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Sample records for suez au rapport

  1. Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, K.I. )

    1988-08-01

    The Gulf of Suez is an intracratonic rift basin which originated in the early Miocene on the once-continuous Arabo-African plate. The Precambrian crystalline basement is overlain by a platform cover of Early Cambrian to Eocene age. There is no evidence of tectonic precursors to the Miocene breakup. Marine transgressions, for example during the Carboniferous and Cretaceous, followed wide embayments caused by long-wavelength oscillations trending northwest-southeast on the North African craton. This article discusses the geologic history of the Gulf.

  2. ASTER Suez Canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five

  3. Suez Canal, Gulf of Suez, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt, as seen from the Apollo 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Suez Canal, Gulf of Suez, Sinai Peninsula, United Arab Republic (Egypt), Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 13th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 126 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 19 hours and 42 minutes.

  4. Rapport in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Manzanares, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Rapport has been recognized as important in learning in general but little is known about its importance in distance education (DE). The study we report on in this paper provides insights into the importance of rapport in DE as well as challenges to and indicators of rapport-building in DE. The study relied on interviews with 42 Canadian…

  5. Adlai Stevenson and the Suez Crisis of 1956.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Leo W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines Adlai Stevenson's response to the Suez crisis, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the struggle between the nationalism emerging in Third World countries and the imperialism fading in Europe. It also looks at Stevenson's stance toward Israel and his relations with American Zionists during the 1956 presidential campaign. (AM)

  6. Mites (acari) infesting commensal rats in Suez Canal zone, Egypt.

    PubMed

    el Kady, G A; Shoukry, A; Ragheb, D A; el Said, A M; Habib, K S; Morsy, T A

    1995-08-01

    Mites are arthropods distinguished from ticks by usually being microscopical in size and have a hypostome unarmed with tooth-like anchoring processes. They are group in a number of suborders, each with super-families and families including many genera of medical and economic importance. In this paper, commensal rodents (Rattus norvegicus, R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorous) were surveyed in the Suez Canal Zone for their acari ectoparasites. Four species of mites were recovered. In a descending order of mite indices, they were Eulaelaps stabularis (4.83 on 6 rats), Laelaps nuttalli (3.11 on 27 rats), Ornithonyssus bacoti (1.66 on 9 rats) and Dermanyssus gallinae (0.66 on 24 rats). The overall mite indices in the three governorates were 3.66 in Suez, 2.82 in Ismailia and zero in Port Said. The medical and economic importance of the mites were discussed.

  7. Geology of the Warda discovery, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, J.N.; Greet, M.J.; Collings, B.P.; Davis, C.B.; Miller, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    British Gas, as operator for its partners, Yukong Ltd., and Union Pacific Petroleum Suez Ltd., recently discovered the Warda field in the Gulf of Suez in November 1990. Discovery well Hb78-2, located 4 km off the mouth of the Wadi Araba on the west side of the north-central Gulf of Suez, reached a total depth of 8,400 ft in Nubia clastics. Oil was tested in the Hb78-2 from five separate clastic intervals at a cumulative flow rate of approximately 7,000 BOPD of 20-24{degree} API with no water. Currently, an appraisal well program is underway to extend the limits of the field. This significant new-field discovery is located in a part of the Suez basin that previously considered to have limited oil potential. Geophysical assessment of the structure used exploration 3-D seismic coverage and concurrently acquired potential-fields datasets. The Warda structure at Kareen-Rudeis levels is a broad four-way closure, trending northwest-southeast, which drapes over older pre-Miocene tilted fault blocks. The Warda structure lies downthrown to a major Clysmic shoulder fault and is bounded on the northeast by another Clysmic down-to-the-basin normal fault. Cross faulting is noted at the deeper levels, and particularly influences the rift boundary faults. According to burial-history modeling, oil generation occurred within 4-5 million years after the Eocene-Senonian carbonate source rocks achieved onset of oil generation at a birthline of 10,000-11,000 ft subsea. The Cretaceous-Carboniferous Nubia sandstones apparently have acted as a conduit for oil migration from the adjacent Lagia hydrocarbon kitchen a few kilometers to the northeast.

  8. 75 FR 57911 - Application To Export Electric Energy; GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing NA, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing NA, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing NA... utilities, Federal power marketing agencies and other entities within the United States. The...

  9. 46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of war, must be measured...

  10. 46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of war, must be measured...

  11. 46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of war, must be measured...

  12. 46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of war, must be measured...

  13. 46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of war, must be measured...

  14. Graben infilling in Gulf of Suez and Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Burollet, P.F.

    1986-05-01

    During the last 4 years, the French research group Genegass has completed geological and geophysical studies in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Suez. Neogene infilling of the basin is related with basement quality and volume of clastic supply, and inherited structural features are important to the development of Miocene rifting. The Neogene series may be divided into four major groups (Listed A-D), each limited by unconformities that seem to reflect the major stages of rifting. (A) The lowermost formations begin with a conglomerate and are followed by a variegated unit of sand and clay. In the Gulf of Suez, especially on the eastern bank, these formations are marine. Along the Red Sea, tilted blocks may be capped by stromatolites, and the valleys between them are the site of shale and evaporite sedimentation (lower Miocene). (B) The main extension phase results in an invasion of marine shales. The lower zones contain coarse clastics, and the high zones contain reefs and bioclastic limestone (late Burdigalian to early Serravallian). (C) The middle to late Miocene corresponds to a regional basinward tilting. Stromatolites coat the slopes, and conglomerate fans are found in the lower zones. Evaporite sedimentation dominates; anhydrite is found on the borders, and in the basin, thick halite is overlain by a clastic series. Basement shoulders are uplifted. (D) During the Pliocene and Pleistocene, the central part of the graben showed an important subsidence, and salt tectonism was active with diapirs and collapses.

  15. Biogenic Films at the Mouth of the Suez Canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery used the sunglint off the surface of the Mediterranean Sea to reveal biogenic films on the ocean surface. ('Biogenic film' refers to a thin layer of biologically-produced film resting on the surface. Click for more details.) The films dampen surface capillary waves, creating brighter and darker reflections, which, in turn, trace the complex surface water movements along the coast. The sunglint also highlights coastal features (jetties, submerged coastal areas) near the Port of Suez. Image STS105-331-18, taken in August 2001, was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  16. Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    James, N.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

    1988-02-01

    Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

  17. Intentionally Building Rapport with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcher, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Developing rapport with students is important. Carson (1996) found that when alumni reflected on professors they had encountered 30 years ago, the quality most frequently associated with effective teachers was this: their attitude toward and relationship with students. In this article, the author shares the positive consequences of intentionally…

  18. Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, J.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

    1988-01-01

    Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. In the upper unit, the reef crest is massive columnar Porites and less common Caulastrea framestone. The back-reef is a framestone of diverse faviids, mainly Montastrea Favites, and Tarbellastrea, and interbedded reef-flat rhodolite rudstones. The back-reef and reef-flat facies grade onshelf into Stylophora bafflestone biostromers and faviid bioherms. The reef front is a shallow to intermediate depth zone of numerous and diverse faviids, dominated by Montastrea and Acanthastrea framestones, bioclastic sands, and hardgrounds. Deeper zones are mostly small Acanthastrea mounds or rhodolite/bivalve rudstones with scattered faviids and Acanthastrea. Synsedimentary lithification, internal sedimentationm, and bioerosion prevail throughout. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

  19. Cost estimate for a proposed GDF Suez LNG testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Brady, Patrick Dennis; Jernigan, Dann A.; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Nissen, Mark R.; Lopez, Carlos; Vermillion, Nancy; Hightower, Marion Michael

    2014-02-01

    At the request of GDF Suez, a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate was prepared for the design, construction, testing, and data analysis for an experimental series of large-scale (Liquefied Natural Gas) LNG spills on land and water that would result in the largest pool fires and vapor dispersion events ever conducted. Due to the expected cost of this large, multi-year program, the authors utilized Sandia's structured cost estimating methodology. This methodology insures that the efforts identified can be performed for the cost proposed at a plus or minus 30 percent confidence. The scale of the LNG spill, fire, and vapor dispersion tests proposed by GDF could produce hazard distances and testing safety issues that need to be fully explored. Based on our evaluations, Sandia can utilize much of our existing fire testing infrastructure for the large fire tests and some small dispersion tests (with some modifications) in Albuquerque, but we propose to develop a new dispersion testing site at our remote test area in Nevada because of the large hazard distances. While this might impact some testing logistics, the safety aspects warrant this approach. In addition, we have included a proposal to study cryogenic liquid spills on water and subsequent vaporization in the presence of waves. Sandia is working with DOE on applications that provide infrastructure pertinent to wave production. We present an approach to conduct repeatable wave/spill interaction testing that could utilize such infrastructure.

  20. 77 FR 39689 - Application To Export Electric Energy; IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...; IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc... Mexico would be surplus energy purchased from electric utilities, Federal power marketing agencies,...

  1. L'intérêt de la sélection du faisceau (12)C par rapport au (13)C pour la radiothérapie du cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farés, G.; Hachem, A.; Bimbot, R.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Anne, R.; Mirea, M.; Belahbib, S.; Benfoughal, T.; Cabot, C.; Clapier, F.; Freeman, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Sauvestre, J. E.; Sida, J. L.

    1998-04-01

    Heavy ions having interesting properties as Bragg's peak require an important energy in order to attain a deep tumor. At intermediate and relativist energies, fragmentation reactions occur throughout their path and produce fragments lighter than the projectile. Consequently, the product fragments give a residual dose beyond the Bragg peak. For these reasons, the interesting ions in radiotherapy of cancer converge toward heavy light ions (C - Ne). Moreover, for a better treatment safety, it is envisaged also to use β(+) transmitting radioactive ion beams. This allows to provide the picture of the really irradiated volume by using a positon camera. In this context, our works essentially is concentrated on production rates and cross sections calculations for nucleus products in the fragmentation of (12)C at 95 MeV/u and (13)C at 75 MeV/u. Les ions lourds possédant des propriétés balistiques importantes tel que le pic de Bragg nécessitent une énergie importante pour atteindre une tumeur profonde. Aux énergies intermédiaires et relativistes, des réactions de fragmentation se produisent tout au long de leur trajet et donnent naissance à des fragments plus légers que le projectile. Ces derniers entraînent une dose résiduelle au-delà du pic de Bragg. Pour cette raison, les ions les plus intéressants en radiothérapie convergent vers les ions lourds - légers (C à Ne). Par ailleurs, pour une sécurité accrue du traitement, on envisage d'utiliser aussi des faisceaux d'ions radioactifs émetteurs β(+). Ceci permet de fournir l'image du volume réellement irradié en utilisant une caméra à positon. Dans ce contexte, nos travaux ont porté essentiellement sur le calcul de taux de production et de la section efficace des noyaux issus de la fragmentation du (12)C à 95 MeV/u et du (13)C à 75 MeV/u.

  2. Thermochronological investigation of the timing of rifting and rift segmentation in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, W.; Stockli, D. F.

    2006-12-01

    The Tertiary Gulf of Suez rift system is one of the best-studied continental rift systems and has inspired many fundamental geodynamic models for continental rifting. However, our limited knowledge of how extensional strain is spatially and temporally distributed has made it difficult to adequately evaluate models for the dynamic evolution of this rift. A critical aspect of constraining the evolution of rifting and rift segmentation in the Gulf of Suez involves acquiring reliable geochronological constraints on extensional faulting. This study has commenced a systematic investigation of the timing and spatial distribution of rifting, lateral rift segmentation, and rift localization within the Gulf of Suez, Egypt, employing apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometry. (U-Th)/He thermochronometric analysis of sample transects from exhumed fault blocks within the rift integrated with structural data will allow us to directly determine the timing, distribution, and magnitude of extension. The onset of major rifting (~24-19 Ma) in the Gulf of Suez was marked by the development of crustal domino-style tilt blocks and syn-rift deposition of the late Oligocene non-marine Abu Zenima Fm and non-marine to restricted marine Nukhul Fm. Development of the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform cut off the rift from the Red Sea rift at an early extensional stage. Apatite (AHe) and zircon (ZHe) (U- Th)/He data were collected from basement and pre-rift sedimentary sample transects from the central and southern Sinai Peninsula portion and the Gebel El Zeit area in the southern Gulf of Suez as well as from basement samples from selected drill cores off Gebel El Zeit. Preliminary data exhibit partially reset ages trending as old as ~70 Ma (AHe) and ~450 Ma (ZHe) from shallower structural levels (Proterozoic basement and Phanerozoic cover sequence). Structurally deeper samples yield abundant AHe ages of ~22-24 Ma, indicative of rapid cooling and exhumation during the early Miocene. More

  3. Ascidian introductions through the Suez Canal: The case study of an Indo-Pacific species.

    PubMed

    Rius, Marc; Shenkar, Noa

    2012-10-01

    Although marine biological invasions via the Suez Canal have been extensively documented, little is known about the introduction of non-indigenous ascidians (Chordata, Ascidiacea), a group containing particularly aggressive invasive species. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to study the introduction of the ascidian Herdmania momus into the Mediterranean Sea. We reviewed its taxonomy and global distribution, and analyzed how genetic variation is partitioned between sides of the Suez Canal. The taxonomic revision showed that H. momus currently has a wide Indo-Pacific distribution. Genetic data indicated two well-differentiated colonization histories across the eastern Mediterranean. Our findings suggest that the range expansion of H. momus has been greatly facilitated by the combined effect of human-mediated transport and the species' ability to adapt to different environments. The integrative approach presented here is critical to attain a holistic understanding of marine biological invasions, especially when studying groups with a poorly resolved taxonomy.

  4. A study of Salmonella typhi isolated in Suez Canal area. Biotyping, phage typing and colicinogenic property.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, S; Khalifa, I; el Daly, O; Heiba, A; Farmer, J; Brenner, F; el Batawi, Y

    1989-01-01

    In this work a total of 82 strains of Salmonella typhi were isolated from Egyptian patients diagnosed as quiry enteric fever. These cases were from Ismalia, Suez and port Said Areas. The strains fell in 16 phage types. Phage types N, 40, E1, and degraded Vi were the commonest phage type in Ismailia, while phage types degraded Vi and C1 were the commonest in Port Said. Phage types Di-N, degraded Vi, A and C1 were the commonest in Suez. Chemotyping of Salmonella typhi showed that the majority of the strains belonged to chemotype I (82%), and the rest belonged to chemotype II (18%). Colicin production was negative and all the strains were susceptible to the currently used antibiotics.

  5. Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabek, M. G.; El-Shinawy, R. M. K.; Gomaa, M.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 1986-1992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U 3O 8) represent the main items that contribute significantly to the collective dose within the Suez Canal area (Port-Said, Ismailia and Suez). The values of the annual collective dose due to transportation of all radionuclide materials was found to be at a maximum in Suez town and is equal to 5.04 × 10 -8 Man-Sv for the whole populations. If we only consider the workder at the harbour (estimated to be 50 persons), the value of the annual collective dose is about 3.33 × 10 -4 Man-Sv. These values are less than the exemption value of 1 Man-Sv recommended by the IAEA. For the accident case, the following pathways are considered by the code: ground-shine, direct inhalation, inhalation of resuspended material and cloud-shine. The total values of the estimated risks for each radionuclide material are presented in table form and, in addition, health effects (genetic effects, GE, and latent cancer fatality), LCF) are discussed. The calculated values of the radiological risks are very low for the three towns, showing that no radiation-induced early deaths are to be expected.

  6. Synrift sedimentation in the Gulf of Suez rift controlled by eustatic sea level variations

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S.K.; Schamel, S.

    1985-01-01

    Laterally persistent stratigraphic variations in the southern Gulf of Suez rift indicate that eustatic variations in sea level predominate over local tectonic effects in controlling Neogene basin-fill sedimentation. Low sea level allows extensive erosion of tilt-block crests and rift shoulders, sending clastic aprons into the intervening subbasins and allowing evaporite deposition. High sea level minimizes clastic input, allowing marls and shales to build up off structure and reefs to form on and around tilt blocks. Thus variations in sediment character indicate relative sea level. Early rifting events in the upper Oligocene are marked by deposition of continental red beds. Overlying lowest Miocene clastics and evaporites are cut by a lower Burdigalian unconformity, indicating a minor transgression in the Aquitanian. Above a disconformity, laterally varying clastics and evaporites suggest regression followed by intermittent shallow-water conditions. A higher unconformity is overlain by thick cyclic evaporites representing periodic flooding and drying of the rift, a result of sea level remaining close to the height of the Suez sill to the north. A major Messinian unconformity cuts the section, indicating major regression, and is overlain by largely clastic sediments of both continental and marine affinities, showing rapid sea level fluctuations. Regional synrift sedimentation has been controlled more by eustatic sea level change, modified by the Suez sill to the north, than by tectonic movements within the rift.

  7. Evaluation of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aquatic species of Suez Gulf water along El-Sokhna area to the Suez refineries.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nabila A; Ahmed, Omayma E; Doheim, Mamdouh M

    2014-02-01

    The Egyptian Red Sea environment especially along El-Sokhna area to the Suez refineries (Suez) is severely contaminated with organic compounds, as well as overfishing. This may be well contributory to recent serious declines in fish stocks. Fish embryos are also particularly vulnerable to oil exposure, even at extremely low concentrations of less than one part per billion. Consequently, even traces of oil pollution at levels often considered safe for wildlife can cause severe damage to fish. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in ten fish species of aquatic species by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The compositions of PAHs determined in all samples were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAH pollutants in the studied region. The total content of these16 PAHs ranged from 399.616 up to 67,631.779 ng/g wet weight. The data show that these values are considered to be alarmingly high enough to cause lethal toxicity effect by accumulation. All studied aquatic species samples are characterized by relatively high concentrations of the six-membered ring PAHs. The origin of PAHs in the collected samples is either petrogenic, biogenic, or mixed petrogenic and biogenic.

  8. Professor-Student Rapport Scale Predicts Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.; Pugh, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Rapport traditionally has been measured in therapy or in other one-on-one relationships such as with roommates. As yet, no scale is available to measure professor-student rapport. In this study, 51 undergraduates created items to measure professor-student rapport, and subsequently, 195 different college students rated their agreement with items…

  9. October field: The latest giant under development in Egypt's Gulf of Suez

    SciTech Connect

    Lelek, J.J.; Abdine, A.S. )

    1990-09-01

    October field, the third largest oil field in Egypt, produced 378 MMBO from its discovery in 1977 until January 1990. It is the northernmost giant oil field in the Gulf of Suez Rift basin. Twenty wells from five platforms in approximately 190 ft (58 m) of water currently drain over 3,238 ha. Recent successful field extensions demonstrate the viability of continuing exploration in this oil-rich area. This structurally trapped field is a complex of rotated fault blocks typical of rift basins worldwide. A northwest-trending normal fault with an approximate throw of 1,220 m has trapped an 335-m oil column on the upthrown eastern side. On the upthrown side, the Carboniferous through Oligocene prerift section dips gently to the northeast and is unconformably overlain by generally flat Miocene to Holocene clastics, carbonates, and evaporites. Severe multiple problems result from thick Miocene evaporites hampering seismic definition of the highly productive prerift section. These same evaporites serve as the ultimate seal in October field and throughout the Gulf of Suez. Although four layers are productive, approximately 95% of field reserves are within Carboniferous to Lower Cretaceous massive Nubia Sandstones. The remaining reserves are in more stratified Upper Cretaceous sandstones, basal Miocene rift-fill Nukhul Formation clastics, and a Lower Miocene clastic in the upper Rudeis Formation. Several distinct reservoir accumulations exist, with the deepest and most significant original oil-water contact at {minus}10,670 ft subsea. October field oil gravities range from 14 to 34{degree} API, with an initial solution GOR of 134 to 474 SCF/STB. The hydrocarbon source for all October field oil as well as most Gulf of Suez oil is believed to be the Campanian Brown Limestone Member of the Sudr Formation. Average reservoir parameters for the Nubia Formation are 16% porosity, 236 md permeability, 137 m net pay thickness, and 5,506 psi original reservoir pressure.

  10. Depositional setting and hydrocarbon source potential of the Miocene Gulf of Suez syn-rift evaporites

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Arthur, M.A.; Quinn, J.S.; Whelan, J.K.; Katz, B.J. )

    1988-08-01

    The Red Sea rift basin and its northern continuation, the Gulf of Suez, has experienced continuous deposition of marine evaporites throughout much of its development from the early Miocene to the Pliocene resulting in the accumulation of up to 5 km of evaporite strata in the rift. In this paper, the geologic history of these evaporites are discussed, along with their petroleum source rock potential. The authors hypothesize that rapid deposition of organic matter occurred during episodic storms and freshening events in which a less saline surface layer developed.

  11. Phytoplankton variability in relation to some environmental factors in the eastern coast of Suez Gulf, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mohamed Z; El-Din, Nihal G Shams; Gharib, Samiha M

    2015-10-01

    Water samples were seasonally collected from 12 stations of the eastern coast of Suez Gulf during autumn of 2012 and winter, spring, and summer of 2013 in order to investigate phytoplankton community structure in relation to some physicochemical parameters. The study area harbored a diversified phytoplankton community (138 species), belonging to 67 genera. Four algal groups were represented and classified as Bacillariophyceae (90 species), Dinophyceae (28 species), Cyanophyceae (16 species), and Chlorophyceae (4 species). The results indicated a relative high occurrence of some species namely.; Pleurotaenium trabecula of green algae; Chaetoceros lorenzianus, Proboscia alata var. gracillima, Pseudosolenia calcar-avis, and Pseudo-nitzschia pungens of diatoms; Trichodesmium erythraeum and Pseudoanabaena limnetica of cyanophytes. Most of other algal species were fairly distributed at the selected stations of the study area. The total abundance of phytoplankton was relatively low (average of 2989 unit/L) in the eastern coast of Suez Gulf, as compared its western coast and the northern part of the Red Sea. The diversity of phytoplankton species was relatively high (2.35-3.82 nats) with an annual average of 3.22 nats in the present study. The results concluded that most of eastern coast of Suez Gulf is still healthy, relatively unpolluted, and oligotrophic area, which is clearly achieved by the low values of dissolved phosphate (0.025-0.3 μM), nitrate (0.18-1.26 μM), and dissolved ammonium (0.81-5.36 μM). Even if the occurrence of potentially harmful algae species was low, the study area should be monitored continuously. The dissolved oxygen ranged between 1.77 and 8.41 mg/L and pH values between 7.6 and 8.41. The multiple regression analysis showed that the dissolved nitrate and pH values were the most effective factors that controlled the seasonal fluctuations of phytoplankton along the eastern coast of Suez Gulf during 2012-2013.

  12. Current motion and short-term deformations in the Suez Sinai area from GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riguzzi, Federica; Pietrantonio, Grazia; Piersanti, Antonio; Mahmoud, Salah M.

    2006-07-01

    We analyze observations from eight GPS campaigns carried out between 1997 and 2005 on a network of 13 sites in the Suez-Sinai area, where separation between the African and the Arabian plates takes place. This is the key area to understand if and in which way Sinai behaves like a sub-plate of the African plate and the role played by seismic and geodetic (long-term) deformation release. Our analysis shows that, on average, the Suez-Sinai area motion, in terms of ITRF00 velocities, matches the African plate motion defined by the NNR-NUVEL-1A model. The horizontal principal strain rate axes estimated separately in the Gulf of Suez area and in the northern Sinai vary from compression across the Gulf (-2.2 ± 1.2) × 10 -8 year -1 to NE extension (1.0 ± 1.5) × 10 -8 year -1 in the North, showing the presence of two distinct domains, so that in our opinion Sinai cannot be considered simply a unique rigid block. The analysis of GPS baseline length variations shows short-term deformations across the Gulf of Suez, reaching up a maximum value of more than 1 cm in 8 years. Since current geodynamical models do not predict significant tectonic deformation in this area, we work under the hypothesis that a contribute may be expected by post-seismic relaxation effects. Under this hypothesis, we compare the baselines length variations with the post-seismic relaxation field associated with five major local earthquakes occurred in the area, testing two different viscoelastic models. Our results show that the detected short-term deformations are better modeled for viscosity values of 10 18 Pa s in the lower crust and 10 20 Pa s in the asthenosphere. However, since the modeled post-seismic effect results modest and a certain amount of the detected deformation is not accounted for, we think that an improved modeling should take into account the lateral heterogeneities of crust and upper mantle structures.

  13. [The corvette "Nordstjernen's" voyage to the opening of the Suez Canal--naval medicine in 1869].

    PubMed

    Ongre, Aksel; Pettersen, Jan Sommerfelt; Munch, Johan Storm

    2002-06-30

    When the Norwegian corvette Nordstjernen was in the North Sea bound for Port Said to be present at the opening of the Suez Canal on 17 November 1869, an officer suffered a rupture of m. triceps brachii when he was drawn into the machinery during a storm. He was put ashore in Harwich; four days after the injury he was hospitalized in Colchester. The voyage was eventful in other ways too. Another officer died from typhoid fever in Ismailia. On the Swedish frigate Vanadis, also present at the opening of the Suez Canal, one of the doctors died from lung infection and was buried in Smyrna; a twelve-feet high column of white marble was taken from the ruins of Aesculap's temple and put on his grave. Denmark was represented by the frigate Sjaelland. During a storm in the North Sea, one seaman fell down on the deck from the foresail yard and suffered contusions and a fracture of the left clavicle. These cases illustrate challenges that faced our ancestors. The accident happened when the ship was in the Netherlands sector of the North Sea as we know it today. Today the Coast Guard could have arranged transport by helicopter and hospitalized the patient in about two hours.

  14. Relationship between sediment morphology and oil pollution along the Suez Canal beaches, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Mostafa, Y.M.

    1996-10-01

    In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grains-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the major class represented in the studied marine sediments. Pollution in these sand grains increases in the irregular grains more so than in the more rounded grains. Also, deep surface points, pitting, and fissures are considered to be good sites to precipitate oil contamination. Also, the presence of iron oxides may be taken as evidence for tanker ballast washings. The heavy fraction (zircon) shows more contamination than the light fraction (quartz) in these samples. Finally, GC profiles have shown two types of samples: one typical of weathered or highly weathered crude oil patterns and the other for samples with very highly weathered profiles. The relationship obtained between morphology studies and both oil content and GC chromatogram profiles indicates that all of the studied locations are suffering from pollution of oil that is spilled while shipping petroleum through the Suez Canal.

  15. Oil prospect of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt - a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Elzarka, M.H.; Mostafa, A.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Four groups of rocks, having more than 0.5% of organic carbon are defined within the subsurface section of Rahmi area, Gulf of Suez. The deduced types of indigenous kerogen are: algal-amorphous, inertinite-woody, and herbaceous. The algal-amorphous kerogen of Rudeis/Nukhul Formations (Lower Miocene), Eocene and pre-Eocene rocks is recognized as being oil prone, that is having high capacity for generating oil. The application of hydrocarbon liquid window concept shows that the LOM values fall within the range from 8.6 to 10.8, and the thermal alteration index for the different units is not extended into oil generation window, where it ranges from immature (Kareem Formation-Lower Miocene), to moderately mature (Paleocene), to the beginning of the thermal phase of oil generation (Senonian). The vitrinite reflectance values indicate a low level of thermal maturity. The formational temperatures increase towards the depocentral part of the basin and eastwards to the present Gulf of Suez. The thermal maturity index increases towards ancient stratigraphic units. The study of organic richness, quality and maturity revealed that, where the Nukhul, Eocene and Senonian rocks are buried deeper in the study area, would have been excellent source rocks for oil.

  16. Surface expression of an accommodation zone within the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffield, Dana Q.; Schamel, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The Gebel Gharamul region in the western Gulf of Suez offers an excellent outcrop example of the structural geometries associated with an accommodation zone termination. The surface expression of the accommodation zone is dominated by a basement promontory, which protrudes from the rift shoulder and underlies the junction of oblique ramps from two adjacent half-grabens, both of which face the Gulf of Suez. The southern half-graben represents the breakaway fault of the southwest-dipping tilt-block domain, and the northern half-graben represents the collapse of the upper plate above the northeast-dipping tilt-block domain. Basement and Nubian rocks in the hanging walls above the opposing low-angle detachments on either side of the accommodation zone are broken by gulf-parallel synthetic normal faults and orthogonal transfer faults, which act as block terminations and incrementally accommodate the large-scale rotation and displacement between adjacent blocks. The prerift and synrift stratigraphic succession is draped over this fault template, resulting in a complex and variable distribution of structures, the product of an inhomogeneous stratigraphic succession within an accommodation zone.

  17. Subsurface structural mapping of Gebel El-Zeit area, Gulf of Suez, Egypt using aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; Salem, Ahmed; Ushijima, Keisuke

    2005-08-01

    The Gebel El-Zeit area is located on the western coast of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The areas in/and around the Gulf of Suez are generally important due to their hydrocarbon resources. In this study, we have applied gradient interpretation techniques (Euler deconvolution and analytic signal) to the aeromagnetic data of the Gebel El-Zeit area. The main objective of this study is to identify and delineate the possible subsurface structure of the area that may assist in locating new hydrocarbon prospects. Results of Euler method suggested that, on the eastern and western parts of the area, the basement could be observed on the ground (~50 m over the ground) and became more deeper on the central part to reach depth of 5 km (from the ground level). Results from the analytic signal method indicated that, the depth to the basement has an average value of 156 m on the eastern side and 758 m on the western side. Generally, the area is characterized by a graben structure bounded by major faults striking in the NW-SE direction.

  18. Structural evolution of the southern transfer zone of the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Allah, Ali M. A.; Abdel Aal, Mohamed H.; El-Said, Mohamed M.; Abd El-Naby, Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed study about the initiation and reactivations of Zeit-El Tor transfer zone, south Gulf of Suez rift, and its structural setting and tectonic evolution with respect to the Cretaceous-Cenozoic tectonic movements in North Egyptian margin. NE trending zone of opposed-dipping faults (22 km wide) has transferred the NE and SW rotations of the sub-basins in central and south Gulf of Suez rift, respectively. The evolution of this zone started by reactivation of the NE oriented late Neoproterozoic fractures that controlled the occurrence of Dokhan Volcanics in the rift shoulders. Later, the Syrian Arc contraction reactivated these fractures by a sinistral transpression during the Late Cretaceous-Eocene time. N64°E extension of the Oligo-Miocene rift reactivated the NE fractures by a sinistral transtension. During this rifting, the NE trending faults forming the transfer zone were more active than the rift-bounding faults; the Upper Cretaceous reverse faults in the blocks lying between these NE trending faults were rotated; and drape-related reverse faults and the positive flower structures were formed. Tectonic inversion from contraction to extension controlled the distribution and thickness of the Upper Cretaceous-Miocene rocks.

  19. Revenge versus rapport: Interrogation, terrorism, and torture.

    PubMed

    Alison, Laurence; Alison, Emily

    2017-04-01

    This review begins with the historical context of harsh interrogation methods that have been used repeatedly since the Second World War. This is despite the legal, ethical and moral sanctions against them and the lack of evidence for their efficacy. Revenge-motivated interrogations (Carlsmith & Sood, 2009) regularly occur in high conflict, high uncertainty situations and where there is dehumanization of the enemy. These methods are diametrically opposed to the humanization process required for adopting rapport-based methods-for which there is an increasing corpus of studies evidencing their efficacy. We review this emerging field of study and show how rapport-based methods rely on building alliances and involve a specific set of interpersonal skills on the part of the interrogator. We conclude with 2 key propositions: (a) for psychologists to firmly maintain the Hippocratic Oath of "first do no harm," irrespective of perceived threat and uncertainty, and (b) for wider recognition of the empirical evidence that rapport-based approaches work and revenge tactics do not. Proposition (a) is directly in line with fundamental ethical principles of practice for anyone in a caring profession. Proposition (b) is based on the requirement for psychology to protect and promote human welfare and to base conclusions on objective evidence. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Penetrating evaporites - new information from old seismic data in Suez Rift, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S.K.; Gawarecki, S.L.; Schamel, S.

    1987-05-01

    Structures in the prerift sediments, Gulf of Suez, are of primary interest for petroleum exploration. However, the overlying thick blanket of Miocene synrift evaporites severely limits resolution of deep structures in seismic reflection lines. A technique for maximizing accuracy of prerift maps and sections is illustrated by examples from the south-central Gulf of Suez. Preliminary structural maps of prerift units are generated from limited well data, good seismically derived maps of the base evaporite, and fragmentary deep seismic data. Through rigorous application of conventional cross section balancing techniques and geometric rules for listric normal fault-block rotation, trial cross sections are constructed. Construction of trial cross sections relies heavily on the following information from seismic lines: (1) thickness variations of synrift fill; (2) sequence boundaries representing unconformities over buried tilt blocks; (3) dip domains faintly visible beneath Miocene evaporites; and (4) faulting in Miocene sediments in response to deeper normal faults. The integration of well data allows control of seismic interpretation and of depth to prerift rocks. The sections are refined through iteration and are then used in conjunction with areal balancing methods to correct the structure maps. The subsequent serialization of balanced sections results in an internally consistent, geometrically constrained, three-dimensional picture of the basin which best fits all the available data. Important information on prerift structures which results from this technique includes location of normal faults and the magnitude of their throw, attitude of deep tilt blocks, and location of tilt-block terminations. Using this methodology, old prospects can be refined and new plays and prospects generated. These can then be tested by local detailed seismic work or by the drill.

  1. Examining the positive effects of rapport building: when and why does rapport building benefit adult eyewitness memory?

    PubMed

    Kieckhaefer, Jenna Mitchell; Vallano, Jonathan Patrick; Schreiber Compo, Nadja

    2014-01-01

    Most investigative interviewing protocols recommend building rapport with cooperative adult witnesses to increase the accuracy of their reports. Although a few recent studies support the benefits of rapport building on adult witness recall, no study has examined whether the timing of rapport in relation to post-event misinformation affects recall accuracy, and whether these effects are related to witness anxiety levels throughout the interview. The present study provided two hundred and thirty-three undergraduates with a videotaped mock crime followed by building high or low rapport either before or after they received post-event misinformation. All witnesses were then interviewed about the mock crime. Results indicated that high rapport before misinformation increased the amount of accurate information reported in a subsequent witness interview compared to low rapport. However, these recall benefits were not due to a reduction in anxiety. Theoretical implications and practical recommendations for police interviewing practices are discussed.

  2. Reproductive biology of the Suez Canal spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834: Crustacea: Brachyura: Majidae).

    PubMed

    El-Serehy, Hamed A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Ibrahim, Nesreen K; Al-Misned, Fahad A

    2015-11-01

    A reproductive biology study of the spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) was conducted in the Suez Canal from July 2012 to June 2013. The annual sex ratio (Male:Female) of S. aspera was female biased with values of 1:1.25. Out of the four ovarian development stages of this crab, two stages were observed in the Suez Canal throughout the whole year. The ovigerous crab's carapace width varied from 28 to 52 mm. This crab species can spawn during most of the year in the canal water, with a peak during late spring and early winter. The fecundity of ovigerous females ranged between 2349 and 13600 eggs with a mean of 5494 ± 1486 eggs. Female crabs that reached sexual maturity exhibited a minimum carapace width varying between 22 and 46 mm, and fifty percentage of all ovigerous females showed a carapace width of 36 mm.

  3. Neuro-Linguistic Programming, Matching Sensory Predicates, and Rapport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmedlen, George W.; And Others

    A key task for the therapist in psychotherapy is to build trust and rapport with the client. Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) practitioners believe that matching the sensory modality (representational system) of a client's predicates (verbs, adverbs, and adjectives) improves rapport. In this study, 16 volunteer subjects participated in two…

  4. Psychometric Characteristics of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca G.; Wilson, Janie H.; Pugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale, the first scale to measure professor-student rapport. The scale was found to have adequate test-retest and internal-consistency reliability. In addition to these findings, measures used to determine convergent validity included the Working…

  5. Rapport Management of International Teaching Assistants in Their Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The current study adopts Spencer-Oatey's theory of rapport management as the main framework, and examines the IT A participants' perceptions of their management of rapport, i.e. social relationship, with their American undergraduates, which are also compared with perceptions of American counterparts, including American professor and ATA…

  6. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Six Items Predict Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapport between students and teachers leads to numerous positive student outcomes, including attitudes toward the teacher and course, student motivation, and perceived learning. The recent development of a Professor-Student Rapport scale offers assessment of this construct. However, a Cronbach's [alpha] of 0.96 indicated item redundancy, and the…

  7. Rapport in Negotiation: The Contribution of the Verbal Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Ilan; Nelson, Noa; Livnat, Zohar; Ben-Ari, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of verbal behavior to the creation of rapport in negotiation, while methodologically addressing the issue of dependence between dyadic measures, which is inherent to the concept of rapport, with the Actor-Partner Interdependence model. The approach adopted is substantially different from that of past research,…

  8. Controls on erosional retreat of the uplifted rift flanks at the Gulf of Suez and northern Red Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckler, Michael S.; Omar, Gomaa I.

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea rigts are currently bordered by large asymmetric uplifts that are undergoing erosion. We find that the amount and timing of erosion vary systematically along the strike of the margin and have been controlled by variations in the perift stratigraphy. The perfit strata are compsoed of cliff-forming Eocene-Cretaceous carbonates overlaying the easily eroded Cretaceous-Cambrian 'Nubian' sandstone. This lithologic succession promotes scarp retreat of the sedimentary section, follwed by dissection of the underlying basement. The perift section thins from over 2000 m at the northern end of the rift to less htan 400 m at its junction with the Red Sea. Thus, at the northern part of the Gulf of Suez, the Nubian sandstone is minimally exposed, and the carbonates form a scarp at the rift border fault. Farther south, undercuttin of hte carbonates by erosion of the sandstion has resulted in scarp retreat. The escarpment cuts diagonally away from the border fault andis over 100 km inland from the border fault at the southernmost Gulf of Suez. The amount of retreat varies inversely with the sediment thickness. Exposure and erosion of basement are initiated by the retreate of the escarpment, and the depth of erosion, as indicated by fission track ages, increases with distance from the escarpment. These observations are explained by a model in which erosion along the Gulf of Suez is initiated as rift flank uplift becomes sufficiently large ot expose the friable sandstones. Undercutting the escarpment and exhumation of basement has been propagating northward and westward for at least 20 m.y. The average rate of scarp retreat has been 6 km/m.y. and the along-strike propagation of the erosion has been 12 km/m.y. The diachronous erosion of the rift flanks at the Gulf of Suez highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of uplift and of erosion. Both thermochronometric and stratigraphic data primarily indicate the timing of erosion, which

  9. Now It's Personal: Antecedents and Outcomes of Rapport between Business Faculty and Their Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granitz, Neil A.; Koernig, Stephen K.; Harich, Katrin R.

    2009-01-01

    "Rapport" refers to when two people "click." Although business education researchers have begun to study rapport, past research has principally focused on students' perceptions of rapport, whereas faculty's perceptions of rapport have never been studied or contrasted with those of students. Understanding this is critical as…

  10. L'atteinte vésicale au cours de la neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen

    PubMed Central

    Benazzouz, Mohamed Hicham; Hajjad, Tilila; Essatara, Younes; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

    2014-01-01

    La neurofibromatose de type 1 ou maladie de Von Recklinghausen est une maladie génétique autosomique dominante en rapport avec des mutations dans le gène suppresseur de tumeur NF1. L'atteinte uro-génitale au cours de cette maladie est rare et moins de 80 cas ont été rapportés à ce jour dans la littérature mondiale. Les auteurs rapportent un nouveau cas d'atteinte vésicale découverte fortuitement au cours du suivi d'une patiente atteinte de la maladie de Von Recklinghausen. A travers cette observation et une revue de la littérature les auteurs discutent également les difficultés diagnostiques, thérapeutiques ainsi que les modalités de suivi dans cette maladie. PMID:25328590

  11. Physico-chemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Serehy, H. A. H.; Sleigh, M. A.

    1992-02-01

    Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20-40‰ and over 40‰ in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50-70 cm fell to below 20 °C in winter and rose to above 30 °C in summer; oxygen concentration at the same depth ranged between 6-10 mg l -1 and the pH was 8·1-8·3, and at mid-day this water was supersaturated with oxygen through 6-8 months of the year. The main chemical nutrients reached their highest levels in winter (December-February) and their lowest levels in summer (May-August), silicate varying between 1-7 μ M, phosphate between 0·1 and 0·8 μ M and nitrate between 4-10 μ M; nitrite varied in a more complex manner, usually between 0·25 and 0·4 μ M. The atomic ratio of N/P was generally well above the Redfield ratio level, except for a few months in midwinter. These nutrient concentrations are high in comparison with those of unpolluted seas of the region, but are typical of the more eutrophic coastal waters in most parts of the world.

  12. Miocene salt structures as exploration indicators in the offshore B-Trend, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Saoudi, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The B-Trend is a structural horst block extending in a northwest-southeast direction for about 40 km in the southern offshore area of the Gulf of Suez. It contains six individual sub-structures (six oil fields) oriented along strike and dipping toward the southwest. Subsurface geologic data from 60 wells together with the available seismic data in the area were integrated to explain the development of salt structures along this belt and their influence on oil exploration. These salt structures are restricted to the Belayim and South Gharib formations of middle and upper Miocene age, respectively. Moreover, they are arranged as linear features along the trend. Thickening in the Belayim salt is due in some cases to injection and in others to deposition. The apexes of the Belayim injected salt bodies are located down-dip from the crest of the underlying structures and are shifted westward from the apexes of the overlying larger South Gharib salt bulges. The highset corner of the pre-Miocene structures is located to the east of the injected Belayim salt pillows. Thick Belayim salt of depositional origin usually exists on the downthrown side of the leading edge fault to the east. The thickness ratios between the different members of the Belayim Formation help to differentiate between the injected and deposited salt bodies. These ratios can be used to orient well tracks to the optimum structural target while drilling.

  13. Tectonic and structural setting of the northeastern central Gulf of Suez area using aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Hesham Shaker; Nakhla, Adel Mokhles

    2016-03-01

    Cumulative qualitative and quantitative analysis of the filtered regional and residual magnetic components of the northeastern central area of the Gulf of Suez, as well as images of the second vertical derivatives of the reduced to the northern magnetic pole map of the total magnetic intensity field images, supplemented with the available geologic information, enabled the precise delineation of the detailed structural configuration of the basement complex, which consequently illustrated the structural deformational pattern of the overlying sedimentary succession. The basement tectonic map reflects a series of N-S to NNW-SSE oriented belts of high and low basement structures. These structures are interrupted by a set of NE-SW crossing diagonal faults having varying throws and creating promising blocks for exploration. An often remarkable correlation between the reduced to the magnetic pole map and the basement relief map is noted, in particular the outline of various oil fields. A larger number of the tilted fault blocks and basement culminations have been outlined and numerous interesting exploration prospects are indicated, which appear to warrant further follow up investigation.

  14. Women in parole: respect and rapport.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Connie; Berg, Bruce

    2008-08-01

    Although the number of females in law enforcement has increased in recent years, research suggests that the uniquely gendered contributions of females are minimized in favor of traditional modes of law enforcement, emphasizing physical presence, authoritative commands, and demonstrative control. This research examines women in parole, using in-depth interviews with a small convenience sample of female parole agents in California. Participants discussed their experiences as parole agents from the perspective of women in a predominantly male occupation. Overwhelmingly, they emphasized traditionally associated female traits of intuition, verbal communication, and relationships, over physical tactics. Participants emphasized the importance of building respect and rapport with parolees in multiple contexts, including in the parolees' homes, with the families of parolees, and at parolees' places of employment. Participants suggested that this approach ensures their personal safety and enhances parolee compliance, especially when considering their subjective account of experiences by male parole agents.

  15. Leishmaniose viscerale et leucemie aigüe lymphoblastique B: quel est le rapport?

    PubMed Central

    El Youssi, Hind; Touaoussa, Aziz; Bergui, Imane; Bougrine, Nawal; Amrani, Moncef Hassani

    2015-01-01

    L'association leishmaniose viscérale et leucémie aigue a été rarement rapportée dans la littérature, cependant le diagnostic concomitant de ces deux entités n'a jamais été rapporté au Maroc. Le lien entre ces deux pathologies n'a pas encore été établi et le traitement n'a pas encore été codifié. Nous rapportons le cas d'un garçon de 12 ans chez qui une leishmaniose viscérale et une leucémie aigue lymphoblastique type B ont été diagnostiquées simultanément. Malgré l'administration d'un traitement antiparasitaire associé à une chimiothérapie l’évolution était marquée par le décès du patient. PMID:26090011

  16. Evaluation of local site effect in the western side of the Suez Canal area by applying H/V and MASW techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Emad K.; Shokry, M. M. F.; Hassoup, Awad; Helal, A. M. A.

    2016-11-01

    The soft sediments are one of the most important factors responsible for the amplification of the seismic ground motion in an area of study. Three components, single-station microtremor measurements were performed at 61 sites along the Suez Canal to estimate the fundamental frequencies of the soil and corresponding H/V amplitude ratios by using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. We have applied the investigations of the shear wave velocity for supplementing the existing seismic microzonation of the Suez Canal. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) tests were done along the Suez Canal in the three cities, Suez, Ismailia, and Port Said using 24 channels digital engineering seismograph with 4.5 Hz geophones from September 2014 to January 2015 to get the shear wave velocity VS30. The SeisImager/SW software was used for analyzing the data, and 1D-shear wave velocity model have achieved for each site. The HVSR curves show that the fundamental frequency values are ranging from 0.57 to 1.08 Hz, and H/V amplitude ratios are ranging from 4.05 to 6.46. The average values of VS30 are (548, 301), (241, 319), (194, 110, 238) for Suez, Ismailia, and Port Said respectively. The average of shear wave velocity up to 30 m depth is estimated and used for site classification based on the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) classification. The majority of the sites was classified as Class D (stiff soil) except one site at Port Said city is classified as Class E (soft soils), and another site in the Suez city is classified as Class C (hard rock).

  17. An ecological examination of rapport using a dyadic puzzle task.

    PubMed

    Grahe, Jon E; Sherman, Ryne A

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated that situational context impacts the rapport experience (e.g., F. J. Bernieri, J. S. Gillis, J. M. Davis, & J. E. Grahe, 1996; N. M. Puccinelli, L. Tickle-Degnen, & R. Rosenthal, 2003). The authors designed the present study to further document the behavioral and experiential predictors of dyadic rapport and to evaluate dyadic rapport experiences when contributions were required from both interactants. Participants (N = 60) were paired into dyads and instructed to complete children's puzzles. However, the dyadic members were restricted in how they could accomplish this task: Only one interactant was allowed to work on the puzzle and had to do so blindfolded, while the second interactant gave instructions. Results suggested that less attribution of responsibility to the worker and the instructor's experience of enjoyment and frustration were indicative of higher rapport. Other characteristics of dyads reporting higher dyadic rapport included difficulty completing the task and more communicative behavior. The results provide important information for the understanding of the dyadic experience of rapport.

  18. Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Mansour, Nadia M.; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master's and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM). A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. Objective: This study aimed to describe Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. Materials and Methods: GP/FM degree theses were reviewed at the Faculty of Medicine and central Suez Canal libraries. Several characteristics were extracted from each thesis relating to the main researcher, supervisors, themes, and study methods according to predefined criteria. Publications from the theses were described. Results: Over 33 years, 208 theses were completed by 173 GP/FM researchers. The majority of the theses were for Master's degrees (84.1%). Regarding the study design, most of the degree theses were cross-sectional studies (76.9%). The adult population was targeted in 33.7% of research theses. Nonprobability sampling was used in 51%. Rural communities were the setting of research in 43.8%, and primary health center (PHC)-based studies in 59.1%. The “Patient” category exceeded the other categories (28.4%). Publication from theses started in the second decade of research production. Of the degree theses, 21.6% original articles were published. Only 13.3% of articles from theses were published in PubMed-indexed journals. The researcher was first author in 62.2% of published articles. Conclusion: The production of GP/FM theses and their publications are going to increase. Continuous assessment and planning for GP/FM studies are recommended. PMID:25949959

  19. Syn-rift carbonate depositional patterns: Miocene, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Suez rift, initiated in the Miocene, consists of asymmetric fault blocks, separated by transfer zones. Syn-rift Miocene carbonates developed on highs; the intricate relations are illustrated at Gebel Gharamul and Esh El Mellaha. Gebel Gharamul is a rollover, cut by antithetic faults, located on a transfer zone. Small coralgal rimmed shelves initially developed over the eroded footwall nick of an early western antithetic. Steepening depositional dips reflect increasing graben subsidence. Subsequently, the main easterly antithetic regionally lowered the rollover, promoting stacked coral rimmed shelf sequences with increasing dip filling the graben, with the back reef onlapping the main rollover crest. Simultaneously, a low-angle flexure (2/sup 0/-3/sup 0/) developed along the northern rollover margin. Low-angle (5/sup 0/) biostromal rimmed shelves, exhibiting sigmoidal clinoforms rapidly accreted laterally, as reflected in flat-based sequences. Depositional pattern eventually merged over the rollover to produce laterally complex rimmed shelf sequences. Esh El Mellaha is a footwall to a major extensional fault. In a southerly extensional cusp (20 km), the fault throw decreases from kilometers to flexural (2-3/sup 0/) displacement. Coralgal rimmed shelves and escarpment fringing reefs mantle the footwall. Initial, thick, and most laterally extensive sequences develop over the flexure. Accretion is primarily subvertical, reflecting continuous flexural subsidence. Where the fault cusp has less than a 30/sup 0/ inclination, carbonate sequences exhibiting oblique and oblique sigmoid clinoforms (40/sup 0/) prograded over and heeled the fault during periods of fault inactivity. With a fault plane inclination over 40/sup 0/, slope progradation was precluded and thin vertically accreting escarpment sequences developed.

