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Sample records for sudi jaak jrime

  1. Sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) in the early neonatal period: the role of bed-sharing.

    PubMed

    Hoffend, Charlotte; Sperhake, Jan-Peter

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has declined substantially, but the proportion of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) in neonates, <7 days old, has increased among all SUDI cases in the first year of life. The aim of this study was to analyze circumstances and common features of SUDI cases during the first 7 days of life. Data have been gathered retrospectively from Departments of Legal Medicine in Germany and Austria by using a standardized questionnaire. 19 out of 46 children died within 24 h after birth. A possible reason for this could be a lack of awareness of the needs of the newborn on the part of an exhausted mother. Fifty-two percent of the incidents occurred while the mother and her newborn were still hospitalized in a birth clinic. Forty-eight percent of the infants had been sleeping in the parents' bed with mother and/or father. In 11 % of the cases, there was a sofa-sharing situation. Bed-sharing seems to increase the risk for SIDS in the newborn period as well as the risk for accidental suffocation/asphyxia of the baby. Therefore, mothers should not be instructed to bed-share. Particularly during the first 24 h after birth, it may be advisable to check mothers and infants regularly. PMID:24399341

  2. Science of the Brain as a Gateway to Understanding Play: An Interview with Jaak Panksepp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Play, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Jaak Panksepp, known best for his work on animal emotions and coining the term "affective neuroscience," investigates the primary processes of brain and mind that enable and drive emotion. As an undergraduate, he briefly considered a career in electrical engineering but turned instead to psychology, which led to a 1969 University of…

  3. Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

  4. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 100 hours duration using sewage sludge and trap grease as simultaneous feedstocks are a primary objective. Follow-on Phases III and IV of the SWPO program will develop and demonstrate a dedicated 5 tpd reduced-scale SWPO facility at a location such as the Encina municipal wastewater treatment plant. Subsequent to this demonstration, the technology will be ready for a commercial-scale demonstration. While there are clearly technical challenges that must still be addressed, SWPO represents an outstanding opportunity to further the dual goals of developing a hydrogen economy and practicing environmentally friendly waste disposal. It may well represent one of the few scenarios in which hydrogen may be produced economically from biomass at a relatively small scale. SWPO could thus play a pivotal role in the proliferation of distributed hydrogen generation.

  5. An Oservational and Experimental Sudy on the Electric Effect of Sandstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Daiying; Qu, Jianjun

    2016-04-01

    The results of wind tunnel experiment simulation for blown sand electrification show that the sands of different particle sizes at certain speeds can produce varied electric field intensities and electric potentials of different polarities .Blown sand electrification intensify becomes large with increase of wind velocity and weak with enlargement of sand particle size. Twenty seven times of observations to the electric field and wind velocity associated with varied sandstorms have been made at the height 16m, 8m, 4m, and 1m at a desert area. During fine days, the electric field at these four heights has positive values which decrease with reducing height with the maximum intensity less than 5kV/m. And the daily change of wind speed has no major influence on the fluctuation of the electric field at each height. During days with blown sand, the intensity of electric fields at all heights change with wind speed. The electric field at the height 16m is negative, with the average value -20kV/m. At the height 8m, the electric field is positive and as large as 10-40kV/m, which is oppositely correlated to that at the height 16m. At the height 1m, the electric field changes little, and its magnitude is below 1kV/m. During the days of strong sandstorm, the electric field at the four heights are all negative and its values decrease with reducing height. Among them the maximum average intensity of electric field at 16m reaches -200kV/m or more, with the instantaneous value exceeding -2500Kv/m, and is contrary to that of fine days in polarity.

  6. L band InSAR sudy on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF), with a total length of about 1500 km, is one of the most active right-lateral strike-slip faults in the world. It defines the tectonic boundary between the Anatolian Plate and the Eurasian Plate in northern Turkey, accommodating ~14-30 mm/yr of relative plate motion between the two plates (fig. 1). The Gazikoy-Saros segment (the Ganos fault, GF) is the onshore segment of the northern strand of the NAF between the Marmara Sea and the Gulf of Saros. It was last ruptured in 1912 with a Ms=7.4 earthquake that broke the entire inland segment of the fault, a length of about 50 km, and produced a right-lateral strike-slip component of at least 3 m. Other large historical earthquakes that have been attributed to the Ganos fault occurred in A.D. 824, 1343, 1509 and 1766 (e. g. Reilinger et al., 2000; Meade et al., 2002; Motagh et al., 2007; Janssen et al., 2009; Megraoui et al., 2012 ; Ersen Aksoy et al., 2010). The GF forms a 45 km long linear fault system and represents the link between the northern strand of the NAFZ in the Sea of Marmara and the North Aegean Trough where slip partitioning results in branching of the fault zone. The present study aims at showing the results retrieved from L band Interferometric Syntethic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements for the monitoring of Crustal Deformation in the Anatolian Fault Zone in the frame of the MARMARA SUPERSITE PROJECT "MARSITE" on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian fault zone. We processed SAR data made available through the CAT-1 ESA (European Space Agency) archives, acquired by the L-band radar sensor ALOS PALSAR between 2007 and 2011. The aim of this exercise is to test L-band capabilities to map the spatial and temporal evolution of the present-day crustal deformation phenomena affecting the Ganos section of the NAFZ with high level of spatial details. The goal of this task is to assess whether InSAR L-Band data can be useful to evaluate the long-term behavior of active faults and eventual interactions between geologic structures, complementarily to GPS measurements and other in-situ observations on the study area. Mid-term monitoring (4 - 10 years) of the crustal deformation in the MARsite area is targeted. The ALOS Palsar archive over the Ganos Section of the NAFZ is not extraordinarily rich concerning the number of SAR scenes acquired with the same viewing and polarisation mode, which is a necessity when willing to perform a standard InSAR study. Thus, we decided to improve the number of potential SAR scenes by performing a processing on multiple polarisation data. We combine Fine Beam Mode Single Polarisation (FBS) and Fine Beam Mode Dual Polarisation (FBD) data, with a look angle of about 38.7°. We actually can process both these data together at the price of a decrease in spatial resolution but improving the data temporal sampling and dataset population. We then have 13 Single Look Complex (SLC) L-band data spanning 4 years, from 2007/07/07 to 2011/01/15. Besides, the satellite path orientation with respect to the fault orientation is optimal to obtain a suitable InSAR LOS sensitivity to strike-slip surface movement parallel to the NAFZ at the Ganos section. The shallow creep signal is expected to range from ~0 to 1.5 cm/yr. From the 66 initial differential interferograms, we select a subset of 41 high-signal-coherence interferograms as input for the stacking procedure. Our results suggest that the tectonic signal within the velocity map retrieved from ALOS Palsar InSAR presented in this study is hidden beneath a number of interferometric phase contributions. The phase contributions are mainly due Radio Frequency Interferences (RFI) that are emitted from the ground and affect L-band data. RFI bias the amplitude and phase of the L-band signal resulting in serious co-registration problems and stripes on the interferometric phase. To compensate this bias, we apply RFI filtering during the SAR focusing. Unfortunately, the RFI filter application results in image distortions and difficulties in image co-registration. We could anyway measure a number of across fault 20km-length profiles that reveal a displacement gradient of 0.6 cm/yr. Is this due to tectonic movements ? At the present stage, our conclusion is that L-Band SAR data on the Ganos section of the NAFZ are too few and too affected by RFI to allow a robust seismotectonic interpretation. Longer-term data acquisitions are needed and could be provided by the new generation L-Band sensor Alos-2.

