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Sample records for successive solar minima

  1. The cosmic radiation in the heliosphere at successive solar minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Frank B.; Moraal, Harm; Reinecke, J. P. L.; Lal, Nand; Mcguire, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Cosmic ray observations at 1 AU are compared for the last three solar minimum periods along with the 1977/1989 and 1987 Pioneer 10 and Voyager 1 and 2 data from the outer heliosphere. There is good agreement between the 1965 and 1987 Galactic cosmic ray H and He spectra at 1 AU. Significant and complex differences are found between the 1977/1978 and 1987 measurements of the Galactic and anomalous cosmic ray components at 1 and 15 AU. In the outer heliosphere there are negative latitudinal gradients that reach their maximum magnitude when the inclination of the outer heliosphere current sheet is at a minimum. The radial gradients decrease with heliocentric distance as about 1/r exp 0.7 and do not differ significantly at the successive solar minima. The measured radial and latitudinal gradients are used to estimate the particle transport parameters in the outer heliosphere. Using the local interstellar He spectrum of Webber et al. (1987), it is estimated that the modulation boundary is of the order of 160 AU.

  2. Implications of Extended Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Davis, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of periodicity in the solar cycle, the historical record of sunspot number has been carefully examined, attempting to make predictions about the next cycle. Much emphasis has been on predicting the maximum amplitude and length of the next cycle. Because current space-based and suborbital instruments are designed to study active phenomena, there is considerable interest in estimating the length and depth of the current minimum. We have developed criteria for the definition of a minimum and applied it to the historical sunspot record starting in 1749. In doing so, we find that 1) the current minimum is not yet unusually long and 2) there is no obvious way of predicting when, using our definition, the current minimum may end. However, by grouping the data into 22- year cycles there is an interesting pattern of extended minima that recurs every fourth or fifth 22-year cycle. A preliminary comparison of this pattern with other records, suggests the possibility of a correlation between extended minima and lower levels of solar irradiance.

  3. Anomalously extended minima of solar cycle~23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ambika; Tiwari, Anil Kumar; Agrawal, S. P.

    The new millennium extended solar minimum of solar cycle 23 (2007-2009) contains some distinct surprises and is anomalous in comparison to the past few solar cycles. In general, the level of solar activity goes through the cyclic changes lasting roughly 11 years. The last solar cycle 23 started in the year 1996 and was expected to last until 2006. Nevertheless, the solar activity minima continued beyond the year 2006 and lasted till 2009. In fact, anomalously, during the years 2007-09, a deep sunspot minima was observed at the end of the last solar cycle 23. It is observed that the sun had no sunspots continuously for over 50 days in July-August, 2009. More so, it is found that the solar cycle 23 has the longest quiet period as compared to the last many previous solar cycles. Anomalously low values of the geomagnetic disturbance Ap is observed during the whole quiet period (2007-09) of the sun, particularly in the month of January-September 2009, during which the high speed solar wind streams are also not observed. As such, the past solar cycle 23 seems to have the very long period of about 14 years, which is anomalously distinct from previous four solar cycles, besides the obvious Ap correlation of very low activity. The low values of the sunspot numbers in years 2007-2009 also have a very distinct effect in producing lowest modulation in cosmic ray intensity, with highest values of neutron monitor counts observed in the year 2009, as compared to that observed so far in previous solar cycles. These results are discussed in the light of many associated solar-terrestrial phenomena.

  4. Grand minima and maxima of solar activity: new observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Solanki, S. K.; Kovaltsov, G. A.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:Using a reconstruction of sunspot numbers stretching over multiple millennia, we analyze the statistics of the occurrence of grand minima and maxima and set new observational constraints on long-term solar and stellar dynamo models. Methods: We present an updated reconstruction of sunspot number over multiple millennia, from 14C data by means of a physics-based model, using an updated model of the evolution of the solar open magnetic flux. A list of grand minima and maxima of solar activity is presented for the Holocene (since 9500 BC) and the statistics of both the length of individual events as well as the waiting time between them are analyzed. Results: The occurrence of grand minima/maxima is driven not by long-term cyclic variability, but by a stochastic/chaotic process. The waiting time distribution of the occurrence of grand minima/maxima deviates from an exponential distribution, implying that these events tend to cluster together with long event-free periods between the clusters. Two different types of grand minima are observed: short (30-90 years) minima of Maunder type and long (>110 years) minima of Spörer type, implying that a deterministic behaviour of the dynamo during a grand minimum defines its length. The duration of grand maxima follows an exponential distribution, suggesting that the duration of a grand maximum is determined by a random process. Conclusions: These results set new observational constraints upon the long-term behaviour of the solar dynamo.

  5. Grand minima of solar activity during the last millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Solanki, Sami K.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2012-07-01

    In this review we discuss the occurrence and statistical properties of Grand minima based on the available data covering the last millennia. In particular, we consider the historical record of sunspot numbers covering the last 400 years as well as records of cosmogenic isotopes in natural terrestrial archives, used to reconstruct solar activity for up to the last 11.5 millennia, i.e. throughout the Holocene. Using a reconstruction of solar activity from cosmogenic isotope data, we analyze statistics of the occurrence of Grand minima. We find that: the Sun spends about most of the time at moderate activity, 1/6 in a Grand minimum and some time also in a Grand maximum state; Occurrence of Grand minima is not a result of long-term cyclic variations but is defined by stochastic/chaotic processes; There is a tendency for Grand minima to cluster with the recurrence rate of roughly 2000-3000 years, with a weak ~210-yr periodicity existing within the clusters. Grand minima occur of two different types: shorter than 100 years (Maunder-type) and long ~150 years (Spörer-type). It is also discussed that solar cycles (most possibly not sunspots cycle) could exist during the Grand minima, perhaps with stretched length and asymmetric sunspot latitudinal distribution. These results set new observational constraints on long-term solar and stellar dynamo models.

  6. GRAND MINIMA AND NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRY OF SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olemskoy, S. V.; Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2013-11-01

    A solar-type dynamo model in a spherical shell is developed with allowance for random dependence of the poloidal field generation mechanism on time and latitude. The model shows repeatable epochs of a strongly decreased amplitude of magnetic cycles similar to the Maunder minimum of solar activity. Random dependence of dynamo parameters on latitude breaks the equatorial symmetry of generated fields. The model shows the correlation of the occurrence of grand minima with deviations in the dynamo field from dipolar parity. An increased north-south asymmetry of magnetic activity can, therefore, be an indicator of transitions to grand minima. Qualitative interpretation of this correlation is suggested. Statistics of grand minima in the model are close to the Poisson random process, indicating that the onset of a grand minimum is statistically independent of preceding minima.

  7. SOLAR ROTATION EFFECTS ON THE HELIOSHEATH FLOW NEAR SOLAR MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Sergey N.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2012-05-01

    The interaction between fast and slow solar wind (SW) due to the Sun's rotation creates corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which further interact with each other creating complex plasma structures at large heliospheric distances. We investigate the global influence of CIRs on the SW flow in the inner heliosheath between the heliospheric termination shock (TS) and the heliopause. The stream interaction model takes into account the major global effects due to slow-fast stream interaction near solar minima. The fast and slow wind parameters are derived from the Ulysses observations. We investigate the penetration of corotating structures through the TS and their further propagation through the heliosheath. It is shown that the heliosheath flow structure may experience substantial modifications, including local decreases in the radial velocity component observed by Voyager 1.

  8. Differences Between the Current Solar Minimum and Earlier Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Fletcher, S.; New, R.

    2010-06-01

    The Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) has collected helioseismic data over three solar cycles. We use these data to determine how the internal properties of the Sun during this minimum differ from the previous two minima. The Cycle 24 data show oscillatory differences with respect to the other two sets, indicating relatively localized changes in the solar interior. Analysis of MDI data from Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 also show significant signs of differences.

  9. Dynamical characterization of the last prolonged solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo Gustavo; Compagnucci, Rosa Hilda

    2012-11-01

    The planetary hypothesis of the solar cycle is an old idea in which the gravitational influence of the planets has a non-negligible effect on the causes of the solar magnetic cycle. The advance of this hypothesis is based on phenomenological correlations between dynamical parameters of the Sun's movement around the barycentre of the Solar System and sunspots time series; and more especially, identifying relationships linking solar barycentric dynamics with prolonged minima (especially Grand Minima events). However, at present there is no clear physical mechanism relating these phenomena. The possible celestial influence on solar cycle modulation is of great importance not only in solar physics but also in Earth sciences, because prolonged solar minima have associated important climatic and telluric variations, in particular, during the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. In this work we looked for a possible causal link in relation with solar barycentric dynamics and prolonged minima events. We searched for particular changes in the Sun's acceleration and concentrated on long-term variations of the solar cycle. We show how the orbital angular momentum of the Sun evolves and how the inclination of the solar barycentric orbit varies during the epochs of orbital retrogressions. In particular, at these moments, the radial component of the Sun's acceleration (i.e., in the barycentre-Sun direction) had an exceptional magnitude. These radial impulses occurred at the very beginning of the Maunder Minimum, during the Dalton Minimum and also at the maximum of cycle 22 before the present extended minimum. We also found a strong correlation between the planetary torque and the observed sunspots international number around that maximum. We apply our results in a novel theory of Sun-planets interaction that it is sensitive to Sun barycentric dynamics and found a very important effect on the Sun's capability of storing hypothetical reservoirs of potential energy that could be released by

  10. Grand minima of solar activity and sociodynamics of culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirsky, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Indices of creative productivity introduced by C. Murrey were used to verify S. Ertel's conclusion about a global increase in creative productivity during the prolonged minimum of solar activity in 1640-1710. It was found that these indices for mathematicians, philosophers, and scientists increase in the Maunder era by factor of 1.6 in comparison with intervals of the same length before and after the minimum. A similar effect was obtained for mathematicians and philosophers for five earlier equitype minima in total (an increase by a factor of 1.9). The regularity that is revealed is confirmed by the fact that the most important achievements of high-ranking mathematicians and philosophers during the whole time period (2300 years) considered in this study fall on epochs of reduced levels of solar activity. The rise in the probability of the generation of rational ideas during grand minima is reflected also in the fact that they precede the appearance of written language and farming. Ultra-low-frequency electromagnetic fields appear to serve as a physical agent stimulating the activity of the brain's left hemisphere during the epochs of minima.

  11. Deciphering Solar Magnetic Activity: On Grand Minima in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcintosh, Scott; Leamon, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The Sun provides the energy necessary to sustain our existence. While the Sun provides for us, it is also capable of taking away. The weather and climatic scales of solar evolution and the Sun-Earth connection are not well understood. There has been tremendous progress in the century since the discovery of solar magnetism - magnetism that ultimately drives the electromagnetic, particulate and eruptive forcing of our planetary system. There is contemporary evidence of a decrease in solar magnetism, perhaps even indicators of a significant downward trend, over recent decades. Are we entering a minimum in solar activity that is deeper and longer than a typical solar minimum, a "grand minimum"? How could we tell if we are? What is a grand minimum and how does the Sun recover? These are very pertinent questions for modern civilization. In this paper we present a hypothetical demonstration of entry and exit from grand minimum conditions based on a recent analysis of solar features over the past 20 years and their possible connection to the origins of the 11(-ish) year solar activity cycle.

  12. Grand minima and maxima of solar activity on multi-millennial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya; Solanki, Sami; Kovaltsov, Gennady

    Using a reconstruction of sunspot numbers stretching over multiple millennia, we analyze the statistics of the occurrence of grand minima and maxima and set new observational constraints on long-term solar and stellar dynamo models. We present an updated reconstruction of sunspot number over multiple millennia, from 14C data by means of a physics-based model, using an updated model of the evolution of the solar open magnetic flux. A list of grand minima and maxima of solar activity is presented for the Holocene (since 9500 BC) and the statistics of both the length of individual events as well as the waiting time between them are analyzed. It is discussed that the occurrence of grand minima/maxima is driven not by long-term cyclic variability, but by a stochastic/chaotic process. The waiting time distribution of the occurrence of grand minima/maxima deviates from an exponential distribution, implying that these events tend to cluster together with long event-free periods between the clusters. Two different types of grand minima are observed: short (30-90 years) minima of Maunder type and long (>110 years) minima of Sp¨rer type, implying that a deterministic behaviour of the dynamo during o a grand minimum defines its length. The duration of grand maxima follows an exponential distribution, suggesting that the duration of a grand maximum is determined by a random process.

  13. Reconstruction Of Grand Minima Of Solar Activity On Multi-Millennial Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I.

    2008-05-01

    Using a reconstruction of sunspot numbers stretching over multiple millennia, we analyze the statistics of the occurrence of grand minima and maxima and set new observational constraints on long-term solar and stellar dynamo models. We present an updated reconstruction of sunspot number over multiple millennia, from 14C data by means of a physics-based model, using an updated model of the evolution of the solar open magnetic flux. A list of grand minima and maxima of solar activity is presented for the Holocene (since 9500 BC) and the statistics of both the length of individual events as well as the waiting time between them are analyzed. The occurrence of grand minima/maxima appears to be driven not by long-term cyclic variability, but by a stochastic/chaotic process. The waiting time distribution of the occurrence of grand minima/maxima deviates from an exponential distribution, implying that these events tend to cluster together with long event-free periods between the clusters. Two different types of grand minima are observed: short (30-90 years) minima of Maunder type and long (>110 years) minima of Spörer type, implying that a deterministic behaviour of the dynamo during a grand minimum defines its length. The duration of grand maxima follows an exponential distribution, suggesting that the duration of a grand maximum is determined by a random process.

  14. The features of longitudinal distribution of solar spots during the last 13 solar activity minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostuchenko, I. G.; Benevolenskaya, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the features of the longitudinal distribution of the areas of solar spots during the solar activity minima, from the 11th cycle to the last minimum, based on data provided by the Greenwich Observatory and the Marshall Research Center. We discovered that the solar spots evolved in one or two neighboring bands (in terms of longitude), the Carrington longitude of which smoothly displaced from the east to the west, in the phase of the deep minimum in all of the considered cases. The spots at the high latitudes associated with a "new" cycle evolved on the same longitude bands. All of this led to the noticeable longitudinal asymmetry of magnetic fluxes related to the spots and flocculi. Based on our research, we propose the hypothesis that a nonaxisymmetric component of the total magnetic flux of the Sun is generated, together with the dipole component, by the solar dynamo mechanism, which is a typical feature of the phase of a minimum between the solar activity cycles.

  15. Polar and Equatorial Coronal Hole Winds at Solar Minima: From the Heliosphere to the Inner Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-02-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  16. Polar and equatorial coronal hole winds at solar minima: From the heliosphere to the inner corona

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-02-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  17. 3D ELECTRON DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA DURING SOLAR MINIMA: ASSESSMENT FOR MORE REALISTIC SOLAR WIND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Patoul, Judith de; Foullon, Claire; Riley, Pete E-mail: c.foullon@exeter.ac.uk

    2015-11-20

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996–1997 and 2008–2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. The goals are to derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method and to compare the results between the two solar minima and with two magnetohydrodynamic models. First, we confirm that the values of the density distribution in thermodynamic models are more realistic than in polytropic ones. The tomography provides more accurate distributions in the polar regions, and we find that the density in tomographic and thermodynamic solutions varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We deduce that tomography offers reliable density distributions in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how they are magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  18. Grand solar minima and maxima deduced from 10Be and 14C: magnetic dynamo configuration and polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Simoniello, R.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.; Olsen, J.; Turck-Chiéze, S.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: This study aims to improve our understanding of the occurrence and origin of grand solar maxima and minima. Methods: We first investigate the statistics of peaks and dips simultaneously occurring in the solar modulation potentials reconstructed using the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) 10Be and IntCal13 14C records for the overlapping time period spanning between ~1650 AD to 6600 BC. Based on the distribution of these events, we propose a method to identify grand minima and maxima periods. By using waiting time distribution analysis, we investigate the nature of grand minima and maxima periods identified based on the criteria as well as the variance and significance of the Hale cycle during these kinds of events throughout the Holocene epoch. Results: Analysis of grand minima and maxima events occurring simultaneously in the solar modulation potentials, reconstructed based on the 14C and the 10Be records, shows that the majority of events characterized by periods of moderate activity levels tend to last less than 50 years: grand maxima periods do not last longer than 100 years, while grand minima can persist slightly longer. The power and the variance of the 22-year Hale cycle increases during grand maxima and decreases during grand minima, compared to periods characterized by moderate activity levels. Conclusions: We present the first reconstruction of the occurrence of grand solar maxima and minima during the Holocene based on simultaneous changes in records of past solar variability derived from tree-ring 14C and ice-core 10Be, respectively. This robust determination of the occurrence of grand solar minima and maxima periods will enable systematic investigations of the influence of grand solar minima and maxima episodes on Earth's climate.

  19. Properties of Supergranulation During the Solar Minima of Cycles 22/23 and 23/24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter E.; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2011-01-01

    The solar minimum at the transition from cycle 23 to 24 was notable for its low level of activity and its extended duration. Among the various fields of study, the evolution of the solar convection zone may provide insight into the causes and consequences of this recent minimum. This study continues previous investigations of the characteristics of solar supergranulation, a convection component strongly linked to the structure of the magnetic field, namely the time-evolution of the global mean of supergranule cell size, determined from spectral analysis of MDI Dopplergrams from the two previous solar minima. Analyses of the global mean of supergranule sizes show a quasi-oscillatory nature to the evolution of this particular supergranule characteristic. Performing similar analyses on realistic, synthetic Doppler images show similar time-dependent characteristics. We conclude that the observed fluctuations are not observational artifacts, and that an underlying trend exists within the evolution of the supergranulation network.

  20. Annual ionospheric variations of the critical frequency foF2 at the equatorial stations during the solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed annual ionospheric variations of the critical frequency foF2 at the equatorial stations during the solar minima. There are essential distinctions between the global TEC (total electron content) and foF2 annual variations during the last two solar minima. Many authors concluded that the annual means of foF2 and the global TEC were reduced, while others investigations no found essential variations as compared with the previous solar minimum. Most if not all of authors suppose that the possible source of this phenomenon is the low level of the EUV (extreme ultraviolet) during the solar minima. The aim of our paper is to amplify these conclusions or to propose new factor which can change ionosphere parameters during the solar minima. We calculated annual variations of foF2 at the equatorial stations and compared these data with Dst annual variations. We found that in addition to low level of the EUV during the solar minima, geomagnetic storms effects have to be included as the influencing factor on annual ionospheric variations.

  1. Comparison of solar activity during last two minima on turn of Activity Cycles 22/23 and 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryciuk, Magdalena; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Podgorski, Piotr; Sylwester, Janusz; Farnik, Frantisek

    2013-07-01

    The subject of our work is the review and comparison of solar activity during the last two solar minima that occurred between recent activity cycles. We use the soft X-ray global solar corona observations covering the two nine-months long time intervals in 1997/98 and 2009. Data from RF15-I multichannel photometer are used for the penultimate minimum. For the last unusually deep and prolonged solar activity minimum in 2009 the data from SphinX spectrophotometer are used. Comparison of measurements from both minima takes place in the overlapping energy range 2-15 keV. We focus on the active region formation, evolution and flaring productivity during respective minima.

  2. SOHO/CELIAS Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) Absolute Solar EUV Irradiance Measurements Spanning Two Solar Minima (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D.

    2010-12-01

    The SOHO/CELIAS Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) has measured absolute EUV solar irradiance nearly continuously over a 15 year period that includes both the cycle 22/23 (1996) and cycle 23/24 (2008) solar minima. These measurements indicate that irradiance in the 26-34 nm spectral range, including the dominant He II 30.4 nm spectral line, was about 15% ± 6% lower during the more recent minimum compared to the previous minimum. The SEM data have been verified against measurements from seven sounding rocket calibration underflights that included a NIST calibrated SEM clone instrument as well as a Rare Gas Ionization Cell (RGIC) absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) detector. Additionally, the SEM measurements are in good agreement with measurements from the EUV Spectrophotomer (ESP) part of the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on SDO. ESP measurements from the EVE sounding rocket flight (2008) confirmed the very low solar EUV irradiance observed during the 23/24 minimum. A comparison of SEM and ESP data in the 30.4 nm spectral windows is presented.

  3. 3D electron density distributions in the solar corona during solar minima: assessment for more realistic solar wind modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Patoul, J.; Foullon, C.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling, and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996-1997 and 2008-2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. We derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method. First we compare the density distributions obtained from tomography with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solutions. The tomography provides more accurate distributions of electron densities in the polar regions, and we find that the observed density varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We conclude that tomography offers reliable density distribution in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how it is magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in-situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. This research combined with the MHD coronal modeling efforts has the potential to increase the reliability for future space weather forecasting.

  4. Depth-dose equivalent relationship for cosmic rays at various solar minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) pose a serious radiation hazard for long-duration missions. In designing a lunar habitat or a Mars transfer vehicle, the radiation exposure determines the GCR shielding thickness, and hence the weight of spacecraft. Using the spherically symmetric diffusion theory of the solar modulation of GCR, and data on the differential energy spectra of H, He, O, and Fe, from 1965 to 1989, it has been shown that (1) the flux is determined by the diffusion parameter which is a function of the time in the solar cycle, and (2) the fluxes in the 1954 and 1976-1977 solar minima were similar and higher than those in 1965. In this paper, we have extended the spherical solar modulation theory back to 1954. The 1954-1955 GCR flux was nearly the same as that from 1976 to 1977; the 1965 flux values were nearly the same as those in 1986. Using this theory we have obtained the GCR spectra for all the nuclei, and calculated the depth dose as a function of Al thickness. It is shown that the shielding required to stay below 0.5 Sv is 17.5 -3/+8 g/sq cm of Al, and 9 -1.5/+5 g/sq cm to stay below 0.6 Sv. The calculated dose equivalent using the ICRP 60 values for quality factors is about 15 percent higher than that calculated using the ICRP 26 value.

  5. Is the Sun heading for another Maunder Minimum? - Precursors of the grand solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, H.; Kitazawa, K.; Nagaya, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Masuda, K.; Nakamura, T.; Muraki, Y.

    2010-06-01

    The Sun shows a quasi-periodic ~200-year cycle of activity that causes sporadic intervals of minimal sunspot activity and prolonged sunspot absence lasting for several decades. Such long-term sunspot absence may influence global climate and appears to be associated with periods of global cooling and little ice ages. Long-lasting sunspot absences since the 13th century are specifically linked to periods of increased glaciation and colder temperatures world wide and the development of "Little Ice Ages". These include the Wolf (AD 1282-342), Spoerer (AD 1416-534), Maunder (AD 1645-1715), and Dalton (AD 1795-1825) periods of sunspot minima. By contrast, increased solar activity may be linked to periods of global warming. Consequently, it is important to establish a methodology that enables predictions of near-future, long-term reductions in solar activity. However, it remains difficult to predict even the timing of onset and amplitude of the next 11-year solar cycle. To address this problem, we examined the features of precursory solar cycles related to three prolonged intervals of sunspot absence that occurred during the past ~600 years. Carbon-14 based analyses of the evolution of solar cycles around the onset of two prolonged periods of sunspot absence, the Maunder Minimum and the Spoerer Minimum, reveal that at least the two preceding solar cycles were longer than usual by several years, as were the cycles during the periods of sunspot absence. The solar cycle is likely to show characteristic precursory features leading up to intervals of sunspot absence, and which can be differentiated by events of different durations.

  6. Space climate. On geoeffective solar activity during Maunder and Dalton grand minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrescu, Crisan; Stefan, Cristiana; Dobrica, Venera

    2014-05-01

    The study of geomagnetic phenomena known as geomagnetic activity has long contributed to progress in solar-terrestrial science. The long geomagnetic time series recorded at geomagnetic observatories have provided means to characterize the Sun-Earth interaction at times prior to space era, via geomagnetic indices (e.g. aa, going back to 1868). For times prior to geomagnetic observatory era, we looked for information at the main geomagnetic field model gufm1 (1590-1990) (Jackson et al., 2000). We show first the presence in the time series provided by this model of a solar-activity-related signal, of 10-20 nT. Then the characteristics of this signal for times to 1600 are discussed. A significant geomagnetic activity at the 22-year time scale is found during the the Maunder and Dalton minima. The signal we discuss also corroborates the so-called excursions in the reconstructed sunspot number based on 10Be determinations on polar ice cores (Usoskin et al., 2003).

  7. Comparison of Coronal Streamer Properties to Solar Wind Models For The Last Two Solar Cycle Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Mari Paz; Landi, E.; Cranmer, S. R.; Raymond, J. C.; Cohen, O.; Oran, R.

    2013-07-01

    We characterize the physical properties of two coronal streamers during Earth/Ulysses quadrature configurations for the previous two solar minimum periods. Comparisons between coronal remote-sensing observations and in situ measurements of solar wind plasma properties are being used to characterize the origin of slow wind streams. In order to investigate slow solar wind heating and acceleration, we compare the measurements with predictions from MHD models. We aim to use the empirical measurements to distinguish between different proposed physical processes for the slow solar wind. This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AQ58G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  8. A Change in the Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure as an Indicator of the Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Gurman, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Solar activity during 2007 - 2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +/- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycle 22/23 minimum when a yearly running-mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a higher concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008 - 2011.We interpret this higher concentration of spatial power in the transition region's global network structure as a larger number of larger-area features on the solar disk. These changes in the global network structure during solar minima may characterize, in part, the geo-effectiveness of the solar He II EUV irradiance in addition to the estimations based on its absolute levels.

  9. Comparison of the extended solar minimum of 2006-2009 with the Spoerer, Maunder, and Dalton Grand Minima in solar activity in the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, K. G.; Beer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We use cosmic radiation records (neutron monitor and the cosmogenic radionuclides, 10Be and 14C) as a proxy to compare the solar activity during the extended solar minimum 2006-2009, with that during the Grand Solar Minima and Maxima that occurred between 1391 and 2010. The inferred cosmic ray intensities during the Spoerer, Maunder, and Dalton Grand Minima were significantly greater than those during 2006-2009. The onset phases of the three Grand Minima extended over between two and five Schwabe (sunspot) cycles, the cosmic ray intensity at the Schwabe minima increasing from a value approximating that of 2006-2009, to substantially higher values later in the Grand Minimum. The minimum estimated strengths of the heliospheric magnetic field near Earth during the Grand Minima were 2.4 nT (Spoerer), <2.0 nT (Maunder), and 2.6 nT (Dalton), compared to 3.9 nT in 2009. We conclude that the periods of highest solar activity during the Maunder Minimum approximated those near the sunspot minima between 1954 and 1996. The average ratio of the maximum to minimum estimated HMF in the six Schwabe cycles in the Maunder Minimum is 1.54 (range 1.30-1.85) compared to 1.52 (1.31-1.63) for the modern epoch suggesting similar operation of the solar dynamo in both intervals. The onset phase of the Maunder Minimum extending over five Schwabe cycles, and the large increase in cosmic ray flux (and decrease in estimated heliospheric magnetic field), leads us to speculate that the magnetohydrodynamic amplification in the solar dynamo exhibits a relaxation time well in excess of the 11 year period of the Schwabe cycle.

  10. Comparisons of Supergranule Characteristics During the Solar Minima of Cycles 22/23 and 23/24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter E.; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2011-01-01

    Supergranulation is a component of solar convection that manifests itself on the photosphere as a cellular network of around 35 Mm across, with a turnover lifetime of 1 2 days. It is strongly linked to the structure of the magnetic field. The horizontal, divergent flows within supergranule cells carry local field lines to the cell boundaries, while the rotational properties of supergranule upflows may contribute to the restoration of the poloidal field as part of the dynamo mechanism, which controls the solar cycle. The solar minimum at the transition from cycle 23 to 24 was notable for its low level of activity and its extended length. It is of interest to study whether the convective phenomena that influence the solar magnetic field during this time differed in character from periods of previous minima. This study investigates three characteristics (velocity components, sizes and lifetimes) of solar supergranulation. Comparisons of these characteristics are made between the minima of cycles 22/23 and 23/24 using MDI Doppler data from 1996 and 2008, respectively. It is found that whereas the lifetimes are equal during both epochs (around 18 h), the sizes are larger in 1996 (35.9 plus or minus 0.3 Mm) than in 2008 (35.0 plus or minus 0.3 Mm), while the dominant horizontal velocity flows are weaker (139 plus or minus m per second in 1996; 141 plus or minus 1 m per second in 2008). Although numerical differences are seen, they are not conclusive proof of the most recent minimum being inherently unusual.

  11. Global Solar Convective Dynamo with Cycles, Equatorward Propagation and Grand Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, Juri; Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S.

    2016-05-01

    The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, using slope-limited diffusion, is used to study the interaction of turbulent convection, rotation and magnetism in a full spherical shell comparable to the solar convection zone. Here a star of one solar mass, with a solar luminosity, is considered that is rotating at three times the solar rate. The dynamo generated magnetic field forms large-scale toroidal wreaths, whose formation is tied to the low Rossby number of the convection in this simulation which we have labeled K3S. This case displays prominent polarity cycles with regular reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. These reversals are linked to the weakened differential rotation and a resistive collapse of the large-scale magnetic field. Distinctive equatorial migration of the strong magnetic wreaths is seen, arising from modulation of the differential rotation rather than a dynamo wave. As the wreaths approach the equator, cross-equatorial magnetic flux is achieved that permits the low-latitude convection to generate poloidal magnetic field with opposite polarity. Poleward migration of such magnetic flux from the equator eventually leads to the reversal of the polarity of the high-latitude magnetic field. This K3S simulation also enters an interval with reduced magnetic energy at low latitudes lasting roughly 16 years (about 2.5 polarity cycles), during which the polarity cycles are disrupted and after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles. An analysis of this striking grand minimum reveals that it likely arises through the interplay of symmetric and antisymmetric dynamo families.

  12. HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRIES IN THE POLAR SOLAR WIND OBSERVED BY ULYSSES NEAR THE MINIMA OF SOLAR CYCLES 22 AND 23

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2013-05-10

    We examined solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observations from Ulysses' first and third orbits to study hemispheric differences in the properties of the solar wind and IMF originating from the Sun's large polar coronal holes (PCHs) during the declining and minimum phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. We identified hemispheric asymmetries in several parameters, most notably {approx}15%-30% south-to-north differences in averages for the solar wind density, mass flux, dynamic pressure, and energy flux and the radial and total IMF magnitudes. These differences were driven by relatively larger, more variable solar wind density and radial IMF between {approx}36 Degree-Sign S-60 Degree-Sign S during the declining phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. These observations indicate either a hemispheric asymmetry in the PCH output during the declining and minimum phase of solar cycles 22 and 23 with the southern hemisphere being more active than its northern counterpart, or a solar cycle effect where the PCH output in both hemispheres is enhanced during periods of higher solar activity. We also report a strong linear correlation between these solar wind and IMF parameters, including the periods of enhanced PCH output, that highlight the connection between the solar wind mass and energy output and the Sun's magnetic field. That these enhancements were not matched by similar sized variations in solar wind speed points to the mass and energy responsible for these increases being added to the solar wind while its flow was subsonic.

  13. Flat minima.

    PubMed

    Hochreiter, S; Schmidhuber, J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for finding low-complexity neural networks with high generalization capability. The algorithm searches for a "flat" minimum of the error function. A flat minimum is a large connected region in weight space where the error remains approximately constant. An MDL-based, Bayesian argument suggests that flat minima correspond to "simple" networks and low expected overfitting. The argument is based on a Gibbs algorithm variant and a novel way of splitting generalization error into underfitting and overfitting error. Unlike many previous approaches, ours does not require gaussian assumptions and does not depend on a "good" weight prior. Instead we have a prior over input-output functions, thus taking into account net architecture and training set. Although our algorithm requires the computation of second-order derivatives, it has backpropagation's order of complexity. Automatically, it effectively prunes units, weights, and input lines. Various experiments with feedforward and recurrent nets are described. In an application to stock market prediction, flat minimum search outperforms conventional backprop, weight decay, and "optimal brain surgeon/optimal brain damage".

  14. Major geophysical events and transitions of heliospheric magnetic field in the beginning, middle and end phase of the Maunder solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Michele; Straser, Valentino; Feron, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades we are moving towards the hypothesis that electromagnetic (EM) processes inside the solar system (not yet fully understood from a physical point of view), may be linked with the energy released during major geophysical events (energy expressed in magnitude or Volcanic Explosivity Index). This research has focused on analysis of the temporal relationship between EM processes inside the solar system and major geophysical events around the crucial phase of the Maunder solar minima (1645-1715). To carry out this study thirty-five limit values of the heliospheric magnetic field strength HMF (minimum and/or maximum) were compared, in terms of time, with twenty-one major geophysical events which occurred between 1600 and 1729. In the solar-terrestrial interaction, the concomitant conditions necessary for the amplification of the energy of the geophysical event, are two: i. low solar activity during a long period (from decades to centuries), for example, the historical solar minima: Wolf, Sporer, Maunder, Dalton, etc. and ii. fast and impulsive EM solar dynamo reorganizations in the short-term (one year or two years), are characteristic in the two periods of the solar cycle border, the incoming or outgoing of the solar minima or solar maximum. The reconstructed intensity of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) was the main set of data used to carry out the present study. HMF evaluated by the annual cosmogenic 10Be ice core data from Dye 3 and North GRIP, in Greenland [McCracken;Beer,Sol.Phys.,2015 in press]. Analysis of the data shows that all the major geophysical events, with magnitude and volcanic explosivity index: 8.7solar minimum, is confirmed by taking into account the comparison of the dates of major

  15. Claim of solar influence is on thin ice: are 11-year cycle solar minima associated with severe winters in Europe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oldenborgh, G. J.; de Laat, A. T. J.; Luterbacher, J.; Ingram, W. J.; Osborn, T. J.

    2013-06-01

    A recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters, ‘Solar influence on winter severity in central Europe’, by Sirocko et al (2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L16704) claims that ‘weak solar activity is empirically related to extremely cold winter conditions in Europe’ based on analyses of documentary evidence of freezing of the River Rhine in Germany and of the Reanalysis of the Twentieth Century (20C). However, our attempt to reproduce these findings failed. The documentary data appear to be selected subjectively and agree neither with instrumental observations nor with two other reconstructions based on documentary data. None of these datasets show significant connection between solar activity and winter severity in Europe beyond a common trend. The analysis of Sirocko et al of the 20C circulation and temperature is inconsistent with their time series analysis. A physically-motivated consistent methodology again fails to support the reported conclusions. We conclude that multiple lines of evidence contradict the findings of Sirocko et al.

  16. A study of the properties of the Grand Solar Minima throughout the past 13,000 years and the implications for Space Weather.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Ken; Beer, Juerg

    2016-04-01

    The intensity of the cosmic radiation reaching the orbit of Earth is primarily controlled by the strength of the heliomagnetic field, which itself is largely determined by the level of solar activity. The paleo-cosmic ray (PCR) record therefore provides the output from a "cosmic magnetometer", and a proxy for solar activity in the past. Using 10Be (ice-cores) and 14C (tree rings) data we investigate the wide variations in the PCR and solar activity that have occurred during the past 13,000 years. In particular, we study the occurrence and properties of "Grand Minima"- the periods of very low solar activity similar to the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715) for which solar and geophysical data are available. There was a sequence of five GM between 950-1830CE; there were three similar sequences of similar duration in the preceding millennia; interspersed with intervals of ~1000 year essentially devoid of GM. The four sequences of GM correspond to the minima of the 2300 y Hallstatt periodicity. The PCR increases by ~50% during "Grand Solar Minima" and we use the PCR intensity to quantify the relative significance of the Grand Minima in the past. On the basis that the terrestrial and heliospheric consequences of a GM will depend on both the amplitude of the change in PCR intensity, and its duration, we have defined a parameter, the GM index, as the product of the amplitude and duration of a GM. We conclude that there have been 22 GM of geophysical significance equal to, or greater than that of the Wolf GM (1230-1350CE). The Sun is in a "Grand Minimum" condition for ~45% of the time during a GM sequence; and for only ~5% of the time in the intervening 1000y intervals of high solar activity. We discuss the implications of these observations in respect of space weather and climate. In conclusion, we speculate that the sun may now be entering one of its extended periods of high activity which will persist for ~1000 y.

  17. A successful solar cooking introduction model

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, W.F.

    1992-12-31

    The author reviews the process he has undertaken to introduce solar cooking in Central America. A slow but increasingly successful acceptance rate is attributed to the following factors: the adaptation of the physical design of the cooker to local conditions; the determination of essential accessories for successful cooking; preliminary assessment of the probability for successful solar cooking; the structure of the oven building workshops; the follow-up program for those who have built their solar ovens. The follow-up program is the emphasis of his current research. The program can be divided into two categories. One is physical maintenance, repair and upgrade needs. The second is education in solar cooking. Another is orientation in the physical use of the oven. While these measures are expected to increase utilization, subsidies will be needed if solar cookers are expected to compete with highly subsidized fuel alternatives such as natural gas and electricity.

  18. Origin of grand minima in sunspot cycles.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Karak, Bidya Binay

    2012-10-26

    One of the most striking aspects of the 11-year sunspot cycle is that there have been times in the past when some cycles went missing, a most well-known example of this being the Maunder minimum during 1645-1715. Analyses of cosmogenic isotopes ((14)C and (10)Be) indicated that there were about 27 grand minima in the last 11,000 yrs, implying that about 2.7% of the solar cycles had conditions appropriate for forcing the Sun into grand minima. We address the question of how grand minima are produced and specifically calculate the frequency of occurrence of grand minima from a theoretical dynamo model. We assume that fluctuations in the poloidal field generation mechanism and in the meridional circulation produce irregularities of sunspot cycles. Taking these fluctuations to be Gaussian and estimating the values of important parameters from the data of the last 28 solar cycles, we show from our flux transport dynamo model that about 1-4% of the sunspot cycles may have conditions suitable for inducing grand minima. PMID:23215173

  19. National solar data network success stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Three of the most successful applications in the MASEC reporting region are described. The three sites are the Scattergood School site in West Branch, Iowa; the South Dakota School of Mines site located at the Mount Rushmore Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota, and the Telex Communications site in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The first is a school recreation center, the second a park recreation center, and the third a business. All three are active systems and each exhibits a variety of approaches to providing space and domestic water heating. The major success of each is that a substantial portion of the heating load was provided by solar energy. The success of the NSDN program is that it indictes the approaches and parts of the systems that seem to work best, so that conclusions can be made about which applications are appropriate in varying circumstances. A brief report is presented for each system explaining the system, the energy flow through the system, the total cost, and the energy saved per year.

  20. National solar data network success stories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Three of the most successful applications in the MASEC reporting region are described. The three sites are the Scattergood School site in West Branch, Iowa; the South Dakota School of Mines site located at the Mount Rushmore Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota, and the Telex Communications site in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The first is a school recreation center, the second a park recreation center, and the third a business. All three are active systems and each exhibits a variety of approaches to providing space and domestic water heating. The major success of each is that a substantial portion of the heating load was provided by solar energy. The success of the NSDN program is that it indicates the approaches and parts of the systems that seem to work best, so that conclusions can be made about which applications are appropriate in varying circumstances. A brief report is presented for each system explaining the system, the energy flow through the system, the total cost, and the energy saved per year.

  1. Radiochemical Solar Neutrino Experiments - Successful and Otherwise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,R.L.

    2008-05-25

    Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ({sup 37}Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ({sup 71}Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled.

  2. Finding pathways between distant local minima.

    PubMed

    Carr, Joanne M; Trygubenko, Semen A; Wales, David J

    2005-06-15

    We report a new algorithm for constructing pathways between local minima that involve a large number of intervening transition states on the potential energy surface. A significant improvement in efficiency has been achieved by changing the strategy for choosing successive pairs of local minima that serve as endpoints for the next search. We employ Dijkstra's algorithm [E. W. Dijkstra, Numer. Math. 1, 269 (1959)] to identify the "shortest" path corresponding to missing connections within an evolving database of local minima and the transition states that connect them. The metric employed to determine the shortest missing connection is a function of the minimized Euclidean distance. We present applications to the formation of buckminsterfullerene and to the folding of various biomolecules: the B1 domain of protein G, tryptophan zippers, and the villin headpiece subdomain. The corresponding pathways contain up to 163 transition states and will be used in future discrete path sampling calculations. PMID:16008483

  3. Finding pathways between distant local minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Joanne M.; Trygubenko, Semen A.; Wales, David J.

    2005-06-01

    We report a new algorithm for constructing pathways between local minima that involve a large number of intervening transition states on the potential energy surface. A significant improvement in efficiency has been achieved by changing the strategy for choosing successive pairs of local minima that serve as endpoints for the next search. We employ Dijkstra's algorithm [E. W. Dijkstra, Numer. Math. 1, 269 (1959)] to identify the "shortest" path corresponding to missing connections within an evolving database of local minima and the transition states that connect them. The metric employed to determine the shortest missing connection is a function of the minimized Euclidean distance. We present applications to the formation of buckminsterfullerene and to the folding of various biomolecules: the B1 domain of protein G, tryptophan zippers, and the villin headpiece subdomain. The corresponding pathways contain up to 163 transition states and will be used in future discrete path sampling calculations.

  4. OUT Success Stories: Solar Trough Power Plants

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.

    2000-08-01

    The Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) plants use parabolic-trough solar collectors to capture the sun's energy and convert it to heat. The SEGS plants range in capacity from 13.8 to 80 MW, and they were constructed to meet Southern California Edison Company's periods of peak power demand.

  5. Solar Success Story at Moanalua Terrace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    Solar systems prove to be the environmentally and economically sound choice for heating water in U.S. Navy housing at Moanalua Terrace in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hawaii is a perfect environment for solar water heating,'' according to Alan Ikeda, a Housing Management Specialist with the Pacific Naval Facility Engineering Command Housing Department in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ''The sun shines most of the time, we don't have to worry about freezing, the state offers a 35% solar tax credit, and our local utility supports the purchase and installation of solar systems with generous rebates.'' The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction helped persuade the Navy to take advantage of Hawaii's solar resource and install solar water heaters on family housing units. At Moanalua Terrace, the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which they are rebuilding in four phases. Designers decided to use the opportunity to give the solar systems a try. When the 100 homes in Phase I were built, money was not available for solar water heaters. However, Ikeda subsequently secured a $130,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to retrofit the Phase I homes with solar systems. In retrofit applications, HECO rebates $800 per unit ($80,000 total) on approved equipment, and Pearl Harbor Family Housing will pay the difference of the estimated $340,000 total cost, or about $130,000. The 136 units built during Phase II of the Moanalua Terrace project included solar systems in their specifications, so the Navy was able to take advantage of the $1,500 per system HECO rebate for approved solar water heaters in new construction. The Navy chose direct (open-loop) active systems that circulate potable water through flat-plate collectors coated with a black chrome selective surface. Each system consists of a 4-foot by 8-foot (1.2-m by 2.4-m) collector made by American

  6. OUT Success Stories: Solar Hot Water Technology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Clyne, R.

    2000-08-01

    Solar hot water technology was made great strides in the past two decades. Every home, commercial building, and industrial facility requires hot water. DOE has helped to develop reliable and durable solar hot water systems. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors. Flat-plate collectors are commonly used in residential hot water systems and can be integrated into the architectural design of the building.

  7. Solar Two: A successful power tower demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    REILLY,HUGH E.; PACHECO,JAMES E.

    2000-03-02

    Solar Two, a 10MWe power tower plant in Barstow, California, successfully demonstrated the production of grid electricity at utility-scale with a molten-salt solar power tower. This paper provides an overview of the project, from inception in 1993 to closure in the spring of 1999. Included are discussions of the goals of the Solar Two consortium, the planned-vs.-actual timeline, plant performance, problems encountered, and highlights and successes of the project. The paper concludes with a number of key results of the Solar Two test and evaluation program.

