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Sample records for suggests central susceptibility

  1. Hypnotic Susceptibility, Suggestion, and Reports of Autokinetic Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Benjamin; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hypnotic susceptibility and of suggestion of direction on four measures of autokinetic movement: the mean number of changes in direction reported per trial, the latency of reported movement, the estimated direction, and the reported magnitude of movement. (Editor)

  2. Regional sinkhole susceptibility maps: The Latium Region case (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Vigna, F.; Teoli, P.; Mazza, R.; Leoni, G.; Capelli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Several and frequent studies were internationally presented about landslide susceptibility, meanwhile in literature is missing a broad diffusion of studies regarding sinkhole susceptibility. That's why sinkhole recurrence depends on several geological conditions related to specific geological and hydrogeological context (sinkhole prone area) that vary case by case. Notwithstanding this regionalization problem of sinkhole recurrence, in the central Appenine sedimentary basins (Italy) a certain number of geological, geomorphologic and hydrogeological conditions (sinkhole predisposing issues) can be considered in common between the surveyed sinkholes. Eventually this could be compared with similar geological conditions and sinkhole occurrence in the rest of Italy or in other countries. In this case study is presented a probabilistic approach regarding the Latium Region deriving from the comparison between the regional sinkhole inventory realized during a precedent project and the dataset of the new Hydrogeological Map of Latium Region (scale 1:100.000). Indexed elements, chosen because associated to the majority of sinkhole phenomena, are: outcropping lithologies, water table depth, main faults (even if buried), hydrothermal springs, land use and the epicentres of recent earthquakes. These indexed elements were weighted and combined in a matrix which preliminary result is the sinkhole susceptibility map of Latium Region. When definitively validated, this approach could be suitable for local authorities to planning more targeted studies in major hazard areas.

  3. Heart rate variability in subjects with different hypnotic susceptibility receiving nociceptive stimulation and suggestions of analgesia.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, R; Varanini, M; Menicucci, D; Santarcangelo, E L; Migliorini, S; Fontani, G; Carli, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible hypnotizability-related modulation of heart activity during nociceptive stimulation (pressor pain) and during nociceptive stimulation associated with the suggestion of analgesia in not hypnotized healthy individuals with a high (Highs) and a low (Lows) hypnotic susceptibility. ECG and respirogram were recorded. Standard time and frequency domain indexes were evaluated, together with the sd1 and sd2 values of the Poincaré plot over the RR series. Results showed self reports of analgesia in Highs and a significant increase of the respiratory frequency during stimulation in both groups. Very few significant differences between groups and among conditions were detected for mean RR and heart rate variability (HRV) through spectral analysis. and through the Poincaré indexes evaluation. On the contrary, a promising approach seems to be the study of the correlations among standard and Poincaré variables. In particular, different changes in (or even lost of) correlations were enlightened in Highs and Lows, suggesting a different modulation of RR in the two groups, probably due to the very low frequency components of HRV. Different roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic activities during stimulation can be suggested.

  4. Genome-wide association studies of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis suggest candidate susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swarkar; Gao, Xiaochong; Londono, Douglas; Devroy, Shonn E; Mauldin, Kristen N; Frankel, Jessica T; Brandon, January M; Zhang, Dongping; Li, Quan-Zhen; Dobbs, Matthew B; Gurnett, Christina A; Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dormans, John P; Herring, John A; Gordon, Derek; Wise, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is an unexplained and common spinal deformity seen in otherwise healthy children. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood despite intensive investigation. Although genetic underpinnings are clear, replicated susceptibility loci that could provide insight into etiology have not been forthcoming. To address these issues, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of ∼327 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 419 AIS families. We found strongest evidence of association with chromosome 3p26.3 SNPs in the proximity of the CHL1 gene (P < 8 × 10(-8) for rs1400180). We genotyped additional chromosome 3p26.3 SNPs and tested replication in two follow-up case-control cohorts, obtaining strongest results when all three cohorts were combined (rs10510181 odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.29-1.73, P = 2.58 × 10(-8)), but these were not confirmed in a separate GWAS. CHL1 is of interest, as it encodes an axon guidance protein related to Robo3. Mutations in the Robo3 protein cause horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS), a rare disease marked by severe scoliosis. Other top associations in our GWAS were with SNPs in the DSCAM gene encoding an axon guidance protein in the same structural class with Chl1 and Robo3. We additionally found AIS associations with loci in CNTNAP2, supporting a previous study linking this gene with AIS. Cntnap2 is also of functional interest, as it interacts directly with L1 and Robo class proteins and participates in axon pathfinding. Our results suggest the relevance of axon guidance pathways in AIS susceptibility, although these findings require further study, particularly given the apparent genetic heterogeneity in this disease.

  5. Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy outside the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dibb, Russell; Xie, Luke; Wei, Hongjiang; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic-susceptibility-based MRI has made important contributions to the characterization of tissue microstructure, chemical composition, and organ function. This has motivated a number of studies to explore the link between microstructure and susceptibility in organs and tissues throughout the body, including the kidney, heart, and connective tissue. These organs and tissues have anisotropic magnetic susceptibility properties and cellular organizations that are distinct from the lipid organization of myelin in the brain. For instance, anisotropy is traced to the epithelial lipid orientation in the kidney, the myofilament proteins in the heart, and the collagen fibrils in the knee cartilage. The magnetic susceptibility properties of these and other tissues are quantified using specific MRI tools: susceptibility tensor imaging (STI), quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), and individual QSM measurements with respect to tubular and filament directions determined from diffusion tensor imaging. These techniques provide complementary and supplementary information to that produced by traditional MRI methods. In the kidney, STI can track tubules in all layers including the cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla. In the heart, STI detected myofibers throughout the myocardium. QSM in the knee revealed three unique layers in articular cartilage by exploiting the anisotropic susceptibility features of collagen. While QSM and STI are promising tools to study tissue susceptibility, certain technical challenges must be overcome in order to realize routine clinical use. This paper reviews essential experimental findings of susceptibility anisotropy in the body, the underlying mechanisms, and the associated MRI methodologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Magnetic susceptibility and relation to initial 87Sr/86Sr for granitoids of the central Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, P.C.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kistler, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of more than 6000 samples of granitic rock from the Mariposa 1?? by 2?? quadrangle, which crosses the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith between 37?? and 38??N latitude, shows that magnetic susceptibility values are above 10-2 SI units in the east and central parts of the batholith and drop abruptly to less than 10-3 SI units in the western foothills. In a narrow transitional zone, intermediate values (10-3 to 10-2) prevail. Magnetic susceptibility appears to decrease slightly westward within the zones of both high and low values. Magnetic susceptibility in plutonic rocks is chiefly a function of the abundance of magnetite, which depends, in turn, on the total iron content of the rocks and their oxidation ratio. Correlations of magnetic susceptibility with initial 87Sr/86Sr suggest that oxidation ratios have been inherited from the source regions for the magmas from which the rocks crystallized. Reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ by organic carbon or other reducing substances may also have affected magnetic susceptibility. -from Authors

  7. Genome-wide gene expression profiling suggests distinct radiation susceptibilities in sporadic and post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Detours, V; Delys, L; Libert, F; Weiss Solís, D; Bogdanova, T; Dumont, J E; Franc, B; Thomas, G; Maenhaut, C

    2007-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) incidence dramatically increased in the vicinity of Chernobyl. The cancer-initiating role of radiation elsewhere is debated. Therefore, we searched for a signature distinguishing radio-induced from sporadic cancers. Using microarrays, we compared the expression profiles of PTCs from the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB, n=12) and from French patients with no history of exposure to ionising radiations (n=14). We also compared the transcriptional responses of human lymphocytes to the presumed aetiological agents initiating these tumours, γ-radiation and H2O2. On a global scale, the transcriptomes of CTB and French tumours are indistinguishable, and the transcriptional responses to γ-radiation and H2O2 are similar. On a finer scale, a 118 genes signature discriminated the γ-radiation and H2O2 responses. This signature could be used to classify the tumours as CTB or French with an error of 15–27%. Similar results were obtained with an independent signature of 13 genes involved in homologous recombination. Although sporadic and radio-induced PTCs represent the same disease, they are distinguishable with molecular signatures reflecting specific responses to γ-radiation and H2O2. These signatures in PTCs could reflect the susceptibility profiles of the patients, suggesting the feasibility of a radiation susceptibility test. PMID:17712314

  8. Susceptibility of field-collected mosquitoes in central New Jersey to organophosphates and a pyrethroid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Debin; Indelicato, Nick; Petersen, Jack; Williges, Eric; Unlu, Isik; Farajollahi, Ary

    2014-06-01

    Chemical insecticides are the primary means to control mosquitoes, and mosquito control programs must regularly monitor for resistance of mosquito vectors to commonly used insecticides to ensure the efficacy and sustainability of active ingredients. We performed insecticide resistance bioassays to test the susceptibility of field-collected mosquitoes in central New Jersey to 1 larvicide (temephos) and 2 adulticides (malathion and sumithrin). Larval susceptibility of Culex pipiens pipiens to temephos provided median concentration (LC50) and 95% lethal concentration (LC95) values of 1.108 microg/l and 2.02 microg/l, respectively. Bottle bioassays of adult Aedes albopictus showed that 100% mortality was achieved at 35-min exposure to sumithrin and at 40-min to malathion. Baseline values were obtained using both temephos and sumithrin. Our bioassays indicate satisfactory susceptibility to temephos and sumithrin in Ae. albopictus and Cx. p. pipiens field populations in central New Jersey. Despite constant field use, both products are still effective and can be used adequately for control of the test species. However, the susceptibility of target insects to various formulations should be closely monitored periodically to ensure continual efficacy.

  9. Mitochondrial Genomes of Giant Deers Suggest their Late Survival in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Immel, Alexander; Drucker, Dorothée G.; Bonazzi, Marion; Jahnke, Tina K.; Münzel, Susanne C.; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Herbig, Alexander; Kind, Claus-Joachim; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The giant deer Megaloceros giganteus is among the most fascinating Late Pleistocene Eurasian megafauna that became extinct at the end of the last ice age. Important questions persist regarding its phylogenetic relationship to contemporary taxa and the reasons for its extinction. We analyzed two large ancient cervid bone fragments recovered from cave sites in the Swabian Jura (Baden-Württemberg, Germany) dated to 12,000 years ago. Using hybridization capture in combination with next generation sequencing, we were able to reconstruct nearly complete mitochondrial genomes from both specimens. Both mtDNAs cluster phylogenetically with fallow deer and show high similarity to previously studied partial Megaloceros giganteus DNA from Kamyshlov in western Siberia and Killavullen in Ireland. The unexpected presence of Megaloceros giganteus in Southern Germany after the Ice Age suggests a later survival in Central Europe than previously proposed. The complete mtDNAs provide strong phylogenetic support for a Dama-Megaloceros clade. Furthermore, isotope analyses support an increasing competition between giant deer, red deer, and reindeer after the Last Glacial Maximum, which might have contributed to the extinction of Megaloceros in Central Europe. PMID:26052672

  10. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-03-23

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (-786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles -786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2-5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue.

  11. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (−786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles −786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2–5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue. PMID:27004986

  12. Complex central structures suggest complex evolutionary paths for barred S0 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Martínez-Lombilla, Cristina; Knapen, Johan H.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate three barred lenticular galaxies (NGC 2681, NGC 3945 and NGC 4371), which were previously reported to have complex central structures but without a detailed structural analysis of these galaxies' high-resolution data. We have therefore performed four- to six-component (pseudo-)bulge/disc/bar/ring/point source) decompositions of the composite (Hubble Space Telescope plus ground-based) surface brightness profiles. We find that NGC 2681 hosts three bars, while NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 are double- and single-barred galaxies, respectively, in agreement with past isophotal analysis. We find that the bulges in these galaxies are compact, and have Sérsic indices of n ˜ 2.2-3.6 and stellar masses of M* ˜ 0.28 × 1010-1.1 × 1010 M⊙. NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 have intermediate-scale `pseudo-bulges' that are well described by a Sérsic model with low n ≲ 0.5 instead of an exponential (n = 1) profile as done in the past. We measure emission line fluxes enclosed within nine different elliptical apertures, finding that NGC 2681 has a low-ionization nuclear emission region (LINER)-type emission inside R ˜ 3 arcsec, but the emission line due to star formation is significant when aperture size is increased. In contrast, NGC 3945 and NGC 4371 have composite (active galactic nucleus plus star-forming)- and LINER-type emissions inside and outside R ˜ 2 arcsec, respectively. Our findings suggest that the three galaxies have experienced a complex evolutionary path. The bulges appear to be consequences of an earlier violent merging event while subsequent disc formation via gas accretion and bar-driven perturbations may account for the build-up of pseudo-bulges, bars, rings and point sources.

  13. A genome-wide association study follow-up suggests a possible role for PPARG in systemic sclerosis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) comprising a French cohort of systemic sclerosis (SSc) reported several non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing a nominal association in the discovery phase. We aimed to identify previously overlooked susceptibility variants by using a follow-up strategy. Methods Sixty-six non-HLA SNPs showing a P value <10-4 in the discovery phase of the French SSc GWAS were analyzed in the first step of this study, performing a meta-analysis that combined data from the two published SSc GWASs. A total of 2,921 SSc patients and 6,963 healthy controls were included in this first phase. Two SNPs, PPARG rs310746 and CHRNA9 rs6832151, were selected for genotyping in the replication cohort (1,068 SSc patients and 6,762 healthy controls) based on the results of the first step. Genotyping was performed by using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. Results We observed nominal associations for both PPARG rs310746 (PMH = 1.90 × 10-6, OR, 1.28) and CHRNA9 rs6832151 (PMH = 4.30 × 10-6, OR, 1.17) genetic variants with SSc in the first step of our study. In the replication phase, we observed a trend of association for PPARG rs310746 (P value = 0.066; OR, 1.17). The combined overall Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis of all the cohorts included in the present study revealed that PPARG rs310746 remained associated with SSc with a nominal non-genome-wide significant P value (PMH = 5.00 × 10-7; OR, 1.25). No evidence of association was observed for CHRNA9 rs6832151 either in the replication phase or in the overall pooled analysis. Conclusion Our results suggest a role of PPARG gene in the development of SSc. PMID:24401602

  14. An innovative tool for landslide susceptibility mapping in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponaro, Annamaria; Pilz, Marco; Wieland, Marc; Bindi, Dino; Parolai, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Kyrgyzstan is among the most exposed countries in the world to landslide susceptibility. The high seismicity of the area, the presence of high mountain ridges and topographic relieves, the geology of the local materials and the occurrence of heavy precipitations represent the main factors responsible for slope failures. In particular, the large variability of material properties and slope conditions as well as the difficulties in forecasting heavy precipitations locally and in quantifying the level of ground shaking call for harmonized procedures for reducing the negative impact of these factors. Several studies have recently been carried out aiming at preparing landslide susceptibility and hazard maps; however, some of them - qualitative-based - suffer from the application of subjective decision rules from experts in the classification of parameters that influence the occurrence of a landslide. On the other hand, statistical methods provide objectivity over qualitative ones since they allow a numerical evaluation of landslide spatial distribution with landslide potential factors. For this reason, we will make use of a bivariate technique known as Weight-Of-Evidence method to evaluate the influence of landslide predictive factors. The aim of this study is to identify areas in Kyrgyzstan being more prone to earthquake-triggered landslides. An innovative approach which exploits the new advances of GIS technology together with statistical concepts is presented. A range of conditioning factors and their potential impact on landslide activation is quantitatively assessed on the basis of landslide spatial distribution and seismic zonation. Results show areas which are more susceptible to landslides induced by earthquakes. Our approach can be used to fill the gap of subjectivity that typically affects already performed qualitative analysis. The resulting landslide susceptibility map represents a potentially supportive tool for disaster management and planning activities

  15. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furby, K. A.; Bouwmeester, J.; Berumen, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (<20 % on average). We resurveyed the reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e.g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea.

  16. A central cavity within the holo-translocon suggests a mechanism for membrane protein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Botte, Mathieu; Zaccai, Nathan R.; Nijeholt, Jelger Lycklama à.; Martin, Remy; Knoops, Kèvin; Papai, Gabor; Zou, Juan; Deniaud, Aurélien; Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Jiang, Qiyang; Roy, Abhishek Singha; Schulten, Klaus; Schultz, Patrick; Rappsilber, Juri; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Berger, Imre; Collinson, Ian; Schaffitzel, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The conserved SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the accessory proteins SecDF-YajC and YidC constitute the bacterial holo-translocon (HTL), capable of protein-secretion and membrane-protein insertion. By employing an integrative approach combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), low-resolution electron microscopy and biophysical analyses we determined the arrangement of the proteins and lipids within the super-complex. The results guided the placement of X-ray structures of individual HTL components and allowed the proposal of a model of the functional translocon. Their arrangement around a central lipid-containing pool conveys an unexpected, but compelling mechanism for membrane-protein insertion. The periplasmic domains of YidC and SecD are poised at the protein-channel exit-site of SecY, presumably to aid the emergence of translocating polypeptides. The SecY lateral gate for membrane-insertion is adjacent to the membrane ‘insertase’ YidC. Absolute-scale SANS employing a novel contrast-match-point analysis revealed a dynamic complex adopting open and compact configurations around an adaptable central lipid-filled chamber, wherein polytopic membrane-proteins could fold, sheltered from aggregation and proteolysis. PMID:27924919

  17. Toxicity and transcriptomic analysis in Hyalella azteca suggests increased exposure and susceptibility of epibenthic organisms to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Poynton, Helen C; Lazorchak, James M; Impellitteri, Christopher A; Blalock, Bonnie; Smith, Mark E; Struewing, Katherine; Unrine, Jason; Roose, Deborah

    2013-08-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are expected to make their way into the aquatic environment where sedimentation of particles will likely occur, putting benthic organisms at particular risk. Therefore, organisms such as Hyalella azteca, an epibenthic crustacean which forages at the sediment surface, is likely to have a high potential exposure. Here we show that zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs are more toxic to H. azteca compared with the corresponding metal ion, Zn(2+). Dissolution of ZnO NPs contributes about 50% of the Zn measured in the ZnO NP suspensions, and cannot account for the toxicity of these particles to H. azteca. However, gene expression analysis is unable to distinguish between the ZnO NP exposures and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) exposures at equitoxic concentrations. These results lead us to hypothesize that ZnO NPs provide an enhanced exposure route for Zn(2+) uptake into H. azteca, and possibly other sediment dwelling organisms. Our study supports the prediction that sediment dwelling organisms are highly susceptible to the effects of ZnO NPs and should be considered in the risk assessment of these nanomaterials.