  7. L band InSAR sudy on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF), with a total length of about 1500 km, is one of the most active right-lateral strike-slip faults in the world. It defines the tectonic boundary between the Anatolian Plate and the Eurasian Plate in northern Turkey, accommodating ~14-30 mm/yr of relative plate motion between the two plates (fig. 1). The Gazikoy-Saros segment (the Ganos fault, GF) is the onshore segment of the northern strand of the NAF between the Marmara Sea and the Gulf of Saros. It was last ruptured in 1912 with a Ms=7.4 earthquake that broke the entire inland segment of the fault, a length of about 50 km, and produced a right-lateral strike-slip component of at least 3 m. Other large historical earthquakes that have been attributed to the Ganos fault occurred in A.D. 824, 1343, 1509 and 1766 (e. g. Reilinger et al., 2000; Meade et al., 2002; Motagh et al., 2007; Janssen et al., 2009; Megraoui et al., 2012 ; Ersen Aksoy et al., 2010). The GF forms a 45 km long linear fault system and represents the link between the northern strand of the NAFZ in the Sea of Marmara and the North Aegean Trough where slip partitioning results in branching of the fault zone. The present study aims at showing the results retrieved from L band Interferometric Syntethic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements for the monitoring of Crustal Deformation in the Anatolian Fault Zone in the frame of the MARMARA SUPERSITE PROJECT "MARSITE" on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian fault zone. We processed SAR data made available through the CAT-1 ESA (European Space Agency) archives, acquired by the L-band radar sensor ALOS PALSAR between 2007 and 2011. The aim of this exercise is to test L-band capabilities to map the spatial and temporal evolution of the present-day crustal deformation phenomena affecting the Ganos section of the NAFZ with high level of spatial details. The goal of this task is to assess whether InSAR L-Band data can be useful to evaluate the long-term behavior of active faults and eventual interactions between geologic structures, complementarily to GPS measurements and other in-situ observations on the study area. Mid-term monitoring (4 - 10 years) of the crustal deformation in the MARsite area is targeted. The ALOS Palsar archive over the Ganos Section of the NAFZ is not extraordinarily rich concerning the number of SAR scenes acquired with the same viewing and polarisation mode, which is a necessity when willing to perform a standard InSAR study. Thus, we decided to improve the number of potential SAR scenes by performing a processing on multiple polarisation data. We combine Fine Beam Mode Single Polarisation (FBS) and Fine Beam Mode Dual Polarisation (FBD) data, with a look angle of about 38.7°. We actually can process both these data together at the price of a decrease in spatial resolution but improving the data temporal sampling and dataset population. We then have 13 Single Look Complex (SLC) L-band data spanning 4 years, from 2007/07/07 to 2011/01/15. Besides, the satellite path orientation with respect to the fault orientation is optimal to obtain a suitable InSAR LOS sensitivity to strike-slip surface movement parallel to the NAFZ at the Ganos section. The shallow creep signal is expected to range from ~0 to 1.5 cm/yr. From the 66 initial differential interferograms, we select a subset of 41 high-signal-coherence interferograms as input for the stacking procedure. Our results suggest that the tectonic signal within the velocity map retrieved from ALOS Palsar InSAR presented in this study is hidden beneath a number of interferometric phase contributions. The phase contributions are mainly due Radio Frequency Interferences (RFI) that are emitted from the ground and affect L-band data. RFI bias the amplitude and phase of the L-band signal resulting in serious co-registration problems and stripes on the interferometric phase. To compensate this bias, we apply RFI filtering during the SAR focusing. Unfortunately, the RFI filter application results in image distortions and difficulties in image co-registration. We c

  8. Sudden unexpected death in infancy associated with maltreatment: evidence from long term follow up of siblings

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, A

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To identify any association between sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and maltreatment within local families. Methods: Retrospective enquiry and subsequent follow up of all siblings and later births within the families. Full investigation of the circumstances of all unexpected deaths. Setting: Scarborough and Bridlington Health Districts and Trusts, North and East Yorkshire. Subjects: All local families losing a baby from SUDI, 1982–96. Follow up to end of 2000. Main outcome measures: Court judgements and the objective decisions of legally constituted Social Services Case Conferences to place siblings on the Child Protection Register (CPR), or provide equivalent safeguards. Results: Sixty nine families had 72 unexpected deaths; three families had two deaths, with two families raising maltreatment issues. Three families had other children subsequently put on the CPR, all identifiable as likely problems of maltreatment at the time of the single SUDI. In 64/69 families, no child protection issues were formally raised at the time of the SUDI; 41/64 of these families already had 63 children. Four families were lost to follow up after the SUDI; 52/60 of the remaining families have had 93 more children without objective evidence of maltreatment. Conclusions: The association of SUDI and maltreatment within families was at the lower end of previous estimates, 3–10%. Child protection intervention is rarely needed, but investigation and follow up for maltreatment is mandatory where apparent life threatening episodes are reported with a second baby, and after a recurrence of apparent SUDI. PMID:12876167

  9. Genetic investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy using next-generation sequencing of 100 genes associated with cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Christin Loeth; Christiansen, Sofie Lindgren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl; Dahl, Morten; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Weeke, Peter Ejvin; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Grarup, Niels; Ottesen, Gyda Lolk; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Banner, Jytte; Morling, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most frequent manner of post-perinatal death among infants. One of the suggested causes of the syndrome is inherited cardiac diseases, mainly channelopathies, that can trigger arrhythmias and sudden death. The purpose of this study was to investigate cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) for potential causative variants in 100 cardiac-associated genes. We investigated 47 SUDI cases of which 38 had previously been screened for variants in RYR2, KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Using the Haloplex Target Enrichment System (Agilent) and next-generation sequencing (NGS), the coding regions of 100 genes associated with inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies were captured and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Sixteen (34%) of the SUDI cases had variants with likely functional effects, based on conservation, computational prediction and allele frequency, in one or more of the genes screened. The possible effects of the variants were not verified with family or functional studies. Eight (17%) of the SUDI cases had variants in genes affecting ion channel functions. The remaining eight cases had variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathies. In total, one third of the SUDI victims in a forensic setting had variants with likely functional effect that presumably contributed to the cause of death. The results support the assumption that channelopathies are important causes of SUDI. Thus, analysis of genes associated with cardiac diseases in SUDI victims is important in the forensic setting and a valuable supplement to the clinical investigation in all cases of sudden death.

  10. Genetic investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy using next-generation sequencing of 100 genes associated with cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Christin Loeth; Christiansen, Sofie Lindgren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl; Dahl, Morten; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Weeke, Peter Ejvin; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Grarup, Niels; Ottesen, Gyda Lolk; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Banner, Jytte; Morling, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most frequent manner of post-perinatal death among infants. One of the suggested causes of the syndrome is inherited cardiac diseases, mainly channelopathies, that can trigger arrhythmias and sudden death. The purpose of this study was to investigate cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) for potential causative variants in 100 cardiac-associated genes. We investigated 47 SUDI cases of which 38 had previously been screened for variants in RYR2, KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Using the Haloplex Target Enrichment System (Agilent) and next-generation sequencing (NGS), the coding regions of 100 genes associated with inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies were captured and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Sixteen (34%) of the SUDI cases had variants with likely functional effects, based on conservation, computational prediction and allele frequency, in one or more of the genes screened. The possible effects of the variants were not verified with family or functional studies. Eight (17%) of the SUDI cases had variants in genes affecting ion channel functions. The remaining eight cases had variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathies. In total, one third of the SUDI victims in a forensic setting had variants with likely functional effect that presumably contributed to the cause of death. The results support the assumption that channelopathies are important causes of SUDI. Thus, analysis of genes associated with cardiac diseases in SUDI victims is important in the forensic setting and a valuable supplement to the clinical investigation in all cases of sudden death. PMID:26350513

  11. Metabolic disease in 10 patients with sudden unexpected death in infancy or acute life-threatening events.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomoo; Yamada, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hironori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Taketani, Takeshi; Fukuda, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-06-01

    In order to determine the associations between sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) or acute life-threatening events (ALTE) and inborn errors of metabolism, particularly organic acidemia and fatty acid oxidation disorders, we evaluated clinical features in patients with SUDI or ALTE. The subjects were infants between the ages of 7 days and 3 years who developed SUDI or ALTE between January 2004 and December 2013. They were then diagnosed as having inborn errors of metabolism on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and/or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The age distribution, onset forms, and clinical findings were evaluated during the acute phase. Inborn errors of metabolism were detected in three of 196 patients with SUDI, and in seven of 167 patients with ALTE. Of these 10 patients, nine had a history of poor feeding and somnolence during the neonatal period, and symptoms of infection such as cough, fever or vomiting during infancy. Routine laboratory tests during an acute phase indicated hyperammonemia, liver dysfunction, increased blood creatine kinase, acidosis, positive ketone bodies in urine or blood, or hypoglycemia. When SUDI or ALTE are encountered in the emergency unit, it is essential that a detailed medical history is taken, particularly with regard to the neonatal period, and that specific abnormalities are investigated on routine laboratory tests. Moreover, samples such as urine, serum, and filter paper blood specimens should be collected for GC/MS and/or MS/MS of organic acids and acylcarnitines, to identify inborn metabolic disorders.

  12. [Apparent life-threatening events and sudden unexpected death in infancy: Two different entities].

    PubMed

    Naud, J

    2015-09-01

    Most infant apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) are minor with spontaneously favorable prognosis. Frequent etiologies are gastroesophageal reflux, obstructive apneas, respiratory infections, and breath-holding spells. Some rare but potentially serious causes must be discussed. Diagnosis is usually guided by careful questioning of the parents and repeated clinical examinations. A few complementary examinations are systematically needed and their performance is increased if they are oriented by clinical aspects. Hospitalization is usual for monitoring, further etiological investigation, and management of parental anxiety. ALTE and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) etiologies are often different. SUDI is called sudden unexplained death in infancy if it remains unexplained after investigation including autopsy. The annual incidence in France fell sharply after prevention campaigns in the 1990s, and now is about 400 SUDI, including 250 unexplained SUDI. The main guidelines of prevention are back sleeping, cessation of smoking during and after pregnancy, securing the bed and bedding, prevention of hyperthermia, and avoidance of dangerous factors of bed sharing. In the future, infants with particular vulnerabilities may be identified. The Haute Autorité de santé (French National Authority for Health) has published guidelines to support SUDI, standardize procedures, and improve our understanding of the causes of death. PMID:26228810

  13. [Apparent life-threatening events and sudden unexpected death in infancy: Two different entities].