  20. Marine molluscs as biomonitors for heavy metal levels in the Gulf of Suez, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Mohamed A.; Emara, Ahmed M.

    2006-05-01

    Levels of the heavy metals Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Iron (Fe) and Manganese (Mn) were determined in coastal water, sediments and soft tissues of the gastropod limpet, Patella caerulea, and the bivalve, Barbatus barbatus, from seven different stations in the western coast of the Gulf of Suez. The concentrations of heavy metals in water ranged between 3.37-4.78, 18.83-21.46, 2.75-3.17, 0.22-0.27, 0.99-1.21, 2.69-3.65, 3.75-4.56 μg L - 1 and 23.82-32.78 mg g - 1 for Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Mn and Fe, respectively. The corresponding concentration values in the sediments were 8.65-12.16, 51.78-58.06, 36.52-42.15, 3.23-3.98, 9.03-12.75, 34.31-49.63, 3.28-4.56 and 64.20-70.22 μg g - 1 for Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Mn and Fe, respectively. The highest accumulated metals were Fe, Zn and Mn in both P. caerulea and B. barbatus, while the lowest one was Cd. The accumulation of metals was more pronounced in P. caerulea than B. barbatus. The highest concentrations of all metals in water, sediments and mollusca were recorded at Adabiya harbour north of the Gulf, while the lowest concentrations were recorded at Gabal El-Zeit and Hurghada. Land based activities and ships awaiting berth are the main source of metal pollution in the northern part of the Gulf.

  1. Reproductive biology of the Suez Canal spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834: Crustacea: Brachyura: Majidae)

    PubMed Central

    El-Serehy, Hamed A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.; Ibrahim, Nesreen K.; Al-Misned, Fahad A.

    2015-01-01

    A reproductive biology study of the spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) was conducted in the Suez Canal from July 2012 to June 2013. The annual sex ratio (Male:Female) of S. aspera was female biased with values of 1:1.25. Out of the four ovarian development stages of this crab, two stages were observed in the Suez Canal throughout the whole year. The ovigerous crab’s carapace width varied from 28 to 52 mm. This crab species can spawn during most of the year in the canal water, with a peak during late spring and early winter. The fecundity of ovigerous females ranged between 2349 and 13600 eggs with a mean of 5494 ± 1486 eggs. Female crabs that reached sexual maturity exhibited a minimum carapace width varying between 22 and 46 mm, and fifty percentage of all ovigerous females showed a carapace width of 36 mm. PMID:26587008

  2. Spatial distribution of radioisotopes in the coast of Suez Gulf, southwestern Sinai and the impact of hot springs.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Kh A; Seddeek, M K; Elnimr, T; Sharshar, T; Badran, H M

    2011-06-01

    This work describes the concentrations of radioisotopes in soil, sediment, wild plants and groundwater in southwestern Sinai. The study area extends from Suez to Abu Rudies along the eastern part of the Suez Gulf. It included two hot springs: Ayun Musa and Hammam Faraoun. No dependence of ¹³⁷Cs concentrations on any of the measured sand characteristics was found, including calcium carbonate. The enrichment of ²²⁶Ra in Hammam Faraoun hot spring was the most prominent feature. The ²²⁶Ra concentration in hot springs of Ayun Musa and Hammam Faraoun were 68 and 2377 Bq kg⁻¹ for sediments, 3.5 and 54.0 Bq kg⁻¹ for wild plants and 205 and 1945 mBq l⁻¹ for the groundwater, respectively. In addition, ²²⁶Ra activity concentration in local sand in the area of Hammam Faraoun was ∼14 times that of Ayun Musa. On the other hand, the ²³²Th concentrations were comparable in the two hot springs, while ¹³⁷Cs concentrations were relatively higher in Ayun Musa. The characteristics and radioelements studies support possible suggestions that the waters in the two hot springs have different contributions of sea and groundwaters crossing different geological layers where the water-rock interaction takes place.

  3. Structural evolution and Cenozoic tectonostratigraphy of the Cairo-Suez district, north Eastern Desert of Egypt: Field-structural data from Gebel Qattamiya-Gebel Um Reheiat area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagag, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Detailed field mapping reveals that continental rifting is strongly deforming the Gebel Qattamiya-Gebel Um Reheiat area and the entire Cairo-Suez district, in north Eastern Desert of Egypt. Rift-related structures are predominantly represented by E to WNW, NNW and NW oriented faults. The E to WNW oriented faults are small and build up the Gebel Qattamiya en echelon fault belt, whereas the faults trending NNW and NW establish a pervasive horst and graben structural style involving some rhomb-shape horsts as Gebel Qattamiya (GQRH), Gebel Um Reheiat (GURRH) and south Gebel Um Reheiat (SGURRH). Rock units of the Eocene succession and Oligocene sediments are well exposed and highly controlled by rift-related structures. Rifting was developed through two rift-phases; initial and major ones. The initial phase (a newly recognized phase in this contribution) has been occurred in Late Eocene (Priabonian), while the main phase was prevailing during Late Oligocene-Early Miocene time and is characterized by hydrothermal veins and basaltic eruptions. Continental transtension in the Cairo-Suez district, including the study area, was probably synchronous with a major tectonic stage (Pyrenean-Atlasic movement) of continental collision between African-Arabian and Eurasian plates in Late Eocene-Oligocene time. Field investigation suggests that the transfer of displacement (slip) from the Gulf of Suez proto-rift into the E-W oriented faults ''relays'' is an important mechanism, which helps to explain the current structural framework and tectonic evolution of the Cairo-Suez district. Reactivation of such faults with right-lateral divergent wrenching with NE-SW oriented extension deformed the Cairo-Suez district with several E-W oriented en echelon fault belts (e.g. Gebel Qattamiya fault belt in the study area). Thus the Cairo-Suez district represents an accommodation or transfer zone in northeastern Egypt, intercepting the ''far-field stresses'' from the Arabian-Nubian Shield, the Red

  4. GC estimation of organic hydrocarbons that threaten shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zawrah, M F; Ebiad, M A; Rashad, A M; El-Sayed, E; Snousy, Moustafa Gamal; Tantawy, M A

    2014-11-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination is one of the important environmental problems at petroleum-related sites, which causes critical environmental and health defects. Severe petroleum hydrocarbon contamination from coastal refinery plant was detected in a shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer is bordered by Gulf in the Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The overall objective of this investigation is to estimate the organic hydrocarbons in shallow sandy aquifers, released from continuous major point-source of pollution over a long period of time (91 years ago). This oil refinery contamination resulted mainly in the improper disposal of hydrocarbons and produced water releases caused by equipment failures, vandalism, and accidents that caused direct groundwater pollution or discharge into the gulf. In order to determine the fate of hydrocarbons, detailed field investigations were made to provide intensive deep profile information. Eight composite randomly sediment samples from a test plot were selected for demonstration. The tested plot was 50 m long × 50 m wide × 70 cm deep. Sediment samples were collected using an American auger around the point 29° 57' 33″ N and 32° 30' 40″ E in 2012 and covered an area of 2,500 m(2) which represents nearly 1/15 of total plant area (the total area of the plant is approximately 3.250 km(2)). The detected total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were 2.44, 2.62, 4.54, 4.78, 2.83, 3.22, 2.56, and 3.13 wt%, respectively. TPH was calculated by differences in weight and subjected to gas chromatography (GC). Hydrocarbons were analyzed on Hewlett-Packard (HP-7890 plus) gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). The percentage of paraffine of the investigated TPH samples was 7.33, 7.24, 7.58, 8.25, 10.25, 9.89, 14.77, and 17.53 wt%, respectively.

  5. Rapport Building in Language Instruction: A Microanalysis of the Multiple Resources in Teacher Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Hanh thi

    2007-01-01

    Current guidelines on teacher--student rapport, while providing helpful suggestions, fail to address the question of how rapport building can be achieved in contextualised classroom interaction in which a balance needs to be reached between rapport and instructional tasks. Using discourse analysis informed by a conversation analytic approach and…

  6. Student Views of Instructor-Student Rapport in the College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Nathan G.; Barrett, Laura Obrycki

    2014-01-01

    Building upon past research on the positive learning outcomes associated with rapport building in the classroom, this study examines the specific behaviors instructors utilize in college classrooms to build rapport with undergraduate students. Participants (N = 230) answered open-ended survey questions about their instructors' rapport-building…

  7. Structural interpretation of seismic data of Abu Rudeis-Sidri area, Northern Central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Hesham Shaker; Nakhla, Adel Mokhles

    2016-12-01

    The 2D and 3D seismic data are interpreted to evaluate the subsurface geologic structures in the Abu Rudeis-Sidri area that occupy the northern central part of the Gulf of Suez. The 2D seismic data are used for determination of the structural configurations and the tectonic features which is analyzed through the study of interpretation with the available geologic data, in which the geo-seismic depth maps for the main interesting tops (Kareem, Nukhul, Matulla, Raha and Nubia Formations) are represented. Such maps reflect that, the Miocene structure of Abu Rudeis-Sidri area is an asymmetrical NW-SE trending anticlinal feature dissected by a set of NW-SE fault system (clysmic). Added, the Pre-Miocene structure of the studied area is very complex, where the area is of NE dip and affected by severe faulting through varying stratigraphic levels.

  8. Rift-related active fault-system and a direction of maximum horizontal stress in the Cairo-Suez district, northeastern Egypt: A new approach from EMR-Technique and Cerescope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagag, Wael; Obermeyer, Hennes

    2016-09-01

    An active fault system has been detected along the Cairo-Suez district in northeastern Egypt, applying the EMR-Technique using Cerescope. The E-W (old Mediterranean) and NW-SE (Red Sea-Gulf of Suez) fault-trends are estimated to have ongoing activity. Horizontal EMR-measurements indicate a NW to NNW orientation as a maximum horizontal stress direction (σ1), whereas an E-W orientation to has a secondary tendency. A simplified stress map for the Cairo-Suez district is constructed from the horizontal stress data measured at about 20 locations within the district. The mapped stresses will contribute to the stress data of the Cairo-Suez region on the world stress map (WSM). The present study results indicate rejuvenation of the inherited Mesozoic E-W oriented and Oligocene-Miocene rift-related NW-SE oriented faults. The transfer of rift-related deformation from Red Sea-Gulf of Suez region, which is currently undergoing an extensional stress regime in NE to NNE direction, would explain a seismotectonic activity of the Cairo-Suez district. These results are consistent with a present day NNW oriented compressional stresses attributed to a convergence between the African and Eurasian plates.

  9. Using Courthouse Portfolios to Establish Rapport and Motivate College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Motivation enhances student learning (Wang, 2012). One means for an instructor to stimulate students and get them actively involved is to establish good rapport with them (Cottringer & Sloan, 2003). For this study, county courthouse portfolios were developed and used to build relationships and motivate college students. The strategy was…

  10. Group Rapport: Posture Sharing as a Nonverbal Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFrance, Marianne; Broadbent, Maida

    1976-01-01

    Systematic observation and a questionnaire format were used to investigate the relationship between posture sharing and self-report indications of rapport in a group situation--college seminar classrooms. The greater the amount of mirroring and congruent postures evidenced by students vis-a-vis the teacher, the higher the ratings of involvement.…

  11. The Stitches Stayed: Creating Rapport around Women's Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Mary Clementine; Stasz, Bird

    2010-01-01

    Establishing rapport between researcher and participants when conducting ethnography is essential to the successful outcome of the research. However, when participants are unwilling to engage, a different approach must be adopted. This article is an examination of the appropriation of a situated learning model during fieldwork with a group of…

  12. Controls on the development and evolution of transfer zones: the influence of basement structure and sedimentary thickness in the Suez rift and Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Adel R.

    1997-06-01

    Detailed field mapping of the northern part of the Gebel Um Hammad-Gebel Duwi area on the western margin of the Red Sea indicates oppositely dipping rift blocks separated by a 60-km long, WNW-ESE-oriented, reactivated pre-rift fault of Late Precambrian age parallel to the Najd fault system of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. This fault forms the Sudmain transfer zone between the oppositely tilted half-grabens in the northwestern Red Sea region and is associated by a SE-plunging syncline. This pre-rift fault was reactivated by dextral transtension during the Late Oligocene rift opening. Compared to the transfer zones of the Suez rift, the Sudmain transfer zone is narrower. The Gebel Sufr El Dara transfer zone (between the southern and central half-grabens of the Suez rift) is 20 km wide and is also controlled by pre-rift faults oriented ENE-WSW. The latter were reactivated by left-lateral slip during the rift opening. On the other hand, the Gharandal transfer zone (northern part of the Suez rift) is 40-60 km wide and is not affected by the pre-rift faults in the Precambrian basement, perhaps owing to the large thickness of pre-rift sedimentary rocks in this area. The location of the Gharandal transfer zone was controlled by a NE-SW-oriented 'Syrian arc' fold. This study suggests that the northward increase in the width of transfer zones as well as the northward decrease in the length of half-grabens in the Suez-northern Red Sea rift system are related to the corresponding increase in the thickness of pre-rift Phanerozoic sedimentary section from about 400 m in the south to about 1800 m in the north.

  13. Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5 kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like β propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the

  14. Modulation of stress related protein genes in the bass (Epinephelus guaza) caught from the Gulf of Suez, the Red Sea, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh; Khalil, Wagdy K B

    2013-10-01

    Impact of chemical pollution on expression of stress protein genes in the bass Epinephelus guaga collected from several locations including Suez Oil Production Port (Floating port), Atakah Fishing Port, Adabiya Port and Tawfik Port in Suez Governorate, Egypt, was investigated. In the current study, levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water and fish samples collected from Suez Gulf were assessed. In addition, gills and liver tissues of caught bass fish were used to address the interaction between pollution status and the expression of stress-related genes (Hsp70a, Hsp70b, Hsp47, MT and CYP1A). Our analysis demonstrated that levels of PAHs in Floating and Tawfik ports were higher than those found in the Atakah Fishing Port and the Adabiya Port. In addition, MDA and PC contents were significantly higher in gills and liver tissues collected from Floating and Tawfik ports than those collected from Adabiya and Atakah ports. In correlation to the above results, all fish collected from the Floating and Tawfik ports presented a significant increase in Hsp-, MT- and CYP1A-mRNAs. On the other hand, fish samples collected from the Atakah Fishing and Adabiya ports showed no induction of the stress-related genes transcription in such tissues. In conclusion, the current research demonstrates that remarkable increase in PAH contaminants levels in Floating and Tawfik ports are correlated with the levels stress protein-related genes transcription in E. guaga gills and liver tissues.

  15. Carcinome basocellulaire de la face: à propos de quatre cas rapportés à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Razafindrakoto, Rex Mario; Razafindranaivo, Mananjara Nandrianina; Schammirah, Mahamad Rojovolaarivony; Randriamboavonjy, Rado

    2015-01-01

    Les carcinomes basocellulaires, fréquemment rencontrés dans la race blanche, sont plus rares chez les sujets de race noire. Les zones exposées de la tête sont des sites préférentiels, et une intense exposition aux rayons solaires ultraviolets a été évoquée dans leur étiopathogénie. Les métastases sont exceptionnelles. Les objectifs ont été de démontrer l'existence de carcinomes basocellulaires à Madagascar et d'en évaluer la prise en charge. Les auteurs ont rapporté quatre cas de carcinomes basocellulaires faciaux vus au service d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo, avec deux hommes et deux femmes, âgés entre 46 et 70 ans (âge moyen= 53,5 ans). Une exérèse chirurgicale a été pratiquée chez trois patients tandis qu'un patient albinos a été traité par radiothérapie. L’épidémiologie, l’étiologie, l'anatomie pathologique et le traitement des carcinomes basocellulaires de la face ont été discutées à travers une revue de la littérature. PMID:26848344

  16. Extension-related buttress-like folds, the western side of the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Sharib, A. S. A. A.; Abdel-Fattah, M. M.; Salama, Y. F.; Abdel-Gawad, G. I.

    2017-02-01

    The wedge-shaped St. Paul block, western side of the Gulf of Suez rift, exposes Late Cretaceous beds that are folded into transverse folds. The block is bounded from the east and west by east- and southeast-dipping rift-related normal faults, respectively. This study reveals that the transverse folds are extension-related, and formed due to the buttress-like effect that was created during the movement along the rift-related normal faults. The more competent Eocene hanging-wall block of the N-S-striking fault buttressed against the moving less competent Cretaceous hanging-wall block of the NE-SW-striking fault. A localized zone of shortening developed between the two fault trends causing the intervening wedge-shaped block to be crumpled and folded into a series of kilometer-scale, gentle SSE-plunging folds. The buttressing, within block internal localized strain caused by the zigzag geometry of the NE-SW-striking fault, and the effect of the minor cross fault explain the SSE-to-ESE plunges of the mesoscopic folds. This study turns the attention to the buttress-like effect as one of the mechanisms of extension-related folds during rifting.

  17. Maastrichtian-Early Eocene litho-biostratigraphy and palægeography of the northern Gulf of Suez region, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibner, C.; Marzouk, A. M.; Kuss, J.

    2001-02-01

    The Maastrichtian-Lower Eocene sediments on both sides of the northern Gulf of Suez can be subdivided into eight formal formations (including one group) and one informal formation that are described in detail. These lithostratigraphic units reflect three different environmental regimes of deposition or non-deposition. The first regime is characterised by uplift and erosion or non-deposition resulting mostly from the uplift of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba structure, a branch of the Syrian Arc Foldbelt. The shallow water carbonate platform and slope deposits of the Late Campanian-Maastrichtian St Anthony Formation and the Paleocene-Lower Eocene Southern Galala and Garra Formations represent the second regime and are found north and south of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba High. The third regime is represented by basinal chalks, marls and shales of the Maastrichtian Sudr Formation and of the Paleocene-Eocene Dakhla, Tarawan and Esna Formations, the Dakhla/Tarawan/Esna informal formation and the Thebes Group. The distribution and lateral interfingering of the above mentioned environmental regimes reflect different vertical movements, changing basin morphology, sea level changes and progradation of shallow water sediments and is illustrated on 11 palæogeographic maps.

  18. Definition of soil characteristics and ground response at the northwestern part of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, M. E. Mohamed; Deif, A.; El-Hadidy, S.; Moustafa Sayed, S. R.; El Werr, A.

    2008-12-01

    The area of interest represents the industrial part of Ain El-Sokhna new port, located in the northwestern part of the seismically active Gulf of Suez zone. The main objective of the current study is to estimate the site characteristics of the area of interest in terms of the fundamental frequency and the corresponding peak amplitude using noise measurements. The microtremor measurements were performed at 44 sites distributed over the study area in order to calculate the horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratio. The standard spectral ratio (SSR) is used in addition to the numerical modelling of horizontal shear (SH) waves in soil at selected sites in order to have a comparison with the H/V spectral ratio. The required 1D soil models for the numerical modelling of SH-waves were derived from 220 P-wave shallow seismic refraction profiles in addition to 30 SH-wave profiles. Maps of the fundamental frequency (f0) and its corresponding H/V peak amplitude (A0) were provided, and a range of site conditions in the area were shown. The amplification factor results derived from the SSR technique are very similar to those derived from the H/V spectral ratio. In most cases, the H/V spectral ratio proved to be suitable for calculating the fundamental resonance. Results were found to be compatible with the surface geology of the area of interest.

  19. Evolution of Miocene footwall-derived coarse-grained deltas, Gulf of Suez, Egypt: Implications for exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Gawthorpe, R.L. ); Hurst, J.M.; Sladen, C.P. )

    1990-07-01

    The Miocene Abu Alaqa Group, exposed on the eastern side of the Gulf of Suez, contains a series of coarse-grained delta deposits located in the hanging wall of the northwest-trending East Margin fault zone. Seven major fan sequences have been identified. The first three fan sequences are aggradational and cover an area of less than 2 km{sup 2}. The sequences are dominated by pebble/boulder conglomerates, with predominantly sigmoidal, high-angle clinoforms (between 15 and 25{degree}) as much as 150 m high. These fan sequences represent talus cones and fan deltas, which were probably deposited during activity on the fault zone and are situated at transfer segments. The other four fan sequences are predominantly progradational, consisting of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic braid deltas with local reefs. They are less than 30 m high, have low-angle clinoforms (< 15{degree}), and cover an area as large as 30 km{sup 2}. These fan sequences were deposited during a phase of tectonic quiescence when sedimentary and eustatic mechanisms determined sand-body geometry. These fan deltas and braid deltas may form hydrocarbon traps in the subsurface and create localized reservoirs. The rapid facies change into basinal fines creates an excellent lateral stratigraphic seal, but vertical and lateral seals across the fault zone generally are not well developed. 8 figs.

  20. Reservoir zonation based on statistical analyses: A case study of the Nubian sandstone, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sharawy, Mohamed S.; Gaafar, Gamal R.

    2016-12-01

    Both reservoir engineers and petrophysicists have been concerned about dividing a reservoir into zones for engineering and petrophysics purposes. Through decades, several techniques and approaches were introduced. Out of them, statistical reservoir zonation, stratigraphic modified Lorenz (SML) plot and the principal component and clustering analyses techniques were chosen to apply on the Nubian sandstone reservoir of Palaeozoic - Lower Cretaceous age, Gulf of Suez, Egypt, by using five adjacent wells. The studied reservoir consists mainly of sandstone with some intercalation of shale layers with varying thickness from one well to another. The permeability ranged from less than 1 md to more than 1000 md. The statistical reservoir zonation technique, depending on core permeability, indicated that the cored interval of the studied reservoir can be divided into two zones. Using reservoir properties such as porosity, bulk density, acoustic impedance and interval transit time indicated also two zones with an obvious variation in separation depth and zones continuity. The stratigraphic modified Lorenz (SML) plot indicated the presence of more than 9 flow units in the cored interval as well as a high degree of microscopic heterogeneity. On the other hand, principal component and cluster analyses, depending on well logging data (gamma ray, sonic, density and neutron), indicated that the whole reservoir can be divided at least into four electrofacies having a noticeable variation in reservoir quality, as correlated with the measured permeability. Furthermore, continuity or discontinuity of the reservoir zones can be determined using this analysis.

  1. Research Publications in Medical Journals (1992-2013) by Family Medicine Authors - Suez Canal University-Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.; Ismail, Mosleh A.; Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research in family medicine (FM) provides an important contribution to its discipline. Family medicine research can contribute to many areas of primary care, ranging from the early diagnosis to equitable health care. Publication productivity is important in academic settings as a marker for career advancement. Objective: To describe the publications by family medicine researcher authors between 1992 and 2013. Materials and Methods: All full text, original articles published by family medicine researcher; author with affiliation to the Suez Canal University were collected using the internet and hand search. The journals that published for family medicine researcher authors were identified. Author characteristics were described. The trend of publications was described. All articles were analyzed for their characteristics, including the themes and study designs according to predefined criteria. Results: Along 22 years, 149 research articles were published by 48 family medicine authors in 39 medical journals. The largest category in publications was related to Family physician/Health service (FP-HS, n = 52 articles), followed by ‘Patient’ category (n = 42). All the studies were quantitative; the largest group was represented by cross-sectional studies (76.5%). Conclusions: The publication productivity by family medicine researchers are going to be increased. FP-HS and patient topics were mostly addressed in publications. Cross-sectional studies exceeded any other designs. There is need to put more emphasis on intervention studies. Continuous assessment and improvement of FM research production and publication is recommended. PMID:25657945

  2. Instructor-Student and Student-Student Rapport in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Brandi N.; Martin, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between instructors and their students, and between students, to determine their roles in building positive relationships and an overall positive classroom environment. Of particular interest was the examination of instructor rapport with students and rapport between students. Students (N = 232) reported on…

  3. The Correlation between Student/Instructor Rapport, Student Perceptions of Instructor Effectiveness, and Course Grade Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yezbick, Erin Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The researcher attempted to determine if a correlation exists between student/instructor rapport, student perceptions of instructor effectiveness, and course grade expectations for freshman general education courses at a career college in the Great Lakes Region of the United States. Previous studies have determined that rapport affects motivation…

  4. Quality of Rapport as a Setting Event for Problem Behavior: Assessment and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Darlene Magito; Carr, Edward G.

    2005-01-01

    Relationship quality (rapport) between people with developmental disabilities and their caregivers has long been suggested as an important variable influencing the likelihood of problem behavior. However, to date, the association between rapport and problem behavior has not been systematically investigated. The authors evaluated a multimethod…

  5. Students' Attitudes towards Rapport-Building Traits and Practices in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robert Demmon

    2012-01-01

    This research was a triangulated study of student attitudes towards instructors' rapport-building traits and their preferences amongst instructors' rapport-building practices in online learning environments. Participants were undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in courses within an educational technology program at a central Texas…

  6. The Relationships among Teacher Immediacy, Professor/Student Rapport, and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estepp, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among teacher immediacy, professor/student rapport, and student self-regulated learning among selected undergraduate students in a college of agriculture. The independent variables for this study were verbal and nonverbal immediacy and professor/student rapport. The dependent variable in…

  7. Oil pollution in the Red Sea — Environmental monitoring of an oilfield in a coral area, Gulf of Suez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicks, Brian

    The Red Sea is rapidly developing as one of the world's largest offshore oil production areas. It also comprises a wide range of tropical marine habitats, many of which are internationally recognised for their conservation, scientific, economic or recreational value. Past oil production, refining and transport have resulted in chronic pollution of some areas, and environmental programmes to protect new areas of development from pollution damage are assuming increasing importance. At the initiative of an Egyptian oil company operating in the Gulf of Suez, an environmental protection and management scheme has been prepared for a new offshore oilfield and marine terminal at Ras Budran. This paper describes the form of the scheme and the results of its component environmental surveys. The development area comprises rich and diverse marine communities of fringing coral reefs, nearshore lagoons, seagrass beds, sandy beaches and fine sediments offshore. A baseline survey was designed following detailed discussion of the scope of the development with the company and a preliminary site visit, and the fieldwork was completed in October 1980. On the basis of the findings of the survey, a series of recommendations was made to the company, aimed at reducing environmental impacts during construction and operation to a minimum and acceptable level. These were subsequently implemented and the results of a post-construction survey in February 1983 are reported which show that environmental damage to the nearshore habitats during the construction phase had been relatively small and localised. Recently, the biological information obtained from the two surveys has also been incorporated into oil spill contingency plans.

  8. Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and geochemistry of Rudies sandstone (Lower Miocene), Warda Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Samir M.

    2012-05-01

    The Lower Miocene Rudies sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southeastern part, Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their provenance and diagenesis and their impact in reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Warda field, representing the Lower and Middle Rudies, were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rudies sandstones have an average framework composition of Q85F7.2R7.8, and 83% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Middle Rudies sandstones are only slightly more quartzose with an average framework composition of Q90F7R3 and 86% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. Rudies sandstones are mostly quartz arenite with subordinate subarkose and sublithic arenites and their bulk-rock geochemistry support the petrographic results. The modal analysis data of studied samples suggest influence of granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks. The geochemical data interpretation on the basis of discriminate function diagrams reveal the source material was deposited on a passive margin. Textural attributes possibly suggest long-distance transport of grains from the source region and indicates a cratonic or a recycled source. Tectonic setting of Rudies Formation reveals that the lower Rudies sandstones are typically rift sandstone and their deposition constrained the beginning of the faulting, while the middle Rudies sandstones were transported from the far along the rift. Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and carbonate dissolution greatly enhance the petrophysical properties of many sandstone samples.

  9. Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and reservoir quality of the sandstones of the Kareem Formation, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Samir M.

    2013-09-01

    The Middle Miocene Kareem sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southwestern part of the Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their diagenesis and provenance and their impact on reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Zeit Bay Oil Field, and the East Zeit Oil Field represent the Lower Kareem (Rahmi Member) and the Upper Kareem (Shagar Member), were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rahmi sandstones have an average framework composition of Q95F3.4R1.6, and 90% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Upper Shagar sandstones are only slightly less quartzose with an average framework composition of Q76F21R3 and 82% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. The Kareem sandstones are mostly quartzarenite with subordinate subarkose and arkose. Petrographical and geochemical data of sandstones indicate that they were derived from granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks and deposited in a passive continental margin of a syn rift basin. The sandstones of the Kareem Formation show upward decrease in maturity. Petrographic study revealed that dolomite is the dominant cement and generally occurs as fine to medium rhombs pore occluding phase and locally as a grain replacive phase. Authigenic quartz occurs as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Authigenic anhydrites typically occur as poikilotopic rhombs or elongate laths infilling pores but also as vein filling cement. The kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene rocks. Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and

  10. Facies and geologic history of an exposed Miocene rift-margin carbonate platform: Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    James, N.P.; Coniglio, M.; Aissaoui, D.M.; Purser, B.H.

    1988-05-01

    Abu Shaar is a small exhumed carbonate platform of lower to middle Miocene age on a horst of Precambrian crystalline rock along the western side of the Gulf of Suez. The reef-rimmed complex is entirely dolomite but with exquisitely preserved primary and diagenetic microfabrics. Similar platforms, some of which contain hydrocarbons, are buried beneath evaporites in the Gulf. The platform developed in three stages, defined as local members of the Rudeis Formation. The first stage records deposition during progressive marine onlap as aprons of mixed terrigenous-carbonate sediments evolved into a wide reef-rimmed platform. Synsedimentary platform-margin collapse subsequently removed the most seaward portions of the reefs along the eastern Gulf-facing margin. These truncation surfaces were then covered by a second phase of reef growth and deposition of fore-reef carbonates. The third and final stage, deposited following a sea level drop and subaerial exposure, is a series of well-bedded peritidal carbonates that become progressively more evaporitic upward. Fore-reef facies are again truncated by synsedimentary slope failure. Former evaporites are now recorded as collapse breccias, contorted bedding, black chert nodules, and evaporite molds. Porosity is mainly secondary as vugs and molds and is highest in platform interior facies. These more porous sediments contained more aragonitic components originally and were less affected by submarine cementation. In contrast, the higher degree of synsedimentary lithification of platform-margin reef and fore-reef sediments is comparable with what is commonly observed in modern reef-dominated platform margins. 15 figures, 1 tables.

  11. Analysis of the similar epicenter earthquakes on 22 January 2013 and 01 June 2013, Central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toni, Mostafa; Barth, Andreas; Ali, Sherif M.; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-09-01

    On 22 January 2013 an earthquake with local magnitude ML 4.1 occurred in the central part of the Gulf of Suez. Six months later on 1 June 2013 another earthquake with local magnitude ML 5.1 took place at the same epicenter and different depths. These two perceptible events were recorded and localized by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN) and additional networks in the region. The purpose of this study is to determine focal mechanisms and source parameters of both earthquakes to analyze their tectonic relation. We determine the focal mechanisms by applying moment tensor inversion and first motion analysis of P- and S-waves. Both sources reveal oblique focal mechanisms with normal faulting and strike-slip components on differently oriented faults. The source mechanism of the larger event on 1 June in combination with the location of aftershock sequence indicates a left-lateral slip on N-S striking fault structure in 21 km depth that is in conformity with the NE-SW extensional Shmin (orientation of minimum horizontal compressional stress) and the local fault pattern. On the other hand, the smaller earthquake on 22 January with a shallower hypocenter in 16 km depth seems to have happened on a NE-SW striking fault plane sub-parallel to Shmin. Thus, here an energy release on a transfer fault connecting dominant rift-parallel structures might have resulted in a stress transfer, triggering the later ML 5.1 earthquake. Following Brune's model and using displacement spectra, we calculate the dynamic source parameters for the two events. The estimated source parameters for the 22 January 2013 and 1 June 2013 earthquakes are fault length (470 and 830 m), stress drop (1.40 and 2.13 MPa), and seismic moment (5.47E+21 and 6.30E+22 dyn cm) corresponding to moment magnitudes of MW 3.8 and 4.6, respectively.

  12. Sedimentology of rift climax deep water systems; Lower Rudeis Formation, Hammam Faraun Fault Block, Suez Rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppard, Christopher W.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.

    2006-09-01

    In most marine rift basins, subsidence outpaces sedimentation during rift climax times. Typically this results in sediment-starved hangingwall depocentres dominated by deep-marine mudstones, with subordinate local development of coarser clastics in the immediate hangingwall derived from restricted catchments on the immediate footwall scarp. To highlight the spatial variability of rift climax facies and the controls upon them, we have investigated the detailed three-dimensional geometry and facies relationships of the extremely well exposed Miocene, rift climax Lower Rudeis Formation in the immediate hangingwall to the Thal Fault Zone, Suez Rift, Egypt. Detailed sedimentological analyses allows the Lower Rudeis Formation to be divided into two contemporaneous depositional systems, (1) a laterally continuous slope system comprising, hangingwall restricted (< 250 m wide) slope apron, slope slumps, fault scarp degradation complex and laterally extensive lower slope-to-basinal siltstones, and (2) a localized submarine fan complex up to 1 km wide and extending at least 2 km basinward of the fault zone. Interpretation of individual facies, facies relationships and their spatial variability indicate that deposition in the immediate hangingwall to the Thal Fault occurred via a range of submarine concentrated density flows, surge-like turbidity flows, mass wasting and hemipelagic processes. Major controls on the spatial variability and stratigraphic architecture of the depositional systems identified reflect the influence of the steep footwall physiography, accommodation and drainage evolution associated with the growth of the Thal Fault. The under-filled nature of the hangingwall depocentre combined with the steep footwall gradient result in a steep fault-controlled basin margin characterised by either slope bypass or erosion, with limited coastal plain or shelf area. Sediment supply to the slope apron deposits is controlled in part by the evolution and size of small

  13. Teaching social play skills to adults and children with autism as an approach to building rapport.

    PubMed

    Shireman, Molly L; Lerman, Dorothea C; Hillman, Conrad B

    2016-09-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and no intellectual disabilities were taught to increase the social play skills of children with ASD as part of a vocational training program. Participants included 3 adults, aged 21 to 27 years, and 6 children with ASD. Probes conducted throughout the study evaluated whether play skills training affected a measure of rapport between the adult and child. Results demonstrated the effectiveness of behavioral skills training for teaching the adult participants the appropriate play skills. In addition, the children's social engagement increased. Finally, rapport probes showed that play skills training increased levels of proximity, our measure of rapport, between the adults and children.

  14. Strangers in sync: Achieving embodied rapport through shared movements.

    PubMed

    Vacharkulksemsuk, Tanya; Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the emergence of behavioral synchrony among strangers in the context of self-disclosure, and their path in predicting interaction quality. Specifically, we hypothesize that behavioral synchrony mediates the direct effect of self-disclosure on the development of embodied rapport. Same-sex stranger pairs (n=94) were randomly assigned to a videorecorded self-disclosure or control condition, and afterward each member rated their social interaction. Following the procedure used by Bernieri, Reznick, & Rosenthal (1988), two trained judges independently watched each video record and rated each pair interaction on behavioral synchrony. Bootstrapping analyses provide support for the hypothesized mediating effect of behavioral synchrony, which emerged as independent of the effects of self-other overlap and positive affect. The authors discuss implications of behavioral synchrony for relationship formation processes and the inevitable entwinement of behavior and judgments in light of embodied cognition.

  15. Spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning selective: Elimination des corrections necessaires a la determination du rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, Sylvain

    Dans le but d'ameliorer la precision avec laquelle le rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene peut etre determine, un spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning a ete construit pour provoquer l'ionisation selective de l'hydrogene moleculaire et de l'hydrure de deuterium a partir d'un melange gazeux. L'utilisation d'atomes dans des etats d'excitation metastable s'est averee une solution adequate pour reponde a cette attente. L'emploi de l'helium, a l'interieur d'une source d'atomes metastables construit specifiquement pour ce travail, ne permet pas d'obtenir un spectre de masse compose uniquement des deux molecules d'interet. L'ionisation de ces dernieres provient de deux processus distincts, soient l'ionisation Penning et l'ionisation par bombardement electronique. Contrairement a l'helium, il a ete demontre que le neon metastable est un candidat ideal pour produire l'ionisation selective de type Penning. Le nombre d'ions produits est directement proportionnel au courant de la decharge electrique et de la pression d'operation de la source d'atomes metastables. Ces resultats demontrent le potentiel d'un tel spectrometre de masse pour ameliorer la precision a laquelle le rapport isotopique peut etre determine comparativement aux autres techniques existantes.

  16. The Extravert Advantage: How and When Extraverts Build Rapport With Other People.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Korrina A; Chartrand, Tanya L

    2015-11-01

    Extraverts are better than introverts at building rapport, but it remains unknown what they do behaviorally to better connect with other individuals. We hypothesized that extraverts mimic more than introverts as a way to build rapport; however, we predicted that this social skillfulness of extraverts emerges only when they are motivated to affiliate. In Study 1, we found that extraversion predicted increased mimicry when an affiliation goal was present, but not when an affiliation goal was absent. In Study 2, we found that mimicry mediates the relationship between extraversion and rapport, but only when an affiliation goal is present. Our findings are the first to identify a behavior that extraverts engage in that helps them build rapport. Furthermore, our studies show that this skillfulness of extraverts emerges only when they are motivated to affiliate, providing evidence in favor of the reward-sensitivity-as-core model of extraversion over the sociability-as-core model of extraversion.

  17. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment. PMID:26500605

  18. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment.

  19. Interviewing Practices, Conversational Practices, and Rapport: Responsiveness and Engagement in the Standardized Survey Interview.

    PubMed

    Garbarski, Dana; Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Dykema, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    "Rapport" has been used to refer to a range of positive psychological features of an interaction -- including a situated sense of connection or affiliation between interactional partners, comfort, willingness to disclose or share sensitive information, motivation to please, or empathy. Rapport could potentially benefit survey participation and response quality by increasing respondents' motivation to participate, disclose, or provide accurate information. Rapport could also harm data quality if motivation to ingratiate or affiliate caused respondents to suppress undesirable information. Some previous research suggests that motives elicited when rapport is high conflict with the goals of standardized interviewing. We examine rapport as an interactional phenomenon, attending to both the content and structure of talk. Using questions about end-of-life planning in the 2003-2005 wave of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we observe that rapport consists of behaviors that can be characterized as dimensions of responsiveness by interviewers and engagement by respondents. We identify and describe types of responsiveness and engagement in selected question-answer sequences and then devise a coding scheme to examine their analytic potential with respect to the criterion of future study participation. Our analysis suggests that responsive and engaged behaviors vary with respect to the goals of standardization-some conflict with these goals, while others complement them.

  20. Late Quaternary reorientation of stress field and extension direction in the southern Gulf of Suez, Egypt: Evidence from uplifted coral terraces, mesoscopic fault arrays, and borehold breakouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, William; Taviani, Marco

    1996-08-01

    Uplifted Pleistocene coral terraces and modern earthquakes show that several large normal faults are presently active in the southern Gulf of Suez rift basin. The footwall of one of these faults is exposed at Gebel el Zeit, where terraces at elevations of +10-18 and +42 m have been radiometrically dated as 125 ka and 426 ka, respectively. After correcting for eustatic sea-level changes, this results in net tectonic uplift rates of about 0.1 m/kyr. Published interpretations and our own observations indicate that the average extension direction during the Miocene to Pliocene synrift history was 055°. Analysis of borehole breakouts and published earthquake fault plane solutions, however, suggests that the present-day stress field in the southern Gulf has a 010°-020° Shmin orientation. Detailed structural observations show that a change in extension direction occurred in the late Pleistocene, with rotation of the stress field beginning prior to formation of the 125 ka terraces but after formation of older Pleistocene terraces whose ages are less tightly constrained. Using a horizontal slip direction of 015° and our observed net footwall uplift rate, we calculate a separation velocity between Sinai and Africa of 0.8-1.2 m/kyr. The proposed Pleistocene change in extension direction in the Gulf of Suez corresponds closely with the post-500 ka change in extension direction documented in the Kenyan rift system and a similar change in extension direction recorded in the central Red Sea. These regional similarities in tectonic history suggest that the underlying causes of these events may be a plate-scale phenomenon affecting the entire Afro-Arabian rift system, rather than local changes in the Quaternary stress field.

  1. Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among Egyptian mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivers grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hassan; Mekki, Laila E; Hussein, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) markers have been used extensively to study genetic diversity and relationships in a number of fruit crops. In this study, 10 (7 commercial mango cultivars and 3 accessions) mango genotypes traditionally grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region of Egypt, were selected to assess genetic diversity and relatedness. Total genomic DNA was extracted and subjected to RAPD analysis using 30 arbitrary 10-mer primers. Of these, eleven primers were selected which gave 92 clear and bright fragments. A total of 72 polymorphic RAPD bands were detected out of 92 bands, generating 78% polymorphisms. The mean PIC values scores for all loci were of 0.85. This reflects a high level of discriminatory power of a marker and most of these primers produced unique band pattern for each cultivar. A dendrogram based on Nei's Genetic distance co-efficient implied a moderate degree of genetic diversity among the cultivars used for experimentation, with some differences. The hybrid which had derived from cultivar as female parent was placed together. In the cluster, the cultivars and accessions formed separate groups according to bearing habit and type of embryo and the members in each group were very closely linked. Cluster analysis clearly showed two main groups, the first consisting of indigenous to the Delta of Egypt cultivars and the second consisting of indigenous to the Suez Canal and Sinai region. From the analysis of results, it appears the majority of mango cultivars originated from a local mango genepool and were domesticated later. The results indicated the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and management of mango germplasm for breeding purposes.

  2. @AuAg nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (Al@Al2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au and Al@Al2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of Al, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form Al@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell Al@Al2O3. The Al@Al2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered Al@Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or Al@Al2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.

  3. Testing the relationship between mimicry, trust and rapport in virtual reality conversations

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Joanna; Hamilton, Antonia F. De C.

    2016-01-01

    People mimic each other’s actions and postures during everyday interactions. It is widely believed this mimicry acts as a social glue, leading to increased rapport. We present two studies using virtual reality to rigorously test this hypothesis. In Study 1, 50 participants interacted with two avatars who either mimicked their head and torso movements at a 1 or 3 second time delay or did not mimic, and rated feelings of rapport and trust toward the avatars. Rapport was higher towards mimicking avatars, with no effect of timing. In Study 2, we aimed to replicate this effect in a pre-registered design and test whether it is modulated by cultural ingroup-outgroup boundaries. Forty participants from European or East Asian backgrounds interacted with four avatars, two of European appearance and two of East Asian appearance. Two avatars mimicked while the other two did not. We found no effects of mimicry on rapport or trust ratings or implicit trust behaviour in a novel maze task, and no effects of group status or interactions. These null results were calculated in line with our pre-registration. We conclude that being mimicked does not always increase rapport or trust, and make suggestions for future directions. PMID:27739460

  4. Developing Rapport with Children in Forensic Interviews: Systematic Review of Experimental Research.

    PubMed

    Saywitz, Karen J; Larson, Rakel P; Hobbs, Sue D; Wells, Christine R

    2015-08-01

    The vast majority of guidelines recommend that developing rapport with children is essential for successful forensic child interviewing; however, the question remains as to whether there is a sufficient body of scientific research to generate evidence-based guidelines for developing rapport with children in legal contexts. To answer this question, we conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify experimental studies of the effects of rapport-building methods on the reliability of children's reports. Independent raters applied 12 exclusion criteria to the 2,761 potentially relevant articles located by electronic and hand searches of the literature. Experimental studies were few. Although studies to date are a beginning, the overall scientific base is weak regarding even basic issues such as how to best define rapport and the efficacy of common rapport-building techniques. This systematic review highlights what we know, what we do not know, and how much more we need to know to create evidence-based best practice. Recommendations for reshaping the research agenda are discussed.

  5. Testing the relationship between mimicry, trust and rapport in virtual reality conversations.

    PubMed

    Hale, Joanna; Hamilton, Antonia F De C

    2016-10-14

    People mimic each other's actions and postures during everyday interactions. It is widely believed this mimicry acts as a social glue, leading to increased rapport. We present two studies using virtual reality to rigorously test this hypothesis. In Study 1, 50 participants interacted with two avatars who either mimicked their head and torso movements at a 1 or 3 second time delay or did not mimic, and rated feelings of rapport and trust toward the avatars. Rapport was higher towards mimicking avatars, with no effect of timing. In Study 2, we aimed to replicate this effect in a pre-registered design and test whether it is modulated by cultural ingroup-outgroup boundaries. Forty participants from European or East Asian backgrounds interacted with four avatars, two of European appearance and two of East Asian appearance. Two avatars mimicked while the other two did not. We found no effects of mimicry on rapport or trust ratings or implicit trust behaviour in a novel maze task, and no effects of group status or interactions. These null results were calculated in line with our pre-registration. We conclude that being mimicked does not always increase rapport or trust, and make suggestions for future directions.

  6. Do Prosecutors Use Interview Instructions or Build Rapport with Child Witnesses?

    PubMed

    Ahern, Elizabeth C; Stolzenberg, Stacia N; Lyon, Thomas D

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the quality of interview instructions and rapport-building provided by prosecutors to 168 children aged 5-12 years testifying in child sexual abuse cases, preceding explicit questions about abuse allegations. Prosecutors failed to effectively administer key interview instructions, build rapport, or rely on open-ended narrative producing prompts during this early stage of questioning. Moreover, prosecutors often directed children's attention to the defendant early in the testimony. The productivity of different types of wh- questions varied, with what/how questions focusing on actions being particularly productive. The lack of instructions, poor quality rapport-building, and closed-ended questioning suggest that children may not be adequately prepared during trial to provide lengthy and reliable reports to their full ability.

  7. Practitioner Perspectives on Child Sexual Exploitation: Rapport Building With Young People.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Elizabeth C; Sadler, Leslie A; Lamb, Michael E; Gariglietti, Gianna M

    2017-01-01

    Young people suspected of being sexually exploited are unlikely to have made prior disclosures before being approached by authorities, and this can make them especially uncomfortable when involved in investigations. Semistructured interviews were conducted with frontline social workers and law enforcement practitioners about their experiences interacting with youth during child sexual exploitation investigations. The findings provided some tentative insights into the processes by which practitioners sought to establish rapport with young people who have been exploited and establish themselves as trustworthy abuse disclosure recipients. Practitioners reported that rapport building in child sexual exploitation cases not only occurred over lengthy periods of time (e.g., months or years) but also required repeated contacts between the practitioners and young people, during which practitioners minimized their roles as authorities and maximized their authenticity as caring people. Practitioners mentioned the importance of dependability, lightheartedness, and having a casual demeanor. Findings have implications for managing reluctance and understanding rapport building when working with possible victims.

  8. Eliciting maltreated and nonmaltreated children's transgression disclosures: narrative practice rapport building and a putative confession.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Thomas D; Wandrey, Lindsay; Ahern, Elizabeth; Licht, Robyn; Sim, Megan P Y; Quas, Jodi A

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the effects of narrative practice rapport building (asking open-ended questions about a neutral event) and a putative confession (telling the child an adult "told me everything that happened and he wants you to tell the truth") on 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children's reports of an interaction with a stranger who asked them to keep toy breakage a secret (n = 264). Only one third of children who received no interview manipulations disclosed breakage; in response to a putative confession, one half disclosed. Narrative practice rapport building did not affect the likelihood of disclosure. Maltreated children and nonmaltreated children responded similarly to the manipulations. Neither narrative practice rapport building nor a putative confession increased false reports.