  18. Identification of potential mitochondrial CLPXP protease interactors and substrates suggests its central role in energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Fabian; Langer, Julian D.; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondria is achieved by several mechanisms, including the regulation of mitochondrial proteostasis. The matrix protease CLPXP, involved in protein quality control, has been implicated in ageing and disease. However, particularly due to the lack of knowledge of CLPXP’s substrate spectrum, only little is known about the pathways and mechanisms controlled by this protease. Here we report the first comprehensive identification of potential mitochondrial CLPXP in vivo interaction partners and substrates using a combination of tandem affinity purification and differential proteomics. This analysis reveals that CLPXP in the fungal ageing model Podospora anserina is mainly associated with metabolic pathways in mitochondria, e.g. components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as subunits of electron transport chain complex I. These data suggest a possible function of mitochondrial CLPXP in the control and/or maintenance of energy metabolism. Since bioenergetic alterations are a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and ageing, our data comprise an important resource for specific studies addressing the role of CLPXP in these adverse processes. PMID:26679294

  19. Maps of Quaternary Deposits and Liquefaction Susceptibility in the Central San Francisco Bay Region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witter, Robert C.; Knudsen, Keith L.; Sowers, Janet M.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Koehler, Richard D.; Randolph, Carolyn E.; Brooks, Suzanna K.; Gans, Kathleen D.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the urban core of the San Francisco Bay region. It supercedes the equivalent area of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 00-444 (Knudsen and others, 2000), which covers the larger 9-county San Francisco Bay region. The report consists of (1) a spatial database, (2) two small-scale colored maps (Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility), (3) a text describing the Quaternary map and liquefaction interpretation (part 3), and (4) a text introducing the report and describing the database (part 1). All parts of the report are digital; part 1 describes the database and digital files and how to obtain them by downloading across the internet. The nine counties surrounding San Francisco Bay straddle the San Andreas fault system, which exposes the region to serious earthquake hazard (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). Much of the land adjacent to the Bay and the major rivers and streams is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that are particularly vulnerable to earthquake shaking and liquefaction of water-saturated granular sediment. This new map provides a consistent detailed treatment of the central part of the 9-county region in which much of the mapping of Open-File Report 00-444 was either at smaller (less detailed) scale or represented only preliminary revision of earlier work. Like Open-File Report 00-444, the current mapping uses geomorphic expression, pedogenic soils, inferred depositional environments, and geologic age to define and distinguish the map units. Further scrutiny of the factors controlling liquefaction susceptibility has led to some changes relative to Open-File Report 00-444: particularly the reclassification of San Francisco Bay mud (Qhbm) to have only MODERATE susceptibility and the rating of artificial fills according to the Quaternary map units inferred to underlie them (other than dams - adf). The two colored

  20. The genetic profile of susceptibility to infectious diseases in Roman-Period populations from Central Poland.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Magda; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Zamerska, Alicja; Płoszaj, Tomasz; Witas, Henryk W

    2017-01-01

    For thousands of years human beings have resisted life-threatening pathogens. This ongoing battle is considered to be the major force shaping our gene pool as every micro-evolutionary process provokes specific shifts in the genome, both that of the host and the pathogen. Past populations were more susceptible to changes in allele frequencies not only due to selection pressure, but also as a result of genetic drift, migration and inbreeding. In the present study we have investigated the frequency of five polymorphisms within innate immune-response genes (SLC11A1 D543N, MBL2 G161A, P2RX7 A1513C, IL10 A-1082G, TLR2 -196 to -174 ins/del) related to susceptibility to infections in humans. The DNA of individuals from two early Roman-Period populations of Linowo and Rogowo was analysed. The distribution of three mutations varied significantly when compared to the modern Polish population. The TAFT analysis suggests that the decreased frequency of SLC11A1 D543N in modern Poles as compared to 2nd century Linowo samples is the result of non-stochastic mechanisms, such as purifying or balancing selection. The disparity in frequency of other mutations is most likely the result of genetic drift, an evolutionary force which is remarkably amplified in low-size groups. Together with the FST analysis, mtDNA haplotypes' distribution and deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, we suggest that the two populations were not interbreeding (despite the close proximity between them), but rather inbreeding, the results of which are particularly pronounced among Rogowo habitants.

  1. Crystallographic Studies of Prion Protein (PrP) Segments Suggest How Structural Changes Encoded by Polymorphism at Residue 129 Modulate Susceptibility to Human Prion Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2010-09-23

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in codon 129 of the human prion gene, leading to a change from methionine to valine at residue 129 of prion protein (PrP), has been shown to be a determinant in the susceptibility to prion disease. However, the molecular basis of this effect remains unexplained. In the current study, we determined crystal structures of prion segments having either Met or Val at residue 129. These 6-residue segments of PrP centered on residue 129 are 'steric zippers,' pairs of interacting {beta}-sheets. Both structures of these 'homozygous steric zippers' reveal direct intermolecular interactions between Met or Val in one sheet and the identical residue in the mating sheet. These two structures, plus a structure-based model of the heterozygous Met-Val steric zipper, suggest an explanation for the previously observed effects of this locus on prion disease susceptibility and progression.

  2. Comparative susceptibility of three species of Anopheles from Belize, Central America, to Plasmodium falciparum (NF-54).

    PubMed

    Grieco, John P; Achee, Nicole L; Roberts, Donald R; Andre, Richard G

    2005-09-01

    In August of 2000, a comparative susceptibility study was conducted using 3 species of Anopheles mosquitoes from Belize, Central America, and a standard species used in laboratory infection studies, Anopheles stephensi. Test populations were fed human blood infected with cultured Plasmodium falciparum (NF-54 strain) parasites via a membrane feeder. The control species, An. stephensi, exhibited the highest infections, with 73.8% of dissected specimens positive for sporozoites in the salivary glands. The control species also showed heavier sporozoite loads; 74.0% of positive glands having greater than 200 sporozoites. Of species from Belize, Anopheles darlingi was the most susceptibile, e.g., 41.0% of salivary glands were positive, with more than 200 sporozoites per gland. Anopheles vestitipennis had a low salivary gland infection rate (9.3%) and a moderate number of sporozoites in glands (i.e., 85.7% containing 50-250 sporozoites). Anopheles albimanus was the least susceptible species to infection. No specimens of An. albimanus from the Golden Stream population developed sporozoites in the salivary glands, yet 20.7% of dissected specimens had positive midgut infections. The An. albimanus Buena Vista population showed similar results with only a 2.2% salivary gland infection rate and a 21.5% midgut infection rate. Oocysts in An. stephensi increased in size by 20% after day 10. Development peaked at day 12, with a mean oocyst diameter of 58 microm at onset of oocyst differentiation. Oocysts developed more slowly in An. vestitipennis until day 10. After day 10, there was a 53% increase in oocyst development over the previous 10 days. Oocyst differentiation was not observed until day 13 postfeed. As with An. vestitipennis, both populations of An. albimanus showed similar slow rates of oocyst development; however, no dramatic growth increase occurred after day 10. The oocysts in the Golden Stream population exhibited a cessation of growth after day 10, peaking at a mean

  3. Investigation of six testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility genes suggests a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Robert; Andreassen, Kristine E; Kristiansen, Wenche; Aschim, Elin L; Bremnes, Roy M; Dahl, Olav; Fosså, Sophie D; Klepp, Olbjørn; Langberg, Carl W; Solberg, Arne; Tretli, Steinar; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Haugen, Trine B; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2013-08-15

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) risk in the genes ATF7IP, BAK1, DMRT1, KITLG, SPRY4 and TERT. In the present study, we validate these associations in a Scandinavian population, and explore effect modification by parental sex and differences in associations between the major histological subtypes seminoma and non-seminoma. A total of 118 SNPs in the six genes were genotyped in a population-based Swedish-Norwegian sample comprising 831 TGCT case-parent triads, 474 dyads, 712 singletons and 3919 population controls. Seven hundred and thirty-four additional SNPs were imputed using reference haplotypes from the 1000 genomes project. SNP-TGCT association was investigated using a likelihood-based association test for nuclear families and unrelated subjects implemented in the software package UNPHASED. Forward stepwise regression within each gene was applied to determine independent association signals. Effect modifications by parent-of-origin and effect differences between histological subtypes were explored. We observed strong association between SNPs in all six genes and TGCT (lowest P-value per gene: ATF7IP 6.2 × 10(-6); BAK1 2.1 × 10(-10); DMRT1 6.7 × 10(-25); KITLG 2.1 × 10(-48); SPRY4 1.4 × 10(-29); TERT 1.8 × 10(-18)). Stepwise regression indicated three independent signals for BAK1 and TERT, two for SPRY4 and one each for DMRT1, ATF7IP and KITLG. A significant parent-of-origin effect was observed for rs10463352 in SPRY4 (maternal odds ratio = 1.72, paternal odds ratio = 0.99, interaction P = 0.0013). No significant effect differences between seminomas and non-seminomas were found. In summary, we validated previously reported genetic associations with TGCT in a Scandinavian population, and observed suggestive evidence of a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4.

  4. Microsatellite data suggest significant population structure and differentiation within the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Vineis, Joseph H; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Scarpassa, Vera M; Póvoa, Marinete M; Padilla, Norma; Achee, Nicole L; Conn, Jan E

    2008-01-01

    Background Anopheles darlingi is the most important malaria vector in the Neotropics. An understanding of A. darlingi's population structure and contemporary gene flow patterns is necessary if vector populations are to be successfully controlled. We assessed population genetic structure and levels of differentiation based on 1,376 samples from 31 localities throughout the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon and Central America using 5–8 microsatellite loci. Results We found high levels of polymorphism for all of the Amazonian populations (mean RS = 7.62, mean HO = 0.742), and low levels for the Belize and Guatemalan populations (mean RS = 4.3, mean HO = 0.457). The Bayesian clustering analysis revealed five population clusters: northeastern Amazonian Brazil, southeastern and central Amazonian Brazil, western and central Amazonian Brazil, Peruvian Amazon, and the Central American populations. Within Central America there was low non-significant differentiation, except for between the populations separated by the Maya Mountains. Within Amazonia there was a moderate level of significant differentiation attributed to isolation by distance. Within Peru there was no significant population structure and low differentiation, and some evidence of a population expansion. The pairwise estimates of genetic differentiation between Central America and Amazonian populations were all very high and highly significant (FST = 0.1859 – 0.3901, P < 0.05). Both the DA and FST distance-based trees illustrated the main division to be between Central America and Amazonia. Conclusion We detected a large amount of population structure in Amazonia, with three population clusters within Brazil and one including the Peru populations. The considerable differences in Ne among the populations may have contributed to the observed genetic differentiation. All of the data suggest that the primary division within A. darlingi corresponds to two white gene genotypes between Amazonia (genotype 1) and

  5. Female rats are more susceptible to central nervous system oxygen toxicity than male rats

    PubMed Central

    Held, Heather E.; Pilla, Raffaele; Ciarlone, Geoffrey E.; Landon, Carol S.; Dean, Jay B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tonic–clonic seizures typify central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS‐OT) in humans and animals exposed to high levels of oxygen, as are encountered during scuba diving. We previously demonstrated that high doses of pseudoephedrine (PSE) decrease the latency to seizure (LS) for CNS‐OT in young male rats. This study investigated whether female rats respond similarly to PSE and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). We implanted 60 virgin stock (VS) and 54 former breeder (FB) female rats with radio‐telemetry devices that measured brain electrical activity. One week later, rats were gavaged with saline or PSE in saline (40, 80, 120, 160, or 320 mg/kg) before diving to five atmospheres absolute in 100% oxygen. The time between reaching maximum pressure and exhibiting seizure was LS. Vaginal smears identified estrus cycle phase. PSE did not decrease LS for VS or FB, primarily because they exhibited low LS for all conditions tested. VS had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (−42, −49, and −57%, respectively). FB also had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (−60, −86, and −73%, respectively). FB were older than VS (286 ± 10 days vs. 128 ± 5 days) and weighed more than VS (299 ± 2.7 g vs. 272 ± 2.1 g). Males tested were younger (88 ± 2 days), heavier (340 ± 4.5 g), and gained more weight postoperatively (7.2 ± 1.6 g) than either VS (−0.4 ± 1.5 g) or FB (−1.6 ± 1.5 g); however, LS correlated poorly with age, body mass, change in body mass, and estrus cycle phase. We hypothesize that differences in sex hormones underlie females' higher susceptibility to CNS‐OT than males. PMID:24771690

  6. Microsatellite genotyping of medieval cattle from central Italy suggests an old origin of Chianina and Romagnola cattle

    PubMed Central

    Gargani, Maria; Pariset, Lorraine; Lenstra, Johannes A.; De Minicis, Elisabetta; Valentini, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of DNA from archeological remains is a valuable tool to interpret the history of ancient animal populations. So far most studies of ancient DNA target mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which reveals maternal lineages, but only partially the relationships of current breeds and ancient populations. In this study we explore the feasibility of nuclear DNA analysis. DNA was extracted from 1000-years old cattle bone collected from Ferento, an archeological site in central Italy. Amplification of 15 microsatellite FAO-recommended markers with PCR products yielded genotypes for four markers. Expected heterozygosity was comparable with values of modern breeds, but observed heterozygosity was underestimated due to allelic loss. Genetic distances suggested a position intermediate between (1) Anatolian, Balkan, Sicilian and South-Italian cattle and (2) the Iberian, North-European and Central-European cattle, but also a clear relationship with two central-Italian breeds, Chianina and Romagnola. This suggests that these breeds are derived from medieval cattle living in the same area. Our results illustrate the potential of ancient DNA for reconstructing the history of local cattle husbandry. PMID:25788902

  7. Cretaceous stratigraphic sequences of north-central California suggest a discontinuity in the Late Cretaceous forearc basin

    SciTech Connect

    Haggart, J.W.

    1986-10-01

    The Cretaceous sedimentary succession preserved east of Redding, at the northern end of California's Great Valley, indicates that marine deposition was widespread in the region for only two periods during the Late Cretaceous. If it is assumed that there was minimal Cenozoic offset between the northern Sierra Nevada and eastern Klamath Mountains terranes, Cretaceous sedimentation in this region was most likely restricted to a narrow trough and was not a continuation of the wide, Cretaceous forearc basin of central California. The dissimilar depositional histories of the Redding basin and the Hornbrook basin of north-central California suggest that the basins were not linked continuously during the Late Cretaceous. A thick section of Cretaceous strata beneath the southwestern Modoc Plateau is considered unlikely.

  8. Antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates in Jabalpur, a city of Madhya Pradesh in Central India.

    PubMed

    Gutch, Ruchi Sethi; Nawange, Shesh Rao; Singh, Shankar Mohan; Yadu, Ruchika; Tiwari, Aditi; Gumasta, Richa; Kavishwar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present antifungal susceptibility data of clinical and environmental isolates of Central Indian Cryptococcus neoformans (Serotype A, n = 8 and n = 50 respectively) and Cryptococcus gattii (Serotype B, n = 01 and n = 04 respectively). Susceptibilities to fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined by using NCCLS broth micro-dilution methodology. The total number of resistant strains for fluconazole in case of C. neoformans and C. gattii showed a significant difference by using chi-square test (p < 0.05*), while considering fisher's exact p value was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). However, the total number of resistant strains for itraconazole and ketoconazole was not found statistically significant. A comparison of geometric means of clinical and environmental strains of C. gattii and C. neoformans was not found statistically significant using student 't' test (p value > 0.05 NS). Though less, the antifungal data obtained in this study suggests that primary resistance among environmental and clinical isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii against tested antifungal was present and C. gattii comparatively was less susceptible than C. neoformans var. grubii isolates to fluconazole than to itraconazole and ketoconazole. A continuous surveillance of antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii is desirable to monitor the emergence of any resistant strains for better management of cryptococcosis patients.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates in Jabalpur, a city of Madhya Pradesh in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Gutch, Ruchi Sethi; Nawange, Shesh Rao; Singh, Shankar Mohan; Yadu, Ruchika; Tiwari, Aditi; Gumasta, Richa; Kavishwar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present antifungal susceptibility data of clinical and environmental isolates of Central Indian Cryptococcus neoformans (Serotype A, n = 8 and n = 50 respectively) and Cryptococcus gattii (Serotype B, n = 01 and n = 04 respectively). Susceptibilities to fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined by using NCCLS broth micro-dilution methodology. The total number of resistant strains for fluconazole in case of C. neoformans and C. gattii showed a significant difference by using chi-square test (p < 0.05*), while considering fisher's exact p value was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). However, the total number of resistant strains for itraconazole and ketoconazole was not found statistically significant. A comparison of geometric means of clinical and environmental strains of C. gattii and C. neoformans was not found statistically significant using student ‘t’ test (p value > 0.05 NS). Though less, the antifungal data obtained in this study suggests that primary resistance among environmental and clinical isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii against tested antifungal was present and C. gattii comparatively was less susceptible than C. neoformans var. grubii isolates to fluconazole than to itraconazole and ketoconazole. A continuous surveillance of antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates of C. neoformans and C. gattii is desirable to monitor the emergence of any resistant strains for better management of cryptococcosis patients. PMID:26691471

  10. Genome-wide linkage study suggests a susceptibility locus for isolated bilateral microtia on 4p15.32-4p16.2.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Hu, Jintian; Zhang, Jiao; Jin, Qian; Wang, Duen-Mei; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Qingguo; Zhang, Yong-Biao

    2014-01-01

    Microtia is a congenital deformity where the external ear is underdeveloped. Genetic investigations have identified many susceptibility genes of microtia-related syndromes. However, no causal genes were reported for isolated microtia, the main form of microtia. We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis on a 5-generation Chinese pedigree with isolated bilateral microtia. We identified a suggestive linkage locus on 4p15.32-4p16.2 with parametric LOD score of 2.70 and nonparametric linkage score (Zmean) of 12.28 (simulated occurrence per genome scan equal to 0.46 and 0.47, respectively). Haplotype reconstruction analysis of the 4p15.32-4p16.2 region further confined the linkage signal to a 10-Mb segment located between rs12505562 and rs12649803 (9.65-30.24 cM; 5.54-15.58 Mb). Various human organ developmental genes reside in this 10-Mb susceptibility region, such as EVC, EVC2, SLC2A9, NKX3-2, and HMX1. The coding regions of three genes, EVC known for cartilage development and NKX3-2, HMX1 involved in microtia, were selected for sequencing with 5 individuals from the pedigree. Of the 38 identified sequence variants, none segregates along with the disease phenotype. Other genes or DNA sequences of the 10-Mb region warrant for further investigation. In conclusion, we report a susceptibility locus of isolated microtia, and this finding will encourage future studies on the genetic basis of ear deformity.

