of long period variable eps Aur is presented as well.

  12. Very extended minima in the A=180 mass region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasman, R. R.

    1993-03-01

    A search for very extended nuclear shapes in the A=180 mass region has been carried out in a three dimensional deformation space, using the cranked Strutinsky procedure. Many such minima have been found and their properties are described in detail. I thank P.H. Heenen for informing me of the Hartree-Fock calculations of VEMs and R.V.F. Janssens for a helpful discussion on this problem. The calculations reported here were carried out on the NERSC computer facility at Livermore.

  13. Global Franck-Condon Breakdown Resulting from Cooper Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. M.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Wang, Kwanghsi; McKoy, V.

    1996-04-01

    Using N2 2σ-1u photoionization as an example, we present the first measurements and calculations of photoion vibrational distributions for an extended energy range ( 5<=Ek<=230 eV). The results show a striking breakdown of the Franck-Condon approximation over a 100 eV range. We show that this coupling between vibrational and electronic motion arises from a dependence of Cooper minima on molecular bond length. Based on this mechanism, the effect is expected to be common for molecular systems.

  14. Iterative h-minima-based marker-controlled watershed for cell nucleus segmentation.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Can Fahrettin; Akhan, Ece; Ersahin, Tulin; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2016-04-01

    Automated microscopy imaging systems facilitate high-throughput screening in molecular cellular biology research. The first step of these systems is cell nucleus segmentation, which has a great impact on the success of the overall system. The marker-controlled watershed is a technique commonly used by the previous studies for nucleus segmentation. These studies define their markers finding regional minima on the intensity/gradient and/or distance transform maps. They typically use the h-minima transform beforehand to suppress noise on these maps. The selection of the h value is critical; unnecessarily small values do not sufficiently suppress the noise, resulting in false and oversegmented markers, and unnecessarily large ones suppress too many pixels, causing missing and undersegmented markers. Because cell nuclei show different characteristics within an image, the same h value may not work to define correct markers for all the nuclei. To address this issue, in this work, we propose a new watershed algorithm that iteratively identifies its markers, considering a set of different h values. In each iteration, the proposed algorithm defines a set of candidates using a particular h value and selects the markers from those candidates provided that they fulfill the size requirement. Working with widefield fluorescence microscopy images, our experiments reveal that the use of multiple h values in our iterative algorithm leads to better segmentation results, compared to its counterparts. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. Mars: The Origin of the 3.58- and 3.69-Micron Minima in the Infrared Spectra.

    PubMed

    Rea, D G; O'leary, B T; Sinton, W M

    1965-03-12

    The 3- to 4-micron spectra of Mars, recorded with the 200-inch telescope in 1958, were reexamined in order to ascertain whether the minima at 3.58 and 3.69 microns are due to telluric HDO molecules. Solar spectra obtained at Denver and water vapor abundances derived from radiosonde flights during the observing period were used. There seems to be a correlation between the intensities of the 3.58- and 3.69-micron features and the amount of telluric water vapor in the optical path. An important corollary is that there is no evidence for attributing these spectral features to Mars.

  16. NREL Scientists Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Before 1984, many scientists believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. One researcher at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thought differently. His name was Jerry Olson, and his innovative thinking changed solar history. Olson identified a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. It is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) products.

  17. Identity of Ṭaṅkārī (Physalis Minima Linn.) in Ayurvedic Classics: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kallianpur, Supriya S; Gokarn, Rohit A; Rajashekhar, N

    2016-01-01

    Proper identification of drugs and their use in proper doses are important for successful treatment. Physalis minima Linn commonly known as country gooseberry has anti-cancerous, anti-diabetic, analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory potentials. The present paper is aimed to ascertain the proper identity of Ṭaṅkārī (Physalis minima Linn.) in Ayurvedic classics by a meticulous search and hence a review of the drug Ṭaṅkārī (Physalis minima Linn) was carried out in the texts of Ayurveda, modern literature, journals and online publications. The result of the search showed that the name "Ṭaṅkārī" is not found in Vedic lore. In Saṃhitās, it is mentioned in Bhāvaprakāśa. Reference of the drug "Śārṅgeṣṭhā" is found in Bṛhattrayī, Bhela, Kāśyapa, Cakradatta and Vaṅgasena. It is variously named as Cirapoṭikā, Kākatikta, and Vāyasī by ḍalhaṇa and he describes it as gaura (pale), vartula (round), and as having avaguṇṭhita/veṣṭhita (covered) fruit which matches the description of Ṭaṅkārī (P. minima Linn). A search for terms Kākatikta and Vāyasī showed Kākatikta to be synonymous to Śārṅgeṣṭhā and Vāyasī to be synonymous to both Kākatikta and Kākamācī (Solanum nigrum). Madanapāla and Śāligrāma Nighaṇṭus have mentioned the name Cirapoṭikā to be synonymous with Ṭaṅkārī. Śodhala has used the term Parpoṭī as a synonym of Ṭaṅkārī, which is the Gujarati name of P. minima Linn. Recent authors have considered Śārṅgeṣṭhā as either P. minima or Cardiospermum helicabum. The regional names of P. minima are Cirpoṭi (Hindi), Cirboli (Marathi), also the folklore uses and pharmacological activities of P. minima are in accordance with the indications of Śārṅgeṣṭhā in classics. Thus with a complete review of both Ayurveda and modern literatures, it can be concluded that the drug mentioned as Ṭaṅkārī in Bhāvaprakāśa is the same as

  18. Identity of Ṭaṅkārī (Physalis Minima Linn.) in Ayurvedic Classics: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Supriya S; Gokarn, Rohit A; Rajashekhar, N

    2016-01-01

    Proper identification of drugs and their use in proper doses are important for successful treatment. Physalis minima Linn commonly known as country gooseberry has anti-cancerous, anti-diabetic, analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory potentials. The present paper is aimed to ascertain the proper identity of Ṭaṅkārī (Physalis minima Linn.) in Ayurvedic classics by a meticulous search and hence a review of the drug Ṭaṅkārī (Physalis minima Linn) was carried out in the texts of Ayurveda, modern literature, journals and online publications. The result of the search showed that the name “Ṭaṅkārī” is not found in Vedic lore. In Saṃhitās, it is mentioned in Bhāvaprakāśa. Reference of the drug “Śārṅgeṣṭhā” is found in Bṛhattrayī, Bhela, Kāśyapa, Cakradatta and Vaṅgasena. It is variously named as Cirapoṭikā, Kākatikta, and Vāyasī by ḍalhaṇa and he describes it as gaura (pale), vartula (round), and as having avaguṇṭhita/veṣṭhita (covered) fruit which matches the description of Ṭaṅkārī (P. minima Linn). A search for terms Kākatikta and Vāyasī showed Kākatikta to be synonymous to Śārṅgeṣṭhā and Vāyasī to be synonymous to both Kākatikta and Kākamācī (Solanum nigrum). Madanapāla and Śāligrāma Nighaṇṭus have mentioned the name Cirapoṭikā to be synonymous with Ṭaṅkārī. Śodhala has used the term Parpoṭī as a synonym of Ṭaṅkārī, which is the Gujarati name of P. minima Linn. Recent authors have considered Śārṅgeṣṭhā as either P. minima or Cardiospermum helicabum. The regional names of P. minima are Cirpoṭi (Hindi), Cirboli (Marathi), also the folklore uses and pharmacological activities of P. minima are in accordance with the indications of Śārṅgeṣṭhā in classics. Thus with a complete review of both Ayurveda and modern literatures, it can be concluded that the drug mentioned as Ṭaṅkārī in Bhāvaprakāśa is the same as

  19. Effect of correlations between minima on a complex energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    We recently modeled cellular interconvertion dynamics by using an epigenetic landscape model inspired by neural network models. Given an arbitrary set of patterns, the model can be used to construct an energy landscape in which those patterns are the global minima. We study the possible stable states and metastable states of the landscapes thus constructed. We consider three different cases: i) choosing the patterns to be random and independently distributed ii) choosing a set of patterns directly derived from the experimental cellular transcription factor expression data for a representative set of cell types in an organism and iii) choosing randomly generated trees of hierarchically correlated patterns, inspired by biology. For each of the three cases, we study the energy landscapes. In particular we study the basins of attraction of both the stable states and the metastable states, we compute the configurational entropy as a function of energy, and we demonstrate how those results depend on the correlations between the patterns.

  20. Viscosity minima in binary mixtures of ionic liquids + molecular solvents.

    PubMed

    Tariq, M; Shimizu, K; Esperança, J M S S; Canongia Lopes, J N; Rebelo, L P N

    2015-05-28

    The viscosity (η) of four binary mixtures (ionic liquids plus molecular solvents, ILs+MSs) was measured in the 283.15 < T/K < 363.15 temperature range. Different IL/MS combinations were selected in such a way that the corresponding η(T) functions exhibit crossover temperatures at which both pure components present identical viscosity values. Consequently, most of the obtained mixture isotherms, η(x), exhibit clear viscosity minima in the studied T-x range. The results are interpreted using auxiliary molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data in order to correlate the observed η(T,x) trends with the interactions in each mixture, including the balance between electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonding.

  1. Enhanced performance of PbS-sensitized solar cells via controlled successive ionic-layer adsorption and reaction.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muhammad A; Basit, Muhammad A; Park, Tae Joo; Bang, Jin Ho

    2015-04-21

    Despite the potential of PbS quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), achieving a high photocurrent density over 30 mA cm(-2) remains a challenging task in PbS-sensitized solar cells. In contrast to previous attempts, where Hg(2+)-doping or multi-step post-treatment is necessary, we are capable of achieving a high photocurrent exceeding 30 mA cm(-2) simply by manipulating the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. We show that controlling temperature at which SILAR is performed is critical to obtain a higher and more uniform coverage of PbS QDs over a mesoporous TiO2 film. The deposition of a CdS inter-layer between TiO2 and PbS is found to be an effective means of ensuring high photocurrent and stability. Not only does this modification improve the light absorption capability of the photoanode, but it also has a significant effect on charge recombination and electron injection efficiency at the PbS/TiO2 interface according to our in-depth study using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The implication of subtle changes in the interfacial events via modified SILAR conditions for PbS-sensitized solar cells is discussed.

  2. The Descent of the Serpent: Using a Successful Ancient Solar Observatories Webcast from Chichen Itza to Highlight Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Higdon, R.; Cline, T.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past seven years, NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum has sponsored and coordinated education and public outreach events to highlight NASA's heliophysics research and discoveries. Our strategy involves using celestial events, such as total solar eclipses and the Transit of Venus, as well as Sun-Earth Day during the March Equinox, to engage K-12 schools and the general public in space science activities, demonstrations, and interactions with space scientists. In collaboration with partners that include the Exploratorium and other museums, Ideum, NASA TV, NASA heliophysics missions, and others, we produce webcasts, other multi-media, and print resources for use by school and informal educators nation-wide and internationally. We provide training and professional development to K-12 educators, museum personnel, amateur astronomers, Girl Scout leaders, etc., so they can implement their own outreach programs taking advantage of our resources. A coordinated approach promotes multiple programs occurring each year under a common theme. As part of an Ancient Observatories theme in 2005, we have successfully featured solar alignments with ancient structures made by indigenous cultures that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices in cultural and historical parks in the Americas. In partnership with the Exploratorium, we produced broadcast-quality and webcast programming during the March equinox that shared heliophysics within a broad cultural context with formal and informal education audiences internationally. The program: "Descent of the Serpent" featured the light and shadow effect at sunset that takes place during the spring equinox at the Pyramid of El Castillo, in Chichén Itzá (México). This program made unique and authentic cultural connections to the knowledge of solar astronomy of the Maya, the living Mayan culture of today, and the importance of the Sun across the ages. We involved Sun-Earth Connection scientists, their missions, and research

  3. Invertebrate and fish assemblage relations to dissolved Oxygen minima in lowland streams of southwestern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Mize, Scott V.; Kroes, Daniel; Wallace, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in lowland streams are naturally lower than those in upland streams; however, in some regions where monitoring data are lacking, DO criteria originally established for upland streams have been applied to lowland streams. This study investigated the DO concentrations at which fish and invertebrate assemblages at 35 sites located on lowland streams in southwestern Louisiana began to demonstrate biological thresholds.Average threshold values for taxa richness, diversity and abundance metrics were 2.6 and 2.3 mg/L for the invertebrate and fish assemblages, respectively. These thresholds are approximately twice the DO concentration that some native fish species are capable of tolerating and are comparable with DO criteria that have been recently applied to some coastal streams in Louisiana and Texas. DO minima >2.5 mg/L were favoured for all but extremely tolerant taxa. Extremely tolerant taxa had respiratory adaptations that gave them a competitive advantage, and their success when DO minima were <2 mg/L could be related more to reductions in competition or predation than to DO concentration directly.DO generally had an inverse relation to the amount of agriculture in the buffer area; however, DO concentrations at sites with both low and high amounts of agriculture (including three least-disturbed sites) declined to <2.5 mg/L. Thus, although DO fell below a concentration that was identified as an approximate biological threshold, sources of this condition were sometimes natural (allochthonous material) and had little relation to anthropogenic activity.

  4. Unveiling the nature of the He II λ4686 periodic minima in η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Mairan; Damineli, Augusto; Richardson, Noel; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; St-Jean, Lucas; Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Pollard, Karen; Walter, Frederick M.; Coimbra, Adriano; Prates, Rodrigo; Fernández-Lajús, Eduardo; gamen, roberto; Hickel, Gabriel; Henrique, William; Navarete, Felipe; Andrade, Thiago; Jablonski, Francisco; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Groh, Jose H.; Hillier, Desmond John; Gerd, Weigelt; SASER Team Members; Heathcote, Bernard; Luckas, Paul; Locke, Malcolm; Powles, Jonathan; Bohlsen, Terry

    2016-01-01

    η Carinae is known to be a massive binary system, but some of the orbital parameters remain uncertain. The nature of the periodic minima seen in several spectral features are associated with periastron passages near stellar conjunction, but its nature has been interpreted either as a low excitation event or as an eclipse of the hotter secondary star by the dense inner wind of the primary. We conducted an intense spectroscopic monitoring of the He II λ4686 emission line across the 2014.6 event using ground- and space-based telescopes. Comparison with results from the past two events confirmed the stability of the equivalent width and radial velocity of this line, as well as the strict periodicity of its minima. In combination with different other measurements, the orbital period is 2022.7 (±0.3) d. We adopted a power law model in combination with the total opacity in the line of sight to the apex of the wind-wind collision region obtained from hydrodynamic simulations to reproduce the observed He II λ4686 equivalent width curve. We constrained the orbital inclination to 135°-153° and the longitude of periastron to 234°-252°. Periastron passage occurred on T0(2014.6)=2456874.4 (±1.3) d. With these orbital elements, we successfully reproduced both the equivalent width curve observed from our direct view of the central source and the polar view. This suggests that the He II λ4686 minimum is ultimately caused by an increase in the opacity in the line of sight to the emitting region as the secondary star moves behind the primary star and plunges into denser regions of its wind.

  5. Thermal Conductivity Minima in Superlattices and Localization-like Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama

    2007-03-01

    It is becoming clear in many 2-dimensional superlattice (SL) material systems that there exists a minimum lattice thermal conductivity for an optimal SL period. These have been first observed and reported in the Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3, PbTe/PbTeSe and Si/Ge SL systems by us in RTI. These minima become evident when the electronic thermal conductivity, using Lorentz parameter, is subtracted from the total thermal conductivity to monitor the lattice thermal conductivity as a function of SL period. The basis for the numerical value of Lorentz parameter, observed from many facets of material and device characteristics, will be presented. Such a lattice thermal conductivity minimum has also been recently observed in other SL material systems. Recently, a similar behavior has also been observed in the thermal conductivity of superlattices embedded with an ordered array of nanoparticles. We will explore the commonality of these results in terms of a localization-like behavior for phonons. The arguments for the complex relationship between the SL period and the low-frequency cut-off wavelength, traceable to a cut-off frequency originating from diffusive transport of a temperature wave, will be presented. The physics behind what triggers the localization-like phenomena of phonons in such nanostructures will be discussed.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 299 variables (Hubscher+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.; Steinbach, H.-M.; Walter, F.

    2009-03-01

    In this 61th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the year 2008 are presented on 299 variable stars giving 655 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. (3 data files).

  7. On Solar Cycle Predictions and Reconstructions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    for grand solar minima and to reconstruct the relative sunspol number in the Maunder minimum . Methods. We calculate the asymmetry of the ascending...was identified in the asymmetry data. The maximal smoothed monthly sunspot number during the Maunder minimum was reconstructed and found to be in the...cycle, to investigate proxies for grand solar minima and to reconstruct the relative sunspot number in the Maunder minimum . Methods. We calculate the

  8. Success Stories of Undergraduate Retention: A Pathways Study of Graduate Students in Solar and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Stoll, W.; Moldwin, M.; Gross, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation describes results from an NSF-funded study of the pathways students in solar and space physics have taken to arrive in graduate school. Our Pathways study has documented results from structured interviews conducted with graduate students attending two, week-long, NSF-sponsored scientific workshops during the summer of 2011. Our research team interviewed 48 solar and space physics students (29 males and 19 females currently in graduate programs at US institutions,) in small group settings regarding what attracted and retained them along their pathways leading to grad school. This presentation addresses what these students revealed about the attributes and influences that supported completion of their undergraduate experience and focused their aspirations toward graduate school. In advance of the interview process, we collected 125 on-line survey responses from students at the two workshops. This 20-item survey included questions about high school and undergraduate education, as well as about research and graduate experience. A subset of the 125 students who completed this on-line survey volunteered to be interviewed. Two types of interview data were collected from the 48 interviewees: 1) written answers to a pre-interview questionnaire; and 2) detailed notes taken by researchers during group interviews. On the pre-interview questionnaire, we posed the question: "How did you come to be a graduate student in your field?" Our findings to date are based on an analysis of responses to this question, cross correlated with the corresponding on-line survey data. Our analysis reveals the importance of early research experiences. About 80% of the students participating in the Pathways study cited formative undergraduate research experiences. Moreover, about 50% of participants reported undergraduate research experiences that were in the field of their current graduate studies. Graduate students interviewed frequently cited a childhood interest in science

  9. Successive injection of opposite magnetic helicity in solar active region NOAA 11928

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Démoulin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Understanding the nature and evolution of the photospheric helicity flux transfer is crucial to revealing the role of magnetic helicity in coronal dynamics of solar active regions. Methods: We computed the boundary-driven helicity flux with a 12-min cadence during the emergence of the AR 11928 using SDO/HMI photospheric vector magnetograms and the derived flow velocity field. Accounting for the footpoint connectivity defined by nonlinear, force-free magnetic extrapolations, we derived and analyzed the corrected distribution of helicity flux maps. Results: The photospheric helicity flux injection is found to change sign during the steady emergence of the AR. This reversal is confirmed with the evolution of the photospheric electric currents and with the coronal connectivity as observed in EUV wavelengths with SDO/AIA. During approximately the three first days of emergence, the AR coronal helicity is positive while later on the field configuration is close to a potential field. As theoretically expected, the magnetic helicity cancellation is associated with enhanced coronal activity. Conclusions: The study suggests a boundary driven transformation of the chirality in the global AR magnetic structure. This may be the result of the emergence of a flux rope with positive twist around its apex while it has negative twist in its legs. The origin of such mixed helicity flux rope in the convective zone is challenging for models.

  10. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Jiawei; Xi, Lili; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2016-05-21

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0-1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrrier transport and defect properties are properly optimized.

  11. Atlantic forcing of Western Mediterranean winter rain minima during the last 12,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielhofer, Christoph; Fletcher, William J.; Mischke, Steffen; De Batist, Marc; Campbell, Jennifer F. E.; Joannin, Sebastien; Tjallingii, Rik; El Hamouti, Najib; Junginger, Annett; Stele, Andreas; Bussmann, Jens; Schneider, Birgit; Lauer, Tobias; Spitzer, Katrin; Strupler, Michael; Brachert, Thomas; Mikdad, Abdeslam

    2017-02-01

    associated with solar minima.

  12. Anti lipid peroxidation activity of Piper trioicum Roxb. and Physalis minima L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Dinakaran, Sathis Kumar; Saraswathi, Narasimha Raju; Nalini, Venkata Rama Rao; Srisudharson; Bodanapu, Venkat Ram Reddy; Avasarala, Harani; Banji, David

    2011-07-01

    Attempt has been made to evaluate free radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extract of Piper trioicum Roxb. and Physalis minima L. individually. In this study goat liver has been used as lipid source. This in vitro evaluation was done by measuring the malondialdehyde (MDA) of tissue homogenates. The results suggest that the ethanolic extract of the Piper trioicum Roxb. and Physalis minima L. has the ability to suppress the lipid peroxidation and it was also found that Piper trioicum Roxb. extract has more activity than Physalis minima L. extract.

  13. INVESTIGATING TWO SUCCESSIVE FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Zhang, J.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Olmedo, O.; Sun, X. D.; Liu, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate two successive flux rope (FR1 and FR2) eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2012 January 23. Both flux ropes (FRs) appeared as an EUV channel structure in the images of high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly prior to the CME eruption. Through fitting their height evolution with a function consisting of linear and exponential components, we determine the onset time of the FR impulsive acceleration with high temporal accuracy for the first time. Using this onset time, we divide the evolution of the FRs in the low corona into two phases: a slow rise phase and an impulsive acceleration phase. In the slow rise phase of FR1, the appearance of sporadic EUV and UV brightening and the strong shearing along the polarity inverse line indicates that the quasi-separatrix-layer reconnection likely initiates the slow rise. On the other hand, for FR2, we mainly contribute its slow rise to the FR1 eruption, which partially opened the overlying field and thus decreased the magnetic restriction. At the onset of the impulsive acceleration phase, FR1 (FR2) reaches the critical height of 84.4 ± 11.2 Mm (86.2 ± 13.0 Mm) where the decline of the overlying field with height is fast enough to trigger the torus instability. After a very short interval (∼2 minutes), the flare emission began to enhance. These results reveal the compound activity involving multiple magnetic FRs and further suggest that the ideal torus instability probably plays the essential role of initiating the impulsive acceleration of CMEs.

  14. SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION FROM DOPPLER SHIFTS OF THE Fe I LINE AT 5250 A AS MEASURED BY THE 150-FOOT SOLAR TOWER TELESCOPE AT THE MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Roger K.

    2010-12-10

    Doppler shifts of the Fe I spectral line at 5250 A from the full solar disk obtained over the period 1986 to 2009 are analyzed to determine the circulation velocity of the solar surface along meridional planes. Simultaneous measurements of the Zeeman splitting of this line are used to obtain measurements of the solar magnetic field that are used to select low field points and impose corrections for the magnetically induced Doppler shift. The data utilized is from a new reduction that preserves the full spatial resolution of the original observations so that the circulation flow can be followed to latitudes of 80{sup 0} N/S. The deduced meridional flow is shown to differ from the circulation velocities derived from magnetic pattern movements. A reversed circulation pattern is seen in polar regions for three successive solar minima. A surge in circulation velocity at low latitudes is seen during the rising phases of cycles 22 and 23.

  15. Erratum: "B.R.N.O. Contributions #38 Times of minima of eclipsing binary" (OEJV #160, [2013])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honková, K.; Juryšek, J.; Lehký, M.; Šmelcer, L.; Trnka, J.; Mašek, M.; Urbaník, M.; Auer, R.; Vrašták, M.; Kučáková, H.; Ruocco, N.; Magris, M.; Polák, J.; Brát, L.; Audejean, M.; Banfi, M.; Moudrá, M.; Lomoz, F.; Přibík, V.; Dřevěný, R.; Scaggiante, F.; Kocián, R.; Cagaš, P.; Poddaný, S.; Zíbar, M.; Jacobsen, J.; Marek, P.; Colazo, C.; Zardin, D.; Sobotka, P.; Starzomski, J.; Hladík, B.; Vincenzi, M.; Skarka, M.; Walter, F.; Chapman, A.; Díaz, N. D.; Aceti, P.; Singh, P.; Kalista, L.; Kamenec, M.; Zejda, M.; Marchi, F.; Bílek, R.; Guzzo, P.; Corfini, G.; Onderková, K.; Hečko, A.; Mina, F.; Vítek, M.; Barsa, R.; Quinones, C.; Taormina, M.; Melia, R.; Schneiter, M.; Scavuzzo, A.; Marcionni, N.; Ehrenberger, R.; Tapia, L.; Fasseta, G.; Suarez, N.; Scaggiante, D.; Artusi, E.; Garcia, R.; Grnja, J.; Fišer, A.; Hynek, T.; Vilášek, M.; Rozehnal, J.; Kalisch, T.; Lang, K.; Gorková, S.; Novysedlák, R.; Salvaggio, F.; Smyčka, T.; Spurný, M.; Wikander, T.; Mravik, J.; Šuchań, J.; Čaloud, J.

    2014-08-01

    Due to an errors in calculated heliocentric corrections, there are 404 wrong HJD minima timings (with larger Difference than Min error; see header of the Table) in "B.R.N.O. Contributions #38 Times of minima of eclipsing binary" paper. The correct minima timings are presented hereafter.

  16. More on conditions of local and global minima coincidence in discrete optimization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, T.T.; Sergienko, I.V.; Soltan, V.P.

    1994-05-01

    In some areas of discrete optimization, it is necessary to isolate classes of problems whose target functions do not have local or strictly local minima that differ from the global minima. Examples include optimizations on discrete metric spaces and graphs, lattices and partially ordered sets, and linear combinatorial problems. A unified schema that to a certain extent generalizes the convexity models on which the above-cited works are based has been presented in articles. This article is a continuation of that research.

  17. Global minima for rare gas clusters containing one alkali metal ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Wales, David J.

    2003-10-01

    We present candidate structures for the global minima of N-atom rare gas clusters containing one additional alkali metal ion, LJNM. Lennard-Jones and Mason-Schamp potentials are used to represent the rare gas-rare gas and rare gas-alkali metal ion interactions, respectively. Results are presented for parameters appropriate to both Ar-K+ and Xe-Cs+ systems. When the ion is closer in size to the rare gas atoms (for XeNCs+) the global minima tend to be based on icosahedral packing. However, when the ion is relatively small (for ArNK+) the global minima below a certain size threshold are based on structures where the ion has lower coordination numbers. For larger clusters the global minima are again based on icosahedral packing. The latter structures can be found with minimal computational effort using the known global minima for clusters bound by Lennard-Jones or Morse potentials, substituting one atom at a time by the ion and minimizing.

  18. Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and micro-sized particles from primary minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the detachments of nano- and micro-sized colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl2 in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the micro-sized colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange.

  19. Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize: Seed to Seed in 60 Days

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, Morgan E.; Wallace, Jason G.; Albert, Patrice S.; Buckler, Edward S.; Birchler, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Two lines of Zea mays were developed as a short-generation model for maize. The Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize (FFMM) lines A and B are robust inbred lines with a significantly shorter generation time, much smaller stature, and better greenhouse adaptation than traditional maize varieties. Five generations a year are typical. FFMM is the result of a modified double-cross hybrid between four fast-flowering lines: Neuffer’s Early ACR (full color), Alexander’s Early Early Synthetic, Tom Thumb Popcorn, and Gaspe Flint, followed by selection for early flowering and desirable morphology throughout an 11-generation selfing regime. Lines A and B were derived from different progeny of the initial hybrid, and crosses between Mini-Maize A and B exhibit heterosis. The ancestry of each genomic region of Mini-Maize A and B was inferred from the four founder populations using genotyping by sequencing. Other genetic and genomic tools for these lines include karyotypes for both lines A and B, kernel genetic markers y1 (white endosperm) and R1-scm2 (purple endosperm and embryo) introgressed into Mini-Maize A, and ∼24× whole-genome resequencing data for Mini-Maize A. PMID:27440866

  20. Time spans between price maxima and price minima in stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yongjie; Li, Honggang

    2014-02-01

    We empirically investigate the distribution of time spans between price maxima and price minima in international stock markets, where a time span is defined as the time interval between a local price minimum and a local price maximum, and local price extrema are identified by a method introduced by Preis and Stanley (Preis et al. (2011), Preis (2011), Preis and Stanley (2011, 2010), Preis (2010), Preis and Stanley (2010), Stanley et al. (2010), Preis and Stanley (2009)). The empirical results show that both the tail distributions of time spans from local price maxima to local price minima and the tail distributions of time spans from local price minima to local price maxima yield an exponential distribution. In addition, price rise/fall asymmetry is observed by comparing the values of the exponents of the distribution curves. These results are robust across eight representative stock markets.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 389 variables (Hubscher+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.; Walter, F.

    2008-11-01

    In this 57th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the year 2006 are presented on 389 variable stars giving 611 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms. The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the light-curves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 380 variables (Hubscher+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.; Steinbach, H.-M.; Walter, F.

    2011-03-01

    In this 63rd compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the year 2008 are presented on 380 variable stars giving 591 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms. The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the light curves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 436 variables (Huebscher+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, J.; Monninger, G.

    2011-08-01

    In this 68th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the year 2010 are presented on 436 variable stars giving 784 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms.The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the lightcurves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 292 variables (Hubscher+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.; Steinbach, H.-M.; Walter, F.

    2008-11-01

    In this 60th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the years 2007 are presented on 292 variable stars giving 399 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms. The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the lightcurves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 452 variables (Hubscher+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.; Lehmann, P. B.; Monninger, G.; Steinbach, H.-M.; Walter, F.

    2011-03-01

    In this 65th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the year 2009 are presented on 521 variable stars giving 871 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms. The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the light curves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 503 variables (Hubscher, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.

    2011-09-01

    In this 69th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the year 2010 and 2011 are presented on 503 variable stars giving 767 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms. The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the light curves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 735 variables (Hubscher+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.

    2008-11-01

    In this 58th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the years 2006 and 2007 are presented on 473 variable stars giving 735 minima and maxima on eclipsing binaries and pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms. The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column 'Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the light curves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  8. Coherent and dissipative wave packet dynamics in cyclic model systems with four equivalent potential minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackhagen, O.; Kühn, O.; Manz, J.; May, V.; Meyer, R.

    1994-06-01

    The dynamics of cyclic systems with four equivalent potential minima is studied here from two different points of view. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation provides insight into the coherent wave packet motion. The resulting reaction mechanism involves relocalization between opposite, not neighboring potential minima. The inclusion of an environment within a density matrix description leads to dissipation and therefore to a transition from coherent to incoherent dynamics. The theoretical considerations are applied to a simple model of the cyclic motion of a proton in a molecular framework.

  9. Restricted random search method based on taboo search in the multiple minima problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung Do; Jhon, Mu Shik

    1997-03-01

    The restricted random search method is proposed as a simple Monte Carlo sampling method to search minima fast in the multiple minima problem. This method is based on taboo search applied recently to continuous test functions. The concept of the taboo region instead of the taboo list is used and therefore the sampling of a region near an old configuration is restricted in this method. This method is applied to 2-dimensional test functions and the argon clusters. This method is found to be a practical and efficient method to search near-global configurations of test functions and the argon clusters.

  10. Source of level dependent minima in rabbit distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, P. F.; Stagner, B. B.; Martin, G. K.

    2008-01-01

    Sharp level dependent minima (commonly called nulls or notches) in the distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) have been postulated to be due to two different mechanisms. It is shown here that the level dependent nulls in rabbit 2f1−f2 DPOAEs carry the signature of the mixing of a third order nonlinear term with a fifth order nonlinear term. This suggests that the minima are not due to the mixing of signals from two different physical sites of origin, but rather are due to the nature of the nonlinearity itself. Model simulations show that null production is indifferent to several properties of nonlinear input∕output functions. PMID:19206797

  11. Studies of the location of azimuth modulation minima for Ku band ocean radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F.; Neumann, G.; Shaffer, S.; Durden, S. L.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive data set of radar backscatter measurements at 14 GHz was used to evaluate the locations of the azimuthal modulation minima relative to the cross-wind directions. It was found that the minima were significantly offset from the cross-wind directions toward the downwind direction for the horizontal polarization data. These offsets were substantially smaller for the vertical polarization data. Simple scattering model calculations, based on the two-scale scattering approach, also show similar offsets. Implications of these results for the goephysical model function are discussed.

  12. Joint Effect of Solar UVB and Heat Stress on the Seasonal Change of Egg Hatching Success in the Herbivorous False Spider Mite (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    Sudo, M; Osakabe, M

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal population dynamics of an herbivorous mite has been documented in terms of the relationship between thermoresponses and temporal biological factors such as resource availability or predation risk. Although recent studies emphasize the deleterious effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm wavelengths) radiation on plant-dwelling mites, how UVB affects mite population remains largely unknown. On a wild shrub Viburnum erosum var. punctatum in Kyoto, an herbivorous false spider mite, Brevipalpus obovatus Donnadieu, occurs only in autumn. Females of this species lay one-third of their eggs on upper leaf surfaces. Oviposition on upper surfaces is beneficial for avoiding predation by phytoseiids, but exposes eggs to solar UVB and heat stress. To test the hypothesis that the seasonal occurrence of this mite is determined by interactions between solar UVB radiation and temperature, we examined variation in egg hatching success under near-ambient and UV-attenuated sunlight conditions from spring to autumn. The UV-attenuation significantly improved hatching success. However, most eggs died under heat stress regardless of UV treatments in July and August. We established a deterministic heat stress-cumulative UVB dose-egg hatching success response model, which we applied to meteorological data. The model analyses illustrated lower and higher survivability peaks in late May and October, respectively, which partly corresponded to data for annual field occurrence, indicating the importance of solar UVB radiation and heat stress as determinants of the seasonal occurrence of this mite. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Spontaneous Detachment of Colloids from Primary Energy Minima by Brownian Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan; Jin, Yan; Shen, Chongyang; Li, Tiantian; Huang, Yuanfang; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    The Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy profile has been frequently used to interpret the mechanisms controlling colloid attachment/detachment and aggregation/disaggregation behavior. This study highlighted a type of energy profile that is characterized by a shallow primary energy well (i.e., comparable to the average kinetic energy of a colloid) at a small separation distance and a monotonic decrease of interaction energy with separation distance beyond the primary energy well. This energy profile is present due to variations of height, curvature, and density of discrete physical heterogeneities on collector surfaces. The energy profile indicates that colloids can be spontaneously detached from the shallow primary energy well by Brownian diffusion. The spontaneous detachment from primary minima was unambiguously confirmed by conducting laboratory column transport experiments involving flow interruptions for two model colloids (polystyrene latex microspheres) and engineered nanoparticles (fullerene C60 aggregates). Whereas the spontaneous detachment has been frequently attributed to attachment in secondary minima in the literature, our study indicates that the detached colloids could be initially attached at primary minima. Our study further suggests that the spontaneous disaggregation from primary minima is more significant than spontaneous detachment because the primary minimum depth between colloid themselves is lower than that between a colloid and a collector surface.

  14. Spontaneous Detachment of Colloids from Primary Energy Minima by Brownian Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Jin, Yan; Shen, Chongyang; Li, Tiantian; Huang, Yuanfang; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    The Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy profile has been frequently used to interpret the mechanisms controlling colloid attachment/detachment and aggregation/disaggregation behavior. This study highlighted a type of energy profile that is characterized by a shallow primary energy well (i.e., comparable to the average kinetic energy of a colloid) at a small separation distance and a monotonic decrease of interaction energy with separation distance beyond the primary energy well. This energy profile is present due to variations of height, curvature, and density of discrete physical heterogeneities on collector surfaces. The energy profile indicates that colloids can be spontaneously detached from the shallow primary energy well by Brownian diffusion. The spontaneous detachment from primary minima was unambiguously confirmed by conducting laboratory column transport experiments involving flow interruptions for two model colloids (polystyrene latex microspheres) and engineered nanoparticles (fullerene C60 aggregates). Whereas the spontaneous detachment has been frequently attributed to attachment in secondary minima in the literature, our study indicates that the detached colloids could be initially attached at primary minima. Our study further suggests that the spontaneous disaggregation from primary minima is more significant than spontaneous detachment because the primary minimum depth between colloid themselves is lower than that between a colloid and a collector surface. PMID:26784446

  15. Release and evaluation of Cyrtobagous salviniae on common salvinia minima in southern Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common salvinia (Salvinia minima) is one of the most widespread, non-native invasive species at the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve in southern Louisiana and currently infests more than 3,600 ha and 48 km of navigable waterways. A proven biological control a...

  16. Checklist of insects associated with Salvinia minima (Baker) in Louisiana, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    his study presents a list of adult insects (excluding Diptera and Lepidoptera) collected from an infestation of an invasive aquatic weed, common salvinia (Salvinia minima Baker), in southern Louisiana, USA. Insects were sampled from May – November of 2009 and 2010 using floating pitfall traps. A to...

  17. Influence of shape resonances on minima in cross sections for photoionization of excited atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Felfli, Z.; Manson, S.T. Department of Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 )

    1990-02-01

    A relationship between the location of Cooper minima and the difference between the quantum defect of the initial state and the threshold phase shift (in units of {pi}) of the final state in excited photoionization has been suggested earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 473 (1982)). The existence of a shape resonance in the final state is shown to modify this relationship.

  18. Fast-flowering mini-maize: seed to seed in 60 days

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two lines of Zea mays were developed as a short-generation model for maize. The Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize (FFMM) lines A and B are robust inbred lines with a significantly shorter generation time, much smaller stature, and better greenhouse adaptation than traditional maize varieties. Five generatio...