    PubMed

    Naud, J

    2015-09-01

    Most infant apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) are minor with spontaneously favorable prognosis. Frequent etiologies are gastroesophageal reflux, obstructive apneas, respiratory infections, and breath-holding spells. Some rare but potentially serious causes must be discussed. Diagnosis is usually guided by careful questioning of the parents and repeated clinical examinations. A few complementary examinations are systematically needed and their performance is increased if they are oriented by clinical aspects. Hospitalization is usual for monitoring, further etiological investigation, and management of parental anxiety. ALTE and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) etiologies are often different. SUDI is called sudden unexplained death in infancy if it remains unexplained after investigation including autopsy. The annual incidence in France fell sharply after prevention campaigns in the 1990s, and now is about 400 SUDI, including 250 unexplained SUDI. The main guidelines of prevention are back sleeping, cessation of smoking during and after pregnancy, securing the bed and bedding, prevention of hyperthermia, and avoidance of dangerous factors of bed sharing. In the future, infants with particular vulnerabilities may be identified. The Haute Autorité de santé (French National Authority for Health) has published guidelines to support SUDI, standardize procedures, and improve our understanding of the causes of death.

  14. Assessing the knowledge of sudden unexpected death in the young among Canadian medical students and recent graduates: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Huisma, Felicity F; Potts, James E; Gibbs, Karen A; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the level of knowledge concerning Sudden Unexpected Death in the Young (SUDY) among Canadian medical students and recent graduates (≤5 years after graduating). Design A cross-sectional study was conducted by distributing a standardised, multiple choice, online questionnaire which assessed basic knowledge of SUDY. Setting Canadian medical schools and residency training programmes. Participants 614 Canadian medical students (in either their penultimate or final year) and recent graduates (≤5 years after graduating) completed an anonymous online questionnaire. Primary and secondary outcome measures The level of knowledge regarding molecular aetiology, clinical presentation, pharmacological management and modes of inheritance of six of the commonest conditions causing SUDY, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), long QT syndrome (LQT) and Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), were compared between medical students and recent graduates. Questions were broken down into basic knowledge and advanced categories and analysed as a secondary outcome measure. Results Of 614 responses, approximately two-thirds were answered by recent graduates, who generally scored 10% higher on all subject categories than medical students. Overall, questions regarding HCM were best answered (40%), followed by WPW syndrome (32%), CPVT (30%), ARVC (23%), Brugada syndrome (21%) and LQT syndrome (17%). Questions categorised as basic knowledge were answered 30% and 39% correctly in medical student and recent graduate groups, respectively, and those in the advanced category were answered 20% and 25% correctly. Conclusions Survey respondents fared poorly when answering questions regarding SUDY, which may be a reflection of inadequate medical education regarding these disorders. Standardised teaching regarding SUDY needs to occupy a

  15. Infant deaths in slings.

    PubMed

    Madre, Chrystèle; Rambaud, Caroline; Avran, David; Michot, Charlotte; Sachs, Philippe; Dauger, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Although the incidence of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) decreased markedly after campaigns to promote supine positioning during sleeping, it has remained unchanged over the last decade. Epidemiological data suggest a role for new causes such as suffocation, asphyxia, and entrapment. Health authorities in several countries have issued warnings about slings used to carry infants. However, few reports of infant deaths in slings have been published in medical journals. Our paediatric intensive care unit has admitted two infants who experienced cardiorespiratory arrest while carried in a sling. Diagnostic investigations including a post-mortem examination established asphyxia as the mechanism of death. In conclusion, baby slings may carry a risk of SUDI, either by compression of the baby into a forward-flexed position or by direct suffocation. European recommendations for the cautious use of baby slings should be disseminated to families and professionals involved in caring for infants, as done recently in Australia, Canada, and the USA. PMID:24343674

  16. Post-mortem Whole exome sequencing with gene-specific analysis for autopsy-negative sudden unexplained death in the young: a case series.

    PubMed

    Narula, Nupoor; Tester, David J; Paulmichl, Anna; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Annually, thousands of sudden deaths in individuals under 35 years remain unexplained following comprehensive medico-legal autopsy. Previously, post-mortem genetic analysis by Sanger sequencing of four major cardiac channelopathy genes revealed that approximately one-fourth of these autopsy-negative sudden unexplained death in the young (SUDY) cases harbored an underlying mutation. However, there are now over 100 sudden death-predisposing cardiac channelopathy-, cardiomyopathy-, and metabolic disorder-susceptibility genes. Here, we set out to determine whether post-mortem whole exome sequencing (WES) is an efficient strategy to detect ultra-rare, potentially pathogenic variants. We performed post-mortem WES and gene-specific analysis of 117 sudden death-susceptibility genes for 14 consecutively referred Caucasian SUDY victims (average age at death 17.4 ± 8.6 years) to identify putative SUDY-associated mutations. On average, each SUDY case had 12,758 ± 2,016 non-synonymous variants, of which 79 ± 15 localized to these 117 genes. Overall, eight ultra-rare variants (seven missense, one in-frame insertion) absent in three publically available exome databases were identified in six genes (three in TTN, and one each in CACNA1C, JPH2, MYH7, VCL, RYR2) in seven of 14 cases (50 %). Of the seven missense alterations, two (T171M-CACNA1C, I22160T-TTN) were predicted damaging by three independent in silico tools. Although WES and gene-specific surveillance is an efficient means to detect rare genetic variants that might underlie the pathogenic cause of death, accurate interpretation of each variant is challenging. Great restraint and caution must be exercised otherwise families may be informed prematurely and incorrectly that the root cause has been found.

  17. A tool for symmetry studies in circular machines

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.

    1988-05-01

    The use of the C (mrad/Amp) conversion factors of the orbit corrector magnets in the sudy of the symmetry properties of a circular accelerator or storage ring, and in the determination of the ratios of the ..beta..-functions at corrector locations is discussed. Measurements obtained for the VUV and x-ray rings of the NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Does DSM-5 nomenclature for inhalant use disorder improve upon DSM-IV?

    PubMed

    Ridenour, Ty A; Halliburton, Amanda E; Bray, Bethany C

    2015-03-01

    Among drug classes, substance use disorder (SUD) consequent to using inhalants (SUD-I) has perhaps the smallest evidence base. This study compared DSM-IV versus DSM-5 nomenclatures, testing whether 4 traditional categories of inhalants (aerosols, gases, nitrites, solvents) are manifestations of a single pathology, obtaining item parameters of SUD-I criteria, and presenting evidence that SUD can result from using nitrites. An urban, Midwestern, community sample of 162 inhalant users was recruited. Participants were 2/3 male, nearly 85% White, and had a mean age of 20.3 years (SD = 2.4 years), spanning the ages of greatest incidence of SUD and slightly older than the primary ages of inhalants use initiation. Analyses consisted of bivariate associations, principle components analysis, and item response theory analysis. Validity was demonstrated for SUD-I consequent to each inhalant type as well as for aggregating all inhalant types into a single drug class. Results supported DSM-5 nomenclature over DSM-IV in multiple ways except that occurrence of diagnostic orphans was not statistically smaller using DSM-5. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: place and time of death

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JFT; Thompson, AJ; Ingram, PJ

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many babies who die of Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (SUDI) in Northern Ireland are found dead in bed – i.e. co-sleeping – with an adult. In order to assess its frequency autopsy reports between April 1996 and August 2001 were reviewed and linked to temporal factors. The day and month of death, and the place where the baby was found were compared to a reference population of infant deaths between one week of age and the second birthday. Although the rate of SUDI was lower than the UK average, 43 cases of SUDI were identified, and two additional deaths with virtually identical autopsy findings that were attributed to asphyxia caused by suffocation due to overlaying. Thirty-two of the 45 (71%) were less than four months of age. In 30 of the 45 cases (67%) the history stated that the baby was bed sharing with others; 19 died sleeping in an adult bed, and 11 on a sofa or armchair. In 16 of the 30 (53%) there were at least two other people sharing the sleeping surface, and in one case, three. SUDI was twice as frequent at weekends (found dead Saturday – Monday mornings) compared to weekdays (p<0.02), and significantly more common compared to reference deaths (p<0.002). Co-sleeping deaths were also more frequent at weekends. Almost half of all SUDI (49%) occurred in the summer months – more than twice the frequency of reference deaths. While sharing a place of sleep per se may not increase the risk of death, our findings may be linked to factors such as habitual smoking, consumption of alcohol or illicit drugs as reported in case-control studies. In advising parents on safer childcare practices, health professionals must be knowledgeable of current research and when, for example, giving advice on co-sleeping this needs to be person-specific cognisant of the risks within a household. New and better means of targeting such information needs to be researched if those with higher risk life-styles are to be positively influenced. PMID:16457407

  20. The dark figure of infanticide in England and Wales: complexities of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brookman, Fiona; Nolan, Jane

    2006-07-01

    Infants aged younger than 12 months have the highest homicide victimization rate of any single age group in England and Wales. In addition, there are good grounds for believing that the official homicide statistics for this particular age group are an underestimate and subject to distortion. At the same time there is evidence mounting in the United Kingdom that some parents have been incorrectly convicted of infanticide. This article first explores all recorded cases of infanticide in England and Wales for the period 1995-2002 (298 cases in total). Characteristics of the offenders, victims, offense, and court outcomes are examined. The second part of the article takes a critical gaze at the complexities involved in distinguishing infanticide from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sudden unexplained deaths in infancy (SUDI). The article ends by considering in what ways infant deaths might be more effectively investigated.