  11. A Genome-Wide SNP Linkage Analysis Suggests a Susceptibility Locus on 6p21 for Ankylosing Spondylitis and Inflammatory Back Pain Trait

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanli; Liao, Zetao; Wei, Qiujing; Pan, Yunfeng; Wang, Xinwei; Cao, Shuangyan; Guo, Zishi; Wu, Yuqiong; Rong, Ju; Jin, Ou; Xu, Manlong; Gu, Jieruo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To screen susceptibility loci for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using an affected-only linkage analysis based on high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a genome-wide manner. Patients and Methods AS patients from ten families with Cantonese origin of China were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were genotyped using genomic DNA derived from peripheral blood leukocytes by Illumina HumanHap 610-Quad SNP Chip. Genotype data were generated using the Illumina BeadStudio 3.2 software. PLINK package was used to remove non-autosomal SNPs and to further eliminate markers of typing errors. An affected-only linkage analysis was carried out using both non-parametric and parametric linkage analyses, as implemented in MERLIN. Result Seventy-eight AS patients (48 males and 30 females, mean age: 39±16 years) were enrolled in the study. The mean age of onset was 23±10 years and mean duration of disease was 16.7±12.2 years. Iritis (2/76, 2.86%), dactylitis (5/78, 6.41%), hip joint involvement (9/78, 11.54%), peripheral arthritis (22/78, 28.21%), inflammatory back pain (IBP) (69/78, 88.46%) and HLA-B27 positivity (70/78, 89.74%) were observed in these patients. Using non-parameter linkage analysis, we found one susceptibility locus for AS, IBP and HLA-B27 in 6p21 respectively, spanning about 13.5Mb, 20.9Mb and 21.2Mb, respectively No significant results were found in the other clinical trait groups including dactylitis, hip involved and arthritis. The identical susceptibility locus region spanning above 9.44Mb was detected in AS IBP and HLA-B27 by the parametric linkage analysis. Conclusion Our genome-wide SNP linkage analysis in ten families with ankylosing spondylitis suggests a susceptibility locus on 6p21 in AS, which is a risk locus for IBP in AS patients. PMID:27973620

  12. Deeply Embedded Protostellar Population in the Central Molecular Zone Suggested by H2O Masers and Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xing; Zhang, Qizhou; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Longmore, Steven N.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Battersby, Cara

    2017-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), usually referring to the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy, contains a dozen of massive (~105 M ⊙) molecular clouds. Are these clouds going to actively form stars like Sgr B2? How are they affected by the extreme physical conditions in the CMZ, such as strong turbulence? Here we present a first step towards answering these questions. Using high-sensitivity, high angular resolution radio and (sub)millimeter observations, we studied deeply embedded star formation in six massive clouds in the CMZ, including the 20 and 50 km s-1 clouds, Sgr B1 off (as known as dust ridge clouds e/f), Sgr C, Sgr D, and G0.253 - 0.016. The VLA water maser observations suggest a population of deeply embedded protostellar candidates, many of which are new detections. The SMA 1.3 mm continuum observations reveal peaks in dust emission associated with the masers, suggesting the existence of dense cores. While our findings confirm that clouds such as G0.253 - 0.016 lack internal compact substructures and are quiescent in terms of star formation, two clouds (the 20 km s-1 cloud and Sgr C) stand out with clusters of water masers with associated dense cores which may suggest a population of deeply embedded protostars at early evolutionary phases. Follow-up observations with VLA and ALMA are necessary to confirm their protostellar nature.

  13. Segregation among test-cross progeny suggests that two complementary dominant genes explain the difference between ascites-resistant and ascites-susceptible broiler lines.

    PubMed

    Druyan, S; Cahaner, A

    2007-11-01

    Ascites syndrome (AS) is a major cause of economic losses to the broiler industry. The tendency of broilers to develop AS was found to be heritable, suggesting that selective breeding could provide a solution to this problem. To further elucidate the genetic control of AS, AS-susceptible (AS-S) and AS-resistant (AS-R) lines were established by 3 cycles of divergent selection on pedigree data of AS mortality under AS-inducing conditions. The rapid divergence between the lines suggested the involvement of a major gene with dominance for AS resistance. It was hypothesized that the difference between the lines is controlled by a single dominant gene, denoted A, with AA (and some Aa) individuals in the AS-R line, and aa individuals in the AS-S line. The current study was designed to test this hypothesis by test-crossing heterozygous (Aa) sires from the AS-R line and F(1) from the AS-R x AS-S cross, with recessive homozygous (aa) dams from the AS-S line. A ratio of 1:1 was expected between progeny with AS vs. healthy progeny when reared under AS-inducing conditions. Test-cross progeny of 5 sires from the AS-R line segregated 1:1, indicating that these sires were heterozygous (Aa) in the suggested major gene and thus supporting the hypothesis of a single major gene with dominance of AS resistance. There was segregation among test-cross progeny of 8 F(1) sires, but with a 3:1 ratio of AS progeny to healthy progeny. The 3:1 ratio is expected if the F(1) sires are heterozygous (AaBb) with complementary interaction between the dominant alleles in 2 unlinked major genes. The segregation among test-cross progeny of the 9 heterozygous AS-R sires could also be explained by the same model. These results suggested that 2 major genes are responsible for the difference between the AS-R and AS-S lines. Resource populations derived from these lines will facilitate an efficient genomic search for these 2 genes. Once the alleles of these genes are identified and genotyping tests are

  14. Susceptibility to varicella in childbearing age women, Central Italy: is there a need for vaccinating this population group?

    PubMed

    Alfonsi, Valeria; Montomoli, Emanuele; Manini, Ilaria; Alberini, Isabella; Gentile, Chiara; Rota, Maria Cristina; Ciofi degli Atti, Marta Luisa

    2007-08-10

    We conducted a cross-sectional seroprevalence study of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antibodies in childbearing age women aged 17-42 years. Sera were collected in Central Italy in years 2001-2002 and were tested by a commercial VZV IgG enzyme immunoassay. Overall VZV seroprevalence was 80.9% and it showed a significant increase by age, confirming a considerable circulation of VZV also in the older age groups not commonly considered at high risk. This study further supports the importance of vaccinating susceptible adolescents and women of childbearing age in order to reduce both maternal and foetal complications associated with varicella in pregnancy.

  15. Kame deltas provide evidence for a new glacial lake and suggest early glacial retreat from central Lower Michigan, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzl, Randall J.; Lepper, Kenneth; Thomas, Sarah E.; Grove, Leslie; Treiber, Emma; Farmer, Alison; Fillmore, Austin; Lee, Jordan; Dickerson, Bethany; Alme, Kayleigh

    2017-03-01

    In association with an undergraduate Honors Seminar at Michigan State University, we studied two small kame deltas in north-central Lower Michigan. These recently identified deltas provide clear evidence for a previously unknown proglacial lake (Glacial Lake Roscommon) in this large basin located in an interlobate upland. Our first goal was to document and characterize the geomorphology of these deltas. Because both deltas are tied to ice-contact ridges that mark the former position of the retreating ice margin within the lake, our second goal was to establish the age of one of the deltas, thereby constraining the timing of ice retreat in this part of Michigan, for which little information currently exists. Both deltas are composed of well-sorted fine and medium sands with little gravel, and have broad, nearly flat surfaces and comparatively steep fronts. Samples taken from the upper 1.5 m of the deltas show little spatial variation in texture, aside from a general fining toward their outer margins. Gullies on the outer margins of both deltas probably postdate the formation of the deltas proper; we suggest that they formed by runoff during a permafrost period, subsequent to lake drawdown. We named the ice lobe that once covered this area the Mackinac Lobe, because it had likely advanced into the region across the Mackinac Straits area. Five of six optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from one of the deltas had minimal scatter and were within ± 1000 years of one another, with a mean age of 23.1 ± 0.4 ka. These ages suggest that the Mackinac Lobe had started to retreat from the region considerably earlier than previously thought, even while ice was near its maximum extent in Illinois and Indiana, and the remainder of Michigan was ice-covered. This early retreat, which appears to coincide with a short-lived warm period indicated from the Greenland ice core, formed an "opening" that was at least occasionally flooded. Thick and deep, fine-textured deposits

  16. Predictive landslide susceptibility analysis along the mountain highway in central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Keh-Jian; Lin, Zora

    2016-04-01

    Climate change caused by global warming affects Taiwan significantly for the past decade. The increasing frequency of extreme rainfall events, in which concentrated and intensive rainfalls generally cause geohazards including landslides and debris flows. The extraordinary Typhoon Morakot hit Southern Taiwan, on August 8, 2009, and induced serious flooding and landslides. Considering the existence of various types of large scale landslides (shallow and deep-seated) and the importance of protection targets (the landslide might affect a residential area, cut a road, isolate a village, etc.), this study aims to analyze the landslide susceptibility along the Nantou County Road # 89 of Taiwan, in the upstream of Wu River. This study employs rainfall frequency analysis together with the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) downscaling estimation to understand the temporal rainfall trends, distributions, and intensities in the Wu River watershed. Based on the data of Li-DAR and the information from boreholes, the temporal behavior and the complex mechanism of large scale landslides were analyzed. To assess the spatial hazard of the landslides, landslide susceptibility analysis was also implemented. The results of this study can be applied for risk prevention and management in the study area.

  17. Determination of hot-spot susceptibility of multistring photovoltaic modules in a central-station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Weaver, R. W.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Spencer, R.; Arnett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Part of the effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) includes a program to improve module and array reliability. A collaborative activity with industry dealing with the problem of hot-spot heating due to the shadowing of photovoltaic cells in modules and arrays containing several paralleled cell strings is described. The use of multiparallel strings in large central-station arrays introduces the likelihood of unequal current sharing and increased heating levels. Test results that relate power dissipated, current imbalance, cross-strapping frequency, and shadow configuration to hot-spot heating levels are presented. Recommendations for circuit design configurations appropriate to central-station applications that reduce the risk of hot-spot problems are offered. Guidelines are provided for developing hot-spot tests for arrays when current imbalance is a threat.

  18. B‐cell very late antigen‐4 deficiency reduces leukocyte recruitment and susceptibility to central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann‐Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab, which binds very late antigen‐4 (VLA‐4), is a potent therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies have focused primarily upon its capacity to interfere with T‐cell migration into the central nervous system (CNS). B cells are important in MS pathogenesis and express high levels of VLA‐4. Here, we report that the selective inhibition of VLA‐4 expression on B cells impedes CNS accumulation of B cells, and recruitment of Th17 cells and macrophages, and reduces susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These results underscore the importance of B‐cell VLA‐4 expression in the pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity and provide insight regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the benefit of natalizumab in MS, as well as candidate therapeutics that selectively target B cells. Ann Neurol 2015;77:902–908 PMID:25712734

  19. Developmental maturation of innate immune cell function correlates with susceptibility to central nervous system autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hertzenberg, Deetje; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Kinzel, Silke; Husterer, Veronika; Cravens, Petra D; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hemmer, Bernhard; Brück, Wolfgang; Zamvil, Scott S; Stüve, Olaf; Weber, Martin S

    2013-08-01

    MS is an inflammatory CNS disorder, which typically occurs in early adulthood and rarely in children. Here we tested whether functional maturation of innate immune cells may determine susceptibility to CNS autoimmune disease in EAE. Two-week-old mice were resistant to active EAE, which causes fulminant paralysis in adult mice; this resistance was associated with an impaired development of Th1 and Th17 cells. Resistant, young mice had higher frequencies of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and plasma-cytoid DCs. Furthermore, myeloid APCs and B cells from young mice expressed lower levels of MHC class II and CD40, produced decreased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, and released enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10. When used as APCs, splenocytes from 2-week-old mice failed to differentiate naive T cells into Th1 and Th17 cells irrespective of the T-cell donor's age, and promoted development of Treg cells and Th2 cells instead. Adoptive transfer of adult APCs restored the ability of 2-week-old mice to generate encephalitogenic T cells and develop EAE. Collectively, these findings indicate that the innate immune compartment functionally matures during development, which may be a prerequisite for development of T-cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease.

  20. SNP screening of central MHC-identified HLA-DMB as a candidate susceptibility gene for HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Aissani, B; Boehme, A K; Wiener, H W; Shrestha, S; Jacobson, L P; Kaslow, R A

    2014-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region on chromosome 6p21.3 is suspected to host susceptibility loci for HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma (HIV-KS). A nested case-control study in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study was designed to conduct fine genetic association mapping across central MHC. Individuals co-infected with HIV-1 and human herpes virus-8 who later developed KS were defined as cases (n=354) and were matched 1:1 with co-infected KS-free controls. We report data for new independent MHC class II and III susceptibility loci. In particular, class II HLA-DMB emerged as a strong candidate, with the intronic variant rs6902982 A>G associated with a fourfold increase of risk (odds ratio (OR)=4.09; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.90-8.80; P=0.0003). A striking multiplicative effect on the estimated risk was associated with further carriage of two non-synonymous variants, rs1800453 A>G (Asp697Gly) and rs4148880 A>G (Ile393Val), in the linked TAP1 gene (OR=10.5; 95% CI=2.54-43.6; P=0.0012). The class III susceptibility variant is moderately associated with HIV-KS and lies within a 120-kb-long haplotype (OR=1.52; 95% CI=1.01-2.28; P=0.047) formed by rs7029 A>G (GPANK1 3' untranslated region), rs1065356 G>A (LY6G6C), rs3749953 A>G (MSH5-SAPCD1 read through) and rs707926 G>A (VARS). Our data suggest that antigen processing by MHC class II molecules is a target pathway in the pathogenesis of HIV-KS.

  1. Landslide Susceptibility Assessment in the Central Part of Republic of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercanoglu, Murat; Boboc, Nicolae; Sirodoev, Igor; Ahmet Temiz, F.; Sirodoev, Ghenadi

    2010-05-01

    There has been an increasing interest in natural hazard assessments within the scientific community, particularly in the last two decades. In other respect, there is also a dramatically rising trend in the number of natural hazards. Growing population and expansion of settlements and lifelines over hazardous areas have largely increased the impact of natural disasters both in industrialized and developing countries. Furthermore, natural disasters such as earthquakes, landslides, floods have dramatic effects on human life, infrastructures, environment, and so on. Landslides, one of the most destructive natural hazards, constitute a major geological hazard throughout the world, like in Turkey and Moldova. There are a lot of regions affected by landslides in Turkey (particularly the West, Middle and East Black Sea Region) and Moldova (e.g.: area between Nisporeni, Calarasi, Balti, Western Rezina District, Codri Hills in Central Moldova etc.), and consequences of landslides are of great importance in the two countries. In the last 50 years' period, only the economic loss due to landslides in Turkey is estimated about 5 billion , and 12.5 % of the whole settlement areas, including big and populated cities, are facing landslide threat. Similar to Turkey, there are about 16000 areas affected by landslides in Moldova. In February-March, 1998 the intensity of landslides in the central part of Moldova, including Chisinau, considerably increased. In total, 357 private households involving 1400 people were affected, 214 houses were destroyed, and 137 were damaged. The total national damage accounted for 44.3 million Lei. At present on Moldavian territory, there are more than 17000 landslides of various types. These landslides are mostly located within Central Moldavian heights, one of the most complicated geomorphologic structure and territory's fragmentation. Among major landslide triggering factors, in addition to natural ones, one should also consider the anthropogenic

  2. Whole Exome Sequencing Suggests Much of Non-BRCA1/BRCA2 Familial Breast Cancer Is Due to Moderate and Low Penetrance Susceptibility Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Gracia-Aznarez, Francisco Javier; Fernandez, Victoria; Pita, Guillermo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Dominguez, Orlando; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Osorio, Ana; Moreno, Leticia; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Rosa-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Sinilnikova, Olga; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Hopper, John; Lazaro, Conchi; Southey, Melissa; Odefrey, Fabrice; Manoukian, Siranoush; Catucci, Irene; Caldes, Trinidad; Lynch, Henry T.; Hilbers, Florentine S. M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Goldgar, David; Radice, Paolo; Devilee, Peter; Benitez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the two most prevalent susceptibility genes in breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, was the beginning of a sustained effort to uncover new genes explaining the missing heritability in this disease. Today, additional high, moderate and low penetrance genes have been identified in breast cancer, such as P53, PTEN, STK11, PALB2 or ATM, globally accounting for around 35 percent of the familial cases. In the present study we used massively parallel sequencing to analyze 7 BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families, each having at least 6 affected women with breast cancer (between 6 and 10) diagnosed under the age of 60 across generations. After extensive filtering, Sanger sequencing validation and co-segregation studies, variants were prioritized through either control-population studies, including up to 750 healthy individuals, or case-control assays comprising approximately 5300 samples. As a result, a known moderate susceptibility indel variant (CHEK2 1100delC) and a catalogue of 11 rare variants presenting signs of association with breast cancer were identified. All the affected genes are involved in important cellular mechanisms like DNA repair, cell proliferation and survival or cell cycle regulation. This study highlights the need to investigate the role of rare variants in familial cancer development by means of novel high throughput analysis strategies optimized for genetically heterogeneous scenarios. Even considering the intrinsic limitations of exome resequencing studies, our findings support the hypothesis that the majority of non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families might be explained by the action of moderate and/or low penetrance susceptibility alleles. PMID:23409019

  3. Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants in fibromyalgia suggest a role for the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Georgia; Gratacòs, Mònica; Villatoro, Sergi; Puig, Anna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Collado, Antonio; Carbonell, Jordi; Rivera, Javier; Vidal, Javier; Alegre, Jose; Estivill, Xavier; Rabionet, Raquel

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a highly disabling syndrome defined by a low pain threshold and a permanent state of pain. The mechanisms explaining this complex disorder remain unclear, and its genetic factors have not yet been identified. With the aim of elucidating FM genetic susceptibility factors, we selected 313 FM cases having low comorbidities, and we genotyped them on the Illumina 1 million duo array. Genotypic data from 220 control women (Illumina 610k array) was obtained for genome-wide association scan (GWAS) analysis. Copy number variants in FM susceptibility were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) experiments on pooled samples using the Agilent 2×400K platform. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached GWAS association threshold, but 21 of the most associated SNPs were chosen for replication in 952 cases and 644 controls. Four of the SNPs selected for replication showed a nominal association in the joint analysis, and rs11127292 (MYT1L) was found to be associated to FM with low comorbidities (P=4.28×10(-5), odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=0.58 [0.44-0.75]). aCGH detected 5 differentially hybridized regions. They were followed up, and an intronic deletion in NRXN3 was demonstrated to be associated to female cases of FM with low levels of comorbidities (P=.021, odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=1.46 [1.05-2.04]). Both GWAS and aCGH results point to a role for the central nervous system in FM genetic susceptibility. If the proposed FM candidate genes were further validated in replication studies, this would highlight a neurocognitive involvement in agreement with latest reports.

  4. X-ray absorption lines suggest matter infalling onto the central black-hole of Mrk 509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadina, M.; Cappi, M.; Malaguti, G.; Ponti, G.; de Rosa, A.