  8. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Joanne M.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric; Wales, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  9. The Earth's climate at minima of Centennial Gleissberg Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Feynman, Joan

    2015-10-01

    The recent extended, deep minimum of solar variability and the extended minima in the 19th and 20th centuries (1810-1830 and 1900-1920) are consistent with minima of the Centennial Gleissberg Cycle (CGC), a 90-100 year variation of the amplitude of the 11-year sunspot cycle observed on the Sun and at the Earth. The Earth's climate response to these prolonged low solar radiation inputs involves heat transfer to the deep ocean causing a time lag longer than a decade. The spatial pattern of the climate response, which allows distinguishing the CGC forcing from other climate forcings, is dominated by the Pacific North American pattern (PNA). The CGC minima, sometimes coincidently in combination with volcanic forcing, are associated with severe weather extremes. Thus the 19th century CGC minimum, coexisted with volcanic eruptions, led to especially cold conditions in United States, Canada and Western Europe.

  10. Bromine enrichment in marsh sediments as a marker of environmental changes driven by Grand Solar Minima and anthropogenic activity (Caminha, NW of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Moreno, J; Fatela, F; Leorri, E; Araújo, M F; Moreno, F; De la Rosa, J; Freitas, M C; Valente, T; Corbett, D R

    2015-02-15

    A sediment core collected in Caminha tidal marsh, NW Portugal, was used to assess bromine (Br) signal over the last ca. 1,700 years. The Br temporal variability reflects its close relationship with soil/sediment organic matter (OM) and also alterations in Br biogeochemical recycling in marsh environment. The highest Br enrichment in sediments was found during the Maunder Solar Minimum, a major solar event characterized by lower irradiance (TSI) and temperature, increased cloudiness and albedo. The obtained results suggest that those climate-induced changes weakened the natural mechanisms that promote Br biochemical transformations, driven by both living plants metabolism and plant litter degradation, with the ensuing generation of volatile methyl bromide (CH3Br). It seems that the prevailing climate conditions during the Maunder favoured the retention of more Br in marsh ecosystem, ultimately decreasing the biogenic Br emissions to the atmosphere. During the 20th century, the Br pattern in sediments appears to mirror likewise anthropogenic sources. The significant correlation (p<0.05) between Br/OM ratios and Pb contents in sediments after 1934 suggests a common source. This is most probably related with the rise, massive consumption and prohibition of leaded gasoline, where ethylene dibromide was added as lead scavenger to antiknock mixtures. More regionally, the concerted use of flame retardants on forest fire management, covering the 1980s through mid-1990s in the north of Portugal and Galicia, could be responsible for the observed increase of sediment Br (relatively to Pb) pool of this tidal marsh. Although man-made brominated compounds are being phased-out since the inception of the 1992 Montreal Protocol, the Caminha tidal marsh sedimentary record showed that Br levels only started to decline after 2002.

  11. Recent Minima of 171 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for 171 eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO EB section. Times of minima from observations received by the author from March 2015 thru October 2015 are presented.

  12. NREL Success Stories - Quest for Inexpensive Silicon Solar Cells

    ScienceCinema

    Branz, Howard

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) share their story about a successful partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Ampulse Corporation and how support from the US Department of Energy's Technology Commercialization & Deployment Fund has helped it and their silicon solar cell research thrive.

  13. Cloud supersaturations and Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Stephen; Hudson, James G.

    2013-05-01

    CCN spectral measurements in four aircraft research projects often showed bimodal distributions of which the Hoppel minima can be used to infer cloud supersaturations (S)—effective S (Seff). These direct critical S (Sc) measurements are superior to differential mobility analyzer (DMA) Seff estimates because they do not need composition information and have more channel resolution. These Seff are higher than Seff obtained by matching CCN spectra with droplet concentrations (Nc). These differences can help determine whether the easier evaporation of polluted cloud droplets can increase cloud turbulence and thus reduce cloud thickness, extent, and liquid water content and thus essentially mitigate the indirect aerosol effect (IAE).

  14. Potential benefits from a successful solar thermal program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terasawa, K. L.; Gates, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy systems were investigated which complement nuclear and coal technologies as a means of reducing the U.S. dependence on imported petroleum. Solar Thermal Energy Systems (STES) represents an important category of solar energy technologies. STES can be utilized in a broad range of applications servicing a variety of economic sectors, and they can be deployed in both near-term and long-term markets. The net present value of the energy cost savings attributable to electric utility and IPH applications of STES were estimated for a variety of future energy cost scenarios and levels of R&D success. This analysis indicated that the expected net benefits of developing an STES option are significantly greater than the expected costs of completing the required R&D. In addition, transportable fuels and chemical feedstocks represent a substantial future potential market for STES. Due to the basic nature of this R&D activity, however, it is currently impossible to estimate the value of STES in these markets. Despite this fact, private investment in STES R&D is not anticipated due to the high level of uncertainty characterizing the expected payoffs.

  15. NREL Policy Stacking Theory Correlates Key Indicators with Solar Market Success (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    NREL's Integrated Applications Group evaluated the time-dependent relationships between policy implementation and the success of solar markets using historical data for installed capacity of solar photovoltaic energy systems. This Science and Technology Highlights fact sheet summarizes their research.

  16. Minima Times of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, S.; Dubovsky, P.; Kudak, V.; Perig, V.

    2016-05-01

    We present 221 CCD minima times of the 76 selected eclipsing binaries obtained during 2013-2016 at Observatory at Kolonica Saddle in Slovakia and Observatory of Laboratory of Space Research, Uzhhorod National University in Ukraine

  17. Learning without local minima in radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, M; Frasconi, P; Gori, M

    1995-01-01

    Learning from examples plays a central role in artificial neural networks. The success of many learning schemes is not guaranteed, however, since algorithms like backpropagation may get stuck in local minima, thus providing suboptimal solutions. For feedforward networks, optimal learning can be achieved provided that certain conditions on the network and the learning environment are met. This principle is investigated for the case of networks using radial basis functions (RBF). It is assumed that the patterns of the learning environment are separable by hyperspheres. In that case, we prove that the attached cost function is local minima free with respect to all the weights. This provides us with some theoretical foundations for a massive application of RBF in pattern recognition.

  18. Potential energy stored by planets and grand minima events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo G.

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Wolff & Patrone (2010), have developed a simple but very interesting model by which the movement of the Sun around the barycentre of the Solar system could create potential energy that could be released by flows pre-existing inside the Sun. The authors claim that it is the first mechanism showing how planetary movements can modify internal structure in the Sun that can be related to solar cycle. In this work we point out limitations of mentioned mechanism (which is based on interchange arguments), which could be inapplicable to a real star. Then, we calculate the temporal evolution of potential energy stored in zones of Sun's interior in which the potential energy could be most efficiently stored taking into account detailed barycentric Sun dynamics. We show strong variations of potential energy related to Maunder Minimum, Dalton Minimum and the maximum of Cycle 22, around 1990. We discuss briefly possible implications of this putative mechanism to solar cycle specially Grand Minima events.

  19. PV technology and success of solar electricity in Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dung, T.Q.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1990 the PV Technology and the Solar electricity have been strongly developed in Vietnam. The PV experts of Solarlab have studied and set up an appropriate PV Technology responding to local Market needs. It has not only stood well but has been also transferred to Mali Republic and Lao P.D.R. The PV off grid systems of Solarlab demonstrate good efficiency and low prices. Over 60 solar stations and villages have been built to provide solar lighting for about 3000 families along the country in remote, mountainous areas and islands. 400 families are using stand-alone Solar Home Systems. The Solar electricity has been chosen for Rural Electrification and National Telecommunication Network in remote and mountainous regions. Many International projects in cooperation with FONDEM-France, SELF USA and Governmental PV projects have been realized by Solarlab. The experiences of maintenance, management and finance about PV development in Vietnam are also mentioned.

  20. Solar Successes: The Best of Today's Energy Efficient Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    This is a brochure developed specifically for residential home builders. It provides information on basic financial factors and additional resources to consider when incorporating solar technologies into building plans.

  1. Variability of space climate and its extremes with successive solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Sandra; Hush, Phillip; Tindale, Elisabeth; Dunlop, Malcolm; Watkins, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Auroral geomagnetic indices coupled with in situ solar wind monitors provide a comprehensive data set, spanning several solar cycles. Space climate can be considered as the distribution of space weather. We can then characterize these observations in terms of changing space climate by quantifying how the statistical properties of ensembles of these observed variables vary between different phases of the solar cycle. We first consider the AE index burst distribution. Bursts are constructed by thresholding the AE time series; the size of a burst is the sum of the excess in the time series for each time interval over which the threshold is exceeded. The distribution of burst sizes is two component with a crossover in behaviour at thresholds ≈ 1000 nT. Above this threshold, we find[1] a range over which the mean burst size is almost constant with threshold for both solar maxima and minima. The burst size distribution of the largest events has a functional form which is exponential. The relative likelihood of these large events varies from one solar maximum and minimum to the next. If the relative overall activity of a solar maximum/minimum can be estimated, these results then constrain the likelihood of extreme events of a given size for that solar maximum/minimum. We next develop and apply a methodology to quantify how the full distribution of geomagnetic indices and upstream solar wind observables are changing between and across different solar cycles. This methodology[2] estimates how different quantiles of the distribution, or equivalently, how the return times of events of a given size, are changing. [1] Hush, P., S. C. Chapman, M. W. Dunlop, and N. W. Watkins (2015), Robust statistical properties of the size of large burst events in AE, Geophys. Res. Lett.,42 doi:10.1002/2015GL066277 [2] Chapman, S. C., D. A. Stainforth, N. W. Watkins, (2013) On estimating long term local climate trends , Phil. Trans. Royal Soc., A,371 20120287 DOI:10.1098/rsta.2012.0287

  2. Magnetic field-aligned electrons escaping from plasma density minima in the cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A.; Lybekk, B.; Haaland, S.; Svenes, K.; Dandouras, I.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2012-04-01

    On Cluster the plasma density in very tenuous plasmas can be estimated based on spacecraft potential measurements. This has made it possible to detect plasma density minima of 0.01-0.1 cm-3 in the cusp poleward of the main precipitation of electrons and ions. Electron data from PEACE show that some of these minima have magnetic field-aligned outflow of electrons with energies of several hundred eV. Ion data from CIS will be used to look for possible related ion field-aligned flow. In this study the locations and the extents of plasma density minima, with electron outflow, will be determined for the northern and the southern cusp. Information about extent across the magnetic field can be obtained by using data from all four Cluster satellites, and electric field data can be used to detect plasma drift and wave activity. Possible connections to solar wind conditions and magnetosphere disturbance level will be presented

  3. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-08-20

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  4. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  5. Occurrence of Knudsen minima in diverging microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Hemadri, Vadiraj; Bhandarkar, Upendra; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-12-09

    Rarefied gas flow is gaining increasing importance with the emergence of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Knudsen minima is one of the characteristic feature of such rarefied flows and has been observed in uniform cross section channels such as plane channel, cylindrical tube and annulus. However, data pertaining to gaseous flow in varying cross section channel is relatively sparse. Channels of varying cross section are frequently encountered in MEMS devices and are fundamental to the design of micro-scale nozzles and micro-valves. In this context, rarefied gas flow through a diverging microchannel (divergence angle – 12 degree) is studied experimentally with three different gases (argon, nitrogen and oxygen). The experiments are performed over a wide range with the mean Knudsen number varying from slip to the transitional regime (0.07 to 1.2). It is found that the effect of molecular weight of the gas on the non-dimensional mass flow rate is negligible. The Knudsen minima is experimentally observed for the first time in microchannel of non-uniform cross section.

  6. HOW PECULIAR WAS THE RECENT EXTENDED MINIMUM: A HINT TOWARD DOUBLE MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F.

    2011-09-20

    In this paper, we address the controversy regarding the recent extended solar minimum as seen in helioseismic low- and intermediate-degree mode frequencies: studies from different instruments identify different epochs of seismic minima. Here we use mode frequencies from a network of six identical instruments, the Global Oscillation Network Group, continuously collecting data for more than 15 years, to investigate the epoch of minimum in solar oscillation frequencies prior to the beginning of solar cycle 24. We include both low- and intermediate-degree modes in the l range of 0-120 and frequency range of 2.0-3.5 mHz. In this analysis, we demonstrate that there were indeed two minima in oscillation frequencies, depending upon the degree of modes, or more precisely the lower turning point radius of the propagating wave. We also analyze frequencies as a function of latitude to identify the beginning of solar cycle 24. We observe two minima at high latitudes and a single minimum at mid/low latitudes. This scenario is in contrast to cycle 23 where the epoch of seismic minimum did not change with latitude or depth. Our results also hint at a possible role of the relic magnetic field in modifying the oscillation frequencies of modes sampling deeper layers.

  7. Solar wind disturbances in th outer heliosphere caused by successive solar flares from the same active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S. I.; Hakamada, K.

    1983-01-01

    Solar wind disturbances caused by successive flares from the same active region are traced to about 20 AU, using the modeling method developed by Hakamada and Akasofu (1982). It is shown that the flare-generated shock waves coalesce with the co-rotating interaction region of the interplanetary magnetic field, resulting in a large-scale magnetic field structure in the outer heliosphere. Such a structure may have considerable effects on the propagation of galactic cosmic rays.

  8. Time delay in photoionization near Cooper minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jobin; Kannur, Sindhu; Kumar, Ashish; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Manson, Steven T.

    2012-06-01

    The connection between the energy dependence of the scattering phase shift and time delay is known [1]. With the developments of techniques in attosecond physics, it has become possible to measure the time delay between photoemission from different subshells [2, 3]. There have been several nonrelativistic calculations of the time delay between photoelectrons from different subshells [4, 5] that confirmed the need to include many-electron correlations. In the present work, the RRPA [6], which includes both relativity and many of the important electron correlation effects, is employed to calculate the time delay between photoelectrons from the valance ns, np3/2 and np1/2 subshells of noble gas atoms in the dipole approximation, and particularly dramatic variations occur in the vicinity of Cooper minimum [7] owing to the rapid variation of the scattering phase shift in the vicinity of Cooper minima, including effects that occur only due to relativistic splittings. These effects appear to be amenable to experimental investigation.[4pt] [1] E. P. Wigner, Phys. Rev. 98, 145 (1955). [2] M. Schultze et al, Science 328, 1658 (2010). [3] K. Klunder et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 143002 (2011). [4] A. S. Kheifets and I. A. Ivanov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 233002 (2010). [5] C. H. Zhang and U. Thumm, Phys. Rev. A 82, 043405 (2010). [6] W. R. Johnson and C. D. Lin, Phys. Rev. A 20, 964 (1979). [7] J. W. Cooper, Phys. Rev. 128, 681 (1962).

  9. Ecology of common salvinia, Salvinia minima, in southern Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The floating macrophyte, Salvinia minima, grows in a variety of freshwater habitats in Florida. We conducted a 39-month study at four sites in southern Florida to elucidate the abiotic and biotic factors that influenced the density, nutritional profile, and size of S. minima. These factors include...

  10. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  11. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  12. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  13. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  14. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  15. Aquasols: on the role of secondary minima.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melinda W; Abadzic, Dean; O'Melia, Charles R

    2004-11-15

    Experiments are presented that test the hypothesis of deposition into and reentrainment from secondary minima during flow through porous media. The release of deposited particles following a decrease in ionic strength is inconsistent with deposition in the primary minimum of either simple DLVO interaction energy curves (which suggest that deposition is irreversible) or Born-DLVO interaction energy curves (which create a finite primary minimum that deepens with decreasing ionic strength). The observed release of particles is, on the other hand, consistent with deposition in the secondary minimum because this energy minimum decreases and can disappear with decreasing ionic strength. The implications for colloid transport of a reversible deposition process in the secondary minimum are very different from those of a process involving irreversible deposition in the primary minimum. First, particles that are continually captured and released will travel much farther in the subsurface than might be expected if the classic irreversible filtration model is applied. Second, and perhaps more significantly, deposition in the secondary well can increase with increasing particle size. Although particle transport by convective diffusion increases as particle size decreases, particle "attachment" in secondary minima decreases with decreasing particle size. Thus, smaller particles (those with diameters in the order of a few tens of nanometers) would be more effective in the facilitated transport of highly sorbing contaminants such as hydrophobic organic molecules, metals, and radionuclides. Other contaminants are themselves particles, such as viruses (tens of nanometers in diameter) and bacteria (near 1 microm in diameter). Due to this difference in size, viruses could be transported over much larger distances than bacteria. Third, the transport of colloids and, hence, the transport of contaminants associated with them, depends on the Hamaker constant of the particle

  16. Tunable reflection minima of nanostructured antireflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, S. A.; Bagnall, D. M.

    2008-09-01

    Broadband antireflection schemes for silicon surfaces based on the moth-eye principle and comprising arrays of subwavelength-scale pillars are applicable to solar cells, photodetectors, and stealth technologies and can exhibit very low reflectances. We show that rigorous coupled wave analysis can be used to accurately model the intricate reflectance behavior of these surfaces and so can be used to explore the effects of variations in pillar height, period, and shape. Low reflectance regions are identified, the extent of which are determined by the shape of the pillars. The wavelengths over which these low reflectance regions operate can be shifted by altering the period of the array. Thus the subtle features of the reflectance spectrum of a moth-eye array can be tailored for optimum performance for the input spectrum of a specific application.

  17. NASA/JPL Solar System Educators Program: Twelve Years of Success and Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, K.; NASA/JPL Solar System Educators Program

    2011-12-01

    Since 1999, the NASA/JPL Solar System Educators Program (SSEP) has been the model of a successful master teacher volunteer program. Integrating nationwide volunteers in this professional development program helped optimize agency funding set aside for education. Through the efforts of these volunteers, teachers across the country became familiarized with NASA's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) educational materials, schools added these products to their curriculum and students benefitted. The years since 1999 have brought about many changes. There have been advancements in technology that allow more opportunities for telecon and web based learning methods. Along with those advancements have also come significant challenges. With NASA budgets for education shrinking, this already frugal program has become more spartan. Teachers face their own hardships with school budget cuts, limited classroom time and little support for professional development. In order for SSEP to remain viable in the face of these challenges, the program management, mission funders and volunteers themselves are working together to find ways of maintaining the quality that made the program a success and at the same time incorporate new, cost-effective methods of delivery. The group will also seek new partnerships to provide enhancements that will aid educators in advancing their careers at the same time as they receive professional development. By working together and utilizing the talent and experience of these master teachers, the Solar System Educators Program can enjoy a revitalization that will meet the needs of today's educators at the same time as renewing the enthusiasm of the volunteers.

  18. Two novel begomoviruses belonging to different lineages infecting Rhynchosia minima.

    PubMed

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique; Martínez-Zubiaur, Yamila

    2010-12-01

    Rhynchosia minima is a host for several begomoviruses, both in the Old World and the New World. In Cuba, a whitefly-transmitted disease causing yellow mosaic symptoms, suggested to be of viral origin, was described more than 30 years ago in R. minima, but no information about the nature of the viruses infecting this weed in this country is available to date. Here, we report the detection of isolates of two novel begomovirus species infecting R. minima in Cuba, which we proposed be named Rhynchosia golden mosaic Havana virus (RhGMHaV) and Rhynchosia rugose golden mosaic virus (RhRGMV). The highest nucleotide sequence identities of RhGMHaV and RhRGMV DNA-A were with isolates of Rhynchosia golden mosaic virus (78.7%) and Sida golden mosaic virus (87.5%), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these novel viruses belong to two different lineages of New World begomoviruses.

  19. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  20. Solar cycle variation of the statistical distribution of the solar wind ɛ parameter and its constituent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, E.; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We use 20 years of Wind solar wind observations to investigate the solar cycle variation of the solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. For the first time, we use generalized quantile-quantile plots to compare the statistical distribution of four commonly used solar wind coupling parameters, Poynting flux, B2, the ɛ parameter, and vB, between the maxima and minima of solar cycles 23 and 24. We find the distribution is multicomponent and has the same functional form at all solar cycle phases; the change in distribution is captured by a simple transformation of variables for each component. The ɛ parameter is less sensitive than its constituent variables to changes in the distribution of extreme values between successive solar maxima. The quiet minimum of cycle 23 manifests only in lower extreme values, while cycle 24 was less active across the full distribution range.

  1. Cooper-type minima in multipole cross sections of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, P.M.; Copeland, G.E.

    1984-07-09

    The quadrupole photoionization cross sections for hydrogen are shown to contain minima at kinetic energies of the free electron that are less than 2 eV. These minima are the result of zeros that occur in some of the quadrupole transition strengths between bound excited (Vertical Barn,l>) and continuum (Vertical BarW,l+2>) states for atomic hydrogen. These minima are compared with Cooper minima which occur in the photoionization cross sections for some multielectron systems.

  2. STUDY OF TWO SUCCESSIVE THREE-RIBBON SOLAR FLARES ON 2012 JULY 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda

    2014-01-20

    This Letter reports two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using Hα observations of 0.''1 resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing ''fish-bone-like'' morphology evidenced by both Hα images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in Hα apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.

  3. Heliobiology, its development, successes and tasks. [solar activity effects on life on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platonova, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    Heliobiology studies the influence of changes in solar activity on life. Considered are the influence of periodic solar activity on the development and growth of epidemics, mortality from various diseases, the functional activity of the nervous system, the development of psychic disturbances, the details of the development of microorganisms and many other phenomena in the living world.

  4. Observations of Hoppel Minima in CCN Spectra in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Samantha S.

    Aerosols are one of the most fundamental keys to understanding the future state of the climate. Aerosols impact the radiation budget of the Earth in numerous ways and are poorly understood. Some aerosols can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and can significantly change the properties of clouds; this is known as the Indirect Aerosol Effect (IAE) and it remains the largest climate change uncertainty. Most studies concerning CCN and the impacts of the CCN distributions occur over the ocean, leaving questions about the processing occurring over the continents. Eleven days of measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site were taken from an Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) during May 2003. A ground based CCN spectrometer and differential mobility analyzer (DMA) were deployed to study the distributions of the CCN spectra and dry aerosol size distributions. 268 measurement periods were sorted by their spectral shapes by using two rating systems. Case studies of the characteristics of the spectra observed during specific times of day or particular meteorological conditions were created and it was shown that meteorological conditions have a significant impact on the shapes of the CCN distributions. Back trajectories were also analyzed and shown to have an even larger impact on the observations of the Hoppel Minima, a minima located between the processed and unprocessed CCN modes. Using vertical velocity and back trajectories along with numerous meteorological measurements it can be shown that cloud processing is not only occurring over the continent but transport of the cloud processed air to the surface is also occurring. The Hoppel Minima during this Oklahoma project had a mean critical supersaturation (Sc) of 0.68%.

  5. B.R.N.O. Contributions #38 Times of minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoňková, K.; Juryšek, J.; Lehký, M.; Šmelcer, L.; Trnka, J.; Mašek, M.; Urbaník, M.; Auer, R.; Vrašták, M.; Kučáková, H.; Ruocco, N.; Magris, M.; Polák, J.; Brát, L.; Audejean, M.; Banfi, M.; Moudrá, M.; Lomoz, F.; Přibík, V.; Dřevěný, R.; Scaggiante, F.; Kocián, R.; Cagaš, P.; Poddaný, S.; Zíbar, M.; Jacobsen, J.; Marek, P.; Colazo, C.; Zardin, D.; Sobotka, P.; Starzomski, J.; Hladík, B.; Vincenzi, M.; Skarka, M.; Walter, F.; Chapman, A.; Díaz, N. D.; Aceti, P.; Singh, P.; Kalista, L.; Kamenec, M.; Zejda, M.; Marchi, F.; Bílek, R.; Guzzo, P.; Corfini, G.; Onderková, K.; Hečko, A.; Mina, F.; Vítek, M.; Barsa, R.; Quinones, C.; Taormina, M.; Melia, R.; Schneiter, M.; Scavuzzo, A.; Marcionni, N.; Ehrenberger, R.; Tapia, L.; Fasseta, G.; Suarez, N.; Scaggiante, D.; Artusi, E.; Garcia, R.; Grnja, J.; Fišer, A.; Hynek, T.; Vilášek, M.; Rozehnal, J.; Kalisch, T.; Lang, K.; Gorková, S.; Novysedlák, R.; Salvaggio, F.; Smyčka, T.; Spurný, M.; Wikander, T.; Mravik, J.; Šuchaň, J.; Čaloud, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents observations of eclipsing binaries acquired by members and cooperating observers of the Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of Czech Astronomical Society (B.R.N.O. observing project). Paper contains 3417 times of minima for 969 objects. It was obtained by 80 observers during 2011 ± 2013 period. Some neglected southern eclipsing binaries and newly discovered stars by the observers of project B.R.N.O. are included in the list. New accurate ephemerides have been found for 447 binary systems. Time of primary minimum of long period variable eps Aur is presented as well.

  6. Iterative h-minima-based marker-controlled watershed for cell nucleus segmentation.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Can Fahrettin; Akhan, Ece; Ersahin, Tulin; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2016-04-01

    Automated microscopy imaging systems facilitate high-throughput screening in molecular cellular biology research. The first step of these systems is cell nucleus segmentation, which has a great impact on the success of the overall system. The marker-controlled watershed is a technique commonly used by the previous studies for nucleus segmentation. These studies define their markers finding regional minima on the intensity/gradient and/or distance transform maps. They typically use the h-minima transform beforehand to suppress noise on these maps. The selection of the h value is critical; unnecessarily small values do not sufficiently suppress the noise, resulting in false and oversegmented markers, and unnecessarily large ones suppress too many pixels, causing missing and undersegmented markers. Because cell nuclei show different characteristics within an image, the same h value may not work to define correct markers for all the nuclei. To address this issue, in this work, we propose a new watershed algorithm that iteratively identifies its markers, considering a set of different h values. In each iteration, the proposed algorithm defines a set of candidates using a particular h value and selects the markers from those candidates provided that they fulfill the size requirement. Working with widefield fluorescence microscopy images, our experiments reveal that the use of multiple h values in our iterative algorithm leads to better segmentation results, compared to its counterparts. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Solar Successes: The Best of Today's Energy Efficient Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-01-01

    This is a brochure developed specifically for residential home builders. It provides information on basic financial factors and additional resources to consider when incorporating solar technologies into building plans.

  8. NREL Scientists Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Before 1984, many scientists believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. One researcher at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thought differently. His name was Jerry Olson, and his innovative thinking changed solar history. Olson identified a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. It is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) products.

  9. Effect of correlations between minima on a complex energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    We recently modeled cellular interconvertion dynamics by using an epigenetic landscape model inspired by neural network models. Given an arbitrary set of patterns, the model can be used to construct an energy landscape in which those patterns are the global minima. We study the possible stable states and metastable states of the landscapes thus constructed. We consider three different cases: i) choosing the patterns to be random and independently distributed ii) choosing a set of patterns directly derived from the experimental cellular transcription factor expression data for a representative set of cell types in an organism and iii) choosing randomly generated trees of hierarchically correlated patterns, inspired by biology. For each of the three cases, we study the energy landscapes. In particular we study the basins of attraction of both the stable states and the metastable states, we compute the configurational entropy as a function of energy, and we demonstrate how those results depend on the correlations between the patterns.

  10. Invertebrate and fish assemblage relations to dissolved Oxygen minima in lowland streams of southwestern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Mize, Scott V.; Kroes, Daniel; Wallace, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in lowland streams are naturally lower than those in upland streams; however, in some regions where monitoring data are lacking, DO criteria originally established for upland streams have been applied to lowland streams. This study investigated the DO concentrations at which fish and invertebrate assemblages at 35 sites located on lowland streams in southwestern Louisiana began to demonstrate biological thresholds.Average threshold values for taxa richness, diversity and abundance metrics were 2.6 and 2.3 mg/L for the invertebrate and fish assemblages, respectively. These thresholds are approximately twice the DO concentration that some native fish species are capable of tolerating and are comparable with DO criteria that have been recently applied to some coastal streams in Louisiana and Texas. DO minima >2.5 mg/L were favoured for all but extremely tolerant taxa. Extremely tolerant taxa had respiratory adaptations that gave them a competitive advantage, and their success when DO minima were <2 mg/L could be related more to reductions in competition or predation than to DO concentration directly.DO generally had an inverse relation to the amount of agriculture in the buffer area; however, DO concentrations at sites with both low and high amounts of agriculture (including three least-disturbed sites) declined to <2.5 mg/L. Thus, although DO fell below a concentration that was identified as an approximate biological threshold, sources of this condition were sometimes natural (allochthonous material) and had little relation to anthropogenic activity.

  11. Unveiling the nature of the He II λ4686 periodic minima in η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Mairan; Damineli, Augusto; Richardson, Noel; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; St-Jean, Lucas; Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Pollard, Karen; Walter, Frederick M.; Coimbra, Adriano; Prates, Rodrigo; Fernández-Lajús, Eduardo; gamen, roberto; Hickel, Gabriel; Henrique, William; Navarete, Felipe; Andrade, Thiago; Jablonski, Francisco; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Groh, Jose H.; Hillier, Desmond John; Gerd, Weigelt; SASER Team Members; Heathcote, Bernard; Luckas, Paul; Locke, Malcolm; Powles, Jonathan; Bohlsen, Terry

    2016-01-01

    η Carinae is known to be a massive binary system, but some of the orbital parameters remain uncertain. The nature of the periodic minima seen in several spectral features are associated with periastron passages near stellar conjunction, but its nature has been interpreted either as a low excitation event or as an eclipse of the hotter secondary star by the dense inner wind of the primary. We conducted an intense spectroscopic monitoring of the He II λ4686 emission line across the 2014.6 event using ground- and space-based telescopes. Comparison with results from the past two events confirmed the stability of the equivalent width and radial velocity of this line, as well as the strict periodicity of its minima. In combination with different other measurements, the orbital period is 2022.7 (±0.3) d. We adopted a power law model in combination with the total opacity in the line of sight to the apex of the wind-wind collision region obtained from hydrodynamic simulations to reproduce the observed He II λ4686 equivalent width curve. We constrained the orbital inclination to 135°-153° and the longitude of periastron to 234°-252°. Periastron passage occurred on T0(2014.6)=2456874.4 (±1.3) d. With these orbital elements, we successfully reproduced both the equivalent width curve observed from our direct view of the central source and the polar view. This suggests that the He II λ4686 minimum is ultimately caused by an increase in the opacity in the line of sight to the emitting region as the secondary star moves behind the primary star and plunges into denser regions of its wind.

  12. The Descent of the Serpent: Using a Successful Ancient Solar Observatories Webcast from Chichen Itza to Highlight Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Higdon, R.; Cline, T.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past seven years, NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum has sponsored and coordinated education and public outreach events to highlight NASA's heliophysics research and discoveries. Our strategy involves using celestial events, such as total solar eclipses and the Transit of Venus, as well as Sun-Earth Day during the March Equinox, to engage K-12 schools and the general public in space science activities, demonstrations, and interactions with space scientists. In collaboration with partners that include the Exploratorium and other museums, Ideum, NASA TV, NASA heliophysics missions, and others, we produce webcasts, other multi-media, and print resources for use by school and informal educators nation-wide and internationally. We provide training and professional development to K-12 educators, museum personnel, amateur astronomers, Girl Scout leaders, etc., so they can implement their own outreach programs taking advantage of our resources. A coordinated approach promotes multiple programs occurring each year under a common theme. As part of an Ancient Observatories theme in 2005, we have successfully featured solar alignments with ancient structures made by indigenous cultures that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices in cultural and historical parks in the Americas. In partnership with the Exploratorium, we produced broadcast-quality and webcast programming during the March equinox that shared heliophysics within a broad cultural context with formal and informal education audiences internationally. The program: "Descent of the Serpent" featured the light and shadow effect at sunset that takes place during the spring equinox at the Pyramid of El Castillo, in Chichén Itzá (México). This program made unique and authentic cultural connections to the knowledge of solar astronomy of the Maya, the living Mayan culture of today, and the importance of the Sun across the ages. We involved Sun-Earth Connection scientists, their missions, and research

  13. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Jiawei; Xi, Lili; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2016-05-01

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0-1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrrier transport and defect properties are properly optimized.

  14. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Jiawei; Xi, Lili; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2016-05-21

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0-1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrrier transport and defect properties are properly optimized. PMID:27208964

  15. Potential energy landscapes for the 2D XY model: Minima, transition states, and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Hughes, Ciaran; Schröck, Mario; Wales, David J.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a numerical study of the potential energy landscape for the two-dimensional XY model (with no disorder), considering up to 100 spins and central processing unit and graphics processing unit implementations of local optimization, focusing on minima and saddles of index one (transition states). We examine both periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions, and show that the number of stationary points located increases exponentially with increasing lattice size. The corresponding disconnectivity graphs exhibit funneled landscapes; the global minima are readily located because they exhibit relatively large basins of attraction compared to the higher energy minima as the lattice size increases.

  16. Erratum: "B.R.N.O. Contributions #38 Times of minima of eclipsing binary" (OEJV #160, [2013])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honková, K.; Juryšek, J.; Lehký, M.; Šmelcer, L.; Trnka, J.; Mašek, M.; Urbaník, M.; Auer, R.; Vrašták, M.; Kučáková, H.; Ruocco, N.; Magris, M.; Polák, J.; Brát, L.; Audejean, M.; Banfi, M.; Moudrá, M.; Lomoz, F.; Přibík, V.; Dřevěný, R.; Scaggiante, F.; Kocián, R.; Cagaš, P.; Poddaný, S.; Zíbar, M.; Jacobsen, J.; Marek, P.; Colazo, C.; Zardin, D.; Sobotka, P.; Starzomski, J.; Hladík, B.; Vincenzi, M.; Skarka, M.; Walter, F.; Chapman, A.; Díaz, N. D.; Aceti, P.; Singh, P.; Kalista, L.; Kamenec, M.; Zejda, M.; Marchi, F.; Bílek, R.; Guzzo, P.; Corfini, G.; Onderková, K.; Hečko, A.; Mina, F.; Vítek, M.; Barsa, R.; Quinones, C.; Taormina, M.; Melia, R.; Schneiter, M.; Scavuzzo, A.; Marcionni, N.; Ehrenberger, R.; Tapia, L.; Fasseta, G.; Suarez, N.; Scaggiante, D.; Artusi, E.; Garcia, R.; Grnja, J.; Fišer, A.; Hynek, T.; Vilášek, M.; Rozehnal, J.; Kalisch, T.; Lang, K.; Gorková, S.; Novysedlák, R.; Salvaggio, F.; Smyčka, T.; Spurný, M.; Wikander, T.; Mravik, J.; Šuchań, J.; Čaloud, J.

    2014-08-01

    Due to an errors in calculated heliocentric corrections, there are 404 wrong HJD minima timings (with larger Difference than Min error; see header of the Table) in "B.R.N.O. Contributions #38 Times of minima of eclipsing binary" paper. The correct minima timings are presented hereafter.

  17. INVESTIGATING TWO SUCCESSIVE FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Zhang, J.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Olmedo, O.; Sun, X. D.; Liu, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate two successive flux rope (FR1 and FR2) eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2012 January 23. Both flux ropes (FRs) appeared as an EUV channel structure in the images of high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly prior to the CME eruption. Through fitting their height evolution with a function consisting of linear and exponential components, we determine the onset time of the FR impulsive acceleration with high temporal accuracy for the first time. Using this onset time, we divide the evolution of the FRs in the low corona into two phases: a slow rise phase and an impulsive acceleration phase. In the slow rise phase of FR1, the appearance of sporadic EUV and UV brightening and the strong shearing along the polarity inverse line indicates that the quasi-separatrix-layer reconnection likely initiates the slow rise. On the other hand, for FR2, we mainly contribute its slow rise to the FR1 eruption, which partially opened the overlying field and thus decreased the magnetic restriction. At the onset of the impulsive acceleration phase, FR1 (FR2) reaches the critical height of 84.4 ± 11.2 Mm (86.2 ± 13.0 Mm) where the decline of the overlying field with height is fast enough to trigger the torus instability. After a very short interval (∼2 minutes), the flare emission began to enhance. These results reveal the compound activity involving multiple magnetic FRs and further suggest that the ideal torus instability probably plays the essential role of initiating the impulsive acceleration of CMEs.

  18. More on conditions of local and global minima coincidence in discrete optimization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, T.T.; Sergienko, I.V.; Soltan, V.P.

    1994-05-01

    In some areas of discrete optimization, it is necessary to isolate classes of problems whose target functions do not have local or strictly local minima that differ from the global minima. Examples include optimizations on discrete metric spaces and graphs, lattices and partially ordered sets, and linear combinatorial problems. A unified schema that to a certain extent generalizes the convexity models on which the above-cited works are based has been presented in articles. This article is a continuation of that research.

  19. Joint Effect of Solar UVB and Heat Stress on the Seasonal Change of Egg Hatching Success in the Herbivorous False Spider Mite (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    Sudo, M; Osakabe, M

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal population dynamics of an herbivorous mite has been documented in terms of the relationship between thermoresponses and temporal biological factors such as resource availability or predation risk. Although recent studies emphasize the deleterious effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm wavelengths) radiation on plant-dwelling mites, how UVB affects mite population remains largely unknown. On a wild shrub Viburnum erosum var. punctatum in Kyoto, an herbivorous false spider mite, Brevipalpus obovatus Donnadieu, occurs only in autumn. Females of this species lay one-third of their eggs on upper leaf surfaces. Oviposition on upper surfaces is beneficial for avoiding predation by phytoseiids, but exposes eggs to solar UVB and heat stress. To test the hypothesis that the seasonal occurrence of this mite is determined by interactions between solar UVB radiation and temperature, we examined variation in egg hatching success under near-ambient and UV-attenuated sunlight conditions from spring to autumn. The UV-attenuation significantly improved hatching success. However, most eggs died under heat stress regardless of UV treatments in July and August. We established a deterministic heat stress-cumulative UVB dose-egg hatching success response model, which we applied to meteorological data. The model analyses illustrated lower and higher survivability peaks in late May and October, respectively, which partly corresponded to data for annual field occurrence, indicating the importance of solar UVB radiation and heat stress as determinants of the seasonal occurrence of this mite.

  20. Joint Effect of Solar UVB and Heat Stress on the Seasonal Change of Egg Hatching Success in the Herbivorous False Spider Mite (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    Sudo, M; Osakabe, M

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal population dynamics of an herbivorous mite has been documented in terms of the relationship between thermoresponses and temporal biological factors such as resource availability or predation risk. Although recent studies emphasize the deleterious effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm wavelengths) radiation on plant-dwelling mites, how UVB affects mite population remains largely unknown. On a wild shrub Viburnum erosum var. punctatum in Kyoto, an herbivorous false spider mite, Brevipalpus obovatus Donnadieu, occurs only in autumn. Females of this species lay one-third of their eggs on upper leaf surfaces. Oviposition on upper surfaces is beneficial for avoiding predation by phytoseiids, but exposes eggs to solar UVB and heat stress. To test the hypothesis that the seasonal occurrence of this mite is determined by interactions between solar UVB radiation and temperature, we examined variation in egg hatching success under near-ambient and UV-attenuated sunlight conditions from spring to autumn. The UV-attenuation significantly improved hatching success. However, most eggs died under heat stress regardless of UV treatments in July and August. We established a deterministic heat stress-cumulative UVB dose-egg hatching success response model, which we applied to meteorological data. The model analyses illustrated lower and higher survivability peaks in late May and October, respectively, which partly corresponded to data for annual field occurrence, indicating the importance of solar UVB radiation and heat stress as determinants of the seasonal occurrence of this mite. PMID:26314033

  1. Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and micro-sized particles from primary minima.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the detachments of nano- and micro-sized colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl(2) in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the micro-sized colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange.

  2. Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and micro-sized particles from primary minima.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the detachments of nano- and micro-sized colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl(2) in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the micro-sized colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange. PMID:22575872

  3. Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize: Seed to Seed in 60 Days.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Morgan E; Wallace, Jason G; Albert, Patrice S; Buckler, Edward S; Birchler, James A

    2016-09-01

    Two lines of Zea mays were developed as a short-generation model for maize. The Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize (FFMM) lines A and B are robust inbred lines with a significantly shorter generation time, much smaller stature, and better greenhouse adaptation than traditional maize varieties. Five generations a year are typical. FFMM is the result of a modified double-cross hybrid between four fast-flowering lines: Neuffer's Early ACR (full color), Alexander's Early Early Synthetic, Tom Thumb Popcorn, and Gaspe Flint, followed by selection for early flowering and desirable morphology throughout an 11-generation selfing regime. Lines A and B were derived from different progeny of the initial hybrid, and crosses between Mini-Maize A and B exhibit heterosis. The ancestry of each genomic region of Mini-Maize A and B was inferred from the four founder populations using genotyping by sequencing. Other genetic and genomic tools for these lines include karyotypes for both lines A and B, kernel genetic markers y1 (white endosperm) and R1-scm2 (purple endosperm and embryo) introgressed into Mini-Maize A, and ∼24× whole-genome resequencing data for Mini-Maize A. PMID:27440866

  4. Influence of Debye plasmas on photoionization of Li-like ions: Emergence of Cooper minima

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C. Y.; Ho, Y. K.

    2010-03-15

    The photoionizaton processes of lithium isoelectronic sequence (Be{sup +}, B{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, N{sup 4+}, O{sup 5+}, and F{sup 6+}) under the influence of plasma environments are explored using the method of complex coordinate rotation in combination with the model potential approximation. The photoionization cross sections compared to existing theoretical predictions and varied with Debye screening lengths are reported. Under the perturbation of plasmas with certain Debye screening lengths, Cooper minima are uncovered in photoionization cross-section curves of the ground-state Li-like ions, in which the Cooper minima are absent in the respective free ion cases. The relations between the appearance of Cooper minima and the instability of the ground states due to plasma environments are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of Docking Target Functions by the Comprehensive Investigation of Protein-Ligand Energy Minima

    PubMed Central

    Oferkin, Igor V.; Katkova, Ekaterina V.; Sulimov, Alexey V.; Kutov, Danil C.; Sobolev, Sergey I.; Voevodin, Vladimir V.; Sulimov, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    The adequate choice of the docking target function impacts the accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculation. To evaluate a docking target function we compared positions of its minima with the experimentally known pose of the ligand in the protein active site. We evaluated five docking target functions based on either the MMFF94 force field or the PM7 quantum-chemical method with or without implicit solvent models: PCM, COSMO, and SGB. Each function was tested on the same set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. For exhaustive low-energy minima search the novel MPI parallelized docking program FLM and large supercomputer resources were used. Protein-ligand binding energies calculated using low-energy minima were compared with experimental values. It was demonstrated that the docking target function on the base of the MMFF94 force field in vacuo can be used for discovery of native or near native ligand positions by finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solute-solvent interaction for the correct ligand positioning is demonstrated. It is shown that docking accuracy can be improved by replacement of the MMFF94 force field by the new semiempirical quantum-chemical PM7 method. PMID:26693223

  6. Influence of shape resonances on minima in cross sections for photoionization of excited atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Felfli, Z.; Manson, S.T. Department of Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 )

    1990-02-01

    A relationship between the location of Cooper minima and the difference between the quantum defect of the initial state and the threshold phase shift (in units of {pi}) of the final state in excited photoionization has been suggested earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 473 (1982)). The existence of a shape resonance in the final state is shown to modify this relationship.