  1. Parental understanding and self-blame following sudden infant death: a mixed-methods study of bereaved parents' and professionals' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Frances; Sidebotham, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Improvements in our understanding of the role of modifiable risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) mean that previous reassurance to parents that these deaths were unpreventable may no longer be appropriate. This study aimed to learn of bereaved parents' and healthcare professionals' experiences of understanding causes of death following detailed sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) investigations. The research questions were: How do bereaved parents understand the cause of death and risk factors identified during detailed investigation following a sudden unexpected infant death? What is the association between bereaved parents' mental health and this understanding? What are healthcare professionals' experiences of sharing such information with families? Design This was a mixed-methods study using a Framework Approach. Setting Specialist paediatric services. Participants Bereaved parents were recruited following detailed multiagency SUDI investigations; 21/113 eligible families and 27 professionals participated giving theoretical saturation of data. Data collection We analysed case records from all agencies, interviewed professionals and invited parents to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and questionnaires or in-depth interviews. Results Nearly all bereaved parents were able to understand the cause of death and several SIDS parents had a good understanding of the relevant modifiable risk factors even when these related directly to their actions. Paediatricians worried that discussing risk factors with parents would result in parental self-blame and some deliberately avoided these discussions. Over half the families did not mention blame or blamed no one. The cause of death of the infants of these families varied. 3/21 mothers expressed overwhelming feelings of self-blame and had clinically significant scores on HADS. Conclusions Bereaved parents want detailed information about their child's death. Our study

  2. Radiation induced changes in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the granary weevil and their relationships to desiccation and adult mortality: Annual progress report, February 15, 1987 to February 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Sriharan, S.

    1988-03-14

    Sitophilus granarius (L) is a major pest of stroed grains and is prone to irradiation treatment. There is considerable scope for use of radiation like Cesium-137 (as a source) as an alternative to chemical treatment for pest control. Study with regard to radiation damage and the effect of environmental factors like temperature and humidity on adult weevil mortality due to radiation effect is limited. Stored-grain insects live in an enviroment where liquid water is seldom available. Waterproofing and conservation of water by the insects is a critical factor for weevil survival. In some insects it has been noted that the rate of water loss through the integument has been associated with changes in the hydrocarbon composition of the epicuticle. Epicuticular hydrocarbons play an important role in preventing desiccation. Information on the effects of irradiation on epicuticular hydrocarbon of the adult weevils is limited. The present investigation sudies the after effects of radiation damage to granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius (L.) in terms of causing increased water loss from the body, weevil nortality and concommitant changes, if any, in the cuticular hydrocarbons that waterproof the insect. 23 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Nutrition supplementation for diabetic wound healing: a systematic review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Maier, Haiyan M; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Kim, Jeong-Su; Spicer, Maria T

    2013-01-01

    There are 25.8 million people with diabetes in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet). This number is expected to increase by 1 million per year. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) occur in patients with a history of poorly controlled blood glucose. Almost 30% of people with diabetes aged 40 years or older experience DFUs caused by an impaired nerve sensation. It is one of the more persistent types of chronic wounds, which poses an economic burden on individuals and society and reduces the quality of life of patients and their families. This paper reviews the efficacy of nutrition supplementation in diabetic wound healing, including both human and animal studies. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methods, the search was conducted in PubMed and ISI's Web of Science databases. Studies in which diabetic wounds/foot ulcers were treated with specific nutritional or herbal suplements were selected. This review includes 4 human and 9 animal studies that met the criteria of the search. Positive outcomes in the human studies were not significant while the nutritional supplements used in the animal studies were effective and promoted wound healing. The most notable effect of supplementation with curcumin, L-Arginine, or vitamin E have been shown in animal sudies. More human studies need to be conducted to determine the efficacy of these nutritional supplements in promoting wound healing.

  4. Control of food handling by cutaneous receptor input in squirrels.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, G L

    1980-01-01

    In a complementary neuroanatomical study by Brenowitz in 1980, it was shown that tree squirrels (Sciurus niger) have a higher relative density of mechanoreceptors in their glabrous forepaw skin than do ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus). The main purpose of this sudy was to test the prediction that tree squirrels would depend upon somatic sensory (cutaneous) input from their forepaws to a greater extent than would ground squirrels in food handling behavior. In addition, a series of more general questions about the sensory control of food handling was examined. First, using different sized food items, it was shown that food handling (rate of manipulation) is subject to sensory control, in general. Secondly, comparision of sham-operated groups with groups receiving median nerve (innervating the palmar surface) lesions showed that cutaneous input from the volar surface of the forepaw contributes to the sensory control in both species of squirrels. Thirdly, comparison of lesion effects in the two species showed that, as predicted, tree squirrels depend upon cutaneous input from their volar forepaw to a greater extent than do ground squirrels. Fourthly, by reanalyzing the above data it was shown that there is continued sensory feedback from food items rather than only an initial evaluation of them. PMID:7437901

  5. Survey of dissolved air flotation system efficiency for reduce of pollution of vegetable oil industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Keramati, H; Alidadi, H; Parvaresh, A R; Movahedian, H; Mahvi, A H

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this research was to sudy the reduction of pollution of vegetable oil manufacturing wastewater with DAF system. At first phase of this examination, the optimum dosage of the coagulants was determined. The coagulants that used in this study were Alum and Ferric Chloride. The second phase was flotation in this series of examinations, oil, COD, total solid, volatile solid, fixed solid and suspended solid measured in raw wastewater and the effluent of the DAF pilot. Optimum value of pH for alum and ferric chloride obtained 7.5 and 5.5, respectively. Optimum dosage for these obtained 30 and 32 mg L(-1) in this research. Mean removal for the parameters ofoil, COD, total solid, volatile solid, fixed solid and suspended solid obtained 75.85, 78.27, 77.32, 82.47, 73.52 and 85.53%, respectively. With pressure rising from 3 to 4 and 5 atm removing rate of COD, total solid, volatile solid, fixed solid parameters reduced, but oil and suspended solid have increase. In addition, following increase of flotation time up to 120 sec all of the measured parameters have increase in removing rate. Optimum A/S for removal of COD, total solid, volatile solid, fixed solid parameters obtained 0.001 and for oil and suspended solid obtained 0.0015.

  6. Osteogenic activity of nanonized pearl powder/poly (lactide-co-glycolide) composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yueh-Lung; Chang, Ching-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Cheng; Kao, Wenny Mei-Wen; Liu, Wei-Chung; Liu, Hsia-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Numerous materials have been proposed for bone tissue engineering. In this study, a newly designed hybrid composite scaffold composed of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) and a naturally bioceramic hybrid material, nanonized pearl powder, were prepared and the biological activities and physical properties of the scaffold for bone tissue engineering were evaluated. It is a composite consisting calcium carbonate crystal in an aragonite structure, embedded in an organic matrix. Peral contains one or more signal molecules capable of stimulating bone formation. The nanonized pearl powder is considered as a promising osteoinductive biomaterial. This biomaterial is biocompatible and shows osteogenic activity. In this study, the designed biohybrid of nanonized pearl powder/poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (NPP/PLGA) biocomposite scaffolds would employ biodegradable material as MC3T3-E1 cells seeded scaffolds. Therefore, the biocomposite scaffolds would be used to culture with MC3T3-E1 cells under spinner bioreactor in vitro. Furthermore, it also detailed how these tissues were characterized, qualitatively and quantitatively, with scanning electron microscopy and biochemical testing. The identity and the mode of action of these molecules on the osteoblast differentiation were analyzed. This study indicates that the efficiency of nanonized pearl powders in bone cell differentiation are certainly different from that of proteins. Further sudy will look forward to manufacturing the promising new generation bone substitute, three dimensional biocomposite scaffolds to replace the implant and autogeneous bone graft, which combines basic research and clinical application. PMID:24211987

  7. Oliver Wendell Holmes 1

    PubMed Central

    Lindskog, Gustaf E.