  19. A new heuristic method for approximating the number of local minima in partial RNA energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Andreas A; Day, Luke; Abdelhadi Ep Souki, Ouala; Steinhöfel, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of energy landscapes plays an important role in mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation. Among the main features of interest are the number and distribution of local minima within the energy landscape. Granier and Kallel proposed in 2002 a new sampling procedure for estimating the number of local minima. In the present paper, we focus on improved heuristic implementations of the general framework devised by Granier and Kallel with regard to run-time behaviour and accuracy of predictions. The new heuristic method is demonstrated for the case of partial energy landscapes induced by RNA secondary structures. While the computation of minimum free energy RNA secondary structures has been studied for a long time, the analysis of folding landscapes has gained momentum over the past years in the context of co-transcriptional folding and deeper insights into cell processes. The new approach has been applied to ten RNA instances of length between 99 nt and 504 nt and their respective partial energy landscapes defined by secondary structures within an energy offset ΔE above the minimum free energy conformation. The number of local minima within the partial energy landscapes ranges from 1440 to 3441. Our heuristic method produces for the best approximations on average a deviation below 3.0% from the true number of local minima.

  20. Opportunities and challenges to conserve water on the landscape in snow-dominated forests: The quest for the radiative minima and more...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, T. E.; Kumar, M.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Seyednasrollah, B.; Ellis, C. R.; Lawler, R.; Essery, R.

    2012-12-01

    In mountainous, forested environments, vegetation exerts a strong control on snowcover dynamics that affect ecohydrological processes, streamflow regimes, and riparian health. Snowcover deposition and ablation patterns in forests are controlled by a complex combination of canopy interception processes coupled with radiative and turbulent heat flux patterns related to topographic and canopy cover variations. In seasonal snow environments, snowcover ablation dynamics in forests are dominated by net radiation. Recent research indicates that in small canopy gaps a net radiation minima relative to both open and forested environments can occur, but depends strongly on solar angle, gap size, slope, canopy height and stem density. The optimal gap size to minimize radiation to snow was estimated to have a diameter between 1 and 2 times the surrounding vegetation height. Physically-based snowmelt simulations indicate that gaps may increase SWE and desynchronize snowmelt by approximately 3 weeks between north and south facing slopes, relative to undisturbed forests. On east and west facing slopes, small gaps cause melt to be slightly delayed relative to intact forests, and have a minimal effect on melt synchronicity between slopes. Recent research focused on canopy thinning also indicates that a net radiation minima occurs in canopies of intermediate densities. Physically-based radiative transfer simulations using a discrete tree-based model indicate that in mid-latitude level forests, the annually-integrated radiative minima occurs at a tree spacing of 2.65 relative to the canopy height. The radiative minima was found to occur in denser forests on south-facing slopes and sparser forests on north-facing slopes. The radiative minimums in thinned forests are controlled by solar angle, crown geometry and density, tree spacing, slope, and aspect. These results indicate that both gap and homogeneous forest thinning may be used to reduce snowmelt rates or alter melt synchronicity

  1. Metastable minima of the Heisenberg spin glass in a random magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Auditya; Yeo, Joonhyun; Moore, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied zero-temperature metastable minima in classical m -vector component spin glasses in the presence of m -component random fields for two models, the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model and the Viana-Bray (VB) model. For the SK model we have calculated analytically its complexity (the log of the number of minima) for both the annealed case where one averages the number of minima before taking the log and the quenched case where one averages the complexity itself, both for fields above and below the de Almeida-Thouless (AT) field, which is finite for m >2 . We have done numerical quenches starting from a random initial state (infinite temperature state) by putting spins parallel to their local fields until there is no further decrease of the energy and found that in zero field it always produces minima that have zero overlap with each other. For the m =2 and m =3 cases in the SK model the final energy reached in the quench is very close to the energy Ec at which the overlap of the states would acquire replica symmetry-breaking features. These minima have marginal stability and will have long-range correlations between them. In the SK limit we have analytically studied the density of states ρ (λ ) of the Hessian matrix in the annealed approximation. Despite the fact that in the presence of a random field there are no continuous symmetries, the spectrum extends down to zero with the usual √{λ } form for the density of states for fields below the AT field. However, when the random field is larger than the AT field, there is a gap in the spectrum, which closes up as the AT field is approached. The VB model behaves differently and seems rather similar to studies of the three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass in a random vector field.

  2. Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and micro-sized particles from primary minima.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the detachments of nano- and micro-sized colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl(2) in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the micro-sized colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    The solar cycle is reviewed. The 11-year cycle of solar activity is characterized by the rise and fall in the numbers and surface area of sunspots. A number of other solar activity indicators also vary in association with the sunspots including; the 10.7 cm radio flux, the total solar irradiance, the magnetic field, flares and coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic activity, galactic cosmic ray fluxes, and radioisotopes in tree rings and ice cores. Individual solar cycles are characterized by their maxima and minima, cycle periods and amplitudes, cycle shape, the equatorward drift of the active latitudes, hemispheric asymmetries, and active longitudes. Cycle-to-cycle variability includes the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Gnevyshev-Ohl (even-odd) Rule. Short-term variability includes the 154-day periodicity, quasi-biennial variations, and double-peaked maxima. We conclude with an examination of prediction techniques for the solar cycle and a closer look at cycles 23 and 24.

  4. The method of intercepts in parameter space for the analysis of local minima caused by dose-volume constraints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan; Jeraj, Robert; Mackie, Thomas R

    2003-06-07

    The local minima problem in radiotherapy optimization has been a concern for both researchers and physicians. In this work, local minima induced by dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints are discussed. The non-convex property of the feasible set formed by DVH constraints is discussed in beam weight space. An intuitive explanation of the origin of this type of local minima is given by a two-beam model setup. Some interesting properties and insights about the DVH-induced local minima are found. Based on this, a heuristic non-random initial guess sampling method is proposed and applied to a clinical nasopharyngeal case, where some significantly different local minima are located.

  5. Third Minima in Thorium and Uranium Isotopes in a Self-Consistent Theory

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Well-developed third minima, corresponding to strongly elongated and reflection-asymmetric shapes associated with dimolecular configurations, have been predicted in some non-self-consistent models to impact fission pathways of thorium and uranium isotopes. These predictions have guided the interpretation of resonances seen experimentally. On the other hand, self-consistent calculations consistently predict very shallow potential-energy surfaces in the third minimum region.

    Purpose: We investigate the interpretation of third-minimum configurations in terms of dimolecular (cluster) states. We study the isentropic potential-energy surfaces of selected even-even thorium and uranium isotopes at several excitation energies. In order to understand the driving effects behind the presence of third minima, we study the interplay between pairing and shell effects.

    Methods: We use the finite-temperature superfluid nuclear density functional theory. We consider two Skyrme energy density functionals: a traditional functional SkM and a recent functional UNEDF1 optimized for fission studies.

    Results: We predict very shallow or no third minima in the potential-energy surfaces of 232Th and 232U. In the lighter Th and U isotopes with N = 136 and 138, the third minima are better developed. We show that the reflection-asymmetric configurations around the third minimum can be associated with dimolecular states involving the spherical doubly magic 132Sn and a lighter deformed Zr or Mo fragment. The potential-energy surfaces for 228,232Th and 232U at several excitation energies are presented. We also study isotopic chains to demonstrate the evolution of the depth of the third minimum with neutron number.

    Conclusions: We show that the neutron shell effect that governs the existence of the dimolecular states around the third minimum is consistent with the spherical-to-deformed shape transition in the Zr andMo isotopes around N = 58.We demonstrate that the depth of

  6. Third minima in thorium and uranium isotopes in a self-consistent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    Background: Well-developed third minima, corresponding to strongly elongated and reflection-asymmetric shapes associated with dimolecular configurations, have been predicted in some non-self-consistent models to impact fission pathways of thorium and uranium isotopes. These predictions have guided the interpretation of resonances seen experimentally. On the other hand, self-consistent calculations consistently predict very shallow potential-energy surfaces in the third minimum region.Purpose: We investigate the interpretation of third-minimum configurations in terms of dimolecular (cluster) states. We study the isentropic potential-energy surfaces of selected even-even thorium and uranium isotopes at several excitation energies. In order to understand the driving effects behind the presence of third minima, we study the interplay between pairing and shell effects.Methods: We use the finite-temperature superfluid nuclear density functional theory. We consider two Skyrme energy density functionals: a traditional functional SkM* and a recent functional UNEDF1 optimized for fission studies.Results: We predict very shallow or no third minima in the potential-energy surfaces of 232Th and 232U. In the lighter Th and U isotopes with N=136 and 138, the third minima are better developed. We show that the reflection-asymmetric configurations around the third minimum can be associated with dimolecular states involving the spherical doubly magic 132Sn and a lighter deformed Zr or Mo fragment. The potential-energy surfaces for 228,232Th and 232U at several excitation energies are presented. We also study isotopic chains to demonstrate the evolution of the depth of the third minimum with neutron number.Conclusions: We show that the neutron shell effect that governs the existence of the dimolecular states around the third minimum is consistent with the spherical-to-deformed shape transition in the Zr and Mo isotopes around N=58. We demonstrate that the depth of the third minimum

  7. Effect of sodium acetate additive in successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction on the performance of CdS quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Ping; Chen, Liang-Yih; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2016-09-01

    Sodium acetate (NaAc) is utilized as an additive in cationic precursors of the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process to fabricate CdS quantum-dot (QD)-sensitized photoelectrodes. The effects of the NaAc concentration on the deposition rate and distribution of QDs in mesoporous TiO2 films, as well as on the performance of CdS-sensitized solar cells are studied. The experimental results show that the presence of NaAc can significantly accelerate the deposition of CdS, improve the QD distribution across photoelectrodes, and thereby, increase the performance of solar cells. These results are mainly attributed to the pH-elevation effect of NaAc to the cationic precursors which increases the electrostatic interaction of the TiO2 film to cadmium ions. The light-to-energy conversion efficiency of the CdS-sensitized solar cell increases with increasing concentration of the NaAc and approaches a maximum value (3.11%) at 0.05 M NaAc. Additionally, an ionic exchange is carried out on the photoelectrode to transform the deposited CdS into CdS1-xSex ternary QDs. The light-absorption range of the photoelectrode is extended and an exceptional power conversion efficiency of 4.51% is achieved due to this treatment.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Minima and maxima of 292 variables (Hubscher+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubscher, J.; Lehmann, P. B.; Monninger, G.; Steinbach, H.-M.; Walter, F.

    2011-03-01

    In this 66th compilation of BAV results, photoelectric observations obtained in the years 2009 and 2010 are presented on 452 variable stars giving 838 minima on eclipsing binaries and maxima on pulsating stars. All moments of minima and maxima are heliocentric. The errors are tabulated in column '+/-'. The values in column 'O-C' are determined without incorporation of nonlinear terms.The references are given in the section 'Remarks'. All information about photometers and filters are specified in the column `Rem'. The observations were made at private observatories. The photoelectric measurements and all the light curves with evaluations can be obtained from the office of the BAV for inspection. (3 data files).

  9. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of Physalis minima Linn.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Khan, Sarwar; Mahmood, Tahira; Khan, Pir Mohammad; Jabar, Abdul

    2009-06-01

    In our present investigation, the crude methanol extract and chloroform fraction of the whole plant of Physalis minima Linn (Solanaceae) was investigated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in NMRI mice and Wistar rats of either sex at 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. Various established in-vivo model's were used during the study. Both crude extract and chloroform fraction showed marked anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities as compared to a control at tested doses. The antipyretic potential of the crude extract and chloroform were insignificant in the Brewer's yeast fever model. Therefore, the whole plant of Physalis minima Linn could be considered as a potential candidate for bioactivity-guided isolation of natural anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

  10. [Preliminary study on molluscicidal effect of active components from Centipeda minima].

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Ma, An-Ning; Zhang, Yun; Geng, Peng

    2009-08-01

    The active components from Centipeda minima were extracted by water or ethanol, and identified by FTIR spectroscopy and UV-visible spectrophotometer. The molluscicidal effect of aqueous extract and ethanol extract from Centipeda minima against Oncomelania hupensis was determined as referring to the WHO guidelines for laboratory molluscicidal test. Treated with over 2.0 g/L aqueous extract and ethanol extract for five days, the mortality of O. hupensis was up to 100%, and their LC50, for snails was 0.50 g/L and 0.62 g/L, respectively. The molluscicidal activity of aqueous extract was higher than that of ethanol extract. The main components of aqueous extract and ethanol extract were sesquiterpenes lactones and sterols.

  11. Antibiotic activity of Emerimicin IV isolated from Emericellopsis minima from Talcahuano Bay, Chile.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Alejandro; Lara, Liliana; Paz, Cristian; Perez, Andrés; Galleguillos, Felipe; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, José; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Silva, Mario

    2017-07-03

    Due to the increasing emergence of resistance of bacterial pathogens to current antibiotics, we have examined the marine fungi present in sea sediments obtained 200 m offshore to discover new antibacterial compounds active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. One strain, identified as Emericellopsis minima, was isolated from sediments of Talcahuano Bay (Chile). From the liquid culture of E. minima, we isolated Emerimicin IV, a unique fungal peptaibol that exhibited antibacterial activity. The structure of this compound was assigned by interpretation of (1)H NMR and HR-LCMS data. Emerimicin IV showed bacteriostatic activity against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis with MIC values ranging between 100 and 12.5 μg/mL.

  12. Minima of Higgs potentials corresponding to non-maximal isotropy subgroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, M.; Anastaze, G.; Eckert, P.; Ruegg, H.

    1985-06-01

    Results are presented of the minimization of the Higgs potential for the irreducible representation 75 of SU(5). Isotropy groups of minima are determined using a geometrical method developed recently by Abud and Sartori. Minima with the maximal isotropy algebras su(3) + su(2) + u(1), sp(4) + u(1), su(2) + su(2) + u(1) and su(2) were found as well as a minimum with a non-maximal isotropy algebra su(2) + su(2) + u(1) + u(1) and discrete symmetry. A minimum having a non-maximal isotropy group SU(2) ⊗ U(1) ⊗ U(1) was also found, contrary to Michel's conjecture. A detailed analysis of the results is presented and the limits of Michel's conjecture are pointed out.

  13. Physalindicanols, New Biogenetic Precursors of C28-Steroidal Lactones from Physalis minima var. indica.

    PubMed

    Sinha, S C; Ali, A; Bagchi, A; Sahai, M; Ray, A B

    1987-02-01

    The structures of two isomeric C (28)-sterols isolated from PHYSALIS MINIMA Linn. var. INDICA were elucidated as ergosta-5,25-dien-3beta,24zeta,-diol and ergosta-5,24(28)-dien-3beta,25-diol on the basis of detailed spectral analysis. The isolated sterols are regarded as precursors in the elaboration of complex C (28)-steroidal lactones, native in this plant and related species.

  14. Solasodine glycoside production by hairy root cultures of Physalis minima Linn.

    PubMed

    Putalun, Waraporn; Prasamsiwamai, Preeyaporn; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2004-04-01

    Hairy root cultures of Physalis minima L. were developed using Agrobacterium rhizogenes, strain ATCC 15834 mediated transformation and grown in half strength of Murashige and Skoog medium containing 8% (w/v) sucrose. Media supplementation with 1 mg naphthalenacetic acid l(-1) and 1 mg benzyladenine increased solasodine glycoside up to 900 g dry wt, which was 20 times higher than that in the native root.

  15. Cooper minima and Young-type interferences in the photoionization of H{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Della Picca, R.; Fainstein, P. D.; Dubois, A.

    2011-09-15

    We present a detailed study of the partial and total cross sections for photon-induced electron emission from H{sub 2}{sup +}. By comparing the results employing exact and approximate, bounded and continuum wave functions, for one- and two-center basis functions, we find the origin and position of the Cooper-like minima in the partial cross sections and their relationship with the Young-type interference pattern.

  16. Quantification of colloid retention and release by straining and energy minima in variably saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wenjing; Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Stoof, Cathelijne R; Gao, Bin; Schatz, Anna Lottie; Zhang, Yalei; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2013-08-06

    The prediction of colloid transport in unsaturated porous media in the presence of large energy barrier is hampered by scant information of the proportional retention by straining and attractive interactions at surface energy minima. This study aims to fill this gap by performing saturated and unsaturated column experiments in which colloid pulses were added at various ionic strengths (ISs) from 0.1 to 50 mM. Subsequent flushing with deionized water released colloids held at the secondary minimum. Next, destruction of the column freed colloids held by straining. Colloids not recovered at the end of the experiment were quantified as retained at the primary minimum. Results showed that net colloid retention increased with IS and was independent of saturation degree under identical IS and Darcian velocity. Attachment rates were greater in unsaturated columns, despite an over 3-fold increase in pore water velocity relative to saturated columns, because additional retention at the readily available air-associated interfaces (e.g., the air-water-solid [AWS] interfaces) is highly efficient. Complementary visual data showed heavy retention at the AWS interfaces. Retention by secondary minima ranged between 8% and 46% as IS increased, and was greater for saturated conditions. Straining accounted for an average of 57% of the retained colloids with insignificant differences among the treatments. Finally, retention by primary minima ranged between 14% and 35% with increasing IS, and was greater for unsaturated conditions due to capillary pinning.

  17. Scale-estimation of quantum coherent energy transport in multiple-minima systems.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-07-01

    A generic and intuitive model for coherent energy transport in multiple minima systems coupled to a quantum mechanical bath is shown. Using a simple spin-boson system, we illustrate how a generic donor-acceptor system can be brought into resonance using a narrow band of vibrational modes, such that the transfer efficiency of an electron-hole pair (exciton) is made arbitrarily high. Coherent transport phenomena in nature are of renewed interest since the discovery that a photon captured by the light-harvesting complex (LHC) in photosynthetic organisms can be conveyed to a chemical reaction centre with near-perfect efficiency. Classical explanations of the transfer use stochastic diffusion to model the hopping motion of a photo-excited exciton. This accounts inadequately for the speed and efficiency of the energy transfer measured in a series of recent landmark experiments. Taking a quantum mechanical perspective can help capture the salient features of the efficient part of that transfer. To show the versatility of the model, we extend it to a multiple minima system comprising seven-sites, reminiscent of the widely studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex. We show that an idealised transport model for multiple minima coupled to a narrow-band phonon can transport energy with arbitrarily high efficiency.

  18. Dynamics of driven transitions between minima of a complex energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    We recently modeled cellular interconvertion dynamics by using an epigenetic landscape model inspired by neural network models. Given an arbitrary set of patterns, the model can be used to construct an energy landscape in which those patterns are the global minima. Here we study the transitions between stable states of the landscapes thus constructed, under the effect of an external driving force. We consider three different cases: i) choosing the patterns to be random and independendently distributed ii) choosing a set of patterns directly derived from the experimental cellular transcription factor expression data for a representative set of cell types in an organism and iii) choosing randomly generated trees of hierarchically correlated patterns, inspired by biology. For each of the three cases, we study the stability of the global minima against thermal fluctuations and external driving forces, and the dynamics of the driven transitions away from global minima. We compare the results obtained in the three cases defined above, and in particular we explore to what degree the correlations between patterns affect the transition dynamics.

  19. Scale-estimation of quantum coherent energy transport in multiple-minima systems

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    A generic and intuitive model for coherent energy transport in multiple minima systems coupled to a quantum mechanical bath is shown. Using a simple spin-boson system, we illustrate how a generic donor-acceptor system can be brought into resonance using a narrow band of vibrational modes, such that the transfer efficiency of an electron-hole pair (exciton) is made arbitrarily high. Coherent transport phenomena in nature are of renewed interest since the discovery that a photon captured by the light-harvesting complex (LHC) in photosynthetic organisms can be conveyed to a chemical reaction centre with near-perfect efficiency. Classical explanations of the transfer use stochastic diffusion to model the hopping motion of a photo-excited exciton. This accounts inadequately for the speed and efficiency of the energy transfer measured in a series of recent landmark experiments. Taking a quantum mechanical perspective can help capture the salient features of the efficient part of that transfer. To show the versatility of the model, we extend it to a multiple minima system comprising seven-sites, reminiscent of the widely studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex. We show that an idealised transport model for multiple minima coupled to a narrow-band phonon can transport energy with arbitrarily high efficiency. PMID:24980547

  20. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlis, N. V.; Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Skordas, E. S.

    2015-06-01

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold Mthres = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  1. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity.

    PubMed

    Sarlis, N V; Christopoulos, S-R G; Skordas, E S

    2015-06-01

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold Mthres = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  2. [Supercomputer investigation of the protein-ligand system low-energy minima].

    PubMed

    Oferkin, I V; Sulimov, A V; Katkova, E V; Kutov, D K; Grigoriev, F V; Kondakova, O A; Sulimov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculations and ligand positioning is strongly influenced by the choice of the docking target function. This work demonstrates the evaluation of the five different target functions used in docking: functions based on MMFF94 force field and functions based on PM7 quantum-chemical method accounting or without accounting the implicit solvent model (PCM, COSMO or SGB). For these purposes the ligand positions corresponding to the minima of the target function and the experimentally known ligand positions in the protein active site (crystal ligand positions) were compared. Each function was examined on the same test-set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. The new parallelized docking program FLM based on Monte Carlo search algorithm was developed to perform the comprehensive low-energy minima search and to calculate the protein-ligand binding energy. This study demonstrates that the docking target function based on the MMFF94 force field can be used to detect the crystal or near crystal positions of the ligand by the finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solvent accounting in the docking process for the accurate ligand positioning is also shown. The accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the correlation between the calculated and experimentally determined protein-ligand binding energies are improved when the MMFF94 force field is substituted by the new PM7 method with implicit solvent accounting.

  3. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlis, N. V. Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Skordas, E. S.

    2015-06-15

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ{sub 1} of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold M{sub thres} = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  4. SYSTEMATIC MOTION OF FINE-SCALE JETS AND SUCCESSIVE RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JET OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE/HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.; Isobe, H.

    2012-11-20

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A {lambda}-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets ({approx}1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  5. Systematic Motion of Fine-scale Jets and Successive Reconnection in Solar Chromospheric Anemone Jet Observed with the Solar Optical Telescope/Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A λ-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets (~1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  6. On the timing of the next great solar activity minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The long-term variations in solar activity are studied using the dataset comprised of sunspot number and 14C radioisotope timeseries. We use a novel S200 index to identify possible past Grand Minima (GM). The Maunder, Oort, Wolf and Spörer Minima fall in phase with the minimum of S200 index. We also show GM develop in clusters, with a separation of about 400-600 years between individual GM. Extending these found similarities to modern solar activity, it is predicted that next grand solar minimum may occur in about ∼ 2090 ± 20 .

  7. Solar wind, radiation belt electrons and atmospheric vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina; Tinsley, Brian; Zhou, Limin

    The association of atmospheric vorticity changes with solar wind sector structure explored by John Wilcox and Walter Orr Roberts in the 1970s is examined in terms of the sector related minima in solar wind speed, and associated minima in relativistic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt. Stronger correlations of atmospheric vorticity with the relativistic electron flux are found than with either solar wind speed or the passage of magnetic sector boundaries over the Earth. This is consistent with changes in the ionosphere-earth current density affecting cloud microphysics, with the ionization from the Bremsstrahlung X-rays from the relativistic electron precipitation increasing the conductivity of the stratosphere.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR MERIDIONAL FLOWS DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Antia, H. M. E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i

    2010-07-01

    We have analyzed available full-disk data from the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO using the 'ring diagram' technique to determine the behavior of solar meridional flows over solar cycle 23 in the outer 2% of the solar radius. We find that the dominant component of meridional flows during solar maximum was much lower than that during the minima at the beginning of cycles 23 and 24. There were differences in the flow velocities even between the two minima. The meridional flows show a migrating pattern with higher-velocity flows migrating toward the equator as activity increases. Additionally, we find that the migrating pattern of the meridional flow matches those of sunspot butterfly diagram and the zonal flows in the shallow layers. A high-latitude band in meridional flow appears around 2004, well before the current activity minimum. A Legendre polynomial decomposition of the meridional flows shows that the latitudinal pattern of the flow was also different during the maximum as compared to that during the two minima. The different components of the flow have different time dependences, and the dependence is different at different depths.

  9. Theoretical studies of the global minima and polarizabilities of small lithium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Han-Shi; Zhao, Ya-Fan; Hammond, Jeff R.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Aprà, Edoardo; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Li, Jun; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    Lithium clusters Lin (n = 1⿿20) have been investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster (CC) methods. The global minima are located via an improved basin-hopping algorithm. Simulated polarizabilities are in good agreement with the measured data generally. The simulated polarizabilities for Li6, Li12 and Li19 are in reasonable agreement when thermal effects are included, except the Li3 cluster. A linear correlation for the inverse relationship between the CCSD calculated polarizabilities and ionization potential (IP) has been reported to have the linear coefficient of 0.996, which further strengthens our simulations.

  10. Quasibiennial Periodicity of Solar and Planetary Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predeanu, Irina

    The quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) of various solar and geophysical parameters is anlysed, taking some planetary configurations as temporal reference points. The incidence of the QBO minima in the proximity of Sun-Mars oppositions is discussed. The increase of this effect when Mars is near the perihelion or Jupiter is conjunct to the Sun is pointed out,

  11. SUCCESSIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS TRIGGERED BY THE COLLISION OF TWO SMALL SUNSPOTS WITH OPPOSITE POLARITIES AND MOTIONAL DIRECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.

    2012-03-15

    We present a study of the two successive M-class flares associated with two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) triggered by the collision of two small sunspots with opposite magnetic polarities and motional directions in NOAA active region (AR) 10484 on 2003 October 22. From the evolution of this AR in the TRACE white-light images and 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO, a large sunspot and a small sunspot with negative polarity rotated clockwise about 33 Degree-Sign and 18 Degree-Sign , respectively, from the northeast of a quiescent sunspot with negative polarity to the southeast from 15:00 UT on October 21 to 16:24 UT on October 23. During the process of their motion, the small sunspot with negative polarity collided with the small sunspot with positive polarity and opposite motional direction. In the collision, this AR produced two successive M-class flares and CMEs according to the observations of GOES and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. By analyzing the magnetic fields at polarity inversion lines (PILs) between the two small sunspot, it is found that a sudden squeeze occurred near the onset of the two M-class flares and then recovered itself after the flares. We ruled out the emergence of the magnetic fields near the PIL. According to the brightenings in TRACE 1600 A and the hard X-ray sources of the RHESSI of two M-class flares, we found that the locations of the two flares are almost situated in the same location at the PIL between the two small sunspots. We suggest that the sudden squeeze between the opposite magnetic polarities is caused by the pressure of the collision of the two small sunspots and resulted in the magnetic reconnection. These results could contribute to understanding the mechanism of flares and CMEs.

  12. Successive Homologous Coronal Mass Ejections Driven by Shearing and Converging Motions in Solar Active Region NOAA 12371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.

    2017-08-01

    We study the magnetic field evolution in AR 12371, related to its successive eruptive nature. During the disk transit of seven days, the active region (AR) launched four sequential fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which are associated with long duration M-class flares. Morphological study delineates a pre-eruptive coronal sigmoid structure above the polarity inversion line (PIL) similar to Moore et al.’s study. The velocity field derived from tracked magnetograms indicates persistent shear and converging motions of polarity regions about the PIL. While these shear motions continue, the crossed arms of two sigmoid elbows are being brought to interaction by converging motions at the middle of the PIL, initiating the tether-cutting reconnection of field lines and the onset of the CME explosion. The successive CMEs are explained by a cyclic process of magnetic energy storage and release referred to as “sigmoid-to-arcade-to-sigmoid” transformation driven by photospheric flux motions. Furthermore, the continued shear motions inject helicity flux with a dominant negative sign, which contributes to core field twist and its energy by building a twisted flux rope (FR). After a limiting value, the excess coronal helicity is expelled by bodily ejection of the FR, which is initiated by some instability as realized by intermittent CMEs. This AR is in contrast with the confined AR 12192 with a predominant negative sign and larger helicity flux, but much weaker (-0.02 turns) normalized coronal helicity content. While predominant signed helicity flux is a requirement for CME eruption, our study suggests that the magnetic flux normalized helicity flux is a necessary condition accommodating the role of background flux and appeals to a further study of a large sample of ARs.

  13. Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction deposited kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanoflakes counter electrodes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, Sawanta S.; Shim, Chang Su; Hong, Chang Kook

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanoflakes by SILAR technique. • Hydrothermal synthesis of TiO{sub 2}. • Counter electrode for DSSC application. • 4.48% conversion efficiency. - Abstract: In this investigation, we have successfully synthesized Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) nanoflakes by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and used as a counter electrode in the hydrothermally grown TiO{sub 2} based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared CZTS nanoflakes were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), micro Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive analysis. Our DSSCs results revealed that, compared with conventional Pt/FTO counter electrode DSSCs, nanoflakes of p-type CZTS as the photocathode and n-type TiO{sub 2} thin films as the photoanode shows an increased short circuit current (13.35 mA/cm{sup 2}) with 4.84% power conversion efficiency. The detailed interface properties of were analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements.

  14. A genetic survey of Salvinia minima in the southern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madeira, Paul T.; Jacono, C.C.; Tipping, Phil; Van, Thai K.; Center, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    The genetic relationships among 68 samples of Salvinia minima (Salviniaceae) were investigated using RAPD analysis. Neighbor joining, principle components, and AMOVA analyses were used to detect differences among geographically referenced samples within and outside of Florida. Genetic distances (Nei and Li) range up to 0.48, although most are under 0.30, still relatively high levels for an introduced, clonally reproducing plant. Despite the diversity AMOVA analysis yielded no indication that the Florida plants, as a group, were significantly different from the plants sampled elsewhere in its adventive, North American range. A single, genetically dissimilar population probably exists in the recent (1998) horticultural introduction to Mississippi. When the samples were grouped into 10 regional (but artificial) units and analyzed using AMOVA the between region variance was only 7.7%. Genetic similarity among these regions may indicate introduction and dispersal from common sources. The reduced aggressiveness of Florida populations (compared to other states) may be due to herbivory. The weevil Cyrtobagous salviniae, a selective feeder, is found in Florida but not other states. The genetic similarity also suggests that there are no obvious genetic obstacles to the establishment or efficacy of C. salviniae as a biological control agent on S. minima outside of Florida.

  15. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  16. Systematic Phase Diagram of LiSi and LiAl compounds from Minima Hopping Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Aldo; Marques, Miguel; Botti, Silvana; Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Valencia-Jaime, Irais; Amsler, Max; Goedecker, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    We performed an extensive theoretical exploration of the structural phase diagram of LiSi and LiAl alloys through global structural prediction. These compounds have very interesting properties. For example, LiSi alloys have been considered for high energy density anodes for future rechargeable battery technology, while LiAl alloys are expected to have applications in the field of structural components due to its light weight and maleability. The global structural prediction was performed with the minima hopping method. In this method the low energy structures are obtained by solving a set of dynamical equations of motion that allows efficient visits to local minima on the Born Oppenheimer surface. We found very good agreement between our simulations and previously reported stoichiometries. Moreover, we were able to identify several novel thermodynamically stable compositions that have not been previously synthesized. The ground-state structures were further characterized both structurally and electronically. Our calculations show that global structural prediction is a very powerful tool to predict new thermodynamically stable materials, and that it consistently outperforms other methods commonly used. Support from ACS-PRF #54075-ND10 is recognized.

  17. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C.T.; Jian, L.K.; Luhmann, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23–24 transition. PMID:25685425

  18. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition.

  19. Minima in generalized oscillator strengths of atomic transitions and the approach to the high-energy limit

    SciTech Connect

    Avdonina, N.B.; Fursa, D.; Msezane, A.Z.; Pratt, R.H.

    2005-06-15

    Minima in the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) and the convergence of the GOS to the first Born approximation (FBA) limit for the Ba 6s {sup 1}S{yields}6p {sup 1}P optically allowed transition are investigated. The random-phase approximation with exchange, which takes into account correlation effects among the atomic electrons themselves, and the convergent close-coupling (CCC) approximation are used for the calculations. We find the following. (1) The GOS as a function of the momentum transfer squared K{sup 2} is characterized by a complex structure of multiple minima, significantly different in the two approximations and approaches the high-energy FBA limit only at small K{sup 2} values (less than about 0.5 a.u.). (2) The number of minima calculated in the CCC approximation increases with increase in energy, but does not correspond to the number obtained in the FBA, even at high energy {approx}1 keV. The CCC and FBA minima are in general not directly related. The FBA minima, except for the first, do not correspond to physical observables at these energies. (3) At high energy the interaction between the incident electron and the target remains significant, resulting in slowing down the convergence of the CCC GOS to the corresponding nonrelativistic FBA results.

  20. MinFinder: Locating all the local minima of a function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, Isaac E.

    2006-01-01

    A new stochastic clustering algorithm is introduced that aims to locate all the local minima of a multidimensional continuous and differentiable function inside a bounded domain. The accompanying software (MinFinder) is written in ANSI C++. However, the user may code his objective function either in C++, C or Fortran 77. We compare the performance of this new method to the performance of Multistart and Topographical Multilevel Single Linkage Clustering on a set of benchmark problems. Program summaryTitle of program:MinFinder Catalogue identifier:ADWU Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWU Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Installation:University of Ioannina, Greece Programming language used:GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data:200 KB No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:5797 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:588 121 Distribution format:gzipped tar file Nature of the physical problem:A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques can be trapped in any local minimum. Global optimization is then the appropriate tool. For example, solving a non-linear system of equations via optimization, employing a "least squares" type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions, i.e. they are far from zero. Method of solution:Using a uniform pdf, points are sampled from the

  1. Absence of multiple local minima effects in intensity modulated optimization with dose-volume constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llacer, Jorge; Deasy, Joseph O.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Promberger, Claus

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of intensity modulated radiation treatment optimization problems in the presence of non-convex feasible parameter spaces caused by the specification of dose-volume constraints for the organs-at-risk (OARs). The main aim was to determine whether the presence of those non-convex spaces affects the optimization of clinical cases in any significant way. This was done in two phases: (1) Using a carefully designed two-dimensional mathematical phantom that exhibits two controllable minima and with randomly initialized beamlet weights, we developed a methodology for exploring the nature of the convergence characteristics of quadratic cost function optimizations (deterministic or stochastic). The methodology is based on observing the statistical behaviour of the residual cost at the end of optimizations in which the stopping criterion is progressively more demanding and carrying out those optimizations to very small error changes per iteration. (2) Seven clinical cases were then analysed with dose-volume constraints that are stronger than originally used in the clinic. The clinical cases are two prostate cases differently posed, a meningioma case, two head-and-neck cases, a spleen case and a spine case. Of the 14 different sets of optimizations (with and without the specification of maximum doses allowed for the OARs), 12 fail to show any effect due to the existence of non-convex feasible spaces. The remaining two sets of optimizations show evidence of multiple minima in the solutions, but those minima are very close to each other in cost and the resulting treatment plans are practically identical, as measured by the quality of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). We discuss the differences between fluence maps resulting from those similar treatment plans. We provide a possible reason for the observed results and conclude that, although the study is necessarily limited, the annealing characteristics of a simulated annealing method may not be

  2. Capturing the solubility minima of n-alkanes in water by soft-SAFT.

    PubMed

    Vega, Lourdes F; Llovell, Fèlix; Blas, Felipe J

    2009-05-28

    The purpose of this work is twofold: (1) to provide an accurate molecular model for water within the soft-SAFT equation of state [Blas, F.J.; Vega, L.F. Mol. Phys. 1997, 92, 135; Llovell, F., et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 10715] and (2) to check the capability of this molecular-based equation of state for capturing the solubility minima of n-alkanes in water experimentally found at room temperature for these mixtures. Water was modeled as a Lennard-Jones sphere with four associating sites, with parameters obtained by fitting to experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data. Special care was taken to the value of these parameters depending on the range of applicability of the equation, which turned out to be essential for accurate predictions for mixtures. A correlation available in the literature was used for the molecular parameters of the n-alkane series. The crossover soft-SAFT equation was able to accurately describe the phase behavior of water near to and far from the critical point, up to 350 K. If instead of obtaining an overall good agreement one is interested in a more precise description of the near-ambient conditions, a more refined fitting of the parameters is needed. The model was used to describe the water+methane up to water+n-decane binary mixtures. The equation was able to predict the mutual solubilities in almost quantitative agreement with experimental data, including the presence of the solubility minima at ambient temperature, with a single transferable energy binary parameter, independent of temperature and chain length. Predictions obtained from the soft-SAFT approach are clearly superior than those obtained from the Huang and Radosz version of the SAFT equation [Economou, I. G.; Tsonopoulos, C. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1997, 52, 511], due to the more refined reference term and the more accurate radial distribution function used in the chain and association terms. This is the first time a SAFT approach is able to describe this minima.

  3. A concept for reducing oceanic separation minima through the use of a TCAS-derived CDTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, W. D.; Mcfarland, A. L.; Ludwick, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A concept for using a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI), as derived from a modified version of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System 2 (TCAS 2), to support reductions in air traffic separation minima for an oceanic track system is presented. The concept, and the TCAS modifications required to support it, are described. The feasibility of the concept is examined from a number of standpoints, including expected benefits, maximum alert rates, and possible transition strategies. Various implementation issues are analyzed. Pilot procedures are suggested for dealing with alert situations. Possible variations of the concept are also examined. Finally, recommendations are presented for other studies and simulation experiments which can be used to further verify the feasibility of the concept.

  4. Prediction of a reconstructed α-boron (111) surface by the minima hopping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Goedecker, Stefan; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2014-03-01

    Boron exhibits an impressive structural variety and immense efforts have recently been made to explore boron structures of low dimensionality, such as boron fullerenes, two-dimensional boron sheets or boron nanotubes which are theoretically predicted to exhibit superior electronic properties compared to their carbon analogues. By performing an extensive and systematic ab initio structural search for the (111) surface of α-boron (111) using the minima hopping structure prediction method we found very strong reconstructions that lead to two-dimensional surface layers. The topmost layer of these low energy reconstructions is a conductive, nearly perfectly planar boron sheet. If exfoliation was experimentally possible, promising precursors for a large variety of boron nano-structures such as single walled boron nanotubes and boron fullerenes could be obtained.