    2005-11-01

    Evidence for both red- and blue-shifted absorption lines due to ionized Fe in the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 509 is reported. These features appear to be transient on time-scales as short as ~20 ks, and have been observed with two different satellites, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton. The red- and blue-shifted lines are found at E˜5.5 keV and ~8.1-8.3 keV (rest-frame), respectively. The first is seen in one out of six BeppoSAX observations, the latter is seen by both satellites. Under the assumption that the absorption is due to either H- or He-like Iron, the implied velocities for the absorbing matter are v˜0.15-0.2 c, in both outward and inward directions. An alternative explanation in terms of gravitational red-shift for the ~5.5 keV line cannot be ruled out with the current data. We argue, however, that the temporal patterns and sporadic nature of the lines are more easily reconciled with models that predict important radial motions close to the central black hole, such as the "aborted jet" model, the "thundercloud" model, or magneto-hydrodynamical models of jets and accretion-disks.

  5. Magnetic Susceptibility and Mineral Zonations Controlled by Provenance in Loess along the Illinois and Central Mississippi River Valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimley, D.A.; Follmer, L.R.; McKay, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) patterns have proven useful for regional stratigraphic correlations of zones within thick, oxidized Peoria and Roxana Silts along the Illinois and Central Mississippi River valleys for more than 350 km. Variations in MS of C horizon loess are controlled by silt-sized magnetite content and are interpreted to reflect changes in sediment provenance due to fluctuations of the Superior and Lake Michigan glacier lobes and the diversion of the Mississippi River to its present course. Grain size distributions and scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that stratigraphic changes in MS are not significantly influenced by eolian sorting or diagenetic dissolution, respectively. Three compositional zones (lower, middle, and upper) are delineated within Peoria Silt which usually can be traced in the field by MS, the occurrence of clay beds, interstadial soils, and/or subtle color changes. These zones can be correlated with, but are generally of more practical use than, previously studied dolomite zones (McKay, 1977) or clay mineral zones (Frye et al., 1968). However, mineralogical analyses can help to substantiate zone boundaries when in question. MS and compositional zones may indirectly record a climatic signal, primarily through the effect that global cooling has had on ice lobe fluctuations in the Upper Mississippi drainage basin. ?? 1998 University of Washington.

  6. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    PubMed

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels.

  7. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Barott, K. L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K. C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  8. Susceptibility of field populations of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, to a selection of insecticides in Central China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Jun; Mao, Kaikai; You, Hong; Li, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    The diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is a globally distributed and important economic pest. Chemical control is the primary approach to regulate populations of this pest. However, resistance to insecticides evolves following heavy and frequent use. Therefore, the insecticide resistance in field populations of P. xylostella collected from Central China from 2013 to 2014 was determined with a leaf-dipping method. Based on the results of the monitoring, P. xylostella has developed high levels of resistance to beta-cypermethrin (resistance ratio=69.76-335.76-fold), Bt (WG-001) (RR=35.43-167.36), and chlorfluazuron (RR=13.60-104.95) and medium levels of resistance to chlorantraniliprole (RR=1.19-14.26), chlorfenapyr (RR=4.22-13.44), spinosad (RR=5.89-21.45), indoxacarb (RR=4.01-34.45), and abamectin (RR=23.88-95.15). By contrast, the field populations of P. xylostella remained susceptible to or developed low levels of resistance to diafenthiuron (RR=1.61-8.05), spinetoram (RR=0.88-2.35), and cyantraniliprole (RR=0.4-2.15). Moreover, the LC50 values of field populations of P. xylostella were highly positively correlated between chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole (r=0.88, P=0.045), chlorantraniliprole and spinosad (r=0.66, P=0.039), spinosad and diafenthiuron (r=0.57, P=0.0060), and chlorfenapyr and diafenthiuron (r=0.51, P=0.016). Additionally, the activities of detoxification enzymes in field populations of P. xylostella were significantly positively correlated with the log LC50 values of chlorantraniliprole and spinosad. The results of this study provide an important base for developing effective and successful strategies to manage insecticide resistance in P. xylostella.

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of the hippocampus from six inbred strains of mice suggests a basis for sex-specific susceptibility and severity of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Vied, Cynthia; Ray, Surjyendu; Badger, Crystal-Dawn; Bundy, Joseph L; Arbeitman, Michelle N; Nowakowski, Richard S

    2016-09-01

    Identifying sex differences in gene expression within the brain is critical for determining why multiple neurological and behavioral disorders differentially affect males and females. Several disorders are more common or severe in males (e.g., autism and schizophrenia) or in females (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and depression). We analyzed transcriptomic data from the mouse hippocampus of six inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C57BL/6J, DBA/1J, DBA/2J, and PWD/Ph) to provide a perspective on differences between male and female gene expression. Our data show that 1) gene expression differences in males vs. females varies substantially across the strains, 2) only a few genes are differentially expressed across all of the strains (termed core genes), and 3) >2,600 genes differ in the individual strain comparisons (termed noncore genes). We found that DBA/2J uniquely has a substantial majority (89%) of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that are more highly expressed in females than in males (female-biased); 129/SvImJ has a majority (69%) of DEGs that are more highly expressed in males. To gain insight into the function of the DEGs, we examined gene ontology and pathway and phenotype enrichment and found significant enrichment in phenotypes related to abnormal nervous system morphology and physiology, among others. In addition, several pathways are enriched significantly, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), with 32 genes implicated in AD, eight of which are male-biased. Three of the male-biased genes have been implicated in a neuroprotective role in AD. Our transcriptomic data provide new insight into the possible genetic bases for sex-specific susceptibility and severity of brain disorders. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2696-2710, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Discovery of a new species of Caloptilia (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) from east and central Africa with its suggested associated host (Gentianales: Rubiaceae) and natural enemies (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    PubMed

    De Prins, Jurate; Gumovsky, Alex; De Coninck, Eliane

    2015-05-18

    A new species of the leaf-mining moth genus Caloptilia (Gracillariidae), C. mwamba sp. nov., suggested to be associated with Cremaspora triflora (Thonn.) K.Schum. (Rubiaceae) is described from east and central Africa. The taxonomic relationships of the new species with its congeners from the Oriental and the Palaearctic regions are discussed. Newly obtained taxonomic and biological data are linked with the DNA barcode workbench in BOLD, providing the molecular, machine-readable identification tag of the new species. New distribution and morphological data for two parasitoid species, Afrotroppopsis risbeci Gumovsky, 2007 and Zaommomentedon newbyi (Kerrich, 1969) (Eulophidae), which were found to be associated with C. mwamba sp. nov., are presented.

  11. Resequencing and association analysis of coding regions at twenty candidate genes suggest a role for rare risk variation at AKAP9 and protective variation at NRXN1 in schizophrenia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Rama, José Javier; Arrojo, Manuel; Sobrino, Beatriz; Amigo, Jorge; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Brión, María; Carracedo, Ángel; Páramo, Mario; Costas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of genetic risk to develop schizophrenia may be due to low-frequency variants. This multistep study attempted to find low-frequency variants of high effect at coding regions of eleven schizophrenia susceptibility genes supported by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and nine genes for the DISC1 interactome, a susceptibility gene-set. During the discovery step, a total of 125 kb per sample were resequenced in 153 schizophrenia patients and 153 controls from Galicia (NW Spain), and the cumulative role of low-frequency variants at a gene or at the DISC1 gene-set were analyzed by burden and variance-based tests. Relevant results were meta-analyzed when appropriate data were available. In addition, case-only putative damaging variants were genotyped in a further 419 cases and 398 controls. The discovery step revealed a protective effect of rare missense variants at NRXN1, a result supported by meta-analysis (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47-0.94, P = 0.021, based on 3848 patients and 3896 controls from six studies). The follow-up step based on case-only putative damaging variants revealed a promising risk variant at AKAP9. This variant, K873R, reached nominal significance after inclusion of 240 additional Spanish controls from databases. The variant, located in an ADCY2 binding region, is absent from large public databases. Interestingly, GWAS revealed an association between common ADCY2 variants and bipolar disorder, a disorder with considerable genetic overlap with schizophrenia. These data suggest a role of rare missense variants at NRXN1 and AKAP9 in schizophrenia susceptibility, probably related to alteration of the excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance, deserving further investigation.

  12. Lower limb areflexia without central and peripheral conduction abnormalities is highly suggestive of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease Pro102Leu.

    PubMed

    Salsano, Ettore; Fancellu, Roberto; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Ciano, Claudia; Scaioli, Vidmer; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Mariotti, Caterina; Pareyson, Davide

    2011-03-15

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease Pro102Leu (GSS102) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited prion disease due to a substitution of proline for leucine at codon 102 in the Prion Protein gene, and characterized by early walking difficulties and much later occurring dementia. We report clinical, electrophysiological and neuroradiological features of seven novel Italian cases of GSS102. The findings in our series support the thesis that early signs of GSS102 (including areflexia, ataxia, lower limb weakness, and painful dysesthesias) are likely due to a caudal myelopathic process, and suggest that GSS102 should be included among the causes of ataxia with areflexia. Moreover, our observations show that in patients with GSS102, as opposed to Friedreich's ataxia and other forms of ataxia with areflexia, nerve conduction studies and somato-sensory evoked potentials are normal, despite the presence of lower limb areflexia. Hence, in subjects with walking difficulties, the presence of lower limb areflexia without central and peripheral conduction abnormalities is highly suggestive or possibly pathognomonic of GSS102, and can easily guide the clinicians to make the diagnosis of this rare neurodegenerative disease.

  13. A comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes identified in tobacco suggests a central role of autophagy in plant response to various environmental cues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Wei; Zou, Jie; Cheng, Tian-he; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both animals and plants, which has been shown to be involved in various essential developmental processes in plants. Nicotiana tabacum is considered to be an ideal model plant and has been widely used for the study of the roles of autophagy in the processes of plant development and in the response to various stresses. However, only a few autophagy-related genes (ATGs) have been identified in tobacco up to now. Here, we identified 30 ATGs belonging to 16 different groups in tobacco through a genome-wide survey. Comprehensive expression profile analysis reveals an abroad expression pattern of these ATGs, which could be detected in all tissues tested under normal growth conditions. Our series tests further reveal that majority of ATGs are sensitive and responsive to different stresses including nutrient starvation, plant hormones, heavy metal and other abiotic stresses, suggesting a central role of autophagy, likely as an effector, in plant response to various environmental cues. This work offers a detailed survey of all ATGs in tobacco and also suggests manifold functions of autophagy in both normal plant growth and plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:26205094

  14. Multi-drug resistance and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from the Middle East and Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, B A; Wasfy, M O; Maksoud, M A; Hanna, N; Dueger, E; House, B

    2014-01-01

    Typhoid fever is common in developing countries, with an estimated 120 million infections and 700 000 annual deaths, worldwide. Fluoroquinolones have been the treatment of choice for infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). However, alarming reports of fluoroquinolone-resistance and failure of typhoid fever treatment have recently been published. To determine the proportion of S. Typhi isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (RSC) from six countries in the Middle East and Central Asia, 968 S. Typhi isolates collected between 2002 and 2007 from Egypt, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Qatar, Jordan and Iraq were tested for antibiotic susceptibility to five antibiotics using the disc-diffusion method. MDR was defined as resistance to amicillin, chloramphenicol and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The E-test was employed to determine the MIC of ciprofloxacin only. Nalidixic acid resistance was evaluated as a marker for RSC. Interpretations were made according to CLSI guidelines. MDR strains were considerably more prevalent in Iraq (83%) and Pakistan (52%) compared with the other countries studied (13–52%). Nearly all isolates were susceptible (99.7%) to ceftriaxone. RSC was detected in a total of 218 isolates (22%), mostly from Iraq (54/59, 92%), Uzbekistan (98/123, 80%), Qatar (23/43, 54%) and Pakistan (31/65, 47%). Many of these (21%) were also MDR. Use of nalidixic acid resistance as an indicator for RSC was 99% sensitive and 98% specific. This study reinforces the need for routine antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance of enteric fever isolates and close review of current therapeutic policies in the region. PMID:25356352

  15. Changing trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive diseases in Central Thailand, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chatsuwan, Tanittha; Nunthapisud, Pongpun; Treerauthaweeraphong, Vipa; Rungnobhakhun, Pimpha; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2014-01-01

    To describe the trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) we tested 238 pneumococci isolates from normally sterile sites between 2009 and 2012 and compared these findings with previous data collected within our network. Serotyping was performed for 15 serotypes contained in the 7-,10-, 13-, and experimental 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The most common serotypes found were 6B (13.9%), 19A (12.6%), 14 (8.0%), 18C (5.9%), and 6A (3.8%); and 39.9% were non-PCV15 serotypes. One of 81 patients with available data had breakthrough infection with vaccine serotype (19F). There was a significant increase of serotype 19A among children ≤5 years (5.6% in 2000-2009 vs 18.3% in 2009-2012, P = 0.003). The all-age serotype coverage was 36.4%, 41.5%, 59.3%, and 59.7% for PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PCV 15, respectively. The corresponding coverage in children ≤5 years were 46.4%, 48.8%, 73.2%, and 73.2% respectively. High susceptibilities to penicillin (89.7%), cefotaxime (95.7%), cefditoren (90.2% by Spanish breakpoints), ofloxacin (97.9%), and levofloxacin (100%), but low to cefdinir (50.0%), cefditoren (45.1% by US-FDA breakpoints), macrolides (<50%), clindamycin (67.7%), tetracycline (41.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.4%) were observed. Serotype 19A was less susceptible to penicillin (80.0 vs 91.2%, P = 0.046), cefditoren (66.7 vs 95.5% by Spanish breakpoints, P = 0.004), and tetracycline (9.1 vs 45.5%, P = 0.024) than non-19A isolates. These data emphasize the need for continued surveillance to monitor changes in serotypes as well as antimicrobial susceptibilities in order to guide strategies for prevention and treatment.

  16. Changing trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive diseases in Central Thailand, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chatsuwan, Tanittha; Nunthapisud, Pongpun; Treerauthaweeraphong, Vipa; Rungnobhakhun, Pimpha; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2014-01-01

    To describe the trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) we tested 238 pneumococci isolates from normally sterile sites between 2009 and 2012 and compared these findings with previous data collected within our network. Serotyping was performed for 15 serotypes contained in the 7-,10-, 13-, and experimental 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The most common serotypes found were 6B (13.9%), 19A (12.6%), 14 (8.0%), 18C (5.9%), and 6A (3.8%); and 39.9% were non-PCV15 serotypes. One of 81 patients with available data had breakthrough infection with vaccine serotype (19F). There was a significant increase of serotype 19A among children ≤5 years (5.6% in 2000–2009 vs 18.3% in 2009–2012, P = 0.003). The all-age serotype coverage was 36.4%, 41.5%, 59.3%, and 59.7% for PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PCV 15, respectively. The corresponding coverage in children ≤5 years were 46.4%, 48.8%, 73.2%, and 73.2% respectively. High susceptibilities to penicillin (89.7%), cefotaxime (95.7%), cefditoren (90.2% by Spanish breakpoints), ofloxacin (97.9%), and levofloxacin (100%), but low to cefdinir (50.0%), cefditoren (45.1% by US-FDA breakpoints), macrolides (<50%), clindamycin (67.7%), tetracycline (41.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.4%) were observed. Serotype 19A was less susceptible to penicillin (80.0 vs 91.2%, P = 0.046), cefditoren (66.7 vs 95.5% by Spanish breakpoints, P = 0.004), and tetracycline (9.1 vs 45.5%, P = 0.024) than non-19A isolates. These data emphasize the need for continued surveillance to monitor changes in serotypes as well as antimicrobial susceptibilities in order to guide strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:25424794

  17. The characterization of Bordetella pertussis strains isolated in the Central-Western region of Brazil suggests the selection of a specific genetic profile during 2012-2014 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Rocha, E L; Leite, D; Camargo, C H; Martins, L M; Silva, R S N; Martins, V P; Campos, T A

    2017-02-21

    Pertussis is a worldwide acute respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Despite high vaccine coverage, the bacterium continues to circulate in populations and is still one of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases. In Brazil, pertussis incidence has presented a significant decrease since 1990 but since 2011 a sudden increase in incidence has been observed. Thus, the aim of this study was to perform a molecular epidemiological characterization of B. pertussis strains isolated in the Central-Western region (specifically in Distrito Federal) of Brazil from August 2012 to August 2014. During this period, 92 B. pertussis strains were isolated from the outbreaks. All strains were characterized by serotyping and XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. From August to December 2012, the most prevalent serotype observed was 1,3 (13/17). During 2013 the prevalence of serotype 1,3 decreased (13/30) and from January 2014 to August 2014 the most prevalent serotype was 1,2 (33/45). Fourteen PFGE profiles were identified. Of these, BP-XbaI0039 prevalence increased from 3/17 in 2012 to 10/30 in 2013, and 35/45 in 2014. These results evidence the selection of a specific genetic profile during this period, suggesting the occurrence of a bacterial genomic profile with high circulation potential.

  18. The crystal structure of the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Acinetobacter baumannii suggests a flexible conformational change in the central domain before nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Kim-Hung; Hong, Myoung-ki; Lee, Clarice; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Lee, Sang Hee; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, which is emerging as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen, causes a number of diseases, including pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and skin infections. With ATP hydrolysis, the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) catalyzes the synthesis of D-alanyl-D-alanine, which is an essential component of bacterial peptidoglycan. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of DDL from A. baumannii (AbDDL) at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The asymmetric unit contained six protomers of AbDDL. Five protomers had a closed conformation in the central domain, while one protomer had an open conformation in the central domain. The central domain with an open conformation did not interact with crystallographic symmetry-related protomers and the conformational change of the central domain was not due to crystal packing. The central domain of AbDDL can have an ensemble of the open and closed conformations before the binding of substrate ATP. The conformational change of the central domain is important for the catalytic activity and the detail information will be useful for the development of inhibitors against AbDDL and putative antibacterial agents against A. baumannii. The AbDDL structure was compared with that of other DDLs that were in complex with potent inhibitors and the catalytic activity of AbDDL was confirmed using enzyme kinetics assays.

  19. New insights into the palaeoclimatic interpretation of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Li, Bingshuai

    2017-02-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility (χ-T curves) and magnetization (M-T curves) has been used as a routine rock magnetic tool to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and magnetic granulometry of Chinese loess/palaeosols. However, palaeoclimatic interpretation of these thermomagnetic analyses remains controversial. In the present study, total organic carbon (TOC), thermomagnetic and low-temperature magnetic experiments on Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) have been conducted. We found that the M (T) cooling curves at room temperature were mostly lower than the corresponding heating curves, whereas for the χ (T) analyses the cooling curves at room temperature were always much higher than the heating curves. Low-temperature magnetic measurements demonstrated that a large amount of superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles were produced during the thermal treatment and resulted in the aforementioned differences. This finding further indicated that the use of the M-T curves to estimate the relative content of maghemite in the loess/palaeosols from the CLP was problematic. In addition, a positive correlation exists between the TOC and the frequency-dependent susceptibility (χFD) in the CLP, suggesting that stronger pedogenesis would result in the simultaneous increase in the content of both maghemite and organic matter. Consequently, the parameters ▵χ1 (representing the relative content of pedogenic maghemite), ▵χ2 ([χph - χ] +▵χ1) and χph (related to the organic matter concentration), which can be calculated from the χ-T analyses, can potentially be used as new indicators of pedogenesis and palaeoclimate in Central Asia and the CLP.