    1974-01-01

    The life of Oliver Wendell Holmes was selected as the subject for a lecture in the 1974 History of Medicine series at Yale University School of Medicine because, as the Latin subtitle of the essay suggests, he represents a fortunate and uncommon, but by no means unique, synthesis of the practical and aesthetic, of science and the humanities. An attempt has been made by the lecturer, employing frequent, but brief, excerpts from the works of several disinguished biographers as well as Doctor Holmes' own lectures, medical papers, essays and poems to delineate the elite heritage and the events that led this complex person transiently into the sudy of law, the profession in which his older son reached the pinnacle of the U.S. Supreme Court, and finally into medicine where a short period of private practice was followed by more than three decades of distinguished teaching is anatomy. His lifetime (1809-1894) spanned most of the nineteenth century, in the literary hisory of which he played a significant role. His writings reveal a remarkable, and sometimes prophetic, appreciation of the impact that burgeoning science and evolving social pressures and changes would have on the teaching and practice of medicine in the future—our present. PMID:4617425

  8. [The effects of methylmercury on health in children and adults; national and international studies].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Sáinz-Martín, María; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Martínez-García, M José; Bretón Lesmes, Irene; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    The benefit of fish consumption in children and adults is well-known. However, it has been pointed out that excessive methylmercury intake due to consumption of contaminated fish leads to neurological toxicity in children, affecting cognitive function, memory, visual-motor function and language. After the intoxications in Minamata and Iraq, wide-ranging epidemiological studies were carried out in New Zealand, the Faroe Islands and the Seychelles and international recommendations were established for fish consumption in pregnant women and small children. In Spain, the Childhood and Environmental project (INMA, its Spanish acronym) has studied the effects of diet and the environment on fetal and childhood development in different geographic areas of Spain. National and international sudies have demonstrated that mercury concentrations are mainly dependent on fish consumption, although there are variations among countries which can be explained not only by the levels of fish consumption, but also by the type or species of fish that is consumed, as well as other factors. Although the best documented adverse effects of methylmercury are the effects on nervous sytem development in fetuses and newborns, an increasing number of studies indicate that cognitive function, reproduction and, especially, cardiovascular risk in the adult population can also be affected. However, more studies are necessary in order to confirm this and establish the existance of a causal relationship.

  9. Seismicity map of the State of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stover, C.W.; Barnhard, L.M.; Reagor, B.G.; Algermissen, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    The earthquake data shown on this map and listed in table 1 are a list of earthquakes that were originally used in preparing the Seismic Risk Studies in the United States (Algermissen, 1969) which have been recompiled and updated through 1977.  These data have been reexamined which resulted in some revisions of epicenters and intensities as well as assignment of intensities to earthquakes that previously had none assigened.  Intensity values were updated from new and additional data soureces that were not available at the time of original compilation.  Some epicenters were relocated on the basis of new informaition.  The data shown in table 1 are estimates of the most accurate epicenter, magnitude, and intensity of each earthquake, on the basis of historical and current information.  Some of the aftershocks from large earthquakes are listed but are incomplete in many instances, especialy for ones that occurred before seismic instruments were in universal usage.  Only earthquakes located within the borders of the states of Maine are listed.  This map superceeds Miscellaneous Field Sudies Map MF-845.

  10. The effects of acute intermittent hypoxia on cardiovascular parameters in normotensive and chronic hypobaric hypoxia-induced hypertensive rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Muhittin O; Guner, Ibrahim; Uzun, Hafize; Sahin, Gulderen; Yelmen, Nermin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of both chronic hypoxia and acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) on cardiovascular system are unclear. We designed this study to develop a rabbit model of hypertension by exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) and to investigate the effects of AIH on hypertensive rabbits. Present study was performed in 13 albino rabbits that divided into CHH and control groups. To develop hypertension, the rabbits were placed in a hypobaric chamber (390 mmHg; 22 hours/day, 30 days). Afterwards, AIH protocol was applied (8% FIO2 (Fraction of Inspired Oxygen) 1 min + 5 min normoxia, 20 cycles, 2 hours) to rabbits anesthetized with urethane and alpha-chloralose. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and hematocrit values have been determined. Also asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and norepinephrine values have been analyzed in blood. We developed a model of hypertension in rabbits via exposure to severe CHH and we believe that ADMA is an important parameter in the development and permanence of CHH-induced hypertension. The main finding of this sudy was the depressor effect of AIH on blood pressure and heart rate in CHH- induced hypertension model. Finally, we believe that AIH protocol may be applicable for prevention and treatment of hypertension if properly developed. PMID:24448370

  11. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of FEMY-R7 composed of fucoidan and evening primrose extract in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Su; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Kim, Jihyun; Shin, Kyungha; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Youngjin; Jeon, Joseph H; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori-eliminating effects of FEMY-R7, composed of fucoidan and evening primrose extract, were investigated in mice and humans. Male C57BL/6 mice were infected with the bacteria by intragastric inoculation (1×10(9) CFU/mouse) 3 times at 2-day intervals, and simultaneously, orally treated twice a day with 10 or 100 mg/kg FEMY-R7 for 2 weeks. In Campylobcter-like organism-detection test, FEMY-R7 markedly reduced the urease-positive reactivity. In a clinical sudy, human subjects, confirmed to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, were orally administered twice a day with a capsule containing 150 mg FEMY-R7 for 8 weeks. FEMY-R7 significantly decreased both the Delta over baseline-value in urea breath test and the serum pepsinogens I and II levels. The results indicate that FEMY-R7 not only eliminates H. pylori from gastric mucosa of animals and humans, but also improves gastric function.

  12. [The problem of molecular-genetic identification of sweat and grease deposits in the human fingerprints].

    PubMed

    Faleeva, T G; Ivanov, I N; Mishin, E S; Vnukova, N V; Kornienko, I V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present experimental molecular-genetic study of DNA contained in of human fingerprints was to establish the relationship between the reference genetic profiles and the genotypes of the individuals leaving their fingerprints on a smooth metal object. The biological material for the purpose of the investigation was sampled at different time intervals. The were taken using a scotch tape and used to obtain the complete genetic profile immediately after the fingerprints had been left as well as within the next 24 hours and one week. It proved impossible to identify the complete genetic profile one month after the fingerprints had been left. The alleles not typical for reference samples were identified within one week after swabbing the material from the metal surface. The results of the sudy can be explained by the decrease of the concentration of the initial DNA-matrix in the samples due to its degradation in the course of time. It is concluded that the parallel genetic analysis is needed if reliable evidence of identity of the profiles of interest or its absence is to be obtained.

  13. Nutrition supplementation for diabetic wound healing: a systematic review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Maier, Haiyan M; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Kim, Jeong-Su; Spicer, Maria T

    2013-01-01

    There are 25.8 million people with diabetes in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet). This number is expected to increase by 1 million per year. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) occur in patients with a history of poorly controlled blood glucose. Almost 30% of people with diabetes aged 40 years or older experience DFUs caused by an impaired nerve sensation. It is one of the more persistent types of chronic wounds, which poses an economic burden on individuals and society and reduces the quality of life of patients and their families. This paper reviews the efficacy of nutrition supplementation in diabetic wound healing, including both human and animal studies. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methods, the search was conducted in PubMed and ISI's Web of Science databases. Studies in which diabetic wounds/foot ulcers were treated with specific nutritional or herbal suplements were selected. This review includes 4 human and 9 animal studies that met the criteria of the search. Positive outcomes in the human studies were not significant while the nutritional supplements used in the animal studies were effective and promoted wound healing. The most notable effect of supplementation with curcumin, L-Arginine, or vitamin E have been shown in animal sudies. More human studies need to be conducted to determine the efficacy of these nutritional supplements in promoting wound healing. PMID:24053007

  14. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of FEMY-R7 composed of fucoidan and evening primrose extract in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Su; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Kim, Jihyun; Shin, Kyungha; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Youngjin; Jeon, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-eliminating effects of FEMY-R7, composed of fucoidan and evening primrose extract, were investigated in mice and humans. Male C57BL/6 mice were infected with the bacteria by intragastric inoculation (1×109 CFU/mouse) 3 times at 2-day intervals, and simultaneously, orally treated twice a day with 10 or 100 mg/kg FEMY-R7 for 2 weeks. In Campylobcter-like organism-detection test, FEMY-R7 markedly reduced the urease-positive reactivity. In a clinical sudy, human subjects, confirmed to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, were orally administered twice a day with a capsule containing 150 mg FEMY-R7 for 8 weeks. FEMY-R7 significantly decreased both the Delta over baseline-value in urea breath test and the serum pepsinogens I and II levels. The results indicate that FEMY-R7 not only eliminates H. pylori from gastric mucosa of animals and humans, but also improves gastric function. PMID:25324874

  15. [The problem of molecular-genetic identification of sweat and grease deposits in the human fingerprints].

    PubMed

    Faleeva, T G; Ivanov, I N; Mishin, E S; Vnukova, N V; Kornienko, I V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present experimental molecular-genetic study of DNA contained in of human fingerprints was to establish the relationship between the reference genetic profiles and the genotypes of the individuals leaving their fingerprints on a smooth metal object. The biological material for the purpose of the investigation was sampled at different time intervals. The were taken using a scotch tape and used to obtain the complete genetic profile immediately after the fingerprints had been left as well as within the next 24 hours and one week. It proved impossible to identify the complete genetic profile one month after the fingerprints had been left. The alleles not typical for reference samples were identified within one week after swabbing the material from the metal surface. The results of the sudy can be explained by the decrease of the concentration of the initial DNA-matrix in the samples due to its degradation in the course of time. It is concluded that the parallel genetic analysis is needed if reliable evidence of identity of the profiles of interest or its absence is to be obtained. PMID:27070033

  16. Axonal injury in young pediatric head trauma: a comparison study of β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunohistochemical staining in traumatic and nontraumatic deaths.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael W; Stoll, Lisa; Rubio, Ana; Troncoso, Juan; Pletnikova, Olga; Fowler, David R; Li, Ling

    2011-09-01

    We tested the independent utility of β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunohistochemical staining as evidence of brain trauma in the deaths of young children. Blinded reviewers retrospectively reviewed immunostained brain tissues from homicidal deaths, age-matched control cases without evidence of trauma, as well as cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The reviewers correctly identified five of the seven cases with documented inflicted head trauma. However, one of seven age-matched control cases and one of 10 SIDS/sudden unexplained death in infancy (SUDI) cases demonstrated staining patterns similar to those seen in cases of inflicted trauma. We discuss these cases and the circumstances surrounding them with the intent to explain the difficulties associated with immunohistological interpretation of axonal injury. Although the utility of β-APP is quite powerful if not confounded by global hypoxic-ischemic injury, ultimately, β-APP studies should be only one piece of information in the determination of cause and manner of death.