  5. Withanolides from Physalis minima and their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yu-Zhou; Shan, Si-Ming; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2014-04-01

    Six new withanolides (1-6), including two uncommon 1,10-seco withanolides (1 and 2), together with five known withanolides (7-11), were isolated from the whole plants of Physalis minima Linn.. The structures of new compounds were elucidated through spectroscopic methods, including (1)H, (13)C NMR, 2D-NMR, HRESIMS and circular dichroism (CD). Inhibitory effects of the isolates on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccaride-activated RAW264.7 macrophages were evaluated. Compounds 2 and 5 showed strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 8.04 and 10.01 μM, respectively. Compounds 1, 9 and 10 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities with IC50 values from 25.54 to 43.58 μM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of CdS-sensitized inverted organic solar cells prepared via a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleiwi, Hind Fadhil; Zakaria, Azmi; Yap, Chi Chin; Abbas, Haidr Abdulzahra; Tan, Sin Tee; Lee, Hock Beng; Tan, Chun Hui; Ginting, Riski Titian; Alshanableh, Abdelelah; Talib, Zainal Abidin

    2017-05-01

    One-dimensional ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) synthesized on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass by hydrothermal method were modified with cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) as an electron transport layer (ETL) in order to enhance the photovoltaic performance of inverted organic solar cell (IOSC). In present study, CdS QDs were deposited on ZNRs using a Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction method (SILAR) method. In typical procedures, IOSCs were fabricated by spin-coating the P3HT:PC61BM photoactive layer onto the as-prepared ZNRs/CdS QDs. The results of current-voltage (I-V) measurement under illumination shows that the FTO/ZNRs/CdS QDs/ P3HT:PC61BM/ PEDOT: PSS/Ag IOSC achieved a higher power conversion efficiency (4.06 %) in comparison to FTO/ZNRs/P3HT:PC61BM/PEDOT: PSS/Ag (3.6 %). Our findings suggest that the improved open circuit voltage (Voc) and short circuit current density (Jsc) of ZNRs/CdS QDs devices could be attributed to enhanced electron selectivity and reduced interfacial charge carrier recombination between ZNRs and P3HT:PC61BM after the deposition of CdS QDs. The CdS QDs sensitized ZNRs reported herein exhibit great potential for advanced optoelectronic application.

  7. Efficient CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells prepared by an improved successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojoong; Wang, Mingkui; Chen, Peter; Gamelin, Daniel R; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Md K

    2009-12-01

    In pursuit of efficient quantum dot (QD)-sensitized solar cells based on mesoporous TiO(2) photoanodes, a new procedure for preparing selenide (Se(2-)) was developed and used for depositing CdSe QDs in situ over TiO(2) mesopores by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process in ethanol. The sizes and density of CdSe QDs over TiO(2) were controlled by the number of SILAR cycles applied. After some optimization of these QD-sensitized TiO(2) films in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells using a cobalt redox couple [Co(o-phen)(3)(2+/3+)], including addition of a final layer of CdTe, over 4% overall efficiencies were achieved at 100 W/m(2) with about 50% IPCE at its maximum. Light-harvesting properties and transient voltage decay/impedance measurements confirmed that CdTe-terminated CdSe QD cells gave better charge-collection efficiencies and kinetic parameters than corresponding CdSe QD cells. In a preliminary study, a CdSe(Te) QD-sensitized TiO(2) film was combined with an organic hole conductor, spiro-OMeTAD, and shown to exhibit a promising efficiency of 1.6% at 100 W/m(2) in inorganic/organic hybrid all-solid-state cells.

  8. Meridional Surface Flows and the Recent Extended Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Nandy, D.; Munoz-Jaramillo, A.

    2011-05-01

    Nandy, Munoz, & Martens, have published a kinematic dynamo model that successfully reproduces the main characteristics of the recent extended solar minimum (Nature 2011, 471, 80). The model depends on the solar meridional flow and its return flow along the tachocline determining the period and character of the cycle. In particular Nandy et al. found that a meridional flow that is fast in the first half of the cycle and then slows down around solar maximum, can lead to an extended minimum with the characteristics of the recent minimum: an extended period without sunspots and weak polar fields. It has been pointed out that the observed surface meridional flows over the last cycle do not fit the pattern assumed by Nandy et al. Hathaway & Rightmire (Science 2010, 327-1350) find that the meridional speed of small magnetic surface elements observed by SoHO/MDI decreased around solar maximum and has not yet recovered. Basu & Antia (ApJ 2010, 717, 488) find surface plasma meridional flow speeds that are lower at solar maximum 23 than at the surrounding minima, which is different from both Hathaway and Nandy. While there is no physical reason that solar surface flows -- both differential rotation and meridional flow -- would vary in lockstep with flows at greater depth, as the large radial gradients near the surface clearly indicate, and while Nandy et al. have demonstrated that the deeper flows dominate the net meridional mass flow, we find that there is in effect a very satisfying agreement between the observational results of Hathaway & Rightmire, Basu & Antia, and the model assumptions of Nandy, Munoz, & Martens. We present an analytical model that reconciles the first two, followed by a hydrodynamical model that demonstrates the consistency of these observational results with the model assumptions of Nandy et al.

  9. Comparing the Internal Structure of the Sun During the Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Davies, G. R.; Schou, J.; Larson, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) has been collecting helioseismic data for the last three solar cycles. We use these data to determine whether the internal properties of the Sun during the minimum preceding cycle 24 was different compared to that preceding cycle 23.

  10. Understanding Solar Cycle Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2017-07-01

    The level of solar magnetic activity, as exemplified by the number of sunspots and by energetic events in the corona, varies on a wide range of timescales. Most prominent is the 11-year solar cycle, which is significantly modulated on longer timescales. Drawing from dynamo theory, together with the empirical results of past solar activity and similar phenomena for solar-like stars, we show that the variability of the solar cycle can be essentially understood in terms of a weakly nonlinear limit cycle affected by random noise. In contrast to ad hoc “toy models” for the solar cycle, this leads to a generic normal-form model, whose parameters are all constrained by observations. The model reproduces the characteristics of the variable solar activity on timescales between decades and millennia, including the occurrence and statistics of extended periods of very low activity (grand minima). Comparison with results obtained with a Babcock-Leighton-type dynamo model confirm the validity of the normal-mode approach.

  11. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Centipeda minima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Chiu, Chuan-Sung; Lin, Tsung-Hui; Lee, Min-Min; Lee, Chao-Ying; Chang, Shu-Jen; Hou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Deng, Jeng-Shyan

    2013-05-20

    Centipeda minima (L.) is traditionally used in Chinese folk medicine for the treatments of rhinitis, sinusitis, relieving pain, reducing swelling, and treating cancer for a long history in Taiwan. However, there is no scientific evidence which supports the use in the literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous extract of Centipeda minima (ACM). The following activities were investigated: antioxidant activities [2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl)], and anti-inflammatory [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 macrophages and paw-edema induced by λ-carrageenan (Carr)]. We also investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of ACM via studies of the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the edema paw. Serum NO, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were also measured in vivo. In HPLC analysis, the fingerprint chromatogram of ACM was established. ACM showed the highest TEAC and DPPH radical scavenging activities, respectively. ACM also had highest contents of polyphenol and flavonoid contents. We evaluated that ACM and the reference compound of protocatechualdehyde and caffeic acid decreased the LPS-induced NO production in RAW264.7 cells. Administration of ACM showed a concentration dependent inhibition on paw edema development after Carr treatment in mice. The anti-inflammatory effects of ACM could be via NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β suppressions and associated with the increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Western blotting revealed that ACM decreased Carr-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of ACM might be correlated to the decrease in the level of Malondialdehyde (MDA), iNOS, and COX-2 via

  12. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Le Mouel, J.; Courtillot, V.

    2011-12-01

    The anomalous character of solar cycle 23 has been pointed out. It is proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of "grand maximum" to one of "regular oscillations". In this study, we analyze the time distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, from cycle 21 to 23. We consider 32355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1-8Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated to their daily energy flux. The long duration of cycle 23 (~13 years), the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of cycle 23 and the start of cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. Amplitudes of extreme flares increase when mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days: the singular shape of cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: the first ~70% of the cycle display (in logarithmic scale) linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. Energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002. Durations of inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (~11yr) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call "active" and "quiet", with sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for cycles 21 to 23, cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous cycle 23 resembles cycle 4, which was followed by reduced cycles 5 and 6 at the time of the Dalton-minimum in solar activity, often associated with a cooler global climate. It will be interesting to monitor the evolution of solar flares in cycle 24, in order to further our

  13. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Courtillot, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    The anomalous character of Solar Cycle 23, which ended in the Summer of 2009, has been pointed out by many authors. It has even been proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of “grand maximum” to one of “regular oscillations”. We analyze the temporal distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, over Cycles 21 to 23. We consider 32 355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1 to 8 Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated with their daily energy flux. The long duration of Cycle 23 (12.8 years based on sunspots, 13.2 years based on flares) and the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of Cycle 23, and the start of Cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. The amplitudes of extreme flares increase when the mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days. The singular shape of Cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: in the first ≈ 70% of the cycle (displayed on a logarithmic scale) we see linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. The energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002 (a time when it is suggested that photospheric fields were abruptly reduced). Inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (≈ 11 years) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call “active” and “quiet”, with extremely sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs. quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for Cycles 21 to 23, Cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous Cycle 23 resembles Cycle 4, which was

  14. A gentic survey of Salvinia minima in the southern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madeira, Paul T.; Jacono, Colette C.; Tipping, Phil; Van, Thai K.; Center, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    The genetic relationships among 68 samples of Salvinia minima (Salviniaceae) were investigated using RAPD analysis. Neighbor joining, principle components, and AMOVA analyses were used to detect differences among geographically referenced samples within and outside of Florida. Genetic distances (Nei and Li) range up to 0.48, although most are under 0.30, still relatively high levels for an introduced, clonally reproducing plant. Despite the diversity AMOVA analysis yielded no indication that the Florida plants, as a group, were significantly different from the plants sampled elsewhere in its adventive, North American range. A single, genetically dissimilar population probably exists in the recent (1998) horticultural introduction to Mississippi. When the samples were grouped into 10 regional (but artificial) units and analyzed using AMOVA the between region variance was only 7.7%. Genetic similarity among these regions may indicate introduction and dispersal from common sources. The reduced aggressiveness of Florida populations (compared to other states) may be due to herbivory. The weevilCyrtobagous salviniae, a selective feeder, is found in Florida but not other states. The genetic similarity also suggests that there are no obvious genetic obstacles to the establishment or efficacy of C. salviniae as a biological control agent on S. minimaoutside of Florida.

  15. [Adam Christian Thebesius (1686-1732) and the discovery of the Vasa Cordis Minima].

    PubMed

    Mettenleiter, A

    2001-01-01

    In first years of the 18th century, Raymond Vieussens (1635-1713) and Adam Christian Thebesius (1686-1732) discovered the Vasa cordis minima, today known as Vasa Thebesii; in 1868, Odilon Marc Lannelongue (1840-1911) described the so-called crypts of Lannelongue in the right atrium. The present study gives a historical survey over the research on the cardiac vascularization before 1700 and presents these three authors and their works on the Thebesian vessels with a biographical introduction and a commented translation. As for the biography of the Silesian anatomist Thebesius large, mostly inedited materials from Polish archives and from family archives were studied, among them, poems, a handwritten biography and a pedigree of the family. A schedule tables the studies and articles on the Thebesian vessels and the Thebesian valve published since 1708. As a commentary to the bibliography, the present stage of knowledge on the Thebesian vessels is shortly summarized. Although a compensatory function of the Thebesian vessels in coronary sclerosis and other pathological conditions has been discussed repeatedly, methodical difficulties still do not allow a reliable judgement on the role of the Thebesian vessels in physiological and pathological conditions. This study shows the contradictory results and summarizes all statements which have been published on the embryology, comparative anatomy, macroscopical and (electron-)microscopical anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and cardio-surgery. The aim is to encourage an interdiscplinary discussion on the base of the thorough literature study.

  16. The mobility minima in pulsed-field capillary electrophoresis of large DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sudor, J; Novotny, M

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed-field capillary electrophoresis represents a new tool for rapid and highly efficient separations of large biopolymers. The method has been utilized here to study dependencies of the electrophoretic mobility upon the frequency and pulse shape of applied voltage for large, double-stranded DNA molecules (5-100 kb) migrating in neutral polymer solutions. Two different shapes of alternating electric field (sine- and square-wave impulses) were examined with the frequency values ranging from 1 to 30 Hz. The linear dependence between duration of the forward pulse (at which the DNA molecule experiences a minimum mobility) and the product N.In(N) (where N is the number of base pairs) was experienced in field-inversion gel electrophoresis, while exponential dependence was found with the sinusoidal electric field. The mobility minima were lower in field-inversion electrophoresis than with the biased sinusoidal-field technique. The DNA (5 kb concatamers) was adequately separated using a ramp of frequency in the square-wave electric field, in approximately 1 h. The migration order of DNA fragments was referenced through adding a monodisperse DNA (48.5 kb) into the sample. The band inversion phenomena were not observed under any experimental conditions used in this work. PMID:7630733

  17. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    with the bulk loess median grain size (D50bulk) that is considered an integrated proxy of wind strength, dust source distance, aridity and vegetation cover. While an increase of dust flux and D50bulk with time is apparent, such a trend cannot be seen in the quartz grain size measures (D50quartz). This observation may imply that wind speeds were relatively constant in the studied time interval, while the turbulence of the flow may have been extremely varying (i.e. strong/rapid changes in the frequency/magnitude of dust storm events). A striking feature of the MAR record is that accumulation minima in the Dunaszekcsö record are synchronous with the Greenland Interstadials (GI-5.1 to GI-3). Subsequent Ca2+ minima in the NGRIP record at 26.22 and 25.02 ka (b2k) are also coeval with the MAR minima in the studied loess sequence. At the same time, these patterns are barely visible in the bulk and quartz grain size records. We speculate that the synchronous changes in the NGRIP Ca2+ and the Dunaszekcsö MAR records are results of millennial scale variations in the activity of Northern Hemisphere dust emitting regions shown in two archives from different environments. The very similar timing of MAR minima (and also some of the maxima) suggest a rapid aeolian system response in East Central Europe to abrupt climatic changes in the North Atlantic. Although such a synchronicity does not prove a Central European dust source to Greenland, it is consistent with this possibility. This study was supported by the OTKA PD-108639 grant and the Bolyai János Research Fellowship (both to GÚ). [1] Dansgaard, W., et al. (1993). Evidence for general instability of past climate from a 250-kyr ice-core record. Nature 364, 218-220. [2] Johnsen, S.J., et al. (1992). Irregular glacial interstadials recorded in a new Greenland ice core. Nature 359, 311-313. [3] Rasmussen, S.O., et al. (2014). A stratigraphic framework for abrupt climatic changes during the Last Glacial period based on three

  18. Synonymous Mutations and Ribosome Stalling Can Lead to Altered Folding Pathways and Distinct Minima

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Sauna, Zuben E.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    How can we understand a case where a given amino acid sequence folds into structurally and functionally distinct molecules? Synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1 or ABCB1) gene involving frequent to rare codon substitutions lead to identical protein sequences. Remarkably these alternative sequences give a protein product with similar but different structures and functions. Here we propose that long-enough ribosomal pause time-scales may lead to alternate folding pathways and distinct minima on the folding free energy surface. While the conformational and functional differences between the native and alternate states may be minor, the MDR1 case illustrates that the barriers may nevertheless constitute sufficiently high hurdles in physiological time-scales, leading to kinetically trapped states with altered structures and functions. Different folding pathways leading to conformationally-similar trapped states may be due to swapping of (fairly symmetric) segments. Domain swapping is more likely in the no-pause case where the chain elongates and folds simulaneously; on the other hand, sufficiently long pause times between such segments may be expected to lessen the chances of swapping events. Here, we review the literature in this light. PMID:18722384

  19. Processes controlling mid-water column oxygen minima over the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Hetland, Robert D.; DiMarco, Steven F.; Fennel, Katja

    2015-04-01

    We investigate distributions of dissolved oxygen over the Texas-Louisiana shelf using spatially highly resolved observations in combination with a regional circulation model with simple oxygen dynamics. The observations were collected using a towed, undulating CTD during the Mechanisms Controlling Hypoxia (MCH) program. Mid-water oxygen minimum layers (dissolved oxygen lower than 3.2 mL L-1) were detected in many transects. These oxygen minimum layers are connected with the bottom boundary layer and follow the pycnocline seaward as a tongue of low oxygen into the mid-water column. T-S diagrams highlighting the low oxygen minima in both observations and simulations imply direct connections between low-oxygen bottom water and the oxygen minimum layer. The dynamics of these oxygen minimum layers in the mid-water column are examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Convergence within the bottom boundary layer relative to density surfaces is calculated, results show that there is a convergence in the bottom boundary layer at the location where the pycnocline intersects the bottom. Buoyancy advection forced by bottom Ekman transport creates this convergent flow, and the corresponding low-oxygen intrusion. Similar intrusions of near-bottom water into the pycnocline are observed in other regions. The presence of hypoxia within the bottom boundary layer in the northern Gulf of Mexico creates a unique situation in which these intrusions are also associated with low dissolved oxygen.

  20. Ultrastructure of the Feeding Apparatus of Rhabdodemania minima Chitwood, 1936 (Enoplida: Rhabdodemaniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hope, W. Duane

    1988-01-01

    The feeding apparatus of the marine nematode Rhabdodemania minima Chitwood, 1936 has been examined with light and transmission electron microscopy. The buccal capsule consists of a posterior region with smooth walls bearing three sets of three minute denticles at its posterior end and three large onchia in its mid region; a middle region with grooved walls; and an anterior region with costae and six odontia. The anterior and middle portions of the buccal capsule are enveloped by the cephalic cuticle, whereas the posterior region, which is set off from the middle region by a buccal seam, is partially enveloped by the anterior end of the esophagus. Two subventral esophageal glands open into the lumen of the esophagus. Secretions of each of three paraesophageal glands are conveyed through a duct in each of the three corresponding corners of the buccal wall to an opening between labia. A pair of wing-like thickenings, termed pterons, embraces the duct of each paraesophageal gland in the posterior and middle regions of the buccal capsule. A model of how the buccal capsule operates is proposed and tested. Morphological and functional aspects of the buccal apparatus and cephalic cuticle are compared with those of other taxa of the Enoplida, and their phylogenetic implications are discussed. PMID:19290194

  1. The Total Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitte, Steven; Nevens, Stijn

    2016-10-01

    We present the composite measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) as measured by an ensemble of space instruments. The measurements of the individual instruments are put on a common absolute scale, and their quality is assessed by intercomparison. The composite time series is the average of all available measurements. From 1984 April to the present the TSI shows a variation in phase with the 11 yr solar cycle and no significant changes of the quiet-Sun level in between the three covered solar minima.

  2. The Solar Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, David H

    The solar cycle is reviewed. The 11-year cycle of solar activity is characterized by the rise and fall in the numbers and surface area of sunspots. A number of other solar activity indicators also vary in association with the sunspots including; the 10.7 cm radio flux, the total solar irradiance, the magnetic field, flares and coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic activity, galactic cosmic ray fluxes, and radioisotopes in tree rings and ice cores. Individual solar cycles are characterized by their maxima and minima, cycle periods and amplitudes, cycle shape, the equatorward drift of the active latitudes, hemispheric asymmetries, and active longitudes. Cycle-to-cycle variability includes the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Gnevyshev-Ohl (even-odd) Rule. Short-term variability includes the 154-day periodicity, quasi-biennial variations, and double-peaked maxima. We conclude with an examination of prediction techniques for the solar cycle and a closer look at cycles 23 and 24. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.1007/lrsp-2015-4.

  3. Mitigating local minima in full-waveform inversion by expanding the search space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Tristan; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2013-10-01

    Wave equation based inversions, such as full-waveform inversion and reverse-time migration, are challenging because of their computational costs, memory requirements and reliance on accurate initial models. To confront these issues, we propose a novel formulation of wave equation based inversion based on a penalty method. In this formulation, the objective function consists of a data-misfit term and a penalty term, which measures how accurately the wavefields satisfy the wave equation. This new approach is a major departure from current formulations where forward and adjoint wavefields, which both satisfy the wave equation, are correlated to compute updates for the unknown model parameters. Instead, we carry out the inversions over two alternating steps during which we first estimate the wavefield everywhere, given the current model parameters, source and observed data, followed by a second step during which we update the model parameters, given the estimate for the wavefield everywhere and the source. Because the inversion involves both the synthetic wavefields and the medium parameters, its search space is enlarged so that it suffers less from local minima. Compared to other formulations that extend the search space of wave equation based inversion, our method differs in several aspects, namely (i) it avoids storage and updates of the synthetic wavefields because we calculate these explicitly by finding solutions that obey the wave equation and fit the observed data and (ii) no adjoint wavefields are required to update the model, instead our updates are calculated from these solutions directly, which leads to significant computational savings. We demonstrate the validity of our approach by carefully selected examples and discuss possible extensions and future research.

  4. UV solar irradiance low during recent solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-10-01

    Solar irradiance, which varies with the 11-year solar cycle and on longer time scales, can affect temperatures and winds in the atmosphere, influencing Earth's climate. As the Sun currently wakes up from a period of low sunspot activity, researchers want to know how irradiance during the recent solar minimum compares to historical levels. In addition to understanding the total received power, it is important to know how various spectral bands behave, in particular, the ultraviolet, which causes heating and winds in the stratosphere. Lockwood analyzed solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance data from May 2003 to August 2005 from both the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) instrument on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) and the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instrument on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite. Using several different methods to intercalibrate the data, he developed a data composite that can be used to determine differences between the recent solar minimum and previous minima. The author found that solar irradiance during the recent sunspot minimum has been especially low. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2010JD014746, 2011)

  5. Are both symmetric and buckled dimers on Si(100) minima? Density functional and multireference perturbation theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yousung; Shao, Yihan; Gordon, Mark S.; Doren, Douglas J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2003-08-29

    We report a spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) solution at the symmetric dimer structure for cluster models of Si(100). With this solution, it is shown that the symmetric structure is a minimum on the DFT potential energy surface, although higher in energy than the buckled structure. In restricted DFT calculations the symmetric structure is a saddle point connecting the two buckled minima. To further assess the effects of electron correlation on the relative energies of symmetric versus buckled dimers on Si(100), multireference second order perturbation theory (MRMP2) calculations are performed on these DFT optimized minima. The symmetric structure is predicted to be lower in energy than the buckled structure via MRMP2, while the reverse order is found by DFT. The implications for recent experimental interpretations are discussed.

  6. Spectroscopic Evidence of Sporadic Gas Accretion onto the Herbig AE Stars with Non-Periodic Algol-Type Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, O. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Rostopchina, A. N.

    We present the results of simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations for six isolated Herbig Ae stars with non-periodic Algol-like minima: UX Ori, BF Ori, CQ Tau, SV Cep, VX Gas, and WW Vul. In all cases the Ha line has the profile typical for axially symmetric accretion. In the spectra of five stars (CQ Tau is the exception) the strong He I 5876 Å line has been observed in absorption which is not typical of normal A stars. In three cases: UX Ori, VX Cas, and WW Vul, variability of this line is found. We did not observe any correlation between the strength of this line and the brightness of the stars. These observational facts are considered as evidence for gas accretion, which is probably an important property of young stars with non-periodic Algol-type minima.

  7. White-light corona and solar polar magnetic field strength over solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Komžík, R.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the large-scale structure of the solar corona, in particular its helmet streamers, as observed during total solar eclipses around maxima of solar cycles and make its comparison with solar polar magnetic field strength as observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) since 1976. Even though the magnetic field strength at the solar poles around cycle minima decreased minimally twice in the last forty years, distributions of helmet streamers around the Sun in different cycles around cycle maxima remain nearly the same. This indicates that large-scale magnetic structures governing the shape and evolution of helmet streamers must be of a different nature than those related with solar polar fields.

  8. Solar extreme ultraviolet variability of the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, F.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    The last solar minimum has been unusually quiet compared to the previous minima (since space-based radiometric measurements are available). The Sun's magnetic flux was substantially lower during this minimum. Some studies also show that the total solar irradiance during the minimum after cycle 23 may have dropped below the values known from the two minima prior to that. For chromospheric and coronal radiation, the situation is less clear-cut. The Sun's 10.7 cm flux shows a decrease of ~4% during the solar minimum in 2008 compared to the previous minimum, but Ca ii K does not. Here we consider additional wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV), specifically transitions of He i at 584.3 Å and O v at 629.7 Å, of which the CDS spectrometer aboard SOHO has been taking regular scans along the solar central meridian since 1996. We analysed this unique dataset to verify if and how the radiance distribution undergoes measurable variations between cycle minima. To achieve this aim we determined the radiance distribution of quiet areas around the Sun centre. Concentrating on the last two solar minima, we found out that there is very little variation in the radiance distribution of the chromospheric spectral line He i between these minima. The same analysis shows a modest, although significant, 4% variation in the radiance distribution of the TR spectral line O v. These results are comparable to those obtained by earlier studies employing other spectral features, and they confirm that chromospheric indices display a small variation, whereas in the transition region a more significant reduction of the brighter features is visible.

  9. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J.

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  10. Latitudinal Dependence of Coronal Hole-Associated Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-05-01

    The fast solar wind can have at least two different coronal sources: high-latitude, polar coronal holes (PCH) and low-latitude, equatorial coronal holes (ECH). The in-situ differences in the PCH and ECH winds have not been well studied, nor have the differences in their evolution over the solar cycles. Ulysses' 19 years of observations from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present, provide us with measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles, which allow us to study the in-situ properties and evolution of the coronal hole-associated solar wind at different latitudes. In this work, we focus on the PCH and ECH solar winds during the minima between solar cycles 22-23 and 23-24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses, and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton dynamics, heavy ion composition, elemental abundance, and magnetic field properties of the PCH wind and ECH wind, with a special focus on their differences during the recent two solar minima. We also include the slow and hot, streamer-associated (ST) wind as a reference in the comparison. The comparison of PCH and ECH wind shows that: 1) the in-situ properties of ECH and PCH winds are significantly different during the two solar minima, and 2) the two types of coronal hole-associated solar wind respond differently to changes in solar activity strength from cycle 23 to cycle 24.

  11. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Potential Energy Minima Effect on Energy Efficiency for the F(-) + CH3Cl → FCH3 + Cl(-) Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yida; Wang, Yuping; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-04-13

    The Polanyi rules on the energy efficiency on reactivity are summarized solely from the locations of barriers on the potential energy surfaces. Here, our quantum dynamics study for the F(-) + CH3Cl → FCH3 + Cl(-) reaction shows that the two potential energy minima in the entrance channel on the potential energy surface play an essential role in energy efficiency on reactivity. The reactivity of this reaction is dominated by the low collision energies where two distinctive reaction mechanisms involve the two minima in the entrance channel. Overall, the Cl-CH3 stretching motion and C-H3 umbrella motion both are more efficient than the translational motion in promoting this reaction. Although this reaction has a negative energy barrier, our study shows that it is the minima in the entrance channel, together with the energy barrier relative to these minima, that determine the energy efficacy on reactivity.

  12. The adventive status of Salvinia minima and S. molestain the southern United States and the related distribution of the weevil Cyrtobagous salviniae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacono, Colette C.; Davern, Tracy R.; Center, Ted D.

    2001-01-01

    The recent introduction of Salvinia molesta constitutes a serious threat to aquatic systems in the warm temperate regions of the United States. Salvinia minima, the only other member of Salviniaceae present in North America, is considered native by current floras. Evidence is presented which suggests that Salvinia minima was also introduced to North America, probably during the late 1920s and early 1930s. Likely sites of introduction and subsequent range expansions are identified. The accidentally introduced salvinia weevil, putatively Cyrtobagous salviniae, was found to occur widely on S. minima in Florida but is not established in other states. The disparate distribution of this Salvinia herbivore may account for the reduced aggressiveness of S. minima in Florida as compared to its troublesome growth in Texas and LOUisiana, where the weevil is not yet known.

  13. Pinpointing Gap Minima in Ba(Fe0:94Co0:06)2 via Band Structure Calculations and Electronic Raman Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-03

    for the Raman vertices, it is shown that the location of the gap minima may occur on loops stretching over a portion of the c-axis in Ba(Fe0.94Co0.06...the value of B1g Raman vertex is larger than the average are shaded red. The gold ellipses mark the area where the deep gap minima or nodes are

  14. A novel approach to decoy set generation: designing a physical energy function having local minima with native structure characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keasar, Chen; Levitt, Michael

    2003-05-23

    We suggest a new approach to the generation of candidate structures (decoys) for ab initio prediction of protein structures. Our method is based on random sampling of conformation space and subsequent local energy minimization. At the core of this approach lies the design of a novel type of energy function. This energy function has local minima with native structure characteristics and wide basins of attraction. The current work presents our motivation for deriving such an energy function and also tests the derived energy function. Our approach is novel in that it takes advantage of the inherently rough energy landscape of proteins, which is generally considered a major obstacle for protein structure prediction. When local minima have wide basins of attraction, the protein's conformation space can be greatly reduced by the convergence of large regions of the space into single points, namely the local minima corresponding to these funnels. We have implemented this concept by an iterative process. The potential is first used to generate decoy sets and then we study these sets of decoys to guide further development of the potential. A key feature of our potential is the use of cooperative multi-body interactions that mimic the role of the entropic and solvent contributions to the free energy. The validity and value of our approach is demonstrated by applying it to 14 diverse, small proteins. We show that, for these proteins, the size of conformation space is considerably reduced by the new energy function. In fact, the reduction is so substantial as to allow efficient conformational sampling. As a result we are able to find a significant number of near-native conformations in random searches performed with limited computational resources.

  15. Comparison of PSF maxima and minima of multiple annuli coded aperture (MACA) and complementary multiple annuli coded aperture (CMACA) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, Challa; Lakshmana Rao, Vadlamudi; Lachaa Goud, Sivagouni

    2006-10-01

    In the present paper, and a series of papers to follow, the Fourier analytical properties of multiple annuli coded aperture (MACA) and complementary multiple annuli coded aperture (CMACA) systems are investigated. First, the transmission function for MACA and CMACA is derived using Fourier methods and, based on the Fresnel-Kirchoff diffraction theory, the formulae for the point spread function are formulated. The PSF maxima and minima are calculated for both the MACA and CMACA systems. The dependence of these properties on the number of zones is studied and reported in this paper.

  16. Solving Local Minima Problem in Back Propagation Algorithm Using Adaptive Gain, Adaptive Momentum and Adaptive Learning Rate on Classification Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Norhamreeza Abdul; Nawi, Nazri Mohd; Ghazali, Rozaida; Salleh, Mohd Najib Mohd

    This paper presents a new method to improve back propagation algorithm from getting stuck with local minima problem and slow convergence speeds which caused by neuron saturation in the hidden layer. In this proposed algorithm, each training pattern has its own activation functions of neurons in the hidden layer that are adjusted by the adaptation of gain parameters together with adaptive momentum and learning rate value during the learning process. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is compared with the conventional back propagation gradient descent and the current working back propagation gradient descent with adaptive gain by means of simulation on three benchmark problems namely iris, glass and thyroid.

  17. Solar Influence on Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenovic, Pavle; Stenke, Andrea; Rozanov, Eugene; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Global warming is one of the main threats to mankind. There is growing evidence that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have become the dominant factor, however natural factors such as solar variability cannot be neglected. Sun is a variable star; its activity varies in regular 11-years solar cycles. Longer periods of decreased solar activity are called Grand Solar Minima, which have stronger impact on terrestrial climate. Another natural factor related with solar activity are energetic particles. They can ionize neutral molecules in upper atmosphere and produce NOx and HOx which deplete ozone. We investigate the effect of proposed Grand Solar Minimum in 21st and 22nd century on terrestrial climate and ozone layer. The simulations are performed with different solar forcing scenarios for period of 200 years (2000-2200) using global chemistry-climate model coupled with ocean model (SOCOL-MPIOM). We also deal with problem of representation of middle range energy electrons (30-300 keV) in the model and investigation of their influence on climate.

  18. Solar effects on circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, R.; Cahynová, M.; Kyselý, J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, defined over central Europe, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases present in any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal are eliminated once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the solar 10.7 cm flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. An enhanced frequency under solar minima and a reduced frequency under solar maxima are observed almost exclusively for the types with easterly flow over central Europe. On the other hand, a reduced frequency under solar minima and an enhanced frequency under solar maxima are found for the types with westerly flow over central Europe. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  19. Influence of Solar Cycles on Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, M.

    2011-12-01

    This research inspects possible influence of solar cycles on earthquakes through of statistical analyses. We also discussed the mechanism that would drive the occurrence of increasing of earthquakes during solar maxima. The study was based on worldwide earthquakes events during approximately four hundred years (1600-2010). The increase of earthquakes events followed the Maxima of Solar cycle, and also depends on the tectonic plate location. From 1600 until 1645 events increased during the Maxima in some of the tectonic plates as Pacific, Arabian and South America. The earthquakes analyzed during two grand solar minima, the Maunder (1645-1720) and the Dalton (1790-1820) showed a decrease in the number of earthquakes and the solar activity. It was observed during these minima a significant number of events at specific geological features. After the last minima (Dalton) the earthquakes pattern increased with solar maxima. The calculations showed that events increasing during solar maxima most in the Pacific, South America or Arabian until 1900. Since there were few records during these three centuries we needed additional analysis on modern data. We took the last four solar cycles events (1950-2010) and made similar calculations. The results agreed with the former calculations. It might be that the mechanism for the Sun-Earth connection relies on the solar wind speed. In both records (1600-1900) and (1950-2010) the results showed a significant increase in earthquakes events in some of the tectonic plates linked to solar maxima. The Solar wind energy striking the Earth's magnetosphere affects the entire environment because the pressure on the region increases and the magnetosphere shrinks sometimes four Earth's radii. This sudden compression causes earthquakes in specific plates. During the times of solar minima the pressure from the solar wind on the earth decreases, then the magnetosphere expands and earthquakes happen in a different pattern according to the

  20. Methanolic Extract of Ceplukan Leaf (Physalis minima L.) Attenuates Ventricular Fibrosis through Inhibition of TNF-α in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Bayu; Permatasari, Nur; Rohman, Mohammad Saifur

    2016-01-01

    The increase of heart failure prevalence on menopausal women was correlated with the decrease of estrogen level. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ceplukan leaf (Physalis minima L.), which contains phytoestrogen physalin and withanolides, on ventricular TNF-α level and fibrosis in ovariectomized rats. Wistar rats were divided into six groups (control (-); OVX 5: 5-week ovariectomy (OVX); OVX 9: 9-week ovariectomy; treatments I, II, and III: 9-weeks OVX + 4-week ceplukan leaf's methanolic extract doses 500, 1500, and 2500 mg/kgBW, resp.). TNF-α levels were measured with ELISA. Fibrosis was counted as blue colored tissues percentage using Masson's Trichrome staining. This study showed that prolonged hypoestrogen increases ventricular fibrosis (p < 0.05). Ceplukan leaf treatment also resulted in a decrease of ventricular fibrosis and TNF-α level in dose dependent manner compared to without treatment group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the TNF-α level was normalized in 2500 mg/kgBW Physalis minima L. (p < 0.05) treatment. The reduction of fibrosis positively correlated with TNF-α level (p < 0.05, r = 0.873). Methanolic extract of ceplukan leaf decreases ventricular fibrosis through the inhibition of ventricular TNF-α level in ovariectomized rats.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of supercritical n-m Lennard-Jones fluids and isochoric and isobaric heat capacity maxima and minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairhofer, Jonas; Sadus, Richard J.

    2013-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the thermodynamic properties of n-m Lennard-Jones fluids, where n = 10 and 12, and m = 5 and 6. Results are reported for the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound at supercritical conditions covering a wide range of fluid densities. The thermodynamic criteria for maxima/minima in the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities are identified and the simulation results are also compared with calculations from Lennard-Jones equations of state. The Johnson et al. [Mol. Phys. 78, 591 (1993)] equation of state can be used to reproduce all heat capacity phenomena reported [T. M. Yigzawe and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194502 (2013)] from molecular dynamics simulations for the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential. Significantly, these calculations and molecular dynamics results for other n-m Lennard-Jones potentials support the existence of Cp minima at supercritical conditions. The values of n and m also have a significant influence on many other thermodynamic properties.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of supercritical n-m Lennard-Jones fluids and isochoric and isobaric heat capacity maxima and minima.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Jonas; Sadus, Richard J

    2013-10-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the thermodynamic properties of n-m Lennard-Jones fluids, where n = 10 and 12, and m = 5 and 6. Results are reported for the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound at supercritical conditions covering a wide range of fluid densities. The thermodynamic criteria for maxima∕minima in the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities are identified and the simulation results are also compared with calculations from Lennard-Jones equations of state. The Johnson et al. [Mol. Phys. 78, 591 (1993)] equation of state can be used to reproduce all heat capacity phenomena reported [T. M. Yigzawe and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194502 (2013)] from molecular dynamics simulations for the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential. Significantly, these calculations and molecular dynamics results for other n-m Lennard-Jones potentials support the existence of Cp minima at supercritical conditions. The values of n and m also have a significant influence on many other thermodynamic properties.