  20. New insights into the paleoclimatic interpretation of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Li, Bingshuai

    2016-11-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility (χ-T curves) and magnetization (M-T curves) has been used as a routine rock magnetic tool to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and magnetic granulometry of Chinese loess/palaeosols. However, paleoclimatic interpretation of these thermomagnetic analyses remains controversial. In the present study, total organic carbon (TOC), thermomagnetic and low-temperature magnetic experiments on Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) have been conducted. We found that the M (T) cooling curves at room temperature were mostly lower than the corresponding heating curves, whereas for the χ (T) analyses the cooling curves at room temperature were always much higher than the heating curves. Low-temperature magnetic measurements demonstrated that a large amount of superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles were produced during the thermal treatment and resulted in the aforementioned differences. This finding further indicated that the use of the M - T curves to estimate the relative content of maghemite in the loess/paleosols from the CLP was problematic. In addition, a positive correlation exists between the TOC and the frequency-dependent susceptibility (χFD) in the CLP, suggesting that stronger pedogenesis would result in the simultaneous increase in the content of both maghemite and organic matter. Consequently, the parameters △χ1 (representing the relative content of pedogenic maghemite), △χ2 ([χph-χ] +△χ1) and χph (related to the organic matter concentration), which can be calculated from the χ - T analyses, can potentially be used as new indicators of pedogenesis and paleoclimate in Central Asia and the CLP.

  1. Oroclinal bending of the Juan Fernández Ridge suggested by geohistory analysis of the Bahía Inglesa Formation, north-central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Achurra, Luciano; Henríquez, Álvaro; Carreño, Catalina; Rivera, Huber; Suárez, Mario E.; Ishman, Scott E.; Pyenson, Nicholas D.; Gutstein, Carolina S.

    2016-03-01

    The stratigraphy of the Bahía Inglesa Formation in the Caldera Basin west of Copiapó, (north-central Chile) is revised, based on hitherto unpublished stratigraphic sections and 87Sr/86Sr dating. The depositional environment varied from a rocky shoreline to the upper continental slope, with sea-level oscillations and tectonic movements causing numerous local unconformities as well as lateral and vertical facies changes. Geohistory and sedimentological analyses show that the area was close to the concurrent sea level at about 15.3 Ma, but at the same time being elevated about 100 m above the present sea level. Although the basin then subsided at least 350 m until around 6 Ma, marine deposition was only recorded after 10.4 Ma. This suggests that the sea level initially dropped faster than the rate of subsidence so that subaerial erosion occurred. The period of subaerial exposure before 10.4 Ma can be attributed to the presence of a NE-trending branch of the Juan Fernández Ridge below the continental crust at this time, whereas the ensuing subsidence was due to subduction erosion and crustal accommodation in its wake as it migrated south along the South American coastline. The subsequent uplift of at least 250 m can be explained by an acceleration in plate expansion and isostatic rebound of the continental crust after being partially submerged in the upper mantle. The uplift-subsidence-uplift pattern mirrors those recorded around the Nazca Ridge in Peru, as well as in similar basins to the south of Caldera. However, a higher southward migration rate of the Juan Fernández Ridge against the edge of the South American Plate and less intense uplift-subsidence-uplift cycles are recorded in the latter basins. This can possibly be attributed to oroclinal bending of the ridge due to friction with the overlying continental plate, which diminished the angle of incidence and the intensity of the stress field, but increased the migration velocity of the ridge relative to the

  2. Molecular genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from Central and South America revealed highly diverse populations and suggested possible different origins of the three archetypal lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most T. gondii strains in North America and Europe belong to three archetypal clonal lineages including the Type I, II and III but, isolates from Brazil are highly diverse. Here, we analyzed 164 T. gondii isolates from three countries in Central America (Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica), from one c...

  3. Ancient DNA Analysis Suggests Negligible Impact of the Wari Empire Expansion in Peru’s Central Coast during the Middle Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Barreto Romero, María Inés; Flores Espinoza, Isabel; Cooper, Alan; Fehren-Schmitz, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of ancient human DNA from South America allows the exploration of pre-Columbian population history through time and to directly test hypotheses about cultural and demographic evolution. The Middle Horizon (650–1100 AD) represents a major transitional period in the Central Andes, which is associated with the development and expansion of ancient Andean empires such as Wari and Tiwanaku. These empires facilitated a series of interregional interactions and socio-political changes, which likely played an important role in shaping the region’s demographic and cultural profiles. We analyzed individuals from three successive pre-Columbian cultures present at the Huaca Pucllana archaeological site in Lima, Peru: Lima (Early Intermediate Period, 500–700 AD), Wari (Middle Horizon, 800–1000 AD) and Ychsma (Late Intermediate Period, 1000–1450 AD). We sequenced 34 complete mitochondrial genomes to investigate the potential genetic impact of the Wari Empire in the Central Coast of Peru. The results indicate that genetic diversity shifted only slightly through time, ruling out a complete population discontinuity or replacement driven by the Wari imperialist hegemony, at least in the region around present-day Lima. However, we caution that the very subtle genetic contribution of Wari imperialism at the particular Huaca Pucllana archaeological site might not be representative for the entire Wari territory in the Peruvian Central Coast. PMID:27248693

  4. Increased frequency of dicentric chromosomes in therapy-related MDS and AML compared to de novo disease is significantly related to previous treatment with alkylating agents and suggests a specific susceptibility to chromosome breakage at the centromere.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M K; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J

    2000-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are observed in many malignant diseases including myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and have often been observed in a subset of these diseases, namely therapy-related MDS (t-MDS) and AML (t-AML). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with centromere-specific probes, we investigated the frequency and type of dicentric chromosomes in 180 consecutive patients with t-MDS and t-AML and in 231 consecutive patients with de novo MDS and AML, whose karyotypes had been studied previously by conventional G-banding. Twenty-seven out of 180 patients with t-MDS or t-AML presented dicentric chromosomes compared to only seven out of 231 patients with de novo disease (P = 0.00003). A dic(1q;7p) was observed in 10 cases, a dic(5p;17q) was observed in six cases, whereas various isodicentric chromosomes were observed in six cases. Excluding these six cases with isodicentrics, all 25 patients with dicentric chromosomes had involvement of at least one of the chromosome arms 1q, 5p, or 7p resulting in monosomy for 5q or 7q, and/or trisomy for 1q. Patients with dicentric chromosomes presented significantly more often as t-MDS compared to patients without dicentrics (P = 0.046), and the presence of a dicentric chromosome was significantly related to previous therapy with alkylating agents (P = 0.026). Thus, only one out of 27 patients with a dicentric chromosome had not previously received an alkylating agent. A specific susceptibility to breakage at the centromere after exposure to alkylating agents is suggested and may explain the frequent loss of whole chromosomes, in particular chromosomes 5 and 7 in t-MDS and t-AML, if the breaks are not followed by rejoining. Leukemia (2000) 14, 105-111.

  5. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species from bovine subclinical mastitis in dairy herds in the central region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Raspanti, Claudia G; Bonetto, Cesar C; Vissio, Claudina; Pellegrino, Matías S; Reinoso, Elina B; Dieser, Silvana A; Bogni, Cristina I; Larriestra, Alejandro J; Odierno, Liliana M

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a common cause of bovine subclinical mastitis (SCM). The prevalence of CNS species causing SCM identified by genotyping varies among countries. Overall, the antimicrobial resistance in this group of organisms is increasing worldwide; however, little information exists about a CNS species resistant to antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to genotypically characterize CNS at species level and to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance profiles of CNS species isolated from bovine SCM in 51 dairy herds located in the central region of the province of Cordoba, Argentina. In this study, we identified 219 CNS isolates at species level by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the groEL gene. Staphylococcus chromogenes (46.6%) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (32%) were the most prevalent species. A minimum of three different CNS species were present in 41.2% of the herds. S. chromogenes was isolated from most of the herds (86.3%), whereas S. haemolyticus was isolated from 66.7% of them. The broth microdilution method was used to test in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. Resistance to a single compound or two related compounds was expressed in 43.8% of the isolates. S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus showed a very high proportion of isolates resistant to penicillin. Resistance to two or more non-related antimicrobials was found in 30.6% of all CNS. S. haemolyticus exhibited a higher frequency of resistance to two or more non-related antimicrobials than S. chromogenes.

  6. Estimates of flow direction for calc-alkaline welded tuffs and paleomagnetic data reliability from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements: Central San Juan Mountains, southwest Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, Brooks B.

    1982-07-01

    Flow directions are estimated from the measurement of the magnetic fabric of 106 samples, collected at 18 sites in four welded tuff units in the central San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado. The estimates assume that the tuffs generally flowed directly away from the extrusive vents and that the lineations of magnetic grains within the tuffs represent the flow direction at individual sites. Errors in the estimation may arise from topographic variation, rheomorphism (post-emplacement mass flow) within the tuff, and other factors. Magnetic lineation is defined as the site mean anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility maximum azimuth. A test on the flow directions for individual units is based on the projection of lineation azimuths and their intersection within or near the known source caldera for the tuff. This test is positive for the four units examined. Paleomagnetic results for these tuffs are probably reliable indicators of the geomagnetic field direction in southwest Colorado, during the time (28.2-26.5 Ma) of emplacement.

  7. ALDH1A1 Deficiency in Gorlin Syndrome Suggests a Central Role for Retinoic Acid and ATM Deficits in Radiation Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas J; Magnaldo, Thierry; Xiong, Yijia

    2014-09-11

    We hypothesize that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) deficiency will result in impaired ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation in a retinoic acid-sensitive fashion. Data supporting this hypothesis include (1) reduced ATM activation in irradiated primary dermal fibroblasts from ALDH1A1-deficient Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), relative to ALDH1A1-positive normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and (2) increased ATM activation by X-radiation in GDFs pretreated with retinoic acid, however, the impact of donor variability on ATM activation in fibroblasts was not assessed and is a prudent consideration in future studies. Clonogenic survival of irradiated cells showed differential responses to retinoic acid as a function of treatment time. Long-term (5 Day) retinoic acid treatment functioned as a radiosensitizer and was associated with downregulation of ATM protein levels. Short-term (7 h) retinoic acid treatment showed a trend toward increased survival of irradiated cells and did not downregulate ATM protein levels. Using a newly developed IncubATR technology, which defines changes in bulk chemical bond patterns in live cells, we can discriminate between the NHDF and GDF phenotypes, but treatment of GDFs with retinoic acid does not induce reversion of bulk chemical bond patterns associated with GDFs toward the NHDF phenotype. Collectively, our preliminary investigation of the Gorlin phenotype has identified deficient ALDH1A1 expression associated with deficient ATM activation as a possible susceptibility factor that is consistent with the high incidence of spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis in these patients. The IncubATR technology exhibits sufficient sensitivity to detect phenotypic differences in live cells that may be relevant to radiation health effects.

  8. ALDH1A1 Deficiency in Gorlin Syndrome Suggests a Central Role for Retinoic Acid and ATM Deficits in Radiation Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Thomas J.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Xiong, Yijia

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) deficiency will result in impaired ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation in a retinoic acid-sensitive fashion. Data supporting this hypothesis include (1) reduced ATM activation in irradiated primary dermal fibroblasts from ALDH1A1-deficient Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), relative to ALDH1A1-positive normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and (2) increased ATM activation by X-radiation in GDFs pretreated with retinoic acid, however, the impact of donor variability on ATM activation in fibroblasts was not assessed and is a prudent consideration in future studies. Clonogenic survival of irradiated cells showed differential responses to retinoic acid as a function of treatment time. Long-term (5 Day) retinoic acid treatment functioned as a radiosensitizer and was associated with downregulation of ATM protein levels. Short-term (7 h) retinoic acid treatment showed a trend toward increased survival of irradiated cells and did not downregulate ATM protein levels. Using a newly developed IncubATR technology, which defines changes in bulk chemical bond patterns in live cells, we can discriminate between the NHDF and GDF phenotypes, but treatment of GDFs with retinoic acid does not induce reversion of bulk chemical bond patterns associated with GDFs toward the NHDF phenotype. Collectively, our preliminary investigation of the Gorlin phenotype has identified deficient ALDH1A1 expression associated with deficient ATM activation as a possible susceptibility factor that is consistent with the high incidence of spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis in these patients. The IncubATR technology exhibits sufficient sensitivity to detect phenotypic differences in live cells that may be relevant to radiation health effects. PMID:28250390

  9. A suggested model for potato MIVOISAP involving functions of central carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, as well as actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Ignacio; Li, Jun; Ovecka, Miroslav; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Montero, Manuel; Díaz de Cerio, Jessica; Hidalgo, Maite; Sesma, María Teresa; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Etxeberria, Ed; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2010-12-01

    We have recently found that microbial species ranging from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria to different fungi emit volatiles that strongly promote starch accumulation in leaves of both mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. Transcriptome and enzyme activity analyses of potato leaves exposed to volatiles emitted by Alternaria alternata revealed that starch over-accumulation was accompanied by enhanced 3-phosphoglycerate to Pi ratio, and changes in functions involved in both central carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Exposure to microbial volatiles also promoted changes in the expression of genes that code for enzymes involved in endocytic uptake and traffic of solutes. With the overall data we propose a metabolic model wherein important determinants of accumulation of exceptionally high levels of starch include (a) upregulation of ADPglucose-producing SuSy, starch synthase III and IV, proteins involved in the endocytic uptake and traffic of sucrose, (b) down-regulation of acid invertase, starch breakdown enzymes and proteins involved in internal amino acid provision, and (c) 3-phosphoglycerate-mediated allosteric activation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase.

  10. The Population Structure of Phytophthora infestans from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico Suggests Genetic Differentiation Between Populations from Cultivated Potato and Wild Solanum spp.

    PubMed

    Flier, Wilbert G; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Kroon, Laurens P N M; Sturbaum, Anne K; van den Bosch, Trudy B M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Lozoya-Saldaña, Hector; Fry, William E; Turkensteen, Lod J

    2003-04-01

    ABSTRACT The population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico was assessed using 170 isolates collected from cultivated potatoes and the native wild Solanum spp., S. demissum and S. xendinense. All isolates were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) multi-locus fingerprint genotype. Isolate samples were monomorphic for mtDNA haplotype because all isolates tested were of the Ia haplotype. A total of 158 multilocus AFLP genotypes were identified among the 170 P. infestans isolates included in this study. P. infestans populations sampled in the Toluca Valley in 1997 were highly variable and almost every single isolate represented a unique genotype based on the analysis of 165 AFLP marker loci. Populations of P. infestans collected from the commercial potato-growing region in the valley, the subsistence potato production area along the slopes of the Nevado de Toluca, and the native Solanum spp. on the forested slopes of the volcano showed a high degree of genetic diversity. The number of polymorphic loci varied from 20.0 to 62.4% for isolates collected from the field station and wild Solanum spp. On average, 81.8% (135) of the AFLP loci were polymorphic. Hetero-zygosity varied between 7.7 and 19.4%. Significant differentiation was found at the population level between strains originating from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum spp. (P = 0.001 to 0.022). Private alleles were observed in individual isolates collected from all three populations, with numbers of unique dominant alleles varying from 9 to 16 for isolates collected from commercial potato crops and native Solanum spp., respectively. Four AFLP markers were exclusively found present in isolates collected from S. demissum. Indirect estimation of gene flow between populations indicated restricted gene flow between both P. infestans populations from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum hosts. There was no evidence

  11. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; Blood Culture ; Bacterial Wound Culture ; AFB Testing ; MRSA ; ...

  12. The phenotype and activation status of T and NK cells in porcine colostrum suggest these are central/effector memory cells.

    PubMed

    Hlavova, Karolina; Stepanova, Hana; Faldyna, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In pigs, the epitheliochorial placenta does not allow transfer of maternally derived antibodies or immune cells to the fetus. Thus, piglets are dependent on intake of colostrum for acquisition of passive immunity during the neonatal period. As well as immunoglobulin G (IgG), cellular components of colostrum, mainly lymphocytes, can enter the systemic circulation and secondary lymphoid organs of the neonate. In order to understand the function and immunological role of these cells, a flow cytometric study was undertaken to characterise the cellular profile and phenotype of T cells and NK cells present in porcine colostrum. The results indicated that the greatest numbers of lymphocytes were found on the first day of lactation. The predominant cell types in colostrum were CD8(+) single positive T cells (53.6%), followed by CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cells (21.1%), CD2(+)CD8(+) γδ T cells (15.0%) and NK cells (13.5%). CD4(+) single positive T cells (4.4%) and other γδ T cell subpopulations (1.8% CD2(-)CD8(-) and 0.4% CD2(+)CD8(-)) were present in colostrum at low levels. Although the profile of the T cell subpopulations during the first 3 days of lactation remained constant, the absolute numbers of T and NK cells decreased significantly in the first few hours of lactation. Expression of CCR7, CD11b, CD25, CD45RA and MHC class II was used to assess the activation status of T and NK cells in colostrum. T cell subpopulations expressed markers consistent with an effector memory phenotype, indicating that these were antigen-experienced cells. The phenotype of colostral T and NK cells suggests a role in mucosal immunity and potentially in transfer of passive immunity from sow to piglet.

  13. Susceptibility of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) strains from central Colombia to two insecticides, methomyl and lambda-cyhalothrin: a study of the genetic basis of resistance.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Díez, J D; Saldamando-Benjumea, C I

    2011-10-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important pest of several crops in the western hemisphere. This insect has genetically differentiated into two host-associated populations: the corn (Zea mays L.) and the rice (Oryza sativa L.) strains. The corn strain also is found in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and sorghum and the rice strain in Bermuda grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] and millet. In the United States and Brazil, lines from corn, rice, Bermuda grass, and millet were used to evaluate the resistance of both strains to various insecticides, and found that the corn strain is more resistant than the rice strain. However, in these studies the larvae were not genotyped. In Colombia, genotyping of fall armyworm is necessary because the rice strain also can be found in corn fields. In this work, collected larvae from corn and rice fields from Tolima (central Colombia) were genotyped and evaluated for the resistance to methomyl and lambda-cyhalothrin. We found that the rice strain does not significantly differ in resistance to methomyl compared with the corn strain but it develops tolerance more rapidly to lambda-cyhalothrin. The eggs viability of treated females also was significantly affected by methomyl on each generation. The realized heritability of resistance was higher for lambda-cyhalothrin (0.23-0.42) than for methomyl (0.04-0.14). The number of generations needed for 10-fold increase in resistance is approximately 11.5 generations for methomyl and 6.5 for lambda-cyhalothrin. Finally, the genetic basis of resistance to both insecticides involves few recessive autosomal genes. The results obtained here suggest that methomyl is a better option than lambda-cyalothin to control fall armyworm.