  17. The large scale view of the young stellar populations in the Orion OB1 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria

    2016-06-01

    The Orion OB1 association, at ~400 pc and with a wide range of ages (~1-10 Myr) and environmental conditions, is an ideal place to look at how stars form, first evolve and disperse among the general population of field stars. Also to study disk dispersal and the duration of the planet formation phase.However, despite spanning nearly 200 deg2 on the sky, almost all we know about Orion comes from studies of a limited fraction of the entire region, mostly of the youngest objects (~<1 Myr) in the A and B molecular clouds and the ~3 Myr old sigma Ori cluster.We will present here the results of our 180 sq deg photometric multi-epoch survey across the Orion OB1 association, using the known variability of T Tauri stars to pick them among the general field population, and following with spectroscopy to confirm members and characterize them.The ~2000 newly identified young low-mass stars are mostly located away from the molecular clouds, across tens of sq. deg. in the Orion OB1a and OB1b sub-associations, with ages in the range ~4-10 Myr. But within this general population we identify a significant fraction concentrated in distinct overdensities, most notably the ~7 Myr old 25 Orionis cluster. These stellar aggregates point to a previously unknown degree of substructure that has survived the dissipation of the parent molecular clouds. We also find that the Orion Nebula Cluster is surrounded by a few sq.deg. halo of young stars, as has been suggested by recent sudies.

  18. Comparison Between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb Geochronometers at ca. 2.1 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Renne, P. R.; Min, K.; Schmitz, M. D.; Bowring, S. A.; de Wit, M. J.; Morelli, C.

    2001-12-01

    Recent sudies have revealed 1-2% age bias between conventional calibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb geochronologic methods applied to quickly cooled volcanic rocks whose isotopic systems should be uncomplicated by differential retention of radiogenic daughter isotopes. The U-Pb system serves as an ideal basis for comparison because of its rigorous internal reliability criteria and precisely-determined decay constants via alpha counting. Studies capable of providing useful comparison have been limited to samples younger than 1.1 Ga, which offers useful constraints primarily on 40Ar/40K of 40Ar/39Ar standards and the electron capture decay constant of 40K. The magnitude of observed bias for these samples is within the range of realistically propagated errors in those quantities. The beta decay constant of 40K is comparably poorly constrained, leading to ambiguities about early solar system cooling rates among other issues, and is more difficult to test directly due to a paucity of appropriate (e.g., minimally altered with demonstrably simple thermal history) rocks for comparison. A strikingly fresh hornblende-biotite dacite from the Eglab region of the Requibat massif, West Africa, offers an exceptional opportunity for head-to-head comparison of the two geochronometers at nearly twice the age limit currently available. Zircons from this unit are concordant to nearly concordant.and indicate an age of ca 2076 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of individual hornblende grains, step-heated with a CO2 laser, reveal some complexities but generally yield plateau ages of 2050-2060 Ma based on IUGS 1977 decay constants and 28.02 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine. Thus the bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb systems in this case is of order 1%, suggesting that relative error in the conventional beta decay constant is somewhat less than that of the electron capture constant for 40K.

  19. A Review on Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Immunosuppressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour, Niloufar; Elyasi, Sepideh; Vahdati, Naser; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Shamsara, Jamal

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppressants require therapeutic drug monitoring because of their narrow therapeutic index and significant inter-individual variability in blood concentrations. This variability can be because of factors like drug-nutrient interactions, drug-disease interactions, renal-insufficiency, inflammation and infection, gender, age, polymorphism and liver mass. Drug monitoring is widely practiced especially for cyclosporine, tacrolimus, sirolimus and mycophenolic acid. Cyclosporine Therapeutic monitoring of immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine is a critical requirement because of intra- and inter-patient variability of drug absorption, narrow therapeutic window and drug induced nephrotoxicity. Mycophenolic acid (MPA) Some reasons for therapeutic drug monitoring of MPA during post-transplant period include: relationship between MPA pharmacokinetic parameters and clinical outcomes, Inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability for MPA despite fixed MMF doses, alternations of MPA pharmacokinetics during the first months after transplantation, drug- drug interaction and influence of kidney function on MPA pharmacokinetic. Sirolimus A recent review of the pharmacokinetics of sirolimus suggested a therapeutic range of 5 to 10 μg l−1 in whole blood. However, the only consensus guidelines published on the therapeutic monitoring of sirolimus concluded that there was not enough information available about the clinical use of the drug to make recommendations. Tacrolimus Sudies have shown, in kidney and liver transplant patients, significant associations of low tacrolimus concentrations with rejection and of high concentrations with nephrotoxicity. Although the feasibility of a limited sampling scheme to predict AUC has been demonstrated, as yet, trough, or pre-dose, whole blood concentration monitoring is still the method of choice. PMID:23493821

  20. The medico-legal investigation of sudden, unexpected and/or unexplained infant deaths in South Africa: where are we--and where are we going?

    PubMed

    du Toit-Prinsloo, L; Dempers, J J; Wadee, S A; Saayman, G

    2011-03-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) has been reported to be the leading cause of death in infants under 1 year of age in many countries. Unfortunately, a paucity of published research data exists in South Africa, with regard to the incidence of and investigation into the circumstances surrounding Sudden Unexplained Deaths in Infants (SUDI) and/or SIDS. Currently, even though most academic centers conform to a protocol consistent with internationally accepted standards, there exists no nationally accepted infant death investigation protocol in South Africa. It is the aim of this study to review the current practice of infant death investigation in two representative but geographically and demographically distinct centers. Retrospective case audit over a five-year period (2000-2004) was conducted at two large medico-legal mortuaries in Pretoria (Gauteng) and Tygerberg (Cape Town). Case files on all infants younger than 1 year of age were reviewed. The outcome measures included number of deaths, demographic details and the nature and final outcome of the post mortem examinations. A total of 512 cases were identified as possible SIDS cases and of these, 171 was classified as SIDS. The study showed marked inter-case and inter-divisional variation in terms of the investigation of infant deaths at the two institutions. It is envisaged that this study will focus attention on the current lack of usable data regarding sudden/unexplained/unexpected infant deaths in South Africa, and aid in the formulation and implementation of a practical (yet internationally accountable) infant death investigation protocol, which could facilitate comparisons with other countries and initiate further structured research in this field.

  1. Simulation study of normal and enhancement methyl cyanide (CH 3CN) observed by JEM/SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, K.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, C.; Sano, T.; Manago, N.; Mitsuda, C.; Iwata, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    A primary source of Methyl cyanide (CH 3CN, also known as acetonitrile) is biomass burning [Arijs and Brasseur, 1986; Hamm and Warneck, 1990; de Gouw et al., 2003]. Atmospheric CH 3CN has been measured remotely from space in the microwave region by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) [Livesey et al., 2001]. They show that a persistent peak in CH 3CN abundance is in the tropical stratosphere between 30 and 10 hPa (25-30 km), which is the result of a ‘puzzling’ stratospheric source. However no independent global measurements of stratospheric CH 3CN have been made since UARS MLS measurements. On the other hand, the values in UT/LS region can be considerably higher in localized areas above forest fires [Livesey et al., 2004]. CH 3CN can be useful indicators for biomass burning emissions in atmospheric chemistry sudies [see also Lobert et al. 1990]. It is threfore important to see how frequent, how long and where enhancements in lower stratospheric CH 3CN are observed. To monitor global distributions of the stratospheric trace gases and to demonstrate the high sensitivity of 4-K cooled sub-mm limb sounders, the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) instrument will be launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 using the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). We already has developed retreival algorithms (Takahashi et al. 2009). From preliminary result of simulation study of current Level 2 version, the observable altitude coverage for normal CH 3CN is estimated that a single scan precision is better than 50 % (20 pptv) at an altitude between 20 km and 43 km, which is twice more accuracy than that of UARS MLS measurement. Moreover we present a performance, detection procedure and observation strategy for enhanced CH 3CN in lower stratosphere from simulation study.