  3. Methanolic Extract of Ceplukan Leaf (Physalis minima L.) Attenuates Ventricular Fibrosis through Inhibition of TNF-α in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lestari, Bayu; Permatasari, Nur; Rohman, Mohammad Saifur

    2016-01-01

    The increase of heart failure prevalence on menopausal women was correlated with the decrease of estrogen level. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ceplukan leaf (Physalis minima L.), which contains phytoestrogen physalin and withanolides, on ventricular TNF-α level and fibrosis in ovariectomized rats. Wistar rats were divided into six groups (control (—); OVX 5: 5-week ovariectomy (OVX); OVX 9: 9-week ovariectomy; treatments I, II, and III: 9-weeks OVX + 4-week ceplukan leaf's methanolic extract doses 500, 1500, and 2500 mg/kgBW, resp.). TNF-α levels were measured with ELISA. Fibrosis was counted as blue colored tissues percentage using Masson's Trichrome staining. This study showed that prolonged hypoestrogen increases ventricular fibrosis (p < 0.05). Ceplukan leaf treatment also resulted in a decrease of ventricular fibrosis and TNF-α level in dose dependent manner compared to without treatment group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the TNF-α level was normalized in 2500 mg/kgBW Physalis minima L. (p < 0.05) treatment. The reduction of fibrosis positively correlated with TNF-α level (p < 0.05, r = 0.873). Methanolic extract of ceplukan leaf decreases ventricular fibrosis through the inhibition of ventricular TNF-α level in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26941790

  4. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the living freshwater diatom Eolimna minima, a species developed in river biofilms.

    PubMed

    Feurtet-Mazel, Agnès; Mornet, Stéphane; Charron, Laëtitia; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Baudrimont, Magalie

    2016-03-01

    Testing biotransformation capacities of living aquatic microalgae diatoms to naturally synthetize gold nanoparticles (AuNP) from gold salts and assessing aftereffects on their viability by microscope observations is a great challenge. In this work, a laboratory experiment was conducted, which aimed to observe (i) directly by transmission electronic and light microscopy and (ii) through indirect measurements (UV-visible spectroscopy) the periphytic freshwater diatom Eolimna minima exposed to gold salts. This work revealed the capacity of E. minima to intracellularly biosynthetize AuNP and to tolerate it. AuNP synthesis appears as a mechanism of detoxification to protect diatom from gold salt contamination. We also pointed out the risks associated with the spread of diatoms full of AuNP, through the trophic web of freshwater ecosystems. The preponderant part of the diatoms in natural biofilms associated with their position at the basis of the trophic webs in rivers could then make them responsible for the contamination of their consumers (grazer animals) and consequently for the potential release of AuNP through the entire food web.

  5. GRAND MINIMA AND EQUATORWARD PROPAGATION IN A CYCLING STELLAR CONVECTIVE DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2015-08-20

    The 3D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic code, using slope-limited diffusion, is employed to capture convective and dynamo processes achieved in a global-scale stellar convection simulation for a model solar-mass star rotating at three times the solar rate. The dynamo-generated magnetic fields possesses many timescales, with a prominent polarity cycle occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic field forms large-scale toroidal wreaths, whose formation is tied to the low Rossby number of the convection in this simulation. The polarity reversals are linked to the weakened differential rotation and a resistive collapse of the large-scale magnetic field. An equatorial migration of the magnetic field is seen, which is due to the strong modulation of the differential rotation rather than a dynamo wave. A poleward migration of magnetic flux from the equator eventually leads to the reversal of the polarity of the high-latitude magnetic field. This simulation also enters an interval with reduced magnetic energy at low latitudes lasting roughly 16 years (about 2.5 polarity cycles), during which the polarity cycles are disrupted and after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles. An analysis of this grand minimum reveals that it likely arises through the interplay of symmetric and antisymmetric dynamo families. This intermittent dynamo state potentially results from the simulation’s relatively low magnetic Prandtl number. A mean-field-based analysis of this dynamo simulation demonstrates that it is of the α-Ω type. The timescales that appear to be relevant to the magnetic polarity reversal are also identified.

  6. Solar collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. I.

    1984-08-01

    Solar dishes, photovoltaics, passive solar building and solar hot water systems, Trombe walls, hot air panels, hybrid solar heating systems, solar grain dryers, solar greenhouses, solar hot water worhshops, and solar workshops are discussed. These solar technologies are applied to residential situations.

  7. RE-Powering Success Stories: Green Manufacturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These success stories discuss sites on formerly contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites that are manufacturing components for renewable energy, either solar panels, wind turbines, or other components.

  8. Geomagnetic detection of the sectorial solar magnetic field and the historical peculiarity of minimum 23-24

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, J.

    2012-01-01

    [1] Analysis is made of the geomagnetic-activityaaindex covering solar cycle 11 to the beginning of 24, 1868–2011. Autocorrelation shows 27.0-d recurrent geomagnetic activity that is well-known to be prominent during solar-cycle minima; some minima also exhibit a smaller amount of 13.5-d recurrence. Previous work has shown that the recent solar minimum 23–24 exhibited 9.0 and 6.7-d recurrence in geomagnetic and heliospheric data, but those recurrence intervals were not prominently present during the preceding minima 21–22 and 22–23. Using annual-averages and solar-cycle averages of autocorrelations of the historicalaadata, we put these observations into a long-term perspective: none of the 12 minima preceding 23–24 exhibited prominent 9.0 and 6.7-d geomagnetic activity recurrence. We show that the detection of these recurrence intervals can be traced to an unusual combination of sectorial spherical-harmonic structure in the solar magnetic field and anomalously low sunspot number. We speculate that 9.0 and 6.7-d recurrence is related to transient large-scale, low-latitude organization of the solar dynamo, such as seen in some numerical simulations.

  9. Solar hydrogen Lyman-α variation during solar cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent Tobiska, W.; Pryor, Wayne R.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1997-05-01

    A full-disk, line-integrated solar Lyman-α dataset is presented that spans two solar cycles. The dataset is created partially from AE-E and SME data that is scaled to the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS) upwind Lyman-α sky background data which is converted to a solar surrogate. PVOUVS measurements overlap AE-E, SME, and UARS observing periods and are calibrated to UARS/SOLSTICE irradiance units at 1 AU. The scaled AE-E/SME, the SOLSTICE, and the PVOUVS surrogate data in the interim between the satellites collectively form a composite dataset with a quiet sun value of 3.0+/-0.1×1011 photons cm-2s-1 common for three solar minima and a solar maximum value of 6.75+/-0.25×1011 photons cm-2s-1 common to cycles 21 and 22.

  10. Solar hydrogen Lyman-α variation during solar cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Pryor, Wayne R.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1997-05-01

    A full-disk, line-integrated solar Lyman-α dataset is presented that spans two solar cycles. The dataset is created partially from AE-E and SME data that is scaled to the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS) upwind Lyman-α sky background data which is converted to a solar surrogate. PVOUVS measurements overlap AE-E, SME, and UARS observing periods and are calibrated to UARS/SOLSTICE irradiance units at 1 AU. The scaled AE-E/SME, the SOLSTICE, and the PVOUVS surrogate data in the interim between the satellites collectively form a composite dataset with a quiet sun value of 3.0±0.1 × 1011 photons cm-2s-1 common for three solar minima and a solar maximum value of 6.75±0.25 × 1011 photons cm-2s-1 common to cycles 21 and 22.

  11. IMP 8 GME Particle Observations Over Three Solar Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Ian; Cane, Hilary; Von Rosenvinge, Tycho; McGuire, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Medium Energy experiment on the IMP 8 spacecraft has made nearly continuous observations of the near-Earth energetic particle environment from its launch in October, 1973 until near present. We summarize several aspects of these observations, including solar energetic particle events, CIR-associated events, and cosmic ray modulations. In particular, we note that, as expected fiom the pattern of smaller recurrent (27 day) cosmic ray modulations seen in the mid 1980's A less than 0 solar minimum compared to the previous and following (A greater than 0) minima, recurrent modulations are again reduced in the current solar minimum.

  12. The Pb-hyperaccumulator aquatic fern Salvinia minima Baker, responds to Pb(2+) by increasing phytochelatins via changes in SmPCS expression and in phytochelatin synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Estrella-Gómez, N; Mendoza-Cózatl, D; Moreno-Sánchez, R; González-Mendoza, D; Zapata-Pérez, O; Martínez-Hernández, A; Santamaría, J M

    2009-03-09

    The relationship between accumulation of Pb(2+) and the activation of chelation and metal sequestration mechanisms mediated by phytochelatins (PC) was analyzed in the Pb(2+) hyperaccumulator aquatic fern Salvinia minima, after exposure to 40microM Pb(NO(3))(2). The tissue accumulation pattern of lead and the phytochelatin biosynthesis responses were analyzed in both, S. minima submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). S. minima roots accumulated a significantly higher concentrations of Pb(+2) than leaves did. Accumulation of Pb(2+) in roots was bi-phasic with a first uptake phase reached after 3h exposure and a second higher uptake phase reached after 24h exposure. In leaves, a single delayed, smaller uptake phase was attained only after 9h of exposure. In roots lead accumulation correlated with an increased phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity and an enhanced PC production. A higher proportion of polymerized PC(4) was observed in both tissues of exposed S. minima plants relative to unexposed ones, although a higher concentration of PC(4) was found in roots than in leaves. PCS activity and Pb(2+) accumulation was also higher in roots than in leaves. The expression levels of the S. minima PCS gene (SmPCS), in response to Pb(2+) treatment, were also evaluated. In S. minima leaves, the accumulation of Pb(2+) correlated with a marked increase in expression of SmPCS, suggesting a transcriptional regulation in the PCS activation and PC accumulation in this S. minima tissue. However, in roots, the basal expression of SmPCS was down-regulated after Pb(2+) treatment. This fact did not correlate with the later but strong increase in both, PCS activity and PC production; suggesting that the PC biosynthesis activation in S. minima roots occurs only by post-translational activation of PCS. Taken together, our data suggest that the accumulation of PC in S. minima is a direct response to Pb(2+) accumulation, and

  13. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Antia, H. M.; Basu, Sarbani E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed

    2010-09-01

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  14. Capacity of the aquatic fern (Salvinia minima Baker) to accumulate high concentrations of nickel in its tissues, and its effect on plant physiological processes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Ignacio I; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Talavera-May, Carlos; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2014-10-01

    An experiment was designed to assess the capacity of Salvinia minima Baker to uptake and accumulate nickel in its tissues and to evaluate whether or not this uptake can affect its physiology. Our results suggest that S. minima plants are able to take up high amounts of nickel in its tissues, particularly in roots. In fact, our results support the idea that S. minima might be considered a hyper-accumulator of nickel, as it is able to accumulate 16.3 mg g(-1) (whole plant DW basis). Our results also showed a two-steps uptake pattern of nickel, with a fast uptake of nickel at the first 6 to 12h of being expose to the metal, followed by a slow take up phase until the end of the experiment at 144 h. S. minima thus, may be considered as a fern useful in the phytoremediation of residual water bodies contaminated with this metal. Also from our results, S. minima can tolerate fair concentrations of the metal; however, at concentrations higher than 80 μM Ni (1.5 mg g(-1) internal nickel concentration), its physiological performance can be affected. For instance, the integrity of cell membranes was affected as the metal concentration and exposure time increased. The accumulation of high concentrations of internal nickel did also affect photosynthesis, the efficiency of PSII, and the concentration of photosynthetic pigments, although at a lower extent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Experiences with solar power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselring, P.

    1985-11-01

    Experience with solar thermal plants is reviewed. The component and subsystems development of the last decade and particularly the receiver, collector and heliostat field development is a technical success. Solar specific problems on the system and component level arose, when off the shelf solutions of fossile fired plants were transferred uncritically. It is shown that concentrated solar radiation is a relatively cheap high quality fuel. Other uses than electricity generation are high temperature processes and the production of solar fuels and chemicals. A technical and economic comparison of solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity generation is made.

  16. An Analysis of Solar Global Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouradian, Zadig

    2013-02-01

    This article proposes a unified observational model of solar activity based on sunspot number and the solar global activity in the rotation of the structures, both per 11-year cycle. The rotation rates show a variation of a half-century period and the same period is also associated to the sunspot amplitude variation. The global solar rotation interweaves with the observed global organisation of solar activity. An important role for this assembly is played by the Grand Cycle formed by the merging of five sunspot cycles: a forgotten discovery by R. Wolf. On the basis of these elements, the nature of the Dalton Minimum, the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Grand Minima are presented.

  17. Planetary beat and solar-terrestrial responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.

    2013-11-01

    Solar activity changes with time in a cyclic pattern. The origin of those changes may be caused by planetary motion around the Sun, affecting the position of the Sun's motion with respect to the centre of mass and subjecting the Sun to changes in angular momentum and gravitational tidal forces. With modern achievements, this multi-body problem can now be addressed in a constructive way. Indeed, there are multiple criteria suggesting that the solar variability is driven by a planetary beat also affecting a number of terrestrial variables: 14C and 10Be production, Earth's rotation, ocean circulation, paleoclimate, geomagnetism, etc. The centennial changes between grand solar maxima and minima imply that we will soon be in a new solar minimum and, in analogy with past events, probably also in Little Ice Age climatic conditions.

  18. Interference minima effect of high-order harmonic generation from H2+ with different full width at half maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Jun; Du, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Dan; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the interference minima of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in H2+ molecule with varying the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the laser field by solving the one-dimensional (1D) time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) within the non-Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The numerical results show that the probability of the electron recombined with the two nuclei is different with the variation of the FWHM. The HHG spectrum of H2+ molecule is separated into two parts according to the electronic coordinate z (z > 0 and z < 0), which illustrate the contributions of the two nuclei to the harmonic generation. In addition, we investigate the time-evolution electron wave packet distributions to illustrate the underlying physical mechanism.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of chemical constituents of Centipeda minima by HPLC-QTOF-MS & HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi-On; Jin, Deng-Ping; Dong, Nai-Ping; Chen, Si-Bao; Mok, Daniel Kam Wah

    2016-06-05

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF-MS) method in both positive and negative ion modes was established to investigate the major constituents in the ethanolic extract of Centipeda minima (EBSC). Twelve common components including flavones and their glycosides, phenolic and polyphenolic acids, and sesquiterpene lactone were identified in ten batches of samples based on comparison with the retention time and accurate mass of external standards (mass accuracy within 3ppm) or the fragmentation patterns of tandem MS. Meanwhile, a simple, accurate and reliable HPLC-DAD method was also developed to determine the content of 10 chemical markers simultaneously. Results obtained from method validations including linearity, accuracy and precision showed that this new method is reliable and robust. Isochlorogenic acid A and brevilin A were found to be the most abundant in the ethanol extract of EBSC and could be served as markers for quality control of EBSC.

  20. Hybrid functional for correlated electrons in the projector augmented-wave formalism: Study of multiple minima for actinide oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollet, F.; Jomard, G.; Amadon, B.; Crocombette, J. P.; Torumba, D.

    2009-12-01

    Exact (Hartree-Fock) exchange for correlated electrons is implemented to describe correlated orbitals in the projector augmented-waves (PAW) framework, as suggested recently in another context [P. Novák , Phys. Status Solidi B 243, 563 (2006)]. Hartree-Fock exchange energy is applied to strongly correlated electrons only inside the PAW atomic spheres. This allows the use of PBE0 hybrid exchange-correlation functional for correlated electrons. This method is tested on NiO and results agree well with already published results and generalized gradient approximation, GGA+U calculations. It is then applied to plutonium oxides and UO2 for which the results are comparable with the ones of GGA+U calculations but without adjustable parameter. As evidenced in the uranium oxide case, the occurrence of multiple energy minima may lead to very different results depending on the initial electronic configurations and on the symmetries taken into account in the calculation.

  1. 13,14-seco-Withanolides from Physalis minima with Potential Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ru; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Li, Rui-Jun; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Four new 13,14-seco-withanolides, minisecolides A - D (1 - 4), together with three known analogues 5 - 7, were isolated from the whole plants of Physalis minima. The structures of new compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including (1) H-, (13) C-NMR, 2D-NMR (HMBC, HSQC, ROESY), and HR-ESI-MS. Evaluation of all isolates for their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide (NO) production was conducted on lipopolysaccaride-activated RAW264.7 macrophages. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 6 showed inhibitory activities, especially for compound 5 with IC50 value of 3.87 μm. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  2. Differential Expression of Antioxidant Enzymes During Degradation of Azo Dye Reactive black 8 in Hairy roots of Physalis minima L.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Modi, Nikita; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, Neetin

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the protection of plant metabolism in presence of azo dye was characterized by studying activities of the role of antioxidant enzymes in the hairy roots (HRs) of Physalis minima L. during degradation of an azo dye, Reactive Black 8 (RB8). When the HRs were exposed to RB8 (30 mg L(-1)), a  nine fold increase in SOD activity was observed after 24 h, while 22 and 50 fold increase in activity was observed for POX and APX respectively after 72 h, whereas there was no significant change in activity of CAT. The activation of different antioxidant enzymes at different time intervals under dye stress suggests the synchronized functioning of antioxidant machinery to protect the HRs from oxidative damage. FTIR analysis confirmed the degradation of dye and the non-toxic nature of metabolites formed after dye degradation was confirmed by phytotoxicity study.

  3. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guillén, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamaría, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.2±4.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.7±29.6 nm in length and 11.1±2.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity using GCMT catalogue in global scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Stavros-Richard G.; Sarlis, Nicholas V.; Skordas, Efthimios S.

    2016-04-01

    It has been recently shown [1,2] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. The identification of this correlation became possible when studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity[3,4]. In the present study, we focus on the behaviour of the fluctuations of κ1 before major earthquakes using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalogue for a magnitude threshold Mthres=5.0 as in Ref.[5]. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations κ1of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than M8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [6] that similar minima of seismicity order parameter fluctuations had been observed before all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Finally, we examine the statistical significance of the results by using ROC graphs [7,8] and the proposed prediction method has a p-value to occur by chance well below 0.1%. The hit rate is 100% with a false alarm rate only 6.67%. An attempt to lower the target earthquake magnitude threshold will be also presented. REFERENCES [1] N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011). [2] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012) [3] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, and E. S. Skordas, Practica of Athens Acad. 76, 294 (2001). [4] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, and E. S. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011902 (2002). [5] N.V. Sarlis, S.-R. G. Christopoulos, and E. S. Skordas, Chaos 25, 063110 (2015) [6] N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013) [7] T. Fawcett, Pattern Recognit. Lett. 27, 861 (2006). [8] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Comput. Phys. Commun. 185, 1172 (2014).

  5. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells.

  6. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  7. Packaging a Successful NASA Mission to Reach a Large Audience with a Small Budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics and NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Nicola J.; Goldberg, Richard; Barnes, Robin J.; Sigwarth, John B.; Beisser, Kerri B.; Moore, Thomas E.; Hoffman, Robert A.; Russell, Christopher T.; Scudder, Jack D.; Spann, James F.

    2004-01-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth's dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story. Team members also created visualizations using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA's Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  8. Packaging a Successful NASA Mission to Reach a Large Audience with a Small Budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics and NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Nicola J.; Goldberg, Richard; Barnes, Robin J.; Sigwarth, John B.; Beisser, Kerri B.; Moore, Thomas E.; Hoffman, Robert A.; Russell, Christopher T.; Scudder, Jack D.; Spann, James F.

    2004-01-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth's dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story. Team members also created visualizations using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA's Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  9. Packaging a successful NASA mission to reach a large audience within a small budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Goldberg, R.; Barnes, R. J.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Beisser, K. B.; Moore, T. E.; Hoffman, R. A.; Russell, C. T.; Scudder, J.; Spann, J. F.; Newell, P. T.; Hobson, L. J.; Gribben, S. P.; Obrien, J. E.; Menietti, J. D.; Germany, G. G.; Mobilia, J.; Schulz, M.

    2004-12-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth’s dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story, and visualizations were created using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts in order to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA’s Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  10. Global minima and energetics of Li +(H 2O) n and Ca 2+(H 2O) n clusters for n ⩽ 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Briesta S.; Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Wales, David J.

    2005-08-01

    We present candidate structures for the global potential energy minima of X(H 2O) n (X = Li +, Ca 2+) clusters with n ⩽ 20. The TIP4P rigid body water-water potential is employed, together with cation-water interactions that are represented as a sum of Coulomb and Lennard-Jones terms. We find that in the Li + global minima the cation tends to be located on the cluster surface with a preferred coordination number of four water molecules in tetrahedral positions. In contrast, for Ca 2+ clusters the cation occupies an interior site surrounded by eight water molecules in a square anti-prismatic arrangement.

  11. Teoria de chovitz de segundo orden aplicada a la busqueda de proyecciones cartograficas de minima deformacion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malpica Velasco, Jose Antonio

    The rampant success of quantum theory is the result of applications of the 'new' quantum mechanics of Schrodinger and Heisenberg (1926-7), the Feynman-Schwinger-Tomonaga Quantum Electro-dynamics (1946-51), the electro-weak theory of Salaam, Weinberg, and Glashow (1967-9), and Quantum Chromodynamics (1973-); in fact, this success of 'the' quantum theory has depended on a continuous stream of brilliant and quite disparate mathematical formulations. In this carefully concealed ferment there lie plenty of unresolved difficulties, simply because in churning out fabulously accurate calculational tools there has been no sensible explanation of all that is going on. It is even argued that such an understanding is nothing to do with physics. A long-standing and famous illustration of this is the paradoxical thought-experiment of Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (1935). Fundamental to all quantum theories, and also their paradoxes, is the location of sub-microscopic objects; or, rather, that the specification of such a location is fraught with mathematical inconsistency. This project encompasses a detailed, critical survey of the tangled history of Position within quantum theories. The first step is to show that, contrary to appearances, canonical quantum mechanics has only a vague notion of locality. After analysing a number of previous attempts at a 'relativistic quantum mechanics', two lines of thought are considered in detail. The first is the work of Wan and students, which is shown to be no real improvement on the iisu.al 'nonrelativistic' theory. The second is based on an idea of Dirac's - using backwards-in-time light-cones as the hypersurface in space-time. There remain considerable difficulties in the way of producing a consistent scheme here. To keep things nicely stirred up, the author then proposes his own approach - an adaptation of Feynman's QED propagators. This new approach is distinguished from Feynman's since the propagator or Green's function is not obtained

  12. Many pathways in laboratory evolution can lead to improved enzymes: how to escape from local minima.

    PubMed

    Gumulya, Yosephine; Sanchis, Joaquin; Reetz, Manfred T

    2012-05-07

    Directed evolution is a method to tune the properties of enzymes for use in organic chemistry and biotechnology, to study enzyme mechanisms, and to shed light on darwinian evolution in nature. In order to enhance its efficacy, iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM) was implemented. This involves: 1) randomized mutation of appropriate sites of one or more residues; 2) screening of the initial mutant libraries for properties such as enzymatic rate, stereoselectivity, or thermal robustness; 3) use of the best hit in a given library as a template for saturation mutagenesis at the other sites; and 4) continuation of the process until the desired degree of enzyme improvement has been reached. Despite the success of a number of ISM-based studies, the question of the optimal choice of the many different possible pathways remains unanswered. Here we considered a complete 4-site ISM scheme. All 24 pathways were systematically explored, with the epoxide hydrolase from Aspergillus niger as the catalyst in the stereoselective hydrolytic kinetic resolution of a chiral epoxide. All 24 pathways were found to provide improved mutants with notably enhanced stereoselectivity. When a library failed to contain any hits, non-improved or even inferior mutants were used as templates in the continuation of the evolutionary pathway, thereby escaping from the local minimum. These observations have ramifications for directed evolution in general and for evolutionary biological studies in which protein engineering techniques are applied. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Triple Solar Eruption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Solar activity surged on the morning of Dec 12, 2010 when the sun erupted three times in quick succession, hurling a trio of bright coronal mass ejections (CMEs) into space. Coronagraphs onboard th...

  14. 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive overview of the solar electricity market and identifies successes and trends within the market from both global and national perspectives.

  15. Solar powered model vehicle races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Nazmi; Serpengüzel, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Koç University SPIE student chapter has been organizing the solar powered model vehicle race and outreaching K-12 students. The solar powered model vehicle race for car, boat, blimp, all solar panel boat, submarine, underwater rower, amphibian, and glider have been successfully organized.

  16. Hale cycle and long-term trend in variation of galactic cosmic rays related to solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities around solar minimum times are modulated by magnetic drifts that depend on the overall solar polarity. GCR intensities reach a higher but more narrow peak during negative minima than during positive minima. However, despite these higher intensities, the variation of GCRs over timescales of solar rotation is smaller during negative minima than during positive minima. Aims: We study the variation of GCR intensity over the 27-day synodic solar rotation and over the 14-day half-rotation, in particular the long-term trend and cyclic pattern of this variation, and propose a unifying explanation for the observations. Methods: We used two high-latitude neutron monitors, Oulu and Apatity, which are most sensitive to the low-energy part of the GCR spectrum and thereby more strongly affected by the changes in the conditions of the local heliosphere. We calculated the yearly mean amplitudes of the GCR intensity variation during the full solar rotation (A27) and half-rotation (A14) in 1964-2016. Results: We verify that the A27 and A14 amplitudes exhibit a clear 22-yr Hale cycle during solar minima at both stations, with larger amplitudes in positive minima. We find that the mean amplitude of the Hale cycle is about 30-45% of the mean amplitude for A14, while is only about 15-30% for A27. We also find that all amplitudes depict a declining long-term trend, which we suggest is due to the weakening of solar polar magnetic fields during the last four solar cycles and the ensuing latitudinal widening of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) region. An exceptionally wide HCS region during the last solar minimum, when A14 reached its all-time minimum, is demonstrated by Ulysses probe observations. Conclusions: Our results emphasize the effect of polarity-dependent drift and the properties of the HCS in modulating the variation of GCR intensity during solar rotation in solar minimum times. The second rotation harmonic yields a larger Hale

  17. Adults of the Waterfern Weevil, Stenopelmus rufinasus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) feed on a Non-Host Plant Salvinia minima Baker, in Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The waterfern weevil, Stenopelmus refinasus Gyllenhal, has previously been reported as host-specific, only feeding on plants in the genus Azolla. We report the first observations of S. rufinasus feeding on a non-host plant, Salvinia minima Baker, within the United States....

  18. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  19. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  20. The role of solar activities & IMF(Bz) on the severe storm of March 13 - 14 1989.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eucharia; Okoro, Chidinma

    We present the statistical study of the severe geomagnetic activity of the 13 - 14th March 1989 as observed using the World Data Centre Observatories; Kyoto, Japan. Increase of the amplitude sudden commencements with solar minima which was not the case was predicted and IMF points Northward(Southward). Discussion that the effect could be from coronal mass ejection and other parameters were illustrated.

  1. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  2. 42 years of continuous observations of the Solar 1 diameter from 1974 to 2015 - What do they forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Penna, Jucira; Boscardin, Sergio; Papa, Andres R. R.; Garcia, Marcos Antonio; Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-07-01

    Several research groups in the world developed observational programs for the Sun in order to measure its apparent diameter over time with dedicated instruments, called solar astrolabes, since 1974. Their data have been gathered in several observing stations connected in the R2S3 (Réseau de Suivi au Sol du Rayon Solaire) network and through reciprocal visits and exchanges: Nice/Calern Observatoire/France, Rio de Janeiro Observatório Nacional/Brazil, Observatório de São Paulo IAGUSP/Brazil, Observatório Abrahão de Moraes IAGUSP/Brazil, Antalya Observatory/Turkey, San Fernando/Spain. Since all the optics and data treatment of the solar astrolabes was the same, from the oldest, with a single fixed objective prism, to the newest, with an angle variable objective prism and digital image acquisition, their results could be put together. Each instrument had its own density filter with a prismatic effect responsible for a particular shift. Thus, identical data gathering and just a different prismatic shift, enabled to reconcile all those series by using the common stretches and derive a single additive constant to place each one onto a common average. By doing so, although the value itself of the ground observed solar diameter is lost, its variations are determined over 35 years. On the combined series of the ground observed solar diameter a modulation with the 11 years main solar cycle is evident. However when such modulation is removed, both from the solar diameter compound series and from the solar activity series (as given by the sunspots count), a very strong anticorrelation is revealed. This suggested a larger diameter for the forthcoming cycles. This was very well verified for solar cycle 23, and correctly forecasted for cycle 24,in a behavior similar to that on the Minima of Dalton and Maunder. The ground monitoring keeps being routinely followed at Observatório Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, now using the Solar Heliometer, specially built to this end . The

  3. Application of ''Protocollo di Minima per l'ictus'' (PMIC- Minimal Protocol for Stroke) for inpatient rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Piazzini, D B; Ferrara, P E; Maggi, L; Frasca, G; Aprile, I; Rabini, A; Specchia, A; Bertolini, C

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics of a sample of stroke patients admitted to rehabilitation settings with the use of a standardised stroke assessment named ''Protocollo di Minima per l'ictus cerebrale'' (PMIC), to verify the usefulness of the application of PMIC and to compare the data of the authors with the international literature. An observational cross sectional study was conducted on a sample of 102 first-time stroke patients (mean age: 71.9 [+/-11.6], 54 men), in three inpatient rehabilitation centres. PMIC. Most patients were enrolled within 14 days of stroke onset. PMIC assessment took on average 20 minutes and provided the following information: 35% had architectural barriers in their homes; 82% of the cases had 1 or more family assistants; the educational level was low for 53%; 72% were retired; most cases were ischemic stroke without any side predominance being shown; 44% had partial anterior circulation infarcts (PACI) ischemic stroke; 18.6% presented dysphagia; 73% had sphincteral incontinence; there was no hypertone in more than 50% of the cases; 87% required assistance; the median Motricity Index Side Score (Miss) value was 44.1; 38% was affected by mood tone alteration. PMIC appeared to be a useful tool for a standardized evaluation of stroke patients. These results provide data with a high correspondence in international reports.

  4. Curvature and the visual perception of shape: theory on information along object boundaries and the minima rule revisited.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ik Soo; Leek, E Charles

    2012-07-01

    Previous empirical studies have shown that information along visual contours is known to be concentrated in regions of high magnitude of curvature, and, for closed contours, segments of negative curvature (i.e., concave segments) carry greater perceptual relevance than corresponding regions of positive curvature (i.e., convex segments). Lately, Feldman and Singh (2005, Psychological Review, 112, 243-252) proposed a mathematical derivation to yield information content as a function of curvature along a contour. Here, we highlight several fundamental errors in their derivation and in its associated implementation, which are problematic in both mathematical and psychological senses. Instead, we propose an alternative mathematical formulation for information measure of contour curvature that addresses these issues. Additionally, unlike in previous work, we extend this approach to 3-dimensional (3D) shape by providing a formal measure of information content for surface curvature and outline a modified version of the minima rule relating to part segmentation using curvature in 3D shape. Copyright 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Salinity minima, water masses and surface circulation in the Eastern Tropical Pacific off Mexico and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Esther; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor; Castro, Rubén; Desmond Barton, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal variations of the water masses and their interactions are analyzed in the Tropical Pacific off Mexico (TPOM) and four contiguous areas of on the basis of new extensive hydrographic database. The regional water masses intervals are redefined in terms of Absolute Salinity (SA) in g kg-1 and Conservative Temperature (Θ) according to TEOS - 10. The California Current System Water (CCSW) mass is introduced as an improved description of the former California Current Water (CCW) together with the Subarctic Water (SAW) to describe better the characteristics of the components of the California Current System. Hydrographic data, Precipitation-Evaporation balance and geostrophic currents were used to investigate the origin and seasonality of two salinity minima in the area. The shallow salinity minimum of around 33.5 g kg-1 originated in the California Current System and became saltier but less dense water as it traveled to the southeast. It can be identified as a mixture of CCSW and tropical waters. The surface salinity minimum of 32 - 33 g kg-1 was seen as a sharp surface feature in the TPOM from August to November. It was produced by the arrival of tropical waters from the south in combination with the net precipitation in the area during these months. This result provides new evidence of the presence of the poleward-flowing Mexican Coastal Current and, for the first time, of its seasonal pattern of variation.

  6. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  7. Study of the Formation and Evolution of Precipitation Induced Sea Surface Salinity Minima in the Tropical Pacific Using HYCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, R. L.

    2016-02-01

    During heavy rain events in the tropics, areas of relatively low salinity water collect on the ocean surface. Rainfall events increase the buoyancy of the ocean surface and impact upper ocean salinity and temperature profiles. This resists downward mixing and as a result can persist (SPURS II planning group, 2012; Oceanography 28(1) 150-159). Salinity at the surface adjusts through advective and diffusive mixing processes (Scott, J. et al, 2013; AGU Fall meeting abstracts). This project investigates the upper ocean salinity response in both advection and diffusion dominated regions. The changes in ocean surface salinity are tracked before, during, and after rainfall events. Data from a standard oceanographic model, HYCOM, are used to identify areas where each surface process is significant. Rainfall events are identified using a TRMM dataset. It provides a tropical rainfall analysis which uses amalgamated satellite data to develop detailed global precipitation grids between 50 o north and south latitude. TRMM is useful due its high temporal and spatial resolutions. The salinity response in HYCOM is tested against simple theoretical advective and diffusive mixing models. The magnitude of sea surface salinity minima, their persistence and the precision by which HYCOM can resolve these phenomena are of interest.

  8. Paravannella minima n. g. n. sp. (Discosea, Vannellidae) and distinction of the genera in the vannellid amoebae.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Paravannella minima n. g. n. sp. (Amoebozoa, Vannellidae) isolated from a freshwater aquarium, possesses all light-microscopic and ultrastructural characteristics of the genus Vannella, being one of the smallest species among the vannellid amoebae (cell size during locomotion usually between 4.5 and 10μm). At the same time, sequence analysis of the genes encoding for nuclear SSU rRNA, actin and mitochondrial Cox1 shows this species as the earliest-branching vannellid that appears to be sister to the rest of this clade. This is correlated with the presence of some plesiomorphic characters; in particular, the secondary structure of the hypervariable helices E23-1-E23-7 in the studied species is shared with Vannella and most of the genera of Dactylopodida. The cell coat structure of the studied species corresponds to the hypothesis that vannellid amoebae were ancestrally enclosed in a cell coat consisting of pentagonal glycostyles that have undergone multiple independent losses in various clades of Vannellidae.

  9. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  10. The periodicity of Grand Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The sunspot number is the most used index to quantify the solar activity. Nevertheless, the sunspot is a syn- thetic index and not a physical index. Therefore, we should be careful to use the sunspot number to quantify the low (high) solar activity. One of the major problems of using sunspot to quantify solar activity is that its minimum value is zero. This zero value hinders the reconstruction of the solar cycle during the Maunder minimum. All solar indexes can be used as analog signals, which can be easily converted into digital signals. In con- trast, the conversion of a digital signal into an analog signal is not in general a simple task. The sunspot number during the Maunder minimum can be studied as a digital signal of the solar activity In 1894, Maunder published a discovery that has maintained the Solar Physics in an impasse. In his fa- mous work on "A Prolonged Sunspot Minimum" Maunder wrote: "The sequence of maximum and minimum has, in fact, been unfailing during the present century [..] and yet there [..], the ordinary solar cycle was once interrupted, and one long period of almost unbroken quiescence prevailed". The search of new historical Grand solar minima has been one of the most important questions in Solar Physics. However, the possibility of estimating a new Grand solar minimum is even more valuable. Since solar activity is the result of electromagnetic processes; we propose to employ the power to quantify solar activity: this is a fundamental physics concept in electrodynamics. Total Solar Irradiance is the primary energy source of the Earth's climate system and therefore its variations can contribute to natural climate change. In this work, we propose to consider the fluctuations in the power of the Total Solar Irradiance as a physical measure of the energy released by the solar dynamo, which contributes to understanding the nature of "profound solar magnetic field in calm". Using a new reconstruction of the Total Solar Irradiance we found the

  11. Zero gravity testing of flexible solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, D. T.; Young, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Zero gravity testing in the KC-135 aircraft of flat fold flexible solar array test specimens sufficiently demonstrated the adequacy of the panel design. The aircraft flight crew provided invaluable assistance and significantly contributed to the design and development of the flexible solar array, and ultimately to the potential success of the solar electric propulsion solar array shuttle flight experiment program.

  12. Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n = 2–6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Aprà, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five hexamer isomer minima previously reported by MP2 are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n=2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ~0.02 Å, indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ~15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ~15 and ~25 cm-1 are observed for the bending and “free” OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies. The CCSD(T) red shifts from the monomer frequencies (Δω) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that the former produces shorter elongations (ΔR) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to the latter. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation - Δω = s · ΔR, with a rate of s = 20.3 cm-1 / 0.001 Å. The CCSD

  13. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  14. Solar-cycle precursors and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie

    2013-07-01

    The sunspot number data during the past 400 years indicates that both the profile and the amplitude of the solar cycle have large variations. Some precursors of the solar cycle were identified aiming to predict the solar cycle. The polar field and the geomagnetic index are two precursors which are received the most attention. The geomagnetic variations during the solar minima are potentially caused by the solar polar field by the connection of the solar open flux. The robust prediction skill of the polar field indicates that the memory of the dynamo process is less than 11 yrs based on the frame of the Babcock-Leighton flux transport dynamo. One possible reason to get the short magnetic memory is the high magnetic diffusivity in the convective zone. Our recent studies show that the radial downward pumping is another possible reason. Based upon the mechanism, we well simulate the cycle irregularities during RGO time period. This opens the possibility to set up a standard dynamo based model to predict the solar cycle. In the end, the no correlation between the polar field and the preceding cycle strength due to two nonlinearities involved in the sunspot emergence will be stressed.

  15. Outstanding Issues in Solar Dynamo Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D.

    The magnetic activity of the Sun, as manifested in the sunspot cycle, originates deep within its convection zone through a dynamo mechanism, which involves nontrivial interactions between the plasma and the magnetic field in the solar interior. Recent advances in magnetohydrodynamic dynamo theory have led us closer towards a better understanding of the physics of the solar magnetic cycle. In conjunction, helioseismic observations of large-scale flows in the solar interior has nowmade it possible to constrain some of the parameters used in models of the solar cycle. In the first part of this review, I briefly describe this current state of understanding of the solar cycle. In the second part, I highlight some of the outstanding issues in solar dynamo theory related to the nature of the dynamo α-effect, magnetic buoyancy, and the origin of Maunder-like minima in activity. I also discuss how poor constraints on key physical processes such as turbulent diffusion, meridional circulation, and turbulent flux pumping confuse the relative roles of these vis-a-vis magnetic flux transport. I argue that unless some of these issues are addressed, no model of the solar cycle can claim to be "the standard model," nor can any predictions from such models be trusted; in other words, we are still not there yet.