  14. N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide cross-linking suggests a central core of helices II in oligomers of URF13, the pore-forming T-toxin receptor of cms-T maize mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M. |; Kaspi, C.I.; Siedow, J.N.; Levings, C.S. III

    1994-08-16

    URF13 is a mitochondrially encoded, integral membrane protein found only in maize carrying the cms-T cytoplasm. URF13 is associated with cytoplasmic male sterility, Texas type, and causes susceptibility to the fungal pathogens Bipolaris maydis race T and Phyllosticta maydis. URF13 is predicted to contain three transmembrane {alpha}-helices and is a receptor for the pathotoxins (T-toxins) produced by B. maydis race T and P. maydis. Binding of T-toxin to URF13 leads to membrane permeability. Cross-linking of URF13 oligomers with N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) protects Escherichia coli cells expressing URF13 and cms-T mitochondria from the permeability caused by T-toxin or methomyl. Using mutated forms of URF13 expressed in E. coli cells, the authors determined the molecular mechanism of DCCD protection. They separately changed Lys-37 in helix II to isoleucine (K37I-URF13) and Lys-32 in the helix I/helix II loop region to alanine (K32A-URF13). DCCD treatment of K37I-URF13-expressing cells did not protect the cells from permeability caused by T-toxin or methomyl. DCCD cross-linking was greatly reduced in K37I-URF13 and in D39V-URF13-expressing cells, but it was unaffected in K32A-URF13-expressing cells. Binding of methomyl or T-toxin decreases DCCD cross-linking of URF13 oligomers expressed in either E. coli or cms-T mitochondria. They conclude that Asp-39 in helix II is cross-linked by DCCD to Lys-37 in helix II of an adjacent URF13 molecule and that this cross-linking protects against toxin-mediated permeabilization. The results also indicate that helices II form a central core in URF13 oligomers.

  15. Linkage analysis in a large Brazilian family with van der Woude syndrome suggests the existence of a susceptibility locus for cleft palate at 17p11.2-11.1.

    PubMed Central

    Sertié, A L; Sousa, A V; Steman, S; Pavanello, R C; Passos-Bueno, M R

    1999-01-01

    van der Woude syndrome (VWS), which has been mapped to 1q32-41, is characterized by pits and/or sinuses of the lower lip, cleft lip/palate (CL/P), cleft palate (CP), bifid uvula, and hypodontia (H). The expression of VWS, which has incomplete penetrance, is highly variable. Both the occurrence of CL/P and CP within the same genealogy and a recurrence risk <40% for CP among descendants with VWS have suggested that the development of clefts in this syndrome is influenced by modifying genes at other loci. To test this hypothesis, we have conducted linkage analysis in a large Brazilian kindred with VWS, considering as affected the individuals with CP, regardless of whether it is associated with other clinical signs of VWS. Our results suggest that a gene at 17p11.2-11.1, together with the VWS gene at 1p32-41, enhances the probability of CP in an individual carrying the two at-risk genes. If this hypothesis is confirmed in other VWS pedigrees, it will represent one of the first examples of a gene, mapped through linkage analysis, which modifies the expression of a major gene. It will also have important implications for genetic counseling, particularly for more accurately predicting recurrence risks of clefts among the offspring of patients with VWS. PMID:10417286

  16. MtNF-YA1, A Central Transcriptional Regulator of Symbiotic Nodule Development, Is Also a Determinant of Medicago truncatula Susceptibility toward a Root Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Rey, Thomas; Laporte, Philippe; Bonhomme, Maxime; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dumas, Bernard; Niebel, Andreas; Jacquet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Plant NF-Y transcription factors control a wide array of biological functions enabling appropriate reproductive and developmental processes as well as adaptation to various abiotic and biotic environments. In Medicago truncatula, MtNF-YA1 was previously identified as a key determinant for nodule development and establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. Here, we highlight a new role for this protein in compatibility to Aphanomyces euteiches, a root pathogenic oomycete. The Mtnf-ya1-1 mutant plants showed better survival rate, reduced symptoms, and increased development of their root apparatus as compared to their wild-type (WT) background A17. MtNF-YA-1 was specifically up-regulated by A. euteiches in F83005.5, a highly susceptible natural accession of M. truncatula while transcript level remained stable in A17, which is partially resistant. The role of MtNF-YA1 in F83005.5 susceptibility was further documented by reducing MtNF-YA1 expression either by overexpression of the miR169q, a microRNA targeting MtNF-YA1, or by RNAi approaches leading to a strong enhancement in the resistance of this susceptible line. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome of WT and Mtnf-ya1-1 led to the identification of 1509 differentially expressed genes. Among those, almost 36 defense-related genes were constitutively expressed in Mtnf-ya1-1, while 20 genes linked to hormonal pathways were repressed. In summary, we revealed an unexpected dual role for this symbiotic transcription factor as a key player in the compatibility mechanisms to a pathogen.

  17. MtNF-YA1, A Central Transcriptional Regulator of Symbiotic Nodule Development, Is Also a Determinant of Medicago truncatula Susceptibility toward a Root Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Thomas; Laporte, Philippe; Bonhomme, Maxime; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dumas, Bernard; Niebel, Andreas; Jacquet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Plant NF-Y transcription factors control a wide array of biological functions enabling appropriate reproductive and developmental processes as well as adaptation to various abiotic and biotic environments. In Medicago truncatula, MtNF-YA1 was previously identified as a key determinant for nodule development and establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. Here, we highlight a new role for this protein in compatibility to Aphanomyces euteiches, a root pathogenic oomycete. The Mtnf-ya1-1 mutant plants showed better survival rate, reduced symptoms, and increased development of their root apparatus as compared to their wild-type (WT) background A17. MtNF-YA-1 was specifically up-regulated by A. euteiches in F83005.5, a highly susceptible natural accession of M. truncatula while transcript level remained stable in A17, which is partially resistant. The role of MtNF-YA1 in F83005.5 susceptibility was further documented by reducing MtNF-YA1 expression either by overexpression of the miR169q, a microRNA targeting MtNF-YA1, or by RNAi approaches leading to a strong enhancement in the resistance of this susceptible line. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome of WT and Mtnf-ya1-1 led to the identification of 1509 differentially expressed genes. Among those, almost 36 defense-related genes were constitutively expressed in Mtnf-ya1-1, while 20 genes linked to hormonal pathways were repressed. In summary, we revealed an unexpected dual role for this symbiotic transcription factor as a key player in the compatibility mechanisms to a pathogen. PMID:27994614

  18. Genetic dissection of the functions of the melanocortin-3 receptor, a seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor, suggests roles for central and peripheral receptors in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Begriche, Karima; Levasseur, Peter R; Zhang, Jingying; Rossi, Jari; Skorupa, Danielle; Solt, Laura A; Young, Brandon; Burris, Thomas P; Marks, Daniel L; Mynatt, Randall L; Butler, Andrew A

    2011-11-25

    The melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) gene is pleiotropic, influencing body composition, natriuresis, immune function, and entrainment of circadian rhythms to nutrient intake. MC3Rs are expressed in hypothalamic and limbic regions of the brain and in peripheral tissues. To investigate the roles of central MC3Rs, we inserted a "lox-stop-lox" (LoxTB) 5' of the translation initiation codon of the mouse Mc3r gene and reactivated transcription using neuron-specific Cre transgenic mice. As predicted based on earlier observations of Mc3r knock-out mice, Mc3r(TB/TB) mice displayed reduced lean mass, increased fat mass, and accelerated diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, rescuing Mc3r expression in the nervous system using the Nestin-Cre transgene only partially rescued obesity in chow-fed conditions and had no impact on the accelerated diet-induced obesity phenotype. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a critical node in the neural networks regulating feeding-related behaviors and metabolic homeostasis, exhibits dense Mc3r expression relative to other brain regions. To target VMH MC3R expression, we used the steroidogenic factor-1 Cre transgenic mouse. Although restoring VMH MC3R signaling also had a modest impact on obesity, marked improvements in metabolic homeostasis were observed. VMH MC3R signaling was not sufficient to rescue the lean mass phenotype or the regulation of behaviors anticipating food anticipation. These results suggest that actions of MC3Rs impacting on energy homeostasis involve both central and peripheral sites of action. The impact of central MC3Rs on behavior and metabolism involves divergent pathways; VMH MC3R signaling improves metabolic homeostasis but does not significantly impact on the expression of behaviors anticipating nutrient availability.

  19. Genetic Dissection of the Functions of the Melanocortin-3 Receptor, a Seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled Receptor, Suggests Roles for Central and Peripheral Receptors in Energy Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Begriche, Karima; Levasseur, Peter R.; Zhang, Jingying; Rossi, Jari; Skorupa, Danielle; Solt, Laura A.; Young, Brandon; Burris, Thomas P.; Marks, Daniel L.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Butler, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) gene is pleiotropic, influencing body composition, natriuresis, immune function, and entrainment of circadian rhythms to nutrient intake. MC3Rs are expressed in hypothalamic and limbic regions of the brain and in peripheral tissues. To investigate the roles of central MC3Rs, we inserted a “lox-stop-lox” (LoxTB) 5′ of the translation initiation codon of the mouse Mc3r gene and reactivated transcription using neuron-specific Cre transgenic mice. As predicted based on earlier observations of Mc3r knock-out mice, Mc3rTB/TB mice displayed reduced lean mass, increased fat mass, and accelerated diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, rescuing Mc3r expression in the nervous system using the Nestin-Cre transgene only partially rescued obesity in chow-fed conditions and had no impact on the accelerated diet-induced obesity phenotype. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a critical node in the neural networks regulating feeding-related behaviors and metabolic homeostasis, exhibits dense Mc3r expression relative to other brain regions. To target VMH MC3R expression, we used the steroidogenic factor-1 Cre transgenic mouse. Although restoring VMH MC3R signaling also had a modest impact on obesity, marked improvements in metabolic homeostasis were observed. VMH MC3R signaling was not sufficient to rescue the lean mass phenotype or the regulation of behaviors anticipating food anticipation. These results suggest that actions of MC3Rs impacting on energy homeostasis involve both central and peripheral sites of action. The impact of central MC3Rs on behavior and metabolism involves divergent pathways; VMH MC3R signaling improves metabolic homeostasis but does not significantly impact on the expression of behaviors anticipating nutrient availability. PMID:21984834

  20. The Susceptibility and Behavioral Response of Anopheles Albimanus Weidemann and Anopheles Vestitipennis Dyar and Knab (Diptera: Culicidae) to Insecticides in Northern Belize, Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    given to molecular and genetic approaches for understanding and controlling malaria. Support for vector studies, particularly fieldwork on mosquito...nerves and on the central nervous system affecting nerve transmission. These insecticides interact at the molecular level with sodium ion channels by...Soc. Am. 27:198-201. 52 Brown., TM. and W. Brogdon. 1987. Improved detection ofinsecticide resistance through conventional and molecular techniques

  1. Individual susceptibility to toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P

    1992-12-01

    Individual variation in susceptibility to chemical toxicity may be due to differences in toxicokinetic patterns or effect modification. Well-documented interspecies genetic differences in susceptibility to chemicals had lead to studies of such variation also within species. Epidemiological evidence now suggests that common variations, particularly in the P-450 enzymes, may play a major role in determining individual susceptibility to chemically-induced disease. Physiologic factors are involved in the particular susceptibility of the fetus, the newborn, and the old. Constitutional susceptibility is also affected by acquired conditions, including chronic disease, such as diabetes mellitus. Perhaps the most complex area relates to the increase in vulnerability caused by previous or contemporary exposure to other factors, thus eliciting, e.g., synergistic effects. Although amply demonstrated by experimental studies, epidemiological or clinical confirmation is generally lacking. One hypothesis suggests that a chemical exposure may affect the reserve capacity of the body, though not resulting in any immediate adverse effect. Subsequently, the body becomes unable to compensate for an additional stress, and toxicity then develops. Epidemiological approaches are available and need to be expanded. Research in this area has potential ethical implications which should be dealt with in an open, informed forum.

  2. Using the statistical analysis method to assess the landslide susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hsun-Chuan; Chen, Bo-An; Wen, Yo-Ting

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the landslide susceptibility in Jing-Shan River upstream watershed, central Taiwan. The landslide inventories during typhoons Toraji in 2001, Mindulle in 2004, Kalmaegi and Sinlaku in 2008, Morakot in 2009, and the 0719 rainfall event in 2011, which were established by Taiwan Central Geological Survey, were used as landslide data. This study aims to assess the landslide susceptibility by using different statistical methods including logistic regression, instability index method and support vector machine (SVM). After the evaluations, the elevation, slope, slope aspect, lithology, terrain roughness, slope roughness, plan curvature, profile curvature, total curvature, average of rainfall were chosen as the landslide factors. The validity of the three established models was further examined by the receiver operating characteristic curve. The result of logistic regression showed that the factor of terrain roughness and slope roughness had a stronger impact on the susceptibility value. Instability index method showed that the factor of terrain roughness and lithology had a stronger impact on the susceptibility value. Due to the fact that the use of instability index method may lead to possible underestimation around the river side. In addition, landslide susceptibility indicated that the use of instability index method laid a potential issue about the number of factor classification. An increase of the number of factor classification may cause excessive variation coefficient of the factor. An decrease of the number of factor classification may make a large range of nearby cells classified into the same susceptibility level. Finally, using the receiver operating characteristic curve discriminate the three models. SVM is a preferred method than the others in assessment of landslide susceptibility. Moreover, SVM is further suggested to be nearly logistic regression in terms of recognizing the medium-high and high susceptibility.

  3. Late-stage magma flow in a shallow felsic reservoir: Merging the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility record with numerical simulations in La Gloria Pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GutiéRrez, F.; PayacáN, I.; Gelman, S. E.; Bachmann, O.; Parada, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    La Gloria Pluton is a 10 Myr old epizonal intrusion located in the southern Andes. We present anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data that indicate a magnetic fabric that is mainly oblate. We find that lineations are weak and have a N-NW trend with a nearly horizontal dip, while foliations are more pronounced, have NW trends, and have dips that vary from vertical at the walls of the intrusion to horizontal at the center and under the roof of the chamber. To interpret these magmatic fabrics, we developed a time-dependent 2-D magmatic fluid dynamic numerical simulation. Our model is calibrated with MELTS and accounts for the coupled processes of cooling, crystallization, and degassing of a magma chamber. Simulations indicate that the resulting convective flow pattern in the crystallizing reservoir is consistent with the magnetic fabric, which is largely produced in the shear zone between the convecting liquid-dominated core and the growing solidification fronts adjacent to the walls. The magnetic fabric records the last increment of strain induced by convective magmatic flow in the cooling reservoir during crystallization at the rheological magma locking point along solidification fronts. Despite the small size of the pluton, the core of the chamber remains thermally insulated from the colder host rocks, surviving up to 20 kyr above the solidus, which allows enough time for the extraction of residual leucogranitic melt and partial late magmatic reactive recrystallization. The results of the simulations are also consistent with the previously determined compositional and mineralogical zonation patterns in the pluton.

  4. Ground-water quality and susceptibility of ground water to effects from domestic wastewater disposal in eastern Bernalillo County, central New Mexico, 1990-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.; Kues, Georgianna E.

    1999-01-01

    Eastern Bernalillo County is a historically rural, mountainous area east of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Historically, the primary economic activity consisted of subsistence farming and ranching and support of these activities from small communities. During the last 40 to 50 years, however, the area increasingly has become the site of residential developments. Homes in these developments typically are on 1- to 2-acre lots and are serviced by individual wells and septic systems. Between 1970 and 1990, the population of the area increased from about 4,000 to more than 12,000, and housing units increased from about 1,500 to more than 5,000. Results of analysis of water samples collected from 121 wells throughout eastern Bernalillo County in 1990 indicated that (1) total-nitrate concentrations in 10 samples exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national primary drinking-water regulation maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter as nitrogen; (2) total-nitrate concentrations may be related to the length of time an area has been undergoing development; and (3) large dissolved-chloride concentrations may result from geologic origins, such as interbedded salt deposits or upward movement of saline ground water along faults and fractures, as well as from domestic wastewater disposal. Ground water throughout eastern Bernalillo County was assessed to be highly susceptible to contamination by overlying domestic wastewater disposal because (1) soils in more than 95 percent of eastern Bernalillo County were determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service to have severe limitations for use as septic-system absorption fields and (2) a fractured carbonate geologic terrane, which typically has large secondary permeability and limited sorption capacity, is at the surface or underlying unconsolidated material in 73 percent of the area. Ground-water-level rises following an episodal precipitation event during July 22-27, 1991

  5. Free T3 to free T4 ratio less than 2.0 suggests low T3 syndrome rather than central hypothyroidism from the age of two to eighteen years.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Risa; Miyai, Kentaro; Kuge, Rie; Okura, Takashi; Goto, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-02-27

    No serological cut-off exists to separate low T3 syndrome (LT) and central hypothyroidism (CH). The objective of this retrospective study was to propose such a cut-off. The first participant group comprised 52 patients from the age of six to twenty years. This group consisted of patients of 36 anorexia nervosa with LT and 16 CH. The second participant groups comprised 229 patients of all the same range of ages at the same hospital and included LT (n = 58) and CH (n = 4) patients, respectively. The third group of participants comprised 125 LT and 27 CH patients at the same hospital at all ages less than eighteen years. The last group of participants comprised 10 CH patients from the other two hospitals. The main outcome measure was fT3/fT4 ratio (pg/mL, ng/dL respectively). This ratio in the first group was significantly different (p < 0.05) between LT and CH. When the cut off value of fT3/fT4 was set as 2.0, the sensitivity of the LT and CH patients in the second group was 62% and 100%, respectively. This cut-off value of 2.0 was useful for distinguishing LT from CH only above the age of two years, as shown in the third group. The fT3/fT4 in 10 subjects with CH in the last group, aged 2 to 7 years, ranged from 2.55 to 7.71. In conclusion, fT3/fT4 less than 2.0 suggests LT rather than CH for patients from the age of two to eighteen years.

  6. Distribution of the immune inhibitory molecules CD200 and CD200R in the normal central nervous system and multiple sclerosis lesions suggests neuron-glia and glia-glia interactions.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nathalie; Swaab, Dick F; Hoek, Robert M; Huitinga, Inge

    2009-02-01

    CD200 is a membrane glycoprotein that suppresses immune activity via its receptor, CD200R. CD200-CD200R interactions have recently been considered to contribute to the "immune privileged" status of the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms by which these interactions take place are not well understood in part because there is limited detailed information on the distribution of CD200 and CD200R in the CNS. Here, we used immunohistochemistry to characterize the distinct anatomical and cellular distribution of these molecules in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and controls. CD200 was robustly expressed in gray matter areas including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and spinal cord, where neurons appeared immunopositive. CD200 expression was also detected in oligodendrocytes, but not in astrocytes or microglia. In CNS samples from MS patients, CD200 expression was additionally observed on reactive astrocytes in chronic active plaque centers, despite our previous finding of an overall decrease ofCD200 expression in MS lesions. In contrast to CD200, the immunolocalization pattern of CD200R was very distinct, showing high expression on perivascular macrophages in both gray and white matter. Using flow cytometry, we also found that human primary microglia express low levels of CD200R. These data suggest that CD200-mediated immune suppression may occur not only via neuron-microglia interactions, but also via glia-glia interactions, especially in inflammatory conditions in which an immune-suppressive environment needs to be restored; this may occur as a result of increased CD200 expression on reactive astrocytes.