  2. Comparative analysis of anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of FEMY-R7 composed of Laminaria japonica and Oenothera biennis extracts in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Su; Shin, Kyungha; Jeon, Joseph H.; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Lee, Yoon-Bok

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-eliminating effects of FEMY-R7, composed of Laminaria japonica and Oenothera biennis extracts, were investigated in mice and humans. Male C57BL/6 mice were infected with the bacteria by intragastric inoculation (1×109 CFU/mouse) 3 times at 2-day intervals, and simultaneously, orally treated twice a day with total 20, 64 or 200 mg/kg/day FEMY-R7 for 2 weeks. In Campylobcter-like organism (CLO)-detection tests on gastric mucosa and feces, FEMY-R7 reduced the urease-positive reactivity in a dose-dependent manner; i.e., the positivity ratios were decreased to 70, 20, and 10% for gastric mocosa and to 80, 50, and 20% for feces. In a clinical sudy, human subjects, confirmed to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, were orally administered twice a day with capsules containing total 100, 320 or 1,000 mg/man/day FEMY-R7 (matching doses for 20, 64 or 200 mg/kg/day, respectively, in mice from a body surface area-based dose translation) for 8 weeks. FEMY-R7 decreased the positivity ratios in feces to 70, 40, and 30%, respectively. In bacterial culture, H. pylori was identified from the CLO-positive stools of mice and humans. The bacterial identification ratios exhibited a good correlation between the matching doses in mice and humans. It is suggested that FEMY-R7 could be a promising functional food without tolerance as an adjunct to reduce the dosage of antibiotics for the treatment of recurrent H. pylori infection. PMID:25806078

  3. What Affective Neuroscience Means for Science Of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Pereira, Alfredo; Carrara-Augustenborg, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic concept of conscious processing in cognitive neurosciences, which is based on the identification of brain circuits responsible for the processing of (cognitive) representations. Within cognitive neurosciences, the frontal lobes are assigned the role of coordinators in maintaining affective states and their emotional expressions under cognitive control. An intermediary view is the Damasio-Bechara Somatic Marker model, which puts cognition under partial somatic-affective control. We present here our efforts to make a synthesis of these views, by proposing the existence of two interacting brain circuits; the first one in charge of cognitive processes and the second mediating feelings about cognitive contents. The coupling of the two circuits promotes an endogenous feedback that supports conscious processes. Within this framework, we present the defence that detailed study of both affective and cognitive processes, their interactions, as well of their respective brain networks, is necessary for a science of consciousness. PMID:23678246

  4. Critical notes on the neuro-evolutionary archaeology of affective systems.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Barnaby B

    2015-04-01

    If progress is to be made in resolving the debate over the relevance of neuroscientific findings to psychoanalysis, a clearer distinction must be established between a narrow definition of psychoanalysis as "praxis" (the science of lived experience and its conflicts or contradictions) and a definition that focuses on metapsychology as objectivistic theory-building. The investigations of Jaak Panksepp on the "neuro-archaeology" of affective systems are reviewed as an example of how findings in neuroscience cannot be legitimately extrapolated to offer conclusions about the domain of lived experience. In this context, Freud's shifting standpoint is reviewed and, following the writings of Jean Laplanche, the significance of Freud's distinction between "drives" or libidinality, as acquired through experience, and "instincts," which are purely biological, is emphasized. It is argued that there is an unavoidable component of myth-making in any consideration of the connection between neural circuitry and the domain of psychic representations. Freud's need for a notion of drive or energy, which is required to understand the findings of free-associative method, is admittedly mythematic, but it implies a major challenge to extant philosophical doctrines of the "mind/body" question (emergentism, double-aspect monism, and neutral monism). Thus, whereas psychoanalysis as praxis is, in Freud's words, "free to follow its own requirements," the claims of metapsychology are not so unrestrained. Further debate is required on the irrelevance of a revised objectivistic theory of the "mental apparatus" to the venture of healing the fracturing of our lived experience.

  5. Kinetics of Gravity-induced Amyloplast Sedimentation in Cress Root Statocytes Formed under 1 g and on Fast-rotating Clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svegzdiene, D.; Rakleviciene, D.; Gaina, V.

    The aim of the sudy was to compare the motion of a statolith complex in statocytes of roots grown vertically under 1 g and simulated weightlessness by fast-clinorotation (50 rpm) during lateral stimulation by the gravity vector; the experiments with cress (Lepidium sativum L.) on a centrifuge-clinostat device have been performed. Before gravistimulation, the statoliths are grouped in the distal region of 1g-root statocytes and at the center of statocytes in clino-rotated roots. Then roots were placed horizontally for increasing periods of time (1, 2, 4 or 6 min) and chemically fixed. Quantitative analysis of amyloplast movement in side-to-side and distal-to-proximal directions within statocytes of the 2nd to 5th statenchyma storeys was accomplished by light and electron microscopy. After the first minute of gravistimulation, the position of statolith complex in the 1g-statocytes has been changed by about 12.2% in side-to-side and 18.3% in distal-to-proximal direction versus its initial position. In roots grown on the clinostat, the plastids changed their initial position by 22.5% toward the lower longitudinal wall of the statocyte and negligibly (2.4%) -- toward the proximal cell wall during this stimulation period. Later, up to 2 min, the statoliths continued to displace following the alike trajectory in side-to-side by 36.6% as well as in distal-to-proximal direction by 34.4% in 1g-root statocytes versus their position occupied at 1 min, while they remained approximately at the same position in statocytes of clinostat-grown roots. During the period from 2 to 6 min, in the former roots a significant further shift (15.1%) parallel to the gravity vector and otherwise a reversible movement (- 13.3%) toward the distal wall of statolith complex were observed. However, within the same period of gravistimulation the statolith positioning in clinorotated-roots changed only slightly in side-to-side (4.8%) as well as in distal-to-proximal (2.1%) directions. The obtained

  6. Late Cenozoic flexural deformation of the middle U.S. Atlantic passive margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pazzaglia, Frank J.; Gardner, Thomas, W.

    1994-01-01

    resulting rom sediment loading are accomodated primately by a convex-up flexural hinge, physiographically represented by the Fall Zone. Our results elucidate an inherent danger in using topography alone to constrain late-stage passive margin deformation mechanisms. Only through careful synthesis of field stratigraphic and geomorphic elements such as fluvial terraces, Coastal Plain deposits, and offshore stratigraphy can age control be extended from the offshore depositional setting to the erosionally dominated continent. This sudy demonstrates that despite a relatively subdued topography, the middle U.S. Atlantic margin experiences progressive flexural isostatic deformation similar to that proposed for high-relief margins characterized by great escarpments. Thus margin topographic diversity remains a function of other factors, such as lithospheric composition and/or structure, supracrustal stratigraphy and structure, degree of drainage integration, drainage divide migration and climate.

  7. Direct Drive Hall Thruster System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskins, W. Andrew; Homiak, Daniel; Cassady, R. Joseph; Kerslake, Tom; Peterson, Todd; Ferguson, Dale; Snyder, Dave; Mikellides, Ioannis; Jongeward, Gary; Schneider, Todd

    2003-01-01

    The sta:us of development of a Direct Drive Ha!! Thruster System is presented. 13 the first part. a s:udy of the impacts to spacecraft systems and mass benefits of a direct-drive architecture is reviewed. The study initially examines four cases of SPT-100 and BPT-4000 Hall thrusters used for north-south station keeping on an EXPRESS-like geosynchronous spacecraft and for primary propulsion for a Deep Space- 1 based science spacecraft. The study is also extended the impact of direct drive on orbit raising for higher power geosynchronous spacecraft and on other deep space missions as a function of power and delta velocity. The major system considerations for accommodating a direct drive Hall thruster are discussed, including array regulation, system grounding, distribution of power to the spacecraft bus, and interactions between current-voltage characteristics for the arrays and thrusters. The mass benefit analysis shows that, for the initial cases, up to 42 kg of dry mass savings is attributable directly to changes in the propulsion hardware. When projected mass impacts of operating the arrays and the electric power system at 300V are included, up to 63 kg is saved for the four initial cases. Adoption of high voltage lithium ion battery technology is projected to further improve these savings. Orbit raising of higher powered geosynchronous spacecraft, is the mission for which direct drive provides the most benefit, allowing higher efficiency electric orbit raising to be accomplished in a limited period of time, as well as nearly eliminating significant power processing heat rejection mass. The total increase in useful payload to orbit ranges up to 278 kg for a 25 kW spacecraft, launched from an Atlas IIA. For deep space missions, direct drive is found to be most applicable to higher power missions with delta velocities up to several km/s , typical of several Discovery-class missions. In the second part, the status of development of direct drive propulsion power

  8. The sustainable management of ameliorated peatlands on changed land use conditions; scenarios of constrains and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanskiy, , Merrit; Vollmer, Elis; Penu, Priit

    2015-04-01

    The utilization of organic soils for forestry or agriculture requires the land amelioration that could result on the peat losses from 15 to 20 t ha-1 in a year on following five years. After five years, the peat losses will be 5 - 15 t ha-1 in a year. The agricultural land resource on different types of organic soils (including ameliorated bogs) in Estonia is 360 000 ha that comprises 41% of total agricultural land area. The landscape iself is a valuable resource that considered to be a set of characteristics that satisfy needs of people using the landscape: economical or non-economical value; ecological, social, recreational, aesthetical, educational, scientific or even protective value. More diverse landscapes have higher biodiversity and yield more services to public, they are also seen as more sustainable and resilient to short-term changes. In order to maintain landscape diversity, sustainable maintenance is important. The purpose of current study was to estimate the land use potential on three different ameliorated peat areas and to develop the methodology for the futher sustainable utilization in order to secure the best ecological functioning of soil while taking into account maintaining and increasing landscape value. Therefore, site specific soil sampling (n=77) was carried out on predetermined eight study sites. Soil samples were analyzed for main agrochemical parameters (n=17; pHKCl, P, K, C%, N%, S%, ash, main anions and cations). This enables determing site-specific best suitable crops and land use scenarios. For the land resource description (soils type, topology) the digital soil map (1: 10,000) and field sudy based database were used for describing the model areas. For more specific identification of the field layers the Agricultural Registers and Information Board (ARIB) and databases of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) payments were used for subsidy schemes chekout. Estonian Nature Information System map tool was used to specify the

  9. Affective Infrastructures: Toward a Cultural Neuropsychology of Sport

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Leslie L.