  9. Do Prosecutors Use Interview Instructions or Build Rapport with Child Witnesses?

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, Elizabeth C.; Stolzenberg, Stacia N.; Lyon, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the quality of interview instructions and rapport-building provided by prosecutors to 168 children aged 5–12 years testifying in child sexual abuse cases, preceding explicit questions about abuse allegations. Prosecutors failed to effectively administer key interview instructions, build rapport, or rely on open-ended narrative producing prompts during this early stage of questioning. Moreover, prosecutors often directed children's attention to the defendant early in the testimony. The productivity of different types of wh- questions varied, with what/how questions focusing on actions being particularly productive. The lack of instructions, poor quality rapport-building, and closed-ended questioning suggest that children may not be adequately prepared during trial to provide lengthy and reliable reports to their full ability. PMID:26206485

  10. L'engelure causée par le butane commercial au cours d’un accident industriel

    PubMed Central

    Assi-Dje Bi Dje, V.; Abhe, C.M.; Sie-Essoh, J.B.; Kouamé, K.; Vilasco, B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Les engelures sont encore exceptionnelles en Afrique sub-saharienne, mais l’essor des industries pétrochimiques en rapport avec la promotion d’une large utilisation du gaz domestique (butane commercial) expose au risque de survenue de ce type de brûlures abusivement dites gelures. Nous rapportons un cas de brûlures au froid par gaz de pétrole liquéfié (GPL) en milieu professionnel dont le diagnostic de gravité et la prise en charge tardifs ont défavorisé l’évolution locale. Le respect des mesures de sécurité au sein des usines reste néanmoins le principal moyen de prévention de ce type de brûlures méconnues. PMID:26170791

  11. Facteurs associes au port de charge céphalique chez des enfants au Bénin: étude transversale

    PubMed Central

    Akplogan, Barnabé; Hounmenou, Alain Mahoutin; Aze, Oscar; Alegbeh, Sakibou Essofa; Azondekon, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Le port de charge céphalique par les enfants est une méthode de manutention courante au Bénin. Peu d’étude sont investigué sur le port de charge céphalique chez les enfants. Méthodes Cette étude transversale vise à faire l’état des lieux et à identifier les facteurs associés au port de charge céphalique chez des enfants au Bénin. Au total,300 enfants âgés de 13,7 ± 2,6 ans ont participé à l’étude dans les 12 départements du Bénin. La méthode non probabiliste et la technique accidentelle ont été utilisées pour déterminer la taille de l’échantillon. La masse portée par les enfants constitue la variable dépendante. L’âge, la taille, les sites corporels des douleurs, l'ancienneté dans le port de charge etla fréquence hebdomadaire du port céphalique de charge constituent les variables indépendantes. Résultats Le rapport de la masse portée sur le poids corporel est évalué en moyenne à 66%. Pendant et après le port de charge, les douleurs ressenties sont localisées essentiellement au cou, au dos et au bas du dos. Le test de corrélation entre charge portée et la taille indique r = 0,58 (p < 0,001). Conclusion Cette étude indique que les enfants surchargent leur rachis lors du port de charge céphalique. PMID:27279962

  12. When Rapport Building Extends Beyond Affiliation: Communication Overaccommodation Toward Patients with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Ashley P; Bradshaw, Ylisabyth S; Swergold, Natalie; Altman, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Physician rapport with patients is described as a vital component of relationship-centered care, but rapport-building communication behaviors may exceed boundaries and instead indicate patronizing behavior toward patients with disabilities. This paper addresses the types of communication behaviors and contexts for interpreting when rapport building extends beyond boundaries toward patients with disabilities. Methods: Videotaped interactions between third- and fourth-year medical students (N = 142) and standardized patient educators with physical disabilities were qualitatively analyzed. Results: Results suggest six primary themes of exceeding expected rapport boundaries, including baby talk (ie, exaggerated nonverbal gestures and “we” language to indicate “you”), kinesic movement (ie, stiff posture and awkward handshakes), vocalics (ie, volume or pitch that interfered with the flow of conversation), relationship assumptions (ie, communicating assumptions that relationships were grounded in care-receiving), emotional divergence from patient disclosure (ie, minimizing or embellishing disability), and inconsistency with patient emotional cues (ie, responding to negative or neutral disclosure by overly accentuating positive interpretation). Discussion: This study suggests that communication behaviors generally described as positive, rapport-building behaviors can pose negative implications when they exceed the expected quantity or duration, when they are inconsistent with patient verbal disclosure, or when verbal and nonverbal messages are inconsistent. Identified themes serve as examples to understand when rapport building exceeds beyond affiliation and instead appears to indicate patronizing behavior toward patients with disabilities. Suggestions for interpreting communication behaviors within the context of patient disclosure and building capacity to distinguish attitudes and biases limiting communication are addressed. PMID:21841921

  13. Aqaba-Levant transform-related faults in the Gulf of Suez rift: The Durba-Araba fault, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh M.; Abdelmaksoud, Ashraf S.

    2014-09-01

    The Gulf of Suez rift is dominated by NNW- to NW-striking “Clysmic” faults trending parallel to the rift. In addition there are NNE- and WNW-striking (oblique) faults that trend at an angle to the rift. The Durba-Araba fault (DAF) in southwestern Sinai represents one of several NNE-striking faults. It separates the Durba fault block on its NW from the Araba fault block on its SE. Detailed (1:20,000 scale) field mapping and structural studies of the DAF and the onshore area to the east of Belayim Bay (eastern margin of the central Gulf of Suez rift), indicate that the exposed part of the DAF extends for 7.5 km NNE from the mouth of Wadi Araba, at which point it bends and splays into three N- to NNW striking faults, forming a horse tail structure. The fault shows 4 km of pure sinistral strike-slip displacement. Northerly plunging fault propagation folds in the Phanerozoic rocks adjacent to the DAF accommodated the sinistral displacement. These folds are cut and displaced by the splay faults. Near its northern end, the middle splay fault affects the Pliocene El Qa'a Formation. At Gebel Qabeliat a group of en echelon left-stepping NNE- to N-striking faults overlaps the DAF generating a pull-apart (rhomb) graben, in which Pliocene and Quaternary sediments are downthrown against the Upper Miocene rocks. Kinematic indicators on most of these faults show major sinistral strike-slip movement. Palaeostress analysis of slip striae indicates sub-horizontal ENE to NNE extension, comparable to the present day stress regime. Cross-cutting relationships indicate that the NNE- to N-striking oblique faults are younger than the NW-striking Clysmic faults. These faults are probably presently active since they affect Pliocene and Quaternary sediments. It is proposed that these faults are related to the Aqaba-Levant transform that has been active since the Middle Miocene.

  14. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  15. Palynology, palynofacies and petroleum potential of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Diasty, W. Sh.; El Beialy, S. Y.; Abo Ghonaim, A. A.; Mostafa, A. R.; El Atfy, H.

    2014-07-01

    Palynological, palynofacies and organic geochemical results of 46 samples retrieved from the Upper Cretaceous - Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt are presented. The two latter formations are not dated palynologically as their lithology is not promising for palynological yield. However the Matulla Formation is dated as Turonian-Santonian age, based on the combined evidence of pollen and dinocysts. Palynofacies analysis carried out under both transmitted and fluorescent microscopy indicated that both the Thebes and Brown Limestone formations are deposited under a distal suboxic-anoxic environment. On the other hand, the Turonian-Santonian Matulla Formation supported the existence of a marginal marine deposition under dysoxic-anoxic basin to proximal suboxic-anoxic shelf environments. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and TOC results indicated that most of the studied formations are thermally immature to marginally mature and have a good petroleum potential. They are organically-rich in both oil- and gas-prone kerogen Type-II and II/III, deposited under marine reducing conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and expulsion.

  16. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.; Okada, T.

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  17. Interaction of counseling rapport and topics discussed in sessions with methadone treatment clients.

    PubMed

    Joe, George W; Simpson, D Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic rapport between counselors and clients in drug user treatment has been shown to be an important predictor of follow-up outcomes. This naturalistic study investigated the relationship of counseling rapport to drug-related topics discussed in counseling sessions in a sample of 330 clients and nine counselors. These voluntary clients had been admitted to a private, for-profit outpatient methadone treatment in Texas between September 1995 and August 1997 and received no-fee services for a year for participation in this study. The data were gathered using forms in the TCU community treatment assessments (www.ibr.tcu.edu) that measured intake information, counseling session topics, and counselor evaluation of the client. A majority were males, Hispanic, had a pending legal status and the average age was 39. Co-occurring drug dependence for these heroin users included cocaine (38%) and alcohol (31%). The results supported the hypothesis that higher rapport would be associated with addressing clients in a more "supportive approach" that emphasized relapse prevention and strengths-building while lower rapport would be associated with a punitive counseling style that stressed program rules and compliance. The influences of client background, counselor differences, and during-treatment positive urines were also examined. Although counselors differed in their general manner of dealing with clients, each also showed flexibility determined in part by client behavior (such as continued cocaine use). The findings indicate that focusing on constructive solutions is the preferred counseling approach.

  18. Who Is Controlling the Interaction? The Effect of Nonverbal Mirroring on Teacher-Student Rapport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang-yuan, Zhou; Wei, Guo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nonverbal mirroring on teacher-student rapport in one-on-one interactions. Nonverbal mirroring refers to the unconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partner in social interactions. In a within-subjects paradigm, students had four…

  19. Integrating Rapport-Building into Language Instruction: A Study of Korean Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mi Yung

    2016-01-01

    Using a conversation-analytic approach along with the notions of frame and footing (Goffman 1981), this study examines what strategies teachers use to build rapport with their students in Korean as a foreign language classrooms. It also discusses what kinds of interactional resources they employ in tandem with these strategies. Analysis of…

  20. Humor, Rapport, and Uncomfortable Moments in Interactions with Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovarsky, Dana; Schiemer, Christine; Murray, Allison

    2011-01-01

    We examined uncomfortable moments that damaged rapport during group interactions between college students in training to become speech-language pathologists and adults with traumatic brain injury. The students worked as staff in a community-based program affiliated with a university training program that functioned as a recreational gathering…

  1. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Psychometric Properties of the Brief Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The original Professor-Student Rapport Scale contained 34 items and predicted several single-item student outcomes. A high level of internal consistency encouraged the development of a shorter measure in order to address apparent redundancy. Our goals in the current study were to provide psychometric data for the brief version of the scale and to…

  2. More than Just Language Advising: Rapport in University English Writing Consultations and Implications for Tutor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a case study approach with multiple data sources, this paper explores the ways in which rapport is built, and its impact on the learning process based on five successive writing support consultations between a native English-speaking (NES) tutor and her second language (L2) tutee in a Hong Kong university. With reference to the prepared…

  3. Reconsidering Rapport with Urban Teachers: Negotiating Shifting Boundaries and Legitimizing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinke, Carol R.; Mawhinney, Lynnette

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses Lincoln's [2010. "'What a long, strange trip it's been …': Twenty-five years of qualitative and new paradigm research." "Qualitative Inquiry" 16, no. 1: 3-9] call for greater attention to the question of rapport in qualitative research through a reflexive examination of researcher-participant relationships…

  4. Student Self-Assessment and Student Ratings of Teacher Rapport in Secondary Student Course Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, John Wilford

    2010-01-01

    This study involved administering two rating forms (student self-rating on commitment and student rating of teacher rapport) to approximately 1,400 secondary students taught by 12 different teachers at two different high school Latter-day Saint (LDS) released time seminaries along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Seminaries and Institutes of Religion…

  5. Saving Face: Managing Rapport in a Problem-Based Learning Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leslie; Harris, Ann; Burton, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the complex social aspects of communication required for students to participate effectively in Problem-Based Learning and explored how these dynamics are managed. The longitudinal study of a group of first-year undergraduates examined interactions using Rapport Management as a framework to analyse communication…

  6. Preservice Music Teachers' and Therapists' Nonverbal Behaviors and Their Relationship to Perceived Rapport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Alice-Ann; Johnson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the two studies reported in the article was to determine whether or not a relationship exists between preservice music therapists' and teachers' nonverbal behaviors and their perceived rapport. In study 1, evaluators (N = 56) viewed a stimulus tape consisting of 15 45-second segments of 15 preservice music therapists leading songs…

  7. Managing Rapport in Lingua Franca Sales Negotiations: A Comparison of Professional and Aspiring Negotiators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planken, B.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents selective findings from a study that investigated how facework is used to achieve interpersonal goals in intercultural sales negotiations. The article reports on linguistic analyses of what Spencer-Oatey has termed ''rapport management'' which, in a negotiation context, is aimed primarily, but not exclusively, at building a…

  8. Solid-Phase Equilibria in the Au-As, Au-Ga-Sb, Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb Ternaries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    AD6i5 469 SOLID- PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Ru-As AU-GA-SB AU-IN-AS- 1/17 AND AU-IN-SB TERNAR (U) CALIFORNIA UNIV LOS ANGELES DEPT OF CHEMISTRY AND...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED SOLID- PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Au-Ga-As, Au-Ga-Sb Thchnical Report Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb TEARIEIS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGEMI*n Does Entepd) 4./ lie- . .- - - - - -- -- Solid Phase Equilibria in the Au-Ga-As, Au-Ga-Sb, Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb Ternaries C

  9. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; ...

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  10. Carcinome cutané de Merkel: apport de la TEP-TDM au18FDG

    PubMed Central

    Amal, Guensi; Sara, Taleb; Ghofrane, Cherkaoui Salhi; Malika, Ait Idir; Majdouline, Houjami; Souha, Sahraoui; Abdelatif, Benider; Najoua, Touil; Ghita, Benmoussa; Zineb, Baroudi; Nabil, Chikhaoui

    2016-01-01

    Le carcinome à cellules de Merkel (CCM) est une tumeur cutanée neuroendocrinerare d’évolution imprévisible et à grand potentiel métastatique. Ce néoplasme survient habituellement chez le sujet âgé au niveau des zones photo exposées. L'avidité constante du CCM au 18 fluorodésoxyglucose (FDG) justifie l'intérêt de la tomographie par émission de positon (TEP) au cours de cette pathologie. Toutefois, aucun consensus n'est établi à ce jour. Cette étude rapporte le cas d'une patiente de 25 ans suivie pour CCM métastatique, afin d'attirer l'attention sur cette tumeur particulière et d'illustrer l'intérêt de la TEP au 18 FDG dans la prise en charge de cette entité rare. PMID:27303574

  11. meson production in Au+Au collisions at in STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Long; STAR collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we report the measurements of the nuclear modification factor (R AA) and elliptic flow (v 2) for in Au+Au collisions at from the STAR experiment. These results are compared with the results of other open charm mesons to study the hadronization mechanism of the charm quarks and disentangle the transport properties of quark-gluon plasma and hadronic phase [1]. We found that the nuclear modification factor for D s are systematically higher than unity and D 0 R AA. The ratio of D s /D 0 for 10-40% central Au+Au collisions is also higher than that in p+p collisions as predicted by PYTHIA. The D s /D 0 ratio is also compared to that in Pb+Pb collisions at measured by the ALICE experiment. Our results indicate an enhancement of D s meson production in Au+Au collisions.

  12. Statistical methods and errors in family medicine articles between 2010 and 2014-Suez Canal University, Egypt: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

    2016-01-01

    Background: With limited statistical knowledge of most physicians it is not uncommon to find statistical errors in research articles. Objectives: To determine the statistical methods and to assess the statistical errors in family medicine (FM) research articles that were published between 2010 and 2014. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. All 66 FM research articles that were published over 5 years by FM authors with affiliation to Suez Canal University were screened by the researcher between May and August 2015. Types and frequencies of statistical methods were reviewed in all 66 FM articles. All 60 articles with identified inferential statistics were examined for statistical errors and deficiencies. A comprehensive 58-item checklist based on statistical guidelines was used to evaluate the statistical quality of FM articles. Results: Inferential methods were recorded in 62/66 (93.9%) of FM articles. Advanced analyses were used in 29/66 (43.9%). Contingency tables 38/66 (57.6%), regression (logistic, linear) 26/66 (39.4%), and t-test 17/66 (25.8%) were the most commonly used inferential tests. Within 60 FM articles with identified inferential statistics, no prior sample size 19/60 (31.7%), application of wrong statistical tests 17/60 (28.3%), incomplete documentation of statistics 59/60 (98.3%), reporting P value without test statistics 32/60 (53.3%), no reporting confidence interval with effect size measures 12/60 (20.0%), use of mean (standard deviation) to describe ordinal/nonnormal data 8/60 (13.3%), and errors related to interpretation were mainly for conclusions without support by the study data 5/60 (8.3%). Conclusion: Inferential statistics were used in the majority of FM articles. Data analysis and reporting statistics are areas for improvement in FM research articles. PMID:27453839

  13. Geometry and architecture of faults in a syn-rift normal fault array: The Nukhul half-graben, Suez rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Paul; Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Hodgetts, David; Rarity, Franklin; Sharp, Ian R.

    2009-08-01

    The geometry and architecture of a well exposed syn-rift normal fault array in the Suez rift is examined. At pre-rift level, the Nukhul fault consists of a single zone of intense deformation up to 10 m wide, with a significant monocline in the hanging wall and much more limited folding in the footwall. At syn-rift level, the fault zone is characterised by a single discrete fault zone less than 2 m wide, with damage zone faults up to approximately 200 m into the hanging wall, and with no significant monocline developed. The evolution of the fault from a buried structure with associated fault-propagation folding, to a surface-breaking structure with associated surface faulting, has led to enhanced bedding-parallel slip at lower levels that is absent at higher levels. Strain is enhanced at breached relay ramps and bends inherited from pre-existing structures that were reactivated during rifting. Damage zone faults observed within the pre-rift show ramp-flat geometries associated with contrast in competency of the layers cut and commonly contain zones of scaly shale or clay smear. Damage zone faults within the syn-rift are commonly very straight, and may be discrete fault planes with no visible fault rock at the scale of observation, or contain relatively thin and simple zones of scaly shale or gouge. The geometric and architectural evolution of the fault array is interpreted to be the result of (i) the evolution from distributed trishear deformation during upward propagation of buried fault tips to surface faulting after faults breach the surface; (ii) differences in deformation response between lithified pre-rift units that display high competence contrasts during deformation, and unlithified syn-rift units that display low competence contrasts during deformation, and; (iii) the history of segmentation, growth and linkage of the faults that make up the fault array. This has important implications for fluid flow in fault zones.

  14. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  15. Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins’ luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed. PMID:24373347

  16. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L. Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2014-12-14

    Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

  17. On the electron affinity of Au3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The EA of Au3 is estimated to be 3.93 eV. The calculations also show that the feature in the photodetachment spectrum at about 2 eV electron binding energy is due to a two-photon process involving fragmentation of Au3(-) to Au and Au2(-) and subsequent photodetachment of Au2(-). Au3 is found to have a 2B2 ground state that is only slightly distorted from an equilateral triangle.

  18. Determination of relative sensitivity factors during secondary ion sputtering of silicate glasses by Au+, Au2+ and Au3+ ions.

    PubMed

    King, Ashley; Henkel, Torsten; Rost, Detlef; Lyon, Ian C

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Au-cluster ions have been successfully used for organic analysis in secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cluster ions, such as Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+), can produce secondary ion yield enhancements of up to a factor of 300 for high mass organic molecules with minimal sample damage. In this study, the potential for using Au(+), Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) primary ions for the analysis of inorganic samples is investigated by analyzing a range of silicate glass standards. Practical secondary ion yields for both Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) ions are enhanced relative to those for Au(+), consistent with their increased sputter rates. No elevation in ionization efficiency was found for the cluster primary ions. Relative sensitivity factors for major and trace elements in the standards showed no improvement in quantification with Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) ions over the use of Au(+) ions. Higher achievable primary ion currents for Au(+) ions than for Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) allow for more precise analyses of elemental abundances within inorganic samples, making them the preferred choice, in contrast to the choice of Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) for the analysis of organic samples. The use of delayed secondary ion extraction can also boost secondary ion signals, although there is a loss of overall sensitivity.

  19. Instabilité post-traumatique du nerf ulnaire au coude: à propos de cinq cas et revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Azzelarab; Lamkhanter, Adil; Youssef, Jalal; Ouzaa, Mohammed Reda; Benchakroun, Mohammed; Jaafar, Abdelouahab

    2016-01-01

    Le nerf ulnaire au coude a une situation anatomique très particulière, qui explique son importante vulnérabilité. Les auteurs rapportent cinq cas, d'instabilité post-traumatique du nerf ulnaire avec luxation complète du nerf en avant de l'épitrochlée. A la lumière de notre expérience et d'une revue de la littérature, les aspects pathogéniques, diagnostiques et thérapeutiques de cette pathologie sont passés en revue. PMID:28154652

  20. Pion Interferometry in AU+AU Collisions at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.

    1999-01-09

    Two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations have been studied using the BNL-E866 Forward Spectrometer in 11.6 A {center_dot} GeV/c Au + Au collisions. The data were analyzed using three-dimensional correlation parameterizations to study transverse momentum-dependent source parameters. The freeze-out time and the duration of emission were derived from the source radii parameters.

  1. Optical nonlinearities of Au nanoparticles and Au/Ag coreshells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jae Tae; Yang, Qiguang; Kim, Wan-Joong; Heo, Jinhwa; Ma, Seong-Min; Austin, Jasmine; Yun, Wan Soo; Jung, Sung Soo; Han, Sang Woo; Tabibi, Bagher; Temple, Doyle

    2009-02-01

    Au nanoparticles exhibited both negative and positive nonlinear absorptions with ground-state plasmon bleaching and free-carrier absorption that could be origins of the saturable and reverse-saturable optical properties. Au/Ag coreshells displayed only positive nonlinear absorption and reverse-saturable optical properties as a function of excitation intensity at the edge of surface-plasmon resonance, which implies no ground-state plasmon bleaching and the existence of two-photon absorption.

  2. La stigmatisation des PVVIH en Afrique: analyse de ses formes et manifestations au Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ky-Zerbo, Odette; Desclaux, Alice; Asmar, Khalil El; Makhlouf-Obermeyer, Carla; Msellati, Philippe; Somé, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Introduction l’impact négatif de la stigmatisation sur la prévention du VIH et la prise en charge a été documenté. La stigmatisation a été analysée au plan qualitatif au Burkina Faso, où la prévalence VIH est faible (1 %). Des mesures quantitatives sont encore nécessaires pour identifier les formes et manifestations majeures de la stigmatisation. Méthodologie dans le cadre de l’étude MATCH (Multi-country African Study on Testing and Counselling for HIV), une étude transversale a été conduite auprès de personnes ayant déjà fait le test VIH. Les personnes séropositives ont été interrogées sur les conséquences du résultat VIH+. Leur vécu de la stigmatisation a été évalué à travers 20 indicateurs de manifestations de la stigmatisation, regroupés en trois formes de stigmatisation/discrimination. Résultats au total 219 PVVIH ont été recrutées. L’autostigmatisation est la forme majeure de stigmatisation. Elle est estimée dans cette étude à 46 % comparativement à la stigmatisation dans les relations interpersonnelles évaluée à 40 % et la stigmatisation dans les services de santé qui est de 11 %. L’expérience de la stigmatisation dans les relations interpersonnelles est davantage rapportée par les PVVIH qui ont partagé leur résultat, celles qui ont un faible niveau de scolarisation, les veufs/veuves ou séparés, et les membres d’association. La stigmatisation dans les services de santé est rapportée plus souvent par les membres d’associations. Conclusion les programmes de prise en charge doivent, parallèlement à l’extension des antirétroviraux, intégrer un volet psychologique plus adapté aux besoins. Les activités d’appui psychosocial ciblant davantage l’individu doivent être développées, surtout au sein des associations. PMID:25291886

  3. Al-Au-La (010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Au-La (010)' with the content:

  4. "Straight up": enhancing rapport and therapeutic alliance with previously-detained youth in the delivery of mental health services.

    PubMed

    Brown, James R; Holloway, Evan D; Akakpo, Tohoro F; Aalsma, Matthew C

    2014-02-01

    A strong therapeutic alliance has been shown to improve mental health treatment outcomes in adults, but this topic has not been fully explored with youth. Adolescents, particularly justice-involved youth, stand to benefit greatly from an improved treatment experience. One quality which can improve treatment is mental health providers' interpersonal skills when attempting to build a therapeutic rapport with adolescent clients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 youth who screened positive for mental health concerns while in juvenile detention. Four themes were identified as important to improving the therapeutic alliance: Empathy, client-directed care, sequencing, and positive rapport. Suggestions for strengthening a therapeutic alliance are provided.

  5. A Grand Avenue to Au Nanocluster Electrochemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Hesari, Mahdi; Ding, Zhifeng

    2017-02-21

    In most cases of semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals, the inherent optical and electrochemical properties of these interesting nanomaterials do not translate into expected efficient electrochemiluminescence or electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) because of the surface-state induction effect. Thus, their low ECL efficiencies, while very interesting to explore, limit their applications. As their electrochemistry is not well-defined, insight into their ECL mechanistic details is also limited. Alternatively, gold nanoclusters possess monodispersed sizes with atomic precision, low and well defined HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, and stable optical and electrochemical properties that make them suitable for potential ECL applications. In this Account, we demonstrate strong and sustainable ECL of gold nanoclusters Au25(z) (i.e., Au25(SR)18(z), z = 1-, 0, 1+), Au38(SR)24, and Au144(SR)60, where the ligand SR is 2-phenylethanethiol. By correlation of the optical and electrochemical features of Au25 nanoclusters, a Latimer-type diagram can be constructed to reveal thermodynamic relationships of five oxidation states (Au25(2+), Au25(+), Au25(0), Au25(-), and Au25(2-)) and three excited states (Au25(-)*, Au25(0)*, and Au25(+)*). We describe ECL mechanisms and reaction kinetics by means of conventional ECL-voltage curves and novel spooling ECL spectroscopy. Notably, their ECL in the presence of tri-n-propylamine (TPrA), as a coreactant, is attributed to emissions from Au25(-)* (950 nm, strong), Au25(0)* (890 nm, very strong), and Au25(+)* (890 nm, very strong), as confirmed by the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the three Au25 clusters electrogenerated in situ. The ECL emissions are controllable by adjustment of the concentrations of TPrA· and Au25(-), Au25(0), and Au25(+) species in the vicinity of the working electrode and ultimately the applied potential. It was determined that the Au25(-)/TPrA coreactant system should have an ECL efficiency of >50% relative to the Ru(bpy)3

  6. A study of the electronic properties of Au nanowires and Au nanoislands on Au(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Lijnen, E; Muzychenko, D A; Ceulemans, A; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Lievens, P; Van Haesendonck, C

    2009-09-30

    By means of ion bombardment of clean Au(111) films, atomically flat nanoparticles of various shapes and sizes were created, ranging from several tens of nm(2) down to only a few nm(2). Both two-dimensional Au islands as well as one-dimensional Au nanowire-like structures have been investigated by means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We were able to probe their local electronic structure in a broad energy range, which was found to be dominated by pronounced size-dependent confinement effects. Mapping of the local density of states revealed complex standing wave patterns that arise due to interference of scattered Au surface state electrons at the edges of the Au nanoparticles. The observed phenomena could be modeled with high accuracy by theoretical particle-in-a-box calculations based on a variational method that can be applied to '2D boxes' of arbitrary polygonal shape and that we have previously successfully applied to explain the electronic wave patterns on Co islands on Au(111). Our findings support the general validity of this particle-in-a-box model.

  7. La carence en vitamine D chez l'adulte au Gabon: cas isolé ou problème méconnu?

    PubMed Central

    Ntyonga-Pono, Marie-Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    La carence en vitamine D chez l'adulte est un sujet d'actualité à cause de ses multiples effets et de son extension de par le monde. Cependant elle est peu explorée au Gabon et en Afrique centrale en général. Le but de cet article qui rapporte trois cas documentés de carence en vitamine D chez l'adulte au Gabon, est d'attirer l'attention sur l'existence de ce problème même en zone équatoriale ensoleillée. Vu les implications de cette carence dans diverses pathologies osseuses, cardio-vasculaires, métaboliques, infectieuses, auto-immunes, néoplasiques..., des recherches plus approfondies sont nécessaires pour cerner le problème et prendre des mesures appropriées. PMID:25815104

  8. Winning Their Hearts. Members Speak Out: In performances, How do You Establish Rapport between Your Choir and Young Audiences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Matthew G.

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses techniques on how to establish rapport between the choir and young audiences. According to him, one of the choir's most important assets just might be something he calls access-ability. One of Webster's definitions of "access "is" permission, liberty, or ability to enter, approach, or communicate with." When it comes to…

  9. RAPPORT: running scientific high-performance computing applications on the cloud.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremy; Filippis, Ioannis; Woodbridge, Mark; Bauer, Daniela; Hong, Neil Chue; Jackson, Mike; Butcher, Sarah; Colling, David; Darlington, John; Fuchs, Brian; Harvey, Matt

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing infrastructure is now widely used in many domains, but one area where there has been more limited adoption is research computing, in particular for running scientific high-performance computing (HPC) software. The Robust Application Porting for HPC in the Cloud (RAPPORT) project took advantage of existing links between computing researchers and application scientists in the fields of bioinformatics, high-energy physics (HEP) and digital humanities, to investigate running a set of scientific HPC applications from these domains on cloud infrastructure. In this paper, we focus on the bioinformatics and HEP domains, describing the applications and target cloud platforms. We conclude that, while there are many factors that need consideration, there is no fundamental impediment to the use of cloud infrastructure for running many types of HPC applications and, in some cases, there is potential for researchers to benefit significantly from the flexibility offered by cloud platforms.

  10. An approach to collaborative care and consultation: interviewing, cultural competence, and enhancing rapport and adherence.

    PubMed

    Beck, B J; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    Although changes in the US health care system promote a population-based approach, increases in population diversity emphasize the need for culturally competent, patient-centered, participatory care. Despite this perceived conflict, the global view has improved the recognition of mental health issues as a driver of overall health as well as health care spending. This recognition, along with the many forces that keep mental health care in the primary care sector, actually encourages the development of collaborative models that capitalize on the primary care provider's opportunity to leverage their rapport with the patient to improve access to, and comfort with, specialty mental health services. Engaging patients in their own path to recovery or well-being improves engagement in, and adherence to, the treatment plan and ultimately improves outcomes.

  11. Photoneutron cross sections for Au

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, O.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Kondo, T.; Kamata, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Goko, S.; Nair, C.; Lui, Y.-W.

    2011-10-28

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for Au in the entire energy range of the ({gamma},n) channel based on a direct neutron-counting technique with quasimonochromatic {gamma} rays produced in inverse Compton-scattering of laser photons with relativistic electrons. We present results of the measurement in comparison with the past data.

  12. Péritonites infectieuses en dialyse péritonéale continue ambulatoire au CHU de Rabat: profil bactériologique sur trois ans

    PubMed Central

    Lioussfi, Zineb; Rhou, Hakima; Ezzaitouni, Fatima; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabea; Benamar, Loubna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La péritonite infectieuse (PI) est une des complications les plus sévères et les plus fréquentes de la dialyse péritonéale (DP). But: Déterminer le taux des PI et les germes en causes, et évaluer l’efficacité des protocoles thérapeutiques entrepris chez les patients traités par DP au CHU de Rabat. Méthodes Etude rétrospective effectuée en Septembre 2009 chez tous les patients traités par DP continue ambulatoire (DPCA) au CHU de Rabat depuis l’ouverture de l’unité de DP en Juillet 2006. Ont été inclus dans cette étude, tous les patients ayant fait une péritonite. Pour tous nos patients, nous avons relevé les données cliniques, biologiques et bactériologiques. Nous avons également recherché les causes des péritonites, le délai de survenue par rapport au début de la dialyse, et la durée moyenne de formation des patients. Résultats Au cours de la période de l’étude, 28 épisodes de PI sont survenus chez 19 patients dont la moyenne d’âge est de 46±16 (19-78) ans, avec une prédominance masculine (12 hommes/ 7 femmes). Le taux des PI dans notre unité de DP est de 21.07 mois-patients calculé par le RDPLF. Leur délai de survenue par rapport au début de la dialyse au centre est de 7.9 ±8 (1-29) mois. Lors de ces PI, les bactéries à Gram négatif (BGN) ont été retrouvées dans 55% des cas, contre uniquement 45% pour les Gram positifs. Conclusion La PI est une complication grave et redoutable de la DP. Le taux de PI dans notre centre de DPCA est de 21m-p ce qui correspond au taux acceptable définie par les sociétés internationales. Les germes les plus responsables des PI dans notre centre sont les BGN et la contamination semble être manu-portée se faisant essentiellement à partir de la flore environnementale et cutanée. PMID:22593777

  13. Spiral Patterning of Au Nanoparticles on Au Nanorod Surface to Form Chiral AuNR@AuNP Helical Superstructures Templated by DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenqi; Lan, Xiang; Zhu, Chenggan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Qiangbin

    2017-02-20

    Plasmonic motifs with precise surface recognition sites are crucial for assembling defined nanostructures with novel functionalities and properties. In this work, a unique and effective strategy is successfully developed to pattern DNA recognition sites in a helical arrangement around a gold nanorod (AuNR), and a new set of heterogeneous AuNR@AuNP plasmonic helices is fabricated by attaching complementary-DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the predesigned sites on the AuNR surface. AuNR is first assembled to one side of a bifacial rectangular DNA origami, where eight groups of capture strands are selectively patterned on the other side. The subsequently added link strands make the rectangular DNA origami roll up around the AuNR into a tubular shape, therefore giving birth to a chiral patterning of DNA recognition sites on the surface of AuNR. Following the hybridization with the AuNPs capped with the complementary strands to the capture strands on the DNA origami, left-handed and right-handed AuNR@AuNP helical superstructures are precisely formed by tuning the pattern of the recognition sites on the AuNR surface. Our strategy of nanoparticle surface patterning innovatively realizes hierarchical self-assembly of plasmonic superstructures with tunable chiroptical responses, and will certainly broaden the horizon of bottom-up construction of other functional nanoarchitectures with growing complexity.

  14. Perceptions des jeunes victimes de violence sexuelle au sein de leurs relations amoureuses sur leur pire expérience

    PubMed Central

    Van Camp, Tinneke; Hébert, Martine; Fernet, Mylène; Blais, Martin; Lavoie, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Cette étude explore les pires expériences vécues dans les relations amoureuses de jeunes qui ont rapporté avoir vécu de la violence sexuelle dans une relation de couple récente. Quelles sont les situations perçues comme étant les plus difficiles par les jeunes et est-ce que celles-ci se limitent à des incidents violents? Le questionnaire sur les parcours amoureux des jeunes (PAJ) a été complété par des jeunes Québécois âgés de 14 à 18 ans. Au total, plus de 600 participants ont rapporté au moins un épisode de violence sexuelle (souvent en combinaison avec d’autres formes de violence). Nous présentons les résultats de l’analyse qualitative inductive fondée sur une question ouverte concernant la pire expérience vécue. Les observations suggèrent que, en plus des expériences de violence, les difficultés relationnelles, les ruptures amoureuses et les sentiments amoureux non réciproques sont des situations particulièrement difficiles selon les propos des jeunes. Ces différents enjeux vécus par les jeunes devraient être pris en considération dans l’offre de services d’intervention à leur intention. PMID:28191266

  15. New Structure Model of Au22(SR)18: Bitetrahederon Golden Kernel Enclosed by [Au6(SR)6] Au(I) Complex.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yong; Tang, Jian; Tang, Xianqiong; Huang, Yunqing; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-04-16

    The study of atomic structure of thiolate-protected gold with decreased core size is important to explore the structural evolution from Au(I) complex to Au nanoclusters. In this work, we theoretically predicted the structure of recently synthesized four valence electron (4e) Au22(SR)18 cluster. The Au22(SR)18 cluster is proposed to possess a bitetrahedron Au7 kernel that is surrounded by a unique [Au6(SR)6] Au(I) complex and three Au3(SR)4 staple motifs. More interestingly, the Au22(SR)18 exhibits structural connections with Au24(SR)20 and Au20(SR)16. The stability of Au22(SR)18 can be understood from the superatom electronic configuration of the Au kernel as well as the formation of superatomic network. The present study can offer new insight into the structural evolution as well as electronic structure of thiolate-protected Au nanoclusters.

  16. Onset of nuclear matter expansion in Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochet, P.; Rami, F.; Gobbi, A.; Dona, R.; Coffin, J. P.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Roy, C.; de Schauenburg, B.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Best, D.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cindro, N.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fan, Z. G.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Freifelder, R. P.; Berrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hong, B.; Jeong, S. C.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koncz, P.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Moisa, D.; Mösner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pras, P.; Ramillien, V.; Reisdorf, W.; Ritman, J. L.; Sadchikov, A. G.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K. M.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wang, G. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.; FOPI Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Using the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, excitation functions of collective flow components were measured for the Au+Au system, in the reaction plane and out of this plane, at seven incident energies ranging from 100 A MeV to 800 A MeV. The threshold energies, corresponding to the onset of sideward-flow (balance energy) and squeeze-out effect (transition energy), are extracted from extrapolations of these excitation functions toward lower beam energies for charged products with Z ⩾ 2. The transition energy is found to be larger than the balance energy. The impact parameter dependence of both balance and transition energies, when extrapolated to central collisions, suggests comparable although slightly higher values than the threshold energy for the radial flow. The relevant parameter seems to be the energy deposited into the system in order to overcome the attractive nuclear forces.

  17. Universality in fragment inclusive yields from Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insolia, A.; Tuvè, C.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Scharenberg, R.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J. M.; Tincknell, M. L.; Wang, S.; Warren, P. G.; Wieman, H. H.; Wolf, K. L.

    2001-11-01

    The inclusive light fragment (Z⩽7) yield data in Au+Au reactions, measured by the EOS Collaboration at the LBNL Bevalac, are presented and discussed. For peripheral collisions the measured charge distributions develop progressively according to a power law which can be fitted by a single τ exponent independently of the bombarding energy in the range 250-1200 A MeV. In addition to this universal feature, we observe that the location of the maximum in the individual yields of different charged fragments shift towards lower multiplicity as the fragment charge increases from Z=3 to Z=7. This trend is common to all six measured beam energies. Moments of charge distributions and correlations among different moments are reported. Finally, the THe,DT thermometer has been constructed for central and peripheral collisions using the double yield ratios of He and D, T projectile fragments. The measured nuclear temperatures are in agreement with experimental findings in other fragmentation reactions.

  18. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir and Au-Ir-Rh nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Yury; Plusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-04-06

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6]х[Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals "mixed" at the molecular level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using HR TEM show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5±3 nm. EDX and XRD measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In-situ real-time synchrotron XRD was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the "conversion chemistry" mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 ºC for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  19. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Anne M. Sickles

    2014-05-13

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  20. Two new Myxidium species (Myxosporea: Myxidiidae) infecting the gallbladder of African flying fish, Cheilopogon nigricans and Suez fusilier, Caesio suevicus from the Red Sea, Egypt: a morphological and morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem Sh

    2009-08-01

    Myxidium maamouni sp. n. and Myxidium aydai sp. n. were described from the gallbladder of the African flying fish Cheilopogon nigricans and Suez fusilier Caesio suevicus, respectively. Fishes were collected from the Red Sea at Al-Quseir, Egypt. M. maamouni have irregular to mostly rounded polysporous plasmodia with diameter of 27 microm. Spores were sigmoid or S-shaped and sometimes spindle-shaped in the frontal view with smooth valves. They measured 13.5 x 8.0 x 8.2 microm in size. Their polar capsules were equal pyriform and measured 7.0 x 3.2 microm in size with nine to 12 coils. Spores of M. aydai were spindle-shaped in the frontal view with thin smooth valves. They measured 23.0 x 5.6 x 5.5 microm in size. Their polar capsules were pyriform and measured 7.2 x 3.4 microm in size with eight to nine coils.

  1. When students from different professions are co-located: the importance of interprofessional rapport for learning to work together.

    PubMed

    Croker, Anne; Fisher, Karin; Smith, Tony

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interest and research into interprofessional learning, there is scope to more deeply understand what happens when students from different professions live and study in the same location. This study aimed to explore the issue of co-location and its effects on how students learn to work with other professions. The setting for this study was a rural health education facility in Australia with close links to local health care and community services. Philosophical hermeneutics informed the research method. Interviews were undertaken with 29 participants, including students, academic educators and clinical supervisors in diagnostic radiography, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, pharmacy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology. Photo-elicitation was used to facilitate participant engagement with the topic. The findings foreground the value of interprofessional rapport building opportunities for students learning to work together. Enabled by the proximity of different professions in shared educational, clinical and social spaces, interprofessional rapport building was contingent on contextual conditions (balance of professions, shared spaces and adequate time) and individual's interpersonal capabilities (being interested, being inclusive, developing interpersonal bonds, giving and receiving respect, bringing a sense of own profession and being patient-centred). In the absence of these conditions and capabilities, negative professional stereotypes may be inadvertently re-enforced. From these findings suggestions are made for nurturing interprofessional rapport building opportunities to enable students of different professions to learn to work together.

  2. Perceptions of rapport across the life span: Gaze patterns and judgment accuracy.

    PubMed

    Vicaria, Ishabel M; Bernieri, Frank J; Isaacowitz, Derek M

    2015-06-01

    Although age-related deficits in emotion perception have been established using photographs of individuals, the extension of these findings to dynamic displays and dyads is just beginning. Similarly, most eye-tracking research in the person perception literature, including those that study age differences, have focused on individual attributes gleaned from static images; to our knowledge, no previous research has considered cue use in dyadic judgments with eye-tracking. The current study employed a Brunswikian lens model analysis in conjunction with eye-tracking measurements to study age differences in the judgment of rapport, a social construct comprised of mutual attentiveness, positive feelings, and coordination between interacting partners. Judgment accuracy and cue utilization of younger (n = 47) and older (n = 46) adults were operationalized as correlations between a perceiver's judgments and criterion values within a set of 34 brief interaction videos in which 2 opposite sex college students discussed a controversial topic. No age differences emerged in the accuracy of judgments; however, pathways to accuracy differed by age: Younger adults' judgments relied on some behavioral cues more than older adults. In addition, eye-tracking analyses revealed that older adults spent more time looking at the bodies of the targets in the videos, whereas younger adults spent more time looking at the targets' heads. The contributions from both the lens model and eye-tracking findings provide distinct but complementary insights to our understanding of age-related continuities and shifts in social perceptual processing.

  3. The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-04-20

    The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

  4. Etude séro-épidémiologique de la leishmaniose canine au centre du Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Fellah, Hajiba; Doughmi, Oursula; Maniar, Saâd; Lalami, Abdelhakim El Ouali

    2014-01-01

    Dans le monde, la leishmaniose viscérale humaine est connue pour avoir comme principale source d'infection les Canidés domestiques et sauvages. Au centre du Maroc, les données épidémiologiques, cliniques et parasitologiques sur la leishmaniose canine, sont quasiment inexistantes. Ce travail traite une étude prospective au cours de laquelle 61 sérums canins ont été analysés par un test rapide et par l'immunofluorescence indirecte. La sensibilité du test rapide par rapport à celle de l'immunofluorescence indirecte (IFI) est de 33,33%. La fréquence de la maladie chez les chiens s’élève à 9,83% (Test Rapide) et 24,59% (IFI). 73,33% des cas canins positifs à la sérologie sont asymptomatiques. Ce sont les jeunes chiens de moins de 5 ans qui sont les plus fréquemment atteints avec une sensibilité de la race Berger Allmand à l'infection. Cette étude a permis de mettre en évidence la présence de chiens leishmaniens (15 chiens séropositifs parmi 61) et de prouver l'existence du réservoir canin. Une stratégie de prévention active doit être mise en place. PMID:25852791

  5. Cancer du sein au Maroc: profil phénotypique des tumeurs

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ahmadaye Ibrahim; Bendahhou, Karima; Mestaghanmi, Houriya; Saile, Rachid; Benider, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Le cancer du sein est le plus fréquent chez la femme et figure parmi les principales causes de mortalité liées au cancer. La curabilité de ce type tumoral est en augmentation, grâce aux programmes de dépistage et aux progrès thérapeutiques, qui ont certes augmenté la survie des patients. Mais des défis restent à relever en rapport avec l’instabilité phénotypique des cellules cancéreuses. L’objectif de ce travail est d’étudier le profil phénotypique du cancer du sein chez les patients pris en charge au Centre Mohammed VI pour le traitement des Cancers, durant les années 2013-2014. Il s’agit d’une étude transversale sur deux années, incluant les cas du cancer du sein pris en charge au Centre. Le recueil des données était fait à partir des dossiers des patients et analysés par le logiciel Epi Info. 1277 patients ont été pris en charge au sein de notre centre. 99,5% des cas de sexe féminin, l’âge moyen était 50,20 ± 11,34 ans. Le type histologique le plus fréquent était le carcinome canalaire infiltrant (80,7% des cas). Le stade diagnostic était précoce (56,9%). Le phénotype moléculaire le plus fréquent était le luminal A (41,4% des cas). Le luminal B, le HER2 et les triples négatifs étaient dans respectivement 10,4%, 6,3%, 11,2% des cas. L’étude du phénotype tumoral des patients atteints du cancer du sein permet l’orientation du clinicien dans le choix du traitement, et des décideurs dans la planification de programmes de lutte contre cette pathologie. PMID:28292037

  6. Arthropathie destructrice des épaules au cours d'une acromégalie

    PubMed Central

    Akasbi, Nessrine; Tahiri, Latifa; Lyhyaoui, Ouafae; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Sqalli Houssaini, Ghita; Elmrini, Abdelmajid; Ajdi, Farida; Taoufik, Harzy

    2011-01-01

    L'acromégalie est une maladie endocrinienne rare, en rapport avec une hypersécrétion d'hormone de croissance. Elle a des conséquences rhumatologiques: l'arthropathie périphérique, l'atteinte rachidienne et les syndromes canalaires. L'atteinte articulaire accompagne une acromégalie active, sa survenue après un traitement radical et une rémission complète est rare. Nous présentons le cas d'une patiente de 70 ans ayant un antécédent d'acromégalie sur adénome hypophysaire il y a 25 ans, traitée chirurgicalement et déclarée en rémission complète, a développé une arthropathie destructrice des deux épaules. Le but de notre observation est de mettre le point sur la possibilité d'une atteinte articulaire au cours de l'acromégalie et de son retentissement fonctionnelle. PMID:22187594

  7. Stabilization of Au at edges of bimetallic PdAu nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Yudanov, Ilya V; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2010-05-21

    Density functional calculations were performed to study the distribution of Au atoms in bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles. A series of Pd(79-n)Au(n) clusters of truncated octahedral shape with different content of Au ranging from n = 1 to 60 was used to model such bimetallic nanosystems. Segregation of Au to the particle surface is found to be thermodynamically favorable. The most stable sites for Au substitution are located at the edges of the PdAu nanoclusters. The stabilization at the edges is rationalized by their higher flexibility for surface relaxation which minimizes the strain induced by larger atomic radius of Au as compared to Pd. This stabilization of Au at the edges indicates the possibility to synthesize PdAu particles with Pd atoms located mainly on the facets, and edges "decorated" by Au atoms. Such nanocrystallites are expected to exhibit peculiar catalytic properties and, being thermodynamically stable, should be prone to retaining their initial shape under catalytic conditions.

  8. Impact of Ni/Ge/Au/Ti/Au and Ti/Pt/Au collector metal on GaInP/GaAs HBT characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Woo; Mohammadi, Saeed; Pavlidis, Dimitris

    2000-10-01

    The collector-emitter offset voltage of GaInP/GaAs HBTs grown by chemical-beam epitaxy with reduced toxicity precursors is investigated for Ni/Ge/Au/Ti/Au and Ti/Pt/Au collector contact metals. The offset voltage for HBTs with Ti/Pt/Au collector metal is increased by 0.26 V compared to Ni/Ge/Au/Ti/Au due to the 0.26 eV barrier existing between the n-GaAs subcollector and the Ti/Pt/Au contact metal. Other parameters affected by the collector contact barrier and impacting transistor performance include DC gain, microwave and power performance.

  9. Heterostructured CIGS-Au nanoparticles: from Au-CIGS side-by-side structure to Au-core/CIGS-shell configuration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yeming; Li, Quan

    2011-08-01

    Heterostructured Au-Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) nanoparticles (nps) with Au-CIGS side-by-side and Au-core/CIGS-shell configurations have been synthesized in a controllable manner using seed mediated growth. Detailed microstructure analysis reveals that (112) planes in the tetragonal chalcopyrite CIGS serve as the predominant termination surfaces during single phase CIGS nanoparticle growth. Preferential nucleation of Au on such planes determines the Au-CIGS side-by-side configuration when the pre-synthesized CIGS nps are used as the seeds for further Au growth. Reversing the growth sequence by employing Au nano-seeds results in Au-core/CIGS-shell configuration, as determined by the non-preferential nucleation of CIGS on the spherical Au nanoparticle surface. The different morphological configurations of the heterostructures are found to modify the surface plasmon resonance of Au in the corresponding samples.

  10. Au Fixed Point Development at NRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedyulin, S. N.; Gotoh, M.; Todd, A. D. W.