  7. Spontaneous Detachment of Colloids from Primary Energy Minima by Brownian Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan; Jin, Yan; Shen, Chongyang; Li, Tiantian; Huang, Yuanfang; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    The Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy profile has been frequently used to interpret the mechanisms controlling colloid attachment/detachment and aggregation/disaggregation behavior. This study highlighted a type of energy profile that is characterized by a shallow primary energy well (i.e., comparable to the average kinetic energy of a colloid) at a small separation distance and a monotonic decrease of interaction energy with separation distance beyond the primary energy well. This energy profile is present due to variations of height, curvature, and density of discrete physical heterogeneities on collector surfaces. The energy profile indicates that colloids can be spontaneously detached from the shallow primary energy well by Brownian diffusion. The spontaneous detachment from primary minima was unambiguously confirmed by conducting laboratory column transport experiments involving flow interruptions for two model colloids (polystyrene latex microspheres) and engineered nanoparticles (fullerene C60 aggregates). Whereas the spontaneous detachment has been frequently attributed to attachment in secondary minima in the literature, our study indicates that the detached colloids could be initially attached at primary minima. Our study further suggests that the spontaneous disaggregation from primary minima is more significant than spontaneous detachment because the primary minimum depth between colloid themselves is lower than that between a colloid and a collector surface.

  8. Fast-flowering mini-maize: seed to seed in 60 days

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two lines of Zea mays were developed as a short-generation model for maize. The Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize (FFMM) lines A and B are robust inbred lines with a significantly shorter generation time, much smaller stature, and better greenhouse adaptation than traditional maize varieties. Five generatio...

  9. A new heuristic method for approximating the number of local minima in partial RNA energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Andreas A; Day, Luke; Abdelhadi Ep Souki, Ouala; Steinhöfel, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of energy landscapes plays an important role in mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation. Among the main features of interest are the number and distribution of local minima within the energy landscape. Granier and Kallel proposed in 2002 a new sampling procedure for estimating the number of local minima. In the present paper, we focus on improved heuristic implementations of the general framework devised by Granier and Kallel with regard to run-time behaviour and accuracy of predictions. The new heuristic method is demonstrated for the case of partial energy landscapes induced by RNA secondary structures. While the computation of minimum free energy RNA secondary structures has been studied for a long time, the analysis of folding landscapes has gained momentum over the past years in the context of co-transcriptional folding and deeper insights into cell processes. The new approach has been applied to ten RNA instances of length between 99 nt and 504 nt and their respective partial energy landscapes defined by secondary structures within an energy offset ΔE above the minimum free energy conformation. The number of local minima within the partial energy landscapes ranges from 1440 to 3441. Our heuristic method produces for the best approximations on average a deviation below 3.0% from the true number of local minima.

  10. Third minima in thorium and uranium isotopes in a self-consistent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    Background: Well-developed third minima, corresponding to strongly elongated and reflection-asymmetric shapes associated with dimolecular configurations, have been predicted in some non-self-consistent models to impact fission pathways of thorium and uranium isotopes. These predictions have guided the interpretation of resonances seen experimentally. On the other hand, self-consistent calculations consistently predict very shallow potential-energy surfaces in the third minimum region.Purpose: We investigate the interpretation of third-minimum configurations in terms of dimolecular (cluster) states. We study the isentropic potential-energy surfaces of selected even-even thorium and uranium isotopes at several excitation energies. In order to understand the driving effects behind the presence of third minima, we study the interplay between pairing and shell effects.Methods: We use the finite-temperature superfluid nuclear density functional theory. We consider two Skyrme energy density functionals: a traditional functional SkM* and a recent functional UNEDF1 optimized for fission studies.Results: We predict very shallow or no third minima in the potential-energy surfaces of 232Th and 232U. In the lighter Th and U isotopes with N=136 and 138, the third minima are better developed. We show that the reflection-asymmetric configurations around the third minimum can be associated with dimolecular states involving the spherical doubly magic 132Sn and a lighter deformed Zr or Mo fragment. The potential-energy surfaces for 228,232Th and 232U at several excitation energies are presented. We also study isotopic chains to demonstrate the evolution of the depth of the third minimum with neutron number.Conclusions: We show that the neutron shell effect that governs the existence of the dimolecular states around the third minimum is consistent with the spherical-to-deformed shape transition in the Zr and Mo isotopes around N=58. We demonstrate that the depth of the third minimum

  11. Molecular characterization of a new begomovirus infecting a leguminous weed Rhynchosia minima in India.

    PubMed

    Jyothsna, P; Rawat, Ramaveer; Malathi, V G

    2011-06-01

    A begomovirus associated with yellow mosaic disease in Rhynchosia minima, a common weed was cloned and sequenced. The virus has a bipartite genome, of which DNA-A is 2727 nucleotide length, and DNA-B 2679 nucleotides, and has a typical Old World bipartite begomovirus genome organization. Sequence comparison to all other begomovirus sequences available in the database shows the virus isolated from R. minima to be distinct. Maximum identity of 84% was seen with an isolate of Velvet bean severe mosaic virus-(India: Lucknow:2009) VBSMV-(IN:Luc:09) (GeneBank Accession No. FN543425), while less than 73% identity was observed with any other legumovirus. The molecular data show that the virus identified here is a new species in the genus Begomovirus for which the name Rhynchosia yellow mosaic India virus is proposed.

  12. Dynamical SUSY breaking at meta-stable minima from D-branes at obstructed geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Uranga, Angel M.

    2006-06-01

    We study the existence of long-lived meta-stable supersymmetry breaking vacua in gauge theories with massless quarks, upon the addition of extra massive flavors. A simple realization is provided by a modified version of SQCD with Nf,0 < Nc massless flavors, Nf,1 massive flavors and additional singlet chiral fields. This theory has local meta-stable minima separated from a runaway behavior at infinity by a potential barrier. We find further examples of such meta-stable minima in flavored versions of quiver gauge theories on fractional branes at singularities with obstructed complex deformations, and study the case of the dP1 theory in detail. Finally, we provide an explicit String Theory construction of such theories. The additional flavors arise from D7-branes on non-compact 4-cycles of the singularity, for which we find a new efficient description using dimer techniques.

  13. Dust around young stars. Observations of the polarization of UX Ori in deep minima

    SciTech Connect

    Voshchinnikov, N.V.; Grinin, V.P.; Kiselev, N.N.; Minikulov, N.K.

    1988-09-01

    Photometric and polarimetric monitoring observations of UX Ori begun in 1986 in the Crimea and Bolivia have resulted in the observation of two deep minima of the brightness during which a growth of the linear polarization (to approx. =7%) was observed, together with a tendency for the circular polarization to increase (up to approx. =1%). Analysis of the observational data shows that the main source of the polarized radiation in the deep minima is the emission of the star scattered by grains of circumstellar dust. On the basis of Mie's theory for a polydisperse graphite-silicate mixtures of particles the optical properties of ellipsoidal dust envelopes have been calculated and a model of the Algol-like minimum constructed.

  14. The 2p photoionization of ground-state sodium in the vicinity of Cooper minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobin; Shi, Yinglong; Dong, Chenzhong

    2016-07-01

    The photoionization processes of ground-state sodium have been investigated with the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. The results are in good or at least reasonable agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. In the energy region near the threshold, the cross sections show non-monotonic changes because of Cooper minima, which due to the sign changes of dominant dipole matrix elements and are very sensitive to electron correlations. As the energy increases continuously, the radial wave functions of the photoelectrons will move towards the nucleus. The values of the cross sections, and hence the Cooper minima, mainly depend on the relative positions of the one-electron radial wave functions of the initial bound electrons 2{p}1/{2,3/2} and the continuum photoelectrons.

  15. Cooper minima and Young-type interferences in the photoionization of H{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Della Picca, R.; Fainstein, P. D.; Dubois, A.

    2011-09-15

    We present a detailed study of the partial and total cross sections for photon-induced electron emission from H{sub 2}{sup +}. By comparing the results employing exact and approximate, bounded and continuum wave functions, for one- and two-center basis functions, we find the origin and position of the Cooper-like minima in the partial cross sections and their relationship with the Young-type interference pattern.

  16. Quantification of colloid retention and release by straining and energy minima in variably saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wenjing; Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Stoof, Cathelijne R; Gao, Bin; Schatz, Anna Lottie; Zhang, Yalei; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2013-08-01

    The prediction of colloid transport in unsaturated porous media in the presence of large energy barrier is hampered by scant information of the proportional retention by straining and attractive interactions at surface energy minima. This study aims to fill this gap by performing saturated and unsaturated column experiments in which colloid pulses were added at various ionic strengths (ISs) from 0.1 to 50 mM. Subsequent flushing with deionized water released colloids held at the secondary minimum. Next, destruction of the column freed colloids held by straining. Colloids not recovered at the end of the experiment were quantified as retained at the primary minimum. Results showed that net colloid retention increased with IS and was independent of saturation degree under identical IS and Darcian velocity. Attachment rates were greater in unsaturated columns, despite an over 3-fold increase in pore water velocity relative to saturated columns, because additional retention at the readily available air-associated interfaces (e.g., the air-water-solid [AWS] interfaces) is highly efficient. Complementary visual data showed heavy retention at the AWS interfaces. Retention by secondary minima ranged between 8% and 46% as IS increased, and was greater for saturated conditions. Straining accounted for an average of 57% of the retained colloids with insignificant differences among the treatments. Finally, retention by primary minima ranged between 14% and 35% with increasing IS, and was greater for unsaturated conditions due to capillary pinning.

  17. Dynamics of driven transitions between minima of a complex energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    We recently modeled cellular interconvertion dynamics by using an epigenetic landscape model inspired by neural network models. Given an arbitrary set of patterns, the model can be used to construct an energy landscape in which those patterns are the global minima. Here we study the transitions between stable states of the landscapes thus constructed, under the effect of an external driving force. We consider three different cases: i) choosing the patterns to be random and independendently distributed ii) choosing a set of patterns directly derived from the experimental cellular transcription factor expression data for a representative set of cell types in an organism and iii) choosing randomly generated trees of hierarchically correlated patterns, inspired by biology. For each of the three cases, we study the stability of the global minima against thermal fluctuations and external driving forces, and the dynamics of the driven transitions away from global minima. We compare the results obtained in the three cases defined above, and in particular we explore to what degree the correlations between patterns affect the transition dynamics.

  18. Scale-estimation of quantum coherent energy transport in multiple-minima systems

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    A generic and intuitive model for coherent energy transport in multiple minima systems coupled to a quantum mechanical bath is shown. Using a simple spin-boson system, we illustrate how a generic donor-acceptor system can be brought into resonance using a narrow band of vibrational modes, such that the transfer efficiency of an electron-hole pair (exciton) is made arbitrarily high. Coherent transport phenomena in nature are of renewed interest since the discovery that a photon captured by the light-harvesting complex (LHC) in photosynthetic organisms can be conveyed to a chemical reaction centre with near-perfect efficiency. Classical explanations of the transfer use stochastic diffusion to model the hopping motion of a photo-excited exciton. This accounts inadequately for the speed and efficiency of the energy transfer measured in a series of recent landmark experiments. Taking a quantum mechanical perspective can help capture the salient features of the efficient part of that transfer. To show the versatility of the model, we extend it to a multiple minima system comprising seven-sites, reminiscent of the widely studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex. We show that an idealised transport model for multiple minima coupled to a narrow-band phonon can transport energy with arbitrarily high efficiency. PMID:24980547

  19. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlis, N. V. Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Skordas, E. S.

    2015-06-15

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ{sub 1} of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold M{sub thres} = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  20. [Supercomputer investigation of the protein-ligand system low-energy minima].

    PubMed

    Oferkin, I V; Sulimov, A V; Katkova, E V; Kutov, D K; Grigoriev, F V; Kondakova, O A; Sulimov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculations and ligand positioning is strongly influenced by the choice of the docking target function. This work demonstrates the evaluation of the five different target functions used in docking: functions based on MMFF94 force field and functions based on PM7 quantum-chemical method accounting or without accounting the implicit solvent model (PCM, COSMO or SGB). For these purposes the ligand positions corresponding to the minima of the target function and the experimentally known ligand positions in the protein active site (crystal ligand positions) were compared. Each function was examined on the same test-set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. The new parallelized docking program FLM based on Monte Carlo search algorithm was developed to perform the comprehensive low-energy minima search and to calculate the protein-ligand binding energy. This study demonstrates that the docking target function based on the MMFF94 force field can be used to detect the crystal or near crystal positions of the ligand by the finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solvent accounting in the docking process for the accurate ligand positioning is also shown. The accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the correlation between the calculated and experimentally determined protein-ligand binding energies are improved when the MMFF94 force field is substituted by the new PM7 method with implicit solvent accounting.

  1. Effect of sodium acetate additive in successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction on the performance of CdS quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Ping; Chen, Liang-Yih; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2016-09-01

    Sodium acetate (NaAc) is utilized as an additive in cationic precursors of the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process to fabricate CdS quantum-dot (QD)-sensitized photoelectrodes. The effects of the NaAc concentration on the deposition rate and distribution of QDs in mesoporous TiO2 films, as well as on the performance of CdS-sensitized solar cells are studied. The experimental results show that the presence of NaAc can significantly accelerate the deposition of CdS, improve the QD distribution across photoelectrodes, and thereby, increase the performance of solar cells. These results are mainly attributed to the pH-elevation effect of NaAc to the cationic precursors which increases the electrostatic interaction of the TiO2 film to cadmium ions. The light-to-energy conversion efficiency of the CdS-sensitized solar cell increases with increasing concentration of the NaAc and approaches a maximum value (3.11%) at 0.05 M NaAc. Additionally, an ionic exchange is carried out on the photoelectrode to transform the deposited CdS into CdS1-xSex ternary QDs. The light-absorption range of the photoelectrode is extended and an exceptional power conversion efficiency of 4.51% is achieved due to this treatment.

  2. PbS Quantum Dots Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells Prepared by Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction with Different Adsorption Layers.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jie; Duan, Yanfang; Liu, Chunxia; Gao, Shaohong; Han, Xueting; An, Limin

    2016-04-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized via successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoporous film for the fabrication of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). The reaction is environmental friendly and energy saving. The green synthesized PbS QDs match the maximum remittance region of the solar spectrum and are suitable as sensitizers for TiO2 electrodes for cell devices application. PbS QDs were adsorbed in different adsorption layers in order to improve the solar cell performance. The optical properties of PbS sensitized TiO2 films were studied by scanning electron microscopy and UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy. The photovoltaic characteristics of the PbS QDSCs were analyzed by I-V characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As a result, the light harvesting was enhanced with increasing SILAR adsorption layers. The maximum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the PbS QDSCs (3.14%) was obtained at the 12 adsorption layers with the highest short circuit current density and lowest charge transfer resistance. PMID:27451735

  3. SYSTEMATIC MOTION OF FINE-SCALE JETS AND SUCCESSIVE RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JET OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE/HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.; Isobe, H.

    2012-11-20

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A {lambda}-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets ({approx}1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  4. Systematic Motion of Fine-scale Jets and Successive Reconnection in Solar Chromospheric Anemone Jet Observed with the Solar Optical Telescope/Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A λ-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets (~1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  5. Composite total solar irradiance time series show a secular 0.04 %/decade trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, R. C.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2003-12-01

    The satellite total solar irradiance (TSI) observational database extends over the past 25 years with useful precision for solar physics and climatology investigations. Willson & Mordvinov (2003) reconciled the published results from various experiments to a common scale using overlapping comparisons to produce a composite TSI time series with sufficient precision to resolve a TSI trend of + 0.04 %/decade between successive solar activity minima. Key to this process is determining the relationship of the results of the non-overlapping ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. Two overlapping sets of results are available for this purpose: Nimbus7/ERB and the ERBS/ERBE. The ACRIM composite approach, using unaltered results published by the science teams of each experiment demonstrates a + 0.04 %/decade trend between the solar minima of 1986 and 1996 using the more precise Nimbus7/ERB data to relate ACRIM1 & 2 results. The use of ERBS/ERBE results instead produces a negligibly small trend. This is shown to be the effect of uncorrected ERBS/ERBE degradation during the 2 year ACRIM gap whose magnitude and direction account for the trend difference precisely. A further illustration of this difference is the PMOD composite TSI model of Frohlich & Lean (1998) which uses ERBS/ERBE results to relate ACRIM1 and ACRIM2. It differs from the ACRIM composite in two significant respects: a negligible trend between solar minima and lower TSI at solar maxima. Our findings indicate PMOD's lower trend and lower TSI during solar cycles 22 and 23 maxima result from their use of the ERBS/ERBE data and are therefore artifacts of its uncorrected degradation. Lower PMOD TSI during the maximum of cycle 21 is the result of the modifications of published Nimbus7/ERB and ACRIM1 data made to produce better agreement with a TSI solar proxy regression model. These modifications are not based on reevaluation of basic experiment data or algorithms and are therefore less likely to be correct than the analyses

  6. Early Eocene carbon isotope excursions and landscape destabilization at eccentricity minima: Green River Formation of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. Elliot; Carroll, Alan R.; Scott, Jennifer J.; Singer, Brad S.

    2014-10-01

    Repeated global reorganizations of carbon cycling and biotic, oceanic and terrestrial processes occurred during the Early Eocene, and appear to have been paced by cyclic variations in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit. The phase relationship(s) between insolation variation, terrestrial paleoclimate, and atmospheric pCO2 during these events remains enigmatic however, due to their poorly constrained timing relative to specific orbital configurations. Here we use tiered interpolation between radioisotopic ages and paleomagnetic polarity chrons to compare high-resolution δ13C and lithofacies records from the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation of western North America to a Fe-intensity XRF record from the western Atlantic Ocean, and to numerical solutions for Earth's orbital configuration. Wilkins Peak Member lithofacies stacking patterns record cyclic geomorphic responses to insolation and climate fluctuations, spanning an interval of 1.8 Ma. Previous macrostratigraphic analyses using 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb ash bed ages indicate that these cycles reflect long and short eccentricity modulation of precession. Hydrologic variance appears to have occurred inversely with intervals of maximum sediment advection, with carbonate- and evaporite-dominated lacustrine modes during eccentricity maxima, and siliciclastic-dominated alluvial modes during eccentricity minima. Stable carbon isotope analyses of 126 meters of Wilkins Peak Member strata reveal a regular ∼5 per mil oscillation between high-δ13C lacustrine modes and low-δ13C alluvial modes. Tiered interpolation between paleomagnetically characterized terrestrial ash beds facilitates the integration of 11 radioisotopic ages with the geomagnetic polarity timescale, resulting in significant expansion of chron C23 and shortening of chron C22 relative to timescales based on seafloor magnetic anomaly profiles. The new proposed timescale permits direct comparison of terrestrial and marine climate proxy records

  7. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction, Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities of the Polysaccharides from Rhynchosia minima Root.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuejing; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Jie; He, Muxue; Bao, Jiaolin; Wang, Kai; Li, Peng; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jianbo; Su, Huanxing; Zhang, Qingwen; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Box-Behnken design (BBD), one of the most common response surface methodology (RSM) methods, was used to optimize the experimental conditions for ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Rhynchosia minima root (PRM). The antioxidant abilities and anticancer activity of purified polysaccharide fractions were also measured. The results showed that optimal extraction parameters were as follows: ultrasound exposure time, 21 min; ratio of water to material, 46 mL/g; ultrasound extraction temperature, 63 °C. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of PRM was 16.95%±0.07%. Furthermore, the main monosaccharides of purified fractions were Ara and Gal. PRM3 and PRM5 exhibited remarkable DPPH radical scavenging activities and reducing power in vitro. PRM3 showed strong inhibitory activities on the growth of MCF-7 cells in vitro. The above results indicate that polysaccharides from R. minima root have the potential to be developed as natural antioxidants and anticancer ingredients for the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  8. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  9. Structure in the 3D Galaxy Distribution. II. Voids and Watersheds of Local Maxima and Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  10. A genetic survey of Salvinia minima in the southern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madeira, Paul T.; Jacono, C.C.; Tipping, Phil; Van, Thai K.; Center, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    The genetic relationships among 68 samples of Salvinia minima (Salviniaceae) were investigated using RAPD analysis. Neighbor joining, principle components, and AMOVA analyses were used to detect differences among geographically referenced samples within and outside of Florida. Genetic distances (Nei and Li) range up to 0.48, although most are under 0.30, still relatively high levels for an introduced, clonally reproducing plant. Despite the diversity AMOVA analysis yielded no indication that the Florida plants, as a group, were significantly different from the plants sampled elsewhere in its adventive, North American range. A single, genetically dissimilar population probably exists in the recent (1998) horticultural introduction to Mississippi. When the samples were grouped into 10 regional (but artificial) units and analyzed using AMOVA the between region variance was only 7.7%. Genetic similarity among these regions may indicate introduction and dispersal from common sources. The reduced aggressiveness of Florida populations (compared to other states) may be due to herbivory. The weevil Cyrtobagous salviniae, a selective feeder, is found in Florida but not other states. The genetic similarity also suggests that there are no obvious genetic obstacles to the establishment or efficacy of C. salviniae as a biological control agent on S. minima outside of Florida.

  11. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction, Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities of the Polysaccharides from Rhynchosia minima Root.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuejing; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Jie; He, Muxue; Bao, Jiaolin; Wang, Kai; Li, Peng; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jianbo; Su, Huanxing; Zhang, Qingwen; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Box-Behnken design (BBD), one of the most common response surface methodology (RSM) methods, was used to optimize the experimental conditions for ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Rhynchosia minima root (PRM). The antioxidant abilities and anticancer activity of purified polysaccharide fractions were also measured. The results showed that optimal extraction parameters were as follows: ultrasound exposure time, 21 min; ratio of water to material, 46 mL/g; ultrasound extraction temperature, 63 °C. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of PRM was 16.95%±0.07%. Furthermore, the main monosaccharides of purified fractions were Ara and Gal. PRM3 and PRM5 exhibited remarkable DPPH radical scavenging activities and reducing power in vitro. PRM3 showed strong inhibitory activities on the growth of MCF-7 cells in vitro. The above results indicate that polysaccharides from R. minima root have the potential to be developed as natural antioxidants and anticancer ingredients for the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26610456

  12. SUCCESSIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS TRIGGERED BY THE COLLISION OF TWO SMALL SUNSPOTS WITH OPPOSITE POLARITIES AND MOTIONAL DIRECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.

    2012-03-15

    We present a study of the two successive M-class flares associated with two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) triggered by the collision of two small sunspots with opposite magnetic polarities and motional directions in NOAA active region (AR) 10484 on 2003 October 22. From the evolution of this AR in the TRACE white-light images and 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO, a large sunspot and a small sunspot with negative polarity rotated clockwise about 33 Degree-Sign and 18 Degree-Sign , respectively, from the northeast of a quiescent sunspot with negative polarity to the southeast from 15:00 UT on October 21 to 16:24 UT on October 23. During the process of their motion, the small sunspot with negative polarity collided with the small sunspot with positive polarity and opposite motional direction. In the collision, this AR produced two successive M-class flares and CMEs according to the observations of GOES and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. By analyzing the magnetic fields at polarity inversion lines (PILs) between the two small sunspot, it is found that a sudden squeeze occurred near the onset of the two M-class flares and then recovered itself after the flares. We ruled out the emergence of the magnetic fields near the PIL. According to the brightenings in TRACE 1600 A and the hard X-ray sources of the RHESSI of two M-class flares, we found that the locations of the two flares are almost situated in the same location at the PIL between the two small sunspots. We suggest that the sudden squeeze between the opposite magnetic polarities is caused by the pressure of the collision of the two small sunspots and resulted in the magnetic reconnection. These results could contribute to understanding the mechanism of flares and CMEs.

  13. Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction deposited kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanoflakes counter electrodes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, Sawanta S.; Shim, Chang Su; Hong, Chang Kook

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanoflakes by SILAR technique. • Hydrothermal synthesis of TiO{sub 2}. • Counter electrode for DSSC application. • 4.48% conversion efficiency. - Abstract: In this investigation, we have successfully synthesized Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) nanoflakes by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and used as a counter electrode in the hydrothermally grown TiO{sub 2} based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared CZTS nanoflakes were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), micro Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive analysis. Our DSSCs results revealed that, compared with conventional Pt/FTO counter electrode DSSCs, nanoflakes of p-type CZTS as the photocathode and n-type TiO{sub 2} thin films as the photoanode shows an increased short circuit current (13.35 mA/cm{sup 2}) with 4.84% power conversion efficiency. The detailed interface properties of were analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements.

  14. Absence of multiple local minima effects in intensity modulated optimization with dose-volume constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llacer, Jorge; Deasy, Joseph O.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Promberger, Claus

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of intensity modulated radiation treatment optimization problems in the presence of non-convex feasible parameter spaces caused by the specification of dose-volume constraints for the organs-at-risk (OARs). The main aim was to determine whether the presence of those non-convex spaces affects the optimization of clinical cases in any significant way. This was done in two phases: (1) Using a carefully designed two-dimensional mathematical phantom that exhibits two controllable minima and with randomly initialized beamlet weights, we developed a methodology for exploring the nature of the convergence characteristics of quadratic cost function optimizations (deterministic or stochastic). The methodology is based on observing the statistical behaviour of the residual cost at the end of optimizations in which the stopping criterion is progressively more demanding and carrying out those optimizations to very small error changes per iteration. (2) Seven clinical cases were then analysed with dose-volume constraints that are stronger than originally used in the clinic. The clinical cases are two prostate cases differently posed, a meningioma case, two head-and-neck cases, a spleen case and a spine case. Of the 14 different sets of optimizations (with and without the specification of maximum doses allowed for the OARs), 12 fail to show any effect due to the existence of non-convex feasible spaces. The remaining two sets of optimizations show evidence of multiple minima in the solutions, but those minima are very close to each other in cost and the resulting treatment plans are practically identical, as measured by the quality of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). We discuss the differences between fluence maps resulting from those similar treatment plans. We provide a possible reason for the observed results and conclude that, although the study is necessarily limited, the annealing characteristics of a simulated annealing method may not be

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR MERIDIONAL FLOWS DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Antia, H. M. E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i

    2010-07-01

    We have analyzed available full-disk data from the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO using the 'ring diagram' technique to determine the behavior of solar meridional flows over solar cycle 23 in the outer 2% of the solar radius. We find that the dominant component of meridional flows during solar maximum was much lower than that during the minima at the beginning of cycles 23 and 24. There were differences in the flow velocities even between the two minima. The meridional flows show a migrating pattern with higher-velocity flows migrating toward the equator as activity increases. Additionally, we find that the migrating pattern of the meridional flow matches those of sunspot butterfly diagram and the zonal flows in the shallow layers. A high-latitude band in meridional flow appears around 2004, well before the current activity minimum. A Legendre polynomial decomposition of the meridional flows shows that the latitudinal pattern of the flow was also different during the maximum as compared to that during the two minima. The different components of the flow have different time dependences, and the dependence is different at different depths.

  16. Quasibiennial Periodicity of Solar and Planetary Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predeanu, Irina

    The quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) of various solar and geophysical parameters is anlysed, taking some planetary configurations as temporal reference points. The incidence of the QBO minima in the proximity of Sun-Mars oppositions is discussed. The increase of this effect when Mars is near the perihelion or Jupiter is conjunct to the Sun is pointed out,

  17. A concept for reducing oceanic separation minima through the use of a TCAS-derived CDTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, W. D.; Mcfarland, A. L.; Ludwick, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A concept for using a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI), as derived from a modified version of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System 2 (TCAS 2), to support reductions in air traffic separation minima for an oceanic track system is presented. The concept, and the TCAS modifications required to support it, are described. The feasibility of the concept is examined from a number of standpoints, including expected benefits, maximum alert rates, and possible transition strategies. Various implementation issues are analyzed. Pilot procedures are suggested for dealing with alert situations. Possible variations of the concept are also examined. Finally, recommendations are presented for other studies and simulation experiments which can be used to further verify the feasibility of the concept.

  18. Shear-deformation-potential constant of the conduction-band minima of Si: Pseudopotential calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Fu; Gu, Zong-Quan; Wang, Jian-Qing

    1990-09-01

    We have calculated the value of the shear-deformation-potential constant Ξu of the conduction-band minima of Si and its temperature coefficient dΞu/dT. The value of Ξu is 9.0 eV for an ab initio pseudopotential calculation and 10.8 eV by the empirical-pseudopotential method (EPM), in good agreement with our experiment. The EPM calculations of the temperature dependence of Ξu yield the values of (dΞu/dT)||DW=-0.04 meV/K due to the Debye-Waller contribution, and (dΞu/dT)||TE=-0.04 meV/K for thermal expansion. We suspect and suggest that the existing experimental value of dΞu/dT~=+3 meV/K is unreliable due to large experimental uncertainty.

  19. Anti-angiogenic Activity and Mechanism of Sesquiterpene Lactones from Centipeda minima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weihuan; Yu, Xiaobin; Liang, Ning; Ge, Wei; Kwok, Hin Fai; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Li, Yaolan; Chung, Hau Yin

    2016-04-01

    Centipeda minima is a Chinese herbal medicine used in the treatment of various diseases including cancer. An ethanol extract of the herb, its four fractions with different polarities, and two volatile oils prepared by steam distillation (SD) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) were investigated for their anti-angiogenic activity in a wild-type zebrafish model using a quantitative endogenous alkaline phosphatase (EAP) assay. The SFE oil displayed potent anti-angiogenic activity. Fifteen sesquiterpene lactones (SLs; compounds 1-15) isolated from the SFE oil were evaluated for their anti-angiogenic effect. Results revealed that pseudoguaianolide type SLs (1-8) inhibited vessel formation in the zebrafish embryos while guaianolide type SLs (9-15) showed little effect. Among the active ones, 6-O-angeloylenolin (1), a major component of SFE oil, possessed the strongest effect by reducing vessel formation in zebrafish embryos to 40% of the control value at 29.7 µM. Further study using the Tg (fli1a:EGFP) y1-type zebrafish model revealed that it blocked both intersegmental blood vessels (ISVs) and subintestinal vessels plexus (SIVs) formation in zebrafish embryos. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay on the wild-type zebrafish embryos suggested that 6-O-angeloylenolin affected multiple molecular targets related to angiogenesis including VEGF receptor, angiopoietin, and its receptors. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. minima possesses anti-angiogenic activity, and 6-O-angeloylenolin is a promising candidate for the development of an anti-angiogenic agent. PMID:27396185

  20. Efficient CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells prepared by an improved successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojoong; Wang, Mingkui; Chen, Peter; Gamelin, Daniel R; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Md K

    2009-12-01

    In pursuit of efficient quantum dot (QD)-sensitized solar cells based on mesoporous TiO(2) photoanodes, a new procedure for preparing selenide (Se(2-)) was developed and used for depositing CdSe QDs in situ over TiO(2) mesopores by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process in ethanol. The sizes and density of CdSe QDs over TiO(2) were controlled by the number of SILAR cycles applied. After some optimization of these QD-sensitized TiO(2) films in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells using a cobalt redox couple [Co(o-phen)(3)(2+/3+)], including addition of a final layer of CdTe, over 4% overall efficiencies were achieved at 100 W/m(2) with about 50% IPCE at its maximum. Light-harvesting properties and transient voltage decay/impedance measurements confirmed that CdTe-terminated CdSe QD cells gave better charge-collection efficiencies and kinetic parameters than corresponding CdSe QD cells. In a preliminary study, a CdSe(Te) QD-sensitized TiO(2) film was combined with an organic hole conductor, spiro-OMeTAD, and shown to exhibit a promising efficiency of 1.6% at 100 W/m(2) in inorganic/organic hybrid all-solid-state cells.

  1. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition. PMID:25685425

  2. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition.

  3. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C.T.; Jian, L.K.; Luhmann, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23–24 transition. PMID:25685425

  4. Comparing the Internal Structure of the Sun During the Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Davies, G. R.; Schou, J.; Larson, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) has been collecting helioseismic data for the last three solar cycles. We use these data to determine whether the internal properties of the Sun during the minimum preceding cycle 24 was different compared to that preceding cycle 23.

  5. Using vibrational Cooper minima to determine strong-field molecular-dissociation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severt, T.; Zohrabi, M.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Kling, Nora G.; Ablikim, U.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the possibility of using vibrational ``Cooper minima'' (VCM) locations as a method to determine dissociation pathways of molecules in a strong laser field. As a test case, we study the laser-induced dissociation of an O2+ion beam by several wavelengths (λ = 800 , 400, and 266 nm) using a coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging technique. Vibrational structure is observed in the kinetic energy release spectra, revealing a suppression of the dissociation of certain vibrational levels, which is a manifestation of the VCM effect. Previously, it has been shown in H2+that first-order time-dependent perturbation theory can be used to predict the locations of the VCM. We explore if the VCM locations predicted by perturbation theory can help uniquely identify dissociation pathways in O2+and consider its utility for other systems. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy. TS was partially supported by NSF-REU under Grant No. PHY-0851599.

  6. Purification, structural characterization and anticancer activity of the novel polysaccharides from Rhynchosia minima root.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuejing; Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Lili; Bao, Jiaolin; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jianbo; Su, Huanxing; Han, Jianping; He, Chengwei

    2015-11-01

    Three novel acidic polysaccharides termed PRM1, PRM3 and PRM5 were purified from Rhynchosia minima root using DEAE-52 cellulose and sephadex G-150 column chromatography. Their structures were characterized by ultraviolet (UV) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and differential scanning colorimeter (DSC) analysis. The uronic acid contents of PRM1, PRM3 and PRM5 were 30.7%, 12.7% and 47.7%, respectively. PRM1 (143.2 kDa), PRM3 (105.3 kDa) and PRM5 (162.1 kDa) were heteropolysaccharides because they were composed of arabinose, mannose, glucose and galactose. Their enthalpy values were 201.0, 111.0 and 206.8 J/g, respectively. PRM3 and PRM1 exhibited strong in vitro anticancer activity against lung cancer A549 and liver cancer HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggested that PRM1 and PRM3 could be potentially developed as natural anticancer agents.

  7. A gentic survey of Salvinia minima in the southern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madeira, Paul T.; Jacono, Colette C.; Tipping, Phil; Van, Thai K.; Center, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    The genetic relationships among 68 samples of Salvinia minima (Salviniaceae) were investigated using RAPD analysis. Neighbor joining, principle components, and AMOVA analyses were used to detect differences among geographically referenced samples within and outside of Florida. Genetic distances (Nei and Li) range up to 0.48, although most are under 0.30, still relatively high levels for an introduced, clonally reproducing plant. Despite the diversity AMOVA analysis yielded no indication that the Florida plants, as a group, were significantly different from the plants sampled elsewhere in its adventive, North American range. A single, genetically dissimilar population probably exists in the recent (1998) horticultural introduction to Mississippi. When the samples were grouped into 10 regional (but artificial) units and analyzed using AMOVA the between region variance was only 7.7%. Genetic similarity among these regions may indicate introduction and dispersal from common sources. The reduced aggressiveness of Florida populations (compared to other states) may be due to herbivory. The weevilCyrtobagous salviniae, a selective feeder, is found in Florida but not other states. The genetic similarity also suggests that there are no obvious genetic obstacles to the establishment or efficacy of C. salviniae as a biological control agent on S. minimaoutside of Florida.

  8. Airy minima in the scattering of weakly bound light heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, F.; Ohkubo, S.

    2005-11-01

    We reanalyze the existing 6Li + 12C elastic scattering angular distributions for incident energies ranging from a few MeV to 318 MeV within the frame of the optical model. Despite the important breakup effects expected in the scattering of such a fragile projectile, the system is found to display a surprising transparency. Indeed the barrier-wave/internal-wave decomposition of the elastic scattering amplitude reveals that a substantial part of the incident flux that penetrates the nuclear interior reemerges in the elastic channel, and typical refractive effects, like Airy minima, are clearly identified in the angular distributions. Coupled channel calculations performed on 12C(6Li,6Li')12C*(Jπ=2+,Ex=4.44 MeV) angular distributions extending through the whole angular range confirm the existence of an important internal-wave contribution in the backward hemisphere. A similar transparency is observed in other systems of this mass region, such as 7Li + 12C or 6Li + 16O. Finally, we examine recent 6He + 12C elastic scattering data obtained at 18 MeV by Milin et al. [Nucl. Phys. A730, 285 (2004)] and extending up to θc.m.≃85°, and we suggest additional measurements that could ascertain whether some transparency persists in the scattering of this radioactive projectile.

  9. Purification, structural characterization and anticancer activity of the novel polysaccharides from Rhynchosia minima root.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuejing; Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Lili; Bao, Jiaolin; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jianbo; Su, Huanxing; Han, Jianping; He, Chengwei

    2015-11-01

    Three novel acidic polysaccharides termed PRM1, PRM3 and PRM5 were purified from Rhynchosia minima root using DEAE-52 cellulose and sephadex G-150 column chromatography. Their structures were characterized by ultraviolet (UV) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and differential scanning colorimeter (DSC) analysis. The uronic acid contents of PRM1, PRM3 and PRM5 were 30.7%, 12.7% and 47.7%, respectively. PRM1 (143.2 kDa), PRM3 (105.3 kDa) and PRM5 (162.1 kDa) were heteropolysaccharides because they were composed of arabinose, mannose, glucose and galactose. Their enthalpy values were 201.0, 111.0 and 206.8 J/g, respectively. PRM3 and PRM1 exhibited strong in vitro anticancer activity against lung cancer A549 and liver cancer HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggested that PRM1 and PRM3 could be potentially developed as natural anticancer agents. PMID:26256325

  10. Leaching of lead by ammonium salts and EDTA from Salvinia minima biomass produced during aquatic phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Núñez-López, Roberto Aurelio; Meas, Yunny; Gama, Silvia Citlalli; Borges, Raúl Ortega; Olguín, Eugenia J

    2008-06-15

    Plant biomass harvested after heavy-metal phytoremediation must be considered as a hazardous waste that should be contained or treated appropriately before disposal or reuse. As a potential method to detoxify the biomass and to convert this material to a suitable fertilizer or mulch, leaching of lead (Pb) from Salvinia minima biomass was studied by testing water, several aqueous ammonium salts, and EDTA solution as lead extractants. The research was carried out in two phases: (i) a leaching study to determine the lead-extraction efficiency of the different leachants, and (ii) a thermodynamic analysis to identify the likely reactions and stable Pb(II) species formed in the leaching systems of the most efficient leachants. Experimentally, lead concentrations measured in leached biomass and in leachates were significantly different among the various leachants. It was determined that the extraction strength of the leachants followed the order: EDTA>ammonium oxalate>water approximately ammonium nitrate>ammonium acetate, achieving Pb extraction efficiencies of 99%, 70%, 7.2%, 6.9% and 1.3%, respectively, in single-stage extractions. The thermodynamic study indicated that the dominant species produced by the leaching process should be the soluble species PbEDTA2- for EDTA system, and the insoluble Pb(COO)2S precipitate for the oxalate system. PMID:18078711

  11. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    , together with the bulk loess median grain size (D50bulk) that is considered an integrated proxy of wind strength, dust source distance, aridity and vegetation cover. While an increase of dust flux and D50bulk with time is apparent, such a trend cannot be seen in the quartz grain size measures (D50quartz). This observation may imply that wind speeds were relatively constant in the studied time interval, while the turbulence of the flow may have been extremely varying (i.e. strong/rapid changes in the frequency/magnitude of dust storm events). A striking feature of the MAR record is that accumulation minima in the Dunaszekcsö record are synchronous with the Greenland Interstadials (GI-5.1 to GI-3). Subsequent Ca2+ minima in the NGRIP record at 26.22 and 25.02 ka (b2k) are also coeval with the MAR minima in the studied loess sequence. At the same time, these patterns are barely visible in the bulk and quartz grain size records. We speculate that the synchronous changes in the NGRIP Ca2+ and the Dunaszekcsö MAR records are results of millennial scale variations in the activity of Northern Hemisphere dust emitting regions shown in two archives from different environments. The very similar timing of MAR minima (and also some of the maxima) suggest a rapid aeolian system response in East Central Europe to abrupt climatic changes in the North Atlantic. Although such a synchronicity does not prove a Central European dust source to Greenland, it is consistent with this possibility. This study was supported by the OTKA PD-108639 grant and the Bolyai János Research Fellowship (both to GÚ). [1] Dansgaard, W., et al. (1993). Evidence for general instability of past climate from a 250-kyr ice-core record. Nature 364, 218-220. [2] Johnsen, S.J., et al. (1992). Irregular glacial interstadials recorded in a new Greenland ice core. Nature 359, 311-313. [3] Rasmussen, S.O., et al. (2014). A stratigraphic framework for abrupt climatic changes during the Last Glacial period based on three

  12. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    with the bulk loess median grain size (D50bulk) that is considered an integrated proxy of wind strength, dust source distance, aridity and vegetation cover. While an increase of dust flux and D50bulk with time is apparent, such a trend cannot be seen in the quartz grain size measures (D50quartz). This observation may imply that wind speeds were relatively constant in the studied time interval, while the turbulence of the flow may have been extremely varying (i.e. strong/rapid changes in the frequency/magnitude of dust storm events). A striking feature of the MAR record is that accumulation minima in the Dunaszekcsö record are synchronous with the Greenland Interstadials (GI-5.1 to GI-3). Subsequent Ca2+ minima in the NGRIP record at 26.22 and 25.02 ka (b2k) are also coeval with the MAR minima in the studied loess sequence. At the same time, these patterns are barely visible in the bulk and quartz grain size records. We speculate that the synchronous changes in the NGRIP Ca2+ and the Dunaszekcsö MAR records are results of millennial scale variations in the activity of Northern Hemisphere dust emitting regions shown in two archives from different environments. The very similar timing of MAR minima (and also some of the maxima) suggest a rapid aeolian system response in East Central Europe to abrupt climatic changes in the North Atlantic. Although such a synchronicity does not prove a Central European dust source to Greenland, it is consistent with this possibility. This study was supported by the OTKA PD-108639 grant and the Bolyai János Research Fellowship (both to GÚ). [1] Dansgaard, W., et al. (1993). Evidence for general instability of past climate from a 250-kyr ice-core record. Nature 364, 218-220. [2] Johnsen, S.J., et al. (1992). Irregular glacial interstadials recorded in a new Greenland ice core. Nature 359, 311-313. [3] Rasmussen, S.O., et al. (2014). A stratigraphic framework for abrupt climatic changes during the Last Glacial period based on three

  13. Meridional Surface Flows and the Recent Extended Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Nandy, D.; Munoz-Jaramillo, A.

    2011-05-01

    Nandy, Munoz, & Martens, have published a kinematic dynamo model that successfully reproduces the main characteristics of the recent extended solar minimum (Nature 2011, 471, 80). The model depends on the solar meridional flow and its return flow along the tachocline determining the period and character of the cycle. In particular Nandy et al. found that a meridional flow that is fast in the first half of the cycle and then slows down around solar maximum, can lead to an extended minimum with the characteristics of the recent minimum: an extended period without sunspots and weak polar fields. It has been pointed out that the observed surface meridional flows over the last cycle do not fit the pattern assumed by Nandy et al. Hathaway & Rightmire (Science 2010, 327-1350) find that the meridional speed of small magnetic surface elements observed by SoHO/MDI decreased around solar maximum and has not yet recovered. Basu & Antia (ApJ 2010, 717, 488) find surface plasma meridional flow speeds that are lower at solar maximum 23 than at the surrounding minima, which is different from both Hathaway and Nandy. While there is no physical reason that solar surface flows -- both differential rotation and meridional flow -- would vary in lockstep with flows at greater depth, as the large radial gradients near the surface clearly indicate, and while Nandy et al. have demonstrated that the deeper flows dominate the net meridional mass flow, we find that there is in effect a very satisfying agreement between the observational results of Hathaway & Rightmire, Basu & Antia, and the model assumptions of Nandy, Munoz, & Martens. We present an analytical model that reconciles the first two, followed by a hydrodynamical model that demonstrates the consistency of these observational results with the model assumptions of Nandy et al.