  16. National Community Solar Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, Bart

    2016-06-30

    This project was created to provide a National Community Solar Platform (NCSP) portal known as Community Solar Hub, that is available to any entity or individual who wants to develop community solar. This has been done by providing a comprehensive portal to make CEC’s solutions, and other proven community solar solutions, externally available for everyone to access – making the process easy through proven platforms to protect subscribers, developers and utilities. The successful completion of this project provides these tools via a web platform and integration APIs, a wide spectrum of community solar projects included in the platform, multiple groups of customers (utilities, EPCs, and advocates) using the platform to develop community solar, and open access to anyone interested in community solar. CEC’s Incubator project includes web-based informational resources, integrated systems for project information and billing systems, and engagement with customers and users by community solar experts. The combined effort externalizes much of Clean Energy Collective’s industry-leading expertise, allowing third parties to develop community solar without duplicating expensive start-up efforts. The availability of this platform creates community solar projects that are cheaper to build and cheaper to participate in, furthering the goals of DOE’s SunShot Initiative. Final SF 425 Final SF 428 Final DOE F 2050.11 Final Report Narrative

  17. Variability of surface water dynamics during eccentricity minima interglacials of the last 1 Myr in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Eliana; Emanuele, Dario; Ferretti, Patrizia; Flores, José-Abel; Perugia, Carmen; Petrillo, Zaccaria; Ornella Amore, Filomena

    2014-05-01

    Eccentricity minima occurred only three times during the last 1 Myr in correspondence of Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 1 (last 11 ka), 11 (425-360 ka) and 19 (791-763 ka). All these stages are characterised by similar orbital configurations and the Pleistocene eccentricity minima interglacials are considered, by several authors, as possible analogues for the Holocene and its future evolution. Surface water dynamics were reconstructed through quantitative analyses performed on coccolithophore assemblages in two key-sites of the North Atlantic: MD03-2699 core, retrieved off Iberian Margin (IM), and IODP Site U1313, located in the upper western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Nowadays, IODP Site U1313 is under the influence of a northern ramification of the Gulf Stream, the North Atlantic Current (NAC). This current forms a transitional zone between the productive cold polar system and the oligotrophic warm subtropical system. In addition, the NAC represents the northern boundary of the Portugal Current (PC) system which influences the modern surface oceanography off the IM at MD03-2699 site. Coccolithophore data were carried out by sediments of MD03-2699 core for MIS 11 and MIS 1(Amore et al., 2012; Palumbo et al., 2013a,b) and by IODP Site U1313 for MIS 19 (Emanuele, 2013). The mean sampling resolution for MIS 1 is 140 yrs, for MIS 11 about 400 yrs and for MIS 19 about 220 yrs. The high samples resolution allowed reconstructing long term changes at orbital timescale as well as rapid changes at millennial scale. Data from coccolithophore assemblages were compared with available proxy for the studied cores such as alkenones, lithics, oxygen and carbon isotopes. Coccolithophores belong to phytoplankton group and they are widely used as proxy of surface water dynamics thanks to their attitude to record the smallest paleoclimatic changes and because they directly depend on sea surface temperature and salinity, sunlight and availability of nutrients. Through the use of

  18. Delayed build-up of Arctic ice sheets during 400,000-year minima in insolation variability.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qingzhen; Wang, Luo; Oldfield, Frank; Peng, Shuzhen; Qin, Li; Song, Yang; Xu, Bing; Qiao, Yansong; Bloemendal, Jan; Guo, Zhengtang

    2012-10-18

    Knowledge of the past variability of climate at high northern latitudes during astronomical analogues of the present interglacial may help to inform our understanding of future climate change. Unfortunately, long-term continuous records of ice-sheet variability in the Northern Hemisphere only are scarce because records of benthic (18)O content represent an integrated signal of changes in ice volume in both polar regions. However, variations in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets influence the Siberian High (an atmospheric pressure system), so variations in the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM)--as recorded in the aeolian dust deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau--can serve as a useful proxy of Arctic climate variability before the ice-core record begins. Here we present an EAWM proxy record using grain-size variations in two parallel loess sections representative of sequences across the whole of the Chinese Loess Plateau over the past 900,000 years. The results show that during periods of low eccentricity and precessional variability at approximately 400,000-year intervals, the grain-size-inferred intensity of the EAWM remains weak for up to 20,000 years after the end of the interglacial episode of high summer monsoon activity and strong pedogenesis. In contrast, there is a rapid increase in the EAWM after the end of most other interglacials. We conclude that, for both the 400,000-year interglacials, the weak EAWM winds maintain a mild, non-glacial climate at high northern latitudes for much longer than expected from the conventional loess and marine oxygen isotope records. During these times, the less-severe summer insolation minima at 65° N (ref. 4) would have suppressed ice and snow accumulation, leading to a weak Siberian High and, consequently, weak EAWM winds.

  19. OUT Success Stories: Solar Roofing Shingles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Johnson, N.

    2000-08-01

    Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cells are now doubling as rooftop shingles. PV shingles offer many advantages. The energy generated from a building's PV rooftop shingles can provide power both to the building and the utility's power grid.

  20. The Fraction of the Sun's Lifetime in a Grand Minimum State Estimated from Studies of Solar-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Maunder Minimum is a key event in climate change research, (1) from the vantage point as a natural control experiment in which greenhouse gas (GHG) abundances were at a pre-industrial constant while solar forcing changed by a magnitude comparable to recent GHG increases, and (2) given recent interest and speculation that a similar grand minimum might occur later this century. To date, periodicity in solar grand minima has been difficult to detect in geophysical proxy data, and an alternative approach involves estimating the frequency of the Sun's lifetime spent in a grand minimum state by searching for evidence of grand minima in solar-type stars. Most often this is done by measuring Ca H and K flux as an indicator of chromospheric activity, or by photometric observations of solar cycles on decadal timescales. Early estimates of grand minimum frequency in solar type stars ranged from 10-30%. However, these early studies inadvertently included many stars that have evolved off the main sequence. This paper discusses how measurements of stellar Lithium abundance, and spectroscopically constrained metallicity, are used as additional constraints on age and main sequence membership, to refine detections of grand minima in solar-type stars. Based on the most recent studies, an estimate emerges of 5-6% for the fraction of the Sun's lifetime spent in a low-activity and reduced luminosity state analogous to the Maunder Minimum.

  1. Solar physics. The crucial role of surface magnetic fields for the solar dynamo.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Robert; Schüssler, Manfred

    2015-03-20

    Sunspots and the plethora of other phenomena occurring in the course of the 11-year cycle of solar activity are a consequence of the emergence of magnetic flux at the solar surface. The observed orientations of bipolar sunspot groups imply that they originate from toroidal (azimuthally orientated) magnetic flux in the convective envelope of the Sun. We show that the net toroidal magnetic flux generated by differential rotation within a hemisphere of the convection zone is determined by the emerged magnetic flux at the solar surface and thus can be calculated from the observed magnetic field distribution. The main source of the toroidal flux is the roughly dipolar surface magnetic field at the polar caps, which peaks around the minima of the activity cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Association of solar wind proton flux extremes with pseudostreamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Gibson, S. E.; Fisk, L. A.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the characteristics and solar origins of a subpopulation of the solar wind that possesses extreme values of proton flux. Ulysses observations including solar wind magnetic flux, proton flux, number density and velocity, and ionic composition are examined in this study. We find that the departures of solar wind proton flux from its constancy occur for time intervals leading up to and encompassing the past two solar minima, and the extreme-proton-flux wind possesses the following characteristics: (1) it generally originates from sources middle-distant from the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS); (2) it is associated with a broad range of velocities and electron temperatures but excludes very fast/cold wind; (3) it exhibits anticorrelation between electron temperature and proton velocity, as does the rest of the solar wind; (4) it has extreme proton density values relative to the rest of the solar wind; and (5) the extreme-high-proton-flux wind has radial component of open magnetic flux (Br) greater than the rest of the solar wind, and both extreme-high and extreme-low wind do not possess the lowest values of Br flux. Comparing with SOHO EIT 195 Å coronal images, we find the observed extreme-proton-flux wind has temporal and spatial coincidence with the appearance of low-latitude coronal holes present in the recent two solar minima; the magnetic field lines extrapolated by the Potential Field Source Surface model confirm there are coronal pseudostreamer structures involved. So we propose that these extreme-proton-flux winds can be associated with mid- to low-latitude coronal holes and "pseudostreamer" structures.

  3. Association of Solar Wind Proton Flux Extremes with Pseudostreamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Gibson, S. E.; Fisk, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the characteristics and solar origins of a sub-population of the solar wind that possesses extreme values of proton flux. Ulysses observations including solar wind magnetic flux, proton flux, number density and velocity, and ionic composition are examined in this study. We find the departures of solar wind proton flux from its constancy occur for time intervals leading up to and encompassing the past two solar minima, and the extreme-proton-flux wind possesses the following characteristics: 1) it generally originates from sources middle-distant from the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS); 2) it is associated with a broad range of velocities and electron temperatures, but excludes very fast/cold wind; 3) it exhibits anticorrelation between electron temperature and proton velocity, as does the rest of the solar wind; 4) it has extreme proton density values relative to the rest of the solar wind; and 5) the extreme-high-proton-flux wind has radial component of open magnetic flux (Br) greater than the rest of the solar wind and both extreme-high and extreme-low wind do not possess the lowest values of Br flux. Comparing with SOHO EIT 195 A coronal images, we find the observed extreme-proton-flux wind has temporal and special coincidence with the appearance of low latitude coronal holes present in the recent two solar minima; and the magnetic field lines extrapolated by the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model confirm there are coronal pseudostreamer structures involved. So we propose that these extreme-proton-flux wind can be associated with mid-to-low-latitude coronal holes and "pseudostreamer" structures.

  4. Defect mediated room temperature ferromagnetism and resistance minima study in epitaxial ZnGa0.002Al0.02O transparent conducting oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, Namik K.; Nori, Sudhakar; Kumar, D.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    We report on the micro-structural, transport, optical and magnetic properties in ZnGa0.002Al0.02O (AGZO) films grown by pulsed laser deposition under different growth conditions. AGZO films grown at substrate temperatures of 600 °C show metal-like behavior with a resistivity minima at lower temperatures, whereas films grown at 300 °C and ambient oxygen partial pressure of 1 mTorr show metallic nature with resistivity values on the order of 100 µΩ · cm at room temperature. The most interesting features are the concomitant occurrence of high temperature resistivity minima and room temperature ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetic moment of 1000 A m-1 and with coercivity in the range 100-240 Oe. The temperature dependent resistivity data has been interpreted in the light of quantum corrections to conductivity in disordered systems, suggesting that the e-e interactions is the dominant mechanism in the weak-localization (WL) limit in the case of films showing resisitivity minima. The simultaneous ferromagnetic ordering coupled with the enhancements in electrical conductivity in AGZO system should have their origin in native point defects in the form of oxygen and zinc vacancies and interstitials and their complexes. We propose that formation of oxygen vacancy-zinc interstitial defect complex (V O-I Zn) is responsible for the enhancement in n-type conductivity, and zinc vacancies (V Zn) for the observed room temperature ferromagnetism.

  5. A Topside Equatorial Ionospheric Density and Composition Climatology During and After Extreme Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Simoes, F.; Ivanov, S.; Heelis, R. A.; Bilitza, D.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    During the recent solar minimum, solar activity reached the lowest levels observed during the space age. This extremely low solar activity has accompanied a number of unexpected observations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere when compared to previous solar minima. Among these are the fact that the ionosphere is significantly contracted beyond expectations based on empirical models. Climatological altitude profiles of ion density and composition measurements near the magnetic dip equator are constructed from the C/NOFS satellite to characterize the shape of the top side ionosphere during the recent solar minimum and into the new solar cycle. The variation of the profiles with respect to local time, season, and solar activity are compared to the IRI-2007 model. Building on initial results reported by Heelis et al. [2009], here we describe the extent of the contracted ionosphere, which is found to persist throughout 2009. The shape of the ionosphere during 2010 is found to be consistent with observations from previous solar minima.

  6. Topside Equatorial Ionospheric Density and Composition During and After Extreme Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J.; Simoes, F.; Ivanov, S.; Heelis, R. A.; Bilitza, D.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.

    2011-01-01

    During the recent solar minimum, solar activity reached the lowest levels observed during the space age. This extremely low solar activity has accompanied a number of unexpected observations in the Earth s ionosphere-thermosphere system when compared to previous solar minima. Among these are the fact that the ionosphere is significantly contracted beyond expectations based on empirical models. Altitude profiles of ion density and composition measurements near the magnetic dip equator are constructed from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite to characterize the shape of the topside ionosphere during the recent solar minimum and into the new solar cycle. The variation of the profiles with respect to local time, season, and solar activity are compared to the IRI-2007 model. Building on initial results reported by Heelis et al. (2009), here we describe the extent of the contracted ionosphere, which is found to persist throughout 2009. The shape of the ionosphere during 2010 is found to be consistent with observations from previous solar minima.

  7. A Solar Cycle Dependence of Nonlinearity in Magnetospheric Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay R; Wing, Simon

    2005-03-08

    The nonlinear dependencies inherent to the historical K(sub)p data stream (1932-2003) are examined using mutual information and cumulant based cost as discriminating statistics. The discriminating statistics are compared with surrogate data streams that are constructed using the corrected amplitude adjustment Fourier transform (CAAFT) method and capture the linear properties of the original K(sub)p data. Differences are regularly seen in the discriminating statistics a few years prior to solar minima, while no differences are apparent at the time of solar maximum. These results suggest that the dynamics of the magnetosphere tend to be more linear at solar maximum than at solar minimum. The strong nonlinear dependencies tend to peak on a timescale around 40-50 hours and are statistically significant up to one week. Because the solar wind driver variables, VB(sub)s and dynamical pressure exhibit a much shorter decorrelation time for nonlinearities, the results seem to indicate that the nonlinearity is related to internal magnetospheric dynamics. Moreover, the timescales for the nonlinearity seem to be on the same order as that for storm/ring current relaxation. We suggest that the strong solar wind driving that occurs around solar maximum dominates the magnetospheric dynamics suppressing the internal magnetospheric nonlinearity. On the other hand, in the descending phase of the solar cycle just prior to solar minimum, when magnetospheric activity is weaker, the dynamics exhibit a significant nonlinear internal magnetospheric response that may be related to increased solar wind speed.

  8. Delayed build-up of Arctic ice sheets during 400, 000-year minima in insolation variability confirmed by Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Q.; Wang, L.; Oldfield, F.; Peng, S.; Qin, L.; Song, Y.; Xu, B.; Qiao, Y.; Bloemendal, J.; Guo, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The growth and decay of the Northern Hemisphere ice volume led to alternations of glacial and interglacial climate and major changes in sea level during the Quaternary period. Unfortunately, long-term continuous records of ice-sheet variability in the Northern during the Quaternary period Hemisphere only are scarce because benthic δ18O records represent an integrated signal of changes in ice volume in both polar regions. Direct sedimentary records of Northern Hemisphere polar ice sheets exist only for the late Quaternary and longer term records are scarce. However, variations in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets influence the Siberian High (an atmospheric pressure system), so variations in the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM)--as recorded in the aeolian dust deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau--can serve as a useful proxy of Arctic climate variability. Here we present an EAWM proxy record using grain-size variations in two parallel loess sections over the past 900 kyr to address the timing of build-up of Northern hemisphere ice sheets around 413 kyr mimina in eccentricity and precessional variability. These periods are regarded as the astronomical analogues of the present interglacial. The results show that during periods of low eccentricity and precessional variability around 400 kyr and 800 kyr ago, the grain-size-inferred intensity of the EAWM remains weak for up to 20 kyr after the end of the interglacial episodes MIS 11, MIS 19 and MIS 21. In contrast, there is a rapid increase in the EAWM after the end of most other interglacials. We conclude that, for these interglacials at 400 kyr intervals, the weak EAWM winds maintain a non-glacial climate at high northern latitudes for much longer than expected from the conventional loess and marine oxygen isotope records. During these times, the less severe summer insolation minima at 65° N (modulated by 413-kyr eccentricity cycles) would have suppressed ice and snow accumulation, leading to a weak Siberian High and

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: TU UMa light curves and maxima, CL Aur minima (Liska+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, J.; Skarka, M.; Mikulasek, Z.; Zejda, M.; Chrastina, M.

    2016-02-01

    Differential photometry for RR Lyrae star TU UMa in the 1st and 2nd file. The measurements were obtained using 24-inch and 1-inch telescopes, respectively. The observations were performed at the Masaryk University Observatory in Brno (3 nights, 24-inch), and at the private observatory in Brno (16 nights, 1-inch) in the Czech Republic from December 2013 to June 2014. Observing equipments consisted of 24-inch Newtonian telescope (600/2780mm, diameter/focal length) and a Moravian Instruments CCD camera G2-4000 with Stromgren photometric filters vby, and of 1-inch refractor (a photographic lens Sonnar 4/135mm, lens focal ratio/focal length) and ATIK 16IC CCD camera with green photometric filter with similar throughput as the Johnson V filter. Exposures were v - 60s, b - 30s, y - 30s, green - 30s. For the small aperture telescope, five frames were combined to a single image to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. The time resolution of a such combined frame is about 170s. CCD images were calibrated in a standard way (dark frame and flat field corrections). The C-Munipack software (Motl 2009) was used for this processing as well as for differential photometry. The comparison star BD+30 2165 was the same for both instruments, but the control stars were BD+30 2164 (for the 24-inch telescope) and HD 99593 (for the 1-inch telescope). The 3rd file contains maxima timings of TU UMa adopted from the GEOS RR Lyr database, from the latest publications, together with maxima timings determined in our study. Times of maxima were calculated from our observations, sky-surveys data (Hipparcos, NSVS, Pi of the Sky, SuperWASP), photographic measurements (project DASCH), and from several published datasets, in which the maxima were omitted or badly determined - Boenigk (1958AcA.....8...13B), Liakos, Niarchos (2011IBVS.6099....1L, 2011IBVS.5990....1L), Liu, Janes (1989ApJS...69..593L), Preston et al. (1961ApJ...133..484P). The 4th file contains minima timings of eclipsing binary CL Aur

  10. Solar Cookers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of solar cookers in the science classroom. Includes instructions for construction of a solar cooker, an explanation of how solar cookers work, and a number of suggested activities. (DS)

  11. Success Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boffey, D. Barnes; Boffey, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes success counseling, a counseling approach based on the principles of William Glasser's control theory and reality therapy that helps campers examine their wants and needs, evaluate their own behaviors, and see the connections between behavior and the ability to meet basic needs for love, power, fun, and freedom. Provides examples of…

  12. Project Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Larry D.

    Project Success consists of after-school, weekend, and summer educational programs geared toward minority and disadvantaged students to increase their numbers seeking postsecondary education from the Meadville, Pennsylvania area. The project is funded primarily through the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, whose administration is committed to…

  13. Project Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Larry D.

    Project Success consists of after-school, weekend, and summer educational programs geared toward minority and disadvantaged students to increase their numbers seeking postsecondary education from the Meadville, Pennsylvania area. The project is funded primarily through the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, whose administration is committed to…

  14. Success Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boffey, D. Barnes; Boffey, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes success counseling, a counseling approach based on the principles of William Glasser's control theory and reality therapy that helps campers examine their wants and needs, evaluate their own behaviors, and see the connections between behavior and the ability to meet basic needs for love, power, fun, and freedom. Provides examples of…

  15. High-latitude Conic Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Malova, Helmi V.; Kislov, Roman A.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Obridko, Vladimir N.; Kharshiladze, Alexander F.; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Sokół, Justyna M.; Grzedzielski, Stan; Fujiki, Ken’ichi

    2017-02-01

    We provide observational evidence for the existence of large-scale cylindrical (or conic-like) current sheets (CCSs) at high heliolatitudes. Long-lived CCSs were detected by Ulysses during its passages over the South Solar Pole in 1994 and 2007. The characteristic scale of these tornado-like structures is several times less than a typical width of coronal holes within which the CCSs are observed. CCS crossings are characterized by a dramatic decrease in the solar wind speed and plasma beta typical for predicted profiles of CCSs. Ulysses crossed the same CCS at different heliolatitudes at 2–3 au several times in 1994, as the CCS was declined from the rotation axis and corotated with the Sun. In 2007, a CCS was detected directly over the South Pole, and its structure was strongly highlighted by the interaction with comet McNaught. Restorations of solar coronal magnetic field lines reveal the occurrence of conic-like magnetic separators over the solar poles in both 1994 and 2007. Such separators exist only during solar minima. Interplanetary scintillation data analysis confirms the presence of long-lived low-speed regions surrounded by the typical polar high-speed solar wind in solar minima. Energetic particle flux enhancements up to several MeV/nuc are observed at edges of the CCSs. We built simple MHD models of a CCS to illustrate its key features. The CCSs may be formed as a result of nonaxiality of the solar rotation axis and magnetic axis, as predicted by the Fisk–Parker hybrid heliospheric magnetic field model in the modification of Burger and coworkers.

  16. Proposed solar two project Barstow, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates the environmental consequences of the proposed conversion and operation of the existing Solar One Facility in Daggett, Ca, near the city of Barstow, to a nitrate salt based heat transfer system, Solar Two. The EA also addresses the alternatives of different solar conversion technologies and alternative sites and discusses a no action alternative. A primary objective of the Solar Two Project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a solar central receiver power plant using molten salt as the thermal storage and transport fluid medium. If successful, the information gathered from the Solar Two Project could be used to design larger commercial solar power plants.

  17. Comparing Coronal and Heliospheric Magnetic Fields over Several Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, J. S.; Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K.

    2017-01-01

    Here we use the PFSS model and photospheric data from Wilcox Solar Observatory, SOHO/MDI, SDO/HMI, and SOLIS to compare the coronal field with heliospheric magnetic field measured at 1 au, compiled in the NASA/NSSDC OMNI 2 data set. We calculate their mutual polarity match and the power of the radial decay, p, of the radial field using different source surface distances and different number of harmonic multipoles. We find the average polarity match of 82% for the declining phase, 78%–79% for maxima, 76%–78% for the ascending phase, and 74%–76% for minima. On an average, the source surface of 3.25 RS gives the best polarity match. We also find strong evidence for solar cycle variation of the optimal source surface distance, with highest values (3.3 RS) during solar minima and lowest values (2.6 RS–2.7 RS) during the other three solar cycle phases. Raising the number of harmonic terms beyond 2 rarely improves the polarity match, showing that the structure of the HMF at 1 au is most of the time rather simple. All four data sets yield fairly similar polarity matches. Thus, polarity comparison is not affected by photospheric field scaling, unlike comparisons of the field intensity.

  18. Solar and interplanetary signatures of declining of solar magnetic fields: Implications to the next solar cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2015-08-01

    Our detailed study of solar surface magnetic fields at high-latitudes, using magnetic synoptic magnetograms of NSO/Kitt Peak observatory from 1975-2014, has shown a steady decline of the field strength since mid-1990's until mid-2014, i.e. the solar maximum of cycle 24. We also found that magnetic field strength at high-latitudes declines after each solar cycle maximum, and since cycle 24 is already past its peak implies that solar surface magnetic fields will be continuing to decline until solar minimum of cycle 24. In addition, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of solar wind micro-turbulence levels, from Solar and Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Japan, have also shown a steady decline in sync with the declining surface fields. Even the heliospheric magnetic fields (HMF) at 1 AU have been declined much below the previously proposed floor level of HMF of ~4.6 nT. From study of a correlation between the high-latitude surface fields and the HMF at the last four solar minima we found a floor value of HMF of ~3.2 nT. Using the above correlation and the fact that the high-latitude surface fields is expected to decline until the minimum of cycle 24, we estimate the value of the HMF at the minimum of cycle 24 will be 3.8 ± 0.2 nT and the peak sunspot number for solar cycle 25 will be 56±12 suggesting a weak sunspot activity to be continued in cycle 25 too.

  19. A study of the planetary waves generation and propagation in the MLT region during different phases of the solar cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, Andrey; Gavrilov, Nikolai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander; Shevchuk, Nikita

    2017-04-01

    One of the important factors of atmospheric dynamics and thermal regime at heights of mesosphere-lower thermosphere is energy and momentum transfer by atmospheric planetary waves. We perform numerical modeling of the atmospheric general circulation using improved general circulation model MUAM with 56 vertical levels. This model covers altitudes from the ground to 300 km. The MUAM includes parameterization schemes of stationary planetary waves (SPWs) and normal atmospheric modes (NAMs). To parameterize NAM sources in the MUAM, additional terms to the heat balance equation are used. These terms include sets of time-dependent sinusoidal components with zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2 and periods corresponding to simulated NAMs. We perform numerical simulation of global atmospheric circulation for the initial conditions corresponding to the years of solar cycle minima and maxima. We focus on the changes in amplitudes of SPWs and westward propagating NAMs in the atmosphere under different solar activity phases. In order to analyze the result of the numerical simulation we use calculation of planetary wave's refractivity indexes and Eliassen-Palm fluxes. It is shown that there are significant changes in SPW amplitudes for the different solar activity. SPWs better propagate into the thermosphere at solar cycle minima due to additional waveguides at altitude about 90 km. At the altitudes higher than 100 km SPW amplitudes at low latitudes and high latitudes of the Northern hemisphere may be stronger. Amplitudes of NAM are also in most cases stronger at solar minima.

  20. A history of solar activity over millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2017-03-01

    Presented here is a review of present knowledge of the long-term behavior of solar activity on a multi-millennial timescale, as reconstructed using the indirect proxy method. The concept of solar activity is discussed along with an overview of the special indices used to quantify different aspects of variable solar activity, with special emphasis upon sunspot number. Over long timescales, quantitative information about past solar activity can only be obtained using a method based upon indirect proxies, such as the cosmogenic isotopes ^{14}C and ^{10}Be in natural stratified archives (e.g., tree rings or ice cores). We give an historical overview of the development of the proxy-based method for past solar-activity reconstruction over millennia, as well as a description of the modern state. Special attention is paid to the verification and cross-calibration of reconstructions. It is argued that this method of cosmogenic isotopes makes a solid basis for studies of solar variability in the past on a long timescale (centuries to millennia) during the Holocene. A separate section is devoted to reconstructions of strong solar energetic-particle (SEP) events in the past, that suggest that the present-day average SEP flux is broadly consistent with estimates on longer timescales, and that the occurrence of extra-strong events is unlikely. Finally, the main features of the long-term evolution of solar magnetic activity, including the statistics of grand minima and maxima occurrence, are summarized and their possible implications, especially for solar/stellar dynamo theory, are discussed.

  1. Taboo search by successive confinement: surveying a potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Chekmarev, S F

    2001-09-01

    A taboo search for minima on a potential energy surface (PES) is performed by means of confinement molecular dynamics: the molecular dynamics trajectory of the system is successively confined to various basins on the PES that have not been sampled yet. The approach is illustrated for a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. It is shown that the taboo search radically accelerates the process of surveying the PES, with the probability of finding a new minimum defined by a propagating Fermi-like distribution.

  2. Taboo search by successive confinement: Surveying a potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F.

    2001-09-01

    A taboo search for minima on a potential energy surface (PES) is performed by means of confinement molecular dynamics: the molecular dynamics trajectory of the system is successively confined to various basins on the PES that have not been sampled yet. The approach is illustrated for a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. It is shown that the taboo search radically accelerates the process of surveying the PES, with the probability of finding a new minimum defined by a propagating Fermi-like distribution.

  3. Delayed build-up of Arctic ice sheets during 400, 000-year minima in insolation variability confirmed by Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qingzhen; Wang, Luo; Oldfield, Frank; Peng, Shuzhen; Qin, Li; Song, Yang; Xu, Bing; Qiao, Yansong; Bloemendal, Jan; Guo, Zhengtang

    2014-05-01

    The growth and decay of the Northern Hemisphere ice volume led to alternations of glacial and interglacial climate. Unfortunately, long-term continuous records of ice-sheet variability in the Northern Hemisphere during the Quaternary period only are scarce because benthic δ18O records represent an integrated signal of changes in ice volume in both polar regions. However, variations in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets influence the Siberian High (an atmospheric pressure system), so variations in the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM)—as recorded in the aeolian dust deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau—can serve as a useful proxy of Arctic climate variability. Here we present an EAWM proxy record using grain-size variations in two parallel loess sections over the past 900 kyr to address the timing of build-up of Northern hemisphere ice sheets around 413 kyr mimina in eccentricity and precessional variability. These periods are regarded as the astronomical analogues of the present interglacial. The grain-size-inferred intensity of the EAWM records shows that the wind strength of EAWM increased rapidly after the end of most interglacials. However, during periods of low eccentricity and precessional variability around 400 kyr and 800 kyr ago, EAWM remains weak for up to 20 kyr after the end of the interglacial episodes MIS 11, MIS 19 and MIS 21. We conclude that the delayed increase in wind strength of the EAWM was caused by delayed buildup of Arctic ice sheets at the ends of the interglacials at 400 kyr intervals, which had led to much longer climate of interglacial mode at high northern latitudes than expected from the marine oxygen isotope records. During these times, the less severe summer insolation minima at 65° N (modulated by 413-kyr eccentricity cycles) would have suppressed ice and snow accumulation, leading to a weak Siberian High and, consequently, weak EAWM winds. Astronomically driven insolation during the present interglacial and in the near future is

  4. Cyclic thermal signature in a global MHD simulation of solar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, J.; Charbonneau, P.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    Space-based observations have clearly established that total solar irradiance (TSI) varies on time scales from minutes to days and months as well as on the longer time scale of the 11-year solar cycle. The most conspicuous of these variations is arguably the slight increase of TSI (0.1%) at solar maxima relative to solar minima. Models that include contributions from surface solar magnetism alone (i.e. sunspots, faculae and magnetic network) have been very successful at reproducing the observed TSI fluctuations on time scales shorter than a year, but leave some doubts as to the origin of the longer decadal fluctuations. In particular, one school of thought argues that surface magnetism alone can explain the entire TSI variance; see (Lean & al. 1998, ApJ, 492, 390), whereas; the other emphasizes on taking into account the effect of a global modulation of solar thermal structure by magnetic activity; see (Li & al. 2003, ApJ, 591, 1267). Observationally, the potential for the occurrence of magnetically-modulated global structural changes is supported by a positive correlation between p-mode oscillation frequencies and the TSI cycle as well as by recent evidence for a long-term trend in the TSI record that is not seen in indicators of surface magnetism; see (Bhatnagar & al. 1999, ApJ, 521, 885; Fröhlich 2013, Space Sci Rev,176, 237). Additionally, 1D structural solar models have demonstrated that the inclusion of a magnetically-modulated turbulent mechanism could explain the observed p-mode oscillation frequency changes with great accuracy. However, these models relied upon an ad-hoc parametrization of the alleged process and therefore obtaining a complete physical picture of the modulating mechanism requires solving the equations governing the self-consistent evolution of the solar plasma. Here we present a global magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulation of solar convection extending over more than a millennium that produces large-scale solar-like axisymmetric magnetic

  5. Study of cosmic-ray modulation during the recent deep solar minimum, mini maximum and intervening ascending phase of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, B.; Aslam, O. P. M.

    After a prolonged and deep solar minimum at the end of cycle 23, current solar cycle 24 is one of the very low active cycles, weakest cycle in more than 50 years. These two periods of deep minima and mini maxima are separated by a period of increasing solar activity as measured by sunspot numbers. We study the cosmic ray relationship with the solar activity, heliospheric plasma and field parameters including the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), during these three periods (phases) of different level and nature of solar activity; (a) a deep minimum, (b) an increasing period and (c) a ‘mini’ maximum. We utilize the neutron monitor data from stations located around the globe to study the rigidity dependence of modulation during the two extremes, i.e., minima and maxima. We also study the time lag between the GCR intensity and various solar/interplanetary parameters separately during the three activity phases. Using the cosmic ray data of neutron monitors with different cutoff rigidities, we study the rigidity dependence of time lag during individual phases. The role/effectiveness of various parameters, including the HCS tilt, in modulating the GCR intensity during the three different phases has also been studied by correlation analysis. The relative importance of various physical processes during different phases and the implication of these results for modulation models are also discussed.

  6. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  7. Solar Geometry

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    Solar Noon (GMT time) The time when the sun is due south in the ... and sunset.   Daylight average of hourly cosine solar zenith angles (dimensionless) The average cosine of the angle ... overhead during daylight hours.   Cosine solar zenith angle at mid-time between sunrise and solar noon ...

  8. Preliminary Result from an Observational and Modeling Study of Coronal Pseudostreamer Structure as a Solar Wind Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Gibson, S. E.; Fisk, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Unlike the polar coronal holes, which are the source of fast, cold solar wind, or helmet streamers, associated with slow, hot wind, the so-called "pseudostreamers" are still not well-categorized as a solar wind source, and the source of the slow- and intermediate- speed solar wind is still under debate. The solar wind proton mass flux, while exhibiting remarkable constancy across heliographic latitudes from pole to equator as measured by the Ulysses spacecraft, nevertheless showed departure from this constancy for some mid-latitude wind in the recent two solar minima. Such departures were most obvious during the 23-24 solar minimum and extended to high heliomagnetic latitudes. We examine the non-transient solar wind from Ulysses and ACE observations in the recent two solar minima, including solar wind magnetic flux, proton mass flux and velocity, and ionic composition O7+/O6+ as an indicator of coronal electron temperature, in order to analyze the solar wind exhibiting extremes in proton mass flux. The average proton speed of the extreme-mass-flux wind is in the slow to intermediate range. By applying potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) model to track the observed solar wind to the solar surface and comparing with the solar coronal structures there, we found there is a highly association between the sources of those slow- to intermediate-speed extreme-mass-flux solar wind and the low-latitude coronal holes and pseudostreamers structures. We will also discuss the observational constraints this study has placed on models of solar wind acceleration.

  9. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  10. Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  11. On the Current Solar Magnetic Activity using Its Behavior During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, Fadil; Simoniello, Rosaria; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads; Karoff, Christoffer; Olsen, Jesper; Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine

    2016-07-01

    Solar modulation potential (SMP) reconstructions based on cosmogenic nuclide records reflect changes in the open solar magnetic field and can therefore help us obtain information on the behavior of the open solar magnetic field over the Holocene period. Using the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ^{10}Be and IntCal13 ^{14}C records for the overlapping time period spanning between ˜1650 AD to 6600 BC, we first reconstructed the solar modulation potentials and subsequently investigate the statistics of peaks and dips simultaneously occurring in the two SMP reconstructions. Based on the distribution of these events, we propose a method to identify grand minima and maxima periods. We then aim at comparing the Sun's large-scale magnetic field behavior over the last three solar cycles with variations in the SMP reconstruction through the Holocene epoch. To achieve these objectives, we use the IntCal13 ^{14}C data to investigate distinct patterns in the occurrences of grand minima and maxima during the Holocene period. We then check whether these patterns might mimic the recent solar magnetic activity by investigating the evolution of the energy in the Sun's large-scale dipolar magnetic field using the Wilcox Solar Observatory data. The cosmogenic radionuclide data analysis shows that ˜71 % of grand maxima during the period from 6600 BC to 1650 AD were followed by a grand minimum. The characteristics of the occurrences of grand maxima and minima are consistent with the scenario in which the dynamical non-linearity induced by the Lorentz force leads the Sun to act as a relaxation oscillator. This finding implies that the probability for these events to occur is non-uniformly distributed in time, as there is a memory in their driving mechanism, which can be identified via the back-reaction of the Lorentz force.

  12. Effects in the radiation belts caused by the second adiabatic invariant violation in the presence of dayside off-equatorial magnetic field minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. E.; Gubar', Yu. I.; Kropotkin, A. P.

    Recent experiments (INTERBALL, POLAR) provided new substantial information concerning particle populations in the high-latitude near-magnetopause cusp regions with highly depressed magnetic field. We have studied adiabaticity violation of energetic particle bounce motion in those regions, which is due to nonmonotonous change in magnetic field intensity along field lines near the dayside magnetopause. The violation takes place at the separatrix dividing a region of transequatorial bounce oscillations from that of oscillations about high-latitude field minima. An invariant `jump' is evaluated. Diffusion over the second invariant associated with that jump can result in particle phase space redistribution during magnetic storms.

  13. Homebuilder's Guide to Going Solar (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-04-01

    A Homebuilder's Guide to Going Solar is designed to help you assess the benefits to your business and customers of installing solar equipment or making your houses solar-ready. The information comes from studies of builders who have successfully integrated solar into their operations as well as conversations with builders and solar professionals. These studies and conversations indicate that builders want to know: (1) Do solar economics work in my area? (2) If not, are there other reasons to go solar?; and (3) Is there a local support system of solar professionals I can call on to help me integrate solar seamlessly into my projects? This effort to educate builders about solar is a work in progress.

  14. Succession planning.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Thomas E

    2006-03-01

    This article provides the reader with an appreciation of the diverse elements that go into a buy-sell, affiliation, or merger situation for veterinary practices. In the changing market place of American veterinary medicine, old paradigms no longer hold comfort. The generational differences are briefly explored herein as well as the new economic realities. A few examples are offered to illustrate just how much variability exists in the current business of veterinary medicine and the subsequent practice transitions needed to enhance value. Functioning models are explored, as well as affiliation and merger options. Practice valuation is discussed in general terms, referencing the cutting-edge factors. The six-point summary provides almost all practices a solid operational base for daily operations and succession planning.

  15. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries.