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been a turn toward considerations of embodiment, cognition, and context in sport studies. Many researchers have argued that the traditional focus on clinical psychology and performance enhancement within the discipline is incomplete, and now emphasize the importance of athletes’ social and familial contexts in a research paradigm that examines interconnections between movement, cognition, emotion, and the social and cultural context in which movement takes place. While it is important that the sport studies focus is being expanded to consider these interactions, I will argue that this model is still incomplete in that it is missing a fundamental variable – that of our evolutionary neurobiological roots. I will use the work of affective neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Stephen Porges to show that because sport so clearly activates neural systems that function at both proximate and ultimate levels of causation, it can be seen to serve fundamental needs for affective balance. A neurobiology of affect shows how the evolution of the mammalian autonomic nervous system has resulted in neurophysiological substrates for affective processes and stress responses, and has wide-ranging implications for sport studies in terms of suggesting what forms of coaching might be the most effective in what context. I propose the term cultural neuropsychology of sport as a descriptor for a model that examines the relationships between neurophysiological substrates and athletes’ social and familial contexts in terms of how these variables facilitate or fail to facilitate athletes’ neuroceptions of safety, which in turn have a direct impact on their performance. A cultural neuropsychological model of sport might thereby be seen to elaborate a relationship between proximate and ultimate mechanisms in concretely applied ways. PMID:22069389

  10. Into the subduction plate interface: insights from exhumed terranes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Plunder, A.

    2013-12-01

    In order to place constraints on the still elusive lithological and physical nature of the subduction plate interface, we herein present critical petrological (and modelling) data from intermediate depths along the subduction interface. Their implications, ranging from long-term underplating and exhumation to short-lived seismic events, are confronted with the recent wealth of geophysical/chemical data from the literature. Emphasis is placed on findings from two major localities showing deeply subducted ophiolitic remnants (Zermatt-Saas, Monviso), which crop out in the classic, well-preserved fossil subduction setting of the Western Alps. Both ophiolite remnants in fact represent large, relatively continuous fragments of oceanic lithosphere (i.e., several km-thick tectonic slices across tens of km) exhumed from ~80 km depths and thereby provide important constraints on interplate coupling mechanisms. We show that pervasive hydrothermal processes and seafloor alteration promoting fluid incorporation in both mafic and associated ultramafic rocks was essential, together with the presence of km-thick serpentinite soles, to decrease the density of the tectonic slices and prevent them from an irreversible sinking into the mantle. The Monviso case sudy (particularly the Lago Superiore Unit) provides further insights on both seismicity and fluid flow along the subduction plate interface at ~80 km depths: (1) Eclogite breccias, reported here for the first time, mark the locus of an ancient fault zone associated with intraslab, intermediate-depth earthquakes at ~80 km depth. They correspond to m-sized blocks made of 1-10 cm large fragments of eclogite mylonite later embedded in serpentinite in a ~100m thick eclogite facies shear zone. We suggest that seismic brecciation (possibly at magnitudes Mw ~4) occurred in the middle part of the oceanic crust, accompanied by the input of externally-derived fluids. (2) Prominent fluid-rock interactions, as attested by ubiquitous

  11. Global ocean monitoring for the World Climate Research Programme.

    PubMed

    Revelle, R; Bretherton, F

    1986-07-01

    -"Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere (TOGA)"-will be undertaken to sudy the sequence of events of air-sea interactions in the tropical oceans and their impact on climatic variations on land-for example, variations in the strength and location of the Indian Ocean monsoon, droughts in low latitudes, and climatic fluctuations in temperate latitudes.Experimental and continuing time series will be taken at fixed locations to obtain a better picture of the magnitude and causes of ocean climate variability. National and multinational systematic repeated measurements along selected ocean transects or in specific ocean areas will be taken to determine oceanic variability and teleconnections between oceanic and atmospheric processes. Examples are the long Japanese section along the meridian of 137° E and the 'Sections' program of the USSR and several other countries in Energy-Active zones.The results from this wide range of observations and experiments will be used to guide and define mathematical models of the ocean circulation and its interactions with the atmosphere.It can be shown that biogeochemical processes in the ocean play an important role in determining the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere and thus in causing long-term climatic changes. Variations in the biological productivity of sub-surface waters cause variations in the effectveness of the biological pump which carries organic carbon down into deeper waters where it is oxidized. Studies of ice cores from 20 000 to 30 000 yr before the present indicate that atmospheric carbon dioxide varied by a factor of 2 within times of the order of 100 yr, and these variations were accompanied by large excursions in atmospheric temperature. Thus, ocean climatic monitoring must take into account measurements of both biological and physical variations in the ocean.

  12. The possible regional impact of climate change on water quality: eco-hydrological modeling in the Jizera Basin (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Marta; Hesse, Cornelia; Krysanova, Valentina

    2010-05-01

    The possible impact of climate change on water is well recognized and has been widely reported. Despite this recent progress, the research of impact of climate change on water quality has started only recently. Additionally, the consequences of climate change on water quality are important and are supposed to heavily influence the water resources management. In this sudy, the water quality modeling was done in order to evaluate the possible impact of climate change on water quality in selected mesoscale basin regarding nitrogen pollution and to assess the influence of atmospheric deposition on nitrogen pollution. The research was done by using the eco-hydrological model SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model, http://www.pik-potsdam.de/research/research-domains/climate-impacts-and-vulnerabilities/models/swim), which simulates water and nutrient fluxes in soil and vegetation, as well as transport of water and nutrients to and within the river network. The modeling period was from 1981 until 2003. The Jizera Basin, which is situated in NW Bohemia, Czech Republic, was selected as a study area. To setup the model of the Jizera Basin, the study area was characterized by several raster datasets: digital elevation model, soil map, land use map and subbasin map. Climate data, such as temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and air humidity, were interpolated to the 203 subbasin centroids by an inverse distance weighted method using data of 10 climate stations in and around the Jizera Basin. The discharge at the outlet of the Jizera Basin was calibrated for the period 1981 - 1990. After the adjustments of snowmelt processes in SWIM model, the model reproduces discharge at the outlet quite satisfactorily. The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency for whole calibration period is 0.78. The period 1991-1995 was used for validation of discharge. The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency for whole validation period is 0.73. After the calibration of the hydrological processes in the basin

  13. Fire effects on peat and organo-mineral soils of Meshchera plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibart, Anna; Koshovskii, Timur; Gamova, Natalia; Kovach, Roman

    2015-04-01

    The fire effects the soil properties depend on soil type and on their vulnerability to fires. The most of available data is devoted to changes in organo-mineral soils. But the peat fires can cause deeper changes in soil profiles, especially in case of drained peat soils. Now the lack of information exists in the sphere of the comparison of these fire types on soil cover. Meshchera plain (Moscow and Ryazan Regions, Russia) has different soil types. Moreover peatlands were partly drained, and the plain was affected by numerous fires of different time. So there is a need of detailed post-fire soil investigations in this region. During current research the soils Meshchera plain subjected by wildfires of 2002, 2007, 2010 and 2012 were studied. A total of 32 profiles including background and post-fire histosols, histic and sod podzols were investigated. Moreover the detailed description of vegetation cover was conducted. The samples were taken from genetic horizons. The morfological properties of soil profiles were sudied and the samples were analysed on organic carbon, pH, macroelements, magnetic susceptibility. After the wildfires changes in morfological and physico-chemical properties of soils were detected in most cases. The formation of ash and charry horizons was observed only in cases of peat soils affecetd by intense fires, and all post-fire drained peat soils had thick ash horizons even after 10 years after the fires. The significant loss of organic matter took place after burning. But almost immediately after the fires new stage of humus formation usually started. For instance, in post-fire histosols in 2 years after the burning the content of organic carbon reached to 10-12 % in upper horizons. ph values in background histosols were approximately 4-5. After the fire pH increased in these soil type to 8, and two years after the fire event pH decreased to 6-7. In podzols pH values returned to the pre-fire level 4-5 in two years. The magnetic susceptibility of