    2017-04-01

    Two Au fixed points filled using metal of different nominal purities in carbon crucibles have been developed at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). The primary motivation behind this project was to provide the means for direct thermocouple calibrations at the Au freezing point (1064.18°C). Using a Au fixed point filled with the metal of maximum available purity [99.9997 % pure according to glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS)], multiple freezing plateaus were measured in a commercial high-temperature furnace. Four Pt/Pd thermocouples constructed and calibrated in-house were used to measure the freezing plateaus. From the calibration at Sn, Zn, Al and Ag fixed points, the linear deviation function from the NIST-IMGC reference function (IEC 62460:2008 Standard) was determined and extrapolated to the freezing temperature of Au. For all the Pt/Pd thermocouples used in this study, the measured EMF values agree with the extrapolated values within expanded uncertainty, thus substantiating the use of 99.9997 % pure Au fixed point cell for thermocouple calibrations at NRC. Using the Au fixed point filled with metal of lower purity (99.99 % pure according to GDMS), the effect of impurities on the Au freezing temperature measured with Pt/Pd thermocouple was further investigated.

  11. Synthesis of Au microwires by selective oxidation of Au-W thin-film composition spreads.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Sven; Brunken, Hayo; Salomon, Steffen; Meyer, Robert; Savan, Alan; Ludwig, Alfred

    2013-02-01

    We report on the stress-induced growth of Au microwires out of a surrounding Au-W matrix by selective oxidation, in view of a possible application as 'micro-Velcro'. The Au wires are extruded due to the high compressive stress in the tungsten oxide formed by oxidation of elemental W. The samples were fabricated as a thin-film materials library using combinatorial sputter deposition followed by thermal oxidation. Sizes and shapes of the Au microwires were investigated as a function of the W to Au ratio. The coherence length and stress state of the Au microwires were related to their shape and plastic deformation. Depending on the composition of the Au-W precursor, the oxidized samples showed regions with differently shaped Au microwires. The Au48W52 composition yielded wires with the maximum length to diameter ratio due to the high compressive stress in the tungsten oxide matrix. The values of wire length (35 μm) and diameter (2 μm) achieved at the Au48W52 composition are suitable for micro-Velcro applications.

  12. Au/Au@polythiophene core/shell nanospheres for heterogeneous catalysis of nitroarenes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Seon; Huh, Seong

    2012-11-01

    Monodisperse Au/Au@polythiophene core/shell nanospheres were facilely prepared through the reduction of gold precursor, AuCl₄⁻, by 2-thiopheneacetonitrile in an aqueous solution. Concomitantly, 2-thiopheneacetonitrile polymerized during this redox process. As a result, Au nanoparticle was encapsulated by conductive polymer shell to afford novel core/shell nanospheres. Interestingly, the shell was composed of very tiny Au nanoparticles surrounded with thiophene polymers. Thus, the new material is best described as Au/Au@polythiophene core/shell nanospheres. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the Au nanoparticles were coordinated by the C≡N groups of the polythiophene shell. Some of the C≡N groups were partially hydrolyzed into COOH groups during the redox process because of the acidic reaction condition. The shell was conductive based on the typical ohmic behavior found in electrical measurement. The Au/Au@polythiophene core/shell nanospheres were found to be very active catalysts for the hydrogenation of various nitroarene compounds into corresponding aminoarene compounds in the presence of NaBH₄. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nitroarenes were efficiently hydrogenated under mild conditions.

  13. Au40: A Large Tetrahedral Magic Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Walter, Michael

    2011-01-01

    40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au{sub 40} could be such a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au{sub 40} has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au{sub 20}, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

  14. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  15. Regulating the surface plasmon resonance coupling between Au-nanoparticle and Au-film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; Li, Kewu; Zhang, Rui; Jing, Ning; Chen, Youhua; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report the coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Au-nanoparticles and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the Au-film. According to the conditions for SPR excitation of the classical Kretschmann-Raether structure with 50nm Au thin film, the commonly used classes of spherical Au-nanoparticle is studied and optimized. We used the finite element analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0), to simulate the coupling. The results from calculation and simulation indicate that the resonant plasmonic coupling between Au-nanoparticles and Au-film could lead to a large field enhancement and thus improve SPR. We demonstrate that the resonant plasmonic coupling could be regulated by the size of nanoparticles, the distance between nanoparticles .

  16. Facteurs de risque de l'infection par le VIH dans le district de santé de Meyomessala au Cameroun

    PubMed Central

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kalla, Ginette Claude Mireille; Abessolo, Stéphanie Abo'o; Angwafo, Fru; Muna, Walinjom

    2014-01-01

    Introduction L'objectif de ce travail était de déterminer les facteurs de risque de l'infection par le VIH dans le district de santé de Meyomessala (Région du Sud) au Cameroun. Méthodes Il s'agissait d'une étude transversale, descriptive et analytique qui s'est déroulée de Février à Mai 2011. Pour cette étude, nous avons obtenu une clairance éthique. Résultats L’échantillon était constitué de 315 participants dont 181 (57,46%) hommes et 134 (42,54%) femmes. L’âge moyen était de 24,5±8ans (extrême: 15-45ans). Quarante personnes (40) étaient séropositifs, soit une prévalence de l'infection par le VIH de 12,7%. Cette prévalence augmentait significativement (p = 0) avec le nombre de partenaires occasionnels au cours des douze derniers mois, allant de 2,7% chez ceux n'ayant eu aucun partenaire occasionnel à 21,25% chez ceux ayant plus de trois partenaires occasionnels (RC = 9,72; IC = 1,27-74,14; P = 0,03). le fait d’être âgé entre 20 et 24 ans (RC = 4,88; IC = 1,74-13,67; p = 0), avoir plus de trois partenaires sexuels au cours des douze derniers mois (RC = 9,72; IC = 1,27-74,14; p = 0,03), avoir les rapports sexuels avec les prostitués (RC = 2,86; IC = 1,42-5,76; p = 0), avoir eu le chlamydia (RC = 3,00; IC = 1,07-8,39; p = 0,04), avoir eu la syphilis (RC = 3,35; IC = 1,57-7,14; p = 0), avoir des avantages sociaux lors du premier rapport sexuel (RC = 2,57; IC = 1,03-6,43; p = 0,04) constituaient des potentiels facteurs de risque du VIH. Conclusion Il apparait urgent d'intensifier les campagnes de sensibilisation au risque d'infection par le VIH et les maladies sexuellement transmissibles dans le district de santé de Meyomessala PMID:25419299

  17. Directional light scattering from individual Au nanocup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jinjun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Bo

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the optical scattering properties of gold nanocup with different orientation and fractional height by full vector finite element method. All of the scattering cross section, the distribution of electric field intensity, and the ability of directional light scattering are simulated, respectively. It is demonstrated that the scattering cross section of Au nanocup is a superposition of scattering spectrum of a transverse mode and an axial mode. The wavelength and the intensity of the maximum value of the scattering cross section increase initially then reduce with the fractional height increasing for transverse mode, while they increase monotonously with the fractional height increasing for axial mode. Furthermore, the calculation results show that the ability of redirecting incident light of Au nanocup mainly depends on the transverse mode. And the deflected angle of scattering increases with the fractional height of Au nanocup decreasing. These results indicate that Au nanocup has a promising application in the planar plasmon devices.

  18. PHENIX results on jets in d + Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, J. Ali

    2016-12-01

    We present recently published results [A. Adare, et al., arxiv:arXiv:1509.04657] on fully reconstructed R=0.3 anti-kt jets measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy. The jet yields for four centrality classes along with the p+p reference are presented, as well as both the minimum bias RdAu and centrality dependent RdAu and RCP. We find that while the minimum bias RdA is consistent with unity, providing a strong constraint on models including cold-nuclear-matter effects or energy loss in small systems, the centrality dependent RdAu show a striking variation which presents a challenge to models attempting to describe the interplay between soft and hard processes in these systems.

  19. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  20. Thermal Expansion of AuIn2

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K; Siekhaus, W J

    2004-07-12

    The thermal expansion of AuIn{sub 2} gold is of great interest in soldering technology. Indium containing solders have been used to make gold wire interconnects at low soldering temperature and over time, AuIn{sub 2} is formed between the gold wire and the solder due to the high heat of formation and the high inter-metallic diffusion of indium. Hence, the thermal expansion of AuIn{sub 2} alloy in comparison with that of the gold wire and the indium-containing solder is critical in determining the integrity of the connection. We present the results of x-ray diffraction measurement of the coefficient of linear expansion of AuIn{sub 2} as well as the bulk expansion and density changes over the temperature range of 30 to 500 C.

  1. Counterion-Mediated Assembly of Spherical Nucleic Acid-Au Nanoparticle Conjugates (SNA-AuNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Guerrero-García, Guillermo; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael; Afosr Muri Team

    2015-03-01

    Controlled crystallization of colloids from solution has been a goal of material scientists for decades. Recently, nucleic acid functionalized spherical Au nanoparticles (SNA-AuNPs) have been programmed to assemble in a wide variety of crystal structures. In this approach, the assembly is driven by Watson-Crick hybridization between DNAs coating the AuNPs. Here, we show that counterions can induce ordered assembly of SNA-AuNPs in bulk solutions, even in the absence of base pairing interactions. The electrostatics-driven assembly of spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates (SNA-AuNPs) is probed as a function of counterion concentration and counterion valency [ +1 (Na+) or +2 (Ca2+) ] by in situ solution X-ray scattering. Assemblies of AuNPs capped with single-stranded (ss-) or double-stranded (ds-) DNA are examined. SAXS reveals disordered (gas-like) --> face-centered-cubic (FCC) --> glass-like phase transitions with increasing solution ionic strength. These studies demonstrate how non-base-pairing interactions can be tuned to create crystalline assemblies of SNA-AuNPs. The dependence of the inter-SNA-AuNP interactions on counterion valency and stiffness of the DNA corona will be discussed.

  2. DFT study on cysteine adsorption mechanism on Au(111) and Au(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Floare, Calin G.; Calborean, Adrian; Turcu, Ioan

    2013-11-13

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were used to investigate relevant aspects of adsorption mechanisms of cysteine dimers in protonated form on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces. The projected densities of states are explicitly discussed for all main chemical groups of cysteine, i.e. the amino group (NH2), the thiol group (SH) and the carboxylic group (COOH) to identify differences in adsorption mechanism. Special emphasis is put on the analysis of changes in the electronic structure of molecules adsorbed on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces as well as the accompanying charge transfer mechanisms at molecule-substrate interaction.

  3. Volcano-sedimentary characteristics in the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez District, Egypt: Example of dynamics and fluidization over sedimentary and volcaniclastic beds by emplacement of syn-volcanic basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Abdel Motelib, A.; Hammed, M. S.; El Manawi, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the Neogene lava-sediment mingling from the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez district, Egypt. The lava-sediment interactions as peperites have been identified for the first time at the study area and can be used as paleoenvironmental indicators. The identification of peperite reflects contemporaneous time relationship between volcanism and sedimentation and this finding is of primary importance to address the evolutional reconstruction of the Abu Treifiya Basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and textural framework of peperites was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of their outcrops. The peperites and sedimentary rocks are up to 350 m thick and form a distinct stratigraphic framework of diverse lithology that is widespread over several kilometers at the study area. Lateral and vertical facies of the peperites vary from sediment intercalated with the extrusive/intrusive basaltic rocks forming peperitic breccias to lava-sediment contacts at a large to small scales, respectively. Peperites encompass five main facies types ascribed to: (i) carbonate sediments-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (ii) lava flow-hosted blocky peperites, (iii) volcaniclastics-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (iv) sandstone/siltstone rocks-hosted blocky peperites, and (iv) debris-flows-hosted blocky peperites. Soft sediment deformation structures, vesiculated sediments, sediments filled-vesicles, and fractures in lava flows indicate that lava flows mingled with unconsolidated wet sediments. All the peperites in this study could be described as blocky or fluidal, but mixtures of different clast shapes occur regardless of the host sediment. The presence of fluidal and blocky juvenile clasts elucidates different eruptive styles, reflecting a ductile and brittle fragmentation. The gradual variation from fluidal to blocky peperite texture, producing the vertical grading is affected by influencing factors, e.g., the viscosity, magma

  4. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  5. A + (B[subscript 1]) Professor--student Rapport + (B[subscript 2]) Humor + (B[subscript 3]) Student Engagement = (Y) Student Ratings of Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Aaron S.; Berglund, Majken B.; Epelbaum, Vadim B.; Klein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching effectiveness is often evaluated through student ratings of instruction (SRI). Research suggests that there are many potential factors that can predict student's perceptions of teaching effectiveness such as professor-student rapport, student engagement, and perceived humor of the instructor. Therefore, we sought to assess whether…

  6. Fully Cationized Gold Clusters: Synthesis of Au25(SR(+))18.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yohei; Narita, Kunihiro; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Whetten, Robert L

    2016-10-06

    Although many thiolate-protected Au clusters with different numbers of Au atoms and a variety of thiolate ligands have been synthesized, to date there has been no report of a fully cationized Au cluster protected with cationic thiolates. Herein, we report the synthesis of the first member of a new series of thiolate-protected Au cluster molecules: a fully cationized Au25(SR(+))18 cluster.

  7. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Su, Dangsheng; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-03-07

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd@Au(PVA)/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  8. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura; Su, Dangshen; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  9. LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormaza, M.; Fernández, L.; Lafuente, S.; Corso, M.; Schiller, F.; Xu, B.; Diakhate, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Ortega, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the crystal structure and electronic bands of LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111). By scanning-tunneling microscopy we study the formation of different alloy phases as a function of growth temperature and lanthanide coverage. We determine the specific growth conditions to achieve monolayers and bilayers of LaAu2 and CeAu2 with high crystalline quality. Due to lattice mismatch with the underlying Au substrate, both LaAu2 and CeAu2 exhibit long-range moiré patterns, which can serve as templates for further nanostructure growth. By angle-resolved photoemission we map the two-dimensional band structure of these surface alloys, discussing the nature of the different spectral features in the light of first-principles calculations.

  10. The Other Side of Rapport: Data Collection Mode and Interviewer Gender Effects on Sexual Health Reporting in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Agula, Justina; Barrett, Jennifer B; Tobi, Hilde

    2015-09-01

    Accurate data on young people's sexual behaviour and sexual health practice is essential to inform effective interventions and policy. However, little empirical evidence exists to support methodological design decisions in projects assessing young people's sexual health, especially in African contexts. This short report uses original empirical data collected in Ghana in 2012 to assess the effects of data collection mode and interviewer gender on young people's reporting of sexual health and access to supportive sexual health resources. The findings indicate that the effect of data collection mode may vary by gender, and there is no indication of an interviewer gender effect for males in this study. Preliminary results suggest that building strong rapport with research participants in this context may lead to reduced sexual health data quality. These findings merit further investigation and have direct implications for the design of projects measuring sexual health and related variables in Ghana.

  11. Adsorbate-modified Electron Relaxation in Au-Au_2S Nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, Sarah; Averitt, Richard; Wolfgang, John; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi

    2001-03-01

    Au-Au_2S nanoshells are 50 nm nanoparticles consisting of an Au_2S core encapsulated by a thin (<5 nm) Au shell. Their optical properties are determined by the metallic shell layer, whose inner and outer radii control plasmon frequency and whose thickness determines plasmon linewidth[1]. We studied the time-resolved relaxation of hot electrons in the Au shell, using degenerate pump-probe spectroscopy. The electron relaxation for nanoshells in solution was appreciably slower than relaxation for bulk gold, moreover, adsorbed molecules on the nanoshell surface strongly modify this relaxation. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the molecules providing the strongest modification of relaxation possess the largest induced dipole moments above a metal surface, indicating that the adsorbate-induced perturbation of the nanoshell electron dynamics appears to be primarily electronic in nature. [1] R. D. Averitt, D. Sarkar and N. J. Halas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4217 (1997).

  12. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  13. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  14. Au-Ag@Au Hollow Nanostructure with Enhanced Chemical Stability and Improved Photothermal Transduction Efficiency for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tongtong; Song, Jiangluqi; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hao; Li, Xiaodong; Xia, Ruixiang; Zhu, Lixin; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2015-10-07

    Despite the fact that Au-Ag hollow nanoparticles (HNPs) have gained much attention as ablation agents for photothermal therapy, the instability of the Ag element limits their applications. Herein, excess Au atoms were deposited on the surface of a Au-Ag HNP by improving the reduction power of l-ascorbic acid (AA) and thereby preventing the reaction between HAuCl4 and the Ag element in the Au-Ag alloy nanostructure. Significantly, the obtained Au-Ag@Au HNPs show excellent chemical stability in an oxidative environment, together with remarkable increase in extinction peak intensity and obvious narrowing in peak width. Moreover, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) was used to simulate the optical properties and electric field distribution of HNPs. The calculated results show that the proportion of absorption cross section in total extinction cross section increases with the improvement of Au content in HNP. As predicted by the theoretical calculation results, Au-Ag@Au nanocages (NCs) exhibit a photothermal transduction efficiency (η) as high as 36.5% at 808 nm, which is higher than that of Au-Ag NCs (31.2%). Irradiated by 808 nm laser at power densities of 1 W/cm(2), MCF-7 breast cancer cells incubated with PEGylated Au-Ag@Au NCs were seriously destroyed. Combined together, Au-Ag@Au HNPs with enhanced chemical stability and improved photothermal transduction efficiency show superior competitiveness as photothermal agents.

  15. The role of interfaces in the magnetoresistance of Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Enders, A.; Monchesky, T. L.; Myrtle, K.; Urban, R.; Heinrich, B.; Kirschner, J.; Zhang, X.-G.; Butler, W. H.

    2001-06-01

    The electron transport and magnetoresistance (MR) were investigated in high quality crystalline epitaxial Fe(001) and Au(001) films and exchange coupled Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) trilayer structures. Fits to the experimental data were based on the semiclassical Boltzmann equation, which incorporates the electronic properties obtained from first-principles local density functional calculations. The fits require a surprisingly high asymmetry for the spin dependent electron lifetimes in Fe, {tau}{sup {down_arrow}}/{tau}{sup {up_arrow}}=10 at room temperature. Despite the large atomic terraces at the Au/vacuum and Fe/GaAs interfaces the scattering at the outer interfaces was found to be diffuse. The origin of MR in Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) structures is due to electron channeling in the Au spacer layer. The measured MR is consistent with the diffusivity parameters s{sup {up_arrow}}=0.55, s{sup {down_arrow}}=0.77 at the metal{endash}metal interfaces. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Prises de risques chez les jeunes de Bobo Dioulasso: une analyse des facteurs associés à la précocité et au multipartenariat sexuel

    PubMed Central

    Adohinzin, Clétus Come; Meda, Nicolas; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Ouédraogo, Georges Anicet; Sombie, Issiaka; Berthe, Abdramane; Fond-Harmant, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malgré les efforts d'éducation à la santé, les jeunes continuent d'adopter des comportements sexuels à risques, susceptibles d'avoir des répercussions importantes sur leur santé. Cette étude visait à analyser les facteurs associés à la précocité sexuelle et au multipartenariat chez les jeunes de 19-24 ans de Bobo-Dioulasso. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude quantitative et transversale. Les données d'enquête ont été recueillies en décembre 2014 à Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso), auprès de 573 jeunes de 15 à 24 ans. Ces enquêtés ont été sélectionnés par un sondage en grappes à deux degrés. Des facteurs à risques relatifs à la précocité sexuelle et au multipartenariat ont été analysés à l'aide du logiciel Stata IC 13. Le seuil de signification de P<0,05 a été utilisée. Résultats Plus de la moitié des enquêtés (54%) étaient sexuellement actifs dont 14% avant l'âge de 16 ans. Le multipartenariat sexuel avait été observé chez 24% des jeunes sexuellement actifs. Parmi les facteurs déterminants de la précocité sexuelle et du multipartenariat figuraient l'âge, le sexe, le niveau d'étude, et la situation économique des parents. Nos données avaient aussi montré que les rapports sexuels trop précoces étaient associés au multipartenariat sexuel (p<0,005). Conclusion Les actions visant à renforcer les capacités des jeunes à retarder les premiers rapports sexuels et à mieux évaluer les risques seront de toute importance. Les capacités des parents, des enseignants et des prestataires devraient être aussi renforcées pour l'amélioration de la qualité des relations entre eux et les jeunes. PMID:28292094

  17. Aspects épidémiologiques des fractures de membres liées à l'exercice de la fonction militaire au Togo

    PubMed Central

    Akpoto, Yao Messanvi; Abalo, Anani; Gnandi-pio, Faré; Sonhaye, Lantam; Tchaou, Mazamaesso; Sama, Hamza Doles; Assenouwe, Sarakawabalo; Lamboni, Damessane; Amavi, Kossigan Adodossi; Adam, Saliou; Kpelao, Essossinam; Tengue, Kodjo; Songne-Gnamkoulamba, Badjona

    2015-01-01

    Le but de notre étude était de déterminer la fréquence des fractures de membres liées à l'exercice de la fonction militaire au sein des Forces de Défense et de Sécurité en milieu africain en vue de ressortir l'impact des différentes circonstances de survenue. Nous avons entrepris une étude rétrospective descriptive allant du 1er janvier 2004 au 31 décembre 2013. Elle a concerné les agents des forces de défense et de sécurité traités pour des fractures de membres au cours de cette période. Sept cent quatre (704) cas de fractures de membres ont été dénombrés. L’âge moyen des patients était de 30,57 ans avec des extrêmes de 19 et 55 ans. La prédominance masculine était nette (95,71%). L'Armée de Terre (51,05%) et la Gendarmerie Nationale (38,86%) étaient les plus représentées. Les hommes du rang étaient majoritaires (43,08%), suivis des sous-officiers (32,59%). La fréquence annuelle des fractures de membres en rapport avec la profession militaire était de 63 cas. Les fractures de jambe étaient les lésions les plus recensées (32,96%). Les Formations et les stages militaires ont été les circonstances de survenue les plus rencontrées (42,60%), suivies des accidents de la circulation (39,43%). La perte des journées de service liée à ces lésions était estimée à 14009 jours par an. Les fractures de jambes occupent le premier rang des fractures de membres en rapport avec l'exercice de la profession militaire. Les formations-stages militaires et les accidents de la voie publique en sont les deux grandes circonstances de survenue. PMID:27081434

  18. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic au@pt and au@pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed au square sheets.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhu, Yihan; Huang, Xiao; Han, Yu; Wang, Qingxiao; Liu, Qing; Huang, Ying; Gan, Chee Lip; Zhang, Hua

    2015-05-04

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f -oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures.

  19. Nanoporous Au structures by dealloying Au/Ag thermal- or laser-dewetted bilayers on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.; Grillo, R.; Cacciato, G.; Zimbone, M.; Piccitto, G.; Grimaldi, M. G.

    2017-03-01

    Nanoporous Au attracts great technological interest and it is a promising candidate for optical and electrochemical sensors. In addition to nanoporous Au leafs and films, recently, interest was focused on nanoporous Au micro- and nano-structures on surfaces. In this work we report on the study of the characteristics of nanoporous Au structures produced on surfaces. We developed the following procedures to fabricate the nanoporous Au structures: we deposited thin Au/Ag bilayers on SiO2 or FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide) substrates with thickness xAu and xAg of the Au and Ag layers; we induced the alloying and dewetting processes of the bilayers by furnace annealing processes of the bilayers deposited on SiO2 and by laser irradiations of the bilayers deposited on FTO; the alloying and dewetting processes result in the formation of AuxAgy alloy sub-micron particles being x and y tunable by xAu and xAg. These particles are dealloyed in HNO3 solution to remove the Ag atoms. We obtain, so, nanoporous sub-micron Au particles on the substrates. Analyzing the characteristics of these particles we find that: a) the size and shape of the particles depend on the nature of the dewetting process (solid-state dewetting on SiO2, molten-state dewetting on FTO); b) the porosity fraction of the particles depends on how the alloying process is reached: about 32% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the furnace annealing at 900 °C, about 45% of porosity for the particles fabricated by the laser irradiation at 0.5 J/cm2, in both cases independently on the Ag concentration in the alloy; c) After the dealloying process the mean volume of the Au particles shrinks of about 39%; d) After an annealing at 400 °C the nanoporous Au particles reprise their initial volume while the porosity fraction is reduced. Arguments to justify these behaviors are presented.

  20. SHG anisotropy in Au/Co/Au/Cu/vicinal Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikh-Rouhou, W.; Sampaio, L. C.; Bartenlian, B.; Beauvillain, P.; Brun, A.; Ferré, J.; Georges, P.; Jamet, J.-P.; Mathet, V.; Stupakewicz, Andrei

    2002-02-01

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) reflectivity on magnetic multilayers is a very sensitive technique to reveal the crystallography of buried interfaces. We have used the azimuthal anisotropy of SHG to demonstrate that the vicinal character of Si(1 1 1) substrate is duplicated in the metallic multilayer Au/Co/Au/Cu. The magnetic properties of these multilayers as anisotropy and magneto-optic polar Kerr rotation were studied by linear magneto-optic effects in correlation with SHG experiments, by varying the Co and Au buffer thicknesses as well as the Cu buffer deposition condition.

  1. Time Dependent Universal Conductance Fluctuations In AuPd, Ag, And Au Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trionfi, A.; Lee, S.; Natelson, D.

    2006-09-01

    Quantum transport phenomena allow experimental determinations of the phase coherence information in metals. We report quantitative comparisons of inferred coherence lengths from independent measurements of the weak localization magnetoresistance and time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations' magnetic field dependence. Strong agreement is observed in both quasi-2D and quasi-1D AuPd samples. However, quantitative agreement is not seen in quasi-1D Ag wires below 10 K and quasi-1D Au wires below 14 K. A possible explanation for this disagreement will be discussed. Attempts to produce changes in the coherence length in Au by annealing have also been made and results will be reported.

  2. Profil des diabétiques en hémodialyse chronique: étude multicentrique au Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Kabbali, Nadia; Mikou, Souad; El Pardiya, Nada Tazi; El Bardai, Ghita; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Houssaini, Tarik Sqalli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Le diabète représente la première cause de mortalité par insuffisance rénale au Maroc. Sa prévalence selon l'Enquête Nationale sur la Population et la Santé Familiale de 2011 est de 3,3% [1]. Le but de ce travail est de déterminer la prévalence et d’étudier le profil clinique des diabétiques en hémodialyse chronique au Maroc. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude transversale multicentrique incluant 2066 hémodialysés chroniques dans les 39 centres d'hémodialyse de quatre régions marocaines. Résultats La prévalence du diabète en hémodialyse est 21,6%. L’âge moyen 59±13,2 ans (26-87). Le sex-ratio est de 1,9. L'IMC moyen est de 24,5 ± 4,4 kg/m2 (15-41). 42 patients sont porteurs d′une hépatite virale. La durée moyenne en HD est 39,3± 67 mois. 57% des patients gardent une diurèse résiduelle versus 43% chez les non diabétiques. Par rapport à ces derniers, nous avons noté plus d'HTA (64% versus 45%), plus de complications cardiovasculaires (23% versus 12%), un âge plus avancé à l'initiation de l'hémodialyse (55,5 versus 47 ans) et un taux de FAV proximales plus important. Conclusion La prévalence des diabétiques en hémodialyse est relativement élevée au Maroc sans tenir compte des patients qui ne bénéficient pas d’épuration extra-rénale pour des raisons socio-économiques. Le taux élevé de mortalité est imputable au retard et/ou à l'absence de la prise en charge néphrologique des diabétiques. Dans nos régions où le système sanitaire dispose de faible moyen, l'accent doit être mis sur le dépistage précoce de la néphropathie chez le diabétique. PMID:25374630

  3. Revisiting the S-Au(111) interaction: Static or Dynamic?

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Friend, C M

    2004-08-17

    The chemical inertness typically observed for Au does not imply a general inability to form stable bonds with non-metals but is rather a consequence of high reaction barriers. The Au-S interaction is probably the most intensively studied interaction of Au surfaces with non-metals as, for example, it plays an important role in Au ore formation, and controls the structure and dynamics of thiol-based self-assembled-monolayers (SAMs). In recent years a quite complex picture of the interaction of sulfur with Au(111) surfaces emerged, and a variety of S-induced surface structures was reported under different conditions. The majority of these structures were interpreted in terms of a static Au surface, where the positions of the Au atoms remain essentially unperturbed. Here we demonstrate that the Au(111) surface exhibits a very dynamic character upon interaction with adsorbed sulfur: low sulfur coverages modify the surface stress of the Au surface leading to lateral expansion of the surface layer; large-scale surface restructuring and incorporation of Au atoms into a growing two-dimensional AuS phase were observed with increasing sulfur coverage. These results provide new insight into the Au-S surface chemistry, and reveal the dynamic character of the Au(111) surface.

  4. Coinfection pulmonaire par pneumocystis jirovecii et pseudomonas aeruginosa au cours du SIDA: à propos de deux cas

    PubMed Central

    Mamoudou, Savadogo; Bellaud, Guillaume; Ana, Canestri; Gilles, Pialoux

    2015-01-01

    Rapporter deux cas cliniques de coinfections pulmonaires par Pneumocystis jirovecii et par Pseudomonas aeruginosa chez des patients vivant avec le VIH. Les deux patients étaient âgés respectivement de 32 ans et 46 ans. Un patient a été pris en charge à l'hôpital Yalgado Ouédraogo de Ouagadougou au Burkina Faso et l'autre a été pris en charge à l'hôpital Ténon de Paris, en France. Les deux souffraient de pneumopathie confirmée à la radiographie et à la tomodensitométrie. L'un des patients était sévèrement immuno déprimé, contrairement à l'autre. L'examen bactériologique dans les crachats avait permis d'isoler Pseudomonas aeruginosa et Pneumocystis jirovecii chez les deux patients. Sous traitement, l’évolution a été favorable. Les coinfections morbides sont relativement fréquentes chez les patients vivant avec le VIH. Devant une symptomatologie respiratoire du sujet vivant avec le VIH, il faut savoir rechercher en plus du Bacille de Koch, Pneumocystis jirovecii et Pseudomonas aeruginosa par un lavage broncho alvéolaire. PMID:26516396

  5. Suppression of Upsilon production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV (vol 735, pg 127, 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Gliske, S.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.

    2014-07-30

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Υ (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Aucollisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Υ mesons in Au + Aucollisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  6. Suez Canal Clearance Operation, Task Force 65

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    and remove the four wrecks from the central region of the canal; DREDGE 23, Tug MONGUED, Dredge KASSER and a Concrete Caisson. All salvage operations...feet BUCKET DREDGE NO. 23 72.00 1600 tons 191 feet TUG MONGUED 81.50 1200 tons 165 feet DIPPER DREDGE KASSER 81.50 1200 tons 125 feet CONCRETE CAISSON...MONGUED, DREDGE KASSER , and DREDGE 23 to wet dump in the Great Bitter Lake. Heavy crane THOR arrived in Port Said after transit from Hamburg, Germany

  7. The fast diffusion of Au IN Pb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Ko, C.; Brotzen, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    A treatment of the phenomenon of fast diffusion in lead is presented. The model used is based upon the fast diffusion of free solute interstitials. The very large negative enhancement coefficients found in the Pb-(Au, Ag) systems is explained by the formation of first and second order clusters of vacancies and substitutional solute atoms.

  8. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  9. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  10. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  11. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  12. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  13. Systematics of Global Observables in Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2006-07-11

    Charged particles produced in Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 and 62.4 GeV have been measured in the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The comparison of the results for Cu+Cu and Au+Au for the most central collisions at the same energy reveals that the particle density per nucleon participant pair and the extended longitudinal scaling behavior are similar in both systems. This implies that for the most central events in symmetric nucleus-nucleus collisions the particle density per nucleon participant pair does not depend on the size of the two colliding nuclei but only on the collision energy. Also the extended longitudinal scaling seems independent of the colliding energy and species for central collisions. In addition, there is an overall factorization of dNch/d{eta} shapes as a function of collision centraliry between Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at the same energy.

  14. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Density Distributions from Au+Au Collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.

    2001-09-03

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} has been measured for Au+Au collisions at s{sub NN}=130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most-central Au+Au collisions for |{eta}|{<=}5.4 is found to be 4200{+-}470 . The evolution of dN{sub ch}/d{eta} with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at midrapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  15. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

  16. Magnetic disorder in nanostructured Fe7Au93 films and Fe14Au86 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba Venero, D.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Alonso, J.; Svalov, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Thin films and powders of dilute Fe-Au alloys have been produced by DC-magnetron sputtering and high-energy milling, respectively. Energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy gives Fe7Au93 for the films and Fe14Au86 for the powders. The film, with a thickness below 200 nm measured by atomic force microscopy, was deposited onto a Si(100) substrate. X-ray diffraction reveals a major presence of fcc-Au peaks masking the bcc-Fe phase. The (1 0-300 K) DC-susceptibility (H = 100-1000 Oe) shows a clear cusp in the films in contrast to the powders, with a reentrant spin glass-like behavior.

  17. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  18. Le recours aux modeles dans l'enseignement de la biologie au secondaire : Conceptions d'enseignantes et d'enseignants et modes d'utilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlet, Madeleine

    Le recours aux modeles et a la modelisation est mentionne dans la documentation scientifique comme un moyen de favoriser la mise en oeuvre de pratiques d'enseignement-apprentissage constructivistes pour pallier les difficultes d'apprentissage en sciences. L'etude prealable du rapport des enseignantes et des enseignants aux modeles et a la modelisation est alors pertinente pour comprendre leurs pratiques d'enseignement et identifier des elements dont la prise en compte dans les formations initiale et disciplinaire peut contribuer au developpement d'un enseignement constructiviste des sciences. Plusieurs recherches ont porte sur ces conceptions sans faire de distinction selon les matieres enseignees, telles la physique, la chimie ou la biologie, alors que les modeles ne sont pas forcement utilises ou compris de la meme maniere dans ces differentes disciplines. Notre recherche s'est interessee aux conceptions d'enseignantes et d'enseignants de biologie au secondaire au sujet des modeles scientifiques, de quelques formes de representations de ces modeles ainsi que de leurs modes d'utilisation en classe. Les resultats, que nous avons obtenus au moyen d'une serie d'entrevues semi-dirigees, indiquent que globalement leurs conceptions au sujet des modeles sont compatibles avec celle scientifiquement admise, mais varient quant aux formes de representations des modeles. L'examen de ces conceptions temoigne d'une connaissance limitee des modeles et variable selon la matiere enseignee. Le niveau d'etudes, la formation prealable, l'experience en enseignement et un possible cloisonnement des matieres pourraient expliquer les differentes conceptions identifiees. En outre, des difficultes temporelles, conceptuelles et techniques peuvent freiner leurs tentatives de modelisation avec les eleves. Toutefois, nos resultats accreditent l'hypothese que les conceptions des enseignantes et des enseignants eux-memes au sujet des modeles, de leurs formes de representation et de leur approche

  19. Observation of a Strongly Enhanced Magnetic Susceptibility of Pd in Au-Pd-Au Sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, M. B.; Freeman, A. J.

    1980-07-01

    Exceptionally large increases in the magnetic susceptibility (indicating nearly magnetic ordering) of thin films of Pd sandwiched between thicker Au films have been observed at low temperatures-presumably due to the expansion of the Pd average lattice constant by the Au. The large resultant Stoner factors and the modified paramagnon model of Levin and Valls indicate the possibility of observing p-wave superconductivity in Pd structures with reduced proximity effects.

  20. Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-08-19

    Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays.

  1. Transverse expansion in Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, K.; Schweda, K.; Xu, N.

    2003-06-24

    Using the RQMD model, transverse momentum distributions and particle ratios are studied for {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. In particular, they present results on the mean transverse momentum of charged pions, charged kaons, protons and anti-protons and compare with experimental measurements. They discuss an approach to study early partonic collectivity in high energy nuclear collisions.

  2. Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions at the AGS: recent results from E917.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-C.; Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Britt, H. C.; Chang, W. C.; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Nanal, V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    1999-03-30

    Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions has been measured via the yields of K{sup +} , K{sup {minus}} at 6, 8 AGeV and of {bar {Lambda}} at 10.8 AGeV beam kinetic energy in experiment E917. By varying the collision centrally and beam energy, a systematic search for indications of new phenomena and in-medium effects under high baryon density is undertaken.

  3. Surpoids et obésité dans la population au-dessus de 20 ans en milieu urbain bamakois (Mali)

    PubMed Central

    Oumar Bâ, Hamidou; Menta, Ichaka; Camara, Youssouf; Sangaré, Ibrahima; Sidibé, Noumou; Doumbia, Seydou; Diarra, Mamadou Bocary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Il est question dans notre travail d’étudier le SP et l'OB et les facteurs associés dans la population âgée de 20 ans ou plus. Méthodes Notre échantillon a été obtenu à partir d'une enquête sur les pathologies cardiovasculaires dans le District de Bamako et impliquant 2199 sujets de 5-104 ans, en sélectionnant tous les sujets âgés d'au moins 20 ans (1162). Pour chaque sujet, l'IMC, rapport taille / hanche et le tour de taille ont été déterminées. Les données ont été analysées avec SPSS 12. Résultats L’âge moyen était de 36,86 années, 61,4% étaient des femmes, 49,7% dans le secteur informel et 38,0% avaient réalisé l'enseignement primaire. Facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires étaient l'inactivité physique (72,4%), le tabagisme (12,2%) et hypertension (26,7%). La prévalence de l'obésité était de 8,8 et 14,7% respectivement sur la base de l'indice de masse et le tour de taille. Conclusion Le SP et l'OB sont à prendre en compte dans les mesures de politique sanitaire que dans la pratique quotidienne des professionnels de santé, il est peut-être plus utile d'utiliser plusieurs paramètres pour être à même de bien stratifier nos patients par rapport à leur risque. PMID:25932065

  4. The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-H.; Wang, D.-C.; Chen, G.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.

    2008-03-01

    The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl4- and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

  5. Low specific contact resistivity to graphene achieved by AuGe/Ni/Au and annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shu-Zhen; Song, Yan; Dong, Jian-Rong; Sun, Yu-Run; Zhao, Yong-Ming; He, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Low metal-graphene contact resistance is important in making high-performance graphene devices. In this work, we demonstrate a lower specific contact resistivity of Au0.88Ge0.12/Ni/Au-graphene contact compared with Ti/Au and Ti/Pt/Au contacts. The rapid thermal annealing process was optimized to improve AuGe/Ni/Au contact resistance. Results reveal that both pre- and post-annealing processes are effective for reducing the contact resistance. The specific contact resistivity decreases from 2.5 × 10-4 to 7.8 × 10-5 Ω·cm2 by pre-annealing at 300 °C for one hour, and continues to decrease to 9.5 × 10-7 Ω·cm2 after post-annealing at 490 °C for 60 seconds. These approaches provide reliable means of lowering contact resistance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376065) and the Science and Technology Project of Suzhou, China (Grant No. ZXG2013044).

  6. Magnetism of Au Nanoparticles on Sulfolubus Acidocaldarius S-Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, Juan; Bartolome, F.; Garcia, L. M.; Figueroa, A. I.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Skrotzki, R.; Schoenemann, R.; Wosnitza, J.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Geissler, A.; Reitz, T.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2011-03-01

    Au nanoparticles (NP) with diameters of a few nm have been synthesized on a protein S-layer of Sulfolobus Acidocaldarius bacteria. SQUID magnetization (1.8 K T 300 Kand 0 B 7 T) showssuperparamagneticbehavioratlow - T . ItsoriginlaysattheAuNP ' s , ashasbeenprovenbyAuL 2,3- edgeXMCDspectroscopy , performedintherange 2.2 T 20 KanduptoB app = 17 T . XMCDanalysisyieldsatotalmagneticmomentperAuatom μAu = 0.050 (1) μB , aparticleaveragemomentm part = 2.3 μB , Auorbitaltospinmomentratioofm L / m S = 0.29 Curie and - like superparamagnetism. Au - S bonds are detected by S K - edge XAS measurements. Besides , EXAFS at the Au L 3 -edge shows that the Au NP internal structure is fcc, and Au-S bonds are located at the particle surface. An increase of the hole charge carrier density in the Au 5d band due to electron transfer with the S-layer explains the Au magnetism. The observed magnetic moment per Au atom is 25 times larger than those previously found by XMCD in Au-thiol capped NPs.

  7. Controlling Au Nanorod Dispersion in Thin Film Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael J. A.; Composto, Russell J.

    2012-02-01

    Dispersion of Au nanorods (Au NRs) in polymer thin films is studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. Here, we incorporate small volume fractions of polystyrene-functionalized Au NRs (φrod 0.05) into polystyrene (PS) thin films. By controlling the ratio of the brush length (N) to that of the matrix polymers (P), we can selectively obtain dispersed or aggregated Au NR structures in the PS-Au(N):PS(P) films. A dispersion map of these structures allows one to choose N and P to obtain either uniformly dispersed Au NRs or aggregates of closely packed, side-by-side aligned Au NRs. Furthermore, by blending poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO) into the PS films, we demonstrate that the Au nanorod morphology can be further tuned by reducing depletion-attraction forces and promoting miscibility of the Au NRs. These predictable structures ultimately give rise to tunable optical absorption in the films resulting from surface plasmon resonance coupling between the Au NRs. Finally, self-consistent field theoretic (SCFT) calculations for both the PS-Au(N):PS(P) and PS-Au(N):PS(P):PPO systems provide insight into the PS brush structure, and allow us to interpret morphology and optical property results in terms of wet and dry PS brush states.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Oxidation of Cu-Au Alloy Surfaces: Effect of Bulk Au Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Michio; Tsuda, Yasutaka; Oka, Kohei; Kojima, Kazuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the oxidation of Cu-Au alloy surfaces, viz., Cu3Au(111), CuAu(111), and Au3Cu(111), using hyperthermal O2 molecular beam (HOMB). We observed strong Au segregation to the top layer of the corresponding clean (111) surfaces. This forms a protective layer that hinders further oxidation into the bulk. The higher the concentration of Au in the protective layer formed, the higher the protective efficacy. As a result, of the three Cu-Au surfaces studied, Au3Cu(111) is the most stable against dissociative adsorption of O2, even with HOMB. We also found that this protective property breaks down for oxidations occurring at temperatures above 300 K. PMID:27516137

  9. Bonding, Luminescence, Metallophilicity in Linear Au3 and Au2Ag Chains Stabilized by Rigid Diphosphanyl NHC Ligands.

    PubMed

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Carrara, Serena; De Cola, Luisa; Tobon, Yeny; Giovanella, Umberto; Botta, Chiara; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-09-06

    The heterofunctional and rigid ligand N,N'-diphosphanyl-imidazol-2-ylidene (PCNHCP; P = P(t-Bu)2), through its phosphorus and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors, stabilizes trinuclear chain complexes, with either Au3 or AgAu2 cores, and dinuclear Au2 complexes. The two oppositely situated PCNHCP (L) ligands that "sandwich" the metal chain can support linear and rigid structures, as found in the known tricationic Au(I) complex [Au3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 (OTf = CF3SO3; [Au3L2](OTf)3; Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 103-105) now also obtained by transmetalation from [Ag3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Ag3L2](OTf)3), or in the mixed-metal tricationic [Au2Ag(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Au2AgL2](OTf)3). The latter was obtained stepwise by the addition of AgOTf to the digold(I) complex [Au2(μ2-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC)2](OTf)2 ([Au2L2](OTf)2). The latter contains two dangling P donors and displays fluxional behavior in solution, and the Au···Au separation of 2.8320(6) Å in the solid state is consistent with metallophilic interactions. In the solvento complex [Au3Cl2(tht)(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)](OTf)·MeCN ([Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN), which contains only one L and one tht ligand (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the metal chain is bent (148.94(2)°), and the longer Au···Au separation (2.9710(4) Å) is in line with relaxation of the rigidity due to a more "open" structure. Similar features were observed in [Au3Cl2(SMe2)L](OTf)·2MeCN. A detailed study of the emission properties of [Au3L2](OTf)3, [Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN, [Au2L2](OTf)2, and [Au2AgL2](OTf)3 was performed by means of steady state and time-resolved photophysical techniques. The complex [Au3L2](OTf)3 displays a bright (photoluminescence quantum yield = 80%) and narrow emission band centered at 446 nm with a relatively small Stokes' shift and long-lived excited-state lifetime on the microsecond timescale, both in solution and in the solid state. In line with the very narrow emission

  10. Jet-Hadron Correlations in √sNN =200 GeV p +p and Central Au +Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L., Jr.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au +Au and p +p collisions at √sNN =200 GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au +Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au +Au and p +p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au +Au collisions compared to p +p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Cationic Au(III) versus Au(I) : Catalyst-Controlled Divergent Reactivity of Alkyne-Tethered Lactams.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Cembellín, Sara; Fernández, Israel; Martínez Del Campo, Teresa

    2017-03-02

    Switchable reactivity through cationic gold-based catalyst control built on the oxidation state, namely cationic Au(III) versus Au(I) , has been achieved in the direct functionalization of 2-azetidinone-tethered alkynyl indoles.

  12. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

  13. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  14. Influence of Au and TiO2 structures on hydrogen dissociation over TiO2/Au(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, I.; Mantoku, H.; Furukawa, T.; Takahashi, A.; Fujitani, T.

    2012-11-01

    We performed H2-D2 exchange reactions over TiOx/Au(100) and compared the observed reaction kinetics with those reported for TiOx/Au(111) in order to clarify the influence of the Au and TiO2 structures on dissociation of H2 molecules. Low energy electron diffraction observations showed that the TiO2 produced on Au(100) was disordered, in contrast to the comparatively ordered TiO2 structure formed on Au(111). The activation energies and the turnover frequencies for HD formation over TiO2/Au(100) agreed well with those for TiO2/Au(111), clearly indicating that the hydrogen dissociation sites created over TiO2/Au(100) were the perimeter interface between stoichiometric TiO2 and Au, as was previously concluded for TiO2/Au(111). We concluded that the creation of active sites for hydrogen dissociation was independent of the Au and TiO2 structures consisting perimeter interface, and that local bonds that formed between Au and O atoms of stoichiometric TiO2 were essential for the creation of active sites.

  15. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  16. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    DOE PAGES

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squaredmore » Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  17. La tuberculose cutanée: observation de six cas confirmés au CHU Souro SANOU (CHUSS) de Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    Andonaba, Jean Baptiste; Barro-Traoré, Fatou; Yaméogo, Téné; Diallo, Boukary; Korsaga-Somé, Nina; Traoré, Adama

    2013-01-01

    La localisation cutanée de la maladie tuberculeuse demeure une forme rare et représente seulement 2,1% des localisations. L'objet de cette étude est de rapporter le profil épidémiologique, anatomoclinique et évolutif des cas de tuberculose ganglio-cutanée diagnostiqués dans un CHU au Burkina Faso. La fréquence de la tuberculose cutanée est très faible au CHUSS. Six cas ont été diagnostiqués entre 2004 et 2010, soit une fréquence de un cas par an. La durée d’évolution des cas allait de deux jusqu’à dix ans avant leur diagnostic. Les lésions observées étaient: trois scrofulodermes, trois gommes, une tuberculose testiculaire associée à un mal de Pott, un cas de polyadénopathies et des cicatrices atropho-rétractiles dans la plupart des cas. Sur le plan anatomopathologique, des granulomes tuberculoïdes ont été mis en évidence dans tous les cas avec une forte réaction tuberculinique à l'IDR. Sous antituberculeux pendant six mois, l’évolution a été bonne dans tous les cas mais au prix de séquelles cutanées cicatricielles inesthétiques. Son ampleur reste peut-être encore méconnue. Le renforcement du plateau technique du CHU et une bonne collaboration interdisciplinaire contribuerait à un meilleur diagnostic et prise en charge de cette affection. PMID:24648863

  18. Positron annihilation study of cavities in black Au films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhova, O.; Čížek, J.; Hruška, P.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Novotný, M.; Bulíř, J.

    2017-01-01

    Defects in a black Au film were studied using variable energy positron annihilation spectroscopy. Black Au films exhibit porous morphology similar to cauliflower. This type of structure enhances the optical absorption due to a multiple reflections in the micro-cavities. A nanostructured black Au film was compared with conventional smooth Au films with high reflectivity. The black Au film exhibited a remarkably enhanced S-parameter in sub-surface region. This is caused by a narrow para-Positronium contribution to the annihilation peak.

  19. Au20Si12: A hollow Catalan pentakis dodecahedron.

    PubMed

    Guo, J J; Zhao, H Y; Wang, J; Ai, L Y; Liu, Y

    2017-02-14

    A stable hollow Au20Si12 cage with Ih symmetry has been predicted using first-principles density functional theory. The stability of the cage-like Au20Si12 structure is verified by vibrational frequency analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. A relatively large highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap of 1.057 eV is found. Electronic structure analysis shows that clearly p-d hybridizations between Si atoms and Au atoms are of great importance for the stability of Au20Si12 cage. The cage-like Au20Si12 structure may have potential applications in semiconductor industry and microelectronics.