    PubMed

    Owens, M J; Lockwood, M; Riley, P

    2017-01-31

    The most recent "grand minimum" of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650-1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth's magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  16. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries

    PubMed Central

    Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Riley, P.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent “grand minimum” of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650–1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth’s magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima. PMID:28139769

  17. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Riley, P.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent “grand minimum” of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650–1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth’s magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  18. Solar Eagle 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberto, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    During a 22-month period from February 1991 to December 1993, a dedicated group of students, faculty, and staff at California State University, Los Angeles completed a project to design, build, and race their second world class solar-powered electric vehicle, the Solar Eagle 2. This is the final report of that project. As a continuation of the momentum created by the success of the GM-sponsored Sunrayce USA in 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked up the banner from General Motors as sponsors of Sunrayce 93. In February 1991, the DOE sent a request for proposals to all universities in North America inviting them to submit a proposal outlining how they would design, build, and test a solar-powered electric vehicle for a seven-day race from Arlington, Texas to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to be held in June 1993. Some 70 universities responded. At the end of a proposal evaluation process, 36 universities including CSLA were chosen to compete. This report documents the Solar Eagle 2 project--the approaches take, what was learned, and how our experience from the first Solar Eagle was incorporated into Solar Eagle 2. The intent is to provide a document that would assist those who may wish to take up the challenge to build Solar Eagle 3.

  19. The solar aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is given in a popular manner of the solar powered aircraft Solair I. The achievements of the designer are detailed, and trial runs leading up to the first successful flight are given. Technical data of Solair I are listed, and brief news items about it are presented.

  20. Apoptotic effects of Physalis minima L. chloroform extract in human breast carcinoma T-47D cells mediated by c-myc-, p53-, and caspase-3-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kheng Leong; Tengku Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul; Lim, Chui Hun; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2010-03-01

    The chloroform extract of Physalis minima produced a significant growth inhibition against human T-47D breast carcinoma cells as compared with other extracts with an EC(50) value of 3.8 microg/mL. An analysis of cell death mechanisms indicated that the extract elicited an apoptotic cell death. mRNA expression analysis revealed the coregulation of apoptotic genes, that is, c-myc , p53, and caspase-3. The c-myc was significantly induced by the chloroform extract at the earlier phase of treatment, followed by p53 and caspase-3. Biochemical assay and ultrastructural observation displayed typical apoptotic features in the treated cells, including DNA fragmentation, blebbing and convolution of cell membrane, clumping and margination of chromatin, and production of membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. The presence of different stages of apoptotic cell death and phosphatidylserine externalization were further reconfirmed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Thus, the results from this study strongly suggest that the chloroform extract of P. minima induced apoptotic cell death via p53-, caspase-3-, and c-myc-dependent pathways.

  1. CAl2Be3(2-) and its salt complex LiCAl2Be3-: anionic global minima with planar pentacoordinate carbon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Bo; Duan, Yan; Lu, Hai-Gang; Li, Si-Dian

    2012-03-29

    Following the isoelectronic relationship in global minima planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) species (cationic CAl(5)(+), neutral CAl(4)Be, and monoanionic CAl(3)Be(2)(-)), we designed a dianionic ppC species C(2v) CAl(2)Be(3)(2-) (1a) and its salt complex C(2v) LiCAl(2)Be(3)(-) (2a) in this work. In combination with DFT and high-level ab initio calculations (CCSD(T)), the extensive exploration on their potential energy surfaces indicates that they are the global minima. Their kinetic stability was proved by two sets of 100 ps ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level. The detailed analyses indicate that the introduction of Li(+) into 1a only influences the electrovalent bonding (through changing of the charge distribution) and the σ aromaticity (through changing of the in-plane ring current), while the structures, the bonding properties, the π aromaticity, and so forth are almost unchanged. Nevertheless, the MO energy levels, the HOMO-LUMO gaps, and the values of vertical detachment energies (VDEs) all verify that the lithiation significantly improves the stability. We think the ppC dianion 1a is possible to detect directly in the gas-phase experiments, but it can be detected as its salt complex 2a more easily.

  2. Lead accumulation reduces photosynthesis in the lead hyper-accumulator Salvinia minima Baker by affecting the cell membrane and inducing stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Leal-Alvarado, Daniel A; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Sáenz-Carbonell, Luis; Talavera-May, Carlos; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker accumulates a fair amount of lead in its tissues; however, no studies have investigated the effect of lead on the physiological processes that affect photosynthesis in this species. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the high amounts of lead accumulated by S. minima can affect its photosynthetic apparatus. The physiological changes in the roots and leaves in response to lead accumulation were analyzed. An exposure to 40 μM Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h (first stage) was sufficient to reduce the photosynthetic rate (Pn) by 44%. This reduction in Pn was apparently the result of processes at various levels, including damage to the cell membranes (mainly in roots). Interestingly, although the plants were transferred to fresh medium without lead for an additional 24 h (second stage), Pn not only remained low, but was reduced even further, which was apparently related to stomatal closure, and may have led to reduced CO2 availability. Therefore, it can be concluded that lead exposure first decreases the photosynthetic rate by damaging the root membrane and then induces stomatal closure, resulting in decreased CO2 availability.

  3. On the Current Solar Magnetic Activity in the Light of Its Behaviour During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Simoniello, R.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.; Olsen, J.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2016-01-01

    Solar modulation potential (SMP) reconstructions based on cosmogenic nuclide records reflect changes in the open solar magnetic field and can therefore help us obtain information on the behaviour of the open solar magnetic field over the Holocene period. We aim at comparing the Sun's large-scale magnetic field behaviour over the last three solar cycles with variations in the SMP reconstruction through the Holocene epoch. To achieve these objectives, we use the IntCal13 14C data to investigate distinct patterns in the occurrences of grand minima and maxima during the Holocene period. We then check whether these patterns might mimic the recent solar magnetic activity by investigating the evolution of the energy in the Sun's large-scale dipolar magnetic field using the Wilcox Solar Observatory data. The cosmogenic radionuclide data analysis shows that {≈} 71 % of grand maxima during the period from 6600 BC to 1650 AD were followed by a grand minimum. The characteristics of the occurrences of grand maxima and minima are consistent with the scenario in which the dynamical non-linearity induced by the Lorentz force leads the Sun to act as a relaxation oscillator. This finding implies that the probability for these events to occur is non-uniformly distributed in time, as there is a memory in their driving mechanism, which can be identified via the back-reaction of the Lorentz force.

  4. Properties of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses at 1 AU during the Deep Minimum between Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y. Q.; Zuo, P. B.; Feng, X. S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Observations during the deep solar minimum between Solar Cycles 23 and 24 offer an opportunity for characterizing the nature of solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) under extreme solar activity. In this study, we identify 226 DPPs from July 2008 to June 2009 using an automatic detection algorithm based on high-resolution plasma data from the Wind spacecraft to investigate the features of DPPs during the deep solar minimum. For comparison, the similarities and differences of the statistical characteristics of the DPPs during the deep solar minimum and during the previous solar minimum are also examined. It is found that the number and the occurrence rate of DPPs during the deep solar minimum are only about one-third of those during the previous minimum, which may be attributed to lower solar wind dynamic pressure and weaker dynamic pressure fluctuations. From a statistical perspective, however, no obvious difference is apparent between the other basic DPP properties in the two solar minima, such as the absolute and relative amplitude of the dynamic pressure changes and the durations of the transition regions of DPPs. Other basic properties of the DPPs during the deep solar minimum are as follows: 1) the distribution of the absolute value of the dynamic pressure amplitude change peaks at 1.0 - 1.5 nPa, 2) the most probable relative pressure changes are 0.2 - 0.8, 3) DPP durations are broad-peaked between 150 s and 210 s with a mean of about 171 s, 4) 76.7 % of the DPPs can be considered as pressure balance structures, 5) dynamic pressure changes across DPPs are dominated by density changes, 6) specially, during the deep solar minimum, a considerable portion of DPPs, 86.7 %, are associated with large-scale solar wind transients such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and stream interaction regions (SIRs).

  5. Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Solar Energy's solar panels are collectors for a solar energy system which provides heating for a drive-in bank in Akron, OH. Collectors were designed and manufactured by Solar Energy Products, a firm established by three former NASA employees. Company President, Frank Rom, an example of a personnel-type technology transfer, was a Research Director at Lewis Research Center, which conducts extensive solar heating and cooling research, including development and testing of high-efficiency flat-plate collectors. Rom acquired solar energy expertise which helped the company develop two types of collectors, one for use in domestic/commercial heating systems and the other for drying grain.

  6. Interior design for passive solar homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  7. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  8. The influence of solar system oscillation on the variability of the total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yndestad, Harald; Solheim, Jan-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Total solar irradiance (TSI) is the primary quantity of energy that is provided to the Earth. The properties of the TSI variability are critical for understanding the cause of the irradiation variability and its expected influence on climate variations. A deterministic property of TSI variability can provide information about future irradiation variability and expected long-term climate variation, whereas a non-deterministic variability can only explain the past. This study of solar variability is based on an analysis of two TSI data series, one since 1700 A.D. and one since 1000 A.D.; a sunspot data series since 1610 A.D.; and a solar orbit data series from 1000 A.D. The study is based on a wavelet spectrum analysis. First, the TSI data series are transformed into a wavelet spectrum. Then, the wavelet spectrum is transformed into an autocorrelation spectrum to identify stationary, subharmonic and coincidence periods in the TSI variability. The results indicate that the TSI and sunspot data series have periodic cycles that are correlated with the oscillations of the solar position relative to the barycenter of the solar system, which is controlled by gravity force variations from the large planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. A possible explanation for solar activity variations is forced oscillations between the large planets and the solar dynamo. We find that a stationary component of the solar variability is controlled by the 12-year Jupiter period and the 84-year Uranus period with subharmonics. For TSI and sunspot variations, we find stationary periods related to the 84-year Uranus period. Deterministic models based on the stationary periods confirm the results through a close relation to known long solar minima since 1000 A.D. and suggest a modern maximum period from 1940 to 2015. The model computes a new Dalton-type sunspot minimum from approximately 2025 to 2050 and a new Dalton-type period TSI minimum from approximately 2040 to 2065.

  9. Successful Lecturing

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, H Liesel; Longworth, David L; Hewson, Mariana G; Stoller, James K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In a study conducted over 3 large symposia on intensive review of internal medicine, we previously assessed the features that were most important to course participants in evaluating the quality of a lecture. In this study, we attempt to validate these observations by assessing prospectively the extent to which ratings of specific lecture features would predict the overall evaluation of lectures. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS After each lecture, 143 to 355 course participants rated the overall lecture quality of 69 speakers involved in a large symposium on intensive review of internal medicine. In addition, 7 selected participants and the course directors rated specific lecture features and overall quality for each speaker. The relations among the variables were assessed through Pearson correlation coefficients and cluster analysis. Regression analysis was performed to determine which features would predict the overall lecture quality ratings. The features that most highly correlated with ratings of overall lecture quality were the speaker's abilities to identify key points (r = .797) and be engaging (r = .782), the lecture clarity (r = .754), and the slide comprehensibility (r = .691) and format (r = .660). The three lecture features of engaging the audience, lecture clarity, and using a case-based format were identified through regression as the strongest predictors of overall lecture quality ratings (R2= 0.67, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS We have identified core lecture features that positively affect the success of the lecture. We believe our findings are useful for lecturers wanting to improve their effectiveness and for educators who design continuing medical education curricula. PMID:10886470

  10. Solar and QBO Influences on the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), also known as the 30-60 day oscillation, is the strongest of the intraseasonal climate oscillations and consists of an eastward propagating pattern of alternately intense and weak tropical convection and precipitation. It has significant derivative effects on extratropical circulation and intraseasonal climate. Both the stratospheric quasi-biennial wind oscillation (QBO) and direct solar forcing of the upper stratosphere produce a change in tropical upwelling rate in the lower stratosphere, which results in a temperature change in the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere (UTLS). The solar- and QBO-induced temperature changes modify the static stability, which can affect the intensity of deep tropical convection. Temperature increases (during the QBO east phase at 50 hPa and during solar maxima) tend to decrease tropical convection intensity; the resulting reduced cloud heights produce a positive feedback in the form of increased outgoing longwave radiation, which further heats the UTLS. The opposite occurs during the QBO west phase (QBOW) and during solar minima (SMIN). Here, thirty-six years of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) amplitude and phase data covering the 1980-2015 period produced by the Japan Meteorological Agency (http://ds.data.jma.go.jp/tcc/tcc/products/clisys/mjo/figs/olr0-sst1_1980-2010/rmm8.csv) are analyzed to investigate the dependence of MJO occurrence rate on the phases of the QBO, the 11-year solar cycle (SC), and the solar rotational cycle (SRC). It is found that an MJO event with amplitude > 1.0 occurs about 10% more often under QBOW conditions than under QBOE conditions ( 17% in DJF; 13% in MAM; -5% in JJA; 16% in SON). The occurrence rate is 18% more often under QBOW/SMIN conditions than under QBOE/SMAX conditions ( 26% in DJF; 15% in MAM; -1% in JJA; 26% in SON). Superposed on this is an influence of peaks and minima of the SRC under solar maximum conditions on the occurrence rate of the MJO in the

  11. Investigation of Solar Cyclic and Climatic Trends in Upper Atmospheric Hydrogen Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Susan; Mierkiewicz, Edwin; Roesler, Fred; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Burns, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We will discuss work in progress to better understand solar cyclic and climatic influences on hydrogenous species budgets and distributions from both an observational and modeling perspective. Our Fabry-Perot observations of upper atmospheric hydrogen emissions during solar cycle 23 and during three solar minima (1985, 1997, 2006-2008) establish a reference data set of highly precise, consistently calibrated, thermospheric + exospheric hydrogen column emission observations from Northern mid-latitudes that can be used to compare with future observations and with atmospheric models. We will also discuss use of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's global mean model for sensitivity studies to investigate the response of thermospheric hydrogen to a doubling of carbon dioxide and methane. The results from this study suggest a strong solar cycle dependence and that carbon dioxide cooling may have a greater impact upon the changes in the upper atmospheric hydrogen distribution at solar minimum than do methane increases.

  12. ON THE OCCURRENCE OF THE THIRD-ORDER SCALING IN HIGH LATITUDE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Bruno, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.; Veltri, P.

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence and nature of a nonlinear energy cascade within the intermediate scales of solar wind Alfvenic turbulence represents an important open issue. Using in situ measurements of fast, high latitude solar wind taken by the Ulysses spacecraft at solar minima, it is possible to show that a nonlinear energy cascade of imbalanced turbulence is only observed when the solar wind owns peculiar properties. These are the reduction of the local correlation between velocity and magnetic field (weak cross-helicity); the presence of large-scale velocity shears; and the steepening and extension down to low frequencies of the turbulent spectra. Our observations suggest the important role of both large-scale velocity and Alfvenicity of the field fluctuations for the validation of the Yaglom law in solar wind turbulence.

  13. Radial evolution of the solar wind from IMP 8 to Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.; Paularena, Karolen I.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Belcher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 and Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 data from 1977 through 1994 are presented and compared. Radial velocity and temperature structures remain intact over the distance from 1 to 43 AU, but density structures do not. Temperature and velocity changes are correlated and nearly in phase at 1 AU, but in the outer heliosphere temperature changes lead velocity changes by tens of days. Solar cycle variations are detected by both spacecraft, with minima in flux density and dynamic pressure near solar maxima. Differences between Voyager 2 and IMP 8 observations near the solar minimum in 1986-1987 are attributed to latitudinal gradients in solar wind properties. Solar rotation variations are often present even at 40 AU. The Voyager 2 temperature profile is best fit with a R(exp -0.49 +/- 0.01) decrease, much less steep than an adiabatic profile.

  14. Solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, V.M.

    1981-11-01

    Practical applications of solar energy in commercial, industrial and institutional buildings are considered. Two main types of solar collectors are described: flat plate collectors and concentrating collectors. Efficiency of air and hydronic collectors among the flat plate types are compared. Also several concentrators are described, including their sun tracking mechanisms. Descriptions of some recent solar installations are presented and a list representing the cross section of solar collector manufacturers is furnished.

  15. Solar holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludman, Jacques E.; Riccobono, Juanita R.; Caulfield, H. John; Upton, Timothy D.

    2002-07-01

    A solar photovoltaic energy collection system using a reflection hologram is described herein. The system uses a single-axis tracking system in conjunction with a spectral- splitting holographic element. The hologram accurately focuses the desired regions of the solar spectrum to match the bandgaps of two ro more different solar cells, while diverting unused IR wavelengths away. Other applications for solar holography include daylighting and greenhouses.

  16. Lagrangian least-squares prediction of solar flux (F-bar 10.7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, R. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The result of a study on the application of an improved statistical prediction method for estimating the intermediate-term (months) and long-term (years) behavior of solar flux is discussed. The study indicates that better predictions, in a chi square sense, are possible by selecting sets of the solar flux data such that each set (cycle) starts and ends at the maxima (or minima) for the data base and initialization point of the procedure. Then one applies a Lagrangian least-squares statistical technique. Evidence is also presented to support the existence of an aperiodic variation in the periods as well as the amplitudes.

  17. Long-term Trend of Solar Coronal Hole Distribution from 1975 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.; Satonaka, D.; Hakamada, K.

    2016-08-01

    We developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes using potential magnetic field extrapolation in the solar corona to construct a database of coronal holes appearing from 1975 February to 2015 July (Carrington rotations from 1625 to 2165). Coronal holes are labeled with the location, size, and average magnetic field of each coronal hole on the photosphere and source surface. As a result, we identified 3335 coronal holes and found that the long-term distribution of coronal holes shows a similar pattern known as the magnetic butterfly diagram, and polar/low-latitude coronal holes tend to decrease/increase in the last solar minimum relative to the previous two minima.

  18. Solar reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D. C.

    1981-02-17

    A solar reflector having a flexible triangular reflective sheet or membrane for receiving and reflecting solar energy therefrom. The reflector is characterized by the triangular reflective sheet which is placed under tension thereby defining a smooth planar surface eliminating surface deflection which heretofore has reduced the efficiency of reflectors or heliostats used in combination for receiving and transmitting solar energy to an absorber tower.

  19. Solar Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  20. Buying Solar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  1. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  2. Successful Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R.

    2012-12-01

    In an observational science, it is not possible to test hypotheses through controlled laboratory experiments. One can test parts of the system in the lab (as is done routinely with infrared spectroscopy of greenhouse gases), but the collective behavior cannot be tested experimentally because a star or planet cannot be brought into the lab; it must, instead, itself be the lab. In the case of anthropogenic global warming, this is all too literally true, and the experiment would be quite exciting if it weren't for the unsettling fact that we and all our descendents for the forseeable future will have to continue making our home in the lab. There are nonetheless many routes though which the validity of a theory of the collective behavior can be determined. A convincing explanation must not be a"just-so" story, but must make additional predictions that can be verified against observations that were not originally used in formulating the theory. The field of Earth and planetary climate has racked up an impressive number of such predictions. I will also admit as "predictions" statements about things that happened in the past, provided that observations or proxies pinning down the past climate state were not available at the time the prediction was made. The basic prediction that burning of fossil fuels would lead to an increase of atmospheric CO2, and that this would in turn alter the Earth's energy balance so as to cause tropospheric warming, is one of the great successes of climate science. It began in the lineage of Fourier, Tyndall and Arrhenius, and was largely complete with the the radiative-convective modeling work of Manabe in the 1960's -- all well before the expected warming had progressed far enough to be observable. Similarly, long before the increase in atmospheric CO2 could be detected, Bolin formulated a carbon cycle model and used it to predict atmospheric CO2 out to the year 2000; the actual values come in at the high end of his predicted range, for

  3. Influence of solar activity on the state of the wheat market in medieval England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustil'Nik, Lev A.; Din, Gregory Yom

    2004-09-01

    The database of professor Rogers (1887), which includes wheat prices in England in the Middle Ages, was used to search for a possible influence of solar activity on the wheat market. Our approach was based on the following: (1) Existence of the correlation between cosmic ray flux entering the terrestrial atmosphere and cloudiness of the atmosphere. (2) Cosmic ray intensity in the solar system changes with solar activity, (3) Wheat production depends on weather conditions as a nonlinear function with threshold transitions. (4) A wheat market with a limited supply (as it was in medieval England) has a highly nonlinear sensitivity to variations in wheat production with boundary states, where small changes in wheat supply could lead to bursts of prices or to prices falling. We present a conceptual model of possible modes for sensitivity of wheat prices to weather conditions, caused by solar cycle variations, and compare expected price fluctuations with price variations recorded in medieval England. We compared statistical properties of the intervals between wheat price bursts during the years 1249-1703 with statistical properties of the intervals between the minima of solar cycles during the years 1700-2000. We show that statistical properties of these two samples are similar, both for characteristics of the distributions and for histograms of the distributions. We analyze a direct link between wheat prices and solar activity in the 17th century, for which wheat prices and solar activity data (derived from 10Be isotope) are available. We show that for all 10 time moments of the solar activity minima the observed prices were higher than prices for the corresponding time moments of maximal solar activity (100% sign correlation, on a significance level < 0.2%). We consider these results a direct evidence of the causal connection between wheat prices bursts and solar activity.

  4. Growth arrest and induction of apoptotic and non-apoptotic programmed cell death by, Physalis minima L. chloroform extract in human ovarian carcinoma Caov-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kheng Leong; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2010-03-02

    The decoction of the whole plant of Physalis minima L. is traditionally consumed to treat cancer. Its anticancer property has been previously verified (using in vitro cytotoxicity assays) against NCI-H23 lung, CORL23 lung and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines but the mechanism underlying the anticancer potency towards ovarian carcinoma cells remain unclear. The present study is aimed to systematically determine the cytotoxicity and possible cell death mechanism elicited by the chloroform extract of Physalis minima in human ovarian Caov-3 carcinoma. Cytotoxicity of the extract was measured using the methylene blue assay. The mechanism of cell death was determined using four independent methods, namely DeadEnd assay to label the DNA fragmentation nuclei cells, RT-PCR analysis to determine the mRNA expression level of three apoptotic genes (c-myc, p53 and caspase-3 genes), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis to describe the ultra structural characteristics and annexin V and propidium iodide staining to confirm the types and stages of cell deaths. Cytotoxicity screening of the extract on Caov-3 cells exhibited concentration- and time-dependent inhibitory effects. A combination of apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death was detected. The apoptotic characteristic was initially determined by DNA fragmentation followed by the expression of c-myc and p53 genes that was much earlier than caspase-3. Apoptotic ultra structural changes (including clumping and magination of chromatin, blebbing and convolution of nucleus membrane and formation of apoptotic bodies) and autophagy (Type II non-apoptotic programmed cell death) with distinct vacuolated morphology were detected in TEM analysis. The existence of these programmed cell deaths was then corroborated using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The chloroform extract of Physalis minima exerted anticancer effect due to a combination of apoptotic and autophagic cell death mechanisms on Caov-3 cells. The

  5. Solar Cycle Variability Induced by Tilt Angle Scatter in a Babcock–Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark

    2017-09-01

    We present results from a three-dimensional Babcock–Leighton (BL) dynamo model that is sustained by the emergence and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). On average, each BMR has a systematic tilt given by Joy’s law. Randomness and nonlinearity in the BMR emergence of our model produce variable magnetic cycles. However, when we allow for a random scatter in the tilt angle to mimic the observed departures from Joy’s law, we find more variability in the magnetic cycles. We find that the observed standard deviation in Joy’s law of {σ }δ =15^\\circ produces a variability comparable to the observed solar cycle variability of ∼32%, as quantified by the sunspot number maxima between 1755 and 2008. We also find that tilt angle scatter can promote grand minima and grand maxima. The time spent in grand minima for {σ }δ =15^\\circ is somewhat less than that inferred for the Sun from cosmogenic isotopes (about 9% compared to 17%). However, when we double the tilt scatter to {σ }δ =30^\\circ , the simulation statistics are comparable to the Sun (∼18% of the time in grand minima and ∼10% in grand maxima). Though the BL mechanism is the only source of poloidal field, we find that our simulations always maintain magnetic cycles even at large fluctuations in the tilt angle. We also demonstrate that tilt quenching is a viable and efficient mechanism for dynamo saturation; a suppression of the tilt by only 1°–2° is sufficient to limit the dynamo growth. Thus, any potential observational signatures of tilt quenching in the Sun may be subtle.

  6. Solar driven climate changes recorded in Holocene alpine speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisia, S.; Borsato, A.; Preto, N.; McDermott, F.

    2003-04-01

    Inter-annual variations in the growth rate of three annually laminated speleothems from Grotta di Ernesto, an alpine cave located at 1160 m a.s.l. in northern Italy, reveal significant periodicities at ca. 1/11 and 1/22 cycles/yr, related to changes in solar irradiance. Additional frequency components may be related to the influence of NAO/AO mode changes. In the late Holocene, reduced calcite deposition during historic minima of solar output is indicative of the influence of solar forcing on Alpine climate and environment. Annual growth laminae thickness, controlled by cave drip-water supersaturation with respect to calcite, primarily reflects changes in soil pCO_2 production modulated by incoming solar radiation. The preservation of high-frequency signals, and the rapid response of speleothem climate proxy series to changes in solar radiation, favor atmospheric amplification of solar variability, rather than mechanisms involving changes in oceanic circulation. In the early- to mid-Holocene, only the lower frequency components of solar variability are preserved. Periods of reduced calcite deposition roughly correspond to the ca. 10^3-yrs-scale cycles of North Atlantic drift-ice records. Lowest growth rates are recorded at about 3200 and 6800 years BP. If the lamina thickness-climate relationships assessed for the Recent (through present-day monitoring, and by correlation with 200 years of instrumental records) held also for the mid and early Holocene, these episodes were characterized by very cold winters and relatively dry summers.

  7. THE MAGNETIC CLASSIFICATION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS 1992–2015

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Norton, A. A.

    2016-03-20

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity; however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.

  8. Solar Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The instrument pictured is an inexpensive solar meter which is finding wide acceptance among architects, engineers and others engaged in construction of solar energy facilities. It detects the amount of solar energy available at a building site, information necessary to design the most efficient type of solar system for a particular location. Incorporating technology developed by NASA's Lewis Research Center, the device is based upon the solar cell, which provides power for spacecraft by converting the sun's energy to electricity. The meter is produced by Dodge Products, Inc., Houston, Texas, a company formed to bring the technology to the commercial marketplace.

  9. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  10. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams.

  11. GPP Webinar: The Solar Roadmap—Navigating the Evolving Solar Energy Market

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    GPP and State & Local Climate and Energy Branch webinar on the Solar Roadmap and the evolving solar energy market. This webinar discussed local and state government’s success stories and opportunities for progress in renewable energy goals using the Solar

  12. Characteristics of the Global Ionosphere During the Solar Minimum of Cycle 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, G.; Lee, H.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The last solar minimum period was anomalously low and lasted long compared with previous solar minima. The resulting solar irradiance received in the Earth's upper atmosphere was extremely low and therefore it can readily be expected that the upper atmosphere should be greatly affected by this low solar activity. It has been well reported that the thermospheric temperature was cooler and the density was lower during the last solar minimum than the previous solar minimum periods. The low solar irradiance should also affect the ionosphere, not only via the lower ion-electron production but also through the interactions with the thermosphere that was greatly influenced by the low solar irradiance. In this study, we utilized the measurements of total electron content (TEC) from the TOPEX and JASON-1 satellites for the precious solar minimum and the last solar minimum, respectively, in order to investigate the differences between the ionospheric TECs during the two minimum periods. For this investigation, we first made a comparison between TOPEX and JASON TECs to confirm that they produced identical TECs during the overlap period of the two satellite missions and can be considered as a single TEC observation. Next, the global ionospheric TEC maps are produced during the last two solar minimums for different seasons and the results of the comparison will be discussed, in particular, in relation to the thermospheric changes during the same periods.

  13. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  14. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  15. Solar Sailing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  16. Global minima of (C 60) nCa 2+, (C 60) nF - and (C 60) nI - clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rojas, J.; Bretón, J.; Llorente, J. M. Gomez; Wales, D. J.

    2005-07-01

    Likely candidates for the lowest potential energy minima of (C 60) nCa 2+, (C 60) nF - and (C 60) nI - clusters are located using basin-hopping global optimisation. In each case, the potential energy surface is constructed using the Girifalco form for the C 60 intermolecular interaction, an averaged Lennard-Jones C 60-ion interaction, and a polarisation potential, which depends on the first few non-vanishing C 60 multipole polarisabilities. We find that the ions generally occupy the interstitial sites of a (C 60) n cluster, the coordination shell being tetrahedral for Ca 2+ and F -. The I - ion has an octahedral coordination shell in the global minimum for (C 60) 6I -, however for 12 ⩾ n ⩾ 8 the preferred coordination geometry is trigonal prismatic.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence for the coexistence of tetragonal and trigonal minima within the exited state adiabatic potential energy surfaces of hexachlorotellurate and -selenate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremers, C.; Degen, J.

    1998-11-01

    Coexistence of Jahn-Teller minima resulting from the coupling to different accepting modes within the adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) is not possible within the framework of linear vibronic coupling theory. For the lowest exited triplet state 3T1u of inorganic complexes with s2 electronic ground-state configuration, such a coexistence, due to quadratic coupling effects, is discussed. As a direct experimental evidence two vibronic progressions with different accepting modes in the emission spectra resulting from a single electronic state are observed in the emission spectra of the title compounds. The observation of vibronic finestructure in the emission spectra of [TeCl6]2- is reported for the first time.

  18. Cost-effective, species-specific microsatellite development for the endangered Dwarf Bulrush (Typha minima) using next-generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Csencsics, Daniela; Brodbeck, Sabine; Holderegger, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The dwarf bulrush (Typha minima Funck ex Hoppe) is an endangered pioneer plant species of riparian flood plains. In Switzerland, only 3 natural populations remain, but reintroductions are planned. To identify suitable source populations for reintroductions, we developed 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers with perfect repeats using the 454 pyrosequencing technique and tested them on 20 individuals with low-cost M13 labeling. We detected 2 to 7 alleles per locus and found expected and observed heterozygosities of 0.05-0.76 and 0.07-1, respectively. The whole process was finished in less than 6 weeks and cost approximately USD 5000. Due to low costs and reduced expenditure of time, the use of next-generation sequencing techniques for microsatellite development represent a powerful tool for population genetic studies in nonmodel species, as we show in this first application of the approach to a plant species of conservation importance.

  19. Critical behavior of the number of minima of a random landscape at the glass transition point and the Tracy-Widom distribution.

    PubMed

    Fyodorov, Yan V; Nadal, Celine

    2012-10-19

    We exploit a relation between the mean number N(m) of minima of random Gaussian surfaces and extreme eigenvalues of random matrices to understand the critical behavior of N(m) in the simplest glasslike transition occuring in a toy model of a single particle in an N-dimensional random environment, with N>1. Varying the control parameter μ through the critical value μ(c) we analyze in detail how N(m)(μ) drops from being exponentially large in the glassy phase to N(m)(μ)~1 on the other side of the transition. We also extract a subleading behavior of N(m)(μ) in both glassy and simple phases. The width δμ/μ(c) of the critical region is found to scale as N(-1/3) and inside that region N(m)(μ) converges to a limiting shape expressed in terms of the Tracy-Widom distribution.

  20. Solar cycle dependence of the distribution of solar wind in-situ plasma parameters, and how this drives solar wind-magnetosphere coupling parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, Elizabeth; Chapman, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    Climate is the statistical distribution of observed weather and we thus expect the climate of space weather to vary with the solar cycle of activity. The 11-year solar cycle is irregular, with each cycle exhibiting a unique duration and peak activity. The distinct activity of each cycle is then coupled from the Sun to the Earth's magnetosphere via the solar wind, leading to long-term trends in the statistics of space weather. Here, we introduce the data quantile-quantile (DQQ) plot as a model-independent method for tracing solar cycle changes in the likelihood of observing a given energy flow in the solar wind. We apply the method to 1-minute resolution Wind data spanning the minima and maxima of cycles 23 and 24 [1]. We consider in-situ solar wind plasma parameters in fast and slow solar wind such as the magnetic energy density and the Poynting flux and how these influence commonly used solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions such as Akasofu's ɛ parameter. The core of the plasma parameter distributions retains a log-normal functional form simply varying in amplitude with the solar cycles, in agreement with previous work [e.g. 2] and suggestive of a multiplicative underlying physical process consistent with turbulence. The DQQ method also identifies the threshold energy flux at which solar wind plasma parameters depart from the lognormal regime; this 'extremal' component exhibits its own dependence on the solar cycle which is distinct between fast and slow wind. How the solar wind plasma parameter distributions vary, and how this variation is reflected in that of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions, is different between fast and slow solar wind. We can use this approach to compare different solar wind-magnetosphere coupling parameters to determine which, and under what conditions, are most sensitive to these solar cycle solar wind changes. [1] Tindale, E., and S.C. Chapman (2016), Geophys. Res. Lett., 43(11), doi: 10.1002/2016GL068920. [2] Burlaga

  1. An analysis of interplanetary space radiation exposure for various solar cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; O'Neill, P. M.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The radiation dose received by crew members in interplanetary space is influenced by the stage of the solar cycle. Using the recently developed models of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) environment and the energy-dependent radiation transport code, we have calculated the dose at 0 and 5 cm water depth; using a computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, we have calculated the skin, eye and blood-forming organ (BFO) doses as a function of aluminum shielding for various solar minima and maxima between 1954 and 1989. These results show that the equivalent dose is within about 15% of the mean for the various solar minima (maxima). The maximum variation between solar minimum and maximum equivalent dose is about a factor of three. We have extended these calculations for the 1976-1977 solar minimum to five practical shielding geometries: Apollo Command Module, the least and most heavily shielded locations in the U.S. space shuttle mid-deck, center of the proposed Space Station Freedom cluster and sleeping compartment of the Skylab. These calculations, using the quality factor of ICRP 60, show that the average CAM BFO equivalent dose is 0.46 Sv/year. Based on an approach that takes fragmentation into account, we estimate a calculation uncertainty of 15% if the uncertainty in the quality factor is neglected.

  2. Amylase production by Preussia minima, a fungus of endophytic origin: optimization of fermentation conditions and analysis of fungal secretome by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental screening programs are used to find new enzymes that may be utilized in large-scale industrial processes. Among microbial sources of new enzymes, the rationale for screening fungal endophytes as a potential source of such enzymes relates to the hypothesised mutualistic relationship between the endophyte and its host plant. There is a need for new microbial amylases that are active at low temperature and alkaline conditions as these would find industrial applications as detergents. Results An α-amylase produced by Preussia minima, isolated from the Australian native plant, Eremophilia longifolia, was purified to homogeneity through fractional acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, followed by DEAE-Sepharose ion exchange chromatography. The purified α-amylase showed a molecular mass of 70 kDa which was confirmed by zymography. Temperature and pH optima were 25°C and pH 9, respectively. The enzyme was activated and stabilized mainly by the metal ions manganese and calcium. Enzyme activity was also studied using different carbon and nitrogen sources. It was observed that enzyme activity was highest (138 U/mg) with starch as the carbon source and L-asparagine as the nitrogen source. Bioreactor studies showed that enzyme activity was comparable to that obtained in shaker cultures, which encourages scale-up fermentation for enzyme production. Following in-gel digestion of the purified protein by trypsin, a 9-mer peptide was sequenced and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The partial amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme presented similarity to α-amylase from Magnaporthe oryzae. Conclusions The findings of the present study indicate that the purified α-amylase exhibits a number of promising properties that make it a strong candidate for application in the detergent industry. To our knowledge, this is the first amylase isolated from a Preussia minima strain of endophytic origin. PMID:24602289

  3. Physalin F from Physalis minima L. triggers apoptosis-based cytotoxic mechanism in T-47D cells through the activation caspase-3- and c-myc-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kheng Leong; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2013-10-28

    Physalin F (a secosteroid derivative), is well recognized as a potent anticancer compound from Physalis minima L., a plant that is traditionally used to treat cancer. However, the exact molecular anticancer mechanism remains to be elucidated. We have recently reported the apoptosis-based cytotoxic effect of the chloroform extract of this plant. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity and possible cell death mechanism elicited by the active constituent, physalin F on human breast T-47D carcinoma. Cytotoxic-guided fractionation of the chloroform extract of Physalis minima has led to the isolation of physalin F. The cytotoxicity activity was assayed using MTS assay. The effect of the compound to induce apoptosis was determined by biochemical and morphological observations through DeadEnd Colorimetric and annexin V assays, respectively, and RT-PCR analysis of mRNA expression of the apoptotic-associated genes. Cytotoxicity screening of physalin F displayed a remarkable dose-dependent inhibitory effect on T-47D cells with lower EC50 value (3.60 μg/ml) than the crude extract. mRNA expression analysis revealed the co-regulation of c-myc- and caspase-3-apoptotic genes in the treated cells with the peak expression at 9 and 12h of treatment, respectively. This apoptotic mechanism is reconfirmed by DNA fragmentation and phosphatidylserine externalization. These findings indicate that physalin F may potentially act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent by triggering apoptosis mechanism via the activation of caspase-3 and c-myc pathways in T-47D cells. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amylase production by Preussia minima, a fungus of endophytic origin: optimization of fermentation conditions and analysis of fungal secretome by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Zaferanloo, Bita; Bhattacharjee, Shatabdi; Ghorbani, Mahmood M; Mahon, Peter J; Palombo, Enzo A

    2014-03-07

    Environmental screening programs are used to find new enzymes that may be utilized in large-scale industrial processes. Among microbial sources of new enzymes, the rationale for screening fungal endophytes as a potential source of such enzymes relates to the hypothesised mutualistic relationship between the endophyte and its host plant. There is a need for new microbial amylases that are active at low temperature and alkaline conditions as these would find industrial applications as detergents. An α-amylase produced by Preussia minima, isolated from the Australian native plant, Eremophilia longifolia, was purified to homogeneity through fractional acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, followed by DEAE-Sepharose ion exchange chromatography. The purified α-amylase showed a molecular mass of 70 kDa which was confirmed by zymography. Temperature and pH optima were 25°C and pH 9, respectively. The enzyme was activated and stabilized mainly by the metal ions manganese and calcium. Enzyme activity was also studied using different carbon and nitrogen sources. It was observed that enzyme activity was highest (138 U/mg) with starch as the carbon source and L-asparagine as the nitrogen source. Bioreactor studies showed that enzyme activity was comparable to that obtained in shaker cultures, which encourages scale-up fermentation for enzyme production. Following in-gel digestion of the purified protein by trypsin, a 9-mer peptide was sequenced and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The partial amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme presented similarity to α-amylase from Magnaporthe oryzae. The findings of the present study indicate that the purified α-amylase exhibits a number of promising properties that make it a strong candidate for application in the detergent industry. To our knowledge, this is the first amylase isolated from a Preussia minima strain of endophytic origin.