  14. Mitigating local minima in full-waveform inversion by expanding the search space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Tristan; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2013-10-01

    Wave equation based inversions, such as full-waveform inversion and reverse-time migration, are challenging because of their computational costs, memory requirements and reliance on accurate initial models. To confront these issues, we propose a novel formulation of wave equation based inversion based on a penalty method. In this formulation, the objective function consists of a data-misfit term and a penalty term, which measures how accurately the wavefields satisfy the wave equation. This new approach is a major departure from current formulations where forward and adjoint wavefields, which both satisfy the wave equation, are correlated to compute updates for the unknown model parameters. Instead, we carry out the inversions over two alternating steps during which we first estimate the wavefield everywhere, given the current model parameters, source and observed data, followed by a second step during which we update the model parameters, given the estimate for the wavefield everywhere and the source. Because the inversion involves both the synthetic wavefields and the medium parameters, its search space is enlarged so that it suffers less from local minima. Compared to other formulations that extend the search space of wave equation based inversion, our method differs in several aspects, namely (i) it avoids storage and updates of the synthetic wavefields because we calculate these explicitly by finding solutions that obey the wave equation and fit the observed data and (ii) no adjoint wavefields are required to update the model, instead our updates are calculated from these solutions directly, which leads to significant computational savings. We demonstrate the validity of our approach by carefully selected examples and discuss possible extensions and future research.

  15. Meteoritic evidence for the Maunder minimum in solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Schaeffer, O. A.; Schaeffer, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Concentrations of argon-39 produced by cosmic rays in the metal in 30 meteorites are remarkably similar, but they are slightly higher than expected for the present solar-cycle-averaged flux of cosmic rays. This supports the idea suggested by Eddy (1976) that there were prolonged minima in solar activity before 1715 which caused the deVries maximum in carbon-14 in earth's atmosphere by reducing the amount of cosmic-ray modulation in interplanetary space. The observations are easily consistent with 180 years of 'sunspot minimum' modulation during the Maunder and Spoerer minima, and possibly with virtually no solar modulation at all during that time. This would indicate that the solar wind then contained very little magnetic turbulence or whatever it is in the solar wind that causes the modulation of galactic cosmic rays.

  16. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Deexcitation Energy of Superdeformed Secondary Minima as a Probe to Density Dependence of Symmetry Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-Zhou; Lu, Xing; Chen, Yun-Peng

    2010-10-01

    Deexcitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima of odd-odd Au and Tl isotopes are investigated with the relativistic mean field (RMF) model where the isoscalar-isovector coupling is included to change the symmetry energy. It is verified by the theoretical analysis and numerical results that the deexcitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima relative to the ground states in these heavy nuclei are sensitive to differences in the symmetry energy. In particular, the linear correlation between the deexcitation energies of odd-odd Au and Tl isotopes and the neutron skin thickness in 208Pb is established. Moreover, explorations are extended to superdeformed candidates of other mass regions. It is found that the linear correlation can even be established between the deexcitation energies and the symmetry pressure at subsaturation density. These indicate that deexcitation energies can serve as a probe to the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  17. Are both symmetric and buckled dimers on Si(100) minima? Density functional and multireference perturbation theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yousung; Shao, Yihan; Gordon, Mark S.; Doren, Douglas J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2003-08-29

    We report a spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) solution at the symmetric dimer structure for cluster models of Si(100). With this solution, it is shown that the symmetric structure is a minimum on the DFT potential energy surface, although higher in energy than the buckled structure. In restricted DFT calculations the symmetric structure is a saddle point connecting the two buckled minima. To further assess the effects of electron correlation on the relative energies of symmetric versus buckled dimers on Si(100), multireference second order perturbation theory (MRMP2) calculations are performed on these DFT optimized minima. The symmetric structure is predicted to be lower in energy than the buckled structure via MRMP2, while the reverse order is found by DFT. The implications for recent experimental interpretations are discussed.

  18. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Le Mouel, J.; Courtillot, V.

    2011-12-01

    The anomalous character of solar cycle 23 has been pointed out. It is proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of "grand maximum" to one of "regular oscillations". In this study, we analyze the time distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, from cycle 21 to 23. We consider 32355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1-8Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated to their daily energy flux. The long duration of cycle 23 (~13 years), the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of cycle 23 and the start of cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. Amplitudes of extreme flares increase when mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days: the singular shape of cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: the first ~70% of the cycle display (in logarithmic scale) linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. Energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002. Durations of inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (~11yr) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call "active" and "quiet", with sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for cycles 21 to 23, cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous cycle 23 resembles cycle 4, which was followed by reduced cycles 5 and 6 at the time of the Dalton-minimum in solar activity, often associated with a cooler global climate. It will be interesting to monitor the evolution of solar flares in cycle 24, in order to further our

  19. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Courtillot, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    The anomalous character of Solar Cycle 23, which ended in the Summer of 2009, has been pointed out by many authors. It has even been proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of “grand maximum” to one of “regular oscillations”. We analyze the temporal distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, over Cycles 21 to 23. We consider 32 355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1 to 8 Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated with their daily energy flux. The long duration of Cycle 23 (12.8 years based on sunspots, 13.2 years based on flares) and the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of Cycle 23, and the start of Cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. The amplitudes of extreme flares increase when the mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days. The singular shape of Cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: in the first ≈ 70% of the cycle (displayed on a logarithmic scale) we see linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. The energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002 (a time when it is suggested that photospheric fields were abruptly reduced). Inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (≈ 11 years) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call “active” and “quiet”, with extremely sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs. quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for Cycles 21 to 23, Cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous Cycle 23 resembles Cycle 4, which was

  20. A population-based evolutionary search approach to the multiple minima problem in de novo protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elucidating the native structure of a protein molecule from its sequence of amino acids, a problem known as de novo structure prediction, is a long standing challenge in computational structural biology. Difficulties in silico arise due to the high dimensionality of the protein conformational space and the ruggedness of the associated energy surface. The issue of multiple minima is a particularly troublesome hallmark of energy surfaces probed with current energy functions. In contrast to the true energy surface, these surfaces are weakly-funneled and rich in comparably deep minima populated by non-native structures. For this reason, many algorithms seek to be inclusive and obtain a broad view of the low-energy regions through an ensemble of low-energy (decoy) conformations. Conformational diversity in this ensemble is key to increasing the likelihood that the native structure has been captured. Methods We propose an evolutionary search approach to address the multiple-minima problem in decoy sampling for de novo structure prediction. Two population-based evolutionary search algorithms are presented that follow the basic approach of treating conformations as individuals in an evolving population. Coarse graining and molecular fragment replacement are used to efficiently obtain protein-like child conformations from parents. Potential energy is used both to bias parent selection and determine which subset of parents and children will be retained in the evolving population. The effect on the decoy ensemble of sampling minima directly is measured by additionally mapping a conformation to its nearest local minimum before considering it for retainment. The resulting memetic algorithm thus evolves not just a population of conformations but a population of local minima. Results and conclusions Results show that both algorithms are effective in terms of sampling conformations in proximity of the known native structure. The additional minimization is shown to be

  1. The Total Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitte, Steven; Nevens, Stijn

    2016-10-01

    We present the composite measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) as measured by an ensemble of space instruments. The measurements of the individual instruments are put on a common absolute scale, and their quality is assessed by intercomparison. The composite time series is the average of all available measurements. From 1984 April to the present the TSI shows a variation in phase with the 11 yr solar cycle and no significant changes of the quiet-Sun level in between the three covered solar minima.

  2. The adventive status of Salvinia minima and S. molestain the southern United States and the related distribution of the weevil Cyrtobagous salviniae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacono, Colette C.; Davern, Tracy R.; Center, Ted D.

    2001-01-01

    The recent introduction of Salvinia molesta constitutes a serious threat to aquatic systems in the warm temperate regions of the United States. Salvinia minima, the only other member of Salviniaceae present in North America, is considered native by current floras. Evidence is presented which suggests that Salvinia minima was also introduced to North America, probably during the late 1920s and early 1930s. Likely sites of introduction and subsequent range expansions are identified. The accidentally introduced salvinia weevil, putatively Cyrtobagous salviniae, was found to occur widely on S. minima in Florida but is not established in other states. The disparate distribution of this Salvinia herbivore may account for the reduced aggressiveness of S. minima in Florida as compared to its troublesome growth in Texas and LOUisiana, where the weevil is not yet known.

  3. Mid-Term Quasi-Periodicities and Solar Cycle Variation of the White-Light Corona from 18.5 Years (1996.0 - 2014.5) of LASCO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlyaeva, T.; Lamy, P.; Llebaria, A.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the analysis of the temporal evolution of the solar corona based on 18.5 years (1996.0 - 2014.5) of white-light observations with the SOHO/LASCO-C2 coronagraph. This evolution is quantified by generating spatially integrated values of the K-corona radiance, first globally, then in latitudinal sectors. The analysis considers time series of monthly values and 13-month running means of the radiance as well as several indices and proxies of solar activity. We study correlation, wavelet time-frequency spectra, and cross-coherence and phase spectra between these quantities. Our results give a detailed insight on how the corona responds to solar activity over timescales ranging from mid-term quasi-periodicities (also known as quasi-biennial oscillations or QBOs) to the long-term 11 year solar cycle. The amplitude of the variation between successive solar maxima and minima (modulation factor) very much depends upon the strength of the cycle and upon the heliographic latitude. An asymmetry is observed during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24, prominently in the royal and polar sectors, with north leading. Most prominent QBOs are a quasi-annual period during the maximum phase of Solar Cycle 23 and a shorter period, seven to eight months, in the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24. They share the same properties as the solar QBOs: variable periodicity, intermittency, asymmetric development in the northern and southern solar hemispheres, and largest amplitudes during the maximum phase of solar cycles. The strongest correlation of the temporal variations of the coronal radiance - and consequently the coronal electron density - is found with the total magnetic flux. Considering that the morphology of the solar corona is also directly controlled by the topology of the magnetic field, this correlation reinforces the view that they are intimately connected, including their variability at all timescales.

  4. Comparison of PSF maxima and minima of multiple annuli coded aperture (MACA) and complementary multiple annuli coded aperture (CMACA) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, Challa; Lakshmana Rao, Vadlamudi; Lachaa Goud, Sivagouni

    2006-10-01

    In the present paper, and a series of papers to follow, the Fourier analytical properties of multiple annuli coded aperture (MACA) and complementary multiple annuli coded aperture (CMACA) systems are investigated. First, the transmission function for MACA and CMACA is derived using Fourier methods and, based on the Fresnel-Kirchoff diffraction theory, the formulae for the point spread function are formulated. The PSF maxima and minima are calculated for both the MACA and CMACA systems. The dependence of these properties on the number of zones is studied and reported in this paper.

  5. Cosmic Ray Intensity Variations near the Heliospheric Current Sheet during the Minimum of Solar Cycles 20 - 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, O. P. M.; Badruddin, B.

    2016-07-01

    We study the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) intensity variation, with respect to the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) crossings of the Earth during four solar cycle minima including the peculiar solar cycle 23 deep minimum. As the Sun rotates, the HCS crosses the earth at least once during each solar rotation (≈ 27 days). We perform the analysis of cosmic ray-intensity data as well as solar wind plasma and field parameters data with respect to the crossings of the HCS. We consider those crossings with at least five continuous days with the same polarity (positive or negative) before and after the HCS crossings. Special attention is given during solar minimum conditions as these periods are almost free from large transient decreases and increases in cosmic ray intensity. The solar minima during the last three solar cycles 20, 21, 22 (1976 - 1977, 1986 - 1987, 1996 - 1997) and the recent unusual deep minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 (2008 - 2009) fall during alternate solar polarity epochs (A<0 and A>0). Solar wind high speed streams (HSS) are frequent during solar minima, we perform analysis of cosmic ray as well as interplanetary plasma and field parameters during solar minimum periods with respect to the arrival time of HSS also. In this way, we study the GCR intensity modulation during different solar minima and different solar polarity epochs with reference to (i) HCS crossing dates and (ii) arrival time of HSS. These results are compared with predictions of simulation results based on modulation theories in low solar activity conditions but different polarity epochs of the heliosphere. Special emphasis is placed to discuss about the GCR modulation during the recent unusual deep minimum between solar cycle 23 and 24, in terms of convection/diffusion versus drift dominated modulation models.

  6. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J.

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  7. Molecular characterisation and infectivity of a "Legumovirus" (genus Begomovirus: family Geminiviridae) infecting the leguminous weed Rhynchosia minima in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Qazi, Javaria; Mansoor, Shahid; Briddon, Rob W

    2009-11-01

    The legume yellow mosaic viruses (LYMVs) that cause extensive losses to grain legumes across southern Asia are an evolutionarily unusual group of begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus; family Geminiviridae) with bipartite genomes. All previously identified LYMVs were isolated from leguminous crop species. Here we have identified a virus related to the LYMVs in a common weed, the legume Rhynchosia minima originating from Pakistan. Analysis of the sequence of the virus shows it to be a typical bipartite begomovirus. Sequence comparisons to all other begomovirus sequences available in the databases show the virus from R. minima to be distinct, with the highest level of sequence identity (69.5%) to an isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus. This indicates that the virus identified here is a new species in the genus Begomovirus for which we propose the name Rhynchosia yellow mosaic virus (RhYMV). By Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation we show that, in common with the other LYMVs, the clones of RhYMV are not infectious to the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana. In soybean, the results of inoculation depended upon the variety. In soybean var. Ig6 the symptoms were mild and plants recovered from infection. However, in var. FS-85, symptoms were severe and progressed to necrosis, indicative of a hypersensitive response. These results indicate that there is resistance to RhYMV in the soybean germplasm. The significance of these results is discussed.

  8. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guillén, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamaría, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.2±4.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.7±29.6 nm in length and 11.1±2.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures.

  9. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the living freshwater diatom Eolimna minima, a species developed in river biofilms.

    PubMed

    Feurtet-Mazel, Agnès; Mornet, Stéphane; Charron, Laëtitia; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Baudrimont, Magalie

    2016-03-01

    Testing biotransformation capacities of living aquatic microalgae diatoms to naturally synthetize gold nanoparticles (AuNP) from gold salts and assessing aftereffects on their viability by microscope observations is a great challenge. In this work, a laboratory experiment was conducted, which aimed to observe (i) directly by transmission electronic and light microscopy and (ii) through indirect measurements (UV-visible spectroscopy) the periphytic freshwater diatom Eolimna minima exposed to gold salts. This work revealed the capacity of E. minima to intracellularly biosynthetize AuNP and to tolerate it. AuNP synthesis appears as a mechanism of detoxification to protect diatom from gold salt contamination. We also pointed out the risks associated with the spread of diatoms full of AuNP, through the trophic web of freshwater ecosystems. The preponderant part of the diatoms in natural biofilms associated with their position at the basis of the trophic webs in rivers could then make them responsible for the contamination of their consumers (grazer animals) and consequently for the potential release of AuNP through the entire food web.

  10. Methanolic Extract of Ceplukan Leaf (Physalis minima L.) Attenuates Ventricular Fibrosis through Inhibition of TNF-α in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lestari, Bayu; Permatasari, Nur; Rohman, Mohammad Saifur

    2016-01-01

    The increase of heart failure prevalence on menopausal women was correlated with the decrease of estrogen level. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ceplukan leaf (Physalis minima L.), which contains phytoestrogen physalin and withanolides, on ventricular TNF-α level and fibrosis in ovariectomized rats. Wistar rats were divided into six groups (control (—); OVX 5: 5-week ovariectomy (OVX); OVX 9: 9-week ovariectomy; treatments I, II, and III: 9-weeks OVX + 4-week ceplukan leaf's methanolic extract doses 500, 1500, and 2500 mg/kgBW, resp.). TNF-α levels were measured with ELISA. Fibrosis was counted as blue colored tissues percentage using Masson's Trichrome staining. This study showed that prolonged hypoestrogen increases ventricular fibrosis (p < 0.05). Ceplukan leaf treatment also resulted in a decrease of ventricular fibrosis and TNF-α level in dose dependent manner compared to without treatment group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the TNF-α level was normalized in 2500 mg/kgBW Physalis minima L. (p < 0.05) treatment. The reduction of fibrosis positively correlated with TNF-α level (p < 0.05, r = 0.873). Methanolic extract of ceplukan leaf decreases ventricular fibrosis through the inhibition of ventricular TNF-α level in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26941790

  11. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guillén, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamaría, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.2±4.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.7±29.6 nm in length and 11.1±2.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures. PMID:24211828

  12. Latitudinal Dependence of Coronal Hole-Associated Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-05-01

    The fast solar wind can have at least two different coronal sources: high-latitude, polar coronal holes (PCH) and low-latitude, equatorial coronal holes (ECH). The in-situ differences in the PCH and ECH winds have not been well studied, nor have the differences in their evolution over the solar cycles. Ulysses' 19 years of observations from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present, provide us with measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles, which allow us to study the in-situ properties and evolution of the coronal hole-associated solar wind at different latitudes. In this work, we focus on the PCH and ECH solar winds during the minima between solar cycles 22-23 and 23-24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses, and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton dynamics, heavy ion composition, elemental abundance, and magnetic field properties of the PCH wind and ECH wind, with a special focus on their differences during the recent two solar minima. We also include the slow and hot, streamer-associated (ST) wind as a reference in the comparison. The comparison of PCH and ECH wind shows that: 1) the in-situ properties of ECH and PCH winds are significantly different during the two solar minima, and 2) the two types of coronal hole-associated solar wind respond differently to changes in solar activity strength from cycle 23 to cycle 24.

  13. Coronal Streamers and Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delone, A. B.; Porfir'eva, G. A.; Smirnova, O. B.; Yakunina, G. V.

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the structure of the streamer belt and plasma ejection dynamics during the last two solar minima (1996-1997 and 2006-2009) using white light observations by SOHO and STEREO space observatories. We consider the role of activity centers and of the sectorial structure of the Sun's global magnetic field in the streamer belt topology. During the last minimum plasma was ejected from the streamer belt at a velocity several tens of km/s higher than that during the preceding minimum. We have used the data from Internet and papers published in science journals.

  14. The Pb-hyperaccumulator aquatic fern Salvinia minima Baker, responds to Pb(2+) by increasing phytochelatins via changes in SmPCS expression and in phytochelatin synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Estrella-Gómez, N; Mendoza-Cózatl, D; Moreno-Sánchez, R; González-Mendoza, D; Zapata-Pérez, O; Martínez-Hernández, A; Santamaría, J M

    2009-03-01

    The relationship between accumulation of Pb(2+) and the activation of chelation and metal sequestration mechanisms mediated by phytochelatins (PC) was analyzed in the Pb(2+) hyperaccumulator aquatic fern Salvinia minima, after exposure to 40microM Pb(NO(3))(2). The tissue accumulation pattern of lead and the phytochelatin biosynthesis responses were analyzed in both, S. minima submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). S. minima roots accumulated a significantly higher concentrations of Pb(+2) than leaves did. Accumulation of Pb(2+) in roots was bi-phasic with a first uptake phase reached after 3h exposure and a second higher uptake phase reached after 24h exposure. In leaves, a single delayed, smaller uptake phase was attained only after 9h of exposure. In roots lead accumulation correlated with an increased phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity and an enhanced PC production. A higher proportion of polymerized PC(4) was observed in both tissues of exposed S. minima plants relative to unexposed ones, although a higher concentration of PC(4) was found in roots than in leaves. PCS activity and Pb(2+) accumulation was also higher in roots than in leaves. The expression levels of the S. minima PCS gene (SmPCS), in response to Pb(2+) treatment, were also evaluated. In S. minima leaves, the accumulation of Pb(2+) correlated with a marked increase in expression of SmPCS, suggesting a transcriptional regulation in the PCS activation and PC accumulation in this S. minima tissue. However, in roots, the basal expression of SmPCS was down-regulated after Pb(2+) treatment. This fact did not correlate with the later but strong increase in both, PCS activity and PC production; suggesting that the PC biosynthesis activation in S. minima roots occurs only by post-translational activation of PCS. Taken together, our data suggest that the accumulation of PC in S. minima is a direct response to Pb(2+) accumulation, and

  15. Capacity of the aquatic fern (Salvinia minima Baker) to accumulate high concentrations of nickel in its tissues, and its effect on plant physiological processes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Ignacio I; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Talavera-May, Carlos; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2014-10-01

    An experiment was designed to assess the capacity of Salvinia minima Baker to uptake and accumulate nickel in its tissues and to evaluate whether or not this uptake can affect its physiology. Our results suggest that S. minima plants are able to take up high amounts of nickel in its tissues, particularly in roots. In fact, our results support the idea that S. minima might be considered a hyper-accumulator of nickel, as it is able to accumulate 16.3 mg g(-1) (whole plant DW basis). Our results also showed a two-steps uptake pattern of nickel, with a fast uptake of nickel at the first 6 to 12h of being expose to the metal, followed by a slow take up phase until the end of the experiment at 144 h. S. minima thus, may be considered as a fern useful in the phytoremediation of residual water bodies contaminated with this metal. Also from our results, S. minima can tolerate fair concentrations of the metal; however, at concentrations higher than 80 μM Ni (1.5 mg g(-1) internal nickel concentration), its physiological performance can be affected. For instance, the integrity of cell membranes was affected as the metal concentration and exposure time increased. The accumulation of high concentrations of internal nickel did also affect photosynthesis, the efficiency of PSII, and the concentration of photosynthetic pigments, although at a lower extent.

  16. Arkansas solar-retrofit guide

    SciTech Connect

    Skiles, A.

    1981-06-01

    How solar retrofits should be designed to suit the climate and resources of Arkansas is reported. Retrofits examined are solar greenhouses, solar air heaters, and solar batch water heaters. A composite of successful construction and operation methods is presented in a format to help individuals build solar retrofits for themselves. Appended are a glossary, listings of references and information sources, and solar radiation data for Arkansas. (LEW)

  17. Differential Expression of Antioxidant Enzymes During Degradation of Azo Dye Reactive black 8 in Hairy roots of Physalis minima L.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Modi, Nikita; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, Neetin

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the protection of plant metabolism in presence of azo dye was characterized by studying activities of the role of antioxidant enzymes in the hairy roots (HRs) of Physalis minima L. during degradation of an azo dye, Reactive Black 8 (RB8). When the HRs were exposed to RB8 (30 mg L(-1)), a  nine fold increase in SOD activity was observed after 24 h, while 22 and 50 fold increase in activity was observed for POX and APX respectively after 72 h, whereas there was no significant change in activity of CAT. The activation of different antioxidant enzymes at different time intervals under dye stress suggests the synchronized functioning of antioxidant machinery to protect the HRs from oxidative damage. FTIR analysis confirmed the degradation of dye and the non-toxic nature of metabolites formed after dye degradation was confirmed by phytotoxicity study.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of chemical constituents of Centipeda minima by HPLC-QTOF-MS & HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi-On; Jin, Deng-Ping; Dong, Nai-Ping; Chen, Si-Bao; Mok, Daniel Kam Wah

    2016-06-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF-MS) method in both positive and negative ion modes was established to investigate the major constituents in the ethanolic extract of Centipeda minima (EBSC). Twelve common components including flavones and their glycosides, phenolic and polyphenolic acids, and sesquiterpene lactone were identified in ten batches of samples based on comparison with the retention time and accurate mass of external standards (mass accuracy within 3ppm) or the fragmentation patterns of tandem MS. Meanwhile, a simple, accurate and reliable HPLC-DAD method was also developed to determine the content of 10 chemical markers simultaneously. Results obtained from method validations including linearity, accuracy and precision showed that this new method is reliable and robust. Isochlorogenic acid A and brevilin A were found to be the most abundant in the ethanol extract of EBSC and could be served as markers for quality control of EBSC.

  19. Local minima conformations of the Sc3N @C80 endohedral complex: Ab initio quantum chemical study and suggestions for experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanov, Ilya; Kholod, Yana; Simeon, Tomekia; Kaczmarek, Anna; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    The results of an ab initio quantum chemical study of the Sc3N@C80 endohedral complex are reported. The Hartree-Fock (HF) and B3LYP levels of theory were employed in conjunction with STO-3G and 6-31G(d) basis sets to determine the geometry and properties of the local minima conformations of Sc3N cluster inside the C80 cage. Weak bonding between the Sc3N and C80 molecule and a number of very close geometry and nearly identical by energy local minima structures can explain the large mobility of the endohedral cluster, but complicate determination of the global minimum structure. The effect of the endohedral cluster on the vibrational spectrum of Sc3N@C80 is revealed. Based on the theoretical infrared (IR) spectra, the experimental method to distinguish local minima structures of Sc3N@C80 is proposed.

  20. Study of minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity using GCMT catalogue in global scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Stavros-Richard G.; Sarlis, Nicholas V.; Skordas, Efthimios S.

    2016-04-01

    It has been recently shown [1,2] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. The identification of this correlation became possible when studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity[3,4]. In the present study, we focus on the behaviour of the fluctuations of κ1 before major earthquakes using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalogue for a magnitude threshold Mthres=5.0 as in Ref.[5]. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations κ1of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than M8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [6] that similar minima of seismicity order parameter fluctuations had been observed before all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Finally, we examine the statistical significance of the results by using ROC graphs [7,8] and the proposed prediction method has a p-value to occur by chance well below 0.1%. The hit rate is 100% with a false alarm rate only 6.67%. An attempt to lower the target earthquake magnitude threshold will be also presented. REFERENCES [1] N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011). [2] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012) [3] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, and E. S. Skordas, Practica of Athens Acad. 76, 294 (2001). [4] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, and E. S. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011902 (2002). [5] N.V. Sarlis, S.-R. G. Christopoulos, and E. S. Skordas, Chaos 25, 063110 (2015) [6] N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013) [7] T. Fawcett, Pattern Recognit. Lett. 27, 861 (2006). [8] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Comput. Phys. Commun. 185, 1172 (2014).

  1. On solar cycle predictions and reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajša, R.; Wöhl, H.; Hanslmeier, A.; Verbanac, G.; Ruždjak, D.; Cliver, E.; Svalgaard, L.; Roth, M.

    2009-03-01

    Context: Generally, there are two procedures for solar cycle predictions: the empirical methods - statistical methods based on extrapolations and precursor methods - and methods based on dynamo models. Aims: The goal of the present analysis is to forecast the strength and epochs of the next solar cycle, to investigate proxies for grand solar minima and to reconstruct the relative sunspot number in the Maunder minimum. Methods: We calculate the asymmetry of the ascending and descending solar cycle phases (Method 1) and use this parameter as a proxy for solar activity on longer time scales. Further, we correlate the relative sunspot numbers in the epochs of solar activity minima and maxima (Method 2) and estimate the parameters of an autoregressive moving average model (ARMA, Method 3). Finally, the power spectrum of data obtained with the Method 1 is analysed and the Methods 1 and 3 are combined. Results: Signatures of the Maunder, Dalton and Gleissberg minima were found with Method 1. A period of about 70 years, somewhat shorter than the Gleissberg period was identified in the asymmetry data. The maximal smoothed monthly sunspot number during the Maunder minimum was reconstructed and found to be in the range 0-35 (Method 1). The estimated Wolf number (also called the relative sunspot number) of the next solar maximum is in the range 88-102 (Method 2). Method 3 predicts the next solar maximum between 2011 and 2012 and the next solar minimum for 2017. Also, it forecasts the relative sunspot number in the next maximum to be 90 ± 27. A combination of the Methods 1 and 3 gives for the next solar maximum relative sunspot numbers between 78 and 99. Conclusions: The asymmetry parameter provided by Method 1 is a good proxy for solar activity in the past, also in the periods for which no relative sunspot numbers are available. Our prediction for the next solar cycle No. 24 is that it will be weaker than the last cycle, No. 23. This prediction is based on various independent

  2. Geomagnetic detection of the sectorial solar magnetic field and the historical peculiarity of minimum 23-24

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, J.

    2012-01-01

    [1] Analysis is made of the geomagnetic-activityaaindex covering solar cycle 11 to the beginning of 24, 1868–2011. Autocorrelation shows 27.0-d recurrent geomagnetic activity that is well-known to be prominent during solar-cycle minima; some minima also exhibit a smaller amount of 13.5-d recurrence. Previous work has shown that the recent solar minimum 23–24 exhibited 9.0 and 6.7-d recurrence in geomagnetic and heliospheric data, but those recurrence intervals were not prominently present during the preceding minima 21–22 and 22–23. Using annual-averages and solar-cycle averages of autocorrelations of the historicalaadata, we put these observations into a long-term perspective: none of the 12 minima preceding 23–24 exhibited prominent 9.0 and 6.7-d geomagnetic activity recurrence. We show that the detection of these recurrence intervals can be traced to an unusual combination of sectorial spherical-harmonic structure in the solar magnetic field and anomalously low sunspot number. We speculate that 9.0 and 6.7-d recurrence is related to transient large-scale, low-latitude organization of the solar dynamo, such as seen in some numerical simulations.

  3. Solar Influence on Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenovic, Pavle; Stenke, Andrea; Rozanov, Eugene; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Global warming is one of the main threats to mankind. There is growing evidence that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have become the dominant factor, however natural factors such as solar variability cannot be neglected. Sun is a variable star; its activity varies in regular 11-years solar cycles. Longer periods of decreased solar activity are called Grand Solar Minima, which have stronger impact on terrestrial climate. Another natural factor related with solar activity are energetic particles. They can ionize neutral molecules in upper atmosphere and produce NOx and HOx which deplete ozone. We investigate the effect of proposed Grand Solar Minimum in 21st and 22nd century on terrestrial climate and ozone layer. The simulations are performed with different solar forcing scenarios for period of 200 years (2000-2200) using global chemistry-climate model coupled with ocean model (SOCOL-MPIOM). We also deal with problem of representation of middle range energy electrons (30-300 keV) in the model and investigation of their influence on climate.

  4. On the relationship between the Solar Cycle and the Secular Solar Cycle with the Quasi- quinquennial Periodicity of Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel

    We have done a Wavelet Spectral Analysis of the daily, monthly and annual series of Sunspots; the obtained results show that the 5.5 years (quasi-quinquennial) periodicity is systematically present in the spectrum of the secular maxima of solar activity. Such periodicity is attenuated or disappears during the secular minima: e.g. the Maunder, Dalton and Modern minima. Since such a quasi-quinquennial frequency has been attenuated during the preceding cycles 22 and 23, therefore, we should expect that such a periodicity will be attenuated or disappear during cycle 24 as well as in cycles 25 and 26. Such a behavior will confirm that we are in the descending phase of the secular cycle toward its minima at the end of cycle 26. Data of Suns Spots by the end of Cycle 24 will allow us either, to confirm our results on the relation between the 5.5 years periodicity and the solar secular cycle, or conversely to assume that the secular cycle is shifted, or even our results are not of general validity but only for some cycles as those associated to the Maunder, Dalton, and Modern minima.

  5. Influence of Solar Cycles on Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, M.

    2011-12-01

    This research inspects possible influence of solar cycles on earthquakes through of statistical analyses. We also discussed the mechanism that would drive the occurrence of increasing of earthquakes during solar maxima. The study was based on worldwide earthquakes events during approximately four hundred years (1600-2010). The increase of earthquakes events followed the Maxima of Solar cycle, and also depends on the tectonic plate location. From 1600 until 1645 events increased during the Maxima in some of the tectonic plates as Pacific, Arabian and South America. The earthquakes analyzed during two grand solar minima, the Maunder (1645-1720) and the Dalton (1790-1820) showed a decrease in the number of earthquakes and the solar activity. It was observed during these minima a significant number of events at specific geological features. After the last minima (Dalton) the earthquakes pattern increased with solar maxima. The calculations showed that events increasing during solar maxima most in the Pacific, South America or Arabian until 1900. Since there were few records during these three centuries we needed additional analysis on modern data. We took the last four solar cycles events (1950-2010) and made similar calculations. The results agreed with the former calculations. It might be that the mechanism for the Sun-Earth connection relies on the solar wind speed. In both records (1600-1900) and (1950-2010) the results showed a significant increase in earthquakes events in some of the tectonic plates linked to solar maxima. The Solar wind energy striking the Earth's magnetosphere affects the entire environment because the pressure on the region increases and the magnetosphere shrinks sometimes four Earth's radii. This sudden compression causes earthquakes in specific plates. During the times of solar minima the pressure from the solar wind on the earth decreases, then the magnetosphere expands and earthquakes happen in a different pattern according to the

  6. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells. PMID:26422062

  7. Packaging a Successful NASA Mission to Reach a Large Audience with a Small Budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics and NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Nicola J.; Goldberg, Richard; Barnes, Robin J.; Sigwarth, John B.; Beisser, Kerri B.; Moore, Thomas E.; Hoffman, Robert A.; Russell, Christopher T.; Scudder, Jack D.; Spann, James F.

    2004-01-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth's dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story. Team members also created visualizations using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA's Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  8. Packaging a successful NASA mission to reach a large audience within a small budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Goldberg, R.; Barnes, R. J.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Beisser, K. B.; Moore, T. E.; Hoffman, R. A.; Russell, C. T.; Scudder, J.; Spann, J. F.; Newell, P. T.; Hobson, L. J.; Gribben, S. P.; Obrien, J. E.; Menietti, J. D.; Germany, G. G.; Mobilia, J.; Schulz, M.

    2004-12-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth’s dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story, and visualizations were created using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts in order to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA’s Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  9. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Antia, H. M.; Basu, Sarbani E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed

    2010-09-01

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  10. Relationships among solar activity SEP occurrence frequency, and solar energetic particle event distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho

    The solar cycle 20-22 direct spacecraft measurement results are used to analyze the occurrence frequency and distribution function of solar energetic particle (SEP) events as dependent on solar activity. The analysis has shown that • the mean occurrence frequency of the SEP events with ≥30 MeV proton fluence sizes exceeding 106 is proportional to sunspot number, • the SEP event proton distribution functions for periods of different solar activity levels can be described to be power-law functions whose spectral form (spectral indices and cutoff values) are the same. The above results permit the following conclusions: a) to within statistical deviations, the total number of SEP events observed during any given time interval is proportional to the sum of mean-yearly sunspot numbers; b) large SEP events can occur to within quite a definite probability even during solar minima.

  11. An Analysis of Solar Global Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouradian, Zadig

    2013-02-01

    This article proposes a unified observational model of solar activity based on sunspot number and the solar global activity in the rotation of the structures, both per 11-year cycle. The rotation rates show a variation of a half-century period and the same period is also associated to the sunspot amplitude variation. The global solar rotation interweaves with the observed global organisation of solar activity. An important role for this assembly is played by the Grand Cycle formed by the merging of five sunspot cycles: a forgotten discovery by R. Wolf. On the basis of these elements, the nature of the Dalton Minimum, the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Grand Minima are presented.

  12. Superactive regions in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxiu; Chen, Anqin

    2015-08-01

    Solar super active regions (SARs) are characterized by huge sunspot area, strong thermal and non-thermal radiation, severe activity events and obvious decrease of total solar irradiance during their central meridian passage (Chen et al. 2011). They are more close to the star spots observed in integrated stellar radiation. In last 5 solar cycles, the SARs occupied less than 5% of total solar active regions, but hosted more than 40% of X class X-ray flares (or equivalently, major solar flares). With available vector-magnetograph observations, we quantitatively described the SARs in solar cycles 22-23 with four parameters, which were deduced from vector magnetic fields, and suggested a composite vector field Index Icom (Chen and Wang 2012). The SARs with very strong flare activity all have Icom > 1. Comparing with solar cycles 21-23, the level of solar activity in current solar cycle is very low. So far, there are only 5 SARs and 44 X class flares. The monthly smoothed TSI decreased sharply by 0.09% from the maximum of solar cycle 23 to the minima between solar cycle 23 and 24. In this contribution, we present new studies on SARs in solar cycle 24. The SARs in solar cycle 24 have relatively small flare index and relatively small vector field index Icom comparing with the SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23. There is a clearly linear relationship between the flare index and the composite vector field index (Chen and Wang 2015). The emphasis of this contribution is put on the similarity and different behaviors of vector magnetic fields of the SARs in the current solar cycle and the previous ones. We try to get a satisfactory account for the general characteristics and relatively low level of solar flare activity in cycle 24.

  13. Capitol Success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-08-01

    This legislative session, medicine resolved to ensure physicians can give their patients the best care possible. The hard work paid off in significant victories that largely build on the Texas Medical Association's 2013 legislative successes. PMID:26263520

  14. Capitol Success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-08-01

    This legislative session, medicine resolved to ensure physicians can give their patients the best care possible. The hard work paid off in significant victories that largely build on the Texas Medical Association's 2013 legislative successes.

  15. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys. PMID:27176512

  16. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  17. Manifestation of effective-mass states of secondary minima in the persistent photoconductivity related to the DX centre in ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. E.; Ryabchenko, Yu S.; Sheinkman, M. K.; von Bardeleben, H. J.

    1996-01-01

    The correlation of persistent photoconductivity and photo-Hall studies of Sn- and Si-doped 0268-1242/11/1/016/img8 layers of compositions 0268-1242/11/1/016/img9 with previous photo-EPR results obtained on the same samples shows the importance of hydrogenic effective-mass states derived from secondary conduction band minima in highly (0268-1242/11/1/016/img10) doped samples. The Fermi level pinning after low-temperature photoexcitation in direct-gap material by the resonant 0268-1242/11/1/016/img11 level in the case of Sn-doped samples, directly demonstrated by its EPR detection, explains the difference in the spin and carrier concentrations observed as well as the different kinetics for the relaxation into the initial state. The consideration of this state allows further an interpretation of the nonmonotonic changes of the free-electron mobility with the photon flux observed in highly doped (0268-1242/11/1/016/img12) samples.

  18. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  19. Salinity minima, water masses and surface circulation in the Eastern Tropical Pacific off Mexico and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Esther; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor; Castro, Rubén; Desmond Barton, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal variations of the water masses and their interactions are analyzed in the Tropical Pacific off Mexico (TPOM) and four contiguous areas of on the basis of new extensive hydrographic database. The regional water masses intervals are redefined in terms of Absolute Salinity (SA) in g kg-1 and Conservative Temperature (Θ) according to TEOS - 10. The California Current System Water (CCSW) mass is introduced as an improved description of the former California Current Water (CCW) together with the Subarctic Water (SAW) to describe better the characteristics of the components of the California Current System. Hydrographic data, Precipitation-Evaporation balance and geostrophic currents were used to investigate the origin and seasonality of two salinity minima in the area. The shallow salinity minimum of around 33.5 g kg-1 originated in the California Current System and became saltier but less dense water as it traveled to the southeast. It can be identified as a mixture of CCSW and tropical waters. The surface salinity minimum of 32 - 33 g kg-1 was seen as a sharp surface feature in the TPOM from August to November. It was produced by the arrival of tropical waters from the south in combination with the net precipitation in the area during these months. This result provides new evidence of the presence of the poleward-flowing Mexican Coastal Current and, for the first time, of its seasonal pattern of variation.

  20. Success Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boffey, D. Barnes; Boffey, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes success counseling, a counseling approach based on the principles of William Glasser's control theory and reality therapy that helps campers examine their wants and needs, evaluate their own behaviors, and see the connections between behavior and the ability to meet basic needs for love, power, fun, and freedom. Provides examples of…

  1. SOLAR WIND HEAVY IONS OVER SOLAR CYCLE 23: ACE/SWICS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar wind plasma and compositional properties reflect the physical properties of the corona and its evolution over time. Studies comparing the previous solar minimum with the most recent, unusual solar minimum indicate that significant environmental changes are occurring globally on the Sun. For example, the magnetic field decreased 30% between the last two solar minima, and the ionic charge states of O have been reported to change toward lower values in the fast wind. In this work, we systematically and comprehensively analyze the compositional changes of the solar wind during cycle 23 from 2000 to 2010 while the Sun moved from solar maximum to solar minimum. We find a systematic change of C, O, Si, and Fe ionic charge states toward lower ionization distributions. We also discuss long-term changes in elemental abundances and show that there is a {approx}50% decrease of heavy ion abundances (He, C, O, Si, and Fe) relative to H as the Sun went from solar maximum to solar minimum. During this time, the relative abundances in the slow wind remain organized by their first ionization potential. We discuss these results and their implications for models of the evolution of the solar atmosphere, and for the identification of the fast and slow wind themselves.

  2. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  3. Triple Solar Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar activity surged on the morning of Dec 12, 2010 when the sun erupted three times in quick succession, hurling a trio of bright coronal mass ejections (CMEs) into space. Coronagraphs onboard th...

  4. Shear-deformation-potential constant of the conduction-band minima of Si: Experimental determination by the deep-level capacitance transient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Fu; Zhao, Xue-Shu; Gu, Zong-Quan; Chen, Jian-Xin; Li, Yan-Jin; Wang, Jian-Qing

    1991-06-01

    The shear-deformation-potential constant Ξu of the conduction-band minima of Si has been measured by a method which we called deep-level capacitance transient under uniaxial stress. The uniaxial-stress (F) dependence of the electron emission rate en from deep levels to the split conduction-band minima of Si has been analyzed. Theoretical curves are in good agreement with experimental data for the S0 and S+ deep levels in Si. The values of Ξu obtained by the method are 11.1+/-0.3 eV at 148.9 K and 11.3+/-0.3 eV at 223.6 K. The analysis and the Ξu values obtained are also valuable for symmetry determination of deep electron traps in Si.

  5. Sensitivity of de-excitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima to the density dependence of symmetry energy with the relativistic mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W. Z.; Ren, Z. Z.; Sheng, Z. Q.; Zhu, Z. Y.

    2010-06-01

    The relationship between de-excitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima relative to ground states and the density dependence of the symmetry energy is investigated for heavy nuclei using the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. It is shown that the de-excitation energies of superdeformed secondary minima are sensitive to differences in the symmetry energy that are mimicked by the isoscalar-isovector coupling included in the model. With deliberate investigations on a few Hg isotopes that have data of de-excitation energies, we find that the description for the de-excitation energies can be improved due to the softening of the symmetry energy. Further, we have investigated de-excitation energies of odd-odd heavy nuclei that are nearly independent of pairing correlations, and have discussed the possible extraction of the constraint on the density dependence of the symmetry energy with the measurement of de-excitation energies of these nuclei.

  6. "Success"ful Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Carol J.

    1986-01-01

    The Success in Reading and Writing Program at a K-2 school in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, teaches children of varied races and abilities to read and write using newspapers, dictionaries, library books, magazines, and telephone directories. These materials help students develop language skills in a failure-free atmosphere. Includes two…

  7. 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive overview of the solar electricity market and identifies successes and trends within the market from both global and national perspectives.

  8. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  9. Brachyopa minima (Diptera: Syrphidae), a new species from Greece with notes on the biodiversity and conservation of the genus Brachyopa Meigen in the Northern Aegean Islands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bañón, Celeste; Radenković, Snezana; Vujić, Ante; Petanidou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    An on-going study of the hoverfly fauna of the Northern Aegean Islands (Greece) has revealed the presence of four species of the genus Brachyopa Meigen. During the survey the following species were found: B. bicolor (Fallén), B. quadrimaculosa Thompson in Kaplan & Thompson, B. minima Vujić & Pérez-Bañón sp. nov. and an unidentified species very close to B. pilosa (Collin). Morphological characters and mitochondrial COI barcodes were used to link different life stages of B. minima, and to identify a larval specimen of B. bicolor. In this study adult and larval morphology and habitat preferences for B. minima are described. The description of larval morphology of B. bicolor and Brachyopa sp. aff. pilosa is amended too. An identification key to the adults of the B. quadrimaculosa group sensu Kassebeer (2002) in the Eastern Mediterranean (Greece, Israel and Turkey) is provided. The importance of specific microhabitats for the continued existence of these taxa is discussed. PMID:27395920

  10. Defect mediated room temperature ferromagnetism and resistance minima study in epitaxial ZnGa0.002Al0.02O transparent conducting oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, Namik K.; Nori, Sudhakar; Kumar, D.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    We report on the micro-structural, transport, optical and magnetic properties in ZnGa0.002Al0.02O (AGZO) films grown by pulsed laser deposition under different growth conditions. AGZO films grown at substrate temperatures of 600 °C show metal-like behavior with a resistivity minima at lower temperatures, whereas films grown at 300 °C and ambient oxygen partial pressure of 1 mTorr show metallic nature with resistivity values on the order of 100 µΩ · cm at room temperature. The most interesting features are the concomitant occurrence of high temperature resistivity minima and room temperature ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetic moment of 1000 A m-1 and with coercivity in the range 100-240 Oe. The temperature dependent resistivity data has been interpreted in the light of quantum corrections to conductivity in disordered systems, suggesting that the e-e interactions is the dominant mechanism in the weak-localization (WL) limit in the case of films showing resisitivity minima. The simultaneous ferromagnetic ordering coupled with the enhancements in electrical conductivity in AGZO system should have their origin in native point defects in the form of oxygen and zinc vacancies and interstitials and their complexes. We propose that formation of oxygen vacancy-zinc interstitial defect complex (V O-I Zn) is responsible for the enhancement in n-type conductivity, and zinc vacancies (V Zn) for the observed room temperature ferromagnetism.