  20. Fe impurities weaken the ferromagnetic behavior in Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Crespo, P; García, M A; Fernández Pinel, E; Multigner, M; Alcántara, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Hernando, A

    2006-10-27

    In this Letter, we report on a crucial experiment showing that magnetic impurities reduce the ferromagnetic order temperature in thiol-capped Au glyconanoparticles (GNPs). The spontaneous magnetization of AuFe GNPs exhibits a fast decrease with temperature that contrasts with the almost constant value of the magnetization observed in Au NPs. Moreover, hysteresis disappears below 300 K. Both features indicate that Fe impurities reduce the high local anisotropy field responsible for the ferromagnetic behavior in Au GNPs. As a consequence, the amazing ferromagnetism in Au NPs should not be associated with the presence of magnetic impurities.

  1. Au20Si12: A hollow Catalan pentakis dodecahedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. J.; Zhao, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Ai, L. Y.; Liu, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A stable hollow Au20Si12 cage with Ih symmetry has been predicted using first-principles density functional theory. The stability of the cage-like Au20Si12 structure is verified by vibrational frequency analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. A relatively large highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap of 1.057 eV is found. Electronic structure analysis shows that clearly p-d hybridizations between Si atoms and Au atoms are of great importance for the stability of Au20Si12 cage. The cage-like Au20Si12 structure may have potential applications in semiconductor industry and microelectronics.

  2. Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

    2009-10-29

    The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

  3. Polymers effects on synthesis of AuNPs, and Au/Ag nanoalloys: indirectly generated AuNPs and versatile sensing applications including anti-leukemic agent.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Shanaz; Mansoor, Farrukh; Kanwal, Shamsa

    2014-03-15

    Polymers either serve as shielding or capping agents to restrict the nanoparticle size. This study demonstrates the polymer depositions and their effects in synthesis and sharp stabilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to develop gold/silver nanoalloys (Au/Ag nanoalloys). Effects of different polymers are tested to justify their role in synthesis and stability of phloroglucinol (PG) coated AuNPs and Au/Ag nanoalloys. Cationic and anionic i.e. [Polydiallyldimethylammonium](+) (PDDA), [Polyethyleneimine](+) (PEI), [Polystyrene sulfonate](2-) (PSS) and neutral polymer Polychlorotriflouroethylene (PCTFE) produce praiseworthy stable AuNPs and Au/Ag nanoalloy. To prove polymer effects characterization protocols including UV-vis, Fluorescence (PL), IR and AFM imaging are performed to fully investigate the mechanism and size characteristics of these nanoparticles/nanoalloys. In this study sharp size controlling/sheilding effects were observed particularly with cationic polymers simply through the favorable electrostatic interactions with the terminal ends of PG Potent/significant detection of doxorubicin (DOX, an antileukemic agent) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between PEI shielded AuNPs (AuNPEI) and DOX was achieved upto 10 pM level, while PDDA protected AuNPs facilitated the detection of ascorbic acid based on fluorescence enhancement effects in wide range (10-200 nM) and with detection limit of 200 pM. Similarly sensing performance of PEI stabilized Au/Ag nanoalloys on addition of halides (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) is evaluated through red shifted SPR along with continuous increase in absorbance and also through AFM. Moreover the addition of halide ions also helped the regeneration of AuNPs by taking away silver from the Au/Ag nanoalloys enabling their detections upto subnanomolar levels.

  4. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Kokh, Konstantin A.; Bakakin, Vladimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag2-xAuxSe with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag2Se - Ag1.94Au0.06Se, fischesserite Ag3AuSe2 - Ag3.2Au0.8Se2 and gold selenide AuSe - Au0.94Ag0.06Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe.

  5. Fluorescence quenching of uranine on confeito-like Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Masaki; Dang, Nhut Minh; Imae, Toyoko

    2014-07-01

    Effect of structure and size of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on fluorescence behavior of uranine was examined. Confeito-like AuNPs with different sizes (30 nm, 60 nm and 100 nm, respectively) had plasmon absorption bands at 555, 600 and 660 nm, while the band of spherical AuNP (20 nm in size) was at 525 nm. Fluorescence of uranine was significantly quenched by the small and medium confeito-like AuNPs, and the quenching effect by the large particle was less. In comparison, the spherical AuNP quenched more remarkable than the confeito-like AuNPs. A mechanism of resonance energy transfer from uranine to AuNPs via the surface plasmon was suggested, and the strong quenching effect of the small AuNPs could be explained by the energy transfer from adsorbed uranine molecules to AuNPs. These behaviors indicate that the large confeito-like AuNPs can be a preferable nano-probe and useful for plasmonic devices, which can tune or maintain the fluorescence properties of other markers.

  6. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  7. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  8. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  9. Monolithic Nanocrystalline Au Fabricated by the Compaction of Nanoscale Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Biener, J; Hsiung, L M; Hamza, A V; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-07-28

    We describe a two-step dealloying/compaction process to produce nanocrystalline Au. First, nanocrystalline/nanoporous Au foam is synthesized by electrochemically-driven dealloying. The resulting Au foams exhibit porosities of 60 and 70% with pore sizes of {approx} 40 and 100 nm, respectively, and a typical grain size of <50 nm. Second, the nanoporous foams are fully compacted to produce nanocrystalline monolithic Au. The compacted Au was characterized by TEM and X-ray diffraction and tested by depth-sensing nanoindentation. The compacted nanocrystalline Au exhibits an average grain size of <50 nm and hardness values ranging from 1.4 to 2.0 GPa, which are up to 4.5 times higher than the hardness values obtained from polycrystalline Au.

  10. Mechanical properties and grindability of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-06-01

    Experimental Ti-Au alloys (5, 10, 20 and 40 mass% Au) were made. Mechanical properties and grindability of the castings of the Ti-Au alloys were examined. As the concentration of gold increased to 20%, the yield strength and the tensile strength of the Ti-Au alloys became higher without markedly deteriorating their ductility. This higher strength can be explained by the solid-solution strengthening of the a titanium. The Ti-40%Au alloy became brittle because the intermetallic compound Ti3Au precipitated intensively near the grain boundaries. There was no significant difference in the grinding rate and grinding ratio among all the Ti-Au alloys and the pure titanium at any speed.

  11. Electric Field Induced Surface Modification of Au

    SciTech Connect

    Erchak, A.A.; Franklin, G.F.; Houston, J.E.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-02-15

    We discuss the role of localized high electric fields in the modification of Au surfaces with a W probe using the Interfacial Force Microscope. Upon bringing a probe close to a Au surface, we measure both the interfacial force and the field emission current as a function of separation with a constant potential of 100 V between tip and sample. The current initially increases exponentially as the separation decreases. However, at a distance of less than {approximately} 500{angstrom} the current rises sharply as the surface begins to distort and rapidly close the gap. Retraction of the tip before contact is made reveals the formation of a mound on the surface. We propose a simple model, in which the localized high electric field under the tip assists the production of mobile Au adatoms by detachment from surface steps, and a radial field gradient causes a net flux of atoms toward the tip by surface diffusion. These processes give rise to an unstable surface deformation which, if left unchecked, results in a destructive mechanical contact. We discuss our findings with respect to earlier work using voltage pulses in the STM as a means of nanofabrication.

  12. Fahrzeug-Außengeräusch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genuit, Klaus

    Wirtschaftliches Wachstum ist mit steigenden Anforderungen an Mobilität und Transport verknüpft. Zukunftsorientierter Fortschritt muss hierbei die Wirkungen von Verkehrsgeräuschen auf Mensch und Umwelt berücksichtigen, um eine hohe Lebensqualität sicherstellen zu können. Mehr als die Hälfte der Bevölkerung in der EU fühlt sich durch Verkehrslärm belästigt oder befürchtet direkte Auswirkungen auf Gesundheit und Wohlbefinden. Nach einer repräsentativen Umfrage des Umweltbundesamtes fühlen sich durch Straßenverkehrslärm 20 % der Bevölkerung stark oder wesentlich belästigt (UBA 2008). Daher ist das "Fahrzeug-Außengeräusch“ Gegenstand zahlreicher Forschungsprojekte zu Themen wie Identifikation wesentlicher Geräuschquellen, Zusammenhang zwischen Verkehrsgeräusch und Belästigung, medizinische Folgen aufgrund chronischer Lärmexposition, Geräuschqualität, Entwicklung neuer Methoden und Technologien zur Fahrzeug-Außengeräuschmessung und das Fahrzeug-Außengeräusch als wesentliches Produktattribut, das aktiver Gestaltung bedarf.

  13. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  14. PION INTERFEREMETRY FROM P+P TO AU+AU IN STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    CHAJECKI, Z.

    2005-08-15

    The geometric substructure of the particle-emitting source has been characterized via two-particle interferometry by the STAR collaboration for all energies and colliding systems at RHIC. We present systematic studies of charged pion interferometry. The collective nature of the source is revealed through the m{sub T} dependence of HBT radii for all particle types. Preliminary results suggest a scaling in the pion HBT radii with overall system size, as central Au+Au collisions are compared to peripheral collisions as well as with Cu+Cu and even with d+Au and p+p collisions, naively suggesting comparable flow strength in all systems. To probe this issue in greater detail, multidimensional correlation functions are studied using a spherical decomposition method. This allows clear identification of source anisotropy and, for the light systems, the presence of significant long-range non-femtoscopic correlations.

  15. Simulation of Electric Field in Semi Insulating Au/CdTe/Au Detector under Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; Kubat, J.; Belas, E.; Hoschl, P.; Moravec, P.; Praus, P.

    2009-08-02

    We report our simulations on the profile of the electric field in semi insulating CdTe and CdZnTe with Au contacts under radiation flux. The type of the space charge and electric field distribution in the Au/CdTe/Au structure is at high fluxes result of a combined influence of charge formed due to band bending at the electrodes and from photo generated carriers, which are trapped at deep levels. Simultaneous solution of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations is used for the calculation. We show, that the space charge originating from trapped photo-carriers starts to dominate at fluxes 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, when the influence of contacts starts to be negligible.

  16. Spin transport in Au films: An investigation by spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Eric; Kardasz, Bartek; Burrowes, Capucine; Huttema, Wendell; Girt, Erol; Heinrich, Bret

    2012-04-01

    The thickness and temperature dependence of spin transport in Au has been investigated in multilayer films via the spin pumping effect. To study spin transport in Au, single layer GaAs/16Fe/(d)Au(001) and double layer GaAs/16Fe/(d)Au/12Fe/20Au(001) were investigated using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), where d = 20, 300, and the numerals preceding Fe and Au indicate the layer thickness in atomic layers (AL). FMR measurements were performed at frequencies ranging from 27.3 to 40.6 GHz and at temperatures ranging from 88 to 295 K. By measuring the total Gilbert damping in the 16Fe layer as a function of d and temperature for both single and double magnetic layer structures and by utilizing the spin diffusion equation, one is able to determine the spin mixing conductance, g↑↓, at the Fe/Au interface, and the spin flip relaxation time, τsf, in Au as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of the momentum relaxation time, τm, in Au was measured independently by means of electron transport measurements in a van der Pauw configuration. It has been found that the spin flip relaxation time, τsf, in Au is dominated by phonon interactions.

  17. Photoemission study of Au on a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Tun-Wen; Yang, A.-B.; Olson, C. G.; Lynch, D. W.

    1990-11-01

    We report a high-resolution photoemission study of Au evaporated on rf-sputtered a-Si:H at room temperature. Three regions of coverage can be classified according to the behavior of the valence-band and core-level spectra: an unreacted region with an equivalent thickness of 2 Å, followed by an intermixed Au/a-Si overlayer (~9 Å), and a dual-phase region at higher coverage. Au adatoms are dispersed in the unreacted region. They subsequently cluster in the intermixed region, where they attach to Si atoms that are not hydrogen bonded, suggesting that the intermixed Si is mainly from those that have dangling bonds. In the dual-phase region, two sets of Au 4f core levels evolve with higher binding energy, one from Au intermixed with Si, and the lower one exhibiting pure gold character. The interface eventually ends up with the sequence: a-Si:H(sub.)+(pure Au mixed with intermixed Au/Si)+(vac). This is unlike the case of Au on c-Si, which has a pure gold layer sandwiched by intermixed Au/Si complexes along the surface normal. Traces of silicon atoms on top of composite surfaces appear even at the highest coverage, 205 Å, of the gold deposit. The applicability of the four models previously used for the Au/c-Si interface is also briefly discussed.

  18. Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2006-01-01

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  19. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-07

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  20. Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations on Au64+ - Au69+ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2006-03-31

    Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are an adequate tool for the description of the structure of highly charged multi-electron ions and for the analysis of their spectra. They demonstrate this by way of a re-investigation of n=3, {Delta}n=0 transitions in the EUV spectra of Na-, Mg-, Al-like, and Si-like ions of Au that have been obtained previously by heavy-ion accelerator based beam-foil spectroscopy. They discuss the evidence and propose several revisions on the basis of the multi-reference many-body perturbation theory calculations of Ne- through P-like ions of Au.

  1. Two-Particle Interferometry of 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2004-04-19

    The PHENIX experiment has measured pion-pion, kaon-kaon, and proton-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200GeV. The correlations are fit to extract radii using both the Bowler Coulomb correction and full calculation of the two-particle wave function. The resulting radii are similar for all three species and decrease with increasing k{sub t} as expected for collective flow. The R{sub out} and R{sub side} radii are approximately equal indicating a short emission duration.

  2. Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, K. H.; Adams, N.; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Allgower, C.; Amsbaugh, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderssen, E.; Arnesen, H.; Arnold, L.; Averichev, G. S.; Baldwin, A.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Beddo, M.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Berger, J.; Betts, W.; Bichsel, H.; Bieser, F.; Bland, L. C.; Bloomer, M.; Blyth, C. O.; Boehm, J.; Bonner, B. E.; Bonnet, D.; Bossingham, R.; Botlo, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouillo, N.; Bouvier, S.; Bradley, K.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, E. S.; Braithwaite, W.; Brandin, A.; Brown, R. L.; Brugalette, G.; Byrd, C.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carr, L.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Caylor, B.; Cebra, D.; Chatopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Conin, L.; Consiglio, C.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Danilov, V. I.; Dayton, D.; Demello, M.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, H.; Deyoung, P. A.; Didenko, L.; Dimassimo, D.; Dioguardi, J.; Dominik, W.; Drancourt, C.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Eggert, T.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Feliciano, C.; Ferenc, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Flores, I.; Foley, K. J.; Fritz, D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gojak, C.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grau, M.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gross, J.; Guilloux, G.; Gushin, E.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harper, G.; Harris, J. W.; He, P.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hill, D.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Howe, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Hunt, W.; Hunter, J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jacobson, S.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kenney, V. P.; Khodinov, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Koehler, G.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kormilitsyne, V.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krupien, T.; Kuczewski, P.; Kuhn, C.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lamont, M. A.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Leonhardt, W. J.; Leontiev, V. M.; Leszczynski, P.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.-J.; Lin, J.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Locurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Lopiano, D.; Love, W. A.; Lutz, J. R.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Maier, R.; Majka, R.; Maliszewski, A.; Margetis, S.; Marks, K.; Marstaller, R.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Matyushevski, E. A.; McParland, C.; McShane, T. S.; Meier, J.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Mikhalin, N.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Minor, B.; Mitchell, J.; Mogavero, E.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moltz, D.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; Morse, R.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Ngo, T.; Nguyen, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Noggle, T.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nussbaum, T.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olchanski, K.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Ososkov, G. A.; Ott, G.; Padrazo, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Perevotchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pinganaud, W.; Pirogov, S.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Polk, I.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Puskar-Pasewicz, J.; Rai, G.; Rasson, J.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J.; Renfordt, R. E.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Roehrich, D.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Russ, D.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sanchez, R.; Sandler, Z.; Sandweiss, J.; Sappenfield, P.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheblien, J.; Scheetz, R.; Schlueter, R.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seymour, R.; Shakaliev, E. I.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shi, Y.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shuman, D.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L. P.; Snellings, R.; Solberg, K.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Stone, N.; Stone, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Stroebele, H.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Symons, T. J.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarchini, A.; Tarzian, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Tikhomirov, V.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tonse, S.; Trainor, T.; Trentalange, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Vakula, I.; van Buren, G.; Vandermolen, A. M.; Vanyashin, A.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Visser, G.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vu, C.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Weerasundara, D.; Weidenbach, R.; Wells, R.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitfield, J. P.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wilson, K.; Wirth, J.; Wisdom, J.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wolf, J.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yokosawa, A.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhu, J.; Zimmerman, D.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  3. Reviewing hadron production at SIS energies featuring the new HADES Au + Au data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present the first preliminary results on the production of hadrons with strangeness content (K+, K-, Ks0 , Λ and ϕ) in Au + Au collisions at 1.23 A GeV incident energy measured with HADES. At the corresponding center of mass energy of √{ s} = 2.4 GeV all hadrons carrying strangeness are produced below their free nucleon-nucleon threshold. While the K- /K+ ratio nicely fits the trend observed at higher energies, we find a strong rise of the ϕ /K- ratio. The presented particle ratios are compared to a statistical model fit and put into the context of previously obtained systematics on strangeness production.

  4. Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

    2010-02-10

    We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. An atomistic view of the interfacial structures of AuRh and AuPd nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Ruth L.; Atanasov, Ivailo; Siriwatcharapiboon, Wilai; Khanal, Bishnu P.; Zubarev, Eugene R.; Horswell, Sarah L.; Johnston, Roy L.; Li, Z. Y.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we address the challenge of furthering our understanding of the driving forces responsible for the metal-metal interactions in industrially relevant bimetallic nanocatalysts, by taking a comparative approach to the atomic scale characterization of two core-shell nanorod systems (AuPd and AuRh). Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show the existence of a randomly mixed alloy layer some 4-5 atomic layers thick between completely bulk immiscible Au and Rh, which facilitates fully epitaxial overgrowth for the first few atomic layers. In marked contrast in AuPd nanorods, we find atomically sharp segregation resulting in a quasi-epitaxial, strained interface between bulk miscible metals. By comparing the two systems, including molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to gain insights into the factors that may have influenced their structure and chemical ordering, which cannot be explained by the key structural and energetic parameters of either system in isolation, thus demonstrating the advantage of taking a comparative approach to the characterization of complex binary systems. This work highlights the importance of achieving a fundamental understanding of reaction kinetics in realizing the atomically controlled synthesis of bimetallic nanocatalysts.In this work we address the challenge of furthering our understanding of the driving forces responsible for the metal-metal interactions in industrially relevant bimetallic nanocatalysts, by taking a comparative approach to the atomic scale characterization of two core-shell nanorod systems (AuPd and AuRh). Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show the existence of a randomly mixed alloy layer some 4-5 atomic layers thick between completely bulk immiscible Au and Rh, which facilitates fully epitaxial overgrowth for the first few atomic layers. In marked contrast in AuPd nanorods, we find atomically sharp segregation resulting in a quasi

  6. Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

    2009-05-14

    We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

  7. Collective motion in selected central collisions of Au on Au at 150A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. C.; Herrmann, N.; Fan, Z. G.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Krämer, M.; Randrup, J.; Reisdorf, W.; Schüll, D.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Pelte, D.; Trzaska, M.; Wienold, T.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belayev, I. M.; Berger, L.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Boussange, S.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Dona, R.; Dupieux, P.; Erö, J.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Frolov, S.; Grigorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Kuhn, C.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Maurenzig, P.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Morel, P.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Ramillien, V.; Sadchikov, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Tezkratt, R.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.

    1994-05-01

    Using the FOPI facility at GSI Darmstadt complete data of Au on Au collisions at 150A MeV were collected for charged products (Z=1-15) at laboratory angles 1°<=Θlab<=30°. Central collisions were selected by applying various criteria. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments from an isolated midrapidity source are investigated in detail for center-of-mass angles 25°<=Θc.m.<=45°. The heavy products (Z>=3) are used to determine the collective energy which is found to be at least 10A MeV.

  8. Centrality and Transverse Momentum Dependence of HBT Radii in Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweid, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The expansion dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions is influenced by the transport properties of the created medium, as well as the path of the reaction trajectory in the (T ,μB)-plane. Such an influence can manifest as quantifiable changes in the magnitude of the space-time extent of the emission source, characterized by the so-called HBT radii Rout, Rside and Rlong. We will present and discuss recent HBT measurements which extend the upper momentum range of measurements that have been made in the STAR detector for Au+Au collisions at several collision centralities and beam energies.

  9. Onset of nuclear vaporization in [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, M.B.; Hsi, W.C.; Lynch, W.G.; Bowman, D.R.; Gelbke, C.K.; Lisa, M.A.; Peaslee, G.F. ); Kunde, G.J.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Hofmann, T.; Hubele, J.; Kempter, J.; Kreutz, P.; Kunze, W.D.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Mang, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Neumann, M.; Ocker, B.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rosenberger, F.; Sann, H.; Schuettauf, A.; Serfling, V.; Stroth, J.; Trautmann, W.; Tucholski, A.; Woerner, A.; Zude, E.; Zwieglinski, B. ); Aiello, S.; Imme, G.; Pappalardo, V.; Raciti, G. ); Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G. ); Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Scardoni, R.; Ferr

    1993-09-06

    Multifragmentation has been measured for [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions at [ital E]/[ital A]=100, 250, and 400 MeV. The mean fragment multiplicity increases monotonically with the charged particle multiplicity at [ital E]/[ital A]=100 MeV, but decreases for central collisions with incident energy, consistent with the onset of nuclear vaporization. Molecular dynamics calculations follow some trends but underpredict the observed fragment multiplicities. Including the statistical decay of excited residues improves the agreement for peripheral collisions but worsens it for central collisions.

  10. Manipulation of superparamagnetic beads on patterned Au/Co/Au multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, A.; Holzinger, D.; Urbaniak, M.; Ehresmann, A.; Stobiecki, F.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetophoresis of water-suspended 4 μm-diameter superparamagnetic beads above topographically patterned, sputter deposited Ti(4 nm)/Au(60 nm)/[Co(0.7 nm)/Au(1 nm)] × 3 multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated. The results impressively demonstrate that the magnetic stray field landscape above the stripe structure when superimposed with an external, slowly rotating, field enables the directed transport of magnetic beads across the stripe panel with velocities up to 12 μm s-1.

  11. Effect of Au clustering on ferromagnetism in Au doped TiO2 films: theory and experiments investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhaorui; Zhou, Zhongpo; Wang, Haiying; Yang, Zongxian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the physical properties especially the magnetic properties of the TiO2 films and Au cluster doped TiO2 films fabricated by sol-gel and sputtering methods combined experiments and first-principles calculations. All the samples annealed under air and N2 atmosphere respectively exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism with the crystal phase of anatase. The values of the saturation magnetizations are in the order of Au δ-doped TiO2 (annealed in N2)>undoped TiO2 (annealed in air)>Au δ-doped TiO2 (annealed in air). The first principles calculation results show that the formation energy of Au cluster doped TiO2 films is lower than that of the oxygen vacancy and Au cluster codoped TiO2 films. The effects of the Au cluster dopant are the retard of the formation of surface oxygen vacancy and the electrons transfer from 3d states of Ti atoms to Au 5d states in Au cluster doped TiO2 films. The codoping of surface oxygen vacancies, bulk oxygen vacancies and Au clusters led to the spin-split of Ti 3d and O 2p in Au cluster doped TiO2 films (annealed in N2) which yield the highest saturation magnetization.

  12. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies. PMID:23452438

  13. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  14. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  15. Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

    2008-09-01

    Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

  16. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Curet-Arana, María C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-09-01

    Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH3 < NO < CO < CH3 < HCO < NH2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl,< HCO3 < CH2 < CN b HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N2, NH3 and CH4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.

  17. Ultranarrow AuPd and Al wires

    SciTech Connect

    Altomare, Fabio; Chang, Albert M.; Melloch, Michael R.; Hong Yuguang; Tu, Charles W.

    2005-04-25

    In this letter, we discuss a versatile template technique aimed to the fabrication of sub-10 nm wide wires. Using this technique, we have measured AuPd wires, 12 nm wide and as long as 20 {mu}m. Even materials that form a strong superficial oxide, and thus not suited to be used in combination with other techniques, can be employed. In particular, we have measured Al wires, with lateral width smaller or comparable to 10 nm, and length exceeding 10 {mu}m.

  18. Observation of sputtering damage on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michely, Thomas; Besocke, Karl H.; Comsa, George

    1990-05-01

    The morphology of a Au(111) surface has been observed with the STM (scanning tunneling microscope) after ion bombardment with 2.5 keV Ne + ions at about 400 K. Mostly triangular and hexagonal shaped vacancy islands are seen in the STM topographs. They are bounded by monatomic steps, oriented along the closed packed <110> directions. The general morphology confirms the conclusions inferred from TEAS (thermal energy atom scattering) measurements on ion bombarded Pt(111) surfaces. The observation of a propensity for the formation of {100} microfacetted <110> ledges is discussed.

  19. Analyse des facteurs histo-pronostiques du cancer du rectum non métastatique dans une série ouest Algérienne de 58 cas au CHU-Tlemcen

    PubMed Central

    Mesli, Smain Nabil; Regagba, Derbali; Tidjane, Anisse; Benkalfat, Mokhtar; Abi-Ayad, Chakib

    2016-01-01

    Introduction L'objectif de notre travail est d'analyser les facteurs histo-pronostiques des cancers du rectum non métastatique opérés au service de chirurgie «A» de Tlemcen à ouest Algérien durant une période de six ans. Méthodes Etude rétrospective de 58 patients qui avait un adénocarcinome rectal. Le critère de jugement était la survie. Les paramètres étudiés, le sexe, l’âge, stade tumoral, et les récidives tumorales. Résultats L’âge moyen était de 58 ans. Avec 52% d'hommes contre 48% femmes avec sex-ratio (1,08). Le siège tumoral était: moyen rectum avec 41,37%, 34,48% au bas rectum et dans 24,13% au haut rectum. La classification TNM avec 17,65% au stade I, 18,61% au stade II, 53, 44% au stade III et 7,84% au stade IV. La survie médiane globale était de 40 mois ±2,937 mois. La survie en fonction du stade tumoral, le stade III et IV avait un faible taux de survie (19%) a 3 ans contre le stade I, II avait un taux de survie de (75%) (P = 0,000) (IC 95%). Les patients avec récidives tumorales avaient un taux de survie faible à 3 ans par rapport à ceux n'ayant pas eu de récidive (30,85% Vs 64,30% P = 0,043). Conclusion Dans cette série, l’étude uni varié des différents facteurs pronostiques conditionnant la survie n'a permis de retenir que trois facteurs influençant la survie, à savoir la taille tumorale, le stade, et les récidives tumorales. En analyse multi variée en utilisant le modèle Cox un seul facteur été retenu la récidive tumorale. PMID:27583069

  20. Evaluation of the Olympus AU 400 clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Bilić, A; Alpeza, I; Rukavina, A S

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the Olympus AU 400 clinical chemistry analyzer was evaluated according to the guidelines of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The following analytes were tested: glucose, urea, creatinine, calcium, AST, ALT, CK, LDH, ALP and amylase. The Olympus AU 400 was compared with the Olympus AU 800. Coefficients of correlation showed high correlation between the compared analyzers. Other performances (intra- and inter-assay variation, carry-over and interferences) of the analyzer were satisfactory.

  1. Enhanced Photoresponse of Conductive Polymer Nanowires Embedded with Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchang; Zhong, Liubiao; Sun, Yinghui; Li, Anran; Huang, Jing; Meng, Fanben; Chandran, Bevita K; Li, Shuzhou; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-04-20

    A conductive polymer nanowire embedded with a 1D Au nanoparticle chain with defined size, shape, and interparticle distance is fabricated which demonstrates enhanced photoresponse behavior. The precise and controllable positioning of 1D Au nanoparticle chain in the conductive polymer nanowire plays a critical role in modulating the photoresponse behavior by excitation light wavelength or power due to the coupled-plasmon effect of 1D Au nanoparticle chain.

  2. “Let Me Tell You About My…” Provider Self-Disclosure in the Emergency Department Builds Patient Rapport

    PubMed Central

    Zink, Korie L; Perry, Marcia; London, Kory; Floto, Olivia; Bassin, Benjamin; Burkhardt, John; Santen, Sally A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction As patients become increasingly involved in their medical care, physician-patient communication gains importance. A previous study showed that physician self-disclosure (SD) of personal information by primary care providers decreased patient rating of the provider communication skills. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the incidence and impact of emergency department (ED) provider self-disclosure on patients’ rating of provider communication skills. Methods A survey was administered to 520 adult patients or parents of pediatric patients in a large tertiary care ED during the summer of 2014. The instrument asked patients whether the provider self-disclosed and subsequently asked patients to rate providers’ communication skills. We compared patients’ ratings of communication measurements between encounters where self-disclosure occurred to those where it did not. Results Patients reported provider SD in 18.9% of interactions. Provider SD was associated with more positive patient perception of provider communication skills (p<0.05), more positive ratings of provider rapport (p<0.05) and higher satisfaction with provider communication (p<0.05). Patients who noted SD scored their providers’ communication skills as “excellent” (63.4%) compared to patients without self-disclosure (47.1%). Patients reported that they would like to hear about their providers’ experiences with a similar chief complaint (64.4% of patients), their providers’ education (49%), family (33%), personal life (21%) or an injury/ailment unlike their own (18%). Patients responded that providers self-disclose to make patients comfortable/at ease and to build rapport. Conclusion Provider self-disclosure in the ED is common and is associated with higher ratings of provider communication, rapport, and patient satisfaction. PMID:28116007

  3. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  4. Photoionization of Au+ ions and developments in the synthesis of the metallofullerene Au@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogolub, Kyren; Macaluso, David; Mueller, Allison; Johnson, Andrea; Müller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan; Hellhund, Jonas; Borovik, Alexander; Anders, Andre; Aguilar, Alex; Kilcoyne, A. L. David

    2014-05-01

    Single photoionization of Au+ ions was investigated via the merged-beams technique at AMO Beamline 10.0.1.2 of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The relative single photoionization yield was measured as a function of photon energy in the 45 eV to 120 eV energy range. These measurements were made in preparation for future photoionization studies of the endohedral metallofullerene Au@C60, the production of which was also investigated. In proof-of-principle measurements a mass-resolved beam of Au@C60+was produced with a primary ion beam current in the single picoamp range without optimization of the ion source or synthesis parameters. Plans are presented for improved metallofullere production yield to be used in photoionization measurements of the endohedral fullerene ions in conjunction with the continuing study of pure Au. We would like to acknowledge the generous sharing of equipment vital to this work by Andre Anders, the Plasma Applications group leader at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL.

  5. An atomistic view of the interfacial structures of AuRh and AuPd nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chantry, Ruth L; Atanasov, Ivailo; Siriwatcharapiboon, Wilai; Khanal, Bishnu P; Zubarev, Eugene R; Horswell, Sarah L; Johnston, Roy L; Li, Z Y

    2013-08-21

    In this work we address the challenge of furthering our understanding of the driving forces responsible for the metal-metal interactions in industrially relevant bimetallic nanocatalysts, by taking a comparative approach to the atomic scale characterization of two core-shell nanorod systems (AuPd and AuRh). Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show the existence of a randomly mixed alloy layer some 4-5 atomic layers thick between completely bulk immiscible Au and Rh, which facilitates fully epitaxial overgrowth for the first few atomic layers. In marked contrast in AuPd nanorods, we find atomically sharp segregation resulting in a quasi-epitaxial, strained interface between bulk miscible metals. By comparing the two systems, including molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to gain insights into the factors that may have influenced their structure and chemical ordering, which cannot be explained by the key structural and energetic parameters of either system in isolation, thus demonstrating the advantage of taking a comparative approach to the characterization of complex binary systems. This work highlights the importance of achieving a fundamental understanding of reaction kinetics in realizing the atomically controlled synthesis of bimetallic nanocatalysts.

  6. Divided café-au-lait macule of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Sergay, Amanda; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2007-05-01

    We describe a 4-year-old, otherwise healthy boy with a congenital history of a perioral and labial segmental café-au-lait macule, who was noted to have unilateral localized gingival hyperpigmentation that aligned with the café-au-lait macule. This case is highly illustrative of the embryologic timing of the genetic event locally, which leads to café-au-lait type hyperpigmentation. Because the facial features and the ectoderm overlying the facial muscles develop around the third to fourth week of gestation, the distribution of this café-au-lait macule suggests development at the same time.

  7. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  8. Do methanethiol adsorbates on the Au(111) surface dissociate?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-28

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  9. Do Methanethiol Adsorbates on the Au(111) Surface Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  10. Design of Au/SPIO composite nanoparticle for facile and biocompatible surface functionalization via Au-S bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Shibata, Yujin; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Mukai, Yohei; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization of Au nanoparticles on super-paramagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) enables facile and biocompatible surface functionalization via Au-S bond. Au/SPIO composite nanoparticle is easily modified by thiol-modified polyethylene glycol (PEG-SH), and they are successfully applied on MR tumor imaging. However, its large hydrodynamic size ( 150 nm) still causes the accumulation to liver in vivo. In this study, we controlled the hydrodynamic size of Au/SPIO by testing different raw SPIOs and stabilizing polymers. As the best candidate, Au/Molday-ION which was synthesized from Molday-ION and polyvinyl alcohol comprised the hydrodynamic size of 56 nm. Moreover, PEGylated Au/Molday-ION showed excellent dispersibility in blood serum, with the hydrodynamic size of 65 nm. This surface functionalization strategy is effective for the constructions of magnetic nanocarriers for in vivo applications.

  11. Initial stages of Cu3Au(111) oxidation: oxygen induced Cu segregation and the protective Au layer profile.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Yasutaka; Oka, Kohei; Makino, Takamasa; Okada, Michio; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Hashinokuchi, M; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden; Kasai, Hideaki

    2014-02-28

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the Au concentration profile of Cu3Au(111) during oxidation by a hyperthermal O2 molecular beam at room temperature, using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), in conjunction with synchrotron radiation (SR), and density functional theory (DFT). Before O2 exposure, we observe strong Au segregation to the top layer, i.e., Au surface enrichment of the clean surface. We also observe a gradual Cu surface enrichment, and Au enrichment of the second and third (subsurface) layers, with increasing O coverage. Complete Cu segregation to the surface occurs at 0.5 ML O surface coverage. The Au-rich second and third layers of the oxidized surface demonstrate the protective layer formation against oxidation deeper into the bulk.

  12. Observation of D0 Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p +p to central Au +Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au +Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV /c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  13. Meteoroids at 1 AU: Dynamic and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. A. M.; McBride, N.

    1996-12-01

    Lines of evidence from both retrieved spacecraft and meteoroid studies have been examined to define the properties and understanding of the particulate impact environment at 1 AU. Key studies include: From LDEF and Eureca experiments comprising both thin foils and thick targets, exposed under identical exposures, have permitted physical properties of the meteoroids to be deduced such as shape factor and density. Comparison of such detectors pointing in different directions on the same spacecraft permits the velocity of meteoroids to be assessed and compared with that of radar meteoroids. Results are compared with velocity distributions currently used for ESABASE. Comparison of science experiments exposed on LDEF and Eureca, where different altitude stabilisation configurations apply, leads to a measure for the upper limit of space debris without recourse to chemical analyses. Radar meteoroids provide the only effective measure of the velocity distribution at 1 AU; but the meteor phenomenon differs (in sensitivity to velocity) from the impact cratering. Modelling has been performed, therefore, to derive Apex to Anti-Apex flux distributions appropriate to spacecraft environment modelling as in e.g. ESABASE. High sensitivity in-situ detectors in deep space, in particular HEOS II and Pioneers 8 and 9, provide evidence of the changing distributions and directivity of meteoroids and a swing to beta meteoroids which are being expelled from the solar system. Advances in the characterisation of these populations are presented.

  • Mesomorphic Lamella Rolling of Au in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chang-Ning; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2009-07-01

    Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241-0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74-0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458-0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon-hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration.

  • Mesomorphic Lamella Rolling of Au in Vacuum

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241–0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74–0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458–0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon–hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration. PMID:20628452

  • IMAGING PROMINENCE ERUPTIONS OUT TO 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian E.; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G.

    2016-01-10

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1 AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed for describing the degree of self-similarity for the prominence's expansion away from the Sun. This analysis suggests only modest deviations from self-similar expansion, but close to the Sun the prominence expands radially somewhat more rapidly than self-similarity would predict.

  • Component conversion from pure Au nanorods to multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods assisted by Pt nanoframe templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2016-06-01

    We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications.We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03484e

  • Reduction of Fermi level pinning at Au-MoS2 interfaces by atomic passivation on Au surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyung-Ah; Park, Jinwoo; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Hong, Suklyun

    2017-03-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which is a semiconducting material with direct band gap of ˜1.8 eV, has drawn much attention for application in field effect transistors (FETs). In this connection, it is very important to understand the Fermi level pinning (FLP) which occurs at metal-semiconductor interfaces. It is known that MoS2 has an n-type contact with Au, which is a high work function metal, representing the strong FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces. However, such FLP can obstruct the attainment of high performance of field effect devices. In this study, we investigate the reduction of FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces by atomic passivation on Au(111) using first-principles calculations. To reduce the FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces, we consider sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, fluorine, and hydrogen atoms that can passivate the surface of Au(111). Calculations show that passivating atoms prevent the direct contact between Au(111) and MoS2, and thus FLP at Au-MoS2 interfaces is reduced by weak interaction between atom-passivated Au(111) and MoS2. Especially, FLP is greatly reduced at sulfur-passivated Au-MoS2 interfaces with the smallest binding energy. Furthermore, fluorine-passivated Au(111) can form ohmic contact with MoS2, representing almost zero Schottky barrier height (SBH). We suggest that SBH can be controlled depending on the passivating atoms on Au(111).

  • Ordered arrays of Au catalysts by FIB assisted heterogeneous dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkouider, A.; Ronda, A.; David, T.; Favre, L.; Abbarchi, M.; Naffouti, M.; Osmond, J.; Delobbe, A.; Sudraud, P.; Berbezier, I.

    2015-12-01

    Synthesizing Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts that are homogeneous in size and have controlled position is becoming a challenging and crucial prequisite for the fabrication of ordered semiconductor nanowires. In this study, Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts are synthesized via dewetting of Au layers on Si(111) during thermal annealing in an ultra-high vacuum. In the first part of the paper, the mechanism of homogeneous dewetting is analyzed as a function of the Au-deposited thickness (h Au). We distinguish three different dewetting regimes: (I) for a low thickness ({h}{{Au}}≤slant 0.4 {nm}), a submonolyer coverage of Au is stabilized and there is no dewetting. (II) For an intermediate thickness (0.4 {nm}\\lt {h}{Au}≤slant 5 {nm}), there is both dewetting and Au0.8Si0.2 phase formation. The size and density of the Au0.8Si0.2 clusters are directly related to h Au. When cooling down to room temperature, the clusters decompose and reject the Si at the Au/Si substrate interface. (III) For a large thickness ({h}{{Au}}\\gt 5 {nm}), only dewetting takes place, without forming AuSi clusters. In this regime, the dewetting is kinetically controlled by the self-diffusion of Au (activation energy ∼0.43 eV) without evidence of an Si-alloying effect. As a practical consequence, when relying solely on the homogeneous dewetting of Au/Si(111) to form the Au0.8Si0.2 catalysts (without a supply of Si atoms from vapor), regime II should be used to obtain good size and density control. In the second part of the paper, a process for ordering the catalysts using focused ion beam-(FIB) assisted dewetting (heterogeneous dewetting) is developed. We show that no matter what the FIB milling conditions and the Au nominal thickness are, dewetting is promoted by ion beam irradiation and is accompanied by the formation of Au0.8Si0.2 droplets. The droplets preferentially form on the patterned areas, while in similar annealing conditions, they do not form on the unpatterned areas. This behavior is attributed

  • Partial oxidation of methanol catalyzed with Au/TiO2, Au/ZrO2 and Au/ZrO2-TiO2 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ramírez, E.; Wang, J. A.; Chen, L. F.; Valenzuela, M. A.; Dalai, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    Mesoporous TiO2, ZrO2 and ZrO2-TiO2 mixed oxides were synthesized by the sol-gel method and the Au/TiO2, Au/ZrO2 and Au/ZrO2-TiO2 catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation method using urea solution as a precipitating agent. These materials were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in situ FTIR-pyridine (FTIR-Py) adsorption. XRD patterns of the samples confirmed the formation of ZrTiO4 phase in the ZrO2-TiO2 mixed oxides. TEM micrographs showed that nanosized gold particles on the catalyst had an average diameter smaller than 5 nm. Metallic gold (Au0) and oxidized Au species (Aunδ+) on the surface of the catalysts were evidenced by UV-vis and XPS characterization. In the partial oxidation of methanol (POM) reaction, among the six catalysts, the high metallic Au0/Au+ ratio and low surface acidity in the Au/ZrO2 catalysts are chiefly responsible for the highest hydrogen production rate in the whole temperature range between 210 and 300 °C. Methanol decomposition as secondary reaction was favored on TiO2-based catalysts at higher temperature, producing a large amount of CO. Formation of ZrO2-TiO2 solid solution resulted in generation of both Brønsted and Lewis acid sites; as a result, dehydrogenation and oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol was allowed over Au/ZrO2-TiO2 catalysts.

    1. Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.

      PubMed

      Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

      2006-09-29

      We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur.

    2. Gold Apes Hydrogen. The Structure and Bonding in the Planar B7Au2- and B7Au2 Clusters

      SciTech Connect

      Zhai, Hua JIN.; Wang, Lai S.; Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

      2006-02-09

      We produced the B7Au2- mixed cluster and studied its electronic structure and chemical bonding using photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The photoelectron spectra of B7Au2- were observed to be relatively simple with vibrational resolution, in contrast to the complicated spectra observed for pure B7-, which had contributions from three isomers (Alexandrova et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2004, 108, 3509). Theoretical calculations show that B7Au2- possesses an extremely stable planar structure, identical to that of B7H2-, demonstrating that Au mimics H in its bonding to boron, analogous to the Au-Si bonding. The ground state structure of B7Au2- (B7H2-) can be viewed as adding two Au (H) atoms to the terminal B atoms of a higher-lying planar isomer of B7-. The bonding and stability in the planar B7Au2- (B7H2-) clusters are elucidated on the basis of the strong covalent B-Au (H) bonding and the concepts of aromaticity/antiaromaticity in these systems.

    3. Graphite oxide-coated Au nanoparticles for improved SERS sensing

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Liu, Bingfei; Wang, Qi; Tian, Tian; Mao, Guoming; Liu, Hao; Ren, Xiao Min

      2016-11-01

      Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an effective spectral analysis technique as its advantage of molecular fingerprint, ultra-sensitivity and non-contact. It is the most popular and easiest method to create SERS metal nanoparticles (NPs) combining magnetron sputtering deposition of noble metal with rapid annealing. In this study, we have demonstrated an approach to improve the SERS effect by using graphene oxide (GO) Au NPs composite structure. Here, we obtain the Au NPs coated SOI substrate prepared by magnetron sputtering 4 nm Au film and followed by rapid annealing treatment. The experimental results indicate that the SERS intensity is maximum of the Au NPs coated SOI substrate with the average particle diameter of 20 nm when the rapid annealing time is 30s and temperature is 500 degrees. Then, graphene oxide solution is spin coated on the Au NPs to form the GO-Au NPs composite structure. The morphology of GO-Au NPs have been characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Rhodamine 6G (R6G) is used as the probe molecule to detect the SERS intensity. The GO-Au NPs has an excellent SERS effect which can detect R6G as low as 10-9M. Besides, compared to the Au NPs without GO the GO-Au NPs has two times Raman intensity enhancement of bands at 774 cm-1 because of the GO improving the SERS properties through strong ability of adsorption the probe molecule and chemical enhancement effect. Therefore, the GO-Au NPs composite structure shows a promising future to detect low concentration material.

    4. Le don après un décès d'origine cardiocirculatoire au Canada

      PubMed Central

      Shemie, Sam D.; Baker, Andrew J.; Knoll, Greg; Wall, William; Rocker, Graeme; Howes, Daniel; Davidson, Janet; Pagliarello, Joe; Chambers-Evans, Jane; Cockfield, Sandra; Farrell, Catherine; Glannon, Walter; Gourlay, William; Grant, David; Langevin, Stéphan; Wheelock, Brian; Young, Kimberly; Dossetor, John

      2006-01-01

      Résumé Ces recommandations sont le fruit d'un processus multidisciplinaire national ayant duré un an et visant à déterminer si et comment l'on pourrait procéder au don d'organes après un décès d'origine cardiocirculatoire («don après le décès cardiocirculatoire», ou DDC) au Canada. Le forum national organisé en février 2005 a permis aux participants de discuter et d'élaborer des recommandations sur les principes, interventions et pratiques se rapportant au DDC. Les aspects éthiques et juridiques ont été abordés dans les discussions. À la fin du Forum, la majorité des participants ont été favorables à l'implantation de programmes de DDC au Canada. Les participants du Forum ont également convenu qu'il fallait formuler et prôner des valeurs fondamentales pour orienter l'élaboration de programmes et de protocoles basés sur le cadre médical, éthique et juridique établi lors de cette réunion. Même si la possibilité d'un don d'organes et de tissus doit faire partie intégrante des soins de fin de vie, il faut insister sur le fait que le devoir de diligence envers les patients mourants et leurs familles doit demeurer la priorité des équipes soignantes. La complexité et les répercussions profondes du décès sont reconnues et doivent être respectées, de même que les différences personnelles, ethnoculturelles et religieuses face à la mort et au don d'organes. Les décisions d'arrêter le traitement de maintien des fonctions vitales, la prise en charge des derniers moments de la vie et le diagnostic de décès selon des critères cardiocirculatoires doivent être distincts et indépendants des processus de don et transplantation. Ce rapport contient des recommandations destinées aux gestionnaires de program, aux autorités sanitaires régionales et aux instances appelés à élaborer les protocoles de DDC. Les programmes doivent être conçus en fonction des éléments suivants : direction et planification locales, éducation et

    5. Doppler transcranien au cours de la drépanocytose chez l'enfant Malagasy

      PubMed Central

      Herinirina, Nicolas Fanantenana; Rajaonarison, Lova Hasina Ny Ony Narindra; Herijoelison, Andry Roussel; Rakoto, Olivat Aimée Alson; Ahmad, Ahmad

      2016-01-01

      Introduction Le doppler transcrânien est un outil efficace permettant de dépister les enfants drépanocytaires à risque d'AVC. Méthodes Nous avons réalisé une étude descriptive transversale sur des enfants Malagasy âgés entre 24 mois et 15 ans (groupe 1: 57 drépanocytaires, groupe 2: 43 témoins) afin d’évaluer le profil vélocimétrique des artères cérébrales chez les drépanocytaires. Un examen Doppler transcrânien a été réalisé avec étude des flux sanguins cérébraux chez les enfants des deux groupes. Résultats Pour les sujets drépanocytaires, la vitesse moyenne (VM) de l'artère cérébrale moyenne était de 100,9 ± 26,8 cm/s, l'indice de pulsatilité (IP) de 0,73 ± 0,20, la différence entre les artères cérébrales moyennes droite et gauche (ACMr) de 19,8 ± 21,5 cm/s, le rapport des vitesses de l'artère cérébrale antérieure/artère cérébrale moyenne (ACA/ACM) de 0,7 ± 0,2. Pour les enfants non drépanocytaires, VM: 80,6 ± 19,3 cm/s, IP: 0,79 ± 0,14, ACMr: 17 ± 20,1 cm/s, ACA/ACM: 0,8 ± 0,2. La vélocité des enfants drépanocytaires était supérieure au groupe contrôle. Les vitesses ont été corrélées avec le taux d'hémoglobine et l’âge et non pas avec le sexe et le volume globulaire moyen. Conclusion Les vitesses circulatoires cérébrales sont élevées chez les drépanocytaires que les enfants non drépanocytaires et sont influencées par le taux d'hémoglobine et l’âge. PMID:27516829

    6. Etats hémodynamiques et respiratoires des opérées de fistules obstétricales sous rachianesthésie au CHRR Manakara, Madagascar

      PubMed Central

      Martinetti, Andrianimaro Florelia; Franklin, Rabenjarison; Lalao, Randriamboavonjy Rado; Judicael, Harioly Nirina Marie Osé; Yvonne, Rasolonjatovo Tsiorintsoa; Andriambelo, Rajaonera Tovohery; Nicole, Rakotoarison Ratsaraharimanana Catherine; Enintsoa, Raveloson Nasolotsiry; Edwige, Ravaomanana

      2016-01-01

      L'objectif était d'évaluer les états hémodynamiques et respiratoires des opérées de fistules obstétricales et rapporter nos expériences sur la prise en charge de ces malades. Il s'agit d'une étude transversale descriptive effectuée au Bloc opératoire et Réanimation du CHRR Manakara allant du 20 au 30 aout 2013. Etaient incluses les patientes opérées de fistules obstétricales sous rachianesthésie. Nous avons exclu les patientes classées ASA >2 et celles ayant des tares cardio-vasculaires ou respiratoires. Après consultations préanesthésiques, et bilans préopératoires, nous avons administré chez les patientes 12,5mg de bupivacaïne adrénalinée 0,5% isobare en intrathécal. Elles étaient mises en position de Trendelenburg 5 minutes après l'injection du produit anesthésique et durant toute l'intervention. Le niveau sensitif, la pression artérielle, la fréquence cardiaque, la fréquence respiratoire et la saturation pulsée en oxygène (SpO2) étaient enregistrés pendant l'intervention. Nous avons retenues 57 malades. Le bloc sensitivomoteur était excellent pour toutes les malades. Un niveau métamérique supérieur à T6 était atteint chez 56,36% des malades. A part quelques épisodes d'hypertension artérielle et tachycardie, nous n'avons trouvé aucune difficulté respiratoire ni cardiovasculaire en rapport avec la position. Seuls, le niveau sensitif et la fréquence respiratoire présentaient une corrélation (p=0,01). Cette étude suggère que la position de Trendelenburg est réalisable au cours de la rachianesthésie en utilisant un produit anesthésique approprié, en faisant attention, notamment aux changements de position et en tenant compte de l'examen préanesthésique. PMID:28292102

    7. Registration of ‘AU-1101’ peanut

      Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

      AU-1101’ (Reg. No. CV-xxx, PI 661498) is a large-seeded virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) with high yield and medium maturity, uniform pod size and shape, high grade, superior shelling characters, low oil content, normal oleic acid content, and good flavor. AU-...