  5. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  6. GPP Webinar: Solar Procurement Templates and Tools for Higher Education

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Green Power Partnership webinar on solar procurement for Higher Education which features various tools and templates that schools can use to shape and manage the solar procurement process to a successful outcome.

  7. Solar drum positioner mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The need for additional power on spinning satellites required development of deployable solar arrays activated, as on a 3-axis vehicle, after separation from a booster or shuttle orbiter. Mechanisms were developed for telescopically extending a secondary 36.3 kg (80 lb.), 2.13 m (84 in.) diameter spinning solar drum for a distance of 2.0 m (80 in.) or more along the spin axis. After extension, the system has the capability of dynamically controlling the drum tilt angle about the spin axis to provide precision in-orbit balancing of the spacecraft. This approach was selected for the SBS, ANIK C, ANIK D, WESTAR B and PALAPA B satellites. It was successfully demonstrated during the in orbit deployment of the aft solar panels of the SBS F-3 and F-1 satellites, subsequent to the November 1980 and September 1981 launches.

  8. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  9. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  10. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  11. Solar small-scale dynamo and polarity of sunspot groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, D.; Khlystova, A.; Abramenko, V.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify a possible role of small-scale dynamo in formation of solar magnetic field, we suggest an observational test for small-scale dynamo action based on statistics of anti-Hale sunspot groups. As we have shown, according to theoretical expectations the small-scale dynamo action has to provide a population of sunspot groups which do not follow the Hale polarity law, and the density of such groups on the time-latitude diagram is expected to be independent on the phase of the solar cycle. Correspondingly, a percentage of the anti-Hale groups is expected to reach its maximum values during solar minima. For several solar cycles, we considered statistics of anti-Hale groups obtained by several scientific teams, including ours, to find that the percentage of anti-Hale groups becomes indeed maximal during a solar minimum. Our interpretation is that this fact may be explained by the small-scale dynamo action inside the solar convective zone.

  12. Solar wind proton flux extremes and their association with pseudostreamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Gibson, Sarah E.; Fisk, Lennard A.

    2013-06-01

    Proton flux, as defined by the product of proton number density and proton speed, while exhibiting remarkable constancy across heliographic latitudes from pole to equator as measured by the Ulysses spacecraft, nevertheless showed obvious departure from this constancy for some mid-latitude wind and extended to high heliomagnetic latitudes during the recent two solar minima. We examine the solar wind exclusive of ICMEs from Ulysses and ACE observations, to analyze the solar wind in-situ data exhibiting extremes in proton flux. We first find these extreme-proton-flux winds generally originate in latitudes middle-distant from the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), and they have relatively slower speed than the bulk of the solar wind. Then we map the in-situ ACE observations in Carrington rotation (CR) 1997 back to the solar surface by using the Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) model, in order to consider the coronal properties at the extreme-proton-flux wind sources. We find there is a clear association between these extreme-proton-flux solar wind and the mid-latitude coronal holes and "pseudostreamer" structures.

  13. Data Assimilation and Uncertainties in Early Solar Cycle Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina

    2017-08-01

    Stochastic nature of solar activity variations together with our limited knowledge of the dynamo mechanism and subsurface dynamics causes uncertainty in predictions of the solar cycle. For improving the physics-based predictions we can take advantage of the mathematical data assimilation approach that allows us to take into account both, observational errors and model uncertainties, and provide estimates of the next solar cycle along with prediction uncertainties. In this study we use the Parker's migratory dynamo model together with the equation of magnetic helicity balance, which reproduces main properties of the sunspot cycles and allow us to minimize discrepancies between the observed global activity variations and the model solution. The test simulation runs show that a reliable prediction can be obtained for two phases of preceding solar cycle: 1) if the polar field reversals shortly after the solar maxima (strong toroidal field and weak poloidal field), and 2) during the solar minima (strongest poloidal and weak toroidal fields). The early estimate of Cycle 25 obtained by this method shows that this cycle will start in 2019 - 2020, reach the maximum in 2023 - 2024, and that the mean sunspot number at the maximum will be about 90 (for the v2.0 sunspot number series).

  14. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  15. Solar diameter measurements from eclipses as a solar variability proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David W.; Sofia, Sabatino; Guhl, Konrad; Herald, David

    The widths of total solar eclipse paths depends on the diameter of the Sun, so if observations are obtained near both the northern and southern limits of the eclipse path, in principle, the angular diameter of the Sun can be measured. Concerted efforts have been made to obtain contact timings from locations near total solar eclipse path edges since the mid 19th century, and Edmund Halley organized a rather successful first effort in 1715. Members of IOTA have been making increasingly sophisticated observations of the Baily's bead phenomena near central solar eclipse path edges since 1970.

  16. Estimate solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.; West, B. J.

    2005-12-01

    We study, by using a wavelet decomposition methodology, the solar signature on global surface temperature data using the ACRIM total solar irradiance satellite composite by Willson and Mordvinov. These data present a +0.047% per decade trend between minima during solar cycles 21-23 (1980-2002). By using the phenomenological climate sensitivity to a 22-year cycle, we estimate that the ACRIM upward trend might have contributed 10-30% of the global surface temperature warming over the period 1980-2002. Moreover, by comparing the phenomenological climate sensitivity to the 11-year solar cycle with those hypothesized by some energy balance models we conclude that the former is 1.5-3 times stronger than the latter. Finally, we study the climate sensitivity in different regions of the Earth.

  17. Influence of solar activity on Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influx of solar energy to different latitudes while Jupiter's orbital motion around the Sun varies significantly. This leads to a change in the optical and physical characteristics of its atmosphere. Analysis of the data for 1850-1991 on determination of the integral magnitude Mj Jupiter in the V filter, and a comparison with the changes of the Wolf numbers W, characterizing the variations of solar activity (SA) - showed that the change of Mj in maxima of the SA - has minima for odd, and maximums - for the even of SA cycles. That is, changing of the Jupiter brightness in visible light is much evident 22.3-year magnetic cycle, and not just about the 11.1-year cycle of solar activity. Analysis of the obtained in 1960-2015 data on the relative distribution of brightness along the central meridian of Jupiter, for which we calculated the ratio of the brightness Aj of northern to the southern part of the tropical and temperate latitudinal zones, allowed to approximate the change of Aj by sinusoid with a period of 11.91±0.07 earth years. Comparison of time variation of Aj from changes in the index of SA R, and the movement of the planet in its orbit - indicates the delay of response of the visible cloud layer in the atmosphere of the Sun's exposure mode for 6 years. This value coincides with the radiative relaxation of the hydrogen-helium atmosphere

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR CYCLES 22-24

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of three-dimensional evolution of solar wind density turbulence and speed at various levels of solar activity between solar cycles 22 and 24. The solar wind data used in this study have been obtained from the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made at the Ooty Radio Telescope, operating at 327 MHz. Results show that (1) on average, there was a downward trend in density turbulence from the maximum of cycle 22 to the deep minimum phase of cycle 23; (2) the scattering diameter of the corona around the Sun shrunk steadily toward the Sun, starting from 2003 to the smallest size at the deepest minimum, and it corresponded to a reduction of {approx}50% in the density turbulence between the maximum and minimum phases of cycle 23; (3) the latitudinal distribution of the solar wind speed was significantly different between the minima of cycles 22 and 23. At the minimum phase of solar cycle 22, when the underlying solar magnetic field was simple and nearly dipole in nature, the high-speed streams were observed from the poles to {approx}30 Degree-Sign latitudes in both hemispheres. In contrast, in the long-decay phase of cycle 23, the sources of the high-speed wind at both poles, in accordance with the weak polar fields, occupied narrow latitude belts from poles to {approx}60 Degree-Sign latitudes. Moreover, in agreement with the large amplitude of the heliospheric current sheet, the low-speed wind prevailed in the low- and mid-latitude regions of the heliosphere. (4) At the transition phase between cycles 23 and 24, the high levels of density and density turbulence were observed close to the heliospheric equator and the low-speed solar wind extended from the equatorial-to-mid-latitude regions. The above results in comparison with Ulysses and other in situ measurements suggest that the source of the solar wind has changed globally, with the important implication that the supply of mass and energy from the Sun to the interplanetary

  19. Solar neutrino spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Michael

    2017-04-01

    More than forty years after the first detection of neutrinos from the Sun, the spectroscopy of solar neutrinos has proven to be an on-going success story. The long-standing puzzle about the observed solar neutrino deficit has been resolved by the discovery of neutrino flavor oscillations. Today's experiments have been able to solidify the standard MSW-LMA oscillation scenario by performing precise measurements over the whole energy range of the solar neutrino spectrum. This article reviews the enabling experimental technologies: On the one hand multi-kiloton-scale water Cherenkov detectors performing measurements in the high-energy regime of the spectrum, on the other end ultrapure liquid-scintillator detectors that allow for a low-threshold analysis. The current experimental results on the fluxes, spectra and time variation of the different components of the solar neutrino spectrum will be presented, setting them in the context of both neutrino oscillation physics and the hydrogen fusion processes embedded in the Standard Solar Model. Finally, the physics potential of state-of-the-art detectors and a next generation of experiments based on novel techniques will be assessed in the context of the most interesting open questions in solar neutrino physics: a precise measurement of the vacuum-matter transition curve of electron-neutrino oscillation probability that offers a definitive test of the basic MSW-LMA scenario or the appearance of new physics; and a first detection of neutrinos from the CNO cycle that will provide new information on solar metallicity and stellar physics.

  20. Solar System Educators Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, R.

    2004-11-01

    The Solar System Educators Program is a nationwide network of highly motivated teachers who lead workshops that show other teachers in their local communities how to successfully incorporate NASA materials and research into their classes. Currently there are 57 Solar System Educators in 37 states whose workshops are designed to assist their fellow teachers in understanding and including standards-based NASA materials into their classroom activities. Solar System Educators attend a training institute during their first year in the program and have the option of attending subsequent annual institutes. The volunteers in this program receive additional web-based mission-specific telecon trainings in conjunction with the Solar System Ambassadors. Resource and handout materials in the form of DVDs, posters, pamphlets, fact sheets, postcards and bookmarks are also provided. Scientists can get involved with this program by partnering with the Solar System Educators in their regions, presenting at their workshops and mentoring these outstanding volunteers. This formal education program helps optimize project funding set aside for education through the efforts of these volunteer master teachers. At the same time, teachers become familiar with NASA's educational materials with which to inspire students into pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

  1. OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The description, development history, test history, and orbital performance analysis of the OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory are presented. The OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory was the sixth flight model of a series of scientific spacecraft designed to provide a stable platform for experiments engaged in the collection of solar and celestial radiation data. The design objective was 180 days of orbital operation. The OSO-6 has telemetered an enormous amount of very useful experiment and housekeeping data to GSFC ground stations. Observatory operation during the two-year reporting period was very successful except for some experiment instrument problems.

  2. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image On June 10, 2002 the Moon obscured the central portion of the solar disk in a phenomenon known as an ... in which 99.6 percent of the solar disk was shadowed by the Moon, was situated in the central Pacific Ocean. Since there are no populated ...

  3. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... a solar eclipse where an observer on Earth can watch the Moon's shadow obscure more than 90% the Sun's disk, the Multiangle Imaging ... total solar eclipse of November 23, 2003. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow began in the Indian Ocean in the far Southern Hemisphere, ...

  4. Solar Sprint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  5. Solar Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Frank; Williams, Robert H.

    1975-01-01

    As fossil fuels decrease in availability and environmental concerns increase, soalr energy is becoming a potential major energy source. Already solar energy is used for space heating in homes. Proposals for solar-electric generating systems include land-based or ocean-based collectors and harnessing wind and wave power. Photosynthesis can also…

  6. Solar Sprint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  7. Solar cooking

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over two billion people face fuel wood shortages, causing tremendous personal and environmental stress. Over 4 million people die prematurely from indoor air pollution. Solar cooking can reduce fuel wood consumption and indoor air pollution. Solar cooking has been practiced and published since th...

  8. Solar Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Frank; Williams, Robert H.

    1975-01-01

    As fossil fuels decrease in availability and environmental concerns increase, soalr energy is becoming a potential major energy source. Already solar energy is used for space heating in homes. Proposals for solar-electric generating systems include land-based or ocean-based collectors and harnessing wind and wave power. Photosynthesis can also…

  9. Simulations of Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    chromosphere, and erupting plasma is released outward into the solar corona.A second comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Global InfluencesAfter demonstrating that their models could successfully lead to jet production and propagation, Szente and collaborators compared their results to actual observations of solar jets. The authors constructed simulated EUV and X-ray observations of their modeled events, and they verified that the behavior and structures in these simulated observations were very similar to real observations of coronal jet events from telescopes like SDO/AIA and Hinode.With this confirmed, the authors then used their models to determine how the jets influence the global solar corona and the solar wind. They found that the large-scale corona is significantly affected by the plasma waves from the jet, which travel across 40 in latitude and out to 24 solar radii. In spite of this, the simulated jets contributed only a few percent to the steady-state solar-wind energy outflow.These simulations represent an important step in realistic modeling of the quiet Sun. Because the models make specific predictions about temperature and density gradients within the corona, we can look forward to testing them with upcoming missions like Solar Probe Plus, which should be able to explore the Sun all the way down to ninesolar radii.CitationJ. Szente et al 2017 ApJ 834 123. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/123

  10. A Probable Approx. 2400 Year Solar Quasi-cycle in Atmospheric Delta C-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Jirikowic, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A 2200 to 2600 year quasi-periodicity is present in atmospheric delta C-14 records after removal of long-term trends due to the geomagnetic dipole amplitude variation. This periodicity consists of both a long-term variation of the mean and a superposed, approximately recurring pattern of century-scale variations. The strongest of these latter variations occur near maxima of the approx. 2400 year delta C-14 cycles. The residual record can be modeled to first order as an amplitude modulation of a century-scale periodic forcing function by a approx. 2400 year periodic forcing function. During the last millennium, the largest century-scale variations (occurring near the most recent 2400 year delta C-14 maximum) are known to be mainly a consequence of the pronounced Maunder, Sporer, and Wolf solar activity minima, as verified by independent proxy solar activity records. Therefore, during this period, amplitude modulation has been occurring primarily in the sun and not in the terrestrial radiocarbon system. It is therefore inferred that the approx. 2400 year forcing function is mainly solar although some secondary terrestrial feedback into the delta C-14 record is likely. This conclusion has implications for the predictability of future pronounced solar activity minima and for the interpretation of certain minor Holocene climatic variations.

  11. THE SOLAR WIND AND INTERPLANETARY FIELD DURING VERY LOW AMPLITUDE SUNSPOT CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. Jr. E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil

    2013-02-10

    Cosmogenic isotope records indicate that a solar-cycle modulation persists through extended periods of very low sunspot activity. One immediate implication is that the photospheric field during such grand minima did not consist entirely of ephemeral regions, which produce a negligible amount of open magnetic flux, but continued to have a large-scale component originating from active regions. Present-day solar and heliospheric observations show that the solar wind mass flux and proton density at the coronal base scale almost linearly with the footpoint field strength, whereas the wind speed at Earth is uncorrelated with the latter. Thus a factor of {approx}4-7 reduction in the total open flux, as deduced from reconstructions of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the Maunder Minimum, would lead to a similar decrease in the solar wind densities, while leaving the wind speeds largely unchanged. We also demonstrate that a decrease in the strengths of the largest active regions during grand minima will reduce the amplitude of the Sun's equatorial dipole relative to the axial component, causing the IMF strength to peak near sunspot minimum rather than near sunspot maximum, a result that is consistent with the phase shift observed in the {sup 10}Be record during the Maunder Minimum. Finally, we discuss the origin of the 5 yr periodicity sometimes present in the cosmogenic isotope data during low and medium amplitude cycles.

  12. Performance of the IRI-2007 Model for Topside Ion Density and Composition Profiles During the 23/24 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Simoes, F.; Ivanov, S.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.; Bilitza, D.; Heelis, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24 was unusually extended and deep, resulting in an ionosphere that is significantly different from that expected based on previous solar minima. The ion density and composition estimates from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite are used to evaluate the performance of the IRI-2007 model between 400 and 850 kIn altitude in equatorial regions. The current model is shown to typically overestimate the expected topside density of 0+ and underestimate the density of H+ during 2008 and 2009. The overestimation of ion density by IRI-2007 is found to vary with local time and longitude.

  13. Predicting Major Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are two examples of major explosions from the surface of the Sun but theyre not the same thing, and they dont have to happen at the same time. A recent study examines whether we can predict which solar flares will be closely followed by larger-scale CMEs.Image of a solar flare from May 2013, as captured by NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]Flares as a Precursor?A solar flare is a localized burst of energy and X-rays, whereas a CME is an enormous cloud of magnetic flux and plasma released from the Sun. We know that some magnetic activity on the surface of the Sun triggers both a flare and a CME, whereas other activity only triggers a confined flare with no CME.But what makes the difference? Understanding this can help us learn about the underlying physical drivers of flares and CMEs. It also might help us to better predict when a CME which can pose a risk to astronauts, disrupt radio transmissions, and cause damage to satellites might occur.In a recent study, Monica Bobra and Stathis Ilonidis (Stanford University) attempt to improve our ability to make these predictions by using a machine-learning algorithm.Classification by ComputerUsing a combination of 6 or more features results in a much better predictive success (measured by the True Skill Statistic; higher positive value = better prediction) for whether a flare will be accompanied by a CME. [Bobra Ilonidis 2016]Bobra and Ilonidis used magnetic-field data from an instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to build a catalog of solar flares, 56 of which were accompanied by a CME and 364 of which were not. The catalog includes information about 18 different features associated with the photospheric magnetic field of each flaring active region (for example, the mean gradient of the horizontal magnetic field).The authors apply a machine-learning algorithm known as a binary classifier to this catalog. This algorithm tries to predict, given a set of features

  14. Ultrasonic Bonding of Solar-Cell Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rolling ultrasonic spot-bonding method successfully joins aluminum interconnect fingers to silicon solar cells with copper metalization. Technique combines best features of ultrasonic rotary seam welding and ultrasonic spot bonding: allows fast bond cycles and high indexing speeds without use of solder or flux. Achieves reliable bonds at production rates without damage to solar cells. Bonding system of interest for all solar-cell assemblies and other assemblies using flat leads (rather than round wires).

  15. Ultrasonic Bonding of Solar-Cell Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rolling ultrasonic spot-bonding method successfully joins aluminum interconnect fingers to silicon solar cells with copper metalization. Technique combines best features of ultrasonic rotary seam welding and ultrasonic spot bonding: allows fast bond cycles and high indexing speeds without use of solder or flux. Achieves reliable bonds at production rates without damage to solar cells. Bonding system of interest for all solar-cell assemblies and other assemblies using flat leads (rather than round wires).

  16. Detoxification of Cr(VI) in Salvinia minima is related to seasonal-induced changes of thiols, phenolics and antioxidative enzymes.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carolina; Pagano, Eduardo; Prado, Fernando; Rosa, Mariana

    2012-11-15

    In this study, protein- and non-protein-thiol-containing compounds (THCC), soluble phenolics (SP), proline (Pro), proteins and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and antioxidative enzyme activities were analyzed in floating and submerged leaves of Salvinia minima to establish their role against Cr-induced oxidative stress. We analyzed relationships among biochemical responses to different Cr(VI) concentrations to explore underlying mechanisms of Cr detoxification in plants growing under field conditions during summer and winter seasons. Significant increases in THCC were observed in submerged leaves from both seasons, while in floating leaves THCC increased only in summer being decreased in winter. Contrarily SP increased in floating leaves and decreased in submerged ones. MDA increased significantly in winter-leaves, but in summer-leaves remained unchanged. Antioxidative enzymes, i.e. guaiacol peroxidase (G-POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) showed different activity patterns. G-POD significantly increased in Cr-treated leaves from both seasons, while SOD increased in submerged leaves only, remaining practically unchanged in floating ones. CAT activity increased in floating leaves from both seasons, whereas in submerged ones was decreased or increased. Proteins increased in both leaf types during summer whereas decreased or remained unchanged in winter. Pro increased in winter-submerged leaves only. Results show that seasonal-induced changes occur in all measured parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytotoxic Activities of Physalis minima L. Chloroform Extract on Human Lung Adenocarcinoma NCI-H23 Cell Lines by Induction of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ooi Kheng; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima L. is reputed for having anticancer property. In this study, the chloroform extract of this plant exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activities on NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell line at dose- and time-dependent manners (after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation). Analysis of cell-death mechanism demonstrated that the extract exerted apoptotic programed cell death in NCI-H23 cells with typical DNA fragmentation, which is a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. Morphological observation using transmission electron microscope (TEM) also displayed apoptotic characteristics in the treated cells, including clumping and margination of chromatins, followed by convolution of the nuclear and budding of the cells to produce membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. Different stages of apoptotic programed cell death as well as phosphatidylserine externalization were confirmed using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, acute exposure to the extract produced a significant regulation of c-myc, caspase-3 and p53 mRNA expression in this cell line. Due to its apoptotic effect on NCI-H23 cells, it is strongly suggested that the extract could be further developed as an anticancer drug.

  18. Correlation between the variation in observed melting temperatures and structural motifs of the global minima of gallium clusters: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Susan, Anju; Kibey, Aniruddha; Kaware, Vaibhav; Joshi, Kavita

    2013-01-07

    We have investigated the correlation between the variation in the melting temperature and the growth pattern of small positively charged gallium clusters. Significant shift in the melting temperatures was observed for a change of only few atoms in the size of the cluster. Clusters with size between 31-42 atoms melt between 500-600 K whereas those with 46-48 atoms melt around 800 K. Density functional theory based first principles simulations have been carried out on Ga(n)(+) clusters with n = 31, ..., 48. At least 150 geometry optimizations have been performed towards the search for the global minima for each size resulting in about 3000 geometry optimizations. For gallium clusters in this size range, the emergence of spherical structures as the ground state leads to higher melting temperature. The well-separated core and surface shells in these clusters delay isomerization, which results in the enhanced stability of these clusters at elevated temperatures. The observed variation in the melting temperature of these clusters therefore has a structural origin.

  19. Cytotoxic Activities of Physalis minima L. Chloroform Extract on Human Lung Adenocarcinoma NCI-H23 Cell Lines by Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ooi Kheng; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima L. is reputed for having anticancer property. In this study, the chloroform extract of this plant exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activities on NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell line at dose- and time-dependent manners (after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation). Analysis of cell-death mechanism demonstrated that the extract exerted apoptotic programed cell death in NCI-H23 cells with typical DNA fragmentation, which is a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. Morphological observation using transmission electron microscope (TEM) also displayed apoptotic characteristics in the treated cells, including clumping and margination of chromatins, followed by convolution of the nuclear and budding of the cells to produce membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. Different stages of apoptotic programed cell death as well as phosphatidylserine externalization were confirmed using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, acute exposure to the extract produced a significant regulation of c-myc, caspase-3 and p53 mRNA expression in this cell line. Due to its apoptotic effect on NCI-H23 cells, it is strongly suggested that the extract could be further developed as an anticancer drug. PMID:19541726

  20. Analytic evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling terms at the MR-CI level. II. Minima on the crossing seam: formaldehyde and the photodimerization of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Dallos, Michal; Lischka, Hans; Shepard, Ron; Yarkony, David R; Szalay, Peter G

    2004-04-22

    The method for the analytic calculation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector at the multireference configuration-interaction (MR-CI) level and its program implementation into the COLUMBUS program system described in the preceding paper [Lischka et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7322 (2004)] has been combined with automatic searches for minima on the crossing seam (MXS). Based on a perturbative description of the vicinity of a conical intersection, a Lagrange formalism for the determination of MXS has been derived. Geometry optimization by direct inversion in the iterative subspace extrapolation is used to improve the convergence properties of the corresponding Newton-Raphson procedure. Three examples have been investigated: the crossing between the 1(1)B1/2(1)A1 valence states in formaldehyde, the crossing between the 2(1)A1/3(1)A1 pi-pi* valence and ny-3py Rydberg states in formaldehyde, and three crossings in the case of the photodimerization of ethylene. The methods developed allow MXS searches of significantly larger systems at the MR-CI level than have been possible before and significantly more accurate calculations as compared to previous complete-active space self-consistent field approaches.

  1. Effect of seasonality and Cr(VI) on starch-sucrose partitioning and related enzymes in floating leaves of Salvinia minima.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mariana; Prado, Carolina; Chocobar-Ponce, Silvana; Pagano, Eduardo; Prado, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    Effects of seasonality and increasing Cr(VI) concentrations on leaf starch-sucrose partitioning, sucrose- and starch-related enzyme activities, and carbon allocation toward leaf development were analyzed in fronds (floating leaves) of the floating fern Salvinia minima. Carbohydrates and enzyme activities of Cr-exposed fronds showed different patterns in winter and summer. Total soluble sugars, starch, glucose and fructose increased in winter fronds, while sucrose was higher in summer ones. Starch and soluble carbohydrates, except glucose, increased under increasing Cr(VI) concentrations in winter fronds, while in summer ones only sucrose increased under Cr(VI) treatment. In summer fronds starch, total soluble sugars, fructose and glucose practically stayed without changes in all assayed Cr(VI) concentrations. Enzyme activities related to starch and sucrose metabolisms (e.g. ADPGase, SPS, SS and AI) were higher in winter fronds than in summer ones. Total amylase and cFBPase activities were higher in summer fronds. Cr(VI) treatment increased enzyme activities, except ADPGase, in both winter and summer fronds but no clear pattern changes were observed. Data of this study show clearly that carbohydrate metabolism is differently perturbed by both seasonality and Cr(VI) treatment in summer and winter fronds, which affects leaf starch-sucrose partitioning and specific leaf area (SLA) in terms of carbon investment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation between the variation in observed melting temperatures and structural motifs of the global minima of gallium clusters: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, Anju; Kibey, Aniruddha; Kaware, Vaibhav; Joshi, Kavita

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the correlation between the variation in the melting temperature and the growth pattern of small positively charged gallium clusters. Significant shift in the melting temperatures was observed for a change of only few atoms in the size of the cluster. Clusters with size between 31-42 atoms melt between 500-600 K whereas those with 46-48 atoms melt around 800 K. Density functional theory based first principles simulations have been carried out on Ga+n clusters with n = 31, …, 48. At least 150 geometry optimizations have been performed towards the search for the global minima for each size resulting in about 3000 geometry optimizations. For gallium clusters in this size range, the emergence of spherical structures as the ground state leads to higher melting temperature. The well-separated core and surface shells in these clusters delay isomerization, which results in the enhanced stability of these clusters at elevated temperatures. The observed variation in the melting temperature of these clusters therefore has a structural origin.

  3. Solar sail

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, K.E.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a solar sail propulsion system comprising: solar sail means for intercepting light pressure to produce thrust, the solar sail means being a thin metal film; tension truss means having two ends attached at one end to the solar sail means for transferring the thrust from the solar sail and for preventing gross deformation of the solar sail under light pressure, the solar sail means being a plurality of separate generally two-dimensional pieces joined by springs to the tension truss means; a payload attached to the other end of the tension truss means, the tension truss means comprising a plurality of attachment means for attaching shroud lines to the top of the tension truss means and a plurality of the shroud lines attached to the attachment means at one of their ends and the payload at the other; a plurality of reel means attached to the shroud lines for controllably varying the length of the lines; and a plurality of reflective panel means attached to the sail means for controlling the orientation of the system.

  4. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    This report first describes the different types of solar ponds including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. It then discusses the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds, and compares the economics of salty and saltless ponds as a function of salt cost. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirements is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  5. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löptien, Björn; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Blanco Rodríguez, Julián; Cally, Paul S.; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H.; Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-12-01

    performance for helioseismology applications. As input we used a 6 hr time-series of realistic solar magneto-convection simulation (Stagger code) and the SPINOR radiative transfer code to synthesize the observables. The simulated power spectra of solar oscillations show that the instrument is suitable for helioseismology. In particular, the specified point spread function, image jitter, and photon noise are no obstacle to a successful mission.

  6. Solar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Bech-Thomsen, N; Thomsen, K

    1995-11-01

    A case of solar pruritus is reported. Severe pruritus of the back, shoulders and upper lateral aspects of the arms, without any eruption, developed in a 28-year-old outdoor worker during 4 to 6 weeks of intensive solar exposure. The pruritus was intense and described as a burning sensation deep in the skin. Only a few excoriations and slight xerosis were found. Solar pruritus or brachioradial pruritus is a condition primarily seen in Caucasian people living in the tropics or subtropics. Previously the disease has only been reported once outside these areas.

  7. Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power on demand to the local utility, Southern California Edison Company. It can do so because it operates not only during sunny parts of the day, but it can store enough thermal energy from the sun to operate during cloudy periods and after dark, for up to three hours, at its rated output of 10 megawatts (MW). For the first time ever, a utility scale solar power plant can supply electricity when the utility needs it most, to satisfy the energy requirements of its customers.

  8. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar panel designs that utilize new high-efficiency solar cells and lightweight rigid panel technologies are described. The resulting designs increase the specific power (W/kg) achievable in the near-term and are well suited to meet the demands of higher performance small satellites (smallsats). Advanced solar panel designs have been developed and demonstrated on two NASA SBIR contracts at Applied Solar. The first used 19% efficient, large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells with a lightweight rigid graphite epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A 1,445 cm(exp 2) coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 60 W/kg with a high potential of achieving 80 W/kg. The second panel design used new 22% efficiency, dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with a lightweight aluminum core/graphite fiber mesh facesheet substrate. A 1,445 cm(exp 2) coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 105 W/kg with the potential of achieving 115 W/kg. This paper will address the construction details for the GaAs/isogrid and dual-junction GaAs/carbon mesh panel configurations. These are ultimately sized to provide 75 Watts and 119 Watts respectively for smallsats or may be used as modular building blocks for larger systems. GaAs/isogrid and dual-junction GaAs/carbon mesh coupons have been fabricated and tested to successfully demonstrate critical performance parameters and results are also provided here.

  9. Solar pond technology for Navy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L. C. P.; Major, W. R.

    1985-04-01

    Many of the Navy and Marine Corps bases have potential for thermal solar pond systems that can cost-effectively displace existing thermal and electrical loads. The salt-gradient solar pond offers a simple method of collecting solar insulation while providing its own storage medium for the energy collected. The economic attractiveness of a solar pond is enhanced by this feature; however, the viability of a given application is dependent on site attributes and requirements. For the salt-gradient solar pond, site specific features such as solar radiation, siting area, type of load to be displaced, and availability of salt, clay, and water are important factors affecting the success of each application. An investigation of current salt-gradient solar pond technology was conducted and a preliminary technical and economic analysis was performed for a proposed application at the Marine Corps Logistics Base, Barstow, California.

  10. A new method for forecasting the solar cycle descent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Sai Ramesh, Durbha

    2015-08-01

    The prediction of an extended solar minimum is extremely important because of the severity of its impact on the near-earth space. Here, we present a new method for predicting the descent time of the forthcoming solar cycle (SC); the method is based on the estimation of the Shannon entropy. We use the daily and monthly smoothed international sunspot number. For each nth SC, we compute the parameter [Tpre]n by using information on the descent and ascent times of the n - 3th and nth SCs, respectively. We find that [Tpre] of nth SC and entropy can be effectively used to predict the descent time of the n + 2th SC. The correlation coefficient between [Td]n+2 - [Tpre]n and [E]n is found to be 0.95. Using these parameters the prediction model is developed. Solar magnetic field and F10.7 flux data are available for SCs 21-22 and 19-23, respectively, and they are also utilized to get estimates of the Shannon entropy. It is found that the Shannon entropy, a measure of randomness inherent in the SC, is reflected well in the various proxies of the solar activity (viz sunspot, magnetic field, F10.7 flux). The applicability and accuracy of the prediction model equation is verified by way of association of least entropy values with the Dalton minimum. The prediction model equation also provides possible criteria for the occurrence of unusually longer solar minima.

  11. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  12. Austin, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Austin, Texas, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Antonio, TX, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  14. Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Houston, TX, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  15. Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Knoxville, TN, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  16. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Ann Arbor, Michigan, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  17. Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Berkeley, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  18. San Jose, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Jose, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. Madison, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Madison, WI, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  20. Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Denver, Colorado, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  1. Tucson, Arizona: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Tucson, AZ, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  2. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  3. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Seattle, WA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  4. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Milwaukee, WI, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  5. New Orleans, Louisiana: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of New Orleans, LA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  6. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Francisco, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  7. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Philadelphia, PA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  8. San Diego, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Diego, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  9. Sacramento, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Sacramento, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  10. Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Orlando, FL, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  11. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Pittsburgh, PA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  12. Santa Rosa, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Santa Rosa, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. High resolution reconstruction of solar prominence images observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yong-yuan; Liu, Zhong; Jin, Zhen-yu

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution image showing fine structures is crucial for understanding the nature of solar prominence. In this paper, high resolution imaging of solar prominence on the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is introduced, using speckle masking. Each step of the data reduction especially the image alignment is discussed. Accurate alignment of all frames and the non-isoplanatic calibration of each image are the keys for a successful reconstruction. Reconstructed high resolution images from NVST also indicate that under normal seeing condition, it is feasible to carry out high resolution observations of solar prominence by a ground-based solar telescope, even in the absence of adaptive optics.

  14. Solar chulha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  15. Solar chulha

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-06

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  16. Solar Nexus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jim

    1980-01-01

    The design team for the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has pushed the state of the energy art to its current limits for the initial phase, with provisions for foreseeable and even speculative future applications. (Author/MLF)

  17. Solar fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viitanen, M.

    1990-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a review concerning the storage of solar energy by converting it to chemical energy. This is based on several articles published during the last fifteen years. The methods to convert solar energy to chemical energy, e.g., to produce hydrogen, can be divided into three different methods. The most common one is probably the usage of solar cells; thus the solar energy is first converted into electrical energy and further the water is split electrochemically to produce hydrogen. It could be also done in a photoelectrochemical cell, or simply photochemically. A photobiological system can also be considered as a photochemical system, although it is discussed separately from the photochemical systems. These three last mentioned methods will be discussed in this paper.

  18. Solar Triumvirate

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-09

    The magnetic field lines of three active regions in close proximity to one another interacted with each other over two and a half days Feb. 8-10, 2016. This image is from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  19. Solar Forcing of Climate. 2: Evidence from the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, Gerard J. M.

    2005-10-01

    The nature of the climatic response to solar forcing and its geographical coherence is reviewed. This information is of direct relevance for evaluating solar forcing mechanisms and validating climate models. Interpretation of Sun-climate relationships is hampered by difficulties in (1) translating proxy records into quantitative climate parameters (2) obtaining accurate age assessments (3) elucidating spatial patterns and relationships (4) separating solar forcing from other forcing mechanisms (5) lacking physical understanding of the solar forcing mechanisms. This often limits assessment of past solar forcing of climate to identification of correlations between environmental change and solar variability. The noisy character and often insufficient temporal resolution of proxy records often exclude the detection of high frequency decadal and bi-decadal cycles. However, on multi-decadal and longer time scales, notably the ˜90 years Gleisberg, and ˜200 years Suess cycles in the 10Be and 14C proxy records of solar activity are also well presented in the environmental proxy records. The additional ˜1500 years Bond cycle may result from interference between centennial-band solar cycles. Proxy evidence for Sun-climate relations is hardly present for Africa, South America and the marine realm; probably more due to a lack of information than a lack of response to solar forcing. At low latitudes, equatorward movement of the ITCZ (upward component of the Hadley cell) occurs upon a decrease in solar activity, explaining humidity changes for (1) Mesoamerica and adjacent North and South American regions and (2) East Africa and the Indian and Chinese Monsoon systems. At middle latitudes equatorward movement of the zonal circulation during solar minima probably (co-)induces wet and cool episodes in Western Europe, and Terra del Fuego as well as humidity changes in Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the Mediterranean. The polar regions seem to expand during solar minima

  20. Solar cycle dependence of High-Intensity Long-Duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) events, relativistic electron predictors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, R.; Echer, E.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2013-09-01

    Long-Duration, Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) events are studied using long-term geomagnetic and solar wind/interplanetary databases. We use the strict definition of a HILDCAA event, that it occurs outside of the main phase of a magnetic storm, the peak AE is >1000 nT, and the duration is at least 2 days long. One hundred thirty-three events have been identified from the AE indices in the 1975 to 2011 interval, a ~3½ solar cycle span. Of the 133 events, 99 had simultaneous interplanetary data available. The overwhelmed majority (94%) of these latter cases were associated with high-speed solar wind stream (HSS) events. The remaining 6% of the cases occurred after the passage of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The HSS-related events were typically associated with large interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz variances. The ICME-related events were characterized by steady southward Bz intervals or low-frequency fluctuations, both of which we view as possible different interplanetary phenomena. HILDCAA events have been found to have their largest occurrence frequency in the solar cycle descending phase (~6.8/year) with the second largest at solar minimum (~3.5/year). The occurrence frequencies were considerably lower in the ascending phase (~2.5/year) and at solar maximum (~2.2/year). Thus, HILDCAAs can occur during all phases of the solar cycle, with the descending phase approximately three times more likely to have an event than at solar maximum and the ascending phase. The HILDCAA events that occurred in the declining phase and at solar minimum were >20% longer in duration than those in the ascending phase and solar maximum, respectively. The events during the recent solar and geomagnetic minima, 2007-2009, were, on the average, ~17% and 14% weaker in peak AE than the events during the previous two minima of 1995-1997 and 1985-1987, respectively. The recent minimum events were ~35% and 41% shorter in durations, respectively, than the events during

  1. Possible influence of climate factors on the reconstruction of the cosmogenic isotope 14C production rate in the earth's atmosphere and solar activity in past epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, A. I.; Dergachev, V. A.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Ogurtsov, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The paper considers the probable influence of variations of the global temperature and carbon dioxide concentration in the Earth's atmosphere on the results of reconstruction of the production rate of the cosmogenic isotope 14C in the terrestrial atmosphere for the period from the early 15th to the mid 19th century. This time interval covers the Spörer, Maunder, and Dalton minima of solar activity, as well as the Little Ice Age. It was shown that the climate changes that occurred during the Little Ice Age should be taken into account. In the Maunder and Spörer minima of solar activity, the 14C generation rate may be comparable to the values for the Dalton minimum, while exclusion of the climate effect yields extremely large values of the 14C production rate for these grand minima. In the solar activity reconstruction for past epochs, this circumstance should be taken into consideration via measurements of the 14C concentration on a long time scale.