  11. Defect mediated room temperature ferromagnetism and resistance minima study in epitaxial ZnGa0.002Al0.02O transparent conducting oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, Namik K.; Nori, Sudhakar; Kumar, D.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    We report on the micro-structural, transport, optical and magnetic properties in ZnGa0.002Al0.02O (AGZO) films grown by pulsed laser deposition under different growth conditions. AGZO films grown at substrate temperatures of 600 °C show metal-like behavior with a resistivity minima at lower temperatures, whereas films grown at 300 °C and ambient oxygen partial pressure of 1 mTorr show metallic nature with resistivity values on the order of 100 µΩ · cm at room temperature. The most interesting features are the concomitant occurrence of high temperature resistivity minima and room temperature ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetic moment of 1000 A m‑1 and with coercivity in the range 100–240 Oe. The temperature dependent resistivity data has been interpreted in the light of quantum corrections to conductivity in disordered systems, suggesting that the e–e interactions is the dominant mechanism in the weak-localization (WL) limit in the case of films showing resisitivity minima. The simultaneous ferromagnetic ordering coupled with the enhancements in electrical conductivity in AGZO system should have their origin in native point defects in the form of oxygen and zinc vacancies and interstitials and their complexes. We propose that formation of oxygen vacancy–zinc interstitial defect complex (V O–I Zn) is responsible for the enhancement in n-type conductivity, and zinc vacancies (V Zn) for the observed room temperature ferromagnetism.

  12. OUT Success Stories: Solar Roofing Shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.

    2000-08-31

    Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cells are now doubling as rooftop shingles. PV shingles offer many advantages. The energy generated from a building's PV rooftop shingles can provide power both to the building and the utility's power grid.

  13. OUT Success Stories: Solar Roofing Shingles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Johnson, N.

    2000-08-01

    Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cells are now doubling as rooftop shingles. PV shingles offer many advantages. The energy generated from a building's PV rooftop shingles can provide power both to the building and the utility's power grid.

  14. Energy spectrum of the recurrent cosmic rays variation during the solar minimum 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We study temporal changes of the power-law energy/ rigidity spectrum of the first three harmonics of the recurrent variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity during the unusual solar minimum 23/24 and compare with four previous minima. We show that the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the recurrent variation is soft in the minimum 23/24. Moreover, while the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the first harmonic of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity practically behaves as during earlier four minima, the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the second and the third harmonics demonstrate a valuable softening. We attribute this phenomenon to the decrease of an extension of heliosphere caused by the drop of the solar wind dynamic pressure during the solar minimum 23/24.

  15. 42 years of continuous observations of the Solar 1 diameter from 1974 to 2015 - What do they forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Penna, Jucira; Boscardin, Sergio; Papa, Andres R. R.; Garcia, Marcos Antonio; Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-07-01

    Several research groups in the world developed observational programs for the Sun in order to measure its apparent diameter over time with dedicated instruments, called solar astrolabes, since 1974. Their data have been gathered in several observing stations connected in the R2S3 (Réseau de Suivi au Sol du Rayon Solaire) network and through reciprocal visits and exchanges: Nice/Calern Observatoire/France, Rio de Janeiro Observatório Nacional/Brazil, Observatório de São Paulo IAGUSP/Brazil, Observatório Abrahão de Moraes IAGUSP/Brazil, Antalya Observatory/Turkey, San Fernando/Spain. Since all the optics and data treatment of the solar astrolabes was the same, from the oldest, with a single fixed objective prism, to the newest, with an angle variable objective prism and digital image acquisition, their results could be put together. Each instrument had its own density filter with a prismatic effect responsible for a particular shift. Thus, identical data gathering and just a different prismatic shift, enabled to reconcile all those series by using the common stretches and derive a single additive constant to place each one onto a common average. By doing so, although the value itself of the ground observed solar diameter is lost, its variations are determined over 35 years. On the combined series of the ground observed solar diameter a modulation with the 11 years main solar cycle is evident. However when such modulation is removed, both from the solar diameter compound series and from the solar activity series (as given by the sunspots count), a very strong anticorrelation is revealed. This suggested a larger diameter for the forthcoming cycles. This was very well verified for solar cycle 23, and correctly forecasted for cycle 24,in a behavior similar to that on the Minima of Dalton and Maunder. The ground monitoring keeps being routinely followed at Observatório Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, now using the Solar Heliometer, specially built to this end . The

  16. Solar UV Spectral Irradiance Measured by SUSIM During Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the impact of solar variability on terrestrial climate requires detailed knowledge of both solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI). Observations of SSI in the ultraviolet (UV) have been made by various space-based missions since 1978. Of these missions, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) included the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) experiment which measured the UV SSI from 1991 into 2005. In this talk, we present the UV spectral irradiance observations from SUSIM on UARS during solar cycles 22 and 23 along with results of a recent review of the calibration, stability, and in-flight performance. Another more recent mission is the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite which carries the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Solar Irradiance Monitor (SIM). Together, the SORCE instruments have measured the UV, Visible, and IR SSI over the period of 2003 to the present. This talk will include a comparison between SUSIM and SORCE during the period of overlapping observations as well as comparisons of UV spectra observed at various times, particularly during the last two solar minima. These comparisons show that the UV observations by SORCE are inconsistent with those measured by SUSIM.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: TU UMa light curves and maxima, CL Aur minima (Liska+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, J.; Skarka, M.; Mikulasek, Z.; Zejda, M.; Chrastina, M.

    2016-02-01

    Differential photometry for RR Lyrae star TU UMa in the 1st and 2nd file. The measurements were obtained using 24-inch and 1-inch telescopes, respectively. The observations were performed at the Masaryk University Observatory in Brno (3 nights, 24-inch), and at the private observatory in Brno (16 nights, 1-inch) in the Czech Republic from December 2013 to June 2014. Observing equipments consisted of 24-inch Newtonian telescope (600/2780mm, diameter/focal length) and a Moravian Instruments CCD camera G2-4000 with Stromgren photometric filters vby, and of 1-inch refractor (a photographic lens Sonnar 4/135mm, lens focal ratio/focal length) and ATIK 16IC CCD camera with green photometric filter with similar throughput as the Johnson V filter. Exposures were v - 60s, b - 30s, y - 30s, green - 30s. For the small aperture telescope, five frames were combined to a single image to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. The time resolution of a such combined frame is about 170s. CCD images were calibrated in a standard way (dark frame and flat field corrections). The C-Munipack software (Motl 2009) was used for this processing as well as for differential photometry. The comparison star BD+30 2165 was the same for both instruments, but the control stars were BD+30 2164 (for the 24-inch telescope) and HD 99593 (for the 1-inch telescope). The 3rd file contains maxima timings of TU UMa adopted from the GEOS RR Lyr database, from the latest publications, together with maxima timings determined in our study. Times of maxima were calculated from our observations, sky-surveys data (Hipparcos, NSVS, Pi of the Sky, SuperWASP), photographic measurements (project DASCH), and from several published datasets, in which the maxima were omitted or badly determined - Boenigk (1958AcA.....8...13B), Liakos, Niarchos (2011IBVS.6099....1L, 2011IBVS.5990....1L), Liu, Janes (1989ApJS...69..593L), Preston et al. (1961ApJ...133..484P). The 4th file contains minima timings of eclipsing binary CL Aur

  18. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  19. Outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution observed during the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 in Mohe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusha; Zhang, Bairong

    With a simple video-collecting system, the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 has been observed by using Panasonic NV-S88OEN video camera in Mohe. After analyzing the yellow (by adding a GG11 filter) and white coronal observation data, the outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution outside 1.5 Rsun have been found during the solar minima.

  20. The periodicity of Grand Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The sunspot number is the most used index to quantify the solar activity. Nevertheless, the sunspot is a syn- thetic index and not a physical index. Therefore, we should be careful to use the sunspot number to quantify the low (high) solar activity. One of the major problems of using sunspot to quantify solar activity is that its minimum value is zero. This zero value hinders the reconstruction of the solar cycle during the Maunder minimum. All solar indexes can be used as analog signals, which can be easily converted into digital signals. In con- trast, the conversion of a digital signal into an analog signal is not in general a simple task. The sunspot number during the Maunder minimum can be studied as a digital signal of the solar activity In 1894, Maunder published a discovery that has maintained the Solar Physics in an impasse. In his fa- mous work on "A Prolonged Sunspot Minimum" Maunder wrote: "The sequence of maximum and minimum has, in fact, been unfailing during the present century [..] and yet there [..], the ordinary solar cycle was once interrupted, and one long period of almost unbroken quiescence prevailed". The search of new historical Grand solar minima has been one of the most important questions in Solar Physics. However, the possibility of estimating a new Grand solar minimum is even more valuable. Since solar activity is the result of electromagnetic processes; we propose to employ the power to quantify solar activity: this is a fundamental physics concept in electrodynamics. Total Solar Irradiance is the primary energy source of the Earth's climate system and therefore its variations can contribute to natural climate change. In this work, we propose to consider the fluctuations in the power of the Total Solar Irradiance as a physical measure of the energy released by the solar dynamo, which contributes to understanding the nature of "profound solar magnetic field in calm". Using a new reconstruction of the Total Solar Irradiance we found the

  1. The Fraction of the Sun's Lifetime in a Grand Minimum State Estimated from Studies of Solar-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Maunder Minimum is a key event in climate change research, (1) from the vantage point as a natural control experiment in which greenhouse gas (GHG) abundances were at a pre-industrial constant while solar forcing changed by a magnitude comparable to recent GHG increases, and (2) given recent interest and speculation that a similar grand minimum might occur later this century. To date, periodicity in solar grand minima has been difficult to detect in geophysical proxy data, and an alternative approach involves estimating the frequency of the Sun's lifetime spent in a grand minimum state by searching for evidence of grand minima in solar-type stars. Most often this is done by measuring Ca H and K flux as an indicator of chromospheric activity, or by photometric observations of solar cycles on decadal timescales. Early estimates of grand minimum frequency in solar type stars ranged from 10-30%. However, these early studies inadvertently included many stars that have evolved off the main sequence. This paper discusses how measurements of stellar Lithium abundance, and spectroscopically constrained metallicity, are used as additional constraints on age and main sequence membership, to refine detections of grand minima in solar-type stars. Based on the most recent studies, an estimate emerges of 5-6% for the fraction of the Sun's lifetime spent in a low-activity and reduced luminosity state analogous to the Maunder Minimum.

  2. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  3. A Topside Equatorial Ionospheric Density and Composition Climatology During and After Extreme Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Simoes, F.; Ivanov, S.; Heelis, R. A.; Bilitza, D.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    During the recent solar minimum, solar activity reached the lowest levels observed during the space age. This extremely low solar activity has accompanied a number of unexpected observations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere when compared to previous solar minima. Among these are the fact that the ionosphere is significantly contracted beyond expectations based on empirical models. Climatological altitude profiles of ion density and composition measurements near the magnetic dip equator are constructed from the C/NOFS satellite to characterize the shape of the top side ionosphere during the recent solar minimum and into the new solar cycle. The variation of the profiles with respect to local time, season, and solar activity are compared to the IRI-2007 model. Building on initial results reported by Heelis et al. [2009], here we describe the extent of the contracted ionosphere, which is found to persist throughout 2009. The shape of the ionosphere during 2010 is found to be consistent with observations from previous solar minima.

  4. Performance of SuSi: a method for generating atomistic models of amorphous polymers based on a random search of energy minima.

    PubMed

    Curcó, David; Alemán, Carlos

    2004-04-30

    The performance of a recently developed method to generate representative atomistic models of amorphous polymers has been investigated. This method, which is denoted SuSi, can be defined as a random generator of energy minima. The effects produced by different parameters used to define the size of the system and the characteristics of the generation algorithm have been examined. Calculations have been performed on poly(L,D-lactic) acid (rho = 1.25 g/cm3) and nylon 6 (rho = 1.084 g/cm(3)), which are important commercial polymers.

  5. Successful Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R.

    2012-12-01

    In an observational science, it is not possible to test hypotheses through controlled laboratory experiments. One can test parts of the system in the lab (as is done routinely with infrared spectroscopy of greenhouse gases), but the collective behavior cannot be tested experimentally because a star or planet cannot be brought into the lab; it must, instead, itself be the lab. In the case of anthropogenic global warming, this is all too literally true, and the experiment would be quite exciting if it weren't for the unsettling fact that we and all our descendents for the forseeable future will have to continue making our home in the lab. There are nonetheless many routes though which the validity of a theory of the collective behavior can be determined. A convincing explanation must not be a"just-so" story, but must make additional predictions that can be verified against observations that were not originally used in formulating the theory. The field of Earth and planetary climate has racked up an impressive number of such predictions. I will also admit as "predictions" statements about things that happened in the past, provided that observations or proxies pinning down the past climate state were not available at the time the prediction was made. The basic prediction that burning of fossil fuels would lead to an increase of atmospheric CO2, and that this would in turn alter the Earth's energy balance so as to cause tropospheric warming, is one of the great successes of climate science. It began in the lineage of Fourier, Tyndall and Arrhenius, and was largely complete with the the radiative-convective modeling work of Manabe in the 1960's -- all well before the expected warming had progressed far enough to be observable. Similarly, long before the increase in atmospheric CO2 could be detected, Bolin formulated a carbon cycle model and used it to predict atmospheric CO2 out to the year 2000; the actual values come in at the high end of his predicted range, for

  6. A Solar Cycle Dependence of Nonlinearity in Magnetospheric Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay R; Wing, Simon

    2005-03-08

    The nonlinear dependencies inherent to the historical K(sub)p data stream (1932-2003) are examined using mutual information and cumulant based cost as discriminating statistics. The discriminating statistics are compared with surrogate data streams that are constructed using the corrected amplitude adjustment Fourier transform (CAAFT) method and capture the linear properties of the original K(sub)p data. Differences are regularly seen in the discriminating statistics a few years prior to solar minima, while no differences are apparent at the time of solar maximum. These results suggest that the dynamics of the magnetosphere tend to be more linear at solar maximum than at solar minimum. The strong nonlinear dependencies tend to peak on a timescale around 40-50 hours and are statistically significant up to one week. Because the solar wind driver variables, VB(sub)s and dynamical pressure exhibit a much shorter decorrelation time for nonlinearities, the results seem to indicate that the nonlinearity is related to internal magnetospheric dynamics. Moreover, the timescales for the nonlinearity seem to be on the same order as that for storm/ring current relaxation. We suggest that the strong solar wind driving that occurs around solar maximum dominates the magnetospheric dynamics suppressing the internal magnetospheric nonlinearity. On the other hand, in the descending phase of the solar cycle just prior to solar minimum, when magnetospheric activity is weaker, the dynamics exhibit a significant nonlinear internal magnetospheric response that may be related to increased solar wind speed.

  7. Statistical Properties of Extreme Solar Activity Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioznova, A. V.; Blinov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A study of long-term solar variability reflected in indirect indices of past solar activity leads to stimulating results. We compare the statistics of intervals of very low and very high solar activity derived from two cosmogenic radionuclide records and look for consistency in their timing and physical interpretation. According to the applied criteria, the numbers of minima and of maxima are 61 and 68, respectively, from the 10Be record, and 42 and 46 from the 14C record. The difference between the enhanced and depressed states of solar activity becomes apparent in the difference in their statistical distributions. We find no correlation between the level or type (minimum or maximum) of an extremum and the level or type of the predecessor. The hypothesis of solar activity as a periodic process on the millennial time scale is not supported by the existing proxies. A new homogeneous series of 10Be measurements in polar ice covering the Holocene would be of great value for eliminating the existing discrepancy in the available solar activity reconstructions.

  8. Solar wind composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have resulted in the determination of the average abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the solar wind to approximately 10%. Comparisons with solar energetic particle (SEP) abundances and galactic cosmic ray abundances have revealed many similarities, especially when compared with solar photospheric abundances. It is now well established that fractionation in the corona results in an overabundance (with respect to the photosphere) of elements with first ionization potentials less than 10 eV. These observations have in turn led to the development of fractionation models that are reasonably successful in reproducing the first ionization (FIP) effect. Under some circumstances it has been possible to relate solar wind observations to particular source regions in the corona. The magnetic topologies of the source regions appear to have a strong influence on the fractionation of elements. Comparisons with spectroscopic data are particularly useful in classifying the different topologies. Ions produced from interstellar neutral atoms are also found in the solar wind. These ions are picked up by the solar wind after ionization by solar radiation or charge exchange and can be identified by their velocity in the solar wind. The pick-up ions provide most of the pressure in the interplanetary medium at large distances. Interstellar abundances can be derived from the observed fluxes of solar wind pick-up ions.

  9. Lead accumulation reduces photosynthesis in the lead hyper-accumulator Salvinia minima Baker by affecting the cell membrane and inducing stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Leal-Alvarado, Daniel A; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Sáenz-Carbonell, Luis; Talavera-May, Carlos; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker accumulates a fair amount of lead in its tissues; however, no studies have investigated the effect of lead on the physiological processes that affect photosynthesis in this species. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the high amounts of lead accumulated by S. minima can affect its photosynthetic apparatus. The physiological changes in the roots and leaves in response to lead accumulation were analyzed. An exposure to 40 μM Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h (first stage) was sufficient to reduce the photosynthetic rate (Pn) by 44%. This reduction in Pn was apparently the result of processes at various levels, including damage to the cell membranes (mainly in roots). Interestingly, although the plants were transferred to fresh medium without lead for an additional 24 h (second stage), Pn not only remained low, but was reduced even further, which was apparently related to stomatal closure, and may have led to reduced CO2 availability. Therefore, it can be concluded that lead exposure first decreases the photosynthetic rate by damaging the root membrane and then induces stomatal closure, resulting in decreased CO2 availability.

  10. Lead accumulation reduces photosynthesis in the lead hyper-accumulator Salvinia minima Baker by affecting the cell membrane and inducing stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Leal-Alvarado, Daniel A; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Sáenz-Carbonell, Luis; Talavera-May, Carlos; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker accumulates a fair amount of lead in its tissues; however, no studies have investigated the effect of lead on the physiological processes that affect photosynthesis in this species. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the high amounts of lead accumulated by S. minima can affect its photosynthetic apparatus. The physiological changes in the roots and leaves in response to lead accumulation were analyzed. An exposure to 40 μM Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h (first stage) was sufficient to reduce the photosynthetic rate (Pn) by 44%. This reduction in Pn was apparently the result of processes at various levels, including damage to the cell membranes (mainly in roots). Interestingly, although the plants were transferred to fresh medium without lead for an additional 24 h (second stage), Pn not only remained low, but was reduced even further, which was apparently related to stomatal closure, and may have led to reduced CO2 availability. Therefore, it can be concluded that lead exposure first decreases the photosynthetic rate by damaging the root membrane and then induces stomatal closure, resulting in decreased CO2 availability. PMID:26742090

  11. The ionosphere under extremely prolonged low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Chen, Yiding; Le, Huijun; Kurkin, Vladimir I.; Polekh, Nelya M.; Lee, Chien-Chih

    2011-04-01

    A critical question in ionospheric physics is the state of the ionosphere and relevant processes under extreme solar activities. The solar activity during 2007-2009 is extremely prolonged low, which offers us a unique opportunity to explore this issue. In this study, we collected the global ionosonde measurements of the F2 layer critical frequency (foF2), E layer critical frequency (foE), and F layer virtual height (h‧F) and the total electron content (TEC) maps produced by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which were retrieved from dual-frequency GPS receivers distributed worldwide, to investigate the ionospheric phenomena during solar minimum of cycle 23/24, particularly the difference in the ionosphere between solar minima of cycle 23/24 and the preceding cycles. The analysis indicates that the moving 1 year mean foF2 at most ionosonde stations and the global average TEC went to the lowest during cycle 23/24 minimum. The solar cycle differences in foF2 minima display local time dependence, being more negative during the daytime than at night. Furthermore, the cycle difference in daytime foF2 minima is about -0.5 MHz and even reaches to around -1.2 MHz. In contrast, a complex picture presents in global h‧F and foE. Evident reduction exists prevailingly in the moving 1 year mean h‧F at most stations, while no huge differences are detected at several stations. A compelling feature is the increase in foE at some stations, which requires independent data for further validation. Quantitative analysis indicates that record low foF2 and low TEC can be explained principally in terms of the decline in solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance recorded by SOHO/SEM, which suggests low solar EUV being the prevailing contributor to the unusual low electron density in the ionosphere during cycle 23/24 minimum. It also verifies that a quadratic fitting still reasonably captures the solar variability of foF2 and global average TEC at such low solar activity levels.

  12. THE BEHAVIOR OF THE 17 GHz SOLAR RADIUS AND LIMB BRIGHTENING IN THE SPOTLESS MINIMUM XXIII/XXIV

    SciTech Connect

    Selhorst, C. L.; Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Shibasaki, K.

    2011-06-10

    The current solar minimum has surprised the entire solar community because the spotless period is presently almost 2-3 years longer than the usual minima. To better understand this, we studied the variation of the solar radius and the polar limb brightening at 17 GHz, comparing the results from the minimum at the end of cycle XXIII with those of the previous one. Daily maps obtained by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) from 1992 through 2010 were analyzed. Whereas the variation of the solar radius at radio frequencies indicates the heating of the solar atmosphere due to solar activity, the limb brightening intensity depends on the organization of the polar magnetic field of the Sun, including the global dipole and the features formed around it. These features are more prominent during minima periods. As a common result, researchers have observed a decrease in both radius and limb brightness intensity at 17 GHz during the present minimum when compared with the previous one. The mean solar radius is 0.''9 {+-} 0.''6 smaller and the limb brightening reduced its intensity by around 20%. Both decrements are interpreted in terms of the weaker solar chromospheric activity of the present cycle. Measurement of the radius and limb brightening at 17 GHz can be used as an alternative solar activity index and should be included in the set of parameters used to predict future cycles.

  13. Solar and interplanetary signatures of declining of solar magnetic fields: Implications to the next solar cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2015-08-01

    Our detailed study of solar surface magnetic fields at high-latitudes, using magnetic synoptic magnetograms of NSO/Kitt Peak observatory from 1975-2014, has shown a steady decline of the field strength since mid-1990's until mid-2014, i.e. the solar maximum of cycle 24. We also found that magnetic field strength at high-latitudes declines after each solar cycle maximum, and since cycle 24 is already past its peak implies that solar surface magnetic fields will be continuing to decline until solar minimum of cycle 24. In addition, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of solar wind micro-turbulence levels, from Solar and Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Japan, have also shown a steady decline in sync with the declining surface fields. Even the heliospheric magnetic fields (HMF) at 1 AU have been declined much below the previously proposed floor level of HMF of ~4.6 nT. From study of a correlation between the high-latitude surface fields and the HMF at the last four solar minima we found a floor value of HMF of ~3.2 nT. Using the above correlation and the fact that the high-latitude surface fields is expected to decline until the minimum of cycle 24, we estimate the value of the HMF at the minimum of cycle 24 will be 3.8 ± 0.2 nT and the peak sunspot number for solar cycle 25 will be 56±12 suggesting a weak sunspot activity to be continued in cycle 25 too.

  14. Study of cosmic-ray modulation during the recent deep solar minimum, mini maximum and intervening ascending phase of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, B.; Aslam, O. P. M.

    After a prolonged and deep solar minimum at the end of cycle 23, current solar cycle 24 is one of the very low active cycles, weakest cycle in more than 50 years. These two periods of deep minima and mini maxima are separated by a period of increasing solar activity as measured by sunspot numbers. We study the cosmic ray relationship with the solar activity, heliospheric plasma and field parameters including the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), during these three periods (phases) of different level and nature of solar activity; (a) a deep minimum, (b) an increasing period and (c) a ‘mini’ maximum. We utilize the neutron monitor data from stations located around the globe to study the rigidity dependence of modulation during the two extremes, i.e., minima and maxima. We also study the time lag between the GCR intensity and various solar/interplanetary parameters separately during the three activity phases. Using the cosmic ray data of neutron monitors with different cutoff rigidities, we study the rigidity dependence of time lag during individual phases. The role/effectiveness of various parameters, including the HCS tilt, in modulating the GCR intensity during the three different phases has also been studied by correlation analysis. The relative importance of various physical processes during different phases and the implication of these results for modulation models are also discussed.

  15. Cyclic thermal signature in a global MHD simulation of solar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, J.; Charbonneau, P.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    Space-based observations have clearly established that total solar irradiance (TSI) varies on time scales from minutes to days and months as well as on the longer time scale of the 11-year solar cycle. The most conspicuous of these variations is arguably the slight increase of TSI (0.1%) at solar maxima relative to solar minima. Models that include contributions from surface solar magnetism alone (i.e. sunspots, faculae and magnetic network) have been very successful at reproducing the observed TSI fluctuations on time scales shorter than a year, but leave some doubts as to the origin of the longer decadal fluctuations. In particular, one school of thought argues that surface magnetism alone can explain the entire TSI variance; see (Lean & al. 1998, ApJ, 492, 390), whereas; the other emphasizes on taking into account the effect of a global modulation of solar thermal structure by magnetic activity; see (Li & al. 2003, ApJ, 591, 1267). Observationally, the potential for the occurrence of magnetically-modulated global structural changes is supported by a positive correlation between p-mode oscillation frequencies and the TSI cycle as well as by recent evidence for a long-term trend in the TSI record that is not seen in indicators of surface magnetism; see (Bhatnagar & al. 1999, ApJ, 521, 885; Fröhlich 2013, Space Sci Rev,176, 237). Additionally, 1D structural solar models have demonstrated that the inclusion of a magnetically-modulated turbulent mechanism could explain the observed p-mode oscillation frequency changes with great accuracy. However, these models relied upon an ad-hoc parametrization of the alleged process and therefore obtaining a complete physical picture of the modulating mechanism requires solving the equations governing the self-consistent evolution of the solar plasma. Here we present a global magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulation of solar convection extending over more than a millennium that produces large-scale solar-like axisymmetric magnetic

  16. Proposed solar two project Barstow, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates the environmental consequences of the proposed conversion and operation of the existing Solar One Facility in Daggett, Ca, near the city of Barstow, to a nitrate salt based heat transfer system, Solar Two. The EA also addresses the alternatives of different solar conversion technologies and alternative sites and discusses a no action alternative. A primary objective of the Solar Two Project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a solar central receiver power plant using molten salt as the thermal storage and transport fluid medium. If successful, the information gathered from the Solar Two Project could be used to design larger commercial solar power plants.

  17. Solar winds along curved magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Chen, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Both remote-sensing measurements using the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique and in-situ measurements by the Ulysses spacecraft show a bimodal structure for the solar wind at solar minimum conditions. At present it still remains to address why the fast wind is fast and the slow wind is slow. While a robust empirical correlation exists between the coronal expansion rate fc of the flow tubes and the speeds v measured in situ, a more detailed data analysis suggests that v depends on more than just fc. Aims. We examine whether the non-radial shape of field lines, which naturally accompanies any non-radial expansion, could be an additional geometrical factor. Methods. We solved the transport equations incorporating the heating from turbulent Alfvén waves for an electron-proton solar wind along curved field lines given by an analytical magnetic field model, which is representative of a solar minimum corona. Results. The field line shape is found to influence the solar wind parameters substantially, reducing the asymptotic speed by up to ~130 km s-1 or by ~28% in relative terms, compared with the case where the field line curvature is neglected. This effect was interpreted in the general framework of energy addition in the solar wind: compared to the straight case, the field line curvature enhances the effective energy deposition to the subsonic flow, which results in a higher proton flux and a lower terminal proton speed. Conclusions. Our computations suggest that the field line curvature could be a geometrical factor which, in addition to the tube expansion, substantially influences the solar wind speed. Furthermore, although the field line curvature is unlikely to affect the polar fast solar wind at solar minima, it does help make the wind at low latitudes slow, which in turn helps better reproduce the Ulysses measurements.

  18. On the Current Solar Magnetic Activity using Its Behavior During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, Fadil; Simoniello, Rosaria; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads; Karoff, Christoffer; Olsen, Jesper; Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine

    2016-07-01

    Solar modulation potential (SMP) reconstructions based on cosmogenic nuclide records reflect changes in the open solar magnetic field and can therefore help us obtain information on the behavior of the open solar magnetic field over the Holocene period. Using the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ^{10}Be and IntCal13 ^{14}C records for the overlapping time period spanning between ˜1650 AD to 6600 BC, we first reconstructed the solar modulation potentials and subsequently investigate the statistics of peaks and dips simultaneously occurring in the two SMP reconstructions. Based on the distribution of these events, we propose a method to identify grand minima and maxima periods. We then aim at comparing the Sun's large-scale magnetic field behavior over the last three solar cycles with variations in the SMP reconstruction through the Holocene epoch. To achieve these objectives, we use the IntCal13 ^{14}C data to investigate distinct patterns in the occurrences of grand minima and maxima during the Holocene period. We then check whether these patterns might mimic the recent solar magnetic activity by investigating the evolution of the energy in the Sun's large-scale dipolar magnetic field using the Wilcox Solar Observatory data. The cosmogenic radionuclide data analysis shows that ˜71 % of grand maxima during the period from 6600 BC to 1650 AD were followed by a grand minimum. The characteristics of the occurrences of grand maxima and minima are consistent with the scenario in which the dynamical non-linearity induced by the Lorentz force leads the Sun to act as a relaxation oscillator. This finding implies that the probability for these events to occur is non-uniformly distributed in time, as there is a memory in their driving mechanism, which can be identified via the back-reaction of the Lorentz force.

  19. Reconstruction and prediction of the total solar irradiance: From the Medieval Warm Period to the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Mendoza, B.; Velasco Herrera, G.

    2015-01-01

    Total solar irradiance is the primary energy source of the Earth’s climate system and therefore its variations can contribute to natural climate change. This variability is characterized by, among other manifestations, decadal and secular oscillations, which has led to several attempts to estimate future solar activity. Of particular interest now is the fact that the behavior of the solar cycle 23 minimum has shown an activity decline not previously seen in past cycles for which spatial observations exist: this could be signaling the start of a new grand solar minimum. The estimation of solar activity for the next hundred years is one of the current problems in solar physics because the possible occurrence of a future grand solar minimum will probably have an impact on the Earth’s climate. In this study, using the PMOD and ACRIM TSI composites, we have attempted to estimate the TSI index from year 1000 AD to 2100 AD based on the Least Squares Support Vector Machines, which is applied here for the first time to estimate a solar index. Using the wavelet transform, we analyzed the behavior of the total solar irradiance time series before and after the solar grand minima. Depending on the composite used, PMOD (or ACRIM), we found a grand minimum for the 21st century, starting in ∼2004 (or 2002) and ending in ∼2075 (or 2063), with an average irradiance of 1365.5 (or 1360.5) Wm±1σ=0.3 (or 0.9) Wm. Moreover, we calculated an average radiative forcing between the present and the 21st century minima of ∼-0.1 (or -0.2) Wm, with an uncertainty range of -0.04 to -0.14 (or -0.12 to -0.33) Wm. As an indicator of the TSI level, we calculated its annual power anomalies; in particular, future solar cycles from 24 to 29 have lower power anomalies compared to the present, for both models. We also found that the solar activity grand minima periodicity is of 120 years; this periodicity could possibly be one of the principal periodicities of the magnetic solar activity not

  20. In search of radiation minima for balancing the needs of forest and water management in snow dominated watersheds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Seyednasrollah, B.; Link, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    In upland snowfed forested watersheds, where the majority of melt recharge occurs, there is growing interest among water and forest managers to strike a balance between maximizing forest productivity and minimizing impacts on water resources. Implementation of forest management strategies that involve reduction of forest cover generally result in increased water yield and peak flows from forests, which has potentially detrimental consequences including increased erosion, stream destabilization, water shortages in late melt season, and degradation of water quality and ecosystem health. These ill effects can be partially negated by implementing optimal gap patterns and vegetation densities through forest management, that may minimize net radiation on snow-covered forest floor (NRSF). A small NRSF can moderate peak flows and increase water availability late in the melt season. Since forest canopies reduce direct solar (0.28 - 3.5 μm) radiation but increase longwave (3.5-100 μm) radiation at the snow surface, by performing detailed quantification of individual radiation components for a range of vegetation density and and gap configurations, we identify the optimal vegetation configurations. We also evaluate the role of site location, its topographic setting, local meteorological conditions and vegetation morphological characteristics, on the optimal configurations. The results can be used to assist forest managers to quantify the radiative regime alteration for various thinning and gap-creation scenarios, as a function of latitudinal, topographic, climatic and vegetation characteristics.

  1. Spectroscopic evidence for the coexistence of tetragonal and trigonal minima within the exited state adiabatic potential energy surfaces of hexachlorotellurate and -selenate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremers, C.; Degen, J.

    1998-11-01

    Coexistence of Jahn-Teller minima resulting from the coupling to different accepting modes within the adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) is not possible within the framework of linear vibronic coupling theory. For the lowest exited triplet state 3T1u of inorganic complexes with s2 electronic ground-state configuration, such a coexistence, due to quadratic coupling effects, is discussed. As a direct experimental evidence two vibronic progressions with different accepting modes in the emission spectra resulting from a single electronic state are observed in the emission spectra of the title compounds. The observation of vibronic finestructure in the emission spectra of [TeCl6]2- is reported for the first time.

  2. Amylase production by Preussia minima, a fungus of endophytic origin: optimization of fermentation conditions and analysis of fungal secretome by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental screening programs are used to find new enzymes that may be utilized in large-scale industrial processes. Among microbial sources of new enzymes, the rationale for screening fungal endophytes as a potential source of such enzymes relates to the hypothesised mutualistic relationship between the endophyte and its host plant. There is a need for new microbial amylases that are active at low temperature and alkaline conditions as these would find industrial applications as detergents. Results An α-amylase produced by Preussia minima, isolated from the Australian native plant, Eremophilia longifolia, was purified to homogeneity through fractional acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, followed by DEAE-Sepharose ion exchange chromatography. The purified α-amylase showed a molecular mass of 70 kDa which was confirmed by zymography. Temperature and pH optima were 25°C and pH 9, respectively. The enzyme was activated and stabilized mainly by the metal ions manganese and calcium. Enzyme activity was also studied using different carbon and nitrogen sources. It was observed that enzyme activity was highest (138 U/mg) with starch as the carbon source and L-asparagine as the nitrogen source. Bioreactor studies showed that enzyme activity was comparable to that obtained in shaker cultures, which encourages scale-up fermentation for enzyme production. Following in-gel digestion of the purified protein by trypsin, a 9-mer peptide was sequenced and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The partial amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme presented similarity to α-amylase from Magnaporthe oryzae. Conclusions The findings of the present study indicate that the purified α-amylase exhibits a number of promising properties that make it a strong candidate for application in the detergent industry. To our knowledge, this is the first amylase isolated from a Preussia minima strain of endophytic origin. PMID:24602289

  3. Surface adsorption, intracellular accumulation and compartmentalization of Pb(II) in batch-operated lagoons with Salvinia minima as affected by environmental conditions, EDTA and nutrients.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Eugenia J; Sánchez-Galván, Gloria; Pérez-Pérez, Teresa; Pérez-Orozco, Arith

    2005-12-01

    The effects of environmental factors and nutrients on the various possible removal mechanisms (surface adsorption, intracellular accumulation and precipitation to sediments) and partitioning of lead among various compartments (plant biomass, water column and sediments) in Salvinia minima batch-operated lagoons, were evaluated. Surface adsorption was found to be the predominant mechanism for Pb(II) removal under all environmental conditions tested in the absence of nutrients (an average of 54.3%) and in a nutrient medium (modified Hutner 1/10 medium) free of EDTA and phosphates (54.41%) at "high" initial Pb(II) concentrations (in the range of 10.3+/-0.13 to 15.2+/-0.05 mg/L). Under these conditions, the bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were 2,431+/-276 and 2,065+/-35, respectively. Lead removal was very rapid during the first 4 h and reached 70% in the absence of nutrients at the "medium" light intensity and temperature (LIT) tested, 88% in nutrient medium free of EDTA and supplemented with synthetic wastewater (at the "lowest" LIT tested), and 85% in medium free of EDTA and phosphates. It was concluded that the mechanisms of lead removal by S. minima, and the compartmentalization of this metal in the microcosm of batch-operated lagoons, are primarily a function of the presence of certain nutrients and chelants, with secondary dependence on environmental conditions. In addition, the results indicate that the percentage of lead removed is only a gross parameter and that the complementary use of BCF and compartmentalization analysis is required to gain a full insight into the metal removal process.

  4. Influence of the Schwabe/Hale solar cycles on climate change during the Maunder Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.

    2010-02-01

    We have examined the variation of carbon-14 content in annual tree rings, and investigated the transitions of the characteristics of the Schwabe/Hale (11-year/22-year) solar and cosmic-ray cycles during the last 1200 years, focusing mainly on the Maunder and Spoerer minima and the early Medieval Maximum Period. It has been revealed that the mean length of the Schwabe/Hale cycles changes associated with the centennial-scale variation of solar activity level. The mean length of Schwabe cycle had been ~14 years during the Maunder Minimum, while it was ~9 years during the early Medieval Maximum Period. We have also found that climate proxy record shows cyclic variations similar to stretching/shortening Schwabe/Hale solar cycles in time, suggesting that both Schwabe and Hale solar cycles are playing important role in climate change. In this paper, we review the nature of Schwabe and Hale cycles of solar activity and cosmic-ray flux during the Maunder Minimum and their possible influence on climate change. We suggest that the Hale cycle of cosmic rays are amplified during the grand solar minima and thus the influence of cosmic rays on climate change is prominently recognizable during such periods.

  5. On the Current Solar Magnetic Activity in the Light of Its Behaviour During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Simoniello, R.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.; Olsen, J.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2016-01-01

    Solar modulation potential (SMP) reconstructions based on cosmogenic nuclide records reflect changes in the open solar magnetic field and can therefore help us obtain information on the behaviour of the open solar magnetic field over the Holocene period. We aim at comparing the Sun's large-scale magnetic field behaviour over the last three solar cycles with variations in the SMP reconstruction through the Holocene epoch. To achieve these objectives, we use the IntCal13 14C data to investigate distinct patterns in the occurrences of grand minima and maxima during the Holocene period. We then check whether these patterns might mimic the recent solar magnetic activity by investigating the evolution of the energy in the Sun's large-scale dipolar magnetic field using the Wilcox Solar Observatory data. The cosmogenic radionuclide data analysis shows that {≈} 71 % of grand maxima during the period from 6600 BC to 1650 AD were followed by a grand minimum. The characteristics of the occurrences of grand maxima and minima are consistent with the scenario in which the dynamical non-linearity induced by the Lorentz force leads the Sun to act as a relaxation oscillator. This finding implies that the probability for these events to occur is non-uniformly distributed in time, as there is a memory in their driving mechanism, which can be identified via the back-reaction of the Lorentz force.

  6. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  7. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  8. Solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, D.

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  9. Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  10. Homebuilder's Guide to Going Solar (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-04-01

    A Homebuilder's Guide to Going Solar is designed to help you assess the benefits to your business and customers of installing solar equipment or making your houses solar-ready. The information comes from studies of builders who have successfully integrated solar into their operations as well as conversations with builders and solar professionals. These studies and conversations indicate that builders want to know: (1) Do solar economics work in my area? (2) If not, are there other reasons to go solar?; and (3) Is there a local support system of solar professionals I can call on to help me integrate solar seamlessly into my projects? This effort to educate builders about solar is a work in progress.

  11. Radial evolution of the solar wind from IMP 8 to Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.; Paularena, Karolen I.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Belcher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 and Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 data from 1977 through 1994 are presented and compared. Radial velocity and temperature structures remain intact over the distance from 1 to 43 AU, but density structures do not. Temperature and velocity changes are correlated and nearly in phase at 1 AU, but in the outer heliosphere temperature changes lead velocity changes by tens of days. Solar cycle variations are detected by both spacecraft, with minima in flux density and dynamic pressure near solar maxima. Differences between Voyager 2 and IMP 8 observations near the solar minimum in 1986-1987 are attributed to latitudinal gradients in solar wind properties. Solar rotation variations are often present even at 40 AU. The Voyager 2 temperature profile is best fit with a R(exp -0.49 +/- 0.01) decrease, much less steep than an adiabatic profile.

  12. ON THE OCCURRENCE OF THE THIRD-ORDER SCALING IN HIGH LATITUDE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Bruno, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.; Veltri, P.

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence and nature of a nonlinear energy cascade within the intermediate scales of solar wind Alfvenic turbulence represents an important open issue. Using in situ measurements of fast, high latitude solar wind taken by the Ulysses spacecraft at solar minima, it is possible to show that a nonlinear energy cascade of imbalanced turbulence is only observed when the solar wind owns peculiar properties. These are the reduction of the local correlation between velocity and magnetic field (weak cross-helicity); the presence of large-scale velocity shears; and the steepening and extension down to low frequencies of the turbulent spectra. Our observations suggest the important role of both large-scale velocity and Alfvenicity of the field fluctuations for the validation of the Yaglom law in solar wind turbulence.

  13. Long-term Trend of Solar Coronal Hole Distribution from 1975 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.; Satonaka, D.; Hakamada, K.

    2016-08-01

    We developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes using potential magnetic field extrapolation in the solar corona to construct a database of coronal holes appearing from 1975 February to 2015 July (Carrington rotations from 1625 to 2165). Coronal holes are labeled with the location, size, and average magnetic field of each coronal hole on the photosphere and source surface. As a result, we identified 3335 coronal holes and found that the long-term distribution of coronal holes shows a similar pattern known as the magnetic butterfly diagram, and polar/low-latitude coronal holes tend to decrease/increase in the last solar minimum relative to the previous two minima.

  14. Solar Eagle 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberto, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    During a 22-month period from February 1991 to December 1993, a dedicated group of students, faculty, and staff at California State University, Los Angeles completed a project to design, build, and race their second world class solar-powered electric vehicle, the Solar Eagle 2. This is the final report of that project. As a continuation of the momentum created by the success of the GM-sponsored Sunrayce USA in 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked up the banner from General Motors as sponsors of Sunrayce 93. In February 1991, the DOE sent a request for proposals to all universities in North America inviting them to submit a proposal outlining how they would design, build, and test a solar-powered electric vehicle for a seven-day race from Arlington, Texas to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to be held in June 1993. Some 70 universities responded. At the end of a proposal evaluation process, 36 universities including CSLA were chosen to compete. This report documents the Solar Eagle 2 project--the approaches take, what was learned, and how our experience from the first Solar Eagle was incorporated into Solar Eagle 2. The intent is to provide a document that would assist those who may wish to take up the challenge to build Solar Eagle 3.