    8. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

      SciTech Connect

      Song, Ho Geon

      2002-05-01

      Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

    9. Découverte fortuite de quadruplets au cours d'un accouchement: illustration d'un cas à l'Hôpital Central de Yaoundé (Cameroun)

      PubMed Central

      Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; Fouedjio, Jeanne Hortence; Dingom, Madye Ange Ngo; Fouogue, Jovanny Tsuala; Enow, Robinson Mbu

      2014-01-01

      Les auteurs rapportent une grossesse de haut rang (quadruplés) dont le nombre de fœtus n'a été découvert que pendant l'accouchement par voie vaginale. Faute de moyens, la parturiente reçue en phase active du travail n'a pas pu bénéficier de la césarienne d'urgence indiquée pour présentation en siège du premier jumeau. Ce n'est qu'après l'accouchement du deuxième fœtus que les deux derniers quadruplés ont été successivement découverts. Les difficultés et les pièges contextuels de la prise en charge des grossesses multiples sont passés en revue. Ce cas rappelle au personnel des salles d'accouchement la possibilité d'erreur de diagnostique sur les résultats d'échographies présentés par les parturientes. PMID:25419323

    10. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

      PubMed

      Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

      2003-08-15

      We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions.

    11. A family of Au-Tl loosely bound butterfly clusters.

      PubMed

      Fernández, Eduardo J; López-de-Luzuriaga, José M; Olmos, M Elena; Pérez, Javier; Laguna, Antonio; Lagunas, M Cristina

      2005-08-22

      By treatment of the polymeric species [AuTl(C6Cl5)2]n with ketones or with acetylacetone and 4,4'-bipyridine, the new tetranuclear complexes [Au2Tl2(C6Cl5)4] x L (L = PhMeC=O, acacH) or [Au2Tl2(C6Cl5)4(bipy)] x (acacH) have been prepared. Their crystal structures have been determined by X-ray diffraction methods and they all present a central Au2Tl2 core formed via one Tl...Tl and four Au...Tl unsupported interactions resulting in a loosely bound butterfly cluster. These complexes are strongly luminescent in both the solid state and solution showing an optical behavior in agreement with the maintenance of the Tl...Tl contact even in solution.

    12. Sputtering of Au induced by single Xe ion impacts

      SciTech Connect

      Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

      1999-12-06

      Sputtering of Au thin films has been determined for Xe ions with energies between 50 and 600 keV. In-situ transmission electron microscopy was used to observe sputtered Au during deposition on a carbon foil near the specimen. Total reflection and transmission sputtering yields for a 62 nm thick Au thin film were determined by ex-situ measurement of the total amount of Au on the carbon foils. In situ observations show that individual Xe ions eject Au nanoparticles as large as 7 nm in diameter with an average diameter of approximately 3 nm. Particle emission correlates with crater formation due to single ion impacts. Nanoparticle emission contributes significantly to the total sputtering yield for Xe ions in this energy range in either reflection or transmission geometry.

    13. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

      DOE PAGES

      Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; ...

      2016-01-25

      In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developedmore » which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

    14. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

      SciTech Connect

      Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

      2016-01-25

      In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developed which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.

    15. Synthesis, characterization and SERS activity of Au-Ag nanorods.

      PubMed

      Philip, Daizy; Gopchandran, K G; Unni, C; Nissamudeen, K M

      2008-09-01

      The formation mechanism and morphology of Au-Ag bimetallic colloidal nanoparticles depend on the composition. Ag coated Au colloidal nanoparticles have been prepared by deposition of Ag through chemical reduction on performed Au colloid. The composition of the Au100-x-Agx particles was varied from x=0 to 50. The obtained colloids were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Au80-Ag20 colloid consists of alloy nanorods with dimension of 25nm x 100nm. The activity of these nanorods in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was checked by using sodium salicylate as an adsorbate probe. Intense SERS bands are observed indicating its usefulness as a SERS substrate in near infrared (NIR) laser excitation.

    16. Analyse sérologique de la toxoplasmose pergravidique: évaluation des risques et perspectives du dépistage prénatal au centre hospitalier universitaire de Bobo Dioulasso au Burkina Faso

      PubMed Central

      Bamba, Sanata; Some, Der Adolphe; Chemla, Cathy; Geers, Régine; Guiguemde, Tinga Robert; Villena, Isabelle

      2012-01-01

      Introduction La présente étude rapporte les données sérologiques de 306 sérums collectés chez des parturientes au CHU de Bobo Dioulasso et analysés rétrospectivement au CHU de Reims en 2011. Le but était de déterminer le statut sérologique de ces parturientes et d'en déduire la conduite à tenir. Méthodes La recherche des IgG et des IgM anti toxoplasmiques était systématique. Les techniques d'agglutination haute sensibilisée et celle d'Immunocapture M ont servi à la recherche respective des anticorps spécifiques IgG et des IgM. Résultats Sur 306 sérums analysés, 95 (31%) avaient des IgG positifs et aucun n'avait des IgM. Deux cent onze (211) sérums (69%) des sérums n'avaient ni IgG, ni IgM. Conclusion Nos résultats montrent que 31% des femmes en dehors d'une immunodépression sous jacente, possèdent une immunité résiduelle vis à vis de Toxoplasma gondii et n'ont pas la nécessité d'avoir une surveillance sérologique pendant la grossesse. Cependant, 69% (211) des parturientes sont à risque d'une séroconversion, et devraient bénéficier de conseils hygiéno diététiques, associés à une surveillance sérologique durant la grossesse. Ces résultats montrent l'intérêt de mettre en place des mesures de prévention contre la toxoplasmose congénitale, étant l'une des affections materno - foetales les plus fréquentes par la mise en place d'un diagnostic prénatal de la toxoplasmose en routine dans notre hôpital. PMID:22937183

    17. Local structure of disordered Au-Cu and Au-Ag alloys

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Frenkel, A. I.; Machavariani, V. Sh.; Rubshtein, A.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Voronel, A.; Stern, E. A.

      2000-10-01

      X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-diffraction (XRD) measurements of disordered alloys AuxCu1-x and Au0.5Ag0.5 prepared by melt spinning were performed. In the Au0.5Ag0.5 alloy, no significant local deviations of the atoms from the average fcc lattice were detected while in AuxCu1-x alloys, significant deviations of atoms from the average fcc lattice were found. Mean-square vibrations of the Cu-Cu distances revealed by the XAFS in AuxCu1-x alloys indicate the weakening of contact between Cu atoms in the dilute limit. Our computer simulation for AuxCu1-x clusters of 105 atoms reproduces the main features of both the XAFS and XRD data.

    18. Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions at

      SciTech Connect

      Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph

      2001-01-01

      We compare three semimicroscopic theories to the first data on particle production in central Au+Au collisions taken at RHIC by the PHOBOS Collaboration as well as to existing data on central Pb+Pb collisions taken at the SPS by the NA49 Collaboration. The Linear Extrapolation of Ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon Scattering to nucleus-nucleus collisions (LEXUS) represents the SPS data quite well but predicts too many particles at RHIC. The wounded nucleon model predicts too few particles at both the SPS and RHIC; the collective tube model predicts fewer particles still. This suggests a transition in the dynamics of particle production between s=17 and 56A GeV as one goes from the SPS to RHIC.

    19. STAR physics program and technical challenges with the RHIC energy scan with Au + Au collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Odyniec, G.; STAR Collaboration

      2008-10-01

      The future STAR physics program includes an Au + Au energy scan extending to low \\sqrt{s_{NN}} . Among other things, this energy scan will provide a unique opportunity to search for the phase boundary between quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and hadronic gas (HG), and a key landmark, a possible critical point, in the QCD phase diagram. Due to its large uniform acceptance and (with the addition of the time-of-flight detector) excellent particle identification capabilities, by the time of Run 10 (in 2010) STAR will be uniquely positioned to cover this physics in unprecedented depth and detail, as well as other novel physics possibilities. Running at very low energies poses major new challenges for accelerator experts at RHIC and for physicists preparing for data taking. We report on the status of STAR preparation for Run 10.

    20. Flow harmonics of Au+Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV with HADES

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kardan, Behruz

      2016-08-01

      Collective flow phenomena are a sensitive probe for the properties of extreme QCD matter. However, their interpretation relies on the understanding of the initial conditions e.g. the eccentricity of the nuclear overlap region. HADES [1] provides a large acceptance combined with a high mass-resolution and therefore allows to study di-electron and hadron production in heavy-ion collisions with unprecedented precision. In this contribution, the capability of HADES to study flow harmonics by utilizing multi-particle azimuthal correlation techniques is discussed. Due to the high statistics of seven billion Au+Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV collected in 2012, a systematic study of higher-order flow harmonics, the differentiation between collective and non-flow effects, and as well the multi-differential (p t, rapidity, centrality) analysis is possible.

    1. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

      2015-11-01

      Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

    2. 200 A GeV Au + Au collisions serve a nearly perfect quark-gluon liquid.

      PubMed

      Song, Huichao; Bass, Steffen A; Heinz, Ulrich; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Shen, Chun

      2011-05-13

      A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity (η/s)(QGP) of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T(c) < T ≲ 2T(c) from the centrality dependence of the eccentricity-scaled elliptic flow v2/ε measured in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Coupling viscous fluid dynamics for the QGP with a microscopic transport model for hadronic freeze-out we find for 200 A GeV Au + Au collisions that v2/ε is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN(ch)/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity ε. Comparing with measurements we find 1<4π(η/s)(QGP) < 2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of ε used to normalize the measured v2.

    3. Collective global dynamics in Au+Au collisions at the BNL AGS

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bravina, L.; Csernai, L. P.; Lévai, P.; Strottman, D.

      1994-10-01

      Signatures of collective effects are studied in the quark gluon string model and in the fluid dynamical model for Au+Au collisions at 11.6A GeV/c. In the fluid dynamical model the dependence of observables on the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation in the equation of state is pointed out although the maximal total amount of pure QGP formed is only about 8 fm3 in these reactions. In contrast to the baryon rapidity distribution, the in-plane transverse flow and especially the squeeze-out effect are particularly sensitive to the EOS. In the QGSM the lifetime and extent of baryon density in strings are studied. The QGSM picture is very similar to the one obtained in the fluid dynamical model with a pure hadronic EOS.

    4. Sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at 400 A.MeV

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ramillien, V.; Dupieux, P.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Bastid, N.; Berger, L.; Boussange, S.; Fraysse, L.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Pras, P.; Basrak, Z.; Belayev, I. M.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Buta, A.; Caplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Donà, R.; Erö, J.; Fan, Z. G.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Freifelder, R.; Frolov, S.; Gobbi, A.; Gregorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Hartnack, C.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jeong, S. C.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Krämer, M.; Khun, C.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Maurenzig, P.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; Sadchikov, A.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Tezkratt, R.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.; FOPI Collaboration

      1995-02-01

      We present new experimental data obtained with the FOPI detector at SIS, for the Au + Au heavy-ion collisions at 400 A MeV incident energy. The sideward flow, determined from a method without reaction-plane reconstruction, and the nuclear stopping are studied as a function of the centrality of the collisions. In order to study the nuclear in-medium effects, which act on the NN cross sections and potential and hence on experimental observables like the nuclear-matter flow and stopping, these results are compared with the predictions of two different QMD versions. The first one offers a fully microscopic calculation of the cross sections and potential in the G-matrix formalism and naturally includes the in-medium effects (this version is for the first time confronted with experiment). The second one uses a standard Skyrme potential plus a momentum-dependent term in order to mimic the in-medium effects.

    5. Charge transport in single Au / alkanedithiol / Au junctions: coordination geometries and conformational degrees of freedom.

      PubMed

      Li, Chen; Pobelov, Ilya; Wandlowski, Thomas; Bagrets, Alexei; Arnold, Andreas; Evers, Ferdinand

      2008-01-09

      Recent STM molecular break-junction experiments have revealed multiple series of peaks in the conductance histograms of alkanedithiols. To resolve a current controversy, we present here an in-depth study of charge transport properties of Au|alkanedithiol|Au junctions. Conductance histograms extracted from our STM measurements unambiguously confirm features showing more than one set of junction configurations. On the basis of quantum chemistry calculations, we propose that certain combinations of different sulfur-gold couplings and trans/gauche conformations act as the driving agents. The present study may have implications for experimental methodology: whenever conductances of different junction conformations are not statistically independent, the conductance histogram technique can exhibit a single series only, even though a much larger abundance of microscopic realizations exists.

    6. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

      2007-08-01

      We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p¯ production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p¯ should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high pT region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p¯ suppression.

    7. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

      SciTech Connect

      Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

      2007-08-15

      We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high p{sub T} region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p suppression.

    8. Charge-Asymmetry Dependence of Proton Elliptic Flow in 200 GeV Au +Au Collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Smith, Rachel; STAR Collaboration

      2016-09-01

      The chiral magnetic wave (CMW) is predicted to manifest a finite electric quadrupole moment in the quark-gluon plasma produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. This quadrupole moment generates a divergence in the azimuthal anisotropy (v2) of positively and negatively charged particles such that v2(+) < v2(-). This effect is proportional to the apparent charge asymmetry (Ach) of particles in the same rapidity window. The Ach dependence of v 2 has already been observed in the cases of charged pions and kaons. We present preliminary STAR measurements of v 2 for protons and anti-protons as a function of Ach from √sNN = 200 GeV Au +Au collisions for different centrality classes. The results are then compared with the previously reported results of pions and kaons. For the STAR Collaboration.

    9. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      McGlinchey, D.

      2016-12-01

      Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

    10. MODELING THE ACCRETION STRUCTURE OF AU Mon

      SciTech Connect

      Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Jan; Peters, Geraldine J. E-mail: mbrendan@umich.edu E-mail: budaj@ta3.sk

      2012-12-01

      AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked H{alpha} emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including H{alpha}, H{beta}, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R {sub Sun }, thickness of 5.2 R {sub Sun }, density of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} g cm{sup -3}, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of {approx}8000 K transferring {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show H{alpha} Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the H{alpha} profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

    11. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

      SciTech Connect

      Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

      2015-08-13

      The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.

    12. Fabrication of Au nanotube arrays and their plasmonic properties

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhu, Haojun; Chen, Huanjun; Wang, Jianfang; Li, Quan

      2013-04-01

      Large-scale Au nanotube arrays on ITO/glass with tunable inner diameters and wall thicknesses were fabricated via a CdSe nanotube array templating method. The initial tubular morphology of the CdSe-nanotube template was maintained during the synthesis, while the composition was converted from CdSe to Au. The obtained Au nanotube arrays showed two surface plasmon resonances in the extinction spectrum, mainly contributed by electron oscillation along the transverse and the longitudinal directions. When used as the substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), the Raman scattering of the probe molecules (4-mercaptobenzoic acid) was amplified by approximately 4 orders of magnitude, mainly due to the plasmonic enhancement effect of the Au nanotube arrays.Large-scale Au nanotube arrays on ITO/glass with tunable inner diameters and wall thicknesses were fabricated via a CdSe nanotube array templating method. The initial tubular morphology of the CdSe-nanotube template was maintained during the synthesis, while the composition was converted from CdSe to Au. The obtained Au nanotube arrays showed two surface plasmon resonances in the extinction spectrum, mainly contributed by electron oscillation along the transverse and the longitudinal directions. When used as the substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), the Raman scattering of the probe molecules (4-mercaptobenzoic acid) was amplified by approximately 4 orders of magnitude, mainly due to the plasmonic enhancement effect of the Au nanotube arrays. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Basic characterizations, optical and SERS properties of Au nanotube arrays obtained from CdSe nanowire arrays; SERS spectra of Au-sputtered ITO/glass and bare ITO/glass; the calculation details of the enhancement factor. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33658a

    13. Thiophenol and thiophenol radical and their complexes with gold clusters Au 5 and Au 6

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Remacle, F.; Kryachko, E. S.

      2004-12-01

      The longstanding controversy between experiment and theory regarding which conformer of thiophenol, planar or perpendicular, is the most stable and what is the magnitude of the corresponding rotational barrier of the S-H group is discussed. We propose a variety of rather modest high-level computational methods within the density theory, which corroborate the experimental data. These methods demonstrate that the planar structure of thiophenol is the most stable and the magnitude of the rotational barrier falls within the experimental range of 3.35±0.84 kJ mol -1. However, the barrier is of the order of RT at room temperature, which might prevent to clearly identify the most stable conformer of thiophenol in experiments and leads to a large-amplitude motion of the thiolic hydrogen. On the other hand, such low value of the barrier may lead to some error in evaluating the thermodynamic properties of thiophenol within the rigid-rotor-harmonic oscillator model, in particular for the bond dissociation enthalpy. We also show the existence of a large entropy contribution to the Gibbs free energy difference between the planar and perpendicular conformers which is the order of the rotational barrier (≈4 kJ mol -1). This might be of interest for experimental study. The most stable complexes of thiophenol with the gold clusters Au 5 and Au 6 are also investigated. It is shown that the sulfur atom prefers to anchor to two- and three-coordinated atoms of gold in these clusters to form a strongly directional gold-sulfur bond. The hydrogen abstraction from the S-H group of thiophenol bonded to the two-coordinated gold atom in Au 5 yields the bridging Au-S dibond and results in a spectacular reduction of the bond dissociation energy of thiophenol by nearly a factor of three.

    14. Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Philip, Daizy

      2009-07-01

      Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size ˜15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (1 1 1) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications.

    15. Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: A detailed comparison of observations and theory

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P. R.

      1984-01-01

      A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

    16. Evaluation des prescriptions antibiotiques au service des urgences de l’Hôpital Militaire d’Instruction Mohammed V (HMIMV)

      PubMed Central

      Elbouti, Anass; Rafai, Mostafa; Chouaib, Naoufal; Jidane, Said; Belkouch, Ahmed; Bakkali, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen

      2016-01-01

      Cette étude à pour objectifs de décrire les pratiques des prescriptions, évaluer leur pertinence et leur conformité aux règles d’utilisations et étudier les facteurs susceptibles de les influencer. Il s’agit d’une étude transversale d’évaluation des prescriptions antibiotiques portant sur 105 patients réalisée au service des urgences médico-chirurgicales de l’H.M.I.Med V de Rabat sur une période d’un mois. Le recueil des données était fait à l’aide d’un questionnaire rapportant les données démographiques et anamnestiques, les antécédents, la notion d’allergie, les données spécifiques de l’examen clinique, les données para cliniques, la prescription détaillée de l’antibiotique. Les données récoltées ont été ensuite évaluées par un médecin référent, chargé d’indiquer les éventuelles erreurs de traitement. Parmi les infections ayant motivé la prescription des antibiotiques, les affections des systèmes respiratoires et urinaires étaient au premier rang, les familles d’antibiotiques les plus couramment employées sont les pénicillines, les quinolones et les céphalosporines. 74 prescriptions soit (70,5%) étaient à la fois pertinentes et conformes contre 9 prescriptions soit (8,6%) justifiées mais non pertinentes et 6 prescriptions soit (5,7%) étaient jugées injustifiées par le médecin référent par absence d’infection. Les évaluations des pratiques médicales sont rarement menées dans les établissements de santé; c’est dans ce cadre que nous avons voulu nous inscrire en produisant cette étude afin d’améliorer la pertinence de nos prescriptions antibiotiques et d’optimiser leur conformité aux différentes recommandations. PMID:28292124

    17. Autonomous Repair Mechanism of Creep Damage in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N Alloys

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhang, S.; Kwakernaak, C.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Sloof, W. G.; Kuzmina, M.; Herbig, M.; Raabe, D.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

      2015-12-01

      The autonomous repair mechanism of creep cavitation during high-temperature deformation has been investigated in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N alloys. Combined electron-microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography reveal how the improved creep properties result from Au precipitation within the creep cavities, preferentially formed on grain boundaries oriented perpendicular to the applied stress. The selective precipitation of Au atoms at the free creep cavity surface results in pore filling, and thereby, autonomous repair of the creep damage. The large difference in atomic size between the Au and Fe strongly hampers the nucleation of precipitates in the matrix. As a result, the matrix acts as a reservoir for the supersaturated solute until damage occurs. Grain boundaries and dislocations are found to act as fast transport routes for solute gold from the matrix to the creep cavities. The mechanism responsible for the self-healing can be characterized by a simple model for cavity growth and cavity filling.

    18. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

      DOE PAGES

      Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

      2014-09-30

      We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore » coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

    19. Au@AuPt nanoparticles embedded in B-doped graphene: A superior electrocatalyst for determination of rutin

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chen, Xianlan; Yang, Guangming; Feng, Shaoping; Shi, Ling; Huang, Zhaolong; Pan, Haibo; Liu, Wei

      2017-04-01

      A hydrothermal approach was used to prepare B-doped graphene with B2O3 as reductant and boron source. Results reveal that the boron atoms have been successfully embedded into graphene with a high content of a total B species (2.85 at.%). Then, B-doped graphene was exfoliated further into monolayer nanosheet by impregnating Au@AuPt core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AuPt NPs) because boron atom creates a net positive charge, which facilitates Au@AuPt NPs adsorption to form Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped graphene hybrid nanocatalysts. After that, the Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped hybrid suspension was dropped on glassy carbon electrode for sensing rutin. In this way, the dispersed carboxyl units of B-doped graphene can form hydrogen bonding with the phenolic hydroxyl groups of rutin, making rutin enrich easily on modified electrode surface to enhance the electrochemical response. At the same time, its electrochemical mechanism on the modified electrode was elucidated using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that its electrochemical behavior on modified electrode surface was a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process, and the charge transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer number (n) were 0.296 and 2, respectively. This electrochemical sensor for rutin provided a wide linear response range of 2.00 × 10-9-4.00 × 10-6 M with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 2.84 × 10-10 M. The proposed method was applied successfully to selective determination of rutin in Tablets with acceptable recovery range (97.23-101.65%).

    20. Medium-sized Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters with distinct gold-kernel structures and spectroscopic features

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Xu, Wen Wu; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

      2016-01-01

      We have analyzed the structures of two medium-sized thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles (RS-AuNPs) Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 and identified the distinct structural features in their Au kernels [Sci. Adv., 2015, 1, e1500425]. We find that both Au kernels of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters can be classified as interpenetrating cuboctahedra. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs with the cuboctahedral kernel are collected and then compared with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs of two other prevailing Au-kernels identified from previous experiments, namely the Ino-decahedral kernel and icosahedral kernel. The distinct X-ray diffraction patterns of RS-AuNPs with the three different types of Au-kernels can be utilized as signature features for future studies of structures of RS-AuNPs. Moreover, the simulated UV/Vis absorption spectra and Kohn-Sham orbital energy-level diagrams are obtained for the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32, on the basis of time-dependent density functional theory computation. The extrapolated optical band-edges of Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 are 1.1 eV and 1.25 eV, respectively. The feature peaks in the UV/Vis absorption spectra of the two clusters can be attributed to the d --> sp electronic transition. Lastly, the catalytic activities of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 are examined using CO oxidation as a probe. Both medium-sized thiolate-protected gold clusters can serve as effective stand-alone nanocatalysts.We have analyzed the structures of two medium-sized thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles (RS-AuNPs) Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 and identified the distinct structural features in their Au kernels [Sci. Adv., 2015, 1, e1500425]. We find that both Au kernels of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters can be classified as interpenetrating cuboctahedra. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs with the cuboctahedral kernel are collected and then compared with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-Au

    1. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

      2012-08-01

      Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

    2. Theoretical studies of acrolein hydrogenation on Au20 nanoparticle

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Li, Zhe; Chen, Zhao-Xu; He, Xiang; Kang, Guo-Jun

      2010-05-01

      Gold nanoparticles play a key role in catalytic processes. We investigated the kinetics of stepwise hydrogenation of acrolein on Au20 cluster model and compared with that on Au(110) surface. The rate-limiting step barrier of CC reduction is about 0.5 eV higher than that of CO hydrogenation on Au(110) surface. On Au20 nanoparticle, however, the energy barrier of the rate-determining step for CC hydrogenation turns out to be slightly lower than the value for the CO reduction. The selectivity difference on the two substrate models are attributed to different adsorption modes of acrolein: via the CC on Au20, compared to through both CC and CO on Au(110). The preference switch implies that the predicted selectivity of competitive hydrogenation depends on substrate model sensitively, and particles with more low-coordinated Au atoms than flat surfaces are favorable for CC hydrogenation, which is in agreement with experimental result.

    3. Corrosion behavior and microstructures of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

      PubMed

      Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

      2004-06-01

      Anodic polarization was performed in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions to characterize the relationship between the corrosion behavior and microstructures of cast Ti-Au (5-40%) alloys. An abrupt increase in the current density occurred at approximately 0.6 V vs. SCE for the 30% and 40% Au alloys in the 0.9% NaCl solution. The microstructures after corrosion testing indicated that this breakdown may have been caused by the preferential dissolution of the Ti3Au. However, the potential for preferential dissolution was higher than the breakdown potential of stainless steel or Co-Cr alloy, which meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was superior. In 1% lactic acid solution, the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was excellent, with no breakdown at any composition. In the present test solutions, the Ti-Au alloys up to 20% Au had good corrosion resistance comparable to that for pure titanium.

    4. African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development. Report and Recommendations = Colloque regional africain la telematique au service du developpement. Rapport et recommandations (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, April 3-7, 1995).

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      International Telecommunication Union, Geneva (Switzerland).

      The African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development was organized in view of the special educational and communication needs of Africa in a time of accelerating change and development of information technologies. The symposium brought together more than 150 African specialists, and over 40 participants from other regions and development…

    5. A Cappella: A Report on the Realities, Concerns, Expectations and Barriers Experienced by Adolescent Women in Canada = A Cappella: Rapport sur les realites, preoccupations, attentes et obstacles que connaissent les adolescentes au Canada.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Canadian Teachers' Federation, Ottawa (Ontario).

      In the spring of 1990 a project was undertaken in Canada to document the major concerns and perceptions of adolescent women; to supplement the words of adolescent women with brief summaries of current knowledge; to use the words of adolescent women and the additional knowledge gathered to provide information to young women on issues which are of…

    6. EXAFS and XANES structural characterization of bimetallic AuPd vapor derived catalysts

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Balerna, A.; Evangelisti, C.; Schiavi, E.; Vitulli, G.; Bertinetti, L.; Martra, G.; Mobilio, S.

      2013-04-01

      Using an innovative procedure known as metal vapor synthesis (MVS) to prepare bimetallic catalysts, starting from Au and Pd vapors, [AuPd] co-evaporated and [Au][Pd] separately evaporated bimetallic catalysts were achieved. After being tested, the catalytic activity and selectivity of the [AuPd] catalyst turned out to be higher than the [Au][Pd] ones. Using EXAFS spectroscopy it was shown that, in the [AuPd] samples, small bimetallic AuPd nanoparticles were present, having an Au rich core surrounded by an AuPd alloyed shell while in the [Au][Pd] sample there was the presence of monometallic Au and Pd nanoparticles showing some alloying only in the boundary regions. The EXAFS results were also qualitatively confirmed by the XANES spectra.

    7. Crystal Structure of the PdAu24(SR)180 Superatom

      PubMed Central

      Tofanelli, Marcus A.; Ni, Thomas W.; Phillips, Billy D.

      2016-01-01

      The single-crystal x-ray structure of Pd doped Au25(SR)18 was solved. The crystal structure reveals that in PdAu24(SR)18, the Pd atom is localized only to the centroid of the Au25(SR)18 cluster. This single crystal x-ray structure shows that PdAu24(SR)180 is well conceptualized with superatom theory. The PdAu24(SR)180 charge state is structurally isoelectronic with Au25(SR)18+1 as determined by a first order Jahn-Teller effect of similar magnitude and by electrochemical comparison. The previously reported increased stability of PdAu24(SR)18 can be rationalized in terms of Pd-Au bonds that are shorter than the Au-Au bonds in Au25(SR)18. PMID:26760220

    8. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Au-based monolayer derivatives in honeycomb structure

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

      2016-05-01

      We present electronic properties of atomic layer of Au, Au2-N, Au2-O and Au2-F in graphene-like structure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The lattice constant of derived monolayers are found to be higher than the pristine Au monolayer. Au monolayer is metallic in nature with quantum ballistic conductance calculated as 4G0. Similarly, Au2-N and Au2-F monolayers show 4G0 and 2G0 quantum conductance respectively while semiconducting nature with calculated band gap of 0.28 eV has been observed for Au2-O monolayer. Most interestingly, half metalicity has been predicted for Au2-N and Au2-F monolayers. Our findings may have importance for the application of these monolayers in nanoelectronic and spintronics.

    9. Controlling Au Photodeposition on Large ZnO Nanoparticles.

      PubMed

      Fernando, Joseph F S; Shortell, Matthew P; Noble, Christopher J; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Jaatinen, Esa A; Waclawik, Eric R

      2016-06-08

      This study investigated how to control the rate of photoreduction of metastable AuCl2(-) at the solid-solution interface of large ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (50-100 nm size). Band-gap photoexcitation of electronic charge in ZnO by 370 nm UV light yielded Au NP deposition and the formation of ZnO-Au NP hybrids. Au NP growth was observed to be nonepitaxial, and the patterns of Au photodeposition onto ZnO NPs observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were consistent with reduction of AuCl2(-) at ZnO facet edges and corner sites. Au NP photodeposition was effective in the presence of labile oleylamine ligands attached to the ZnO surface; however, when a strong-binding dodecanethiol ligand coated the surface, photodeposition was quenched. Rates of interfacial electron transfer at the ZnO-solution interface were adjusted by changing the solvent, and these rates were observed to strongly depend on the solvent's permittivity (ε) and viscosity. From measurements of electron transfer from ZnO to the organic dye toluidine blue at the ZnO-solution interface, it was confirmed that low ε solvent mixtures (ε ≈ 9.5) possessed markedly higher rates of photocatalytic interfacial electron transfer (∼3.2 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)) compared to solvent mixtures with high ε (ε = 29.9, ∼1.9 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)). Dissolved oxygen content in the solvent and the exposure time of ZnO to band-gap, near-UV photoexcitation were also identified as factors that strongly affected Au photodeposition behavior. Production of Au clusters was favored under conditions that caused electron accumulation in the ZnO-Au NP hybrid. Under conditions where electron discharge was rapid (such as in low ε solvents), AuCl2(-) precursor ions photoreduced at ZnO surfaces in less than 5 s, leading to deposition of several small, isolated ∼6 nm Au NP on the ZnO host instead.

    10. AuScope VLBI Project and Hobart 26-m Antenna

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Lovell, Jim; Dickey, John; Reid, Brett; McCallum, Jamie; Shabala, Stas; Watson, Christopher; Ellingsen, Simon; Memin, Anthony

      2013-01-01

      This is a report on the activities carried out at the three AuScope VLBI observatories and the Hobart 26-m antenna. In 2012 the three AuScope 12-m antennas at Hobart (Hb), Katherine (Ke), and Yarragadee (Yg) completed their first full year of operations as an array. The Hobart 26-m antenna (Ho) continued to make a contribution to IVS, providing overlap with the Hb time series. In total the AuScope antennas and the Hobart 26 m observed for 146 antenna days in 2012. In this report we also briefly highlight our research activities during 2012 and our plans for 2013.

    11. Au plasmonics in a WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} photocatalyst for significantly enhanced hydrogen generation

      SciTech Connect

      Cheng, Zhongzhou; Wang, Zhenxing E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Zhan, Xueying; Xu, Kai; He, Jun E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Liu, Quanlin

      2015-11-30

      Promoting the activities of photocatalysts is still the critical challenge in H{sub 2} generation area. Here, a Au plasmon enhanced photocatalyst of WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} is developed by inserting Au nanoparticles between WS{sub 2} nanotubes and CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles. Due to the localized surface plasmonic resonance properties from Au nanoparticles, WS{sub 2}-Au-CIS shows the best performance as compared to Au-CIS, CIS, WS{sub 2}-CIS, CIS-Au, WS{sub 2}-Au, and WS{sub 2}-CIS-Au. The surface plasmonic resonance effects dramatically intensify the absorption of visible light and help to inject hot electrons into the semiconductors. Our findings open up an efficient method to optimize the type-II structures for photocatalytic water splitting.

    12. FT-ICR/MS and ab initio study of polynuclear Au and Au-Cu clusters in aqueous fluids

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lemke, K.; Tse, K.; Sadjadi, A.

      2011-12-01

      The geochemistry and transport of aqueous transition metals such as copper and gold in the Earth's crust is still poorly known. FT-ICR mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations can provide fundamental insight on a molecular-scale level into the structure, stability and abundance of relevant Cu and Au species. We have measured high temperature ion cluster mass spectra of aqueous gold and copper chloride solutions using a custom-modified FT-ICR mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. In pure dilute aqueous AuCl3 solutions (1-25mM), Au(III) is present as an ion complex [AuCl2]+ and is hydrated with up to four water molecules, with the trihydrate [AuCl2]+(H2O)3 being the most stable species. In addition, several polynuclear ion clusters were observed, e.g. the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, including the hydrated forms [Au2Cl5]+(H2O) and [Au2Cl5]+(H2O)2. In more concentrated AuCl3 solutions (100mM, pH=2.3) the protonated Zundel cation [H5O2]+, [H7O3]+ and Eigen cation [H9O4]+ were detected, suggesting that protonated water clusters are equally relevant species in crustal fluids. We also measured mass spectra of binary solutions of aqueous transition metals, i.e. CuCl2/AuCl3 (5mM) and detected mixed Au(III)/Cu(II)-chloro clusters up to the tetranuclear [AuCu3Cl8]+ ion and their hydrated forms. The ab initio component of this study was designed to deliver additional insight into the structure of individual transition metal clusters as well as to the relative stability of each species, both unhydrated and in the presence of water molecules. Ab initio calculations were first conducted using MP2 theory and results thereof were then applied as starting points for subsequent couple-cluster CCSD(T) theory calculations. For the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, for example, the MP2 global minimum is a planar structure (see Figure; A) with an Au-Au bond distance of 3.435Å, while the second isomer (see Figure; B) has an Au-Au bond distance of 3.588Å and is around

    13. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

      SciTech Connect

      Adamczyk, L.

      2015-04-01

      We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

    14. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

      DOE PAGES

      Adamczyk, L.

      2015-04-01

      We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

    15. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form.

      PubMed

      Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ford, Michael J; Halder, Arnab; Ulstrup, Jens; Hush, Noel S

      2016-03-15

      The synthetic chemistry and spectroscopy of sulfur-protected gold surfaces and nanoparticles is analyzed, indicating that the electronic structure of the interface is Au(0)-thiyl, with Au(I)-thiolates identified as high-energy excited surface states. Density-functional theory indicates that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method for quantifying these contributions is presented, revealing that a driving force for nanoparticle growth is nobleization, minimizing Au(I)-thiolate involvement. Predictions that Brust-Schiffrin reactions involve thiolate anion intermediates are verified spectroscopically, establishing a key feature needed to understand nanoparticle growth. Mixing of preprepared Au(I) and thiolate reactants always produces Au(I)-thiolate thin films or compounds rather than monolayers. Smooth links to O, Se, Te, C, and N linker chemistry are established.

    16. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of CeAu 4Si 2 and CeAu 2Si 2

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sefat, Athena S.; Palasyuk, Andriy M.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Corbett, John D.; Canfield, Paul C.

      2008-02-01

      Single crystals of CeAu 4Si 2 and CeAu 2Si 2 have been grown out of ternary fluxes rich in Au, and the former, also by sintering the stoichiometric composition at 750 °C. The single-crystal X-ray refinement result for CeAu 4Si 2 is orthorhombic, Cmmm (No. 65, Z=2), different from a tetragonal result found from an X-ray powder diffraction refinement [H. Nakashima, et al., J. Alloys Compds. 424 (2006) 7]. For CeAu 2Si 2, this is the first report of the stoichiometric crystalline phase, in the known tetragonal I4/ mmm structure. The anisotropic field- and temperature-dependent magnetizations, as well as specific heat and resistivity data are compared. Although both compounds have related structural packing, they present unique magnetic features. CeAu 2Si 2 is a typical antiferromagnet with TN=8.8(1) K and CeAu 4Si 2 features a ferromagnetic component below Tc=3.3(1) K. Both phases have effective moments close in value to that of free Ce 3+.

    17. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of CsAu4Si2 and CeAu2Si2

      SciTech Connect

      Sefat, A.; Palasyuk, A.; Bud'ko, S.; Corbett, J.; Canfield, P.

      2007-12-03

      Single crystals of CeAu{sub 4}Si{sub 2} and CeAu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been grown out of ternary fluxes rich in Au, and the former, also by sintering the stoichiometric composition at 750 C. The single-crystal X-ray refinement result for CeAu{sub 4}Si{sub 2} is orthorhombic, Cmmm (No. 65, Z=2), different from a tetragonal result found from an X-ray powder diffraction refinement [H. Nakashima, et al., J. Alloys Compds. 424 (2006) 7]. For CeAu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, this is the first report of the stoichiometric crystalline phase, in the known tetragonal I4/mmm structure. The anisotropic field- and temperature-dependent magnetizations, as well as specific heat and resistivity data are compared. Although both compounds have related structural packing, they present unique magnetic features. CeAu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is a typical antiferromagnet with T{sub N} = 8.8(1) K and CeAu{sub 4}Si{sub 2} features a ferromagnetic component below T{sub c}=3.3(1) K. Both phases have effective moments close in value to that of free Ce{sup 3+}.

    18. Effects of Au layer thickness and number of bilayers on the properties of Au/ZnO multilayers

      SciTech Connect

      Cespedes, Eva; Prieto, Carlos; Babonneau, David; Sousa Meneses, Domingos de; Fonda, Emiliano; Lyon, Olivier; Briand, Emrick; Traverse, Agnes

      2011-05-01

      Multilayered films of Au/ZnO were prepared by physical vapor deposition. Varying the Au thickness, t{sub Au}, and the number of bilayers, n, allowed us to investigate the role of these parameters on the sample structural and electronic properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments, have been combined to UV-visible and infrared spectroscopy to characterize the multilayers in the as-prepared state and after annealing. In the as-prepared state, the strong Au and ZnO lattice interaction leads to ZnO epitaxy on Au. Gold appears either as continuous layers or in form of nanoparticles. ZnO experiences a structural transformation from wurztite to rock salt monitored by the Au morphology. Annealing at 500 deg. C destroys the lattice matching. The electronic and optical properties of the systems are understood in line with the Au morphology and ZnO structural state.

    19. Characterization of Pt-Au and Ni-Au Clusters on TiO2(110)

      SciTech Connect

      S Tenney; W He; J Ratliff; D Mullins; D Chen

      2011-12-31

      The surface composition and properties of Pt-Au and Ni-Au clusters on TiO{sub 2}(110) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS). STM studies show that bimetallic clusters are formed during sequential deposition of the two metals, regardless of the order of deposition. At the 2 ML of Au/2 ML of Pt or Ni coverages studied here, the second metal contributes to the growth of existing clusters rather than forming new pure metal clusters. LEIS experiments demonstrate that the surfaces of the bimetallic clusters are almost 100% Au when 2 ML of Au is deposited on top of 2 ML of Pt or Ni. However, a much larger fraction of Pt or Ni (50 and 20%, respectively) remains at the surface when 2 ML of Pt or Ni is deposited on 2 ML of Au, most likely due to limited diffusion of atoms within the clusters at room temperature. According to sXPS investigations, the binding energies of the metals in the bimetallic clusters are shifted from those observed for pure metal clusters; the Pt(4f{sub 7/2}) and Ni(3p{sub 3/2}) peaks are shifted to lower binding energies while the position of the Au(4f{sub 7/2}) peak is dominated by surface core level shifts. Pure Pt clusters as well as 0.4 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters reduce the titania support upon encapsulation after annealing to 800 K, whereas 2 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters do not reduce titania, presumably because there is no Pt at the surface of the clusters. Pure Ni clusters are also known to become encapsulated upon heating, but the reduction of titania is much less extensive compared to that of pure Pt clusters.

    20. Recherche de leptons lourds au LEP 2

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Tafirout, Reda

      En 1989, la mise en opération de la première phase du LEP (le LEP 1), au CERN, a une Energie correspondant a la résonance du boson Z0, a permis d'étudier et de confirmer avec une grande précision le Modèle Standard des interactions électrofaibles. Malgré le succès remarquable de ce modèle à décrire toutes les données expérimentales recueillies jusqu'à ce jour en physique des hautes énergies, ce dernier laisse plusieurs questions sans réponse. Il n'explique pas entre autres pourquoi il n'y a que trois familles de particules dont le neutrino associé est léger et la hiérarchie des masses observées des fermions reste une énigme. Ici, nous nous intéressons à l'existence éventuelle de nouveaux fermions, tels que prédits par des extensions du Modèle Standard. Ces nouveaux fermions ont été recherches au LEP 1, mais en vain, et une limite inférieure sur leur masse d'environ MZ/2 a pu être imposée. La deuxième phase du LEP (le LEP 2) qui a débuté dans l'automne 1995 avec une énergie disponible de √s = 130, et 136 GeV, puis dans l'été 1996 a √s = 161 GeV a permis d'améliorer ces limites. Nous présentons ici la recherche de leptons lourds, neutres (N) et chargés (L+/-), effectuée à partir des données recueillies dans l'automne 1996 avec le détecteur de la collaboration OPAL au LEP 2, à des énergies au centre de masse de √s = 170 et 172 GeV. La luminosité totale intégrée fut de 10.3 pb-1. Un nouveau générateur, EXOTIC, conçu et développé a cette fin, a été utilise pour la simulation des échantillons d'événements Monte Carlo qui ont servi à comparer les données obtenues avec les prédictions théoriques. Plus spécifiquement, nous avons recherché le processus e+e- --> NN où N, pouvant être de type Dirac ou Majorana, se désintègre en un lepton léger standard (e, μ, ou τ) et un boson W+/- virtuel (W+/-*). Pour un N de type Dirac, une limite inférieure sur la masse à 95% de niveau de confiance est obtenue

    1. The AuScope geodetic VLBI array

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Reid, P. B.; McCulloch, P. M.; Baynes, B. E.; Dickey, J. M.; Shabala, S. S.; Watson, C. S.; Titov, O.; Ruddick, R.; Twilley, R.; Reynolds, C.; Tingay, S. J.; Shield, P.; Adada, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Morgan, J. S.; Bignall, H. E.

      2013-06-01

      The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12-m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia, will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate. In this paper, we present a description of this new infrastructure and present some initial results, including telescope performance measurements and positions of the telescopes in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. We show that this array is already capable of achieving centimetre precision over typical long-baselines and that network and reference source systematic effects must be further improved to reach the ambitious goals of VLBI2010.

    2. Evaluation of the Olympus AU-510 analyser.

      PubMed

      Farré, C; Velasco, J; Ramón, F

      1991-01-01

      The selective multitest Olympus AU-510 analyser was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Comision de Instrumentacion de la Sociedad Española de Quimica Clinica and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: an examination of the analytical units and then an evaluation in routine work conditions. The operational characteristics of the system were also studied.THE FIRST STAGE INCLUDED A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY: dependent on the absorbance, the inaccuracy varies between +0.5% to -0.6% at 405 nm and from -5.6% to 10.6% at 340 nm; the imprecision ranges between -0.22% and 0.56% at 405 nm and between 0.09% and 2.74% at 340 nm. Linearity was acceptable, apart from a very low absorbance for NADH at 340 nm; and the imprecision of the serum sample pipetter was satisfactory.TWELVE SERUM ANALYTES WERE STUDIED UNDER ROUTINE CONDITIONS: glucose, urea urate, cholesterol, triglycerides, total bilirubin, creatinine, phosphate, iron, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.The within-run imprecision (CV%) ranged from 0.67% for phosphate to 2.89% for iron and the between-run imprecision from 0.97% for total bilirubin to 7.06% for iron. There was no carryover in a study of the serum sample pipetter. Carry-over studies with the reagent and sample pipetters shows some cross contamination in the iron assay.

    3. Metanephrine neuroendocrine tumor marker detection by SERS using Au nanoparticle/Au film sandwich architecture.

      PubMed

      Boca, Sanda; Farcau, Cosmin; Baia, Monica; Astilean, Simion

      2016-02-01

      Neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, are dangerous tumors that constitute a potential threat for a large number of patients. Currently, the biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors is based on measurement of the direct secretory products of the adrenomedullary-sympathetic system or of their metabolites, such as catecholamines or their metanephrine derivatives, from plasma or urine. The techniques used for analysis of plasma free metanephrines, i.e. high-performance liquid chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry are technically-demanding and time consuming, which limit their availability. Here we demonstrate a simple, fast and low-cost method for detecting metanephrine by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The protocol consists in using evaporation-induced self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles incubated with the analyte, on planar gold films. The assembly process produces regions with a dense distribution of both inter-particle gaps and particle-film gaps. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that both kinds of gaps are locations of enhanced electromagnetic fields resulting from inter-particle and particle-film plasmonic coupling, useful for SERS amplification. Metanephrine vibrational bands assignment was performed according to density functional theory calculations. Metanephrine metabolite was detected in liquid at concentration levels lower than previously reported for other similar metabolites. The obtained results demonstrate that the Au nanoparticle/Au film exhibits noticeable SERS amplification of the adsorbed metabolite and can be used in the design of efficient, stable SERS-active substrates for the detection and identification of specific tumor markers.

    4. Ethylene binding to Au/Cu alloy nanoparticles

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gammage, Michael D.; Stauffer, Shannon; Henkelman, Graeme; Becker, Michael F.; Keto, John W.; Kovar, Desiderio

      2016-11-01

      Weak chemisorption of ethylene has been shown to be an important characteristic in the use of metals for the separation of ethylene from ethane. Previously, density functional theory (DFT) has been used to predict the binding energies of various metals and alloys, with Ag having the lowest chemisorption energy amongst the metals and alloys studied. Here Au/Cu alloys are investigated by a combination of DFT calculations and experimental measurements. It is inferred from experiments that the binding energy between a Au/Cu alloy and ethylene is lower than to either of the pure metals, and DFT calculations confirm that this is the case when Au segregates to the particle surface. Implications of this work suggest that it may be possible to further tune the binding energy with ethylene by compositional and morphological control of films produced from Au-surface segregated alloys.

    5. Tunable optical properties of nano-Au on vanadium dioxide

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Xu, Gang; Huang, Chun-Ming; Tazawa, Masato; Jin, Ping; Chen, Li-Hua

      2009-03-01

      The optical properties of Au nanoparticles deposited on thermochromic thin films of VO2 are investigated using spectroscopy. A localized modification on the transmittance spectrum of VO2 film is formed due to the presence of Au nanoparticles which exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the visible-near IR region. The position of the modification wavelength region shows a strong dependence on the Au mass thickness and shifts toward the red as it increases. On the other hand, it was found that the LSPR of Au nanoparticles can be thermally tunable because of the thermochromism of the supporting material of VO2. The LSPR wavelength, λSPR, shifts to the blue with increasing temperature, and shifts back to the red as temperature decreases. A fine tuning is achieved when the temperature is increased in a stepwise manner.