  7. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  8. Paleocurrent direction measurements in a volcanic setting by means of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility: A case study from the Lower Miocene Tepoztlán Formation (Transmexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Nils; Böhnel, Harald; Hinderer, Matthias; Hornung, Jens

    2013-05-01

    Sources of ancient volcanic rocks are often unknown if they are either eroded and/or covered by younger deposits. This problem, as well as the provenance of reworked volcaniclastic, fluvial and mass-flow deposits, can be partially solved by the application of anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS). For massive and poorly sorted volcaniclastic rocks in particular this may be the only way of finding reliable transport directions and therefore allowing for paleogeographic reconstructions. Here, we present a data set of 428 AMS measurements and 249 measurements of sedimentary paleocurrent indicators from the Miocene Tepoztlán Formation at the southern edge of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (Central Mexico). The highest degree of reliability of AMS measurements is gained for data from lava samples and the lowest from mass flows. Sedimentary structures in sandstones and conglomerates such as trough cross-stratification, asymmetric ripple marks, and the shape of scours and channels could be used to calibrate the results from AMS data and to prove their reliability. AMS data on fluvial deposits point to a drainage system with a W-E flow direction, indicating an outflow of the river system into the ancient Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Open to Suggestion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  10. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are

  11. Heck's disease: diagnosis and susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lindsey K; Hinshaw, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, or Heck's disease, is an uncommon proliferation of oral mucosa that presents primarily in Native Central and South American populations. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. In the majority of cases, human papilloma virus 13 or 32 is detected. Factors that determine disease susceptibility are unclear, but genetics, and having the human lymphocytic antigen-DR4 (DRB1*0404) allele in particular, are thought to play a major role in disease vulnerability. We report another case of focal epithelial hyperplasia, hypothesize on disease susceptibility, and review the current understanding of this uncommon disorder.

  12. Suicidality and interrogative suggestibility.

    PubMed

    Pritchard-Boone, Lea; Range, Lillian M

    2005-01-01

    All people are subject to memory suggestibility, but suicidal individuals may be especially so. The link between suicidality and suggestibility is unclear given mixed findings and methodological weaknesses of past research. To test the link between suicidality and interrogative suggestibility, 149 undergraduates answered questions about suicidal thoughts and reasons for living, and participated in a direct suggestibility procedure. As expected, suggestibility correlated with suicidality but accounted for little overall variance (4%). Mental health professionals might be able to take advantage of client suggestibility by directly telling suicidal persons to refrain from suicidal thoughts or actions.

  13. The Life of Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Cathie

    2010-01-01

    Using the notion of a suggestion, or rather charting the life of suggestions, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of suggestions helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…

  14. Identification of highly susceptible individuals in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoting; Teng, Xian; Pei, Sen; Yan, Shu; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-08-01

    Identifying highly susceptible individuals in spreading processes is of great significance in controlling outbreaks. In this paper, we explore the susceptibility of people in susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) and rumor spreading dynamics. We first study the impact of community structure on people's susceptibility. Although the community structure can reduce the number of infected people for same infection rate, it will not significantly affect nodes' susceptibility. We find the susceptibility of individuals is sensitive to the choice of spreading dynamics. For SIR spreading, since the susceptibility is highly correlated to nodes' influence, the topological indicator k-shell can better identify highly susceptible individuals, outperforming degree, betweenness centrality and PageRank. In contrast, in rumor spreading model, where nodes' susceptibility and influence have no clear correlation, degree performs the best among considered topological measures. Our finding highlights the significance of both topological features and spreading mechanisms in identifying highly susceptible population.

  15. Chemistry Curricula. Course Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Listings of suggested topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The suggestions were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…

  16. NRAMP1 and VDR Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Venezuelan Population

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mestre, Mercedes; Villasmil, Ángel; Takiff, Howard; Fuentes Alcalá, Zhenia

    2015-01-01

    Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp1) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) are central components of the innate and adaptive immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and associations between susceptibility to tuberculosis and polymorphisms in the genes NRAMP and VDR have been sought in geographically diverse populations. We investigated associations of NRAMP1 and VDR gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to TB in the Venezuelan population. The results suggest the absence of any association between VDR variants FokI, ApaI, and TaqI and susceptibility to tuberculosis. In contrast, the NRAMP1 3′UTR variants were associated with susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection, as seen in the comparisons between TST+ and TST− controls, and also with progression to TB disease, as shown in the comparisons between TB patients and TST+ controls. This study confirms the previously described association of the NRAMP1 3′UTR polymorphism with M. tuberculosis infection and disease progression. PMID:26578819

  17. Susceptibility to declarative memory interference is pronounced in primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Griessenberger, Hermann; Heib, Dominik P J; Lechinger, Julia; Luketina, Nikolina; Petzka, Marit; Moeckel, Tina; Hoedlmoser, Kerstin; Schabus, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has been shown to stabilize memory traces and to protect against competing interference in both the procedural and declarative memory domain. Here, we focused on an interference learning paradigm by testing patients with primary insomnia (N = 27) and healthy control subjects (N = 21). In two separate experimental nights with full polysomnography it was revealed that after morning interference procedural memory performance (using a finger tapping task) was not impaired in insomnia patients while declarative memory (word pair association) was decreased following interference. More specifically, we demonstrate robust associations of central sleep spindles (in N3) with motor memory susceptibility to interference as well as (cortically more widespread) fast spindle associations with declarative memory susceptibility. In general the results suggest that insufficient sleep quality does not necessarily show up in worse overnight consolidation in insomnia but may only become evident (in the declarative memory domain) when interference is imposed.

  18. Reactivation of Memory by Hypnosis and Suggestion. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Perry; Cooper, Leslie M.

    This study tested the hypothesis that the memory of meaningful material can be reactivated without relearning by means of hypnotic suggestion. Very susceptible (T) and non-susceptible (UT) subjects were sought from among those who volunteered for the experiment. Two forms of a memory test for connected meaningful material were developed. Each form…

  19. Suggestion can help.

    PubMed

    Benson, P E

    2000-10-01

    One cannot practise dentistry without realising that for the patient, the control of pain and fear is extremely important. Modern technical advances have made painless dentistry a reality and yet research has shown that more people avoid dental treatment through fear of pain than all other factors combined. Dental surgeons and psychologists agree that patients frequently magnify their unpleasant dental experiences. There are deep-seated psychological reasons for this exaggerated fear; the mouth being a highly charged erotogenic region, is a primary zone of interaction with the environment and can have important far-reaching emotional significance. To many people the anticipation of dental treatment is sufficient to arouse extreme anxiety. Dental schools lay great emphasis on basic medical sciences and the technical excellence of students, the psychosomatic approach to the alleviation of apprehension, fear and pain is meanwhile often sadly neglected. The use of controlled suggestion and hypnosis can be shown to play a very important role in clinical dentistry.

  20. Alate susceptibility in ants

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Eddie K H; Frederickson, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are predicted to pose a particular threat to eusocial insects because infections can spread rapidly in colonies with high densities of closely related individuals. In ants, there are two major castes: workers and reproductives. Sterile workers receive no direct benefit from investing in immunity, but can gain indirect fitness benefits if their immunity aids the survival of their fertile siblings. Virgin reproductives (alates), on the other hand, may be able to increase their investment in reproduction, rather than in immunity, because of the protection they receive from workers. Thus, we expect colonies to have highly immune workers, but relatively more susceptible alates. We examined the survival of workers, gynes, and males of nine ant species collected in Peru and Canada when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. For the seven species in which treatment with B. bassiana increased ant mortality relative to controls, we found workers were significantly less susceptible compared with both alate sexes. Female and male alates did not differ significantly in their immunocompetence. Our results suggest that, as with other nonreproductive tasks in ant colonies like foraging and nest maintenance, workers have primary responsibility for colony immunity, allowing alates to specialize on reproduction. We highlight the importance of colony-level selection on individual immunity in ants and other eusocial organisms. PMID:25540683

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with SCCmec type V and spa types t437 or t1081 associated to discordant susceptibility results between oxacillin and cefoxitin, Central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Chen, Chao-Jung; Lin, Lee-Chung; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates with discordant susceptibility results between oxacillin and cefoxitin obtained using automated microbiology systems are infrequently observed. From April 2013 to December 2014, 1956 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 1761 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates were obtained from different patients. Forty isolates (1.1% and 2% in case of S. aureus and MRSA, respectively) with discordant susceptibility results (oxacillin susceptible and cefoxitin resistant) and carrying mecA gene were obtained. Except 2 SCCmec type IV isolates, 38 MRSA isolates were all SCCmec type V (VT or non-VT), which were further divided into VT (n=22) and non-VT (n=16). The most common spa type in VT and non-VT isolates were t437 (n=19) and t1081 (n=13), respectively. Only 55% of patients received effective antimicrobial agents; 2 mortalities were not attributable to MRSA infection. Using standard agar dilution, 17 MRSA isolates (0.46% and 0.87% in case of S. aureus and MRSA, respectively) had oxacillin MIC in the susceptible ranges (oxacillin-susceptible MRSA [OS-MRSA]); all carried SCCmec type V (VT, n=8; non-VT, n=9). The most common spa-MLST types of OS-MRSA in VT and non-VT were t437-ST59 (n=4) and t1081-ST45 (n=7), respectively. Concomitant testing by both cefoxitin- and oxacillin-based methods is a practical strategy for OS-MRSA detection in the clinical laboratories. Continuous monitoring of OS-MRSA isolates is necessary to elucidate their impact in clinical infectious diseases.

  2. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.B.

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  3. Asymmetric otolith function and increased susceptibility to motion sickness during exposure to variations in gravitoinertial acceleration level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, James R.; Graybiel, Ashton; Johnson, Walter H.; Money, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Von Baumgarten and coworkers (1979, 1981) have suggested that asymmetries in otolith function between the left and right labyrinths may result from differences in otoconial mass and could play a role in space motion sickness. Such asymmetries would be centrally compensated for under terrestrial conditions, but on exposure to weightlessness the persisting central compensation would produce a central imbalance that could lead to motion sickness. In this work ocular counterrolling was used as a way of measuring the relative 'efficiency' of the left and right otoliths; the ocular counterrolling scores of individuals were compared with their susceptibility to motion sickness during passive exposure to variations in Gz in parabolic flight maneuvers. The experimental findings indicate that large asymmetries in counterrolling for leftward and rightward body tilts are associated with greater susceptibility to motion sickness in parabolic flight.

  4. Ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility and severity--contribution of TNF gene promoter polymorphisms at positions -238 and -308.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Elsa; Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Pinto, Patrícia; Pimentel, Fernando; Teles, José; Canhão, Helena; Rodrigues, Ana; Resende, Catarina; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Ribeiro, Célia; Pinto, Teresa Laura; Rosa, Carlos Miranda; da Silva, José Alberto Pereira; Branco, Jaime; Ventura, Francisco; Queiroz, Mário Viana; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2009-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease in which genetic factors play a central role. The efficacy of TNF blockers has reoriented research in this field in order to explain the influence of TNF in AS pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to access the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at positions -308 and -238 of the promoter region of TNF gene on AS susceptibility and prognosis. SNPs were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients and controls. AS patients exhibited a decreased frequency of the A allele at position -238 (10%) when compared with controls (18%), suggesting that this could be a protective factor for disease susceptibility. In addition, the -308 GA/AA genotypes were associated with later disease onset in AS patients. These results suggest that TNF gene promoter polymorphisms at positions -238 and -308 could have a small influence on AS susceptibility and prognosis.

  5. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  6. New evidence suggesting segmentation of Cocos Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.; Sauermann, R.P.; De Boer, J.

    1985-02-01

    Compilation and analysis of geophysical and geological data indicate that the Cocos plate consists of three segments that have individual poles of rotation and independent motion vectors. Contoured heat-flow and gravity maps of the region delineate the boundaries of the segments within the Cocos plate. These segments have different focal-plane solutions along the Middle America Trench and different sedimentary-basin configurations within the Central America-Mexico island arc. Recent studies of seismic data from the region also have suggested that the subducted Cocos plate consists of three segments. The proposed northern and central segments are separated by the northeast-trending Siqueros-Tehuantepec Ridge fracture zone. The proposed central and southern segments are separated by the northeast-trending Costa Rica fracture zone that is located just northwest of the Cocos Ridge and extends from the Galapagos rift to the central valley of Costa Rica. Poles of rotation and relative motion vectors have been calculated with respect to the Caribbean plate for each segment. The northern segment is moving N75/sup 0/E, oblique to the trench; the central segment is moving N50/sup 0/E, perpendicular to the trench; the southern segment is moving north, perpendicular to the trench. The Siqueros-Tehuantepec and Costa Rice fracture zones appear to join with tectonized zones that dissect the Central America-Mexico island arc and extend across the Caribbean plate, suggesting that it too is segmented. Structural and stratigraphic data from the sedimentary basins on the island arc suggest that these fracture zones have existed throughout the Tertiary history of the region.

  7. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  8. MR Susceptibility Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Duyn, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    This work reviews recent developments in the use of magnetic susceptibility contrast for human MRI, with a focus on the study of brain anatomy. The increase in susceptibility contrast with modern high field scanners has led to novel applications and insights into the sources and mechanism contributing to this contrast in brain tissues. Dedicated experiments have demonstrated that in most of healthy brain, iron and myelin dominate tissue susceptibility variations, although their relative contribution varies substantially. Local variations in these compounds can affect both amplitude and frequency of the MRI signal. In white matter, the myelin sheath introduces an anisotropic susceptibility that has distinct effects on the water compartments inside the axons, between the myelin sheath, and the axonal space, and renders their signals dependent on the angle between the axon and the magnetic field. This offers opportunities to derive tissue properties specific to these cellular compartments. PMID:23273840

  9. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  10. Contextual Suggestion from Wikitravel: Exploiting Community-based Suggestions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    in a spe- cific location, at a specific time, taking into ac- count their personal preferences. As a source for travel suggestions we use Wikitravel...which is a community-based travel guide for destinations all over the world. From pages dedicated to cities in the US we extract suggestions for...formation on user preferences is valuable for pro- viding appropriate suggestions. 1 Introduction Wikitravel1 is a collaboratively created site for travel

  11. Hypnotic suggestion: a musical mathaphor.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, I

    1997-04-01

    Conceptually, hypnotizability has always been associated with the increase in suggestibility produced by hypnosis. In practice, hypnotizability is measured as suggestibility following a hypnotic induction. Our understanding of hypnosis and suggestion has been hampered by this discordance between the conceptual and operational definitions of hypnotizability. For example, despite hundreds of studies purporting to use standardized scales to assess hypnotizability, we know next to nothing about that construct, as it has been defined conceptually. Neither the hypothesis that it is a stable trait nor the hypothesis that it is modifiable have been tested in any study, and correlations between hypnotizability and other psychological or physiological variables have not yet been assessed. Conversely, we have learned much about hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility. Suggestibility has been measured on reliable and valid instruments, and we have abundant data on its stability, modifiability, and correlates. Hypnosis enhances suggestibility to a modest degree and increases the effectiveness of psychotherapy.

  12. Hypnotic suggestion modulates cognitive conflict: the case of the flanker compatibility effect.

    PubMed

    Iani, Cristina; Ricci, Federico; Gherri, Elena; Rubichi, Sandro

    2006-08-01

    The present work was aimed at investigating whether the flanker compatibility effect can be eliminated by means of a posthypnotic suggestion influencing attentional focusing. In Experiment 1, participants who scored high and low on hypnotic susceptibility performed the flanker compatibility task when naturally awake and when under a posthypnotic suggestion aimed at increasing the target's discriminability from the flankers. Results showed that the posthypnotic suggestion effectively eliminated the flanker compatibility effect in highly susceptible participants, whereas low-susceptibility participants did not show any reduction in the effect. In Experiment 2, highly susceptible participants performed the task after receiving a suggestion but without the induction of hypnosis. Results showed that the suggestion alone was not sufficient to reduce the flanker compatibility effect. These results support the view that in highly susceptible participants, hypnotic suggestion can influence the ability to focus on relevant information.

  13. Deepening Sleep by Hypnotic Suggestion

    PubMed Central

    Cordi, Maren J.; Schlarb, Angelika A.; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a critical role in body restoration and promotes brain plasticity; however, it markedly declines across the lifespan. Despite its importance, effective tools to increase SWS are rare. Here we tested whether a hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” extends the amount of SWS. Design: Within-subject, placebo-controlled crossover design. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Participants: Seventy healthy females 23.27 ± 3.17 y. Intervention: Participants listened to an auditory text with hypnotic suggestions or a control tape before napping for 90 min while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Measurements and Results: After participants listened to the hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” subsequent SWS was increased by 81% and time spent awake was reduced by 67% (with the amount of SWS or wake in the control condition set to 100%). Other sleep stages remained unaffected. Additionally, slow wave activity was significantly enhanced after hypnotic suggestions. During the hypnotic tape, parietal theta power increases predicted the hypnosis-induced extension of SWS. Additional experiments confirmed that the beneficial effect of hypnotic suggestions on SWS was specific to the hypnotic suggestion and did not occur in low suggestible participants. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnotic suggestions to specifically increase the amount and duration of slow wave sleep (SWS) in a midday nap using objective measures of sleep in young, healthy, suggestible females. Hypnotic suggestions might be a successful tool with a lower risk of adverse side effects than pharmacological treatments to extend SWS also in clinical and elderly populations. Citation: Cordi MJ, Schlarb AA, Rasch B. Deepening sleep by hypnotic suggestion. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1143-1152. PMID:24882909

  14. Locating influential nodes via dynamics-sensitive centrality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-02-24

    With great theoretical and practical significance, locating influential nodes of complex networks is a promising issue. In this paper, we present a dynamics-sensitive (DS) centrality by integrating topological features and dynamical properties. The DS centrality can be directly applied in locating influential spreaders. According to the empirical results on four real networks for both susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) and susceptible-infected (SI) spreading models, the DS centrality is more accurate than degree, k-shell index and eigenvector centrality.