  15. Solar total irradiance in cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Schmutz, W.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The most recent minimum of solar activity was deeper and longer than the previous two minima as indicated by different proxies of solar activity. This is also true for the total solar irradiance (TSI) according to the PMOD composite. Aims: The apparently unusual behaviour of the TSI has been interpreted as evidence against solar surface magnetism as the main driver of the secular change in the TSI. We test claims that the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field does not reproduce the observed TSI in cycle 23. Methods: We use sensitive, 60-min averaged MDI magnetograms and quasi-simultaneous continuum images as an input to our SATIRE-S model and calculate the TSI variation over cycle 23, sampled roughly every two weeks. The computed TSI is then compared with the PMOD composite of TSI measurements and with the data from two individual instruments, SORCE/TIM and UARS/ACRIM II, that monitored the TSI during the declining phase of cycle 23 and over the previous minimum in 1996, respectively. Results: Excellent agreement is found between the trends shown by the model and almost all sets of measurements. The only exception is the early, i.e. 1996 to 1998, PMOD data. Whereas the agreement between the model and the PMOD composite over the period 1999-2009 is almost perfect, the modelled TSI shows a steeper increase between 1996 and 1999 than implied by the PMOD composite. On the other hand, the steeper trend in the model agrees remarkably well with the ACRIM II data. A closer look at the VIRGO data, which are the basis of the PMOD composite after 1996, reveals that only one of the two VIRGO instruments, the PMO6V, shows the shallower trend present in the composite, whereas the DIARAD measurements indicate a steeper trend. Conclusions: Based on these results, we conclude that (1) the sensitivity changes of the PMO6V radiometers within VIRGO during the first two years have very likely not been correctly evaluated; and that (2) the TSI variations over cycle 23

  16. Interior design for passive solar homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  17. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  18. Observations and models of the slow solar wind in coronal streamers during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2013-05-01

    A quiescent dipolar streamer belt often dominated the coronal streamer structures during past solar minima. Past UV observations with SOHO/UVCS show that the intensity of heavy ion emission lines (such as O VI and Mg X) is dimmer at the cores than at the streamer edges. Three-fluid 2.5D models indicated that the observed emission variability is the signature of slow solar wind outflow regions, where Coulomb coupling between the electron, protons, and heavy ions leads to enhanced emission of heavy ions at the edges of streamers. Recently, Ofman et al (2011, 2012) have modeled in detail the three-fluid interactions and the emission in a quiescent streamer due to Ly α, O 5+, and Mg 9+ ions at solar minimum, and used the model results to synthesize the corresponding line emissions. They found that the model results are in good agreement with observations, provided that the heavy ions experience preferential heating compared to protons. Similar results were found to hold for He++ ions in quiescent streamers. Recently, the 2.5D three-fluid model was extended to full 3D, allowing modeling the ion abundance variations in tilted dipole streamer belt, and eventually in solar maximum streamers. I will discuss the implication of heavy ion emission structure in streamers and the corresponding three-fluid models on the understanding of the slow solar wind sources.

  19. North-south asymmetry in global distribution of the solar wind speed during 1985-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Iju, Tomoya

    2015-05-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made between 1985 and 2013 are used to investigate the north-south (N-S) asymmetry in global distribution of the solar wind speed. The IPS observations clearly demonstrate that the global distribution of the solar wind speed systematically changes with the solar activity. This change is found to closely correlate with that in polar magnetic fields of the Sun, while fast wind data at solar minima systematically deviate from this correlation. The IPS observations show that notable N-S asymmetry of polar solar winds occurs at the solar maxima, and small but significant N-S asymmetry exists at the solar minima. The observed asymmetry at the solar maxima is consistent with the time lag in the reversal of polar magnetic fields between north and south hemispheres. We also find that significant N-S asymmetry of the polar fast wind lasts for the period between Cycles 23 and 24 solar maxima, starting from predominance of the fast wind over the north pole and ending with that over the south pole. The N-S asymmetry revealed from IPS observations is found to be generally consistent with Ulysses observations. We compare IPS observations with magnetic field data of the Sun and find that the ratio of the quadrupole to dipole coefficients exhibits a similar time variation to that of the N-S asymmetry revealed from IPS observations. This suggests that higher-order multipole moments play an important role in determining the N-S asymmetry of the solar wind when the dipole moment weakens.

  20. Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Solar Energy's solar panels are collectors for a solar energy system which provides heating for a drive-in bank in Akron, OH. Collectors were designed and manufactured by Solar Energy Products, a firm established by three former NASA employees. Company President, Frank Rom, an example of a personnel-type technology transfer, was a Research Director at Lewis Research Center, which conducts extensive solar heating and cooling research, including development and testing of high-efficiency flat-plate collectors. Rom acquired solar energy expertise which helped the company develop two types of collectors, one for use in domestic/commercial heating systems and the other for drying grain.

  1. An analysis of interplanetary space radiation exposure for various solar cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Badhwar, G.D.; O`Neill, P.M.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1994-05-01

    The radiation dose received by crew members in interplanetary space is influenced by the stage of the solar cycle. Using the recently developed models of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) environment and the energy-dependent radiation transport code, we have calculated the dose at 0 and 5 cm water depth; using a computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, we have calculated the skin, eye and blood-forming organ (BFO) doses as a function of aluminum shielding for various solar minima and maxima between 1954 and 1989. These results show that the equivalent dose is within about 15% of the mean for the various solar minima (maxima). The maximum variation between solar minimum and maximum equivalent dose is about a factor of three. We have extended these calculations for the 1967-1977 solar minimum to five practical shielding geometries: Apollo Command Module, the least and most heavily shielded locations in the U.S. space shuttle mid-deck, center of the proposed Space Station Freedom cluster and sleeping compartment of the Skylab. These calculations, using the quality factor of ICRP 60, show that the average CAM BFO equivalent dose is 0.46 Sv/year. Based on an approach that takes fragmentation into account, we estimate a calculation uncertainty of 15% if the uncertainty in the quality factor is neglected. 25 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Solar Cooking

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    ... (kWh/m2/day) Amount of electromagnetic energy (solar radiation) incident on the surface of the earth. Also referred to as total or global solar radiation.   Midday insolation (kWh/m2/day) Average ...

  3. Solar Lentigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperpigmented) lesion caused by natural or artificial ultraviolet (UV) light. Solar lentigines may be single or multiple. This ... simplex) because it is caused by exposure to UV light. Solar lentigines are benign, but they do indicate ...

  4. Solar Wind Plasma Flows and Space Weather Aspects Recent Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Sonia; Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients are responsible for initiating short - term and long - term variations in earth's magnetosphere. These variations are termed as geomagnetic disturbances, and driven by the interaction of solar wind features with the geo-magnetosphere. The strength of this modulation process depends upon the magnitude and orientation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and solar wind parameters. These interplanetary transients are large scale structures containing plasma and magnetic field expelled from the transient active regions of solar atmosphere. As they come to interplanetary medium the interplanetary magnetic field drape around them. This field line draping was thought as possible cause of the characteristic eastward deflection and giving rise to geomagnetic activities as well as a prime factor in producing the modulation effects in the near Earth environment. The Solar cycle 23 has exhibited the unique extended minima and peculiar effects in the geomagnetosphere. Selecting such transients, occurred during this interval, an attempt has been made to determine quantitative relationships of these transients with solar/ interplanetary and Geophysical Parameters. In this work we used hourly values of IMF data obtained from the NSSD Center. The analysis mainly based on looking into the effects of these transients on earth's magnetic field. The high-resolution data IMF Bz and solar wind data obtained from WDC-A, through its omniweb, available during the selected period. Dst and Ap obtained from WDC-Kyoto are taken as indicator of geomagnetic activities. It is found that Dst index, solar wind velocity, proton temperature and the Bz component of magnetic field have higher values and increase just before the occurrence of these events. Larger and varying magnetic field mainly responsible for producing the short-term changes in geomagnetic intensity are observed during these events associated with coronal holes.

  5. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  6. Buying Solar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  7. Ion-Stockmayer clusters: Minima, classical thermodynamics, and variational ground state estimates of Li+(CH3NO2)n (n = 1-20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curotto, E.

    2015-12-01

    Structural optimizations, classical NVT ensemble, and variational Monte Carlo simulations of ion Stockmayer clusters parameterized to approximate the Li+(CH3NO2)n (n = 1-20) systems are performed. The Metropolis algorithm enhanced by the parallel tempering strategy is used to measure internal energies and heat capacities, and a parallel version of the genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the most important minima. The first solvation sheath is octahedral and this feature remains the dominant theme in the structure of clusters with n ≥ 6. The first "magic number" is identified using the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy, and it marks the completion of the second solvation layer for the lithium ion-nitromethane clusters. It corresponds to the n = 18 system, a solvated ion with the first sheath having octahedral symmetry, weakly bound to an eight-membered and a four-membered ring crowning a vertex of the octahedron. Variational Monte Carlo estimates of the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy reveal that quantum effects further enhance the stability of the n = 18 system relative to its neighbors.

  8. Cytotoxic Activities of Physalis minima L. Chloroform Extract on Human Lung Adenocarcinoma NCI-H23 Cell Lines by Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ooi Kheng; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima L. is reputed for having anticancer property. In this study, the chloroform extract of this plant exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activities on NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell line at dose- and time-dependent manners (after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation). Analysis of cell-death mechanism demonstrated that the extract exerted apoptotic programed cell death in NCI-H23 cells with typical DNA fragmentation, which is a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. Morphological observation using transmission electron microscope (TEM) also displayed apoptotic characteristics in the treated cells, including clumping and margination of chromatins, followed by convolution of the nuclear and budding of the cells to produce membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. Different stages of apoptotic programed cell death as well as phosphatidylserine externalization were confirmed using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, acute exposure to the extract produced a significant regulation of c-myc, caspase-3 and p53 mRNA expression in this cell line. Due to its apoptotic effect on NCI-H23 cells, it is strongly suggested that the extract could be further developed as an anticancer drug. PMID:19541726

  9. Solar nutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The topics covered include: an overview of the subject of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the theory of stellar evolution, a description of the main sources of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the results of the Brookhaven C1-37 experiment, an anaysis of the principal solar neutrino experiments, and a discussion of how solar neutrino experiments can be used to detect the collapse of stars in the Galaxy. A description of how the Ga-71 experiment can be used to decide whether the origin of the present discrepancy between theory and observation lies in conventional solar models or conventional physics is presented.

  10. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  11. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams.

  12. Solar Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    2000-10-04

    Solar opacities are presented from the center of the Sun to the photosphere. The temperatures, densities and hydrogen mass fractions are taken from the standard solar model. For the heavy element abundances the Grevesse mixture is used. In the solar interior photoabsorption is dominated by free-free absorption and they compare two sets of opacities based on two different models for the inverse bremsstrahlung. The radiative luminosities calculated from the two sets of opacities are compared with those predicted by previous models of the standard solar model and also with the known luminosity of the Sun. pressures, specific heats and the speed of sound in the solar plasma are also presented.

  13. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  14. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  15. Solar Sailing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  16. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  17. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  18. Solar wind proton flux extremes and their association with pseudostreamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Gibson, Sarah E.; Fisk, Lennard A.

    2013-06-01

    Proton flux, as defined by the product of proton number density and proton speed, while exhibiting remarkable constancy across heliographic latitudes from pole to equator as measured by the Ulysses spacecraft, nevertheless showed obvious departure from this constancy for some mid-latitude wind and extended to high heliomagnetic latitudes during the recent two solar minima. We examine the solar wind exclusive of ICMEs from Ulysses and ACE observations, to analyze the solar wind in-situ data exhibiting extremes in proton flux. We first find these extreme-proton-flux winds generally originate in latitudes middle-distant from the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), and they have relatively slower speed than the bulk of the solar wind. Then we map the in-situ ACE observations in Carrington rotation (CR) 1997 back to the solar surface by using the Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) model, in order to consider the coronal properties at the extreme-proton-flux wind sources. We find there is a clear association between these extreme-proton-flux solar wind and the mid-latitude coronal holes and "pseudostreamer" structures.

  19. Slow and fast solar wind - data selection and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Macek, Wiesław M.; Bruno, Roberto; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    In this work we consider the important problem of selection of slow and fast solar wind data measured in-situ by the Ulysses spacecraft during two solar minima (1995-1997, 2007-2008) and solar maximum (1999-2001). To recognise different types of solar wind we use a set of following parameters: radial velocity, proton density, proton temperature, the distribution of charge states of oxygen ions, and compressibility of magnetic field. We present how this idea of the data selection works on Ulysses data. In the next step we consider the chosen intervals for fast and slow solar wind and perform statistical analysis of the fluctuating magnetic field components. In particular, we check the possibility of identification of inertial range by considering the scale dependence of the third and fourth orders scaling exponents of structure function. We try to verify the size of inertial range depending on the heliographic latitudes, heliocentric distance and phase of the solar cycle. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007 - 2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM.

  20. The Solar Maximum observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The successful retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by Shuttle astronauts in April 1984 permitted continuance of solar flare observations that began in 1980. The SMM carries a soft X ray polychromator, gamma ray, UV and hard X ray imaging spectrometers, a coronagraph/polarimeter and particle counters. The data gathered thus far indicated that electrical potentials of 25 MeV develop in flares within 2 sec of onset. X ray data show that flares are composed of compressed magnetic loops that have come too close together. Other data have been taken on mass ejection, impacts of electron beams and conduction fronts with the chromosphere and changes in the solar radiant flux due to sunspots.

  1. Solar drum positioner mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The need for additional power on spinning satellites required development of deployable solar arrays activated, as on a 3-axis vehicle, after separation from a booster or shuttle orbiter. Mechanisms were developed for telescopically extending a secondary 36.3 kg (80 lb.), 2.13 m (84 in.) diameter spinning solar drum for a distance of 2.0 m (80 in.) or more along the spin axis. After extension, the system has the capability of dynamically controlling the drum tilt angle about the spin axis to provide precision in-orbit balancing of the spacecraft. This approach was selected for the SBS, ANIK C, ANIK D, WESTAR B and PALAPA B satellites. It was successfully demonstrated during the in orbit deployment of the aft solar panels of the SBS F-3 and F-1 satellites, subsequent to the November 1980 and September 1981 launches.

  2. Influence of solar activity on Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influx of solar energy to different latitudes while Jupiter's orbital motion around the Sun varies significantly. This leads to a change in the optical and physical characteristics of its atmosphere. Analysis of the data for 1850-1991 on determination of the integral magnitude Mj Jupiter in the V filter, and a comparison with the changes of the Wolf numbers W, characterizing the variations of solar activity (SA) - showed that the change of Mj in maxima of the SA - has minima for odd, and maximums - for the even of SA cycles. That is, changing of the Jupiter brightness in visible light is much evident 22.3-year magnetic cycle, and not just about the 11.1-year cycle of solar activity. Analysis of the obtained in 1960-2015 data on the relative distribution of brightness along the central meridian of Jupiter, for which we calculated the ratio of the brightness Aj of northern to the southern part of the tropical and temperate latitudinal zones, allowed to approximate the change of Aj by sinusoid with a period of 11.91±0.07 earth years. Comparison of time variation of Aj from changes in the index of SA R, and the movement of the planet in its orbit - indicates the delay of response of the visible cloud layer in the atmosphere of the Sun's exposure mode for 6 years. This value coincides with the radiative relaxation of the hydrogen-helium atmosphere

  3. A stochastically forced time delay solar dynamo model: Self-consistent recovery from a maunder-like grand minimum necessitates a mean-field alpha effect

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Soumitra; Nandy, Dibyendu; Passos, Dário E-mail: dariopassos@ist.utl.pt

    2014-07-01

    Fluctuations in the Sun's magnetic activity, including episodes of grand minima such as the Maunder minimum have important consequences for space and planetary environments. However, the underlying dynamics of such extreme fluctuations remain ill-understood. Here, we use a novel mathematical model based on stochastically forced, non-linear delay differential equations to study solar cycle fluctuations in which time delays capture the physics of magnetic flux transport between spatially segregated dynamo source regions in the solar interior. Using this model, we explicitly demonstrate that the Babcock-Leighton poloidal field source based on dispersal of tilted bipolar sunspot flux, alone, cannot recover the sunspot cycle from a grand minimum. We find that an additional poloidal field source effective on weak fields—e.g., the mean-field α effect driven by helical turbulence—is necessary for self-consistent recovery of the sunspot cycle from grand minima episodes.

  4. A Probable Approx. 2400 Year Solar Quasi-cycle in Atmospheric Delta C-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Jirikowic, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A 2200 to 2600 year quasi-periodicity is present in atmospheric delta C-14 records after removal of long-term trends due to the geomagnetic dipole amplitude variation. This periodicity consists of both a long-term variation of the mean and a superposed, approximately recurring pattern of century-scale variations. The strongest of these latter variations occur near maxima of the approx. 2400 year delta C-14 cycles. The residual record can be modeled to first order as an amplitude modulation of a century-scale periodic forcing function by a approx. 2400 year periodic forcing function. During the last millennium, the largest century-scale variations (occurring near the most recent 2400 year delta C-14 maximum) are known to be mainly a consequence of the pronounced Maunder, Sporer, and Wolf solar activity minima, as verified by independent proxy solar activity records. Therefore, during this period, amplitude modulation has been occurring primarily in the sun and not in the terrestrial radiocarbon system. It is therefore inferred that the approx. 2400 year forcing function is mainly solar although some secondary terrestrial feedback into the delta C-14 record is likely. This conclusion has implications for the predictability of future pronounced solar activity minima and for the interpretation of certain minor Holocene climatic variations.

  5. Solar wind composition. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have resulted in the determination of the average abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the solar wind to approximately 10%. Comparisons with solar energetic particle (SEP) abundances and galactic cosmic ray abundances have revealed many similarities, especially when compared with solar photospheric abundances. It is now well established that fractionation in the corona results in an overabundance (with respect to the photosphere) of elements with first ionization potentials less than 10 eV. These observations have in turn led to the development of fractionation models that are reasonably successful in reproducing the first ionization (FIP) effect. Under some circumstances it has been possible to relate solar wind observations to particular source regions in the corona. The magnetic topologies of the source regions appear to have a strong influence on the fractionation of elements. Comparisons with spectroscopic data are particularly useful in classifying the different topologies. Ions produced from interstellar neutral atoms are also found in the solar wind. These ions are picked up by the solar wind after ionization by solar radiation or charge exchange and can be identified by their velocity in the solar wind. The pick-up ions provide most of the pressure in the interplanetary medium at large distances. Interstellar abundances can be derived from the observed fluxes of solar wind pick-up ions.

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR CYCLES 22-24

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of three-dimensional evolution of solar wind density turbulence and speed at various levels of solar activity between solar cycles 22 and 24. The solar wind data used in this study have been obtained from the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made at the Ooty Radio Telescope, operating at 327 MHz. Results show that (1) on average, there was a downward trend in density turbulence from the maximum of cycle 22 to the deep minimum phase of cycle 23; (2) the scattering diameter of the corona around the Sun shrunk steadily toward the Sun, starting from 2003 to the smallest size at the deepest minimum, and it corresponded to a reduction of {approx}50% in the density turbulence between the maximum and minimum phases of cycle 23; (3) the latitudinal distribution of the solar wind speed was significantly different between the minima of cycles 22 and 23. At the minimum phase of solar cycle 22, when the underlying solar magnetic field was simple and nearly dipole in nature, the high-speed streams were observed from the poles to {approx}30 Degree-Sign latitudes in both hemispheres. In contrast, in the long-decay phase of cycle 23, the sources of the high-speed wind at both poles, in accordance with the weak polar fields, occupied narrow latitude belts from poles to {approx}60 Degree-Sign latitudes. Moreover, in agreement with the large amplitude of the heliospheric current sheet, the low-speed wind prevailed in the low- and mid-latitude regions of the heliosphere. (4) At the transition phase between cycles 23 and 24, the high levels of density and density turbulence were observed close to the heliospheric equator and the low-speed solar wind extended from the equatorial-to-mid-latitude regions. The above results in comparison with Ulysses and other in situ measurements suggest that the source of the solar wind has changed globally, with the important implication that the supply of mass and energy from the Sun to the interplanetary

  7. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  8. Solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    A solar greenhouse is disclosed wherein plants are grown and utilized as collectors to absorb solar radiation and produce heat laden humidified air through the process of evapotranspiration. This humidified air is then further heated by solar energy. Energy is then extracted from the humidified air by cooling the air and condensing the water vapor within the air. The extracted heat can then be stored and utilized as required to heat the greenhouse and plants.

  9. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  10. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  11. Solar System Educators Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, R.

    2004-11-01

    The Solar System Educators Program is a nationwide network of highly motivated teachers who lead workshops that show other teachers in their local communities how to successfully incorporate NASA materials and research into their classes. Currently there are 57 Solar System Educators in 37 states whose workshops are designed to assist their fellow teachers in understanding and including standards-based NASA materials into their classroom activities. Solar System Educators attend a training institute during their first year in the program and have the option of attending subsequent annual institutes. The volunteers in this program receive additional web-based mission-specific telecon trainings in conjunction with the Solar System Ambassadors. Resource and handout materials in the form of DVDs, posters, pamphlets, fact sheets, postcards and bookmarks are also provided. Scientists can get involved with this program by partnering with the Solar System Educators in their regions, presenting at their workshops and mentoring these outstanding volunteers. This formal education program helps optimize project funding set aside for education through the efforts of these volunteer master teachers. At the same time, teachers become familiar with NASA's educational materials with which to inspire students into pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

  12. OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The description, development history, test history, and orbital performance analysis of the OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory are presented. The OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory was the sixth flight model of a series of scientific spacecraft designed to provide a stable platform for experiments engaged in the collection of solar and celestial radiation data. The design objective was 180 days of orbital operation. The OSO-6 has telemetered an enormous amount of very useful experiment and housekeeping data to GSFC ground stations. Observatory operation during the two-year reporting period was very successful except for some experiment instrument problems.

  13. Minima de L'intégrale D'action du Problème Newtoniende 4 Corps de Masses Égales Dans R3: Orbites `Hip-Hop'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenciner, Alain; Venturelli, Andrea

    2000-09-01

    We consider the problem of 4 bodies of equal masses in R 3 for the Newtonian r-1 potential. We address the question of the absolute minima of the action integral among (anti)symmetric loops of class H 1 whose period is fixed. It is the simplest case for which the results of [4] (corrected in [5]) do not apply: the minima cannot be the relative equilibria whose configuration is an absolute minimum of the potential among the configurations having a given moment of inertia with respect to their center of mass. This is because the regular tetrahedron cannot have a relative equilibrium motion in R 3 (see [2]). We show that the absolute minima of the action are not homographic motions. We also show that if we force the configuration to admit a certain type of symmetry of order 4, the absolute minimum is a collisionless orbit whose configuration ‘hesitates’ between the central configuration of the square and the one of the tetrahedron. We call these orbits ‘hip-hop’. A similar result holds in case of a symmetry of order 3 where the central configuration of the equilateral triangle with a body at the center of mass replaces the square.

  14. Realize Your Mentoring Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas, Jr.; Bradbury, Leslie; Deaton, Cynthia Minchew

    2008-01-01

    How successful will you be in guiding a new teacher's professional development? While your success will be influenced by how you and your mentee conceptualize teaching, learning, and the nature of science, research indicates that your success is also highly dependent on how you and your mentee conceptualize mentoring itself. This article describes…

  15. Possible influence of climate factors on the reconstruction of the cosmogenic isotope 14C production rate in the earth's atmosphere and solar activity in past epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, A. I.; Dergachev, V. A.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Ogurtsov, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The paper considers the probable influence of variations of the global temperature and carbon dioxide concentration in the Earth's atmosphere on the results of reconstruction of the production rate of the cosmogenic isotope 14C in the terrestrial atmosphere for the period from the early 15th to the mid 19th century. This time interval covers the Spörer, Maunder, and Dalton minima of solar activity, as well as the Little Ice Age. It was shown that the climate changes that occurred during the Little Ice Age should be taken into account. In the Maunder and Spörer minima of solar activity, the 14C generation rate may be comparable to the values for the Dalton minimum, while exclusion of the climate effect yields extremely large values of the 14C production rate for these grand minima. In the solar activity reconstruction for past epochs, this circumstance should be taken into consideration via measurements of the 14C concentration on a long time scale.

  16. Solar Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Frank; Williams, Robert H.

    1975-01-01

    As fossil fuels decrease in availability and environmental concerns increase, soalr energy is becoming a potential major energy source. Already solar energy is used for space heating in homes. Proposals for solar-electric generating systems include land-based or ocean-based collectors and harnessing wind and wave power. Photosynthesis can also…

  17. Solar Sprint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  18. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image On June 10, 2002 the Moon obscured the central portion of the solar disk in a phenomenon known as an annular solar eclipse. Partial phases of the eclipse were visible throughout much of southeast Asia and North ...

  19. Predicting Major Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are two examples of major explosions from the surface of the Sun but theyre not the same thing, and they dont have to happen at the same time. A recent study examines whether we can predict which solar flares will be closely followed by larger-scale CMEs.Image of a solar flare from May 2013, as captured by NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]Flares as a Precursor?A solar flare is a localized burst of energy and X-rays, whereas a CME is an enormous cloud of magnetic flux and plasma released from the Sun. We know that some magnetic activity on the surface of the Sun triggers both a flare and a CME, whereas other activity only triggers a confined flare with no CME.But what makes the difference? Understanding this can help us learn about the underlying physical drivers of flares and CMEs. It also might help us to better predict when a CME which can pose a risk to astronauts, disrupt radio transmissions, and cause damage to satellites might occur.In a recent study, Monica Bobra and Stathis Ilonidis (Stanford University) attempt to improve our ability to make these predictions by using a machine-learning algorithm.Classification by ComputerUsing a combination of 6 or more features results in a much better predictive success (measured by the True Skill Statistic; higher positive value = better prediction) for whether a flare will be accompanied by a CME. [Bobra Ilonidis 2016]Bobra and Ilonidis used magnetic-field data from an instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to build a catalog of solar flares, 56 of which were accompanied by a CME and 364 of which were not. The catalog includes information about 18 different features associated with the photospheric magnetic field of each flaring active region (for example, the mean gradient of the horizontal magnetic field).The authors apply a machine-learning algorithm known as a binary classifier to this catalog. This algorithm tries to predict, given a set of features

  20. Solar forcing of Gulf of California climate during the past 2000 yr suggested by diatoms and silicoflagellates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David

    2007-01-01

    Cores BAM80 E-17 (27.9° N) and NH01-26 (24.3° N) contain longer-duration cycles of diatoms and silicoflagellates. The early part of Medieval Climate Anomaly (∼ A.D. 900 to 1200) is characterized by two periods of reduced productivity (warmer SST) with an intervening high productivity (cool) interval centered at ∼ A.D. 1050. Reduced productivity and higher SST also characterize the record of the last ∼ 100 to 200 yr in these cores. Solar variability appears to be driving productivity cycles, as intervals of increased radiocarbon production (sunspot minima) correlate with intervals of enhanced productivity. It is proposed that increased winter cooling of the atmosphere above southwest U.S. during sunspot minima causes intensification of the northwest winds that blow down the Gulf during the late fall to early spring, leading to intensified overturn of surface waters and enhanced productivity.

  1. A Novel Hybrid Statistical Particle Swarm Optimization for Multimodal Functions and Frequency Control of Hybrid Wind-Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Jain, Cheshta

    2016-09-01

    In this article, a hybrid algorithm of particle swarm optimization (PSO) with statistical parameter (HSPSO) is proposed. Basic PSO for shifted multimodal problems have low searching precision due to falling into a number of local minima. The proposed approach uses statistical characteristics to update the velocity of the particle to avoid local minima and help particles to search global optimum with improved convergence. The performance of the newly developed algorithm is verified using various standard multimodal, multivariable, shifted hybrid composition benchmark problems. Further, the comparative analysis of HSPSO with variants of PSO is tested to control frequency of hybrid renewable energy system which comprises solar system, wind system, diesel generator, aqua electrolyzer and ultra capacitor. A significant improvement in convergence characteristic of HSPSO algorithm over other variants of PSO is observed in solving benchmark optimization and renewable hybrid system problems.

  2. Successful Study Habits. Successful Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This module on successful study habits is one of a series of modules designed to help teach students to become more self-sufficient in their personal and professional lives. This module contains teacher and student materials that are planned to allow students to identify areas that they need to improve in order to perform their best in school and…

  3. Success in Primary School. Success in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    A quality education system is not measured solely by national test scores, but by whether all students are successful in primary school. This simply stated goal is surprisingly difficult to achieve where substantial numbers of children are at risk of failing to complete a primary education. This paper explores the challenges and the diverse…

  4. A new method for forecasting the solar cycle descent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Sai Ramesh, Durbha

    2015-08-01

    The prediction of an extended solar minimum is extremely important because of the severity of its impact on the near-earth space. Here, we present a new method for predicting the descent time of the forthcoming solar cycle (SC); the method is based on the estimation of the Shannon entropy. We use the daily and monthly smoothed international sunspot number. For each nth SC, we compute the parameter [Tpre]n by using information on the descent and ascent times of the n - 3th and nth SCs, respectively. We find that [Tpre] of nth SC and entropy can be effectively used to predict the descent time of the n + 2th SC. The correlation coefficient between [Td]n+2 - [Tpre]n and [E]n is found to be 0.95. Using these parameters the prediction model is developed. Solar magnetic field and F10.7 flux data are available for SCs 21-22 and 19-23, respectively, and they are also utilized to get estimates of the Shannon entropy. It is found that the Shannon entropy, a measure of randomness inherent in the SC, is reflected well in the various proxies of the solar activity (viz sunspot, magnetic field, F10.7 flux). The applicability and accuracy of the prediction model equation is verified by way of association of least entropy values with the Dalton minimum. The prediction model equation also provides possible criteria for the occurrence of unusually longer solar minima.

  5. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  6. Solar electricity and solar fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, David J.

    1989-04-01

    The nature of solar radiation and its variation with location is described. The distribution of energy in the solar spectrum places immediate limits on the theoretical efficiency of conversion processes, since practical absorbers cannot convert all wavelengths received to useful energy. The principles of solar energy conversion methods are described. Absorption of solar energy can give rise to direct electrical generation, heating, or chemical change. Electrical generation from sunlight can be achieved by photovoltaic systems directly or by thermal systems which use solar heat to drive a heat engine and generator. The technology used and under research for promising ways of producing electricity or fuel from solar energy is described. Photovoltaic technology is established today for remote area, small power applications, and photovoltaic module sales alone are over 100 million dollars per year at present. The photovoltaic market has grown steadily since the mid-1970's, as prices have fallen continuously. Future energy options are briefly described. The merits of a sustainable energy economy, based on renewable energy resources, including solar energy, are emphasized, as this seems to provide the only hope of eliminating the problems caused by the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide, acid rain pollution and nuclear waste disposal. There is no doubt that clean fuels which were derived from solar energy and either did not involve carbon dioxide and used atmospheric carbon dioxide as the source dioxide as the source of carbon would be a worthy ideal. Methods described could one day achieve this.

  7. Tucson, Arizona: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Tucson, AZ, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  8. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Francisco, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  9. Santa Rosa, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Santa Rosa, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  10. Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Berkeley, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  11. Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Knoxville, TN, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  12. San Jose, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Jose, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Milwaukee, WI, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  14. Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Houston, TX, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  15. Austin, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Austin, Texas, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  16. San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Antonio, TX, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  17. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Seattle, WA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  18. Sacramento, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Sacramento, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Denver, Colorado, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  20. San Diego, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Diego, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  1. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Ann Arbor, Michigan, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  2. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  3. New Orleans, Louisiana: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of New Orleans, LA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  4. Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Orlando, FL, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  5. Madison, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Madison, WI, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  6. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Pittsburgh, PA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  7. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Philadelphia, PA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  8. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löptien, Björn; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Blanco Rodríguez, Julián; Cally, Paul S.; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H.; Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-12-01

    performance for helioseismology applications. As input we used a 6 hr time-series of realistic solar magneto-convection simulation (Stagger code) and the SPINOR radiative transfer code to synthesize the observables. The simulated power spectra of solar oscillations show that the instrument is suitable for helioseismology. In particular, the specified point spread function, image jitter, and photon noise are no obstacle to a successful mission.

  9. Solar Forcing of Climate. 2: Evidence from the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, Gerard J. M.

    2005-10-01

    The nature of the climatic response to solar forcing and its geographical coherence is reviewed. This information is of direct relevance for evaluating solar forcing mechanisms and validating climate models. Interpretation of Sun-climate relationships is hampered by difficulties in (1) translating proxy records into quantitative climate parameters (2) obtaining accurate age assessments (3) elucidating spatial patterns and relationships (4) separating solar forcing from other forcing mechanisms (5) lacking physical understanding of the solar forcing mechanisms. This often limits assessment of past solar forcing of climate to identification of correlations between environmental change and solar variability. The noisy character and often insufficient temporal resolution of proxy records often exclude the detection of high frequency decadal and bi-decadal cycles. However, on multi-decadal and longer time scales, notably the ˜90 years Gleisberg, and ˜200 years Suess cycles in the 10Be and 14C proxy records of solar activity are also well presented in the environmental proxy records. The additional ˜1500 years Bond cycle may result from interference between centennial-band solar cycles. Proxy evidence for Sun-climate relations is hardly present for Africa, South America and the marine realm; probably more due to a lack of information than a lack of response to solar forcing. At low latitudes, equatorward movement of the ITCZ (upward component of the Hadley cell) occurs upon a decrease in solar activity, explaining humidity changes for (1) Mesoamerica and adjacent North and South American regions and (2) East Africa and the Indian and Chinese Monsoon systems. At middle latitudes equatorward movement of the zonal circulation during solar minima probably (co-)induces wet and cool episodes in Western Europe, and Terra del Fuego as well as humidity changes in Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the Mediterranean. The polar regions seem to expand during solar minima

  10. Coupling and Correlation-analysis Between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres' Solar Cycle Features based on Sunspot Area Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, W. N.; Dikpati, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vast literature on Babcock-Leighton flux-transport dynamo models indicate that the sunspot activity cycles in the Northern and Southern hemispheres are primarily decoupled about the equator and are independent of each other. However, we find from the analysis of long-term sunspot area data from 1875 to 2013 that the two hemispheres continuously attempt to couple about the equator. If we define the coupling line as the line where the sunspot area of the two hemispheres is the same on the plot of North versus South spot-area, we find that the two hemispheres' spot-area tend to fall on the coupling line over a very long period of time, despite their short-term traversal away from the coupling line. This indicates that there must be some underlying process inside the Sun's interior which is causing this coupling. Further analysis of the features, such as rise and decay times of solar cycles, minima and peak amplitudes, reveal that the solar cycles normally follow a saw-tooth pattern with a fast rise and slow fall, as noted before. Most interestingly, we find that rise-time in one hemisphere correlates with minima-amplitude of the other hemisphere, but anti-correlates with that of the same hemisphere. We speculate that this happens because the fast rise of a cycle can annihilate the opposite-hemisphere's flux faster, leading to a lower minima-amplitude. By contrast, the peak of a cycle does not have much influence on minima-amplitude of the opposite hemisphere. We are investigating the physics behind these features through dynamo simulations.

  11. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    This report first describes the different types of solar ponds including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. It then discusses the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds, and compares the economics of salty and saltless ponds as a function of salt cost. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirements is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  12. Solar sail

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, K.E.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a solar sail propulsion system comprising: solar sail means for intercepting light pressure to produce thrust, the solar sail means being a thin metal film; tension truss means having two ends attached at one end to the solar sail means for transferring the thrust from the solar sail and for preventing gross deformation of the solar sail under light pressure, the solar sail means being a plurality of separate generally two-dimensional pieces joined by springs to the tension truss means; a payload attached to the other end of the tension truss means, the tension truss means comprising a plurality of attachment means for attaching shroud lines to the top of the tension truss means and a plurality of the shroud lines attached to the attachment means at one of their ends and the payload at the other; a plurality of reel means attached to the shroud lines for controllably varying the length of the lines; and a plurality of reflective panel means attached to the sail means for controlling the orientation of the system.

  13. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    The different types of solar ponds are described, including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. Then the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds are discussed and costs are compared. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirement is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  14. The SOLAR-C mission: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Tsuneta, Saku; Hara, Hirohisa; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Kusano, Kanya; Sakao, Taro; Sekii, Takashi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2011-10-01

    Two mission concepts (plan A: out-of-ecliptic mission and plan B: high resolution spectroscopic mission) have been studied for the next Japanese-led solar mission Solar-C, which will follow the scientific success of the Hinode mission. The both mission concepts are concluded as equally important and attractive for the promotion of space solar physics. In the meantime we also had to make efforts for prioritizing the two options, in order to proceed to next stage of requesting the launch of Solar-C mission at the earliest opportunity. This paper briefly describes the two mission concepts and the current status on our efforts for prioritizing the two options. More details are also described for the plan B option as the first-priority Solar-C mission. The latest report from the Solar-C mission concept studies was documented as "Interim Report on the Solar-C Mission Concept."

  15. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations in 240 - 1600 nm During the Recent Solar Cycles 21 - 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J.; Weber, M.; Deland, M. T.; Floyd, L. E.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Regular solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations from space that simultaneously cover the UV, visible (vis), and the near-IR (NIR) spectral region began with SCIAMACHY aboard ENVISAT in August 2002. Up to now, these direct observations cover less than a decade. In order for these SSI measurements to be useful in assessing the role of the Sun in climate change, records covering more than an eleven-year solar cycle are required. By using our recently developed empirical SCIA proxy model, we reconstruct daily SSI values over several decades by using solar proxies scaled to short-term SCIAMACHY solar irradiance observations to describe decadal irradiance changes. These calculations are compared to existing solar data: the UV data from SUSIM/UARS, from the DeLand & Cebula satellite composite, and the SIP model (S2K+VUV2002); and UV-vis-IR data from the NRLSSI and SATIRE models, and SIM/SORCE measurements. The mean SSI of the latter models show good agreement (less than 5%) in the vis regions over three decades while larger disagreements (10 - 20%) are found in the UV and IR regions. Between minima and maxima of Solar Cycles 21, 22, and 23, the inferred SSI variability from the SCIA proxy is intermediate between SATIRE and NRLSSI in the UV. While the DeLand & Cebula composite provide the highest variability between solar minimum and maximum, the SIP/Solar2000 and NRLSSI models show minimum variability, which may be due to the use of a single proxy in the modeling of the irradiances. In the vis-IR spectral region, the SCIA proxy model reports lower values in the changes from solar maximum to minimum, which may be attributed to overestimations of the sunspot proxy used in modeling the SCIAMACHY irradiances. The fairly short timeseries of SIM/SORCE shows a steeper decreasing (increasing) trend in the UV (vis) than the other data during the descending phase of Solar Cycle 23. Though considered to be only provisional, the opposite trend seen in the visible SIM data

  16. Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power on demand to the local utility, Southern California Edison Company. It can do so because it operates not only during sunny parts of the day, but it can store enough thermal energy from the sun to operate during cloudy periods and after dark, for up to three hours, at its rated output of 10 megawatts (MW). For the first time ever, a utility scale solar power plant can supply electricity when the utility needs it most, to satisfy the energy requirements of its customers.

  17. High resolution reconstruction of solar prominence images observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yong-yuan; Liu, Zhong; Jin, Zhen-yu

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution image showing fine structures is crucial for understanding the nature of solar prominence. In this paper, high resolution imaging of solar prominence on the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is introduced, using speckle masking. Each step of the data reduction especially the image alignment is discussed. Accurate alignment of all frames and the non-isoplanatic calibration of each image are the keys for a successful reconstruction. Reconstructed high resolution images from NVST also indicate that under normal seeing condition, it is feasible to carry out high resolution observations of solar prominence by a ground-based solar telescope, even in the absence of adaptive optics.

  18. Solar modulation of Little Ice Age climate in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Polissar, P J; Abbott, M B; Wolfe, A P; Bezada, M; Rull, V; Bradley, R S

    2006-06-13

    The underlying causes of late-Holocene climate variability in the tropics are incompletely understood. Here we report a 1,500-year reconstruction of climate history and glaciation in the Venezuelan Andes using lake sediments. Four glacial advances occurred between anno Domini (A.D.) 1250 and 1810, coincident with solar-activity minima. Temperature declines of -3.2 +/- 1.4 degrees C and precipitation increases of approximately 20% are required to produce the observed glacial responses. These results highlight the sensitivity of high-altitude tropical regions to relatively small changes in radiative forcing, implying even greater probable responses to future anthropogenic forcing.

  19. Solar modulation of Little Ice Age climate in the tropical Andes

    PubMed Central

    Polissar, P. J.; Abbott, M. B.; Wolfe, A. P.; Bezada, M.; Rull, V.; Bradley, R. S.

    2006-01-01

    The underlying causes of late-Holocene climate variability in the tropics are incompletely understood. Here we report a 1,500-year reconstruction of climate history and glaciation in the Venezuelan Andes using lake sediments. Four glacial advances occurred between anno Domini (A.D.) 1250 and 1810, coincident with solar-activity minima. Temperature declines of −3.2 ± 1.4°C and precipitation increases of ≈20% are required to produce the observed glacial responses. These results highlight the sensitivity of high-altitude tropical regions to relatively small changes in radiative forcing, implying even greater probable responses to future anthropogenic forcing. PMID:16740660

  20. Intermittency and Multifractal behavior in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind Beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Echim, Marius; Macek, Wiesław M.; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study the evolution of intermittency in the solar wind magnetic turbulence at heliocentric distances between 1.5 and 5.4 AU and at heliolatitudes between -80 and 70o. We use the a multifractal analysis based on the partition function formalism. More precisely, we consider magnetic field intensity for the solar wind data from Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998, 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). By modeling multifractal spectrum we reveal intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun both in the slow and fast solar wind we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) which decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks and other nonlinear interaction can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm the lower level of multifractality and intermittency than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme

  1. Solar Physics at Evergreen: Solar Dynamo and Chromospheric MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.; Maxwell, J.; Song, N.; Dikpati, M.

    2006-12-01

    We describe our five year old solar physics research program at The Evergreen State College. Famed for its cloudy skies, the Pacific Northwest is an ideal location for theoretical and remote solar physics research activities. Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip polarity every 11 years or so? How does this contribute to the magnetic storms Earth experiences when the Sun's field reverses? Why is the temperature in the Sun's upper atmosphere millions of degrees higher than the Sun's surface temperature? How do magnetic waves transport energy in the Sun’s chromosphere and the Earth’s atmosphere? How does solar variability affect climate change? Faculty and undergraduates investigate questions such as these in collaboration with the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder. We will describe successful student research projects, logistics of remote computing, and our current physics investigations into (1) the solar dynamo and (2) chromospheric magnetohydrodynamics.

  2. Solar Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown here is one of the first images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander of one of the octagonal solar panels, which opened like two handheld, collapsible fans on either side of the spacecraft. Beyond this view is a small slice of the north polar terrain of Mars.

    The successfully deployed solar panels are critical to the success of the 90-day mission, as they are the spacecraft's only means of replenishing its power. Even before these images reached Earth, power readings from the spacecraft indicated to engineers that the solar panels were already at work recharging the spacecraft's batteries.

    Before deploying the Surface Stereo Imager to take these images, the lander waited about 15 minutes for the dust to settle.

    This image was taken by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol, or Martian day, 0 (May 25, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Solar Power Grid Unfurled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown here is one of the first images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander of one of the octagonal solar panels, which opened like two handheld, collapsible fans on either side of the spacecraft. Beyond this view is a small slice of the north polar terrain of Mars.

    The successfully deployed solar panels are critical to the success of the 90-day mission, as they are the spacecraft's only means of replenishing its power. Even before these images reached Earth, power readings from the spacecraft indicated to engineers that the solar panels were already at work recharging the spacecraft's batteries.

    Before deploying the Surface Stereo Imager to take these images, the lander waited about 15 minutes for the dust to settle.