    6. Solvent: A Key in Digestive Ripening for Monodisperse Au Nanoparticles

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Peng; Qi, Xuan; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Tieqiang; Li, Yunong; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Shuang; Zhou, Jun; Fu, Yu

      2017-01-01

      This work has mainly investigated the influence of the solvent on the nanoparticles distribution in digestive ripening. The experiments suggested that the solvents played a key role in digestive ripening of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). For the benzol solvents, the resulting size distribution of Au NPs was inversely related to the solvent polarity. It may be interpreted by the low Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles in the high polarity medium, which was supposedly in favor of reducing the nanoparticles distribution. Through digestive ripening in the highly polar benzol solvent of p-chlorotoluene, monodisperse Au NPs with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.8% were achieved. This indicated that digestive ripening was an effective and practical way to prepare high-quality nanoparticles, which holds great promise for the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

    7. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

      PubMed Central

      Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

      2016-01-01

      In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

    8. Dynamic features of rod-shaped Au nanoclusters

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      So, Woong Young; Das, Anindita; Wang, Shuxin; Zhao, Shuo; Byun, Hee Young; Lee, Dana; Kumar, Santosh; Jin, Rongchao; Peteanu, Linda A.

      2015-08-01

      Gold nanoclusters hold many potential applications such as biosensing and optics due to their emission characteristics, small size, and non-toxicity. However, their low quantum yields remain problematic for further applications, and their fluorescence mechanism is still unclear. To increase the low quantum yields, various methods have been performed: doping, tuning structures, and changing number of gold atoms. In the past, most characterizations have been performed on spherical shaped nanoclusters; in this paper, several characterizations of various rod-shaped Au nanoclusters specifically on Au25 are shown. It has been determined that the central gold atom in Au25 nano-rod is crucial in fluorescence. Furthermore, single molecule analysis of silver doped Au25 nano-rod revealed that it has more photo-stability than conjugated polymers and quantum dots.

    9. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

      DOE PAGES

      Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; ...

      2016-05-26

      In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), displaymore » less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.« less

    10. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

      SciTech Connect

      Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

      2016-05-26

      In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

    11. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

      2016-05-01

      In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

    12. Intrinsic spin Seebeck effect in Au/YIG.

      PubMed

      Qu, D; Huang, S Y; Hu, Jun; Wu, Ruqian; Chien, C L

      2013-02-08

      The acute magnetic proximity effects in Pt/YIG compromise the suitability of Pt as a spin current detector. We show that Au/YIG, with no anomalous Hall effect and a negligible magnetoresistance, allows the measurements of the intrinsic spin Seebeck effect with a magnitude much smaller than that in Pt/YIG. The experiment results are consistent with the spin polarized density functional calculations for Pt with a sizable and Au with a negligible magnetic moment near the interface with YIG.

    13. Melting curve of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Tam, Pham Dinh; Hoc, Nguyen Quang; Tinh, Bui Duc; Tan, Pham Duy

      2016-01-01

      In this paper, the dependence of the melting temperature of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure in the interval from 0 kbar to 40 kbar is studied by the statistical moment method (SMM). This dependence has the form of near linearity and the calculated slopes of melting curve are 3.9 for Cu, 5.7 for Ag and 6 for Au. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

    14. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

      SciTech Connect

      Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

      2016-01-12

      Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.

    15. Synthetic routes to [Au(NHC)(OH)] (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) complexes.

      PubMed

      Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Ramón, Rubén S; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

      2012-05-14

      New procedures for the synthesis of [Au(NHC)(OH)] are reported. Initially, a two-step reaction via the digold complex [{Au(NHC)}(2)(μ-OH)][BF(4)] was probed, enabling the preparation of the novel [Au(SIPr)(OH)] complex and of its previously reported congener [Au(IPr)(OH)]. After further optimization, a one-step procedure was developed.

    16. Derivatives of the thiolate-protected gold cluster Au25(SR)18 -1

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Häkkinen, H.

      2011-07-01

      Loss of small fragments (like AuL, Au2L3, Au4L4) have been found systematically in several MALDI and FAB experiments on thiolate-protected gold clusters of different sizes. When using the cluster Au25L18 -1 as parent cluster, the fragmented cluster Au21L14 -1 has been reported to be obtained in high proportion (L = SCH2CH2Ph). Here we analyse a few possible fragmentation patterns of the well-known parent cluster Au25L18 -1 (L = SCH3). Using DFT calculations we study the different atomic configurations obtained after a AuL fragment is lost from Au25L18 -1. We found energetically favourable configurations that can be written as Au13 [Au2L3]6- z [AuL2] z -1, where the modification can be described as a replacement of the long protecting unit by a short one (Au2L3 → AuL2). A full replacement ( z = 6) gives rise to a protected Au19L12 -1 cluster. This mechanism does not modify the super-atomic electronic structure of the gold core, i.e., all these fragments remain an 8 electron super-atom clusters exactly like the parent Au25L18 -1. We suggest that the Au19L12 -1 cluster could be realized by using a bulky thiolate, such as the tert-butyl thiolate SC(CH3)3.

    17. On the stability of AuFe alloy nanoparticles.

      PubMed

      Velasco, V; Pohl, D; Surrey, A; Bonatto-Minella, A; Hernando, A; Crespo, P; Rellinghaus, B

      2014-05-30

      AuFe nanoparticles with mean diameters d p  = 13.2 nm have been prepared by inert-gas condensation. Conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy investigations show that the particles are mostly icosahedra. Scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy-loss spectroscopy show that the as-grown particles exhibit a core-shell structure. The shell is mainly composed of an amorphous FeO layer. Although Fe and Au are immiscible in the bulk, the particle cores are found to be homogeneously mixed at the atomic level with a local composition of around Au84Fe16 (at.%). AuFe nanoparticles exhibit a complex magnetic structure in which the core behaves as a spin glass with a freezing temperature of 35 K, whereas the amorphous FeO shell behaves as a ferro-ferrimagnetic system. On annealing above 300 °C, the AuFe icosahedra phases separate into their elemental constituents. Hence the as-grown AuFe icosahedra are metastable, thereby implying that the bulk phase diagram also applies for nanoscopic materials.

    18. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

      SciTech Connect

      De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

      2011-08-30

      Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

    19. Interfacial reactions in the Sn-Ag/Au couples

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chen, Sinn-Wen; Yen, Yee-Wen

      2001-09-01

      Ag-Sn alloys are one of the most promising lead-free solders. Their reactions with Au substrates have been examined by using the reaction couple technique. Sn-3.5wt.%Ag/Au and Sn-25wt.%Ag/Au couples have been prepared and reacted at 120, 150, 180 and 200 C for various lengths of time. Three phases, δ-AuSn, ɛ2-AuSn2, and η-AuSn4, are found in all the couples. The thickness of the reaction layers inccreases with higher temperatures and longer reaction time, and their growth rates are described by using the parabolic law. Arrhenius equation is used to describe the temperature dependence of the growth rates. The activation energy of the growth of the intermetallic layers in both kinds of the reaction couples is similar and is determined to be 76.74 KJ/mole. Based on the reaction path knowledge and interfacial morphology, it is concluded that Sn is the fastest diffusion species in the couples.

    20. Structural and dynamical properties of liquid Al-Au alloys

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Peng, H. L.; Voigtmann, Th.; Kolland, G.; Kobatake, H.; Brillo, J.

      2015-11-01

      We investigate temperature- and composition-dependent structural and dynamical properties of Al-Au melts. Experiments are performed to obtain accurate density and viscosity data. The system shows a strong negative excess volume, similar to other Al-based binary alloys. We develop a molecular-dynamics (MD) model of the melt based on the embedded-atom method (EAM), gauged against the available experimental liquid-state data. A rescaling of previous EAM potentials for solid-state Au and Al improves the quantitative agreement with experimental data in the melt. In the MD simulation, the admixture of Au to Al can be interpreted as causing a local compression of the less dense Al system, driven by less soft Au-Au interactions. This local compression provides a microscopic mechanism explaining the strong negative excess volume of the melt. We further discuss the concentration dependence of self- and interdiffusion and viscosity in the MD model. Al atoms are more mobile than Au, and their increased mobility is linked to a lower viscosity of the melt.

    1. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

      SciTech Connect

      Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

      2010-05-23

      Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

    2. A first look at Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies using the PHOBOS detector.

      SciTech Connect

      Back, B. B.; George, N.; Wousmaa, A. H.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics

      2003-05-01

      The PHOBOS detector has been used to study Au + Au collisions at {radical}sNN = 56,130, and 200 GeV Several global observables have been measured and the results are compared with theoretical models. These observables include the charged-particle multiplicity measured as a function of beam energy, pseudo-rapidity, and centrality of the collision. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its almost complete angular coverage such that these quantities can be studied over a pseudo-rapidity interval of |{eta}|{<=}5.4. This allows for an almost complete integration of the total charged particle yield, which is found to be about N{sub ch}{sup tot} = 4200 {+-}470 at {radical}sNN = 130 GeV and N{sub ch}{sup tot} = 5300 {+-}530 at {radical}sNN = 200 GeV. The ratio of anti-particles to particles emitted in the mid-rapidity region has also been measured using the PHOBOS magnetic spectrometer. Of particular interest is the ratio of anti-protons to protons in the mid-rapidity region, which was found to be (i.e.921-1) at {radical}sNN = 130 GeV. This high value suggests that an almost baryon-free region has been produced in the collisions.

    3. QUELS FUTURS TRAITEMENTS POUR LA DEPENDANCE AU TABAC ET AU CANNABIS?

      PubMed Central

      LE FOLL, Bernard; JUSTINOVA, Zuzana; TANDA, Gianlugi; GOLDBERG, Steven R.

      2009-01-01

      RESUME Plus de trois millions de morts sont attribués au tabagisme dans le monde par an, et l’usage de tabac est en progression dans les pays en voie de développement. L’usage de tabac est donc une des rares causes de mortalité qui augmente, avec une prévision de plus de 10 millions de morts par an dans 30–40 ans. Le cannabis ou marijuana est la drogue illicite la plus consommée dans le monde et il n’y a actuellement pas de traitement disponible. Bien que les systèmes dopaminergiques jouent un rôle central dans les effets renforçants des drogues, d’autres systèmes sont impliqués. Nous présentons ici des résultats récents obtenus avec des antagonistes des récepteurs cannabinoides CB1, des récepteurs D3 de la dopamine et des récepteurs opioïdes. Ces antagonistes qui modulent de façon directe ou indirecte la transmission dopaminergique cérébrale représentent des approches prometteuses pour le traitement du tabagisme ou de la dépendance au cannabis. Ces approches sont à valider dans des essais cliniques. PMID:18663981

    4. Dilepton Results from HADES Using Au+Au Data at 1.23 AGeV

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Franco, C.

      The High Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI was designed to investigate the properties of hadrons inside dense nuclear matter. The latter is created in heavy-ion collisions at energies of 1-2 AGeV. HADES is currently the only running experiment that studies the region in the QCD phase diagram of very high net-baryon densities and low temperatures. Similar conditions are also present in one of the most fascinating objects of the universe: the neutron stars. Therefore, HADES has also the potential to improve our knowledge concerning the properties of such stars. The best probes that one can use to investigate a strongly interacting baryon-rich medium are the dileptons emerging from virtual photon decays. Since electromagnetic probes decouple from the dense interaction region once they are produced, their phase space distributions carry information about the temperature and structure of the dense QCD medium. Preliminary dilepton results from the Au+Au data of HADES at 1.23 AGeV will be presented. The analysis method will also be discussed.

    5. Coherent electron-positron pair production in ultra-peripheral AuAu collisions at STAR

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Rehbein, Matthew; STAR Collaboration

      2016-09-01

      The focus of this study is coherent photoproduction of electron-positron pairs in 200 GeV ultraperipheral AuAu collisions detected by STAR, with an integrated luminosity of 1.9 inverse nanobarns. Because hadronic interactions are suppressed in ultra-peripheral collisions, these events provide an opportunity to study purely electromagnetic interaction in the non-perturbative regime. This presentation will provide a description of the techniques used to select exclusive electron-positron events, as well as the resulting kinematic distributions for pair invariant mass greater than 0.35 GeV, pair transverse momentum less than 0.1 GeV, and absolute value of pair pseudorapidity less than 0.8. Efficiency correction techniques will also be discussed. In previous measurements at the same energy at STAR, the shape of the transverse momentum distribution could not be fully described by the equivalent photon approximation (EPA). Measurements at the LHC indicate that the cross section is reduced by approximately 25 percent compared to the EPA. This study ultimately seeks to examine these effects in more detail at RHIC energies. Partial funding provided by DOE Grant #DE-FG02-96ER40991.

    6. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

      2016-03-01

      We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

    7. PHENIX results on low-mass dileptons in Au + Au collisions with the Hadron Blind Detector

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Makek, M.

      2016-12-01

      We present e+e- continuum measurement in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV from the RHIC 2010 run with the Hadron Blind Detector upgrade of PHENIX. The measurement reaches a high purity of the electron sample of ≥ 95% at all centralities and provides an excellent qualitative and quantitative understanding of the background. The e+e- invariant yields show an enhancement in the low-mass region (mee = 0.30 - 0.76 GeV /c2) compared to the expectations from hadronic sources, but not as large as the one previously reported by PHENIX. The observed excess is well reproduced by models incorporating the broadening of the ρ meson due to scattering off baryons in the hot hadronic gas. The measured invariant yields in the intermediate-mass region (mee = 1.2 - 2.8 GeV /c2) leave room for additional sources when compared to the cocktail dominated by the semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons.

    8. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

      SciTech Connect

      Adamczyk, L.

      2015-11-24

      Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

    9. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

      DOE PAGES

      Adamczyk, L.

      2015-11-24

      Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

    10. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U+U and Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

      PubMed

      Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, H Z; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, C; Li, Z M; Li, X; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, L; Ma, R; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B J; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, G; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Q H; Xu, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J; Zhang, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

      2015-11-27

      Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v_{2}{2} and v_{2}{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=193  GeV and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v_{2}{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. We also show that v_{2} vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

    11. Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.; Ashktorab, K.; Baker, M. D.; Beavis, D.; Britt, H. C.; Chang, J.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y. Y.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, B. A.; Crawford, H. J.; Cumming, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eldredge, W.; Engelage, J.; Fung, S.-Y.

      1997-01-01

      Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A(center-dot)GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N(anti N) annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions.

    12. Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

      PubMed

      Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, G; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

      2003-10-24

      We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5Au+Au, p+p, and e(+)e(-) collisions. This enhancement is limited to p(T)<5 GeV/c as deduced from the ratio of charged hadrons to pi(0) measured in the range 1.5

    13. Centrality definition using mid-rapidity E T distributions from p+Be to Au+Au at AGS energies

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Tannenbaum, M. J.; E802 Collaboration

      1999-12-01

      Measurements by the E802 Collaboration of the A-dependence and pseudorapidity interval (δη) dependence of mid-rapidity E T distributions in a half-azimuth electromagnetic calorimeter are presented for p+Be, p+Au, O+Cu, Si+Au and Au+Au collisions at the BNL-AGS. The issues addressed are 1) whether the shapes of the upper edges of the E T distributions vary with δη similarly to the variation in shapes of mid-rapidity charged particle distributions and 2) how small a δη interval would still give a meaningful characterization of the 'nuclear geometry' of a reaction. A new way of plotting E T distributions was found from which the reaction dynamics could be read directly.

    14. Measuring dynamical K/π and p/π fluctuations in AuAu collisions from the STAR experiment

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Tarnowsky, T.

      2012-05-01

      Results from new measurements of dynamical K/π and p/π ratio fluctuations are presented. Dynamical fluctuations in global conserved quantities such as baryon number, strangeness, or charge may be observed near a QCD critical point. The STAR experiment has previously acquired data in AuAu collisions at the energies √{s_{NN} } = 200, 130, 62.4, and 19.6 GeV and CuCu collisions at √{s_{NN} } = 200, 62.4, and 22.4 GeV. The commencing of a QCD critical point search at RHIC has extended the reach of possible measurements of dynamical K/π and p/π ratio fluctuations from AuAu collisions to lower energies. New results are compared to previous measurements and to theoretical predictions from the UrQMD model.

    15. An ultrafast look at Au nanoclusters.

      PubMed

      Yau, Sung Hei; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

      2013-07-16

      In the past 20 years, researchers studying nanomaterials have uncovered many new and interesting properties not found in bulk materials. Extensive research has focused on metal nanoparticles (>3 nm) because of their potential applications, such as in molecular electronics, image markers, and catalysts. In particular, the discovery of metal nanoclusters (<3 nm) has greatly expanded the horizon of nanomaterial research. These nanosystems exhibit molecular-like characteristics as their size approaches the Fermi-wavelength of an electron. The relationships between size and physical properties for nanomaterials are intriguing, because for metal nanosystems in this size regime both size and shape determine electronic properties. Remarkably, changes in the optical properties of nanomaterials have provided tremendous insight into the electronic structure of nanoclusters. The success of synthesizing monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) in the condensed phase has allowed scientists to probe the metal core directly. Au MPCs have become the "gold" standard in nanocluster science, thanks to the rigorous structural characterization already accomplished. The use of ultrafast laser spectroscopy on MPCs in solution provides the benefit of directly studying the chemical dynamics of metal nanoclusters (core), and their nonlinear optical properties. In this Account, we investigate the optical properties of MPCs in the visible region using ultrafast spectroscopy. Based on fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we propose an emission mechanism for these nanoclusters. These clusters behave differently from nanoparticles in terms of emission lifetimes as well as two-photon cross sections. Through further investigation of the transient (excited state) absorption, we have found many unique phenomena of nanoclusters, such as quantum confinement effects and vibrational breathing modes. In summary, based on the differences in the optical properties, the distinction between nanoclusters and

    16. In vitro corrosion of dental Au-based casting alloys in polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution.

      PubMed

      Takasusuki, Norio; Ida, Yusuke; Hirose, Yukito; Ochi, Morio; Endo, Kazuhiko

      2013-01-01

      The corrosion and tarnish behaviors of two Au-based casting alloys (ISO type 1 and type 4 Au alloys) and their constituent pure metals, Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd in a polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution were examined. The two Au alloys actively corroded, and the main anodic reaction for both was dissolution of Au as AuI₂(-). The amount of Au released from the ISO type 1 Au alloy was significantly larger than that from the ISO type 4 Au alloy (P<0.05). Visible light spectrophotometry revealed that the type 1 alloy exhibited higher susceptibility to tarnishing than the type 4 alloy. The corrosion forms of the two Au alloys were found to be completely different, i.e., the type 1 alloy exhibited the corrosion attack over the entire exposed surface with a little irregularity whereas the type 4 alloy exhibited typical intergranular corrosion, which was caused by local cells produced by segregation of Pd and Pt.

    17. Longitudinal flow of protons from (2-8)A GeV central Au+Au collisions.

      PubMed

      Klay, J L; Ajitanand, N N; Alexander, J M; Anderson, M G; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K; Das, A C; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lauret, J; Law, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, G; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R; Schroeder, L; Srivastava, B; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Wells, R; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Zhang, W N

      2002-03-11

      Rapidity distributions of protons from central 197Au+197Au collisions measured by the E895 Collaboration in the energy range from (2-8)A GeV at the Brookhaven AGS are presented. Longitudinal flow parameters derived using a thermal model including collective longitudinal expansion are extracted from these distributions. The results show an approximately linear increase in the longitudinal flow velocity, (L), as a function of the logarithm of beam energy.

    18. Measurement of inclusive antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV.

      PubMed

      Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; de Toledo, A S; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

      2001-12-24

      We report the first measurement of inclusive antiproton production at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The antiproton transverse mass distributions in the measured transverse momentum range of 0.25

    19. Strangeness in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV observed with the STAR detector

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Barnby, Lee S.; STAR Collaboration; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Curto, G. Lo; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lynn, D.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, M. L.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Mitchell, J.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Radomski, S.; Rai, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schüttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; umbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Thomas, J. H.; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, J. W.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zborovský, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

      2002-07-01

      The STAR detector has made a variety of measurements of strange and other hadronic species in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV. A comparison of kaon and pion production enables an examination of the systematics of strangeness production with energy by comparing them to lower energy collisions. Anti-baryon to baryon ratios indicate a much reduced net-baryon density and transverse momentum spectra show that a picture of transverse expansion seems appropriate.

    20. Effect of Au thickness on AuAg bimetallic growth on reconstructed Si(5 5 12) surfaces

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bhukta, Anjan; Ghosh, Arnab; Guha, Puspendu; Maiti, Paramita; Satpati, Biswarup; Satyam, Parlapalli Venkata

      2017-03-01

      Large, stable and single domain unit cell with row-like structures makes reconstructed Si(5 5 12) surface an important one-dimensional growth template of nanostructures. We report on the morphological aspects of the growth of AuAg bimetallic nanostructures on a reconstructed Si(5 5 12) surface that has been deposited with a 0.5 monolayer (ML) Ag and various Au thicknesses (0.5 to 5.0 ML) to determine the optimum gold thickness for a growth of high aspect ratio of AuAg nanostructures. The mean aspect ratio of AuAg nanostructures increases up to Au thickness of 3.0 ML and for larger thickness the mean aspect ratio decreases. The prior growth of 0.5 ML Ag on reconstructed surface result in the formation of one-dimensional Ag strips which are helping for preferential nucleation sites along Si< 1bar{1}0 rangle to form AuAg bimetallic long aspect ratio structures. Followed by these early processes of growth, for Au thickness >3.0 ML, excess Au ad-atoms begin to accumulate along Si< 66bar{5} rangle and consequences reduction of mean aspect ratio of bimetallic nanostructures. Nanostructures are grown using molecular beam epitaxy method under ultra-high vacuum conditions and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to investigate the morphological variations. Determination of structural aspects and compositional analysis has been carried out using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and high-resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy methods.

    1. Λ Λ Correlation Function in Au +Au Collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

      2015-01-01

      We present Λ Λ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au +Au collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the Λ Λ correlation function and interaction parameters for dihyperon searches are discussed.

    2. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

      DOE PAGES

      An, Wei; Liu, Ping

      2015-09-18

      Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based core–shell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au tomore » replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayer–shell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of core–shell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.« less

    3. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

      SciTech Connect

      An, Wei; Liu, Ping

      2015-09-18

      Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based core–shell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au to replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayer–shell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of core–shell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.

    4. Measurements of DS± -meson production in Au + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV in STAR

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nasim, Md.

      2016-12-01

      We present the first measurement of the nuclear modification factor RAA and elliptic flow v2 of Ds in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV with the STAR detector. These results have been compared with those of other open charm mesons and strange mesons to determine how the (possibly) strangeness equilibrated partonic matter affects the Ds meson production. We find that the nuclear modification factor of DS are systematically higher than unity and that of D0. The ratio Ds /D0 is shown as a function of transverse momentum for the 10-40% most central Au+Au collisions and compared with that in p + p collisions obtained from PYTHIA. It is also compared with that in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV by the ALICE experiment. Our measurement indicates a hint of enhancement of DS production in Au+Au collisions with respect to p + p collisions as compared to non-strange D mesons.

    5. Theoretical investigation of superconductivity in SrAuSi3 and SrAu2Si2

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Arslan, Enes; Karaca, Ertuǧrul; Tütüncü, H. M.; Başoglu, A.; Srivastava, G. P.

      2016-08-01

      The structural and electronic properties of BaNiSn3-type SrAuSi3 and ThCr2Si2-type SrAu2Si2 have been investigated by using the planewave pseudopotential method and the density functional theory. The electronic structures and phonon dispersion relations of these two materials have been analyzed with and without the inclusion of spin-orbit interaction, and similarities and differences highlighted. By integrating the Eliashberg spectral function α2F(ω), the average electron-phonon coupling parameter is determined to be λ=0.47 for SrAuSi3 and 0.42 for SrAu2Si2. The largest contribution to the electron-phonon coupling for SrAuSi3 comes from the Si p electrons near the Fermi energy and Si-related vibrations. Using a reasonable value of μ* = 0.12 for the effective Coulomb repulsion parameter, the superconducting critical temperature Tc for SrAuSi3 is found to be 1.47 K which compares very well with its experimental value of 1.54 K.

    6. Effect of Au Content on Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of Au-Cu-Ag-Si Bulk Metallic Glasses

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Guo, H.; Zhang, W.; Chen, M. W.; Saotome, Y.; Fukuhara, M.; Inoue, A.

      2011-06-01

      The thermal stability, glass-forming ability (GFA), and mechanical and electrical properties of Au-based Au x Si17Cu75.5- x Ag7.5 ( x = 40 to 75.5 at. pct) metallic glasses were investigated. The glass transition temperature ( T g ) and crystallization temperature ( T x ) decreased with increasing Au content. The ultralow T g values below 373 K (100 °C) were obtained for alloys with x = 55 to 75.5. The alloys with x = 45 to 70 exhibited a high stabilization of supercooled liquid and a high GFA, and the supercooled liquid region and critical sample diameter for glass formation were in the range of 31 K to 50 K and 2 to 5 mm, respectively. The compressive fracture strength ( σ c,f ), Young's modulus ( E), and Vicker's hardness ( H v ) of the bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) decreased with increasing Au content. A linear correlation between Au concentration and the characteristic temperature, i.e., T g and T x , and mechanical properties, i.e., σ c,f , E, and H v , as well as electrical resistivity can be found in the BMGs, which will be helpful for the composition design of the desirable Au-based BMGs with tunable physical properties.

    7. Versatile and efficient catalysts for energy and environmental processes: Mesoporous silica containing Au, Pd and Au-Pd

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      da Silva, Anderson G. M.; Fajardo, Humberto V.; Balzer, Rosana; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Lovón, Adriana S. P.; Lovón-Quintana, Juan J.; Valença, Gustavo P.; Schreine, Wido H.; Robles-Dutenhefner, Patrícia A.

      2015-07-01

      We described a versatile approach for the synthesis of Au/MCM-41, Pd/MCM-41 and Au-Pd/MCM-41 by the direct incorporation of the noble metals into the MCM-41 framework. The structural, textural and chemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), N2-adsorption (BET and BJH methods), H2-chemisorption, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanomaterials, being comprised of Au, Pd and Au-Pd nanoparticles and possessing high surface areas were applied as versatile and efficient catalysts in benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) oxidation and in the steam reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production. The results revealed that the catalytic behavior in both processes was influenced by the experimental conditions and the nature of the catalyst employed. The Au-Pd/MCM-41 catalyst was the most active in the BTX total oxidation. On the basis of characterization data, it was proposed that the close contact between Pd and Au and the higher dispersion of Pd may be responsible for the enhanced activity of the bimetallic catalyst. However, the strong interaction between the noble metals did not improve the performance of the bimetallic catalyst in ethanol steam reforming, the Pd/MCM-41 catalyst being the most active and selective for hydrogen production.

    8. Sulfur-induced mobilization of Au surface atoms on Au(1 1 1) studied by real-time STM

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M.

      2007-04-01

      The interaction of sulfur with gold surfaces has attracted considerable interest due to numerous technological applications such as the formation of self-assembled monolayers and as a chemical sensor. Here, we report on the interaction of sulfur with Au(1 1 1) at two different temperatures (300 K and 420 K) studied by real-time scanning tunnelling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. In the low coverage regime (<0.1 ML), S adsorption lifts the herringbone reconstruction of the clean Au(1 1 1) surface indicating a lateral expansion of the surface layer. An ordered (√3 × √3) R30° sulfur adlayer develops as the coverage reaches ˜0.3 ML. At higher S coverages (>0.3 ML) gold surface atoms are removed from regular terrace sites and incorporated into a growing gold sulfide phase. At 300 K this process leads to the formation of a rough pit and mound surface morphology. This gold sulfide exhibits short-range order and an incommensurate, long-range ordered AuS phase develops upon annealing at 450-525 K. In contrast, formation of an ordered AuS phase via rapid step-retraction rather than etch pit formation is observed during S-interaction with Au(1 1 1) surfaces at 420 K. Our results shed new light on the S-Au(1 1 1) interaction.

    9. Heterojunction metal-oxide-metal Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au single nanowire device for spintronics

      SciTech Connect

      Reddy, K. M. Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles; Padture, Nitin P.

      2015-05-07

      In this report, we present the synthesis of heterojunction magnetite nanowires in alumina template and describe magnetic and electrical properties from a single nanowire device for spintronics applications. Heterojunction Au-Fe-Au nanowire arrays were electrodeposited in porous aluminum oxide templates, and an extensive and controlled heat treatment process converted Fe segment to nanocrystalline cubic magnetite phase with well-defined Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} interfaces as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed Verwey transition shoulder around 120 K and a room temperature coercive field of 90 Oe. Current–voltage (I-V) characteristics of a single Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanowire have exhibited Ohmic behavior. Anomalous positive magnetoresistance of about 0.5% is observed on a single nanowire, which is attributed to the high spin polarization in nanowire device with pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase and nanocontact barrier. This work demonstrates the ability to preserve the pristine Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and well defined electrode contact metal (Au)–magnetite interface, which helps in attaining high spin polarized current.

    10. Crystal structure and magnetic behavior in CeAu2Si2 and CeAu4Si2

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Palasyuk, Andriy M.; Corbett, John D.; Sefat, Athena S.; Canfield, Paul C.

      2007-03-01

      Interest in Ce-based compounds of systems like CeCu2Si2, CePd2Si2 and CeRu2Si2 has attracted much interest due to magnetic ordering, heavy Fermion behavior and superconductivity. This work is a comparative study of crystal structure and properties of CeAuxSi2 flux-grown crystals with x=2, 4. For CeAuxSi2 system, we have studied structure and anisotropic field- and temperature-dependent magnetization M(H, T). The single-crystal x-ray data indicate that CeAu4Si2 has CeRe4Si2-type structure and is orthorhombic (Cmmm) and CeAu2Si2 is tetragonal (I4/mmm). Although there is an extra layer of Au atoms in the CeAu4Si2 structure the magnetic ordering temperatures of CeAu2Si2and CeAu4Si2 are remarkably similar. In this work we will examine and discuss the similarities and differences between the thermodynamic, transport and structural properties of these related materials.

    11. Amperometric Immunosensor for Carbofuran Detection Based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-Antibody Conjugate

      PubMed Central

      Zhu, Ying; Cao, Yaoyao; Sun, Xia; Wang, Xiangyou

      2013-01-01

      In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au) nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE) via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab) and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3). The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication. PMID:23604029

    12. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

      PubMed Central

      Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

      2015-01-01

      A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination. PMID:25994222

    13. Disappearance of back-to-back high-pT hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN ] =200 GeV.

      PubMed

      Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

      2003-02-28

      Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudorapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes previously observed in high-energy collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au+Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

    14. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

      2015-05-01

      A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination.

    15. Disappearance of back-to-back high p {sub T} hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

      SciTech Connect

      Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li , Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; et al.

      2002-10-25

      Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudo-rapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at = {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes already observed in elementary collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au + Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

    16. Formation of one-dimensional Ag-Au solid solution colloids with Au nanorods as seeds, their alloying mechanisms, and surface plasmon resonances

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Guo, Tao; Tan, Yiwei

      2012-12-01

      In this work, one dimensional (1D) Ag-Au solid solution nanoalloys were synthesized by rapidly diffusing Ag into the preformed Au nanorod (AuNR) seeds at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. By varying the molar ratio of AgCl/AuNR (in gold atoms), two kinds of 1D Ag-Au alloy nanostructures with a narrow size distribution--AgAu nanowires and Ag33Au67 nanorods--could be obtained in high yields when NaCl and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used as an additive and capping reagent, respectively. Based on HRTEM imaging combined with a series of control experiments, it is conceivable that vacancy/defect-motivated interdiffusion of Ag and Au atoms coupled with oxidative etching is a crucial stage in the mechanism responsible for this room-temperature alloying process, and the subsequent conjugation of the fused Ag-Au alloyed nanostructures is associated with the formation of the AgAu nanowires. The resulting 1D Ag-Au nanoalloys form stable colloidal dispersions and show unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks in the ensemble extinction spectra.In this work, one dimensional (1D) Ag-Au solid solution nanoalloys were synthesized by rapidly diffusing Ag into the preformed Au nanorod (AuNR) seeds at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. By varying the molar ratio of AgCl/AuNR (in gold atoms), two kinds of 1D Ag-Au alloy nanostructures with a narrow size distribution--AgAu nanowires and Ag33Au67 nanorods--could be obtained in high yields when NaCl and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used as an additive and capping reagent, respectively. Based on HRTEM imaging combined with a series of control experiments, it is conceivable that vacancy/defect-motivated interdiffusion of Ag and Au atoms coupled with oxidative etching is a crucial stage in the mechanism responsible for this room-temperature alloying process, and the subsequent conjugation of the fused Ag-Au alloyed nanostructures is associated with the formation of the AgAu nanowires. The resulting 1D Ag-Au

    17. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

      PubMed

      Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

      2004-03-19

      Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

    18. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

      DOE PAGES

      Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; ...

      2016-01-12

      Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

    19. The characteristics of solar wind magnetic field during the negative-AU and large-AU (>1200nT) events

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lyu, L. H.; Kao, W.

      2014-12-01

      The negative-AU events are relatively unusual, which have caught our attention. To understand the cause of negative AU, we first eliminate the ring-current effect by considering only the events with AUAU has strong negative Bz and By components during these negative-AU events. We also found that one of the negative AU events has been reported by Feldstein et al. (2006). They associated the enhancement of westward electric jet by the negative IMF-By component based on previous models obtained independently by Friis-Christensen et al. (1972) and Sumaruk & Feldstein (1973). Enhancement of electric jet in opposite direction is expected to be found when the IMF-By is positive. To verify their models we also examine the strong AU events with AU > 1200nT. We found that these large-AU events are associated with IMF-Bz<0 and IMF-By >0. Both negative-AU and large-AU events tend to occur during the beginning of the main phase of a strong magnetic storm with Kp= 7~9. The enhancement of Cowling electrojet has been proposed by Kan et al. (2011) for the triggering of substorm onset. We will discuss the possibility that a similar enhancement process might take place in the dayside auroral oval during these extreme AU events.

    20. Intriguing centrality dependence of the Au-Au source size at the AGS

      SciTech Connect

      Baker, M.D.; The E802 Collaboration

      1996-06-01

      One of the main goals of high energy heavy ion physics is to establish the existence of a deconfined phase of nuclear matter--the quark-gluon plasma--at high temperatures or densities. One possible signature of such a phase transition, especially if it were first order, would be a larger source size or lifetime than a similar hadronic system. At current AGS energies, we attempt to form a quark- gluon plasma by achieving a high baryon density for a period of time in the center of the collision region. For a given density threshold, the size of this high density region should be a strong function of the impact parameter: the more central the event, the larger the high density region. Therefore, one possible signature of a quark-gluon plasma would be a sudden change in system lifetime or size as a function of the centrality of the collision. In this talk we present an intriguing effect which was not predicted for simple hadronic systems: a rapid increase of the HBT-measured source radius parameter for pion pairs with increasing centrality for Au-Au collisions at a beam momentum of 11.45 A GeV/c on a fixed target. Experience has shown, however, that we must be cautious in our interpretation. A complete understanding of the collision dynamics at a given energy must be built up from several measurements and new, but conventional, hadronic explanations must be considered for such unexpected effects. More study is needed, therefore, before any strong conclusions can be reached.

    1. Drowned reefs and antecedent karst topography, Au'au channel, S.E. Hawaiian Islands

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Grigg, R.W.; Grossman, E.E.; Earle, S.A.; Gittings, S.R.; Lott, D.; McDonough, J.

      2002-01-01

      During the last glacial maximum (LGM), about 21,000 years ago, the Hawaiian Islands of Maui, Lanai, and Molokai were interconnected by limestone bridges, creating a super-island known as Maui-Nui. Approximately 120 m of sea-level rise during the Holocene Transgression flooded, and then drowned, these bridges separating the islands by inter-island channels. A new multibeam high-resolution bathymetric survey of the channels between the islands, coupled with observations and video-transects utilizing DeepWorker-2000 submersibles, has revealed the existence of numerous drowned reef features including concentric solution basins, solution ridges (rims), sand and sediment plains, and conical-shaped reef pinnacles. The concentric basins contain flat lagoon-like bottoms that are rimmed by steep-sided limestone walls. Undercut notches rim the basins at several depths, marking either sea-level still stands or paleo-lake levels. All of the solution basins shallower than 120 m were subaerial at the LGM, and at one stage or another may have been shallow shoreline lakes. Today, about 70 drowned reef pinnacles are scattered across the Maui-Lanai underwater bridge and all are situated in wave-sheltered positions. Most drowned during the interval between 14,000 and 10,000 years ago when sea-level rise averaged 15 mm/year. Virtually all of the surficial topography in the Au'au Channel today is a product of karst processes accentuated by marginal reef growth during the Holocene. Both the submerged basins and the drowned reefs represent an archive of sea-level and climate history in Hawaii during the late Quaternary.

    2. Dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Issah, M.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masumoto, S.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.

      2016-01-01

      We present measurements of e+e- production at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. The invariant yield is studied within the PHENIX detector acceptance over a wide range of mass (me e<5 GeV /c2) and pair transverse momentum (pT<5 GeV /c ) for minimum bias and for five centrality classes. The e+e- yield is compared to the expectations from known sources. In the low-mass region (me e=0.30 - 0.76 GeV /c2 ) there is an enhancement that increases with centrality and is distributed over the entire pair pT range measured. It is significantly smaller than previously reported by the PHENIX experiment and amounts to 2.3 ±0.4 (stat )±0.4 (syst )±0.2 (model ) or to 1.7 ±0.3 (stat )±0.3 (syst )±0.2 (model ) for minimum bias collisions when the open heavy-flavor contribution is calculated with pythia or mc@nlo, respectively. The inclusive mass and pT distributions, as well as the centrality dependence, are well reproduced by model calculations where the enhancement mainly originates from the melting of the ρ meson resonance as the system approaches chiral symmetry restoration. In the intermediate-mass region (me e=1.2 - 2.8 GeV /c2 ), the data hint at a significant contribution in addition to the yield from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor mesons.

    3. Blue luminescence of Au nanoclusters embedded in silica matrix

      SciTech Connect

      Dhara, S.; Chandra, Sharat; Magudapathy, P.; Kalavathi, S.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Sastry, V.S.; Hsu, C.W.; Wu, C.T.; Chen, K.H.; Chen, L.C.

      2004-12-22

      Photoluminescence study using the 325 nm He-Cd excitation is reported for the Au nanoclusters embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix. Au clusters are grown by ion beam mixing with 100 KeV Ar{sup +} irradiation on Au [40 nm]/SiO{sub 2} at various fluences and subsequent annealing at high temperature. The blue bands above {approx}3 eV match closely with reported values for colloidal Au nanoclusters and supported Au nanoislands. Radiative recombination of sp electrons above Fermi level to occupied d-band holes are assigned for observed luminescence peaks. Peaks at 3.1 and 3.4 eV are correlated to energy gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points, respectively, with possible involvement of relaxation mechanism. The blueshift of peak positions at 3.4 eV with decreasing cluster size is reported to be due to the compressive strain in small clusters. A first principle calculation based on density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals formalism with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy is used to estimate the band gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points by calculating the band structures and joint density of states for different strain values in order to explain the blueshift of {approx}0.1 eV with decreasing cluster size around L-symmetry point.

    4. Au/metal oxides for low temperature CO oxidation

      SciTech Connect

      Srinivas, G.; Wright, J.; Bai, C.S.; Cook, R.

      1996-12-31

      Oxidation of carbon monoxide is important for several operations including fuel cells and carbon dioxide lasers. Room temperature CO oxidation has been investigated on a series of Au/metal oxide catalysts at conditions typical of spacecraft atmospheres; CO = 50 ppm, CO{sub 2} = 7,000 ppm, H{sub 2}O = 40% (RH) at 25{degrees}C, balance = air, and gas hourly space velocities of 7,000-60,000 hr{sup -1}. The addition of Au increases the room temperature CO oxidation activity of the metal oxides dramatically. All the Au/metal oxides deactivate during the CO oxidation reaction, especially in the presence of CO{sub 2} in the feed. The stability of the Au/metal oxide catalysts decreases in the following order: TiO{sub 2} > Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} > NiO > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The stability appears to decrease with an increase in the basicity of the metal oxides. In situ FTIR of CO adsorption on Au/TiO{sub 2} at 25{degrees}C indicates the formation of adsorbed CO, carboxylate, and carbonate species on the catalyst surface.

    5. Simulation of Au particle interaction on graphene sheets

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mcleod, A.; Vernon, K. C.; Rider, A. E.; Ostrikov, K.

      2013-09-01

      The interaction of Au particles with few layer graphene is of interest for the formation of the next generation of sensing devices 1. In this paper we investigate the coupling of single gold nanoparticles to a graphene sheet, and multiple gold nanoparticles with a graphene sheet using COMSOL Multiphysics. By using these simulations we are able to determine the electric field strength and associated hot-spots for various gold nanoparticle-graphene systems. The Au nanoparticles were modelled as 8 nm diameter spheres on 1.5 nm thick (5 layers) graphene, with properties of graphene obtained from the refractive index data of Weber 2 and the Au refractive index data from Palik 3. The field was incident along the plane of the sheet with polarisation tested for both s and p. The study showed strong localised interaction between the Au and graphene with limited spread; however the double particle case where the graphene sheet separated two Au nanoparticles showed distinct interaction between the particles and graphene. An offset was introduced (up to 4 nm) resulting in much reduced coupling between the opposed particles as the distance apart increased. Findings currently suggest that the graphene layer has limited interaction with incident fields with a single particle present whilst reducing the coupling region to a very fine area when opposing particles are involved. It is hoped that the results of this research will provide insight into graphene-plasmon interactions and spur the development of the next generation of sensing devices.

    6. Acetanilide mediated reversible assembly and disassembly of Au nanoparticles.

      PubMed

      Murugadoss, A; Kar, Manoranjan; Chattopadhyay, Arun

      2008-08-01

      Herein we report the generation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) by sparingly soluble acetanilide in water. We also report the formation of linear chain-like superstructures of self-assembled Au NPs, in the presence of excess acetanilide. This was achieved in two different ways. In the first method, acetanilide was added, with increasing concentration, into aqueous HAuCl(4) to produce Au NPs as well as for the formation of assembly, which varied according to the concentration of acetanilide. The other route involved formation of spherical Au NPs at the lowest concentration of acetanilide, which was followed by the formation of assembly of various lengths upon further addition of variable amount of acetanilide. The assemblies were stable in aqueous solution for days with characteristic UV-vis absorption spectra consisting of two peaks. While the wavelength of the first peak remained the same, the position of the second peak changed to longer wavelength with increasing acetanilide concentration. Interestingly, the linear chain-like arrays could be broken into individual particles by first dilution of the solution concentration followed by treatment with ultrasonic waves. The individual Au NPs again formed linear chain-like arrays upon addition of excess acetanilide.

    7. Au nanoinjectors for electrotriggered gene delivery into the cell nucleus.

      PubMed

      Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo

      2015-01-01

      Intracellular delivery of exogenous materials is an essential technique required for many fundamental biological researches and medical treatments. As our understanding of cell structure and function has been improved and diverse therapeutic agents with a subcellular site of action have been continuously developed, there is a demand to enhance the performance of delivering devices. Ideal intracellular delivery devices should convey various kinds of exogenous materials without deteriorating cell viability regardless of cell type and, furthermore, precisely control the location and the timing of delivery as well as the amount of delivered materials for advanced researches.In this chapter the development of a new intracellular delivery device, a nanoinjector made of a Au (gold) nanowire (a Au nanoinjector) is described in which delivery is triggered by external application of an electric pulse. As a model study, a gene was delivered directly into the nucleus of a neuroblastoma cell, and successful delivery without cell damage was confirmed by the expression of the delivered gene. The insertion of a Au nanoinjector directly into a cell can be generally applied to any kind of cell, and a high degree of surface modification of Au allows attachment of diverse materials such as proteins, small molecules, or nanoparticles as well as genes on Au nanoinjectors. This expands their applicability, and it is expected that they will provide important information on the effects of delivered exogenous materials and consequently contribute to the development of related therapeutic or clinical technologies.

    8. Observations of high spin states in {sup 179}Au

      SciTech Connect

      Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.J.

      1995-08-01

      As part of a current study on the properties of the {pi} i{sub 13/2} intruder state in the A = 175-190 region, we conducted an experiment at ATLAS to observe high spin states in {sup 179}Au utilizing the reaction {sup 144}Sm({sup 40}Ar,p4n) at beam energies of 207 MeV and 215 MeV. To aid in the identification of {sup 179}Au, and to filter out the large amount of events from fission by-products, the Fragment Mass Analyzer was utilized in conjunction with ten Compton-suppression germanium detectors. In total, 11 x 10{sup 6} {gamma}-{gamma} and 4 x 10{sup 5} {gamma}-recoil events were collected. By comparing {gamma}-rays in coincidence with an A = 179 recoil mass gate and {gamma}-rays in coincidence with Au K{alpha} and K{beta} X-rays, ten {gamma}-rays were identified as belonging to {sup 179}Au. Based on {gamma}-ray coincidence relationships and on comparisons with neighboring odd-A Au nuclei, we constructed a tentative level scheme and assigned a rotational-like sequence to the {pi} i{sub 13/2} proton configuration.

    9. Blue luminescence of Au nanoclusters embedded in silica matrix.

      PubMed

      Dhara, S; Chandra, Sharat; Magudapathy, P; Kalavathi, S; Panigrahi, B K; Nair, K G M; Sastry, V S; Hsu, C W; Wu, C T; Chen, K H; Chen, L C

      2004-12-22

      Photoluminescence study using the 325 nm He-Cd excitation is reported for the Au nanoclusters embedded in SiO(2) matrix. Au clusters are grown by ion beam mixing with 100 KeV Ar(+) irradiation on Au [40 nm]/SiO(2) at various fluences and subsequent annealing at high temperature. The blue bands above approximately 3 eV match closely with reported values for colloidal Au nanoclusters and supported Au nanoislands. Radiative recombination of sp electrons above Fermi level to occupied d-band holes are assigned for observed luminescence peaks. Peaks at 3.1 and 3.4 eV are correlated to energy gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points, respectively, with possible involvement of relaxation mechanism. The blueshift of peak positions at 3.4 eV with decreasing cluster size is reported to be due to the compressive strain in small clusters. A first principle calculation based on density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals formalism with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy is used to estimate the band gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points by calculating the band structures and joint density of states for different strain values in order to explain the blueshift of approximately 0.1 eV with decreasing cluster size around L-symmetry point.

    10. Interfacial Reaction Characteristics of Au Stud/Sn/Cu Pillar Bump During Annealing and Current Stressing.

      PubMed

      Kim, Jun-Beom; Lee, Byeong-Rok; Kim, Sung-Hyuk; Park, Jong-Myeong; Park, Young-Bae

      2015-11-01

      In this work, intermetallic compound (IMC) growth behavior in Au stud/Sn/Cu pillar bumps was investigated under annealing and current stressing conditions. AuSn2 and AuSn4 IMCs formed at the interface between the Au studs and Sn after bonding. The AuSn2 phase grew significantly as the stressing time increased, causing micro-voids to form near the (Cu, Au)6Sn5, AuSn2 and AuSn4 IMC interfaces. The interfacial reactions resulting from current stressing took place quicker than observed for pure annealing. The apparent activation energies for the growth of the AuSn2 phase during annealing and current stressing were 0.52 eV and 0.47 eV, respectively, which may be closely related to the acceleration of the interfacial reaction by electron wind forces during current stressing.

    11. Study on antibacterial activity of chemically synthesized PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Boomi, Pandi; Prabu, Halliah Gurumallesh; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Ravikumar, Sundaram

      2014-05-01

      Pristine polyaniline (PANI), PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization method using aniline as monomer, ammonium persulphate as oxidant and metal (Ag, Au and Ag-Au) colloids. UV-Vis analysis exhibited surface Plasmon resonances of Ag, Au, Ag-Au nanoparticles. FT-IR spectra revealed the shift in peak position of N-H stretching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the presence of Ag, Au and Au-Ag nanoparticles. HR-TEM images show nanosizes of Ag, Au, Ag-Au and the incorporation of such nanoparticles into the PANI matrix. Pristine PANI, PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites were tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method. PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite exhibited higher antibacterial activity against both gram-positive [Streptococcus sp. (MTCC 890), Staphylococcus sp. (MTCC 96)] and gram-negative bacteria [Escherichia coli (MTCC 1671) and Klebsiella sp. (MTCC 7407)] when compared with PANI-Ag nanocomposite, PANI-Au nanocomposite and pristine PANI. The novelty of this study is the polymer-bimetal synthesis and its antibacterial potential.

    12. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

      SciTech Connect

      Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

      2015-12-02

      Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

    13. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

      DOE PAGES

      Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; ...

      2015-12-02

      Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with definedmore » defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.« less

    14. Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 at Functionalized Au Electrodes.