  2. Solar Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pique, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Proposed pump moves liquid by action of bubbles formed by heat of sun. Tube of liquid having boiling point of 100 to 200 degrees F placed at focal axis of cylindrical reflector. Concentrated sunlight boils liquid at focus, and bubbles of vapor rise in tube, carrying liquid along with them. Pressure difference in hot tube sufficient to produce flow in large loop. Used with conventional flat solar heating panel in completely solar-powered heat-storage system.

  3. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  4. Solar Physics at Evergreen: Solar Dynamo and Chromospheric MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.; Maxwell, J.; Song, N.; Dikpati, M.

    2006-12-01

    We describe our five year old solar physics research program at The Evergreen State College. Famed for its cloudy skies, the Pacific Northwest is an ideal location for theoretical and remote solar physics research activities. Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip polarity every 11 years or so? How does this contribute to the magnetic storms Earth experiences when the Sun's field reverses? Why is the temperature in the Sun's upper atmosphere millions of degrees higher than the Sun's surface temperature? How do magnetic waves transport energy in the Sun’s chromosphere and the Earth’s atmosphere? How does solar variability affect climate change? Faculty and undergraduates investigate questions such as these in collaboration with the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder. We will describe successful student research projects, logistics of remote computing, and our current physics investigations into (1) the solar dynamo and (2) chromospheric magnetohydrodynamics.

  5. ISS Solar Array Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  6. Solar Schematic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The home shown at right is specially designed to accommodate solar heating units; it has roof planes in four directions, allowing placement of solar collectors for best exposure to the sun. Plans (bottom) and complete working blueprints for the solar-heated house are being marketed by Home Building Plan Service, Portland, Oregon. The company also offers an inexpensive schematic (center) showing how a homeowner only moderately skilled in the use of tools can build his own solar energy system, applicable to new or existing structures. The schematic is based upon the design of a low-cost solar home heating system built and tested by NASA's Langley Research Center; used to supplement a warm-air heating system, it can save the homeowner about 40 percent of his annual heating bill for a modest investment in materials and components. Home Building Plan Service saved considerable research time by obtaining a NASA technical report which details the Langley work. The resulting schematic includes construction plans and simplified explanations of solar heat collection, collectors and other components, passive heat factors, domestic hot water supply and how to work with local heating engineers.

  7. Solar synthesis of advanced materials: A solar industrial program initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A.

    1992-06-01

    This is an initiative for accelerating the use of solar energy in the advanced materials manufacturing industry in the United States. The initiative will be based on government-industry collaborations that will develop the technology and help US industry compete in the rapidly expanding global advanced materials marketplace. Breakthroughs in solar technology over the last 5 years have created exceptional new tools for developing advanced materials. Concentrated sunlight from solar furnaces can produce intensities that approach those on the surface of the sun and can generate temperatures well over 2000{degrees}C. Very thin layers of illuminated surfaces can be driven to remarkably high temperatures in a fraction of a second. Concentrated solar energy can be delivered over large areas, allowing for rapid processing and high production rates. By using this technology, researchers are transforming low-cost raw materials into high-performance products. Solar synthesis of advanced materials uses bulk materials and energy more efficiently, lowers processing costs, and reduces the need for strategic materials -- all with a technology that does not harm the environment. The Solar Industrial Program has built a unique, world class solar furnace at NREL to help meet the growing need for applied research in advanced materials. Many new advanced materials processes have been successfully demonstrated in this facility, including the following: Metalorganic deposition, ceramic powders, diamond-like carbon materials, rapid heat treating, and cladding (hard coating).

  8. Solar Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown here is one of the first images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander of one of the octagonal solar panels, which opened like two handheld, collapsible fans on either side of the spacecraft. Beyond this view is a small slice of the north polar terrain of Mars.

    The successfully deployed solar panels are critical to the success of the 90-day mission, as they are the spacecraft's only means of replenishing its power. Even before these images reached Earth, power readings from the spacecraft indicated to engineers that the solar panels were already at work recharging the spacecraft's batteries.

    Before deploying the Surface Stereo Imager to take these images, the lander waited about 15 minutes for the dust to settle.

    This image was taken by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol, or Martian day, 0 (May 25, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Solar Power Grid Unfurled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown here is one of the first images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander of one of the octagonal solar panels, which opened like two handheld, collapsible fans on either side of the spacecraft. Beyond this view is a small slice of the north polar terrain of Mars.

    The successfully deployed solar panels are critical to the success of the 90-day mission, as they are the spacecraft's only means of replenishing its power. Even before these images reached Earth, power readings from the spacecraft indicated to engineers that the solar panels were already at work recharging the spacecraft's batteries.

    Before deploying the Surface Stereo Imager to take these images, the lander waited about 15 minutes for the dust to settle.

    This image was taken by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol, or Martian day, 0 (May 25, 2008).

    This image has been geometrically corrected.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Solar Power Grid Unfurled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown here is one of the first images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander of one of the octagonal solar panels, which opened like two handheld, collapsible fans on either side of the spacecraft. Beyond this view is a small slice of the north polar terrain of Mars.

    The successfully deployed solar panels are critical to the success of the 90-day mission, as they are the spacecraft's only means of replenishing its power. Even before these images reached Earth, power readings from the spacecraft indicated to engineers that the solar panels were already at work recharging the spacecraft's batteries.

    Before deploying the Surface Stereo Imager to take these images, the lander waited about 15 minutes for the dust to settle.

    This image was taken by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol, or Martian day, 0 (May 25, 2008).

    This image has been geometrically corrected.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Solar Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown here is one of the first images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander of one of the octagonal solar panels, which opened like two handheld, collapsible fans on either side of the spacecraft. Beyond this view is a small slice of the north polar terrain of Mars.

    The successfully deployed solar panels are critical to the success of the 90-day mission, as they are the spacecraft's only means of replenishing its power. Even before these images reached Earth, power readings from the spacecraft indicated to engineers that the solar panels were already at work recharging the spacecraft's batteries.

    Before deploying the Surface Stereo Imager to take these images, the lander waited about 15 minutes for the dust to settle.

    This image was taken by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol, or Martian day, 0 (May 25, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Solar forcing of Gulf of California climate during the past 2000 yr suggested by diatoms and silicoflagellates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David

    2007-01-01

    Cores BAM80 E-17 (27.9° N) and NH01-26 (24.3° N) contain longer-duration cycles of diatoms and silicoflagellates. The early part of Medieval Climate Anomaly (∼ A.D. 900 to 1200) is characterized by two periods of reduced productivity (warmer SST) with an intervening high productivity (cool) interval centered at ∼ A.D. 1050. Reduced productivity and higher SST also characterize the record of the last ∼ 100 to 200 yr in these cores. Solar variability appears to be driving productivity cycles, as intervals of increased radiocarbon production (sunspot minima) correlate with intervals of enhanced productivity. It is proposed that increased winter cooling of the atmosphere above southwest U.S. during sunspot minima causes intensification of the northwest winds that blow down the Gulf during the late fall to early spring, leading to intensified overturn of surface waters and enhanced productivity.

  13. A Novel Hybrid Statistical Particle Swarm Optimization for Multimodal Functions and Frequency Control of Hybrid Wind-Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Jain, Cheshta

    2016-09-01

    In this article, a hybrid algorithm of particle swarm optimization (PSO) with statistical parameter (HSPSO) is proposed. Basic PSO for shifted multimodal problems have low searching precision due to falling into a number of local minima. The proposed approach uses statistical characteristics to update the velocity of the particle to avoid local minima and help particles to search global optimum with improved convergence. The performance of the newly developed algorithm is verified using various standard multimodal, multivariable, shifted hybrid composition benchmark problems. Further, the comparative analysis of HSPSO with variants of PSO is tested to control frequency of hybrid renewable energy system which comprises solar system, wind system, diesel generator, aqua electrolyzer and ultra capacitor. A significant improvement in convergence characteristic of HSPSO algorithm over other variants of PSO is observed in solving benchmark optimization and renewable hybrid system problems.

  14. Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments; Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    DOE designed this guide "Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments" to assist local government officials and stakeholders in designing and implementing strategic local solar plans. The 2011 edition contains the most recent lessons and successes from the 25 Solar America Cities and other communities promoting solar energy. Because DOE recognizes that there is no one path to solar market development, this guide introduces a range of policy and program options that can help a community build a local solar infrastructure.

  15. Intermittency and Multifractal behavior in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind Beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Echim, Marius; Macek, Wiesław M.; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study the evolution of intermittency in the solar wind magnetic turbulence at heliocentric distances between 1.5 and 5.4 AU and at heliolatitudes between -80 and 70o. We use the a multifractal analysis based on the partition function formalism. More precisely, we consider magnetic field intensity for the solar wind data from Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998, 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). By modeling multifractal spectrum we reveal intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun both in the slow and fast solar wind we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) which decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks and other nonlinear interaction can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm the lower level of multifractality and intermittency than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme

  16. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-04-16

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008-2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002-2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 10(18) more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years.

  17. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008–2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002–2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 1018 more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Key Points First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years PMID:26074647

  18. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kistner, Rainer; Price, Henry W.

    1999-04-14

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier’s perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  19. Sequencing of small RNAs of the fern Pleopeltis minima (Polypodiaceae) offers insight into the evolution of the microrna repertoire in land plants

    PubMed Central

    Berruezo, Florencia; de Souza, Flávio S. J.; Picca, Pablo I.; Nemirovsky, Sergio I.; Martínez Tosar, Leandro; Rivero, Mercedes; Mentaberry, Alejandro N.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, single stranded RNA molecules that regulate the stability and translation of messenger RNAs in diverse eukaryotic groups. Several miRNA genes are of ancient origin and have been maintained in the genomes of animal and plant taxa for hundreds of millions of years, playing key roles in development and physiology. In the last decade, genome and small RNA (sRNA) sequencing of several plant species have helped unveil the evolutionary history of land plants. Among these, the fern group (monilophytes) occupies a key phylogenetic position, as it represents the closest extant cousin taxon of seed plants, i.e. gymno- and angiosperms. However, in spite of their evolutionary, economic and ecological importance, no fern genome has been sequenced yet and few genomic resources are available for this group. Here, we sequenced the small RNA fraction of an epiphytic South American fern, Pleopeltis minima (Polypodiaceae), and compared it to plant miRNA databases, allowing for the identification of miRNA families that are shared by all land plants, shared by all vascular plants (tracheophytes) or shared by euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants) only. Using the recently described transcriptome of another fern, Lygodium japonicum, we also estimated the degree of conservation of fern miRNA targets in relation to other plant groups. Our results pinpoint the origin of several miRNA families in the land plant evolutionary tree with more precision and are a resource for future genomic and functional studies of fern miRNAs. PMID:28494025

  20. Sequencing of small RNAs of the fern Pleopeltis minima (Polypodiaceae) offers insight into the evolution of the microrna repertoire in land plants.

    PubMed

    Berruezo, Florencia; de Souza, Flávio S J; Picca, Pablo I; Nemirovsky, Sergio I; Martínez Tosar, Leandro; Rivero, Mercedes; Mentaberry, Alejandro N; Zelada, Alicia M

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, single stranded RNA molecules that regulate the stability and translation of messenger RNAs in diverse eukaryotic groups. Several miRNA genes are of ancient origin and have been maintained in the genomes of animal and plant taxa for hundreds of millions of years, playing key roles in development and physiology. In the last decade, genome and small RNA (sRNA) sequencing of several plant species have helped unveil the evolutionary history of land plants. Among these, the fern group (monilophytes) occupies a key phylogenetic position, as it represents the closest extant cousin taxon of seed plants, i.e. gymno- and angiosperms. However, in spite of their evolutionary, economic and ecological importance, no fern genome has been sequenced yet and few genomic resources are available for this group. Here, we sequenced the small RNA fraction of an epiphytic South American fern, Pleopeltis minima (Polypodiaceae), and compared it to plant miRNA databases, allowing for the identification of miRNA families that are shared by all land plants, shared by all vascular plants (tracheophytes) or shared by euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants) only. Using the recently described transcriptome of another fern, Lygodium japonicum, we also estimated the degree of conservation of fern miRNA targets in relation to other plant groups. Our results pinpoint the origin of several miRNA families in the land plant evolutionary tree with more precision and are a resource for future genomic and functional studies of fern miRNAs.

  1. The change of the solar cyclicity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.

    2015-02-01

    Our analysis of groups of sunspots since the year 1610 till indicates that the Gnevyshev-Ohl rule (GO) displays cycles of inversion with the period of 200 years. The latest inversion occurred in the Hale double cycle 22-23. Due to that, in several subsequent double cycles the odd cycles should be weaker than their preceding even cycles. Gleissberg cycles with the period of about 100 years and variations with the period of 200 years are manifested in variations of physical parameters of sunspots and are interconnected. We suggested that the secular minima of the solar activity occur in the vicinity of the extreme points of the 200-year cycles of inversion of the GO rule. The peak of the next secular minimum is expected between the years 2025 - 2035 . We studied the variations of the physical parameters of sunspots in a Gleissberg cycle. At the maximum phase of the Gleissberg cycle, the average area of groups and the average number of spots in a group reach their maximum. According to our forecast, the amplitude of the 25th solar activity cycle will be somewhat lower than that of the 24th.

  2. Solar and stellar activity: diagnostics and indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.; Thompson, Michael J.

    2012-07-01

    We summarize the fifty-year concerted effort to place the ``activity'' of the Sun in the context of the stars. As a working definition of solar activity in the context of stars, we adopt those globally-observable variations on time scales below thermal time scales, of ~105 yr for the convection zone. So defined, activity is dominated by magnetic-field evolution, including the 22-year Hale cycle, the typical time it takes for the quasi-periodic reversal in which the global magnetic-field takes place. This is accompanied by sunspot variations with 11 year periods, known since the time of Schwabe, as well as faster variations due to rotation of active regions and flaring. ``Diagnostics and indices'' are terms given to the indirect signatures of varying magnetic-fields, including the photometric (broad-band) variations associated with the sunspot cycle, and variations of the accompanying heated plasma in higher layers of stellar atmospheres seen at special optical wavelengths, and UV and X-ray wavelengths. Our attention is also focussed on the theme of the Symposium by examining evidence for deep and extended minima of stars, and placing the 70-year long solar Maunder Minimum into a stellar context.

  3. Comparing the Large-Scale Magnetic Field During the Last Three Solar Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale magnetic field observations show that the current extended solar cycle minimum differs from the two previous well-observed minima in several respects. The weaker polar fields increase the relative influence of middle and low-latitude flux patterns on the configuration of the corona and heliosphere. A much larger fraction of the open flux originates in equatorial coronal holes. Even though the heliospheric field magnitude and the mean solar magnetic field are the weakest since direct measurements began, the sector structure of the interplanetary field that reflects the shape of the heliospheric current sheet continues to extend to fairly high latitude. The pattern of emergence of active regions through the cycle and the transport of flux from low to high latitudes also show quite different patterns, providing insight into the meridional flow that influences the dynamo that drives the cycle. The long records of synoptic observations that provide a rich source of information about solar activity must be maintained.

  4. 25 MeV Solar Proton Events in Cycle 24 and Previous Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize observations of nearly 1000 solar energetic particle events that include 25 MeV protons made by Goddard instruments on various spacecraft (IMPs IV, V, 7, 8, ISEE-3) and by other instruments on SOHO, since 1967, encompassing solar cycles 20 to 24. We also include recent observations of such events from the STEREO spacecraft. These extended observations place studies focusing on Cycles 23 and 24 in a broader context. For example, the time distribution of 25 MeV proton events varies from cycle to cycle such that each cycle is unique. In the current cycle, ~25 MeV proton events were absent during the preceding solar minimum, whereas earlier minima showed occasional, often reasonably intense events, and there have been, so far, fewer exceptionally intense events compared to Cycles 22 and 23, though Cycle 21 also apparently lacked such events.

  5. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts

  6. Coupling and Correlation-analysis Between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres' Solar Cycle Features based on Sunspot Area Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, W. N.; Dikpati, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vast literature on Babcock-Leighton flux-transport dynamo models indicate that the sunspot activity cycles in the Northern and Southern hemispheres are primarily decoupled about the equator and are independent of each other. However, we find from the analysis of long-term sunspot area data from 1875 to 2013 that the two hemispheres continuously attempt to couple about the equator. If we define the coupling line as the line where the sunspot area of the two hemispheres is the same on the plot of North versus South spot-area, we find that the two hemispheres' spot-area tend to fall on the coupling line over a very long period of time, despite their short-term traversal away from the coupling line. This indicates that there must be some underlying process inside the Sun's interior which is causing this coupling. Further analysis of the features, such as rise and decay times of solar cycles, minima and peak amplitudes, reveal that the solar cycles normally follow a saw-tooth pattern with a fast rise and slow fall, as noted before. Most interestingly, we find that rise-time in one hemisphere correlates with minima-amplitude of the other hemisphere, but anti-correlates with that of the same hemisphere. We speculate that this happens because the fast rise of a cycle can annihilate the opposite-hemisphere's flux faster, leading to a lower minima-amplitude. By contrast, the peak of a cycle does not have much influence on minima-amplitude of the opposite hemisphere. We are investigating the physics behind these features through dynamo simulations.

  7. Period and phase of the 88-year solar cycle and the Maunder minimum - Evidence for a chaotic sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of whether the solar dynamo is quasi-periodic or chaotic is addressed by examining 1500 years of sunspot, geomagnetic, and auroral activity cycles. Sub-harmonics were found of the fundamental solar cycle period during the years preceding the Maunder minimum and loss of phase of the subharmonic on emergence from it. These phenomena are indicative of chaos. They indicate that the solar dynamo is chaotic and is operating in a region close to the transition between period doubling and chaos. Since Maunder-type minima reoccur irregularly for millennia, it appears that the sun remains close to this transition to and from chaos. This is postulated to be a universal characteristic of solar type stars caused by feedback in the dynamo number.

  8. Solar Activity Predictions Based on Solar Dynamo Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    2009-05-01

    We review solar activity prediction methods, statistical, precursor, and recently the Dikpati and the Choudhury groups’ use of numerical flux-dynamo methods. Outlining various methods, we compare precursor techniques with weather forecasting. Precursors involve events prior to a solar cycle. First started by the Russian geomagnetician Ohl, and then Brown and Williams; the Earth's field variations near solar minimum was used to predict the next solar cycle, with a correlation of 0.95. From the standpoint of causality, as well as energetically, these relationships were somewhat bizarre. One index used was the "number of anomalous quiet days,” an antiquated, subjective index. Scientific progress cannot be made without some suspension of disbelief; otherwise old paradigms become tautologies. So, with youthful naïveté, Svalgaard, Scherrer, Wilcox and I viewed the results through rose-colored glasses and pressed ahead searching for understanding. We eventually fumbled our way to explaining how the Sun could broadcast the state of its internal dynamo to Earth. We noted one key aspect of the Babcock-Leighton Flux Dynamo theory: the polar field at the end of a cycle serves as a seed for the next cycle's growth. Near solar minimum this field usually bathes the Earth, and thereby affects geomagnetic indices then. We found support by examining 8 previous solar cycles. Using our solar precursor technique we successfully predicted cycles 21, 22 and 23 using WSO and MWSO data. Pesnell and I improved the method using a SODA (SOlar Dynamo Amplitude) Index. In 2005, nearing cycle 23's minimum, Svalgaard and I noted an unusually weak polar field, and forecasted a small cycle 24. We discuss future advances: the flux-dynamo methods. As far as future solar activity, I shall let the Sun decide; it will do so anyhow.

  9. Solar modulation of Little Ice Age climate in the tropical Andes

    PubMed Central

    Polissar, P. J.; Abbott, M. B.; Wolfe, A. P.; Bezada, M.; Rull, V.; Bradley, R. S.

    2006-01-01

    The underlying causes of late-Holocene climate variability in the tropics are incompletely understood. Here we report a 1,500-year reconstruction of climate history and glaciation in the Venezuelan Andes using lake sediments. Four glacial advances occurred between anno Domini (A.D.) 1250 and 1810, coincident with solar-activity minima. Temperature declines of −3.2 ± 1.4°C and precipitation increases of ≈20% are required to produce the observed glacial responses. These results highlight the sensitivity of high-altitude tropical regions to relatively small changes in radiative forcing, implying even greater probable responses to future anthropogenic forcing. PMID:16740660

  10. Solar ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, H.

    1981-01-01

    The history and current status of salt-gradient non-convecting solar ponds are presented. These ponds are large-area collectors, capable of providing low-cost thermal, mechanical, or electrical energy using low-temperature turbo-generators. The basic theory of salt-gradient solar ponds is sketched; the effects of wind, leakage, and fouling and their constraints on location selection for solar ponds are discussed. The methods of building and filling the ponds, as well as extracting heat from them are explained in detail. Practical operating temperatures of 90 C can be obtained with collection efficiencies between 15% and 25%, demonstrating the practical use of the ponds for heating and cooling purposes, power production, and desalination. A condensed account of solar pond experience in several countries is given. This includes the 150 kW solar pond power station (SPPS) operating in Israel since December, 1979 and a 5000 kW unit currently under development. A study of the economics involved in using the ponds is presented: despite a low conversion efficiency, the SPPS is shown to have applications in many countries.

  11. Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    DOE designed this guide—Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments—to assist local government officials and stakeholders in designing and implementing strategic local solar plans. The 2011 edition contains the most recent lessons and successes from the 25 Solar America Cities and other communities promoting solar energy. Because DOE recognizes that there is no one path to solar market development, this guide introduces a range of policy and program options that can help a community build a local solar infrastructure.

  12. Temporal Variations in Solar Irradiance Since 1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebabal, A.; Damtie, B.; Nigussie, M.; Yizengaw, E.

    2017-08-01

    The study of variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) and spectral irradiance is important for understanding how the Sun affects the Earth's climate. A data-driven approach is used in this article to analyze and model the temporal variation of the TSI and Mg ii index back to 1947. In both cases, observed data in the time interval of the satellite era, 1978 - 2013, were used for neural network (NN) model-design and testing. For this particular purpose, the evolution of the solar magnetic field is assumed to be the main driver for the day-to-day irradiance variability. First, we design a model for the Mg ii index data from F10.7 cm solar radio-flux using the NN approach in the time span of 1978 through 2013. Results of Mg ii index model were tested using various numbers of hidden nodes. The predicted values of the hidden layer with five nodes correspond well to the composite Mg ii values. The model reproduces 94% of the variability in the composite Mg ii index, including the secular decline between the 1996 and 2008 solar cycle minima. Finally, the extrapolation of the Mg ii index was performed using the developed model from F10.7 cm back to 1947. Similarly, the NN model was designed for TSI variability study over the time span of the satellite era using data from the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD) as a target, and solar activity indices as model inputs. This model was able to reproduce the daily irradiance variations with a correlation coefficient of 0.937 from sunspot and facular measurements in the time span of 1978 - 2013. Finally, the temporal variation of the TSI was analyzed using the designed NN model back to 1947 from the Photometric Sunspot Index (PSI) and the extrapolated Mg ii index. The extrapolated TSI result indicates that the amplitudes of Solar Cycles 19 and 21 are closely comparable to each other, and Solar Cycle 20 appears to be of lower irradiance during its maximum.

  13. OBSERVING EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING PERIODS OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-20

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  14. A comparative study of solar facula during cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Choudhary, D. P.; Moon, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    The solar activity minimum between the end of cycle 23 and beginning of cycle 24 was the longest and deepest since the modern satellite era of 20th century. In this paper, we have investigated statistical properties of solar facula and sunspot area (and their ratio) covering entire solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. The facular area has been considered from the K-line composite at the San Fernando Observatory and is a direct measurement of the strength of solar cycle activity. It is found that solar facular area decreased during minimum phase of cycle 23/24 compared to maximum phase and also during rising phase of cycle 24. However, the ratio of facula to sunspot area increased during minimum epoch of cycle 23. Power spectrum analysis shows that along with other periods, the solar rotational periods 22 -31 days and Rieger type periods are both prominent during maxima, minima of cycle 23 and ascending branch of cycle 24. During the decline phase of cycle 23, the period ~ 27 days is more prominent whereas ~ 14 days and ~ 31 days periods are dominant during activity maxima. During maximum phase of cycle 23 and 24, there was no phase lag between sunspot and facular area, but a phase lag ~ 3 months has been detected during activity minima of cycle 23. These results indicate that the distribution of active regions during the activity maximum years is quite different from that in the minimum years. We shall present discussion of our results in this paper.

  15. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Rast, Mark P.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of "extreme" solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  16. Solar ADEPT: Efficient Solar Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar ADEPT Project: The 7 projects that make up ARPA-E's Solar ADEPT program, short for 'Solar Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,' aim to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, which convert the sun's rays into electricity. Solar ADEPT projects are integrating advanced electrical components into PV systems to make the process of converting solar energy to electricity more efficient.

  17. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  18. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  19. Solar retinitis.

    PubMed

    SHIRLEY, S Y

    1963-07-20

    Retinal burns can be produced by direct gazing at the sun. This lesion is caused by the thermal effects of the visible and near infrared rays focused on the pigment structure behind the retina. It is rarely seen, as the normal eye will tolerate only fleeting glances at the sun, but is fairly common during a solar eclipse. A case of solar retinitis is presented in which treatment with corticosteroids lessened the retinal edema but the patient suffered a bilateral central scotoma and vision reduced to the 20/40 level. In viewing a solar eclipse a No. 4 density filter is recommended; as a rough test this filter will abolish the readability of print on a 60-watt incandescent frosted electric light bulb.

  20. Solar Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, S. Y.

    1963-01-01

    Retinal burns can be produced by direct gazing at the sun. This lesion is caused by the thermal effects of the visible and near infrared rays focused on the pigment structure behind the retina. It is rarely seen, as the normal eye will tolerate only fleeting glances at the sun, but is fairly common during a solar eclipse. A case of solar retinitis is presented in which treatment with corticosteroids lessened the retinal edema but the patient suffered a bilateral central scotoma and vision reduced to the 20/40 level. In viewing a solar eclipse a No. 4 density filter is recommended; as a rough test this filter will abolish the readability of print on a 60-watt incandescent frosted electric light bulb. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:13977409

  1. Presence of two emissive minima in the lowest excited state of a push-pull cationic dye unequivocally proved by femtosecond up-conversion spectroscopy and vibronic quantum-mechanical computations.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Enrico; Carlotti, Benedetta; Segado, Mireia; Cesaretti, Alessio; Spalletti, Anna; Elisei, Fausto; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-05-14

    The long-standing controversy about the presence of two different emissive minima in the lowest excited state of the cationic push-pull dye o-(p-dimethylamino-styryl)-methylpyridinium (DASPMI) was definitively proved through the observation of dual emission, evidenced by both experimental (femtosecond up-conversion measurements) and theoretical (density functional theory calculations) approaches. From the fluorescence up-conversion data of DASPMI in water, the time resolved area normalized spectra (TRANES) were calculated, showing one isoemissive point and therefore revealing the presence of two distinct emissive minima of the excited state potential energy hypersurface with lifetimes of 0.51 and 4.8 ps. These spectroscopic techniques combined with proper data analysis allowed us to discriminate the sub-picosecond emitting state from the occurrence of ultrafast solvation dynamics and to disentangle the overlapping fluorescence (very close in energy) of the two components. Vibronic computations based on TD-DFT potential energy surfaces fully confirm those results and provide deeper insights about the key factors playing a role in determining the overall result. The two emissive minima have different structural and electronic characteristics: on one hand, the locally excited (LE) minimum has a flat geometry and an electric dipole moment smaller than the ground state; on the other hand, the twisted-intramolecular-charge-transfer (TICT) minimum shows a rotation of the methylpyridinium moiety with respect to the rest of the structure, and has an electric dipole moment significantly larger than the ground state.

  2. The Anti-inflammatory Activities of Two Major Withanolides from Physalis minima Via Acting on NF-κB, STAT3, and HO-1 in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Jun; Gao, Cai-Yun; Guo, Chao; Zhou, Miao-Miao; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-12-02

    Physalis minima has been traditionally used as a folk herbal medicine in China for the treatment of many inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about its anti-inflammatory constituents and associated molecular mechanisms. In our study, withaphysalin A (WA) and 2, 3-dihydro-withaphysalin C (WC), two major withanolide-type compounds, were obtained from the anti-inflammatory fraction of P. minima. Both WA and WC significantly inhibited the production of nitrite oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and several pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 macrophages. Further research indicated that they downregulated the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, they also suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylation of STAT3, and upregulated HO-1 expression. Intriguingly, the activation of MAPKs was suppressed by WA but was not altered by WC. Taken together, these data provide scientific evidence for elucidating the major bioactive constituents and related molecular mechanisms for the traditional use of P. minima and suggest that WA and WC can be attractive therapeutic candidates for various inflammatory diseases.

  3. Minima de L'intégrale D'action du Problème Newtoniende 4 Corps de Masses Égales Dans R3: Orbites `Hip-Hop'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenciner, Alain; Venturelli, Andrea

    2000-09-01

    We consider the problem of 4 bodies of equal masses in R 3 for the Newtonian r-1 potential. We address the question of the absolute minima of the action integral among (anti)symmetric loops of class H 1 whose period is fixed. It is the simplest case for which the results of [4] (corrected in [5]) do not apply: the minima cannot be the relative equilibria whose configuration is an absolute minimum of the potential among the configurations having a given moment of inertia with respect to their center of mass. This is because the regular tetrahedron cannot have a relative equilibrium motion in R 3 (see [2]). We show that the absolute minima of the action are not homographic motions. We also show that if we force the configuration to admit a certain type of symmetry of order 4, the absolute minimum is a collisionless orbit whose configuration ‘hesitates’ between the central configuration of the square and the one of the tetrahedron. We call these orbits ‘hip-hop’. A similar result holds in case of a symmetry of order 3 where the central configuration of the equilateral triangle with a body at the center of mass replaces the square.

  4. Attitudes of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendarvis, Faye

    This document investigates the attitudes of successful individuals, citing the achievement of established goals as the criteria for success. After offering various definitions of success, the paper focuses on the importance of self-esteem to success and considers ways by which the self-esteem of students can be improved. Theories of human behavior…

  5. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  6. Development of solar tower observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  7. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  8. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature

  9. Solar panel

    SciTech Connect

    Bayles, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    A solar panel includes a base within which are mounted transversely extending conduits. A heat collector plate in the base is in heat conductive relationship with the conduits for the heating of a fluid medium. The base additionally supports a transparent cover outwardly spaced from the heat collector plate to provide a protective insulative air space over the plate. A manifold communicates one series of panels with those of an adjacent series. A modified base dispenses with a collector plate and is formed so as to define integral lengthwise extending passageways for the solar heated medium. Inserted nipples interconnect the passageways of adjacent panels.

  10. Solar trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1988-02-09

    A solar trap for collecting solar energy at a concentrated level is described comprising: (a) a compound light funnel including a pair of light reflecting substantially planar members arranged into a trough having a substantially V-shaped cross section; (b) a two dimensional Fresnel lens cover covering the opening of the compound light funnel, the opening being the open diverging end of the substantially V-shaped cross section of the compound light funnel; (c) at least one conduit for carrying a heat transfer fluid disposed substantially adjacent and substantially parallel to the apex line of the compound light funnel.

  11. Solar Energy and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  12. Solar maximum: Solar array degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    The 5-year in-orbit power degradation of the silicon solar array aboard the Solar Maximum Satellite was evaluated. This was the first spacecraft to use Teflon R FEP as a coverglass adhesive, thus avoiding the necessity of an ultraviolet filter. The peak power tracking mode of the power regulator unit was employed to ensure consistent maximum power comparisons. Telemetry was normalized to account for the effects of illumination intensity, charged particle irradiation dosage, and solar array temperature. Reference conditions of 1.0 solar constant at air mass zero and 301 K (28 C) were used as a basis for normalization. Beginning-of-life array power was 2230 watts. Currently, the array output is 1830 watts. This corresponds to a 16 percent loss in array performance over 5 years. Comparison of Solar Maximum Telemetry and predicted power levels indicate that array output is 2 percent less than predictions based on an annual 1.0 MeV equivalent election fluence of 2.34 x ten to the 13th power square centimeters space environment.

  13. Solar maximum: solar array degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.

    1985-08-01

    The 5-year in-orbit power degradation of the silicon solar array aboard the Solar Maximum Satellite was evaluated. This was the first spacecraft to use Teflon R FEP as a coverglass adhesive, thus avoiding the necessity of an ultraviolet filter. The peak power tracking mode of the power regulator unit was employed to ensure consistent maximum power comparisons. Telemetry was normalized to account for the effects of illumination intensity, charged particle irradiation dosage, and solar array temperature. Reference conditions of 1.0 solar constant at air mass zero and 301 K (28 C) were used as a basis for normalization. Beginning-of-life array power was 2230 watts. Currently, the array output is 1830 watts. This corresponds to a 16 percent loss in array performance over 5 years. Comparison of Solar Maximum Telemetry and predicted power levels indicate that array output is 2 percent less than predictions based on an annual 1.0 MeV equivalent election fluence of 2.34 x ten to the 13th power square centimeters space environment.

  14. Heliogyro Solar Sail Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale A.; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Heaton, Andrew F.; Heaton, Andrew F.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Littell, Justin D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Thomson, Mark W.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent successful flight of the JAXA IKAROS solar sail has renewed interest within NASA in spinning solar sail concepts for high-performance solar sailing. The heliogyro solar sail, in particular, is being re-examined as a potential game-changing architecture for future solar sailing missions. In this paper, we present an overview of ongoing heliogyro technology development and feasibility assessment activities within NASA. In particular, a small-scale heliogyro solar sail technology demonstration concept will be described. We will also discuss ongoing analytical and experimental heliogyro structural dynamics and controls investigations and provide an outline of future heliogyro development work directed toward enabling a low cost heliogyro technology demonstration mission ca. 2020.

  15. Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

  16. Dynamo theory prediction of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamo theory technique to predict decadal time scale solar activity variations is introduced. The technique was developed following puzzling correlations involved with geomagnetic precursors of solar activity. Based upon this, a dynamo theory method was developed to predict solar activity. The method was used successfully in solar cycle 21 by Schatten, Scherrer, Svalgaard, and Wilcox, after testing with 8 prior solar cycles. Schatten and Sofia used the technique to predict an exceptionally large cycle, peaking early (in 1990) with a sunspot value near 170, likely the second largest on record. Sunspot numbers are increasing, suggesting that: (1) a large cycle is developing, and (2) that the cycle may even surpass the largest cycle (19). A Sporer Butterfly method shows that the cycle can now be expected to peak in the latter half of 1989, consistent with an amplitude comparable to the value predicted near the last solar minimum.

  17. Defect engineering in solar cell manufacturing and thin film solar cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-08-01

    During the last few years many defect engineering concepts were successfully applied to fabricate high efficiency silicon solar cells on low-cost substrates. Some of the research advances are described.

  18. Boston, Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Boston, MA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given. The City of Boston and its Solar America Cities program, Solar Boston, are helping to debunk the myth that solar energy is only feasible in the southern latitudes. Boston has some of the highest energy prices in the country and will likely be one of the first locations where solar power achieves grid parity with conventional energy technologies. Solar Boston is facilitating the rapid development of solar energy projects and infrastructure in the short-term, and is preparing for the rapid market growth that is expected with the imminent arrival of grid parity over the long-term. Solar Boston developed the strategy for achieving Mayor Menino's goal of installing 25 MW of solar energy throughout Boston by 2015. Through Solar Boston, the city has developed a strategy for the installation of solar technology throughout Boston, including mapping feasible locations, preparing a permitting guide, and planning the citywide bulk purchase, financing, and installation of solar technology. The city has also worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing initiatives. The resulting accomplishments include the following: (1) Created an online map of current local renewable energy projects with a tool to allow building owners to calculate their rooftop solar potential. The map is currently live at http://gis.cityofboston.gov/solarboston/. (2) Supported the city's Green Affordable Housing Program (GAHP), in partnership with the Department of Neighborhood Development (DND). Under GAHP, the city is installing more than 150 kW of PV on 200 units of affordable housing. DND requires that all new city-funded affordable housing be LEED silver certified and

  19. Solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J. B.; Ware, R. R.

    1985-12-31

    A solar cooking device made of a flat array of concentric mirrors tilted to focus at a small area, the array being movable mounted on a stand to be movable around a ball joint and with a carrier for a cooking vessel held by a double crank to be at the focal area of the mirrors.

  20. Solar Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Norman C.; Kane, Joseph W.

    1971-01-01

    Proposes a method of collecting solar energy by using available plastics for Fresnel lenses to focus heat onto a converter where thermal dissociation of water would produce hydrogen. The hydrogen would be used as an efficient non-polluting fuel. Cost estimates are included. (AL)