    This image was taken by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol, or Martian day, 0 (May 25, 2008).

    This image has been geometrically corrected.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Period and phase of the 88-year solar cycle and the Maunder minimum - Evidence for a chaotic sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of whether the solar dynamo is quasi-periodic or chaotic is addressed by examining 1500 years of sunspot, geomagnetic, and auroral activity cycles. Sub-harmonics were found of the fundamental solar cycle period during the years preceding the Maunder minimum and loss of phase of the subharmonic on emergence from it. These phenomena are indicative of chaos. They indicate that the solar dynamo is chaotic and is operating in a region close to the transition between period doubling and chaos. Since Maunder-type minima reoccur irregularly for millennia, it appears that the sun remains close to this transition to and from chaos. This is postulated to be a universal characteristic of solar type stars caused by feedback in the dynamo number.

  5. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts

  6. ISS Solar Array Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  7. Solar chulha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  8. Solar dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelin, R.W.; Hurst, D.W.; Osos, G.R.

    1984-02-07

    Fabrics are dried by tumbling the fabrics in a drying chamber into which hot air is introduced. The hot air is formed by passing ambient air through a solar heater to heat the air to a first temperature, and then further heating the air with a second heater such as a burner. The burner can be one which burns a fuel in the presence of combustion air. The combustion air can be a portion of the air that is passed through the solar heater. After drying the fabrics by this method, the drying zone can be cooled and the fabrics can be further dried by passing air through the solar heater, and then without further heating the air that has passed through the solar heater, introducing the air to the drying chamber.

  9. Solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.I.; Kaplow, R.

    1980-08-26

    An improved solar cell designed for optimum efficiency is comprised of a plurality of series connected unit solar cells formed from a common substrate of semiconductor material. Each unit solar cell has spaced elongate sidewalls, and a ''dead space'' area between adjoining sidewalls of adjacent units is made substantially smaller than an active, light receiving area, extending between the opposite sidewalls of each individual unit. In addition, the width of the active area is concisely limited to ensure that radiation incident on the active area is incident at a point which is spaced from the p-n junction of each unit by no more than a predetermined optimum distance. Reducing the ''dead space'' area while concisely limiting the width of the active area provides improved solar cell performance without requiring focusing lenses.

  10. Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Design and Construction, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes 21 completed projects now using solar energy for heating, cooling, or electricity. Included are elementary schools in Atlanta and San Diego, a technical school in Detroit, and Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. (MLF)

  11. Solar Nexus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jim

    1980-01-01

    The design team for the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has pushed the state of the energy art to its current limits for the initial phase, with provisions for foreseeable and even speculative future applications. (Author/MLF)

  12. The Solar Corona at the 2015 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Carter, Allison L.

    2015-04-01

    We report on our successful observations of the solar corona at the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse from our site at a latitude of about 78° on the Svalbard archipelago, and related observations by colleagues aloft. Our equipment included cameras for imaging at a variety of scales for use in making high-contrast composites, as reported our Astrophysical Journal article (2015) about our 2012 total solar eclipse observations and similar articles about the corona and changes in it at previous total eclipses. Our Svalbard equipment also included a spectrograph, with which we continued our monitoring of the ratio of the Fe XIV and Fe X coronal lines, which has recently been >1 with the solar maximum, a reversal from <1 at earlier eclipses closer to the last solar minimum. Our 2013 observations from Gabon showed two coronal mass ejections and an erupting prominence; the 2015 eclipse showed an erupting prominence and some unusual coronal structure in an overall coronal shape typical of solar maximum. We use our ground-based eclipse observations to fill the gap in imaging between the SDO and SWAP (17.4 nm) EUV observations on the solar disk and the inner location of the LASCO C2 occultation disk, with STEREO observations providing the possibility of three-dimensional interpretations. Our expedition was supported by a grant (9616-14) from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  13. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  14. Solar Schematic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The home shown at right is specially designed to accommodate solar heating units; it has roof planes in four directions, allowing placement of solar collectors for best exposure to the sun. Plans (bottom) and complete working blueprints for the solar-heated house are being marketed by Home Building Plan Service, Portland, Oregon. The company also offers an inexpensive schematic (center) showing how a homeowner only moderately skilled in the use of tools can build his own solar energy system, applicable to new or existing structures. The schematic is based upon the design of a low-cost solar home heating system built and tested by NASA's Langley Research Center; used to supplement a warm-air heating system, it can save the homeowner about 40 percent of his annual heating bill for a modest investment in materials and components. Home Building Plan Service saved considerable research time by obtaining a NASA technical report which details the Langley work. The resulting schematic includes construction plans and simplified explanations of solar heat collection, collectors and other components, passive heat factors, domestic hot water supply and how to work with local heating engineers.

  15. Predictors of Postsecondary Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Vanessa; Smerdon, Becky; Sambolt, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this brief is to provide information to state, district, and school personnel seeking support to determine whether their students are on a path to postsecondary success. The College and Career Readiness and Success Center (CCRS Center) has received technical assistance requests from a number of states regarding factors that predict…

  16. Exploring MBA Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Amanda; Hodgkinson, Myra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the meaning of career success in relation to the attainment of an MBA degree, for a group of experienced managers. In so doing, the paper aims to consider the adequacy of MBA career success, defined solely in terms of external criteria. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 36 in-depth interviews…

  17. Principal Experiences of Succession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Farla Gay

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study explored the experiences of school principals and the usefulness of Peters' (2011) succession planning model. Ten purposefully selected principals from varying grade levels were interviewed; none reported a formal succession plan, and all had been assistant principals. The study concluded the assistant principal position…

  18. Predicting Classroom Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Ronald P.

    A study was conducted at Rancho Santiago College (RSC) to identify personal and academic factors that are predictive of students' success in their courses. The study examined the following possible predictors of success: language and math test scores; background characteristics; length of time out of high school; high school background; college…

  19. Leadership Succession. Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy

    2005-01-01

    One of the most significant events in the life of a school is a change in its leadership. Yet few things in education succeed less than leadership succession. Failure to care for leadership succession is sometimes a result of manipulation or self-centeredness; but more often it is oversight, neglect, or the pressures of crisis management that are…

  20. Momentum and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, William

    2008-01-01

    Success begets success and opportunity begets opportunity. This principle is something that the author sees at work in his own life. One example of opportunities begetting opportunities is the experience he had at the Academy of Science and Technology to practice his programming skills. The Academy served as a great training ground for what would…

  1. Successful Community Development Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Thomas G.

    This paper sketches several successful community economic development programs that have implications for rural education. Case studies are used to discuss community characteristics that contribute to development success. In Virginia, a Community Certification Program offers statewide business recruitment services to communities that meet program…

  2. Getting Set for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    These career development materials consist of three booklets: the text, success portfolio, and facilitator's guide. Unit 1 in the text tests the students' coping skills. Contracts in the success portfolio for this unit enable the student to determine the sources of stress and ways of coping; describe different procedures for managing time; assess…

  3. Blueprint for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Curtis A.

    1992-01-01

    key to facilities planning and successful bond issues is involving public. Taxpayers are unlikely to support superintendent's plan but will certainly vote for their own plan. Success means ensuring fiscally uncluttered pathway, retaining an architect, and working with demographer. Appointing broad-based community task force of about 30 members,…

  4. What Price Career Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Gerard A.

    2003-01-01

    Looks at individual and organizational perspectives on career success and the disparities between these viewpoints and organizational culture and control systems. Discusses how culture might influence managers to violate ethical and legal principles for the sake of career success. (Contains 46 references.) (SK)

  5. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  6. Student Success. March 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Student Success" is EPI's occasional e-magazine dedicated to the discussion of retaining students in higher education. Over the course of the next issues of "Student Success," the Educational Policy Institute (EPI) will explore three questions about retention on our college campuses. Part I will look at the barriers to student retention, both…

  7. Student Success Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Coll., CA.

    The Student Success Project at Fresno City College (FCC), in California, is structured around 13 student success core indicators for which activities and completion timelines are developed annually. This report presents data on the status of the indicators as of 1994 and describes activities planned for 1995. Following an introduction, a list of…

  8. Focused on Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In January 2011, the California Community Colleges Board of Governors formed a task force to chart a roadmap for system-wide focus on student success. The task force identified best practices and designed evidence-based recommendations to ensure student success is a driving theme in colleges. This comprehensive plan, known as the Student Success…

  9. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Rast, Mark P.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of "extreme" solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  10. Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments; Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    DOE designed this guide "Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments" to assist local government officials and stakeholders in designing and implementing strategic local solar plans. The 2011 edition contains the most recent lessons and successes from the 25 Solar America Cities and other communities promoting solar energy. Because DOE recognizes that there is no one path to solar market development, this guide introduces a range of policy and program options that can help a community build a local solar infrastructure.

  11. Successful systems sustaining change.

    PubMed

    Bullas, Sheila; Bryant, John

    2007-01-01

    Much has been published on the success and particularly the failure of IT projects; still failures are commonplace. This prospective study focused from the outset on assessing risk of failure and addressing critical success factors. The aim was to apply existing methods in a challenging acute care hospital where success demanded rapid achievement of sustainable improvements in clinical and administrative processes. The implementations were part of the English National Programme for IT. The desired outcomes required the integration of accepted tools and techniques to provide a pragmatic approach to systems implementation: Lean, Six Sigma, PRINCE2 and Benefits Management. The outcome and further insights into success and failure of IT projects in healthcare are described. In particular lessons are identified related to the business need for the project and the successful achievement of the required benefits and business change.

  12. Solar radiation pressure as a mechanism of acceleration of atoms and first ions with low ionization potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.

    2015-04-01

    Calculated results are presented for solar radiation pressure acting on atoms and first ions. For some of these particles, radiation pressure exceeds the gravitational attraction and can accelerate them to large velocities. A comparison of the results with ionization potentials shows that the maxima of radiation pressure on neutral atoms coincide with the minima of the first ionization potentials (FIPs). This relationship is even more apparent for first ions. The minima of the second ionization potentials (SIPs) coincide with the radiation pressure maxima for a number of ions such as Be II, Mg II, Ca II, and the neighboring elements. Thus, radiation pressure may serve as a possible mechanism of acceleration of pickup ions and energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from an inner source (zodiacal dust and sungrazing comets). These atoms and ions, which are not typical of the solar wind, are formed as a result of the disintegration of comets or meteor showers near the Sun and can accelerate and reach the Earth's orbit as part of the solar wind. Doubly ionized atoms have resonance lines in the UV range, where solar radiation pressure has no apparent impact on the particle dynamics; thus, the proposed acceleration mechanism can only be applied to neutral atoms and first ions with low potentials of the subsequent ionization.

  13. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature

  14. Solar Activity and Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Our Sun is a dynamic, ever-changing star. In general, its atmosphere displays major variation on an 11-year cycle. Throughout the cycle, the atmosphere occasionally exhibits large, sudden outbursts of energy. These "solar eruptions" manifest themselves in the form of solar flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and energetic particle releases. They are of high interest to scientists both because they represent fundamental processes that occur in various astrophysical context, and because, if directed toward Earth, they can disrupt Earth-based systems and satellites. Research over the last few decades has shown that the source of the eruptions is localized regions of energy-storing magnetic field on the Sun that become destabilized, leading to a release of the stored energy. Solar scientists have (probably) unraveled the basic outline of what happens in these eruptions, but many details are still not understood. In recent years we have been studying what triggers these magnetic eruptions, using ground-based and satellite-based solar observations in combination with predictions from various theoretical models. We will present an overview of solar activity and solar eruptions, give results from some of our own research, and discuss questions that remain to be explored.

  15. Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    DOE designed this guide—Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments—to assist local government officials and stakeholders in designing and implementing strategic local solar plans. The 2011 edition contains the most recent lessons and successes from the 25 Solar America Cities and other communities promoting solar energy. Because DOE recognizes that there is no one path to solar market development, this guide introduces a range of policy and program options that can help a community build a local solar infrastructure.

  16. Impact of Solar Variability on the quasi-2-year Modulation of Planetary Wave Activity in the Mesopause Region OH* Temperature Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höppner, Kathrin; Koppmann, Ralf; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang

    A time series of nightly mean OH*(3,1) temperature measurements from 1987 to 2007 using IR- spectrometers above Wuppertal (51° N, 7° E) and Hohenpeissenberg (48° N, 11° E) are analysed. After removing seasonal trends from the data record temperature fluctuations - calculated with the wavelet analysis - are interpreted to reflect planetary wave activity. These fluctuations show a nearly 22-year cycle. Superimposed on this 22-year variability a quasi-2-year modulation is found. The peak-to-peak amplitude of this variation is not uniform; it shows a maximum during 1994-1995 and a secondary maximum during 2005-2007. The quasi-2-year modulation is tentatively being interpreted as a QBO-effect on the planetary wave activity. Thus, it is expected that the QBO-modulation is large when planetary wave activity is well pronounced and vice versa. Maximum QBO-modulation is found to be correlated with the minima of the 11-year solar cycle and the maximum of the 22-year solar magnetic field (Hale cycle). Evidence is found that the planetary normal modes are well pronounced during solar minimum. This is taken as an indicator that planetary waves can develop more efficiently during solar minimum than solar maximum when external solar forcing is large. In addition former work has shown that planetary wave activity is systematically larger during maximum of the 22-year Hale cycle. The consequence of these findings is that the superimposed QBO-signal on the planetary wave activity is strongly pronounced if the minimum of the 11-year solar cycle coincides with the maximum of the 22-year solar magnetic Hale cycle. A secondary maximum of the QBO- modulation occurs when both the solar magnetic field and the 11-year solar cycle are in their minima.

  17. Are southern South American Rivers linked to the solar variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagnucci, Rosa Hilda; Berman, Ana Laura; Velasco Herrera, Victor; Silvestri, Gabriel

    2014-04-01

    This article explores the Sun's influence on the hydrological cycle in southern South America (SSA) at the range of interannual-to-multidecadal scales from the early 1900s to 2011. The solar variability is described by the sunspot number (SSN) index. The hydrological cycle is examined by using annual mean discharges of the Paraná River (PAR) and the Atuel River (ATU) that represents the behaviour of the subtropical Argentinean Andean hydrological system. Wavelet-based methods are used in order to describe relationships in the entire time-frequency domain. The SSN-PAR connection is statistically weak in oscillations with period about 11-years (the Schwabe's solar cycle). Therefore, the solar forcing at this scale must be considered with great caution. The periodicity about 30 years is highly significant throughout the analysed period. Two potential physical mechanisms affecting the Paraná discharge could be involved: one is the solar irradiance influence on the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and the other is the solar influence on the Pacific long-term variability. The SSN-ATU connection shows by far the most striking, robust and convincing result for the Schwabe cycle. A large amplitude and statistically significant cycle with a period about 11 years is observed not only in the Morlet-based global and local wavelet spectra of the Atuel discharges and SSN but also in the global and local spectra of Cross and Coherent wavelets in most of the analysed period. High (low) discharges occur following maxima (minima) of the Schwabe cycles with time lags of up to ∼2 years. Previous studies have shown a close relationship between the subtropical Argentinean Andean Rivers and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), as well as a solar influence on the ENSO variability. We suggest that El Niño events occurring a few years after solar maxima could explain the connection. Periodicities longer than 30 years are suggested.

  18. The solar wind structure and heliospheric magnetic field in the solar Cycle 23-24 minimum and in the increasing phase of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Zhao, L.; Fisk, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The solar wind structure and the heliospheric magnetic field were substantially different in the latest solar minimum between solar Cycle 23 and 24 from the previous minimum. Compared with the previous minimum, in the latest solar minimum, the heliospheric magnetic field strength was substantially reduced; the streamer-associated-low-temperature solar wind (streamer-stalk wind) was distributed in a narrower region relative to the heliospheric current sheet (HCS); the slow-proton-speed solar wind was scattered in a wider latitudinal region; and there are more large and steady coronal holes at low latitude. We offer an explanation for the decreased magnetic-field strength and the narrowed streamer-stalk wind based on an analysis of the Ulysses and ACE in-situ observations. Solar-wind composition data are used to demonstrate that there are two distinct structures of solar wind: solar wind likely to originate from the stalk of the streamer belt (the highly elongated loops that underlie the HCS), and solar wind from outside this region. The region outside the streamer-stalk region is noticeably larger in the Cycle 23-24 minimum; however, the increased area can account for the reduction in the heliospheric magnetic-field strength in that minimum. Thus, the total magnetic flux contained in this region is the same in the two minima. To have a further understanding of the solar wind structure and its solar source, we ballistically map the ACE in-situ observation back along a radial trajectory from 1 AU to the solar source surface (r = 2.5Rsun) using the observed proton speeds. Then we track the field line from the source surface to the solar surface using a potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation model. So the ACE observations, including the heliospheric magnetic field, the solar wind compositional and dynamic properties at 1AU, can be connected to their coronal sources on the solar surface. Synoptic maps showing this connection will be provided, and based on

  19. Springboard to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Martha; Heitman, Susan

    1985-01-01

    The University of Southern California, home to the United States Olympic team, benefited from the success of the olympiad. The long-range impact is still being assessed. A description of their public relations program is presented. (MLW)

  20. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  1. Forest succession models

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.; West, D.C.

    1980-05-01

    Studies in succession attempt to determine the changes in species composition and other ecosystem attributes expected to occur over periods of time. Mathematical models developed in forestry and ecology to study ecological succession are reviewed. Tree models, gap models and forest models are discussed. Model validation or testing procedures are described. Model applications can involve evaluating large-scale and long-term changes in the ambient levels of pollutants and assessing the effects of climate change on the environment. (RJC)

  2. Defect engineering in solar cell manufacturing and thin film solar cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-08-01

    During the last few years many defect engineering concepts were successfully applied to fabricate high efficiency silicon solar cells on low-cost substrates. Some of the research advances are described.

  3. Evolution of Intermittency in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Echim, M.; Macek, W. M.; Bruno, R.

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997–1998 and 2007–2008) and one solar maximum (1999–2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  4. Observations of Solar Spectral Irradiance Change During Cycle 22 from NOAA-9 SBUV/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    The NOM-9 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, model 2 (SBUV/2) instrument is one of a series of instruments providing daily solar spectral irradiance measurements in the middle and near ultraviolet since 1978. The SBUV/2 instruments are primarily designed to measure stratospheric profile and total column ozone, using the directional albedo as the input to the ozone processing algorithm. As a result, the SBUV/2 instrument does not have onboard monitoring of all time-dependent response changes. We have applied internal comparisons and vicarious (external) comparisons to determine the long-term instrument characterization for NOAA-9 SBUV/2 to derive accurate solar spectral irradiances from March 1985 to May 1997 spanning two solar cycle minima with a single instrument. The NOAA-9 data show an amplitude of 9.3(+/- 2.3)% (81-day averaged) at 200-205 nm for solar cycle 22. This is consistent with the result of (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 8.3(+/- 2.6)% for cycle 21 from Nimbus-7 SBUV and (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 10(+/- 2)% (daily values) for cycle 23 from UARS SUSIM. NOAA-9 data at 245-250 nm show a solar cycle amplitude of (Delta)F(sub 245-250) = 5.7(+/- 1.8)%. NOAA-9 SBUV/2 data can be combined with other instruments to create a 25-year record of solar UV irradiance.

  5. EVOLUTION OF INTERMITTENCY IN THE SLOW AND FAST SOLAR WIND BEYOND THE ECLIPTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Macek, W. M.; Echim, M.; Bruno, R. E-mail: marius.echim@oma.be E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997–1998 and 2007–2008) and one solar maximum (1999–2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  6. Development of solar tower observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  7. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  8. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  9. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  10. Solar ADEPT: Efficient Solar Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar ADEPT Project: The 7 projects that make up ARPA-E's Solar ADEPT program, short for 'Solar Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,' aim to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, which convert the sun's rays into electricity. Solar ADEPT projects are integrating advanced electrical components into PV systems to make the process of converting solar energy to electricity more efficient.

  11. Dynamo theory prediction of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamo theory technique to predict decadal time scale solar activity variations is introduced. The technique was developed following puzzling correlations involved with geomagnetic precursors of solar activity. Based upon this, a dynamo theory method was developed to predict solar activity. The method was used successfully in solar cycle 21 by Schatten, Scherrer, Svalgaard, and Wilcox, after testing with 8 prior solar cycles. Schatten and Sofia used the technique to predict an exceptionally large cycle, peaking early (in 1990) with a sunspot value near 170, likely the second largest on record. Sunspot numbers are increasing, suggesting that: (1) a large cycle is developing, and (2) that the cycle may even surpass the largest cycle (19). A Sporer Butterfly method shows that the cycle can now be expected to peak in the latter half of 1989, consistent with an amplitude comparable to the value predicted near the last solar minimum.

  12. Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

  13. Heliogyro Solar Sail Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale A.; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Heaton, Andrew F.; Heaton, Andrew F.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Littell, Justin D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Thomson, Mark W.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent successful flight of the JAXA IKAROS solar sail has renewed interest within NASA in spinning solar sail concepts for high-performance solar sailing. The heliogyro solar sail, in particular, is being re-examined as a potential game-changing architecture for future solar sailing missions. In this paper, we present an overview of ongoing heliogyro technology development and feasibility assessment activities within NASA. In particular, a small-scale heliogyro solar sail technology demonstration concept will be described. We will also discuss ongoing analytical and experimental heliogyro structural dynamics and controls investigations and provide an outline of future heliogyro development work directed toward enabling a low cost heliogyro technology demonstration mission ca. 2020.

  14. Evaluation of glass resin coatings for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    Using a variety of non-vacuum deposition techniques coatings were implemented on silicon solar cells and arrays of cells interconnected on Kapton substrates. The coatings provide both antireflection optical matching and environmental protection. Reflectance minima near 2% was achieved at a single wavelength in the visible. Reflectance averaging below 5% across the useful collection range was demonstrated. The coatings and methods of deposition were: (1) Ta2O5 spun, dipped or sprayed; (2) Ta2O5.SiO2 spun, dipped or sprayed; (3) GR908 (SiO2) spun, dipped, or sprayed. Total coating thickness were in the range of 18 microns to 25 microns. The coatings and processes are compatible with single cells or cells mounted on Kapton substrates.

  15. Successive phase transitions and kink solutions in ϕ(8), ϕ(10), and ϕ(12) field theories.

    PubMed

    Khare, Avinash; Christov, Ivan C; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-08-01

    We obtain exact solutions for kinks in ϕ(8), ϕ(10), and ϕ(12) field theories with degenerate minima, which can describe a second-order phase transition followed by a first-order one, a succession of two first-order phase transitions and a second-order phase transition followed by two first-order phase transitions, respectively. Such phase transitions are known to occur in ferroelastic and ferroelectric crystals and in meson physics. In particular, we find that the higher-order field theories have kink solutions with algebraically decaying tails and also asymmetric cases with mixed exponential-algebraic tail decay, unlike the lower-order ϕ(4) and ϕ(6) theories. Additionally, we construct distinct kinks with equal energies in all three field theories considered, and we show the coexistence of up to three distinct kinks (for a ϕ(12) potential with six degenerate minima). We also summarize phonon dispersion relations for these systems, showing that the higher-order field theories have specific cases in which only nonlinear phonons are allowed. For the ϕ(10) field theory, which is a quasiexactly solvable model akin to ϕ(6), we are also able to obtain three analytical solutions for the classical free energy as well as the probability distribution function in the thermodynamic limit.

  16. Successive phase transitions and kink solutions in ϕ(8), ϕ(10), and ϕ(12) field theories.

    PubMed

    Khare, Avinash; Christov, Ivan C; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-08-01

    We obtain exact solutions for kinks in ϕ(8), ϕ(10), and ϕ(12) field theories with degenerate minima, which can describe a second-order phase transition followed by a first-order one, a succession of two first-order phase transitions and a second-order phase transition followed by two first-order phase transitions, respectively. Such phase transitions are known to occur in ferroelastic and ferroelectric crystals and in meson physics. In particular, we find that the higher-order field theories have kink solutions with algebraically decaying tails and also asymmetric cases with mixed exponential-algebraic tail decay, unlike the lower-order ϕ(4) and ϕ(6) theories. Additionally, we construct distinct kinks with equal energies in all three field theories considered, and we show the coexistence of up to three distinct kinks (for a ϕ(12) potential with six degenerate minima). We also summarize phonon dispersion relations for these systems, showing that the higher-order field theories have specific cases in which only nonlinear phonons are allowed. For the ϕ(10) field theory, which is a quasiexactly solvable model akin to ϕ(6), we are also able to obtain three analytical solutions for the classical free energy as well as the probability distribution function in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:25215844

  17. NREL Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    Many scientists once believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. However, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) thought differently, and they employed GaInP in a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. The multijunction cell is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic products.

  18. Solar and laser energy conversion with Schottky barrier solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y.-C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices have been fabricated for solar and short-wavelength laser energy conversion using the thin metal film-semiconductor (Schottky barrier) approach. Studies of the metal film optical characteristics and the voltage outputs were emphasized. Air mass zero efficiencies of 8 to 9% in GaAs and laser conversion efficiencies of 25% at 4880 A in GaAs(0.6)P(0.4) are presently measured, with projected efficiencies of 15 and 45%, respectively. The techniques, if applied successfully to semiconductor thin films, could have an impact in solar energy terrestrial application.

  19. Solar Energy and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  20. Boston, Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Boston, MA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given. The City of Boston and its Solar America Cities program, Solar Boston, are helping to debunk the myth that solar energy is only feasible in the southern latitudes. Boston has some of the highest energy prices in the country and will likely be one of the first locations where solar power achieves grid parity with conventional energy technologies. Solar Boston is facilitating the rapid development of solar energy projects and infrastructure in the short-term, and is preparing for the rapid market growth that is expected with the imminent arrival of grid parity over the long-term. Solar Boston developed the strategy for achieving Mayor Menino's goal of installing 25 MW of solar energy throughout Boston by 2015. Through Solar Boston, the city has developed a strategy for the installation of solar technology throughout Boston, including mapping feasible locations, preparing a permitting guide, and planning the citywide bulk purchase, financing, and installation of solar technology. The city has also worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing initiatives. The resulting accomplishments include the following: (1) Created an online map of current local renewable energy projects with a tool to allow building owners to calculate their rooftop solar potential. The map is currently live at http://gis.cityofboston.gov/solarboston/. (2) Supported the city's Green Affordable Housing Program (GAHP), in partnership with the Department of Neighborhood Development (DND). Under GAHP, the city is installing more than 150 kW of PV on 200 units of affordable housing. DND requires that all new city-funded affordable housing be LEED silver certified and

  1. Differences in the Effect of Coal Pile Runoff (Low pH, High Metal Concentrations) Versus Natural Carolina Bay Water (Low pH, Low Metal Concentrations) on Plant Condition and Associated Bacterial Epiphytes of Salvinia minima.

    PubMed

    Lindell, A H; Tuckfield, R C; McArthur, J V

    2016-05-01

    Numerous wetlands and streams have been impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting in lowered pH and increased levels of toxic heavy metals. Remediation of these contaminated sites requires knowledge on the response of microbial communities (especially epiphytic) and aquatic plants to these altered environmental conditions. We examined the effect of coal pile runoff waters as an example of AMD in contrast to natural water from Carolina Bays with low pH and levels of metals on Salvinia minima, a non-native, metal accumulating plant and associated epiphytic bacteria. Treatments included water from two Carolina Bays, one AMD basin and Hoagland's Solution at two pH levels (natural and adjusted to 5.0-5.5). Using controlled replicated microcosms (N = 64) we determined that the combination of low pH and high metal concentrations has a significant negative impact (p < 0.05) on plant condition and epiphytes. Solution metal concentrations dropped indicating removal from solution by S. minima in all microcosms. PMID:26908369

  2. Solar heating shingle roof structure

    SciTech Connect

    Straza, G.T.

    1984-01-31

    A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. Shingles are assembled in a normal overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive shingles to provide a fluid path through the complete array. An inlet manifold is contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the lowest row of shingles.

  3. Project Solar Cooker SK 12

    SciTech Connect

    Jobst, G.

    1992-12-31

    A solar cooking unit designed for use in developing countries is described. The unit with its 1.4 meter solar collector is capable of bringing 3 liters of water to a boil in half an hour or less. Positioning the cooker for accurate tracking of the sun is achieved using the shadow of a pin on a small plate. Safety concerns are also addressed in the design. The unit can be used to meet the needs of as many of 20 people. Manufacture by local workers is possible and is the best guarantee of successful technology transfer.

  4. Succeeding with succession planning.

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1996-12-01

    Succession planning is the process of identifying people who could presently move into key positions or could do so after specifically targeted development occurs. The process identifies the better people in the organization and takes a consistent approach to assembling, analyzing, and retaining information about potential leaders and planning for their further development. At its simplest level, it is the development of a backup and potential successor to each manager; at is most formal, it is a documented plan for management succession at all levels in the organization. Strongly supportive of a policy of development and promotion from within the organization, succession planning also represents a proactive posture in respect to inevitable management turnover. In these days of rapid change in health care, no modern organization that expects to keep up with increasing competition can afford to drift--or even to let a single department drift--while replacements are recruited for managers who resign, retire, or otherwise leave.

  5. Amplitude and phase changes on VLF/LF radio signals depending on solar zenith angle during occurrences of solar X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulic, Desanka; Sreckovic, Vladimir; Mihajlov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The focus of this work is on the extraction of D-region electron density that is induced by the intensive X-ray flux under different solar zenith angle. The sensitivity of Very Low and Low Frequency (VLF and LF) propagation in the lower ionosphere makes it an ideal probe for remotely sensing the ambient state and localized perturbations of the ionosphere. The basis of this work is amplitude and phase data acquired by monitoring DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals during the period of ascending and maximum of the solar cycle 24. All the data were recorded at Belgrade station (44.85 ^{0} N, 20.38 ^{0} E) by AWESOME system. DHO-BEL and NSC-BEL are short paths with distances of 1300 and 953 km, respectively. These paths are in the same time zone. The diurnal amplitude and phase variations on VLF/LF radio signal against time vary in characteristic ways that are caused by solar zenith angles over path. Two amplitude minima are observed when sunrise and sunset terminators reach the middle of the propagation path. During daytime condition there are two amplitude minima (in morning and afternoon) developed under solar zenith angles χ ˜80 ^{0} over short path. In this study we considered amplitude and phase perturbations on VLF/LF radio signal induced by solar X-ray flares under solar zenith angles which are close with timings of amplitude minima during daytime under normal ionospheric condition. We expected and estimated differences in amplitude and phase perturbations on DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals induced by solar X-ray flares which occurrences are under solar zenith angles χ ≤ 80 ^{0}. The observations include solar flares with magnitudes in the range from C2 (I_{X} = 2 10^{-6} Wm^{-2} of X-ray flux in the band at 0.1 - 0.8 nm) to X2.1 (I_{X} = 2.1 10^{-4} Wm^{-2}) class. For example on 11 March 2015 occurred X2.1 class flare with maximum of intensity at 16:22 UT, when solar angle was χ = 81^{0} at Belgrade. One day before, under normal

  6. Solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.; Startevant, R.C.

    1985-01-22

    A solar heater has an outlet conduit above an inlet conduit intercoupling a solar heating chamber with the inside of a building through a window opening. In one form the solar collecting chamber is outside the building below the window and the outlet conduit and inlet conduit are contiguous and pass through the window opening between the windowsill and the lower sash. In another form of the invention the solar collecting chambers are located beside each side of the window and joined at the top by the outlet conduit that passes through an opening between the upper window sash and the top of the window frame and at the bottom by an inlet conduit that passes through an opening between the lower sash and the windowsill. The outlet conduit carries photoelectric cells that provide electrical energy for driving a squirrel-cage fan in the outlet conduit through a mercury switch seated on a damper actuated by a bimetallic coil that closes the damper when the temperature in the outlet conduit goes below a predetermined temperature.

  7. Solar VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapping, K. F.; Kuijpers, J.

    1986-01-01

    In April, 1981, radio telescopes at Dwingeloo (The Netherlands) and Onsala (Sweden) were used as a long-baseline interferometer at a wavelength of 18 cm. The baseline of 619 km gave a spatial resolution on the Sun of about 45 km. The major problems of Solar Very Long Baseline Interferometry are discussed.

  8. Solar Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesko, Carolyn, Ed.

    This directory is designed to help the researcher and developer, the manufacturer and distributor, and the general public communicate together on a mutually beneficial basis. Its content covers the wide scope of solar energy activity in the United States primarily, but also in other countries, at the academic, governmental, and industrial levels.…

  9. Solar Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Norman C.; Kane, Joseph W.

    1971-01-01

    Proposes a method of collecting solar energy by using available plastics for Fresnel lenses to focus heat onto a converter where thermal dissociation of water would produce hydrogen. The hydrogen would be used as an efficient non-polluting fuel. Cost estimates are included. (AL)

  10. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... View Larger Image Within that narrow window during a solar eclipse where an observer on Earth can watch the Moon's shadow obscure ... of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20920. The panels cover an area of about 380 kilometers x 2909 kilometers and use data ...

  11. Solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Golder, J.C.

    1981-10-06

    A portable, foldable solar oven is provided wherein the basic construction material is ordinary cardboard, some surfaces of which are coated with a reflective material. The portable oven doubles as an insulated container for keeping refrigerated foodstuffs cold while being transported to a distant site for cooking.

  12. Total Solar Eclipses and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoev, A.; Stoeva, P.; Kuzin, S.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of three total solar eclipses on meteorological parameters is discussed in the paper. Measurements were conducted at the village of Ravnets,General Toshevo municipality, Bulgaria, 1999,in Manavgat, near Antalya, Turkey, 2006 and in Tian Huang Ping, China, 2009. The observed decrease of the sky illumination (incoming solar radiation) during the eclipses was proportional to the percentage of solar coverage. The after eclipse sky illumination level is due to the effect of the natural change of the solar elevation angle. For the 1999 TSE it did not regain its pre eclipse value, it has exactly the same value for the 2006 TSE, and, It is three times larger than the pre eclipse value for the 2009 TSE. This fact can be easily explained by the Local Time of the maximum of the eclipses: LT 13:12, LT 12:58, and LT 09:34, respectively. Measurements showed significant changes in the surface air temperature. The minimum of the air temperature during the 2009 TSE (Tmin=4.5°C) was measured 6 min after the end of the total phase. This minimal temperature drop and larger time lag can be explained with the huge artificial lake near the place of observation, which minimizes the temperature response due to its larger heat capacity. During the 1999 TSE, minimal temperature (Tmin=6.4°C) is measured 7 min 30 s after the total phase, and for the 2006 TSE (Tmin=5°C) - 5 min. It is in accordance with the fact that the temperature minima at residential/commercial stations occurred in general, before the minima at stations in agricultural terrains. In 2006 we were at the yard of the hotel, and in 1999 in the countryside. The wind velocity drops during the total phase as a result of the cooling and stabilization of the atmospheric boundary layer. The wind direction during the total phase changes and the wind begins to blow in the same direction as the direction of motion of the lunar shadow on the earth. Cirrus and cirrostratus clouds were observed during the 2006 total solar

  13. Signal-to-noise enhancement in ground-based intensity observations of solar p modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensity observations of solar p modes are needed to form a complete picture of wave propagation in the photosphere. Ground-based intensity observations are severely hampered by terrestrial atmospheric noise. Partial cancellation of the noise power can be achieved if two spectra having disparate signal-to- noise ratios, and based on time series acquired simultaneously at the same site, are combined. A method of combining the spectra is suggested in which one amplitude is scaled and subtracted from the other. The result is squared yielding a positive-definite power density. To test the method, the intensity of light scattered by the Earth's atmnosphere was recorded at fifteen- second intervals in two narrow bands centered on 0.5 microns and 1.6 microns. When the two resulting spectra were combined, the noise power was attenuated by a factor of 2.7. The scale factor was varied about its optimum value, revealing that noise peaks have a different siganture than signal peaks, and opening up the possibility of a new tool in discrimination against noise peaks. Maxima at symmetry-allowed frequencies and minima at symmetry- forbidden frequencies indicate that the possibility that these results are obtained by chance is only 6.1 x 10(exp -4). The positions of these maxima and minima also support the solar-cycle dependent frequency shifts found by Palle, Regulo, and Roca Cortes.

  14. Solar electric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Warfield, G.

    1984-01-01

    Electricity from solar sources is the subject. The state-of-the-art of photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal electric systems is presented and also a broad range of solar energy activities throughout the Arab world is covered. Contents, abridged: Solar radiation fundamentals. Basic theory solar cells. Solar thermal power plants. Solar energy activities at the scientific research council in Iraq. Solar energy program at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Prospects of solar energy for Egypt. Non-conventional energy in Syria. Wind and solar energies in Sudan. Index.

  15. Transfer to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremen, Phyllis G.

    The developmental college reading course at Seton Hall University has a traditional emphasis on literal, evaluative, and critical reading instruction. The course also has the objective to enable students to carry from the course the skills to be successful and confident in other reading intensive courses. "Transfer days" are thus begun; students…

  16. Many Paths to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mero, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    A close look at the principals who make up the MetLife-NASSP Breakthrough Schools (BTS) Class of 2009 reveals a lot about desirable leadership traits. Each of the five middle level schools and the five high schools has achieved remarkable results while serving large numbers of economically challenged students. Behind each school's successes is a…

  17. Slump with Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Glass slumping is one of those projects that gives students a feeling of success and accomplishment. Glass slumping looks difficult to produce, and it often leaves others wondering how it is created. Slumping glass can provide dramatic results. Slumping refers to glass that, when heated, softens and conforms to the shape of a mold. Elementary…

  18. Mindfulness and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leland, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness has long been practiced in Eastern spiritual traditions for personal improvement, and educators and educational institutions have recently begun to explore its usefulness in schools. Mindfulness training can be valuable for helping students be more successful learners and more connected members of an educational community. To determine…

  19. Ensuring Students' Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  20. Coping with Computing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Richard D.

    Elements of computing success of Iona College, the challenges it currently faces, and the strategies conceived to cope with future computing needs are discussed. The college has mandated computer literacy for students and offers nine degrees in the computerized information system/management information system areas. Since planning is needed in…

  1. Pathways to School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development began implementing a multi-year school readiness project in several area schools. Evidence from both research and the field point to several key elements that foster school readiness and create pathways to school success for all children. This paper presents components of a…

  2. Successful School Composting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahar, Rhea Dawn

    2001-01-01

    School composting programs that have met the challenges inherent in long-term composting have several traits in common: a supportive educational program, schoolwide participation, and a consistent maintenance program. Examines the elements of success, offers examples of incorporating composting into the curriculum, and describes three methods of…

  3. Success Stories Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthitt, Frieda; And Others

    This packet contains the stories of 20 successful alumni of Ohio's secondary vocational programs and postsecondary technical schools. They have been reproduced as loose-leaf camera-ready art. Suggested uses for these one-page biographies with accompanying photograph include the following: illustrations for use in speeches; reproduction of complete…

  4. FOCUS: Sustainable Mathematics Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mireles, Selina V.; Acee, Taylor W.; Gerber, Lindsey N.

    2014-01-01

    The FOCUS (Fundamentals of Conceptual Understanding and Success) Co-Requisite Model Intervention (FOCUS Intervention) for College Algebra was developed as part of the Developmental Education Demonstration Projects (DEDP) in Texas. The program was designed to use multiple services, courses, and best practices to support student completion of a…

  5. Celebrating Successful Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Dan; Case, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    The Machine Tool Program at Cowley College in Arkansas City, Kansas, is preparing students to become future leaders in the machining field, and the school recognizes the importance of sharing and celebrating those stories of success with the public to demonstrate the effectiveness of career and technical education (CTE) programs. Cowley College is…

  6. Writing for Successful Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Kenneth T.

    Arguing that becoming a successful author requires the ability to write simply, clearly, and forcefully, this book provides practical suggestion for clear and forceful professional writing. Chapters include: (1) "Why Write"; (2) "Finding Topics"; (3) "Getting Started"; (4) "About Style"; (5) "Organizing Articles"; (6) "Using Journals, Libraries…

  7. Determinants of project success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. C.; Baker, B. N.; Fisher, D.

    1974-01-01

    The interactions of numerous project characteristics, with particular reference to project performance, were studied. Determinants of success are identified along with the accompanying implications for client organization, parent organization, project organization, and future research. Variables are selected which are found to have the greatest impact on project outcome, and the methodology and analytic techniques to be employed in identification of those variables are discussed.