      PubMed

      Fang, Yuxin; Flake, John C

      2017-03-08

      Electrochemical reduction of CO2 provides an opportunity to store renewable energy as fuels with much greater energy densities than batteries. Product selectivity of the reduction reaction is known to be a function of the electrolyte and electrode; however, electrodes modified with functional ligands may offer new methods to control selectivity. Here, we report the electrochemical reduction of CO2 at functionalized Au surfaces with three thiol-tethered ligands: 2-mercaptopropionic acid, 4-pyridinylethanemercaptan, and cysteamine. Remarkably, Au electrodes modified with 4-pyridinylethanemercaptan show a 2-fold increase in Faradaic efficiency and 3-fold increase in formate production relative to Au foil. Conversely, electrodes with 2-mercaptopropionic acid ligands show nearly 100% Faradaic efficiency toward the hydrogen evolution reaction, while cystemine-modified electrodes show 2-fold increases in both CO and H2 production. We propose a proton-induced desorption mechanism associated with pKa of the functionalized ligand as responsible for the dramatic selectivity changes.

    15. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

      2016-08-01

      Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

    16. Au Nanowire-Striped Cu3P Platelet Photoelectrocatalysts.

      PubMed

      Dutta, Anirban; Samantara, Aneeya K; Adhikari, Samrat Das; Jena, Bikash Kumar; Pradhan, Narayan

      2016-03-17

      A stripy pattern of continuous epitaxial growth of thin Au nanowires on plasmonic Cu3P platelets is reported. The obtained Au-Cu3P heterostructures retain their wide area interfacial heterojunction, which is typically not observed in metal-semiconductor heterostructures. This is performed by phosphine-mediated in situ reduction of Au ions on specific facets of Cu3P platelets. The intriguing stripy movements of nanowires are regulated by strong surface binding ligands. Because this is a dual plasmon heterostructure with wide visible absorption window, these are further explored as a photoelectrocatalyst for efficient hole transfer and sensing of an important biomolecule, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The observed anodic photocurrent was 30 times higher in the presence of NADH, and this proves that the heterostructured material is an ideal photosenser and an efficient catalyst for solar energy conversion.

    17. Study of copper underpotential deposition on Au(111) surfaces

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Xu, J. G.; Wang, X. W.

      1998-06-01

      First-principles total energy calculations are carried out to study the structure of copper underpotential deposition on Au(111) surfaces in sulfuric acid solutions. The norm-conserving method is used to construct the pseudopotentials of all the elements involved. The copper adlayer structure under various copper coverage is investigated. The results show that the proposed honeycomb structure with 2/3 monolayer copper coverage is unstable without the co-adsorption of sulfate. The co-adsorbed sulfate is found to bind to copper. The calculated structural parameters are in general agreement with those obtained from a recent X-ray experiment. In addition, the sulfate adsorption on clean Au(111) surface is studied. The results show that sulfate molecule binds much more weakly with clean Au(111) surfaces. Total energy calculations for bisulfate adsorption suggest that even though it is the dominant species in acidic electrolyte, the adsorbed bisulfate may dissociate thus leave sulfate adsorbed on the surface.

    18. Au-Ag hollow nanostructures with tunable SERS properties

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Jiji, S. G.; Gopchandran, K. G.

      2017-01-01

      Fabrication of hollow Au-Ag nanoparticles is done by the sequential action of galvanic replacement and Kirkendall effect. Polyol synthesized silver nanoparticles were used as templates and the size of cavities is controlled by the systematic addition of the HAuCl4. Au-Ag nanoparticles carved in different depths were tested for application as substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Two medically important Raman active analytes-Nile blue chloride and Crystal violet were used in the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performance analysis. A systematic study has been made on the Raman enhancement of hollow nanoparticles fabricated with different cavity dimensions and compared with that of the silver templates used. The enhancement observed for these hollow substrates with cavities is of interest since Au protected hollow nanostructures are vital and an active area of interest in drug delivery systems.

    19. Molten Au/Ge alloy migration in Ge nanowires.

      PubMed

      Liu, Qian; Zou, Rujia; Wu, Jianghong; Xu, Kaibing; Lu, Aijiang; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Hu, Junqing

      2015-05-13

      Herein, we report time-resolved in situ transmission electron microscopy observation of Au particle melting at a Ge nanowire tip, subsequent forming of Au/Ge alloy liquid, and its migrating within the Ge nanowire. The migration direction and position of the Au/Ge liquid can be controlled by the applied voltage and the migration speed shows a linear deceleration in the nanowire. In a migration model proposed, the relevant dynamic mechanisms (electromigration, thermodiffusion, and viscous force, etc.) are discussed in detail. This work associated with the liquid mass transport in the solid nanowires should provide new insights into the crystal growth, interface engineering, and fabrication of the heterogeneous nanostructure-based devices.

    20. Fundamental interaction between Au quantum dots and DNA

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Karna, Molleshree; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi

      2010-03-01

      Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted a great deal of attention in biology community due to their application as fluorescent labels and sensors. The optical properties of QDs and NPs allow them to be effective imaging agents. However, QDs have the potential to be used as more than just sensors and labels. Their biological sensing abilities include identifying target DNA through a linker followed by color change and electrical signaling. If this property can be combined with the direct binding of QDs with DNA, many other applications in bio-nanotechnological field are possible. In this paper, we investigate the interaction between colloidal Au QDs and 30-base sequence single strand DNA. Our preliminary results indicate that the DNA strand tend to form different structures in the presence of Au QDs. Furthermore, small as well as large agglomerated Au particles appear to be linked along the DNA strand.

    1. Controlled electrodeposition of Au monolayer film on ionic liquid

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ma, Qiang; Pang, Liuqing; Li, Man; Zhang, Yunxia; Ren, Xianpei; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

      2016-05-01

      Gold (Au) nanoparticles have been attractive for centuries for their vibrant appearance enhanced by their interaction with sunlight. Nowadays, there have been tremendous research efforts to develop them for high-tech applications including therapeutic agents, sensors, organic photovoltaics, medical applications, electronics and catalysis. However, there remains to be a challenge to fabricate a monolayer Au coating with complete coverage in controlled fashion. Here we present a facile method to deposit a uniform Au monolayer (ML) film on the [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid substrate using an electrochemical deposition process. It demonstrates that it is feasible to prepare a solid phase coating on the liquid-based substrate. Moreover, the thickness of the monolayer coating can be controlled to a layer-by-layer accuracy.

    2. Au-Based Catalysts: Electrochemical Characterization for Structural Insights.

      PubMed

      Pifferi, Valentina; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Campisi, Sebastiano; Testolin, Anna; Villa, Alberto; Falciola, Luigi; Prati, Laura

      2016-02-25

      Au-based catalysts are widely used in important processes because of their peculiar characteristics. The catalyst performance depends strongly on the nature and structure of the metal nanoparticles, especially in the case of bimetallic catalysts where synergistic effects between the two metals can be occasionally seen. In this paper, it is shown that electrochemical characterisation (cyclovoltammetry CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) of AuPd systems can be used to determine the presence of an electronic interaction between the two metals, thus providing a strong support in the determination of the nature of the synergy between Au and Pd in the liquid phase oxidation of alcohols. However, it seems likely that the strong difference in the catalytic behavior between the single metals and the bimetallic system is connected not only to the redox behaviour, but also to the energetic balance between the different elementary steps of the reaction.

    3. Two-stage melting of Au-Pd nanoparticles.

      PubMed

      Mejía-Rosales, Sergio J; Fernandez-Navarro, Carlos; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo; Montejano-Carrizales, Juan Martín; José-Yacamán, Miguel

      2006-07-06

      Several series of molecular dynamics runs were performed to simulate the melting transition of bimetallic cuboctahedral nanoparticles of gold-palladium at different relative concentrations to study their structural properties before, in, and after the transition. The simulations were made in the canonical ensemble, each series covering a range of temperatures from 300 to 980 K, using the Rafii-Tabar version of the Sutton and Chen interatomic potential for metallic alloys. We found that the melting transition temperature has a strong dependence on the relative concentrations of the atomic species. We also found that, previous to the melting transition, the outer layer of the nanoparticle gets disordered in what can be thought as a premelting stage, where Au atoms near the surface migrate to the surface and remain there after the particle melts as a whole. The melting of the surface below Tm is consistent with studies of the interaction of a TEM electron beam with Au and Au-Pd nanoparticles.

    4. Level densities and thermodynamical properties of Pt and Au isotopes

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Giacoppo, F.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Eriksen, T. K.; Firestone, R. B.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hagen, T. W.; Kheswa, B. V.; Klintefjord, M.; Koehler, P. E.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.

      2014-11-01

      The nuclear level densities of Pt-196194 and Au,198197 below the neutron separation energy have been measured using transfer and scattering reactions. All the level density distributions follow the constant-temperature description. Each group of isotopes is characterized by the same temperature above the energy threshold corresponding to the breaking of the first Cooper pair. A constant entropy excess Δ S =1.9 kB and 1.1 kB is observed in 195Pt and 198Au with respect to 196Pt and 197Au, respectively, giving information on the available single-particle level space for the last unpaired valence neutron. The breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs is revealed by sequential peaks in the microcanonical caloric curve.

    5. Nanoscale arrangement of diblock copolymer micelles with Au nanorods

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kim, Hwan; Lim, Yirang; Kim, Sehee; Kim, Sung-Soo; Sohn, Byeong-Hyeok

      2014-11-01

      We fabricated a single-layered film consisting of spherical micelles of diblock copolymers and one-dimensional Au nanorods that were surface modified with the same polymer as the corona block of the copolymers. When the diameters of micelles were larger than the lengths of the nanorods, spherical micelles arranged in a hexagonal configuration surrounded by nanorods with their long axes perpendicular to the radial direction of the micelles. This arrangement provided selective organization of the Au nanorods and Ag nanoparticles which were selectively synthesized within the cores of the copolymer micelles. Thus, position-selective arrangement of Au nanorods and Ag nanoparticles was demonstrated at the nanometer scale such that a homogenous distribution of two different nanomaterials over a large area without aggregation was achieved.

    6. Crystallography of Martensite in TiAu Shape Memory Alloy

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Inamura, T.; Hosoda, H.

      2011-01-01

      The twin structure, habit plane orientation, and morphology of B19 martensite in TiAu, which is a candidate shape memory alloy (SMA) for high-temperature and biomedical applications, were investigated by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Almost all internal twins were {111} type I twins as lattice-invariant deformation (LID). The <211> type II twin was scarcely observed in TiAu, unlike in TiPd and TiPt SMAs. The habit plane roughly corresponded to the twinning plane ( K 1 plane) of the <211> type II twin because of the superb lattice parameter ratio of TiAu. As a result, an energy-minimizing microstructure referred to as "twins within twins" appears as the major microstructure. The selection rules for the twinning of LID are also discussed considering the results of extensive studies on LID in SMAs.

    7. Zigzag Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes inside Au Microtrenches.

      PubMed

      Cao, Anyuan; Ajayan, Pulickel M

      2004-05-20

      We report the self-assembly of zigzag patterns consisting of aligned carbon nanotubes inside Au microtrenches by chemical vapor deposition using ferrocene/xylene solution as the precursor. The zigzag nanotubes have uniform size and constant interpattern distance, which can be controlled by simply changing the width of the Au trenches. We demonstrated the tunable length and orientation of nanotubes during self-assembly, leading to a predictable motion of zigzag patterns. A growth model was proposed for the zigzag assembly of nanotubes, including the formation and subsequent splitting of an amorphous carbon layer on the pattern top. Rows of nanotube micropatterns regularly distributed along the Au trench are potential candidates as integrated arrays of thermal or mechanical detectors and actuators.

    8. Les manifestations oculaires au cours de la pré-éclampsie sévère ou l’éclampsie au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sourô Sanou de Bobo Dioulasso

      PubMed Central

      Diallo, Jean Wenceslas; Méda, Nonfounikoun; Ahnoux-Zabsonré, Ahgbatouhabéba; Ouattara, Souleymane; Yanogo, Armande; Tougouma, Somnoma Jean Baptiste; Somé, Der; Sanou, Jérôme; Dolo, Mariam

      2015-01-01

      La pré-éclampsie sévère est un problème de santé publique. L'atteinte oculaire est une de ses nombreuses complications. Le but de notre travail était de décrire les atteintes oculaires chez les patientes présentant une pré-éclampsie et/ou éclampsie afin de contribuer à leur meilleure prise en charge. Il s'est agi d'une étude transversale descriptive à collecte prospective allant du 1er novembre 2013 au 31 juillet 2014, chez les patientes ayant souffert de pré-éclampsie sévère/éclampsie. Nous avons inclus 127 patientes dans notre étude. La moyenne d’âge des patientes de notre étude était de 26,37 ans (ET= 6,8 ans), avec des extrêmes de 15 et 40 ans. Les tranches d’âge les plus représentées étaient celles de 26 à 30 ans avec 29,1% des cas et celle des 15 à 20 ans avec 25,2%. Le diagnostic de pré-éclampsie sévère a été retenu dans 69,3% des cas. Les primigestes représentaient 40,9% de la population. Les troubles visuels à type de phosphènes ont été observés chez 33,1% des patientes. Nous avons noté un courant granulaire conjonctival dans 41,7%, des lésions du segment postérieur chez 32,3% des patientes. Ces résultats ont été discutés par rapport à la littérature, et nous notons plus de cas d'atteinte rétinienne. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de lien statistiquement significatif entre la tension artérielle à l'admission et le stade de la rétinopathie hypertensive. Les complications oculaires de la pré-éclampsie sévère sont très fréquentes et souvent ignorées. Les atteintes rétiniennes sont fréquentes mais de bon pronostic. PMID:26405485

    9. Influence of the S-Au Bond Strength on the Magnetic Behavior of S-Capped Au Nanoparticles

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Vázquez, María J. Rodríguez; Rivas, José; López-Quintela, M. Arturo; Mosquera, Antonio Mouriño; Torneiro, Mercedes

      Recently, large permanent atomic magnetic moments have been found in Au nanoparticles capped with thiols. It is assumed that the formation of localized Au-S bonds at the particle surface induces the damping of the surface plasmon resonance and the appearance of a ferromagnetic-like behavior. In this work we will show for the first time that thioethers can also induce both phenomena, i.e., the damping of the plasmon band and the appearance of permanent magnetic moments. Furthermore, we have studied the influence of the Au-S bond strength on both phenomena using two different synthesized thioether ligands. It will be shown that, although both ligands can induce a complete damping of the plasmon band, only with one of the ligands (the one corresponding to the stronger S-Au bond) the appearance of a ferromagnetic-like order is observed. This is an indication of the extreme sensitivity of the magnetism on the strength of the charge transfer at the S-Au bond.

    10. Measurement of direct photons in Au+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

      PubMed

      Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

      2012-10-12

      We report the measurement of direct photons at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV. The direct photon signal was extracted for the transverse momentum range of 4 GeV/cAu+Au collision centralities using the measured p+p direct photon spectrum and compared to theoretical predictions. R(AA) was found to be consistent with unity for all centralities over the entire measured p(T) range. Theoretical models that account for modifications of initial direct photon production due to modified parton distribution functions in Au and the different isospin composition of the nuclei predict a modest change of R(AA) from unity. They are consistent with the data. Models with compensating effects of the quark-gluon plasma on high-energy photons, such as suppression of jet-fragmentation photons and induced-photon bremsstrahlung from partons traversing the medium, are also consistent with this measurement.

    11. Structure and mobility of metal clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd clusters in MOF-74.

      PubMed

      Vilhelmsen, Lasse B; Walton, Krista S; Sholl, David S

      2012-08-01

      Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal-organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au(8), Pd(8), and Au(4)Pd(4) we find that the organic part of the MOF is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster's adsorption energy and diffusion barrier is established, confirming that Au clusters are highly mobile in the MOF-74 framework and Pd clusters are less mobile.

    12. The electric dipole moments in the ground states of gold oxide, AuO, and gold sulfide, AuS

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy C.; Cheng, Lan

      2017-02-01

      The B2Σ- - X2Π3/2(0,0) bands of a cold molecular beam sample of gold monoxide, AuO, and gold monosulfide, AuS, have been recorded at high resolution both field free and in the presence of a static electric field. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μ→ e l, of 2.94±0.06 D and 2.22±0.05 D for the X2Π3/2(v = 0) states of AuO and AuS, respectively. A molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the trend in ground state μ→ e l values for AuX (X = F, Cl, O, and S) molecules. The experimentally determined μ→ e l are compared to those computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level augmented with a perturbative inclusion of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) level of theory.

    13. Final Technical Report: First Principles Investigations for the Ensemble Effects of PdAu and PtAu Bimetallic Nanocatalysts

      SciTech Connect

      Ruqian Wu

      2012-05-18

      Bimetallic surfaces with tunable chemical properties have attracted broad attention in recent years due to their ample potential for heterogeneous catalysis applications. The local chemical properties of constituents are strongly altered from their parent metals by 'ligand effect', a term encompassing the influences of charge transfer, orbital rehybridization and lattice strain. In comparison to the aforementioned, the 'ensemble effect' associated with particular arrangements of the active constituents have received much less attention, despite their notable importance towards the determination of reactivity and selectivity of bimetallic catalysts. We performed theoretical studies for understanding the ensemble effects on bimetallic catalysis: (i) simulations for the formation of different ensembles on PdAu and PtAu nanoclusters; (ii) studies of the size, shape, and substrate dependence of their electronic properties; and (iii) simulations for model reactions such as CO oxidation, methanol, ethylene and water dehydrogenation on PdAu and PtAu nanoclusters. In close collaboration with leading experimental groups, our theoretical research elucidated the fundamentals of Au based bimetallic nanocatalysts.

    14. Bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite for in situ SERS monitoring and degradation of organic pollutants

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ma, Shuzhen; Cai, Qian; Lu, Kailing; Liao, Fan; Shao, Mingwang

      2016-01-01

      The bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite was fabricated by in situ reducing Au nanoparticles onto the surface of FeS (Co3O4). The as-prepared FeS possessed a multi-structure composed of plenty of nanoplates, which were coated by Au nanoparticles with an average size of 47.5 nm. While the Co3O4 showed a thin hexagonal sheet containing Au nanoparticles on its surface with an average size of 79.0 nm. Both the as-prepared Au/FeS and Au/Co3O4 composites exhibited excellent SERS performance, capable of enhancing the Raman signals of R6G molecules with the enhancement factor up to 1.81 × 106 and 7.60 × 104, respectively. Moreover, Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite also has been verified to have intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, which could decompose H2O2 into hydroxyl radicals and then degrade organic pollutants into small molecules. Therefore, SERS can be used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation process of R6G molecules, employing the Au/FeS (Au/Co3O4) composite both as SERS substrate and catalyst.

    15. Formation of one-dimensional Ag-Au solid solution colloids with Au nanorods as seeds, their alloying mechanisms, and surface plasmon resonances.

      PubMed

      Guo, Tao; Tan, Yiwei

      2013-01-21

      In this work, one dimensional (1D) Ag-Au solid solution nanoalloys were synthesized by rapidly diffusing Ag into the preformed Au nanorod (AuNR) seeds at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. By varying the molar ratio of AgCl/AuNR (in gold atoms), two kinds of 1D Ag-Au alloy nanostructures with a narrow size distribution--AgAu nanowires and Ag(33)Au(67) nanorods--could be obtained in high yields when NaCl and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used as an additive and capping reagent, respectively. Based on HRTEM imaging combined with a series of control experiments, it is conceivable that vacancy/defect-motivated interdiffusion of Ag and Au atoms coupled with oxidative etching is a crucial stage in the mechanism responsible for this room-temperature alloying process, and the subsequent conjugation of the fused Ag-Au alloyed nanostructures is associated with the formation of the AgAu nanowires. The resulting 1D Ag-Au nanoalloys form stable colloidal dispersions and show unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks in the ensemble extinction spectra.

    16. Common suppression pattern of eta and pi0 mesons at high transverse momentum in Au + Au collisions at square root S(NN) = 200 GeV.

      PubMed

      Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; Chenawi, K El; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

      2006-05-26

      Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of eta mesons have been measured within p(T) = 2-10 GeV/c at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment in Au + Au collisions at square root S(NN) = 200 GeV. In central Au+Au the eta yields are significantly suppressed compared to peripheral Au + Au, d + Au, and p + p yields scaled by the corresponding number of nucleon-nucleon collisions. The magnitude, centrality, and p(T) dependence of the suppression is common, within errors, for eta and pi0. The ratio of eta to pi0 spectra at high p(T) amounts to 0.40 < R(eta/pi)0 < 0.48 for the three systems, in agreement with the world average measured in hadronic and nuclear reactions and, at large scaled momentum, in e+e- collisions.

    17. Surface structure determination of Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kellar, S. A.; Chen, Y.; Huff, W. R. A.; Moler, E. J.; Hussain, Z.; Shirley, D. A.

      1998-01-01

      We have determined the atomic surface structure of a thin film of Fe (15 ML) grown on the Au(100) surface, Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100), with angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) using the Au 4f7/2 core level. We have confirmed that a bcc crystalline Fe film grows epitaxially on the Au(100) substrate with 1 ML of Au atoms remaining on the surface using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We analyzed the ARPEFS oscillations using an electron-scattering code based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism. Our analysis finds that the surface Au atoms are positioned in the fourfold hollow sites 1.67+/-0.02 Å above the Fe surface. We also find that the grown Fe layers are very like bulk bcc Fe, with an interlayer spacing of 1.43+/-0.03 Å.

    18. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

      2014-09-01

      The ubiquity of Au-bearing arsenian pyrite in hydrothermal ore deposits suggests that the coupled geochemical behaviour of Au and As in this sulfide occurs under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions. Despite significant advances in the last 20 years, fundamental factors controlling Au and As ratios in pyrite from ore deposits remain poorly known. Here we explore these constraints using new and previously published EMPA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, and μ-PIXE analyses of As and Au in pyrite from Carlin-type Au, epithermal Au, porphyry Cu, Cu-Au, and orogenic Au deposits, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VHMS), Witwatersrand Au, iron oxide copper gold (IOCG), and coal deposits. Pyrite included in the data compilation formed under temperatures from ∼30 to ∼600 °C and in a wide variety of geological environments. The pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and the fact that most data points plot below the solid solubility limit defined by Reich et al. (2005) indicate that Au1+ is the dominant form of Au in arsenian pyrite and that Au-bearing ore fluids that deposit this sulfide are mostly undersaturated with respect to native Au. The analytical data also show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite defined by an Au/As ratio of 0.02 is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on the crystal-chemical properties of pyrite and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility in pyrite is retrograde; Au and As contents decrease as a function of increasing temperature from ∼200 to ∼500 °C. Based on these results, two major Au-As trends for Au-bearing arsenian pyrite from ore deposits are defined. One trend is formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock interactions and/or can be highly perturbed by changes in temperature and

    19. Fluctuations Magnetiques des Gaz D'electrons Bidimensionnels: Application AU Compose Supraconducteur LANTHANE(2-X) Strontium(x) Cuivre OXYGENE(4)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Benard, Pierre

      Nous presentons une etude des fluctuations magnetiques de la phase normale de l'oxyde de cuivre supraconducteur La_{2-x}Sr _{x}CuO_4 . Le compose est modelise par le Hamiltonien de Hubbard bidimensionnel avec un terme de saut vers les deuxiemes voisins (modele tt'U). Le modele est etudie en utilisant l'approximation de la GRPA (Generalized Random Phase Approximation) et en incluant les effets de la renormalisation de l'interaction de Hubbard par les diagrammes de Brueckner-Kanamori. Dans l'approche presentee dans ce travail, les maximums du facteur de structure magnetique observes par les experiences de diffusion de neutrons sont associes aux anomalies 2k _{F} de reseau du facteur de structure des gaz d'electrons bidimensionnels sans interaction. Ces anomalies proviennent de la diffusion entre particules situees a des points de la surface de Fermi ou les vitesses de Fermi sont tangentes, et conduisent a des divergences dont la nature depend de la geometrie de la surface de Fermi au voisinage de ces points. Ces resultats sont ensuite appliques au modele tt'U, dont le modele de Hubbard usuel tU est un cas particulier. Dans la majorite des cas, les interactions ne determinent pas la position des maximums du facteur de structure. Le role de l'interaction est d'augmenter l'intensite des structures du facteur de structure magnetique associees a l'instabilite magnetique du systeme. Ces structures sont souvent deja presentes dans la partie imaginaire de la susceptibilite sans interaction. Le rapport d'intensite entre les maximums absolus et les autres structures du facteur de structure magnetique permet de determiner le rapport U_ {rn}/U_{c} qui mesure la proximite d'une instabilite magnetique. Le diagramme de phase est ensuite etudie afin de delimiter la plage de validite de l'approximation. Apres avoir discute des modes collectifs et de l'effet d'une partie imaginaire non-nulle de la self-energie, l'origine de l'echelle d'energie des fluctuations magnetiques est examinee

    20. Thermodynamic Properties of Liquid Ag-Au-Sn Alloys

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hindler, M.; Knott, S.; Mikula, A.

      2010-10-01

      The thermodynamic properties of liquid Ag-Au-Sn alloys were studied with an electromotive force (EMF) method using the eutectic mixture of KCl/LiCl as a liquid electrolyte. Activities of Sn in the liquid alloys were measured at three cross-sections with constant molar ratios of Ag:Au = 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2 with tin in the concentration range between 20 at.% and 90 at.% from the liquidus of the samples up to 1030 K. The integral Gibbs energies at 973 K and the integral enthalpies were calculated by Gibbs-Duhem integration.

    1. Graphene nanoribbons synthesized from molecular precursor polymerization on Au(110)

      SciTech Connect

      Massimi, Lorenzo; Ourdjini, Oualid; Della Pia, Ada; Mariani, Carlo; Betti, Maria Grazia; Cavaliere, Emanuele; Gavioli, Luca

      2015-06-23

      A spectroscopic study of 10,10-dibromo-9,9 bianthracene (DBBA) molecules deposited on the Au(110) surface is presented, by means of ultraviolet and X-ray photoemission, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through a thermally activated procedure, these molecular precursors polymerize and eventually form graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with atomically controlled shape and width, very important building blocks for several technological applications. The GNRs observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) appear as short segments on top of the gold surface reconstruction, pointing out the delicate balance among surface diffusion and surface corrugation in their synthesis on the Au(110) surface.

    2. Dielectric function dependence on temperature for Au and Ag

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chen, Yu-Jen; Lee, Meng-Chang; Wang, Chih-Ming

      2014-08-01

      The dielectric functions of Au and Ag are measured using a spectral ellipsometer. The temperature dependence parameters ωp, τ, and ɛ∞, in the Drude-Sommerfeld model have been studied. Furthermore, we provide an empirical function to describe the temperature dependence of the dielectric function for Au and Ag. The empirical function shows a good agreement with previous results. Through the empirical function, one can obtain the dielectric constant at arbitrary temperature and wavelength. This database is useful for the applications that use surface plasmon (SP) resonance at high temperatures, such as the plasmonic thermal emitter, SP-assisted thermal cancer treatment and so on.

    3. Beyond 3 AU from the Sun: "Hypervolatiles" in Distant Comets

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Paganini, Lucas; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Lippi, Manuela; Gibb, Erika L.; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Kawakita, Hideyo; Altwegg, Kathrin

      2016-10-01

      Our understanding of inner coma composition in comets has long been biased towards heliocentric distances (Rh) smaller than 2-3 AU. However, observations far from the Sun are also of high value for better understanding the nucleus structure and outgassing of volatiles. Substantial and very important evidence for the activity of distant comets has been accumulated from photometry and analyses of light curves, but direct detections of primary (parent) volatiles are still rare. For example, comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) remained outside 3.1 AU throughout its apparition, yet it presented the best opportunity since Hale-Bopp (1997) for detailed spectroscopic studies in a distant comet. C/2006 W3 was observed from several space- and ground-based facilities using both infrared and radio techniques. CO, CH4, and C2H6 were measured via infrared spectroscopy at ESO-VLT at Rh = 3.25 AU. Production rates were found to exceed those measured for each of these species in most other comets, despite those comets being observed much closer to the Sun. With its relatively high CO/CO2 ratio, C/2006 W3 also appears as an outlier in the AKARI comet survey of 18 comets. The detections of H2O (Herschel Space Observatory) and CO (ESO-VLT) allow for constraining the coma abundance ratio H2O/CO at Rh = 5 AU.We will compare the C2H6/CH4/CO ratios in C/2006 W3 with those in other comets spanning a large range in Rh: from D/2012 S1 ISON (~0.7 AU) to 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (~ 6.3 AU). Notably in situ measurements by the Rosetta mission were performed in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at a very similar heliocentric distance to C/2006 W3 (3.15 AU). While comparisons of column-integrated remote sensing measurements and abundances from in-situ mass spectrometry (as performed by the ROSINA instrument) are not straightforward, both types of measurement are of high value for constraining models of nucleus outgassing beyond 3 AU from the Sun, where the inferred nucleus structure and

    4. Magnetic clouds between 2-4 AU: Voyager observations

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.

      1981-01-01

      Magnetic clouds were observed in the solar wind between 2-4 AU. It was shown that they are stable enough to persist without major changes out to such distances. It is estimated that the clouds expand at a speed of the order of 45 km/s. The average Alfven speed at the front and rear boundaries is 104 km/s, the expansion speed is estimated to be nearly half of the Alfven speed, which is consistent with an earlier estimate of the expansion speed of clouds between the Sun and 1 AU. The magnetic field configuration is highly ordered and consistent with the passage of some kind of loop.

    5. Nuclear Shadowing and Select d+Au Observables

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

      2007-04-01

      Much of the complexity of the description of d+Au collisions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) derives from effects of the nuclear environment. Here we investigate the effects of the most recent available nuclear shadowing parametrization, the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) and the updated Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) fragmentation functions on three select d+Au collision observables. We compare our results to available experimental data from the STAR and BRAHMS collaborations.

    6. Atomic Structure of Au329(SR)84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

      DOE PAGES

      Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; ...

      2015-04-03

      To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au329(SR)84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF-STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

    7. Theoretical study of CO oxidation on cationic, neutral, and anionic AuM dimers (M = Pd and Ag).

      PubMed

      Chen, Xuan; Lu, Rui-Feng; Kan, Er-Jun; Liu, Yu-Zhen; Xiao, Chuan-Yun; Deng, Kai-Ming

      2014-06-01

      The CO and O2 adsorption as well as CO oxidation on cationic, neutral, and anionic AuM dimers (M = Pd, Ag) are studied by density functional calculations. Our results show that CO and O2 are adsorbed more stably on AuPd dimers than on AuAg dimers with corresponding charge state. O2 is favorable to be adsorbed on Pd atom in AuPd(+), AuPd and AuPd(-) dimers. CO is adsorbed on Pd in AuPd and AuPd(-), while it is favorable to be adsorbed on Au in AuPd(+). For AuAg dimers, O2 is adsorbed on Ag in AuAg and AuAg(-), and it is adsorbed on Au in AuAg(+). CO is adsorbed on Ag in AuPd(-), while it is adsorbed on Au in AuAg and AuAg(+). The CO oxidation reaction is explored along two possible pathways: path-1 involves CO attacking the initial complexes of AuM dimers and O2, and path-2 is related to O2 interacting with the complexes of AuM dimers and CO. The charge state of AuM dimers has a substantial effect on CO oxidation. The reaction on AuPd(-) prefers path-1, and AuPd(+) mediated reaction proceeds along path-2, while CO oxidation on AuPd is difficult along both paths. For AuAg, both pathways are viable for AuAg(-) mediated reactions, while AuAg and AuAg(+) mediated reactions prefer path-2. Moreover, the energy barriers of CO oxidation on neutral AuAg is comparable with those on AuPd in all charge states while the energy barriers for AuAg(-) and AuAg(+) are considerably lower than those for all AuPd dimmers, indicating the impurity atom also plays a significant role in the catalytic activity. Furthermore, AuAg(-) is proposed to be the most active species due to the lowest barrier involved in the reaction.

    8. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: a platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy.

      PubMed

      Huang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yihan; Lin, Ming; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Lan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ke Xin; Han, Yu

      2013-06-12

      Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity.

    9. Acid/base-controlled AuI/Au0 reductive transformations of the monogold [(μ14-Au)Pd22(CO)20(PEt3)8]+ monocation into three different neutral digold nanoclusters: Au2Pd21(CO)20(PEt3)10, Au2Pd28(CO)26(PEt3)10, and new five-layer hexagonal close-packed (μ12-Au)2Pd42(CO)30(PEt3)12 with a trigonal-bipyramidal AuPd3Au kernel.

      PubMed

      Mednikov, Evgueni G; Dahl, Lawrence F

      2015-02-02

      The monogold [(μ(14)-Au)Pd(22)(CO)(20)(PEt(3))(8)](+) nanocation (2, with a [(CF(3)CO(2))(2)H](-) counterion) is shown to be a versatile precursor for the generation of three different neutral Au-Pd nanoclusters with double gold content in their distinctly dissimilar bimetallic architectures. These carbon monoxide (CO)-induced conversions are based on the reduction of Au(I) to Au(0) that is controlled by the reaction medium. Under basic and acidic conditions, the known Au(2)Pd(21)(CO)(20)(PEt(3))(10) (3; >90% yield) and Au(2)Pd(28)(CO)(26)(PEt(3))(10) (4; ∼40% yield), respectively, were obtained, whereas neutral conditions gave rise to the new (μ(12)-Au)(2)Pd(42)(CO)(30)(PEt(3))(12) (1; ∼10-20% yield; all yields based on gold). The molecular structure of 1, established from a 100 K CCD X-ray diffraction study, consists of a five-layer hexoganol close-packed (hcp) Au(2)Pd(42) framework of pseudo-D(3)h symmetry (crystallographic D(3) site symmetry) of the Pd(6)/AuPd(9)/Pd(12)/AuPd(9)/Pd(6) layer sequence, with the Au atoms centering two identical hcp (μ(12)-Au)Pd(12) face-fused anti-cuboctahedral fragments. The 12 Et(3)-attached P atoms are coordinated to the triangular vertex Pd atoms in the four outer layers (except the middle Pd(12)); all five layers are stapled by interlayer bridging COs. The radial Au(cent)-Pd mean distance of 2.79 Å within the two symmetry-equivalent (μ(12)-Au)Pd(12) anti-cuboctahedral fragments of 1 is identical with the radial Pd(cent)-Pd mean distances within hcp (μ(12)-Pd)Pd(12) anti-cuboctahedral fragments of the two geometrically related nondistorted layered structures of Pd(52)(CO)(36)(PEt(3))(14) and [Ni(9)Pd(33)(CO)(41)(PPh(3))(6)](4-) ([PPh(4)](+) counterion), indicating a strain-free structural effect upon the substitution of Au for Pd in their analogous hcp layer-stacked arrangements. It provides prime evidence for an extension to 1 of our previous self-consistent experimental/theoretical-based hypothesis for

    10. Pion Interferometry of square root of (s(NN)) =130 GeV Au + Au collisions at RHIC.

      PubMed

      Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Bossingham, R; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón De La Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schweda, K; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; Szanto De Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

      2001-08-20

      Two-pion correlation functions in Au+Au collisions at square root of [s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured by the STAR (solenoidal tracker at RHIC) detector. The source size extracted by fitting the correlations grows with event multiplicity and decreases with transverse momentum. Anomalously large sizes or emission durations, which have been suggested as signals of quark-gluon plasma formation and rehadronization, are not observed. The Hanbury Brown-Twiss parameters display a weak energy dependence over a broad range in square root of [s(NN)].

    11. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

      PubMed

      Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

      2003-12-31

      Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion.

    12. True nature of an archetypal self-assembly system: mobile Au-thiolate species on Au(111).

      PubMed

      Yu, Miao; Bovet, N; Satterley, Christopher J; Bengió, S; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Milligan, P K; Jones, Robert G; Woodruff, D P; Dhanak, V

      2006-10-20

      Alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) phases on Au(111) have been assumed to involve direct S head group bonding to the substrate. Using x-ray standing wave experiments, we show the thiolate actually bonds to gold adatoms; self-organization in these archetypal SAM systems must therefore be governed by the movement of these Au-S-R moieties on the surface between two distinct local hollow sites on the surface. The results of recent ab initio total energy calculations provide strong support for this description, and a rationale for the implied significant molecular mobility in these systems.

    13. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

      DOE PAGES

      Adamczyk, L.

      2015-01-12

      In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

    14. V0 Reconstruction of Strange Hadrons in Au+Au Collisions at 1.23 AGeV with HADES

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Scheib, T.; HADES Collaboration

      2015-04-01

      Preliminary results on the production of weakly decaying strange hadrons are reported for collisions of Au+Au at 1.23 AGeV beam energy studied with the HADES detector at GSI in Darmstadt. At this collision energy all strange particles are created below their elementary threshold. The reconstruction of the investigated particles (i.e. Λ and K0s) via the topology of their charged decay products (V0 reconstruction) is presented in detail. From the corrected yields of Λ and K0s the ratio K0S/Λ can be calculated and included into a statistical model fit.

    15. Electron identification in Au+Au collisions at 1.23 GeV/u using multivariate analysis

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Harabasz, Szymon; Hades Collaboration

      2014-04-01

      Au+Au collisions at a beam kinetic energy of 1.23 GeV/u have been measured by HADES in 2012. Lepton identification in this experiment has been done using a multivariate algorithm based on an artificial neural network. In the proceedings, details of the identification method and its assessment in terms of purity of the final lepton sample are presented. The obtained purity reaches 95% and the amount of identified electrons and positrons is sufficient to perform further steps of the physics analysis with e+e- pairs.

    16. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

      SciTech Connect

      Adamczyk, L.

      2015-01-12

      In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

    17. Production of {phi} meson in Au+Au collisions at 11.7 A GeV/c.

      SciTech Connect

      Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chi, C. Y.; E917 Collaboration; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Nanal, V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

      1999-06-29

      First Measurement of {phi} meson production in Au+Au collisions has been conducted by E917 at BNL-AGS via selecting events with identified K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} pairs. Preliminary results on the invariant mass spectra of K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} pairs and the m{sub T} spectra are presented. Also, the inverse slope T, dN/dy, the ratio of {phi}/K{sup {minus}}, ratio of {phi}/K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} and their centrality dependences are extracted in a rapidity range of y = 0.9-1.4. Indications on the possible mechanisms of {phi} production are discussed.

    18. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

      PubMed

      Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

      2001-01-15

      Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

    19. True Nature of an Archetypal Self-Assembly System: Mobile Au-Thiolate Species on Au(111)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yu, Miao; Bovet, N.; Satterley, Christopher J.; Bengió, S.; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Milligan, P. K.; Jones, Robert G.; Woodruff, D. P.; Dhanak, V.

      2006-10-01

      Alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) phases on Au(111) have been assumed to involve direct S head group bonding to the substrate. Using x-ray standing wave experiments, we show the thiolate actually bonds to gold adatoms; self-organization in these archetypal SAM systems must therefore be governed by the movement of these Au-S-R moieties on the surface between two distinct local hollow sites on the surface. The results of recent ab initio total energy calculations provide strong support for this description, and a rationale for the implied significant molecular mobility in these systems.

    20. Midrapidity source of intermediate-mass fragments in highly central collisions of Au + Au at 150A MeV

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Alard, J. P.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belayev, I. M.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Bock, R.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Crouau, M.; Dupieux, P.; Erö, J.; Fan, Z. G.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Freifelder, R.; Fraysse, L.; Frolov, S.; Gobbi, A.; Grigorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, O.; Jeong, S. C.; Jorio, M.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Krämer, M.; Kuhn, C.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Matulewicz, T.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Montarou, G.; Morel, P.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; Sadchikov, A.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Sodan, U.; Taccetti, N.; Teh, K.; Tezkratt, R.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.

      1992-08-01

      Charged particles have been observed in collisions of Au on Au at an incident energy of 150A MeV using a high-granularity detector system covering approximately the forward hemisphere in the center-of-mass system. Highly central collisions have been studied using a double selection criterion which combines large charged-particle multiplicities with small transverse-momentum directivities. In this class of events about one quarter of the total nuclear charge emerges as intermediate-mass fragments with nuclear charges Z>2. These fragments are centered at midrapidity and are produced with large transverse velocities.

    1. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

      SciTech Connect

      Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

      2014-06-23

      The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

    2. Visage sacro-iliaque percutané pour fracture instable du bassin de type C 1-2: à propos d'un cas au CHU de Yaoundé

      PubMed Central

      Guifo, Marc Leroy; Farikou, Ibrahima; Pisoh, Christopher Tagnyin; Ndoumbé, Aurélien; Emaleu, Serge Blaise; Takongmo, Samuel

      2014-01-01

      Les ruptures instables de l'anneau pelvien nécessitent une prise en charge chirurgicale. Elles ont traditionnellement été traitées par des ostéosynthèses à foyer ouvert ou par une prise en charge non opératoire lorsque les compétences n’étaient pas disponibles. Il en découlait des séquelles douloureuses et gênantes pour les patients. En 1993 Routt et coll ont rapporté la technique du vissage sacro-iliaque percutané basée sur l'utilisation de la fluoroscopie. Cette technique a été adoptée dans les pays avancés, mais aucune publication ou utilisation n'a été faite à notre connaissance dans notre milieu. Nous rapportons ici un cas réalisé au CHU de Yaoundé et discutons des considérations médicales et techniques qui en découlent. PMID:25883720

    3. Understanding the effect of ultrathin AuPd alloy shells of irregularly shaped Au@AuPd nanoparticles with high-index facets on enhanced performance of ethanol oxidation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bi, Cuixia; Feng, Cong; Miao, Tingting; Song, Yahui; Wang, Dayang; Xia, Haibing

      2015-11-01

      In this study, irregularly shaped, concave cuboidal Au@AuPd nanoparticles (ISCC-Au@AuPd NPs) with high-index facets were synthesized via Pd overgrowth on pre-formed ISCC-Au NPs with a concentration of Pd precursors as low as 2%. The AuPd alloy nature of the resulting shells was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammogram analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Among the irregularly shaped NPs obtained, the ISCC-Au97.5@Au0.5Pd2.0 NPs display the largest electrochemically active surface area (up to 92.11 m2 g-1), as their closed-packed agglomeration was prevented, and the best long-term stability with respect to ethanol oxidation (0.50 M) in alkaline media (0.30 KOH) by efficiently removing intermediates. Their mass- and ECSA-normalized current densities (4.15 A mgPd-1 and 4.51 mA cm-2) are about 20.7 times and 6.9 times higher than those of commercial Pd/C catalysts (0.20 A mgPd-1 and 0.65 mA cm-2), respectively.In this study, irregularly shaped, concave cuboidal Au@AuPd nanoparticles (ISCC-Au@AuPd NPs) with high-index facets were synthesized via Pd overgrowth on pre-formed ISCC-Au NPs with a concentration of Pd precursors as low as 2%. The AuPd alloy nature of the resulting shells was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammogram analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Among the irregularly shaped NPs obtained, the ISCC-Au97.5@Au0.5Pd2.0 NPs display the largest electrochemically active surface area (up to 92.11 m2 g-1), as their closed-packed agglomeration was prevented, and the best long-term stability with respect to ethanol oxidation (0.50 M) in alkaline media (0.30 KOH) by efficiently removing intermediates. Their mass- and ECSA-normalized current densities (4.15 A mgPd-1 and 4.51 mA cm-2) are about 20.7 times and 6.9 times higher than those of commercial Pd/C catalysts (0.20 A mgPd-1 and 0.65 mA cm-2), respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: High magnification TEM

    4. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

      PubMed

      Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

      2015-07-14

      Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

    5. Au42: a possible ground-state noble metallic nanotube.

      PubMed

      Wang, Jing; Ning, Hua; Ma, Qing-Min; Liu, Ying; Li, You-Cheng

      2008-10-07

      A large hollow tubelike Au(42) is predicted as a new ground-state configuration based on the scalar relativistic density functional theory. The shape of this new Au(42) cluster is similar to a (5,5) single-wall gold nanotube, the two ends of which are capped by half of a fullerenelike Au(32). In the same way, a series of Au(n) (n = 37, 42, 47, 52, 57, 62, 67, 72, ..., Delta n = 5) tubelike structures has been constructed. The highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gaps suggested a significant semiconductor-conductor alternation in n is an element of [32,47]. Similar to the predictions and speculation of Daedalus [D. E. H. Jones, New Sci. 32, 245 (1966); E. Osawa, Superaromaticity (Kagaku, Kyoto, 1970), Vol. 25, pp. 854-863; Z. Yoshida and E. Osawa, Aromaticity Chemical Monograph (Kagaku Dojin, Kyoto, Japan, 1971), Vol. 22, pp. 174-176; D. A. Bochvar and E. G. Gal'pern, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 209, 610 (1973)], here a large hollow ground-state gold nanotube was predicted theoretically.

    6. Au/Si Nanorod-Based Biosensor for Salmonella Detection

      Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

      Among several potentials of nanotechnology applications for food industry, development of nanoscale sensors for food safety and quality measurement are emerging. A novel biosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using Au/Si/ nanorods. The Si nanorods were fabricated by glancing angle depositi...

    7. Crossover among structural motifs in Pd-Au nanoalloys.

      PubMed

      Zhu, Beien; Guesmi, Hazar; Creuze, Jérôme; Legrand, Bernard; Mottet, Christine

      2015-11-14

      The crossovers among the most abundant structural motifs (icosahedra, decahedra and truncated octahedra) of Pd-Au nanoalloys have been determined theoretically in a size range between 2 and 7 nm and for three compositions equivalent to Pd3Au, PdAu and PdAu3. The chemical ordering and segregation optimisation are performed via Monte Carlo simulations using semi-empirical tight-binding potentials fitted to ab initio calculations. The chemical configurations are then quenched via molecular dynamic simulations in order to compare their energy and characterize the equilibrium structures as a function of the cluster size. For the smaller sizes (of around 300 atoms and fewer) the structures are also optimized at the electronic level within ab initio calculations in order to validate the semi-empirical potential. The predictions of the crossover sizes for the nanoalloys cannot be simply extrapolated from the crossover of the pure nanoparticles but imply stress release phenomena related to the size misfit between the two metals. Indeed, alloying extends the range of stability of the icosahedron beyond that of the pure systems and the energy differences between decahedra and truncated octahedra become asymptotic, around the sizes of 5-6 nm. Nevertheless, such equilibrium results should be modulated regarding kinetic considerations or possible gas adsorption under experimental conditions.

    8. Nitrogen mineralization from 'AU Golden' sunn hemp residue

      Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

      The tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) cultivar ‘AU Golden’ has the potential to provide substantial amounts of nitrogen (N) to subsequent crops that could reduce recommended application rates of synthetic N fertilizers. Nitrogen fertilization problems via legumes are often due to asynch...

    9. New ideally absorbing Au plasmonic nanostructures for biomedical applications

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zakomirnyi, Vadim I.; Rasskazov, Ilia L.; Karpov, Sergey V.; Polyutov, Sergey P.

      2017-01-01

      In this paper a new set of plasmonic nanostructures operating at the conditions of an ideal absorption (Grigoriev et al., 2015 [1]) was proposed for novel biomedical applications. We consider spherical x/Au nanoshells and Au/x/Au nanomatryoshkas, where 'x' changes from conventional Si and SiO2 to alternative plasmonic materials (Naik and Shalaev, 2013 [2]), such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum, gallium and indium tin oxide. The absorption peak of proposed nanostructures lies within 700-1100 nm wavelength region and corresponds to the maximal optical transparency of hemoglobin and melanin as well as to the radiation frequency of available pulsed medical lasers. It was shown that the ideal absorption takes place in a given wavelength region for Au coatings with thickness less than 12 nm. In this case finite quantum size effects for metallic nanoshells play a significant role. The mathematical model for the search of the ideal absorption conditions was modified by taking into account the finite quantum size effects.

    10. Restructuring hollow Au-Ag nanostructures for improved SERS activity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Jiji, S. G.; Gopchandran, K. G.

      2016-10-01

      Hollow Au-Ag nanostructures with improved SERS performance were prepared by using a modified galvanic replacement reaction. The plasmon characteristics of the hollow structures are found to be highly sensitive to the volume of cathode, whether or not a co-reductant was used in the synthesis. It is found that the presence of a co-reductant viz., ascorbic acid (AA) during the reaction make the hollow structures capable to maintain its physical structure even after addition of excess cathode and also it transformes sacrificial templates into highly efficient hollow Au-Ag SERS substrates. In the galvanic replacement reaction conducted in presence of AA, where on one side the removal of Ag atoms make cavities to occur and on the other side a coating on the surface with Au and Ag atoms due to co-reduction take place simultaneously. Morphological observations indicated that it is possible to control the competition between these two mechanisms and to make Au-Ag hollow structures in tune with applications by optimizing the volume of cathode or AA. The SERS activity of these substrates were tested with crystal violet molecule as probe, using two different laser lines, 514 and 784.8 nm. In this report, the enhancement observed for hollow structures fabricated under optimum conditions are in the order of 106. SERS measurements have shown that for a specific volume of cathode, substrates fabricated in presence of AA are superior to the other type and also the increase in enhancement factor is ˜10 fold.

    11. Charge-dependent anisotropic flow in Cu + Au collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Niida,