  8. Enhancing Drug Court Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper; Ireland, Connie; Kleinpeter, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of enhanced drug court services in a large county in Southern California. These enhanced services, including specialty counseling groups, educational/employment resources, and increased Residential Treatment (RT) beds, were designed to increase program retention and successful completion (graduation) of drug court.…

  9. Cultivating Models of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starace, Melissa D.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges are often viewed as the gateway to higher education as well as institutions that can rapidly prepare students to enter the workforce. Yet, in spite of widespread acclaim for their effectiveness and success, community colleges have done very little to garner volunteer and financial support from their alumni. Admittedly, many…

  10. Success in a Hurry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Harold L., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    Although a young program, the North Carolina A&T Honors Program illustrates how quickly and successfully honors can achieve its goals of providing a quality education to its high-achieving students, and how these students can benefit academically and personally from the experiences that honors provides for them. This article provides a brief…

  11. Leading to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.; Bradbury, Leslie U.

    2009-01-01

    Teacher mentoring has its unique challenges that are often associated with the teachers' content specialties. For this reason, the involvement and support of school leaders is essential to teachers' mentoring success. Regardless of content specialty, all teachers face challenges that should be considered when organizing and implementing mentoring.…

  12. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way." PMID:24500918

  13. Student Success. February 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Student Success" is EPI's occasional e-magazine dedicated to the discussion of retaining students in higher education. This edition features an interview with Stedman Graham about his efforts to help students succeed in life. As well, EPI President Watson Scott Swail discusses Campus Climate and Students of Color, and the Best Practice showcases…

  14. Hispanic Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Destinon, Mark

    Information is presented on a study designed to learn how successful Mexican American students surmount the factors contributing to Mexican American student attrition at the University of Arizona. The subjects were from the 1985 entering freshman class. Intensive interviews were conducted with each student, and content analysis of the interviews…

  15. Focus on Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Successful middle schools do not happen by accident--they happen through leadership. Principals promote a shared vision that empowers school staffs to set high standards and continuously improve student achievement. And these middle grade educators also try to help their adolescent students see the connection between their work in school and their…

  16. Parent Outreach Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitzberg, Joel; Sparrow, Judith

    2001-01-01

    Presents the Massachusetts Parent Involvement Project (MassPIP) comprising 59 local community coalitions of businesses, service organizations, school personnel, parents, and children. Describes steps coalitions follow in planning events and presents community success stories. The project developed a set of activities that parents can do at home…

  17. ACT and College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyaert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between ACT scores and success in college? For decades, admissions policies in colleges and universities across the country have required applicants to submit scores from a college entrance exam, most typically the ACT (American College Testing) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). This requirement suggests that high school…

  18. The Cult of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Success has meant wealth, virtue, excellence, wisdom, personal contentment, or any combination of these, but its definition has flattened over time, particularly in the past few decades. A combination of economic anxiety, aggressive advertising, ubiquitous ratings, and verbal vagueness has led to an emphasis on the external aspects of…

  19. Postcards for Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budig, Jeanne E.

    Aware of the high correlation between class attendance and academic success, Vincennes University (VU) in Indiana implemented a "blue card" system to improve class attendance. The first week of class, students are asked to sign a blue card verifying their local address and allowing the release of academic information. Instructors begin class by…

  20. Treatment Success in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Kumar, Ambuj; Soares, Heloisa P.; Hozo, Iztok; Bepler, Gerold; Clarke, Mike; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The evaluation of research output, such as estimation of the proportion of treatment successes, is of ethical, scientific, and public importance but has rarely been evaluated systematically. We assessed how often experimental cancer treatments that undergo testing in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) result in discovery of successful new interventions. Methods We extracted data from all completed (published and unpublished) phase 3 RCTs conducted by the National Cancer Institute cooperative groups since their inception in 1955. Therapeutic successes were determined by (1) assessing the proportion of statistically significant trials favoring new or standard treatments, (2) determining the proportion of the trials in which new treatments were considered superior to standard treatments according to the original researchers, and (3) quantitatively synthesizing data for main clinical outcomes (overall and event-free survival). Results Data from 624 trials (781 randomized comparisons) involving 216 451 patients were analyzed. In all, 30% of trials had statistically significant results, of which new interventions were superior to established treatments in 80% of trials. The original researchers judged that the risk-benefit profile favored new treatments in 41% of comparisons (316 of 766). Hazard ratios for overall and event-free survival, available for 614 comparisons, were 0.95 (99% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.98) and 0.90 (99% CI, 0.87- 0.93), respectively, slightly favoring new treatments. Breakthrough interventions were discovered in 15% of trials. Conclusions Approximately 25% to 50% of new cancer treatments that reach the stage of assessment in RCTs will prove successful. The pattern of successes has become more stable over time. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the ethical principle of equipoise defines limits of discoverability in clinical research and ultimately drives therapeutic advances in clinical medicine. PMID:18362256

  1. Collecting Solar Energy. Solar Energy Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Alexander

    This solar energy learning module for use with junior high school students offers a list of activities, a pre-post test, job titles, basic solar energy vocabulary, and diagrams of solar energy collectors and installations. The purpose is to familiarize students with applications of solar energy and titles of jobs where this knowledge could be…

  2. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  3. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  4. Successful biosolids management

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, E.; Braatelien, E. ); McHaney, S.; Stutz-McDonald, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The San Jose (Calif.) Department of Water Pollution Control has embarked on a program of beneficial biosolids reuse to deal with three decades of stored solids that filled 160 ha (400 ac) of lagoons at the San Jose-Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant in San Jose. The effort has taken 10 years of planning and development, and weathered changes in market conditions and federal regulations. It promises to be one of the most cost-effective solids management programs of its kind among similar-sized wastewater treatment agencies in the U.S. The operation includes anaerobic digestion with methane recovery, solar solids drying, and beneficial reuse of biosolids as landfill cover and as an agricultural soil amendment. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Solar Imprints on Asian Inland Moisture Fluctuations over the Last Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Zhou, A.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, C.; He, Y.; Yang, W.; Liu, W.; Li, S. H.; Liu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Solar irradiance changes are thought to play an important role in natural climate variability. How solar activities affected hydrological changes in westerly-controlled arid central Asia (ACA) on decadal/centennial timescales remains poorly investigated, due to lack of high-quality records. Here we present high-resolution multi-proxy records of lake level changes, and thus effective moisture fluctuations, over the last millennium, from a shoreline sediment core retrieved from Lake Manas, northwestern China. Besides generally confirmed relatively wet conditions during the cool Little Ice Age, records of the geophysical and geochemical indicators, including lightness, calcium counts, and C37 alkenone contents, consistently show substantial and frequent lake level fluctuations, and more importantly, resemble solar irradiance changes. Further, the ~11-year Schwabe cycle, ~70-100-year Gleissberg cycle, and relatively weak spectral power in between, as characters in the sunspot number record, together with the ~200-year Suess-de Vries cycle revealed in the reconstructed total solar irradiance records, are all evident in the higher-resolution calcium and lightness records. Together, our records clearly demonstrate solar imprints on effective moisture fluctuations in ACA over the last millennium, and the occurrence of the Schwabe cycle even during the solar minima.

  6. Solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.S.

    1982-06-08

    A solar concentrator having an open framework formed as a geodesic dome. A rotatable support axle extends substantially diametrically across the dome and has the opposite ends thereof supported on the framework. The support axle defines a first rotational axis which is oriented to extend substantially parallel with the earth's north-south axis. A support post is hingedly mounted on the support shaft substantially at the midpoint thereof for permitting angular displacement of the support post relative to the support shaft about a second rotational axis which is perpendicular to the first axis. A dishshaped reflector assembly is positioned within the interior of the framework and fixedly secured to the support post. First and second drives effect angular displacement of the reflector assembly about the first and second axes, respectively, to permit tracking of the solar position.

  7. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  8. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  9. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  10. Heliospheric current sheet in the distant solar wind plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, S.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Kryukov, I. A.

    2007-12-01

    Since Voyager 1 plasma instrument is not operational, understanding the data obtained by its magnetometer is of great importance for heliospheric community. One of the main difficulties one encounters when modeling the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the solar wind (SW) is the necessity of a very fine resolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The angle between the Sun's rotation and magnetic-dipole axes is never zero, varying from about 8-9 degrees during solar minima to 90 degrees at solar maxima. As a result of Sun's rotation, the distance between two consecutive crossings of the ecliptic plane by the HCS becomes as small as about 3 AU in the supersonic SW and necessarily smaller in the inner heliosheath. As shown by Pogorelov (2006), charge exchange of the SW plasma with the interstellar medium neutrals can affect the HCS behavior qualitatively. This study is an attempt to investigate the HCS evolution in the SW from its origin at the inner boundary of the computational region out into the heliosheath. Comparison is made of the ideal MHD and MHD-neutral solutions.

  11. A porcupine Sun? Implications for the solar wind and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Zhao, Liang

    2012-07-01

    The recent minimum was unusually long, and it was not just the case of the ``usual story'' slowed down. The coronal magnetic field never became completely dipolar as in recent Space Age minima, but rather gradually evolved into an (essentially axisymmetric) global configuration possessing mixed open and closed magnetic structures at many latitudes. In the process, the impact of the solar wind at the Earth went from resembling that from a sequence of rotating ``fire-hoses'' to what might be expected from a weak, omnidirectional ``lawn-sprinkler''. The previous (1996) solar minimum was a more classic dipolar configuration, and was characterized by slow wind of hot origin localized to the heliospheric current sheet, and fast wind of cold origin emitted from polar holes, but filling most of the heliosphere. In contrast, the more recent minimum solar wind possessed a broad range of speeds and source temperatures (although cooler overall than the prior minimum). We discuss possible connections between these observations and the near-radial expansion and small spatial scales characteristic of the recent minimum's porcupine-like magnetic field.

  12. Dynamical response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to solar forcing during the early Holocene.

    PubMed

    Marchitto, Thomas M; Muscheler, Raimund; Ortiz, Joseph D; Carriquiry, Jose D; van Geen, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution magnesium/calcium proxy record of Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) from off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, a region where interannual SST variability is dominated today by the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Temperatures were lowest during the early to middle Holocene, consistent with documented eastern equatorial Pacific cooling and numerical model simulations of orbital forcing into a La Niña-like state at that time. The early Holocene SSTs were also characterized by millennial-scale fluctuations that correlate with cosmogenic nuclide proxies of solar variability, with inferred solar minima corresponding to El Niño-like (warm) conditions, in apparent agreement with the theoretical "ocean dynamical thermostat" response of ENSO to exogenous radiative forcing. PMID:21127251

  13. Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchitto, Thomas M.; Muscheler, Raimund; Ortiz, Joseph D.; Carriquiry, Jose D.; van Geen, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution magnesium/calcium proxy record of Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) from off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, a region where interannual SST variability is dominated today by the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Temperatures were lowest during the early to middle Holocene, consistent with documented eastern equatorial Pacific cooling and numerical model simulations of orbital forcing into a La Niña-like state at that time. The early Holocene SSTs were also characterized by millennial-scale fluctuations that correlate with cosmogenic nuclide proxies of solar variability, with inferred solar minima corresponding to El Niño-like (warm) conditions, in apparent agreement with the theoretical “ocean dynamical thermostat” response of ENSO to exogenous radiative forcing.

  14. Solar absorption cooling: An innovative use of solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, R.

    1995-12-31

    Solar thermal energy systems that generate hot water for applications in industry, commerce, and government have been available commercially in the US since the 1970s. Absorption chillers to provide space cooling for nonresidential facilities have been available for commercial use since the 1960s. This paper discusses the merging of the two technologies into one: solar absorption cooling. The author will describe the operating principles of small (up to about 200 tons) single- and double-effect solar-driven absorption cooling systems and specify the potential benefits of the technology. Then, the costs and technical and economic performances of two projects are discussed. One is a successfully operating system in a commercial building in Sacramento, CA; the other is a successfully operating system at the US Army`s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. While solar absorption cooling technology is available for commercial use, cost, performance, and economic barriers still block market acceptance and widespread use. These barriers are discussed as they relate to the two specific projects.

  15. Solar Drivers of 11-yr and Long-Term Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Richardson, I. G.; Ling, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    In the current paradigm for the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), diffusion is taken to be the dominant process during solar maxima while drift dominates at minima. Observations during the recent solar minimum challenge the pre-eminence of drift: at such times. In 2009, the approx.2 GV GCR intensity measured by the Newark neutron monitor increased by approx.5% relative to its maximum value two cycles earlier even though the average tilt angle in 2009 was slightly larger than that in 1986 (approx.20deg vs. approx.14deg), while solar wind B was significantly lower (approx.3.9 nT vs. approx.5.4 nT). A decomposition of the solar wind into high-speed streams, slow solar wind, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs; including postshock flows) reveals that the Sun transmits its message of changing magnetic field (diffusion coefficient) to the heliosphere primarily through CMEs at solar maximum and high-speed streams at solar minimum. Long-term reconstructions of solar wind B are in general agreement for the approx. 1900-present interval and can be used to reliably estimate GCR intensity over this period. For earlier epochs, however, a recent Be-10-based reconstruction covering the past approx. 10(exp 4) years shows nine abrupt and relatively short-lived drops of B to < or approx.= 0 nT, with the first of these corresponding to the Sporer minimum. Such dips are at variance with the recent suggestion that B has a minimum or floor value of approx.2.8 nT. A floor in solar wind B implies a ceiling in the GCR intensity (a permanent modulation of the local interstellar spectrum) at a given energy/rigidity. The 30-40% increase in the intensity of 2.5 GV electrons observed by Ulysses during the recent solar minimum raises an interesting paradox that will need to be resolved.

  16. Solar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    High energy processes that take place in the Sun's atmosphere and the relationship of these phenomena to the basic problems of solar activity are discussed. Gamma ray emission exhibits characteristics of the conditions in regions where accelerated high energy particles interact. A number of gamma ray production mechanisms are considered. These include: the Compton effect, magnetobremsstrahlung, pi meson production by proton-proton interaction or by proton-antiproton annihilation, fission and neutral of charged particle radiative capture on inelastic scatter.

  17. Small(pox) success?

    PubMed

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  18. Hypopituitarism and successful pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xue; Yuan, Qing; Yao, Yanni; Li, Zengyan; Zhang, Huiying

    2014-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder characterized by the deficiency of one or more of the hormones secreted by the pituitary gland. Hypopituitarism patients may present the symptoms of amenorrhea, poor pregnancy potential, infertility, and no production of milk after delivery. Successful pregnancy in hypopituitarism patient is rare because hypopituitarism is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, placental abruption, premature birth, and postpartum hemorrhage. Hypopituitarism during pregnancy and perinatal period should be managed carefully. The hormone levels should be restored to normal before pregnancy. GH and HMG-hCG are combined to improve follicular growth and the success rate of pregnancy. Hypopituitary patients must be closely monitored as changes may need to be made to their medications, and serial ultrasound measurements are also necessary for fetal growth assessment. PMID:25663963

  19. Small(pox) success?

    PubMed

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success. PMID:21340334

  20. A Forecast of Reduced Solar Activity and Its Implications for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth; Franz, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The "Solar Dynamo" method of solar activity forecasting is reviewed. Known generically as a 'precursor" method, insofar as it uses observations which precede solar activity generation, this method now uses the Solar Dynamo Amplitude (SODA) Index to estimate future long-term solar activity. The peak amplitude of the next solar cycle (#24), is estimated at roughly 124 in terms of smoothed F10.7 Radio Flux and 74 in terms of the older, more traditional smoothed international or Zurich Sunspot number (Ri or Rz). These values are significantly smaller than the amplitudes of recent solar cycles. Levels of activity stay large for about four years near the peak in smoothed activity, which is estimated to occur near the 2012 timeflame. Confidence is added to the prediction of low activity by numerous examinations of the Sun s weakened polar field. Direct measurements are obtained by the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory and the Wilcox Solar Observatory. Further support is obtained by examining the Sun s polar faculae (bright features), the shape of coronal soft X-ray "holes," and the shape of the "source surface" - a calculated coronal feature which maps the large scale structure of the Sun s field. These features do not show the characteristics of well-formed polar coronal holes associated with typical solar minima. They show stunted polar field levels, which are thought to result in stunted levels of solar activity during solar cycle #24. The reduced levels of solar activity would have concomitant effects upon the space environment in which satellites orbit. In particular, the largest influences would affect orbit determination of satellites in LEO (Low Earth Orbit), based upon the altered thermospheric and exospheric densities. A decrease in solar activity would result in smaller satellite decay rates, as well as fewer large solar events that can destroy satellite electronic functions. Other effects of reduced solar activity upon the space environment include enhanced

  1. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  2. Solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Zwach, D.M.

    1987-09-29

    A solar unit is described comprising a solar oven having an open end. A generally concave parabolic main reflector is joined to the oven to move therewith and reflect solar radiation away from the oven. The main reflector has a central opening to the oven open end, a generally parabolic convex secondary reflector for reflecting the radiation from the main reflector through the central opening to the open end of the oven, means for mounting the secondary reflector on the main reflector for movement, a frame, and means for mounting the oven on the frame for adjustable movement relative to the frame. This permits adjusting the angular position relative to the earth. The last mentioned means includes means for supporting the oven including first and second pairs of pivot members that respectively have a fist pivot axis and a second pivot axis that extends perpendicular to the first pivot axis. The oven extends between each of the first pivot members and each of the second pivot members.

  3. Untangling Performance from Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    Fame, popularity and celebrity status, frequently used tokens of success, are often loosely related to, or even divorced from professional performance. This dichotomy is partly rooted in the difficulty to distinguish performance, an individual measure that captures the actions of a performer, from success, a collective measure that captures a community's reactions to these actions. Yet, finding the relationship between the two measures is essential for all areas that aim to objectively reward excellence, from science to business. Here we quantify the relationship between performance and success by focusing on tennis, an individual sport where the two quantities can be independently measured. We show that a predictive model, relying only on a tennis player's performance in tournaments, can accurately predict an athlete's popularity, both during a player's active years and after retirement. Hence the model establishes a direct link between performance and momentary popularity. The agreement between the performance-driven and observed popularity suggests that in most areas of human achievement exceptional visibility may be rooted in detectable performance measures. This research was supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under agreement FA9550-15-1-0077.

  4. Persistence Mapping Using EUV Solar Imager Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Young, C. A.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a simple image processing technique that is useful for the visualization and depiction of gradually evolving or intermittent structures in solar physics extreme-ultraviolet imagery. The technique is an application of image segmentation, which we call “Persistence Mapping,” to isolate extreme values in a data set, and is particularly useful for the problem of capturing phenomena that are evolving in both space and time. While integration or “time-lapse” imaging uses the full sample (of size N ), Persistence Mapping rejects (N ‑ 1)/N of the data set and identifies the most relevant 1/N values using the following rule: if a pixel reaches an extreme value, it retains that value until that value is exceeded. The simplest examples isolate minima and maxima, but any quantile or statistic can be used. This paper demonstrates how the technique has been used to extract the dynamics in long-term evolution of comet tails, erupting material, and EUV dimming regions.

  5. Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael; Evans, James; Ellis, Jordan; Schimmels, John; Roberts, Timothy; Rios-Reyes, Leonel; Scheeres, Daniel; Bladt, Jeff; Lawrence, Dale; Piggott, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation Software (S5) toolkit provides solar-sail designers with an integrated environment for designing optimal solar-sail trajectories, and then studying the attitude dynamics/control, navigation, and trajectory control/correction of sails during realistic mission simulations. Unique features include a high-fidelity solar radiation pressure model suitable for arbitrarily-shaped solar sails, a solar-sail trajectory optimizer, capability to develop solar-sail navigation filter simulations, solar-sail attitude control models, and solar-sail high-fidelity force models.

  6. Solar-stellar astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    Nonthermal physical processes in the solar atmosphere are discussed. The solar atmospheric regions are defined, and solar convection and its phenomena are explained. The relationship of the solar dynamo, magnetic field, and flares is explored. The solar atmospheric velocity fields are discussed, and the unresolved problem of the nature of atmospheric heating is detailed. The solar wind heating and acceleration are discussed and the need for global solar atmospheric models is emphasized. The application of these solar nonthermal processes to the stars in general is then taken up, employing the same categories as were applied to the solar atmosphere.

  7. Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The Solar Sail Propulsion investment area has been one of the three highest priorities within the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project. In the fall of 2003, the NASA Headquarters' Science Mission Directorate provided funding and direction to mature the technology as far as possible through ground research and development from TRL 3 to 6 in three years. A group of experts from government, industry, and academia convened in Huntsville, Alabama to define technology gaps between what was needed for science missions to the inner solar system and the current state of the art in ultra1ightweight materials and gossamer structure design. This activity set the roadmap for development. The centerpiece of the development would be the ground demonstration of scalable solar sail systems including masts, sails, deployment mechanisms, and attitude control hardware and software. In addition, new materials would be subjected to anticipated space environments to quantify effects and assure mission life. Also, because solar sails are huge structures, and it is not feasible to validate the technology by ground test at full scale, a multi-discipline effort was established to develop highly reliable analytical models to serve as mission assurance evidence in future flight program decision-making. Two separate contractor teams were chosen to develop the SSP System Ground Demonstrator (SGD). After a three month conceptual mission/system design phase, the teams developed a ten meter diameter pathfinder set of hardware and subjected it to thermal vacuum tests to compare analytically predicted structural behavior with measured characteristics. This process developed manufacturing and handling techniques and refined the basic design. In 2005, both contractor teams delivered 20 meter, four quadrant sail systems to the largest thermal vacuum chamber in the world in Plum Brook, Ohio, and repeated the tests. Also demonstrated was the deployment and articulation of attitude control

  8. The Peculiar Solar Minimum 23/24 Revealed by the Microwave Butterfly Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Yashiro, Seiji; Makela, Pertti; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Hathaway, David

    2010-01-01

    The diminished polar magnetic field strength during the minimum between cycles 23 and 24 is also reflected in the thermal radio emission originating from the polar chromosphere. During solar minima, the polar corona has extended coronal holes containing intense unipolar flux. In microwave images, the coronal holes appear bright, with a brightness enhancement of 500 to 2000 K with respect to the quiet Sun. The brightness enhancement corresponds to the upper chromosphere, where the plasma temperature is approx.10000 K. We constructed a microwave butterfly diagram using the synoptic images obtained by the Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) showing the evolution of the polar and low latitude brightness temperature. While the polar brightness reveals the chromospheric conditions, the low latitude brightness is attributed to active regions in the corona. When we compared the microwave butterfly diagram with the magnetic butterfly diagram, we found a good correlation between the microwave brightness enhancement and the polar field strength. The microwave butterfly diagram covers part of solar cycle 22, whole of cycle 23, and part of cycle 24, thus enabling comparison between the cycle 23/24 and cycle 22/23 minima. The microwave brightness during the cycle 23/24 minimum was found to be lower than that during the cycle 22/23 minimum by approx.250 K. The reduced brightness temperature is consistent with the reduced polar field strength during the cycle 23/24 minimum seen in the magnetic butterfly diagram. We suggest that the microwave brightness at the solar poles is a good indicator of the speed of the solar wind sampled by Ulysses at high latitudes..

  9. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2016-07-12

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  10. Solar energy collector

    DOEpatents

    Brin, Raymond L.; Pace, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar energy collector comprising solar energy absorbing material within chamber having a transparent wall, solar energy being transmitted through the transparent wall, and efficiently absorbed by the absorbing material, for transfer to a heat transfer fluid. The solar energy absorbing material, of generally foraminous nature, absorbs and transmits the solar energy with improved efficiency.

  11. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2012-01-01

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  12. Climatic variables as indicators of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balybina, A. S.; Karakhanyan, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Tree-ring analysis is used successfully in studies of solar-terrestrial relations. We consider a linear dependence between the radial increment in conifers in Eastern Siberia and solar activity parameters: the length and amplitude of an 11-year solar cycle in the 20th century. It is shown that the increment in conifers in the region is larger in a longer and lower solar cycle than in a short and high one. A correlation between the increment in the width of annual rings of Pinus sylvestris and Siberian pine and the length of the ascending phase of an 11-year cycle is revealed: the longer the ascending phase, the larger the radial increment in conifers. The dynamics of the annual increment in conifers in the region is inversely related to the cycle amplitude and magnetic disturbances in the main solar cycle.

  13. Solar Cycle Variations in the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will review the observational evidence for solar cycle-dependent changes in the structure and dynamical motions of the solar interior. It will include the results of studies that have been carried out using the tools of both global and local heiloseismology during Solar Cycles 22, 23, and 24. The presentation will describe results obtained with both ground- and space-based helioseismic programs, and it will also describe the role that these helioseismic studies have played in providing inputs to theoretical studies of the solar dynamo. Among the topics that will be covered are temporal changes in the solar torsional oscillations, the solar meridional circulation, the solar seismic radius, the subsurface vorticity, and the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies and widths. Also covered will be evidence for temporal changes in the solar interior that are related to the emergence of active regions on both the near and far sides of the Sun.

  14. The VELA Success Story and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Mario R.; Belian, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    The VELA program was one of the first successful space programs in the U.S. This project was managed for the Department of Defense by the predecessor of DARPA, with the participation of the U.S. Air Force. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were in charge of providing nuclear surveillance sensors to verify compliance with the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty signed by President John F. Kennedy on October 7, 1963. The first two satellites were launched in tandem ten days later on October 17, 1963. A total of twelve satellites were launched from 1963 until 1970. Successful operations of some VELA on-board detectors continued until the early 1980s. We reviewed some of the many unique and valuable science achievements such as the discovery of gamma-ray bursts, galactic x-ray bursts, x-ray emission of solar flares, the plasma sheet and high Z ions in the solar wind, etc. Furthermore, a few lessons learned, both technical and managerial, are captured in this presentation.

  15. Can irregularities of solar proxies help understand quasi-biennial solar variations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, A.; Le Mouël, J. L.; Shnirman, M.; Courtillot, V.

    2014-08-01

    We define, calculate and analyze irregularity indices λISSN of daily series of the International Sunspot Number ISSN as a function of increasing smoothing from N = 162 to 648 days. The irregularity indices λ are computed within 4-year sliding windows, with embedding dimensions m = 1 and 2. λISSN displays Schwabe cycles with ~5.5-year variations ("half Schwabe variations" HSV). The mean of λISSN undergoes a downward step and the amplitude of its variations strongly decreases around 1930. We observe changes in the ratio R of the mean amplitude of λ peaks at solar cycle minima with respect to peaks at solar maxima as a function of date, embedding dimension and, importantly, smoothing parameter N. We identify two distinct regimes, called Q1 and Q2, defined mainly by the evolution of R as a function of N: Q1, with increasing HSV behavior and R value as N is increased, occurs before 1915-1930; and Q2, with decreasing HSV behavior and R value as N is increased, occurs after ~1975. We attempt to account for these observations with an autoregressive (order 1) model with Poissonian noise and a mean modulated by two sine waves of periods T1 and T2 (T1 = 11 years, and intermediate T2 is tuned to mimic quasi-biennial oscillations QBO). The model can generate both Q1 and Q2 regimes. When m = 1, HSV appears in the absence of T2 variations. When m = 2, Q1 occurs when T2 variations are present, whereas Q2 occurs when T2 variations are suppressed. We propose that the HSV behavior of the irregularity index of ISSN may be linked to the presence of strong QBO before 1915-1930, a transition and their disappearance around 1975, corresponding to a change in regime of solar activity.

  16. Simulation of the Mars Surface Solar Spectra for Optimized Performance of Triple-Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Joslin, David E.; Fetzer, Chris M.; King, RIchard R.; Karam, Nasser H.; Mardesich, Nick; Stella, Paul M.; Rapp, Donald; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The unparalleled success of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) powered by GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells has demonstrated a lifetime for the rovers that exceeded the baseline mission duration by more than a factor of five. This provides confidence in future longer-term solar powered missions on the surface of Mars. However, the solar cells used on the rovers are not optimized for the Mars surface solar spectrum, which is attenuated at shorter wavelengths due to scattering by the dusty atmosphere. The difference between the Mars surface spectrum and the AM0 spectrum increases with solar zenith angle and optical depth. The recent results of a program between JPL and Spectrolab to optimize GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cells for Mars are presented. Initial characterization focuses on the solar spectrum at 60-degrees zenith angle at an optical depth of 0.5. The 60-degree spectrum is reduced to 1/6 of the AM0 intensity and is further reduced in the blue portion of the spectrum. JPL has modeled the Mars surface solar spectra, modified an X-25 solar simulator, and completed testing of Mars-optimized solar cells previously developed by Spectrolab with the modified X-25 solar simulator. Spectrolab has focused on the optimization of the higher efficiency Ultra Triple-Junction (UTJ) solar cell for Mars. The attenuated blue portion of the spectrum requires the modification of the top sub-cell in the GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cell for improved current balancing in the triple-junction cell. Initial characterization confirms the predicted increase in power and current matched operation for the Mars surface 60-degree zenith angle solar spectrum.

  17. Solar photocatalytic treatment of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Klausner, J.F.; Viera, A.; Moghadam, N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will describe solar photocatalytic process and the design of an efficient and cost-effective commercial-scale, solar-driven photocatalytic oxidation facility for destroying BTEX compounds in groundwater. The State of Florida commits millions of dollars annually to remedy BTEX contaminated aquifers, and Environmental Consulting Technology, Inc. (ECT) is a prime contractor to Florida for handling this problem. The University of Florida and ECT have formed a partnership to fabricate a cost-effective solar-driven photocatalysis facility to destroy the BTEX compounds in the groundwater. The approach which will be taken to make the facility cost-effective when compared with alternate technologies is to optimize the photoreactor design. The proposed facility will be thoroughly tested at a remediation site which has already been selected and is in close proximity to the University of Florida. A successful outcome from the research will allow ECT to replace less desirable technologies (i.e. air stripping) with solar-driven photocatalysis in addition to utilizing an energy-efficient remediation technology which is driven by a renewable energy source, solar radiation.

  18. Commission 12: Solar Radiation & Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Thomas. J.; Martínez Pillet, Valentin; Asplund, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cauzzi, G.; Cram, L. E.; Dravins, D.; Gan, W.; Henzl, P.; Kosovichev, A.; Mariska, J. T.; Rovira, M. G.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2007-03-01

    Commission 12 covers research on the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, the "quiet" solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. There is considerable productive overlap with the other Commissions of Division II as investigations move progressively toward the fertile intellectual boundaries between traditional research disciplines. In large part, the solar magnetic field provides the linkage that connects these diverse themes. The same magnetic field that produces the more subtle variations of solar structure and radiative output over the 11 yr activity cycle is also implicated in rapid and often violent phenomena such as flares, coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and episodes of sporadic magnetic reconnection.The last three years have again brought significant progress in nearly all the research endeavors touched upon by the interests of Commission 12. The underlying causes for this success remain the same: sustained advances in computing capabilities coupled with diverse observations with increasing levels of spatial, temporal and spectral resolution. It is all but impossible to deal with these many advances here in anything except a cursory and selective fashion. Thankfully, the Living Reviews in Solar Physics; has published several extensive reviews over the last two years that deal explicitly with issues relevant to the purview of Commission 12. The reader who is eager for a deeper and more complete understanding of some of these advances is directed to http://www.livingreviews.org for access to these articles.

  19. Can industry afford solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Bezdek, R.

    1983-03-01

    Falling oil prices and conservation measures have reduced the economic impetus to develop new energy sources, thus decreasing the urgency for bringing solar conversion technologies to commercial readiness at an early date. However, the capability for solar to deliver thermal energy for industrial uses is proven. A year-round operation would be three times as effective as home heating, which is necessary only part of the year. Flat plate, parabolic trough, and solar tower power plant demonstration projects, though uneconomically operated, have revealed engineering factors necessary for successful use of solar-derived heat for industrial applications. Areas of concern have been categorized as technology comparisons, load temperatures, plant size, location, end-use, backup requirements, and storage costs. Tax incentives have, however, supported home heating and not industrial uses, and government subsidies have historically gone to conventional energy sources. Tax credit programs which could lead to a 20% market penetration by solar energy in the industrial sector by the year 2000 are presented.

  20. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  1. Successful product realization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, John; Boulton, William R.

    1995-02-01

    Product realization is the process of defining, designing, developing, and delivering products to the market. While the main thrust of this JTEC panel was to conduct a complete investigation of the state of Japanese low-cost electronic packaging technologies, it is very difficult to totally separate the development of technology and products from the product realization process. Japan's electronics firms adhere to a product realization strategy based on a strong customer focus, a consistent commitment to excellence in design, and a cost-effective approach to technology commercialization. The Japanese product-pull strategy has been a successful driver and influencing factor in every aspect of the product development cycle.

  2. Successful product realization strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, John; Boulton, William R.

    1995-01-01

    Product realization is the process of defining, designing, developing, and delivering products to the market. While the main thrust of this JTEC panel was to conduct a complete investigation of the state of Japanese low-cost electronic packaging technologies, it is very difficult to totally separate the development of technology and products from the product realization process. Japan's electronics firms adhere to a product realization strategy based on a strong customer focus, a consistent commitment to excellence in design, and a cost-effective approach to technology commercialization. The Japanese product-pull strategy has been a successful driver and influencing factor in every aspect of the product development cycle.

  3. The 1998 World Solar Rallye: Akita, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacklock, Andy; Duke, Mike; Burgess, Nigel

    In early August 1998, 81 solar/electric vehicles participated in a three day endurance race in Japan. The objective was to complete as many laps of the 31 km circuit as possible. Some of the cars used state-of-the-art motors, batteries, chassis, solar cells and tyres to produce vehicles which could travel at speeds of 70-80 km/h on about 1 kW of input power. With only 20 kg of battery, some solar cars were travelling around 450 km a day. This paper tells the story of the race and the technological developments behind the successful vehicles.

  4. Calibration of the solar neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccianiga, Barbara; Re, Alessandra Carlotta

    2016-04-01

    Calibrations have been crucial for the success of solar neutrino experiments. In this contribution we review the calibration strategies adopted by different solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we will emphasize their common critical aspects and their main differences. In order to do so, we will schematically divide the solar neutrino experiments in two groups: those based on radiochemical techniques, i.e. Homestake, Gallex/GNO, SAGE and those based on real-time techniques i.e. Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, Borexino and KamLAND.

  5. Validation of a Scalable Solar Sailcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion (ISP) program sponsored intensive solar sail technology and systems design, development, and hardware demonstration activities over the past 3 years. Efforts to validate a scalable solar sail system by functional demonstration in relevant environments, together with test-analysis correlation activities on a scalable solar sail system have recently been successfully completed. A review of the program, with descriptions of the design, results of testing, and analytical model validations of component and assembly functional, strength, stiffness, shape, and dynamic behavior are discussed. The scaled performance of the validated system is projected to demonstrate the applicability to flight demonstration and important NASA road-map missions.

  6. Solar Influence on Medieval Megadroughts in the Greater Near East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Y.; Stein, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent surveys of medieval era chronicles provide calendar accurate information of years of unusual, extreme weather and climate events in areas surrounding the eastern Mediterranean, between the mid-A.D. 10th century and end of the 11th century. Put together, these documents show that the region was simultaneously afflicted by unprecedented sever and persistent droughts in Egypt's Nile Valley and by unusually cold and dry winters associated with crop failure and loss of pasture areas in present-day Iraq and Iran, and in historical Khurasan. We show that this documentary information is consistent with the annually dated Nile summer flood record as measured at the Cairo Nilometer site and within acceptable dating accuracies with much more coarsely resolved regional paleoclimate proxies. We furthermore note that the timing of these events coincided with the Oort Grand Solar Minimum that reached its peak between A.D. 1040 and 1080. Given the scientific evidence for the impact of solar minima on sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific and how the latter affect the intensity of the African summer monsoon, we argue that the Oort Solar Minimum forced the frequent failure of the Nile summer floods resulting in dearth and famine in Egypt. Furthermore, the simultaneous cold and dry winters in the northern Near East are also consistent with the hypothesized solar minimum influence on the North Atlantic Oscillation and on the intensity of the Siberian High. This interpretation underscores the sensitivity of the climate system to variations in solar irradiance, particularly on multi-decadal time scales, to their role in regional processes, and their impact on human history and may help understand other rapid Mediterranean cooling events that occured during the Holocene.

  7. Reconstruction of Solar EUV Flux 1740-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation creates the conducting E-layer of the ionosphere, mainly by photo ionization of molecular Oxygen. Solar heating of the ionosphere creates thermal winds which by dynamo action induce an electric field driving an electric current having a magnetic effect observable on the ground, as was discovered by G. Graham in 1722. The current rises and sets with the Sun and thus causes a readily observable diurnal variation of the geomagnetic field, allowing us the deduce the conductivity and thus the EUV flux as far back as reliable magnetic data reach. High-quality data go back to the 'Magnetic Crusade' of the 1830s and less reliable, but still usable, data are available for portions of the hundred years before that. J.R. Wolf and, independently, J.-A. Gautier discovered the dependence of the diurnal variation on solar activity, and today we understand and can invert that relationship to construct a reliable record of the EUV flux from the geomagnetic record. We compare that to the F10.7 flux and the sunspot number, and find that the reconstructed EUV flux reproduces the F10.7 flux with great accuracy. On the other hand, it appears that the Relative Sunspot Number as currently defined is beginning to no longer be a faithful representation of solar magnetic activity, at least as measured by the EUV and related indices. The reconstruction suggests that the EUV flux reaches the same low (but non-zero) value at every sunspot minimum (possibly including Grand Minima), representing an invariant 'solar magnetic ground state'.

  8. Reconstruction of Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Flux 1740 - 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalgaard, Leif

    2016-08-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation creates the conducting E-layer of the ionosphere, mainly by photo-ionization of molecular oxygen. Solar heating of the ionosphere creates thermal winds, which by dynamo action induce an electric field driving an electric current having a magnetic effect observable on the ground, as was discovered by G. Graham in 1722. The current rises and falls with the Sun, and thus causes a readily observable diurnal variation of the geomagnetic field, allowing us to deduce the conductivity and thus the EUV flux as far back as reliable magnetic data reach. High-quality data go back to the "Magnetic Crusade" of the 1830s and less reliable, but still usable, data are available for portions of the 100 years before that. J.R. Wolf and, independently, J.-A. Gautier discovered the dependence of the diurnal variation on solar activity, and today we understand and can invert that relationship to construct a reliable record of the EUV flux from the geomagnetic record. We compare that to the F_{10.7} flux and the sunspot number, and we find that the reconstructed EUV flux reproduces the F_{10.7} flux with great accuracy. On the other hand, it appears that the Relative Sunspot Number as currently defined is beginning to no longer be a faithful representation of solar magnetic activity, at least as measured by the EUV and related indices. The reconstruction suggests that the EUV flux reaches the same low (but non-zero) value at every sunspot minimum (possibly including Grand Minima), representing an invariant "solar magnetic ground state".

  9. Reconstruction of total solar irradiance 1974-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. T.; Unruh, Y. C.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S.; Wenzler, T.; Mortlock, D. J.; Jaffe, A. H.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The study of variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) is important for understanding how the Sun affects the Earth's climate. Aims: Full-disk continuum images and magnetograms are now available for three full solar cycles. We investigate how modelled TSI compares with direct observations by building a consistent modelled TSI dataset. The model, based only on changes in the photospheric magnetic flux can then be tested on rotational, cyclical and secular timescales. Methods: We use Kitt Peak and SoHO/MDI continuum images and magnetograms in the SATIRE-S model to reconstruct TSI over cycles 21-23. To maximise independence from TSI composites, SORCE/TIM TSI data are used to fix the one free parameter of the model. We compare and combine the separate data sources for the model to estimate an uncertainty on the reconstruction and prevent any additional free parameters entering the model. Results: The reconstruction supports the PMOD composite as being the best historical record of TSI observations, although on timescales of the solar rotation the IRMB composite provides somewhat better agreement. Further to this, the model is able to account for 92% of TSI variations from 1978 to 2009 in the PMOD composite and over 96% during cycle 23. The reconstruction also displays an inter-cycle, secular decline of 0.20+0.12-0.09 W m-2 between cycle 23 minima, in agreement with the PMOD composite. Conclusions: SATIRE-S is able to recreate TSI observations on all timescales of a day and longer over 31 years from 1978. This is strong evidence that changes in photospheric magnetic flux alone are responsible for almost all solar irradiance variations over the last three solar cycles.

  10. Time-Series Analysis of Supergranule Characterstics at Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter E.; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2013-01-01

    Sixty days of Doppler images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) / Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) investigation during the 1996 and 2008 solar minima have been analyzed to show that certain supergranule characteristics (size, size range, and horizontal velocity) exhibit fluctuations of three to five days. Cross-correlating parameters showed a good, positive correlation between supergranulation size and size range, and a moderate, negative correlation between size range and velocity. The size and velocity do exhibit a moderate, negative correlation, but with a small time lag (less than 12 hours). Supergranule sizes during five days of co-temporal data from MDI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) / Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) exhibit similar fluctuations with a high level of correlation between them. This verifies the solar origin of the fluctuations, which cannot be caused by instrumental artifacts according to these observations. Similar fluctuations are also observed in data simulations that model the evolution of the MDI Doppler pattern over a 60-day period. Correlations between the supergranule size and size range time-series derived from the simulated data are similar to those seen in MDI data. A simple toy-model using cumulative, uncorrelated exponential growth and decay patterns at random emergence times produces a time-series similar to the data simulations. The qualitative similarities between the simulated and the observed time-series suggest that the fluctuations arise from stochastic processes occurring within the solar convection zone. This behavior, propagating to surface manifestations of supergranulation, may assist our understanding of magnetic-field-line advection, evolution, and interaction.

  11. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  12. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schöngassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J.

    2016-07-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona and the background solar wind conditions. We found that both solar wind models are capable of predicting the large-scale features of the observed solar wind speed (root-mean-square error, RMSE ≈100 km/s) but tend to either overestimate (ESWF) or underestimate (WSA) the number of high-speed solar wind streams (threat score, TS ≈ 0.37). The predicted high-speed streams show typical uncertainties in the arrival time of about 1 day and uncertainties in the speed of about 100 km/s. General advantages and disadvantages of the investigated solar wind models are diagnosed and outlined.

  13. Solar Neutrino Problem

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C.; Cleveland, B. T.

    1978-04-28

    A summary of the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment is given and discussed in relation to solar model calculations. A review is given of the merits of various new solar neutrino detectors that were proposed.

  14. Solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, R.L.

    1981-10-27

    A heat sink in the form of a mesh is interposed between two spaced panes in a window or door light. A combination of holes and passageways formed in the window sash frame members permit the selective establishment of convective air currents past the mesh to absorb the solar converted thermal heat stored in the sink. By manipulating the source of the air for these convective currents (I.E. From the inside or the outside of a building) and by choosing the volume into which the warmed air currents are to be discharged (I.E. Inside or outside the building) significant heating and cooling efficiencies are achieved.

  15. Solar Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ARCO Solar manufactures PV Systems tailored to a broad variety of applications. PV arrays are routinely used at remote communications installations to operate large microwave repeaters, TV and radio repeaters rural telephone, and small telemetry systems that monitor environmental conditions. Also used to power agricultural water pumping systems, to provide electricity for isolated villages and medical clinics, for corrosion protection for pipelines and bridges, to power railroad signals, air/sea navigational aids, and for many types of military systems. ARCO is now moving into large scale generation for utilities.

  16. Total Solar Eclipse 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Nahide; Hawkins, Isabel

    Evaluation and assessments of informal education programs small or large such as science museum traveling exhibits interpretive kiosks hands-on activities and very large public programs have been challenging due to the diverse nature of objectives setups and expected outcomes of these programs. Almost all institutions that develop and present such programs include in their staff evaluation specialists. However for very large public outreach efforts which include participation of multi institutions located across the country larger evaluation groups/institutions can contribute more objective and extensive evaluation and assessment instruments that will help to identify weather the program was successful and if the learning objectives were achieved. Total Solar Eclipse 2001 event was participated by approximately 42000 people at museums science centers and Planetaria all over the world. I will share with you the results of an evaluation of this event that was surveyed and reported by an independent evaluation company. I will expand further on the properties of this program that helps to determine weather the program was successful or not including the discussion on how personal interest in the content publicity connectivity to a group educational as well as entertainment value and the challenges of using high technology can define success.

  17. Energy Spectrum of the Recurrent Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays During the Solar Minimum of Cycles 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael V.

    2016-08-01

    The Sun during the recent epoch of solar activity operated in a different way than during the last 60 years, being less active. We study temporal changes of the energy spectrum of the first three harmonics of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity during the unusual, recent solar minimum, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24 (SC 23/24) and compare with four previous minima. We show that the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity is hard in the maximum epochs and is soft in the minimum epochs during Solar Cycles 20 - 24, but with peculiarities during the Solar Minimum 23/24. In particular, while the energy/rigidity spectrum of the amplitudes of the first harmonic of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity behaves practically the same as for previous epochs, the energy/rigidity spectrum of the amplitudes of the second and the third harmonics demonstrates a pronounced softening. We attribute this phenomenon to the decrease of the extension of the heliosphere caused by the decrease of the solar-wind dynamic pressure during the unusual Solar Minimum 23/24.

  18. Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) absolute irradiance measurements and how they are affected by choice of reference spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Seth R.; Judge, Darrell L.; Didkovsky, Leonid V.

    2011-10-01

    The SOHO/CELIAS Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) has measured absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar irradiance nearly continuously over a 15 year period that includes two solar cycle minima, 22/23 (1996) and 23/24 (2008). Calibration of the SEM flight instrument and verification of the data have been maintained through measurements from a series of sounding rocket calibration underflights that have included a NIST calibrated SEM clone instrument as well as a Rare Gas Ionization Cell (RGIC) absolute detector. From the beginning of SEM data collection in 1996, the SOLERS 22 fixed reference solar spectrum has been used to calculate absolute EUV flux values from SEM raw data. Specifically, the reference spectrum provides a set of weighting factors for determining a weighted average for the wavelength dependent SEM response. The spectrum is used for calculation of the second order contamination in the first order channel signals, and for the comparison between SEM flux measurements with broader-band absolute RGIC measurements. SOHO/SEM EUV flux measurements for different levels of solar activity will be presented to show how the choice of reference spectra now available affects these SEM data. Both fixed (i.e. SOLERS 22) and non-fixed (Solar Irradiance Platform/Solar 2000 and SDO/EVE/MEGS) reference spectra have been included in this analysis.

  19. Solar greenhouses in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Polich, M.

    1981-12-01

    After a discussion of solar greenhouse phenomena and the potential for heat collection and food production, design recommendations are provided for attached heat collecting solar sunspaces and for attached food producing solar greenhouses. Also, design of a single solar structure to maximize heat collection and food production is considered. A method of predicting the performance for attached heat collecting solar sunspaces is given in which the solar savings fraction is calculated. (LEW)

  20. Conversion of solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, N. N.; Shilov, A. E.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of current theoretical and experimental research related to the conversion and practical utilization of solar energy. Topics discussed include semiconductor photovoltaic cells, orbital solar power stations, chemical and biological methods of solar energy conversion, and solar energy applications. Papers are included on new theoretical models of solar cells and prospects for increasing their efficiency, metrology and optical studies of solar cells, and some problems related to the thermally induced deformations of large space structures.