  15. The ontology of genetic susceptibility factors (OGSF) and its application in modeling genetic susceptibility to vaccine adverse events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    the susceptibility genes in Case Study 2. These results validated the proper OGSF structure identified different ontology aspects with SNA methods. Conclusions OGSF provides a verified and robust framework for representing various genetic susceptibility types and genetic susceptibility factors annotated from experimental VAE genetic association studies. The RDF/OWL formulated ontology data can be queried using SPARQL and analyzed using centrality-based network analysis methods. PMID:24963371

  16. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  17. Interrogative suggestibility in opiate users.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Edelmann, R J; Davis, P E

    1996-09-01

    The present study investigated interrogative suggestibility in opiate users. A group of patients undergoing a methadone detoxification programme in an in-patient drug treatment unit (Detox group, n = 21), and a group of residents who had come off drugs and were no longer suffering from withdrawal syndrome (Rehab group, n = 19) were compared on interrogative suggestibility and various other psychological factors. Significant differences were found between the two groups, with the Detox group having more physical and psychological problems, and a higher total suggestibility score in comparison with the Rehab group. These findings are discussed in relation to the context of police interrogations and the reliability of confessions made by suspects and witnesses dependent on opiates.

  18. [Suggestion and hypnosis in hysteria].

    PubMed

    Berner, P

    1995-12-15

    Suggestive influences allow to resolve ambiguities. Normally they are only accepted if they correspond with the knowledge and believes of the subject. Under hypnosis or under the impact of serious psychic perturbations one may take up reality constructions which are not in conformity with these criteria. The restriction of consciousness and the ignoring of certain functions permitting this are the common basis of hypnosis and hysteria. But suggestions do not cause the later; they may only shape the symptomatology. Hypnosis can create a terrain facilitating the resolution of the problems underlying hysteria but it does not represent the treatment of hysteria.

  19. The Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Roger A.; Handley, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Developed Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale using Chiasson induction to produce hypnotic susceptibility scale which is quickly administered and yields scores comparable to the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C). Found that validation study with college students (N=100) produced a correlation of .88 with the SHSS:C and…

  20. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2)…

  1. Suggestions for Library Network Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salton, Gerald

    1979-01-01

    Various approaches to the design of automatic library systems are described, suggestions for the design of rational and effective automated library processes are posed, and an attempt is made to assess the importance and effect of library network systems on library operations and library effectiveness. (Author/CWM)

  2. Online Training Sessions: Suggested Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabonell, Martha; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These planning and evaluative guidelines for online trainers utilize a sliding scale--from minimal to suggested to optimal--for five types of training sessions: (1) Search Service--Beginning; (2) Search Service--Advanced; (3) Search Service--Subject; (4) Database Producer; and (5) Independent Introductory Workshop. (RAA)

  3. Identifying influential and susceptible members of social networks.

    PubMed

    Aral, Sinan; Walker, Dylan

    2012-07-20

    Identifying social influence in networks is critical to understanding how behaviors spread. We present a method that uses in vivo randomized experimentation to identify influence and susceptibility in networks while avoiding the biases inherent in traditional estimates of social contagion. Estimation in a representative sample of 1.3 million Facebook users showed that younger users are more susceptible to influence than older users, men are more influential than women, women influence men more than they influence other women, and married individuals are the least susceptible to influence in the decision to adopt the product offered. Analysis of influence and susceptibility together with network structure revealed that influential individuals are less susceptible to influence than noninfluential individuals and that they cluster in the network while susceptible individuals do not, which suggests that influential people with influential friends may be instrumental in the spread of this product in the network.

  4. Are You Suggesting That's My Hand? The Relation Between Hypnotic Suggestibility and the Rubber Hand Illusion.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E; Guilmette, D N; Longo, M R; Moore, J W; Oakley, D A; Halligan, P W; Mehta, M A; Deeley, Q

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotic suggestibility (HS) is the ability to respond automatically to suggestions and to experience alterations in perception and behavior. Hypnotically suggestible participants are also better able to focus and sustain their attention on an experimental stimulus. The present study explores the relation between HS and susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion (RHI). Based on previous research with visual illusions, it was predicted that higher HS would lead to a stronger RHI. Two behavioral output measures of the RHI, an implicit (proprioceptive drift) and an explicit (RHI questionnaire) measure, were correlated against HS scores. Hypnotic suggestibility correlated positively with the implicit RHI measure contributing to 30% of the variation. However, there was no relation between HS and the explicit RHI questionnaire measure, or with compliance control items. High hypnotic suggestibility may facilitate, via attentional mechanisms, the multisensory integration of visuoproprioceptive inputs that leads to greater perceptual mislocalization of a participant's hand. These results may provide insight into the multisensory brain mechanisms involved in our sense of embodiment.

  5. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of probiotics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Liu, Xiumei; Yang, Baolan; Li, Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse the antibiotic susceptibility of 31 probiotics strains, including 9 Bifidobacterium and 22 Lactobacillus used for the manufacture of various fermented foods in China. Probiotics are tested for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 24 kinds of antibiotics by broth dilution method on cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth with lysed horse blood. 31 strains of probiotics were sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin, imipenem, gentamicine, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gatifloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and resistant to nalidixic acid, vancomycine, fosfomycin.

  6. Suggestions for Popularizing Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The public generally is taking very little interest in the progress of Civil Aviation, and the time has come to educate the public in aeronautics and to make them realize the far-reaching importance of air transport. Briefly, the whole problem resolves itself into discovering and applying means for bringing some of the many aspects and effects of civil aviation into the everyday lives of the public. The report suggests three principal groups of methods: (1) Bring aviation into daily contact with the public. (2) Bring the public into daily contact with aviation. (3) General publicity.

  7. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  8. Macroeconomic susceptibility, inflation, and aggregate supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2017-03-01

    We unify aggregate-supply dynamics as a time-dependent susceptibility-mediated relationship between inflation and aggregate economic output. In addition to representing well various observations of inflation-output dynamics this parsimonious formalism provides a straightforward derivation of popular representations of aggregate-supply dynamics and a natural basis for economic-agent expectations as an element of inflation formation. Our formalism also illuminates questions of causality and time-correlation that challenge central banks for whom aggregate-supply dynamics is a key constraint in their goal of achieving macroeconomic stability.

  9. Consumer hypnotic-like suggestibility: possible mechanism in compulsive purchasing.

    PubMed

    Prete, M Irene; Guido, Gianluigi; Pichierri, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The authors hypothesize a concept, Consumer Hypnotic-Like Suggestibility (CHLS), defined as an altered state of consciousness, as a state causing a tendency to respond positively to messages aimed at inducing consumers to make unplanned purchases. This study aims to investigate the associations of CHLS with interpersonal variables and compulsive purchasing--a frequent and uncontrollable preoccupation with buying or impulses to buy. A study was conducted on a sample of 232 subjects (n = 111 men; M age = 41 yr.), through the administration of a questionnaire, which measured: CHLS, compulsive purchasing, consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (the necessity to enhance one's image in the opinion of others through the consumption of products), and consumer atmospherics, i.e., environmental stimuli known to influence purchasing decisions. Modeling and mediation analyses suggested that internal and external drivers--Consumer Susceptibility to Interpersonal Influence and atmospherics--are positively related to CHLS which affects compulsive purchasing.

  10. Labyrinthine lesions and motion sickness susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mingjia; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    The angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) has a fast pathway, which mediates compensatory eye movements, and a slow (velocity storage) pathway, which determines its low frequency characteristics and orients eye velocity toward gravity. We have proposed that motion sickness is generated through velocity storage, when its orientation vector, which lies close to the gravitational vertical, is misaligned with eye velocity during head motion. The duration of the misalignment, determined by the dominant time constant of velocity storage, causes the buildup of motion sickness. To test this hypothesis, we studied bilateral labyrinthine-defective subjects with short vestibular time constants but normal aVOR gains for their motion sickness susceptibility. Time constants and gains were taken from rotational responses. Motion sickness was generated by rolling the head while rotating, and susceptibility was assessed by the number of head movements made before reaching intolerable levels of nausea. More head movements signified lower motion sickness susceptibility. Labyrinthine-defective subjects made more head movements on their first exposure to roll while rotating than normals (39.8 +/- 7.2 vs 13.7 +/- 5.5; P < 0.0001). Normals were tested eight times, which habituated their time constants and reduced their motion sickness susceptibility. Combining data from all subjects, there was a strong inverse relationship between time constants and number of head movements (r = 0.94), but none between motion sickness susceptibility and aVOR gains. This provides further evidence that motion sickness is generated through velocity storage, not the direct pathway, and suggests that motion sickness susceptibility can be reduced by reducing the aVOR time constant.

  11. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Stephan; Deistung, Andreas; Schweser, Ferdinand; Franthal, Sebastian; Homayoon, Nina; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Koegl-Wallner, Mariella; Pendl, Tamara; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Wenzel, Karoline; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen Rainer; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schwingenschuh, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and R2* relaxation rate mapping have demonstrated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the findings in other subcortical deep gray matter nuclei are converse and the sensitivity of QSM and R2* for morphological changes and their relation to clinical measures of disease severity has so far been investigated only sparsely. Methods The local ethics committee approved this study and all subjects gave written informed consent. 66 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease and 58 control subjects underwent quantitative MRI at 3T. Susceptibility and R2* maps were reconstructed from a spoiled multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence. Mean susceptibilities and R2* rates were measured in subcortical deep gray matter nuclei and compared between patients with PD and controls as well as related to clinical variables. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with PD had increased R2* values in the substantia nigra. QSM also showed higher susceptibilities in patients with PD in substantia nigra, in the nucleus ruber, thalamus, and globus pallidus. Magnetic susceptibility of several of these structures was correlated with the levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LEDD) and clinical markers of motor and non-motor disease severity (total MDS-UPDRS, MDS-UPDRS-I and II). Disease severity as assessed by the Hoehn & Yahr scale was correlated with magnetic susceptibility in the substantia nigra. Conclusion The established finding of higher R2* rates in the substantia nigra was extended by QSM showing superior sensitivity for PD-related tissue changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways. QSM additionally reflected the levodopa-dosage and disease severity. These results suggest a more widespread pathologic involvement and QSM as a novel means for its investigation, more sensitive than current MRI techniques. PMID:27598250

  12. Antifungal susceptibility against yeasts isolated from pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kersun, L S; Reilly, A F; Ingram, M E; Nicholaou, M J; McGowan, K L

    2008-06-01

    Yeast infections cause morbidity in children with cancer and we evaluated species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of the etiologic agents in this group. Specimens from 58 children yielded 64 cultures positive for yeasts. Central venous catheters were present in 56 (97%) of the children and neutrophil counts were <500 cells/ml3 in 34% of the patients. Twenty-two (38%) had received recent antifungal treatment, with 15 (25%) receiving fluconazole (FLU) prophylaxis. The Candida isolates recovered from four (27%) of the children on FLU prophylaxis, were resistant to this drug. Candida albicans isolates were susceptible to 100% of antifungals tested, whereas non-C. albicans Candida spp. were variable in their susceptibility patterns. FLU prophylaxis minimally affected susceptibility.

  13. Network susceptibilities: Theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Manik, Debsankha; Rohden, Martin; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of network susceptibilities quantifying the response of the collective dynamics of a network to small parameter changes. We distinguish two types of susceptibilities: vertex susceptibilities and edge susceptibilities, measuring the responses due to changes in the properties of units and their interactions, respectively. We derive explicit forms of network susceptibilities for oscillator networks close to steady states and offer example applications for Kuramoto-type phase-oscillator models, power grid models, and generic flow models. Focusing on the role of the network topology implies that these ideas can be easily generalized to other types of networks, in particular those characterizing flow, transport, or spreading phenomena. The concept of network susceptibilities is broadly applicable and may straightforwardly be transferred to all settings where networks responses of the collective dynamics to topological changes are essential.

  14. Network susceptibilities: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Debsankha; Rohden, Martin; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of network susceptibilities quantifying the response of the collective dynamics of a network to small parameter changes. We distinguish two types of susceptibilities: vertex susceptibilities and edge susceptibilities, measuring the responses due to changes in the properties of units and their interactions, respectively. We derive explicit forms of network susceptibilities for oscillator networks close to steady states and offer example applications for Kuramoto-type phase-oscillator models, power grid models, and generic flow models. Focusing on the role of the network topology implies that these ideas can be easily generalized to other types of networks, in particular those characterizing flow, transport, or spreading phenomena. The concept of network susceptibilities is broadly applicable and may straightforwardly be transferred to all settings where networks responses of the collective dynamics to topological changes are essential.

  15. [Salmonella of Indian origin: pseudo-susceptibility to fluoroquinolones].

    PubMed

    Denes, E; Gondran, G; Bezanahary, H; Genet, C; Rogez, J P; Weinbreck, P; Martin, C

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of a patient presenting with typhoid fever after returning from a stay in India. This infection was not cured with a course of ciprofloxacin, due to a reduced susceptibility of the bacteria to the drug. This decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones was not detected by the antibiogram, but the MIC for nalidixic acid was greater than 32 mg/l. This case suggests using a third generation cephalosporin instead of a quinolone, for people coming from a high-risk zone. It also suggests that the MIC for nalidixic acid and for norfloxacin can be used as the first clue for a reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

  16. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  17. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    PubMed

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared.

  18. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; de Forcrand, Philippe; Gerber, Urs

    2015-12-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  19. 32 CFR 1900.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1900.04 Section 1900.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC ACCESS TO CIA RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) General § 1900.04 Suggestions...

  20. 32 CFR 1901.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1901.04 Section 1901.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC RIGHTS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 General § 1901.04 Suggestions and complaints. The Agency...

  1. 32 CFR 1900.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1900.04 Section 1900.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC ACCESS TO CIA RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) General § 1900.04 Suggestions...

  2. 32 CFR 1900.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1900.04 Section 1900.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC ACCESS TO CIA RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) General § 1900.04 Suggestions...

  3. 32 CFR 1901.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1901.04 Section 1901.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC RIGHTS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 General § 1901.04 Suggestions and complaints. The Agency...

  4. 32 CFR 1900.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1900.04 Section 1900.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC ACCESS TO CIA RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) General § 1900.04 Suggestions...

  5. 32 CFR 1900.04 - Suggestions and complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suggestions and complaints. 1900.04 Section 1900.04 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC ACCESS TO CIA RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) General § 1900.04 Suggestions...

  6. Nutrition affects insect susceptibility to Bt toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Carrie A.; Behmer, Spencer T.; Tessnow, Ashley E.; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sword, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide resistance represents a major challenge to global food production. The spread of resistance alleles is the primary explanation for observations of reduced pesticide efficacy over time, but the potential for gene-by-environment interactions (plasticity) to mediate susceptibility has largely been overlooked. Here we show that nutrition is an environmental factor that affects susceptibility to Bt toxins. Protein and carbohydrates are two key macronutrients for insect herbivores, and the polyphagous pest Helicoverpa zea self-selects and performs best on diets that are protein-biased relative to carbohydrates. Despite this, most Bt bioassays employ carbohydrate-biased rearing diets. This study explored the effect of diet protein-carbohydrate content on H. zea susceptibility to Cry1Ac, a common Bt endotoxin. We detected a 100-fold increase in LC50 for larvae on optimal versus carbohydrate-biased diets, and significant diet-mediated variation in survival and performance when challenged with Cry1Ac. Our results suggest that Bt resistance bioassays that use ecologically- and physiologically-mismatched diets over-estimate susceptibility and under-estimate resistance.

  7. Nutrition affects insect susceptibility to Bt toxins

    PubMed Central

    Deans, Carrie A.; Behmer, Spencer T.; Tessnow, Ashley E.; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sword, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide resistance represents a major challenge to global food production. The spread of resistance alleles is the primary explanation for observations of reduced pesticide efficacy over time, but the potential for gene-by-environment interactions (plasticity) to mediate susceptibility has largely been overlooked. Here we show that nutrition is an environmental factor that affects susceptibility to Bt toxins. Protein and carbohydrates are two key macronutrients for insect herbivores, and the polyphagous pest Helicoverpa zea self-selects and performs best on diets that are protein-biased relative to carbohydrates. Despite this, most Bt bioassays employ carbohydrate-biased rearing diets. This study explored the effect of diet protein-carbohydrate content on H. zea susceptibility to Cry1Ac, a common Bt endotoxin. We detected a 100-fold increase in LC50 for larvae on optimal versus carbohydrate-biased diets, and significant diet-mediated variation in survival and performance when challenged with Cry1Ac. Our results suggest that Bt resistance bioassays that use ecologically- and physiologically-mismatched diets over-estimate susceptibility and under-estimate resistance. PMID:28045087

  8. [Suggestions for buying medical equipment in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Trontzos, Christos

    2004-01-01

    TO THE EDITOR: Both in Greece and in other European countries there are plans to buy more medical equipment. If the whole procedure is not effective, it may result to a large deficit in the hospital budget. The total hospital deficit now in Greece is about 2.5 billion euros. It is suggested that in every hospital, the Authorized Committee for Medical Equipment Purchasing, should include the following: One Director of a Medical Department related to the equipment to be bought and another Director of a Medical Department, unrelated. One accountant. One legal advisor specialized in hospital affairs. One economical advisor specialized in banking who will be able to suggest leasing or other means of financing the purchase of the relevant equipment. A cost accounting analysis described by a detailed report, should be provided to secure that the equipment to be bought should be cost-effective and leaving a reasonable surplus after not more than 10 years from the time it is installed. Finally, the possibility of using one expensive equipment to cover the needs of more than one hospitals either by moving the equipment (i.e. the PET/CT camera by a large vehicle) or by transferring the patients to a central hospital, may be provided by the above Authorized Committee.

  9. Interference of TRPV1 function altered the susceptibility of PTZ-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yun-Fang; Li, Ying-Chao; Tang, Yan-Ping; Cao, Jun; Wang, Li-Ping; Yang, Yue-Xiong; Xu, Lin; Mao, Rong-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) including hippocampus, and regulates the balance of excitation and inhibition in CNS, which imply its important role in epilepsy. We used both pharmacological manipulations and transgenic mice to disturb the function of TRPV1 and then studied the effects of these alterations on the susceptibility of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. Our results showed that systemic administration of TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (CAP, 40 mg/kg) directly induced tonic-clonic seizures (TCS) without PTZ induction. The severity of seizure was increased in lower doses of CAP groups (5 and 10 mg/kg), although the latency to TCS was delayed. On the other hand, systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ, 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg) and TRPV1 knockout mice exhibited delayed latency to TCS and reduced mortality. Furthermore, hippocampal administration of CPZ (10 and 33 nmol/μL/side) was firstly reported to increase the latency to TCS, decrease the maximal grade of seizure and mortality. It is worth noting that decreased susceptibility of PTZ-induced seizures was observed in hippocampal TRPV1 overexpression mice and hippocampal CAP administration (33 nmol/μL/side), which is opposite from results of systemic agonist CAP. Our findings suggest that the systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonist may be a novel therapeutic target for epilepsy, and alteration of hippocampal TRPV1 function exerts a critical role in seizure susceptibility.

  10. Spatial Resolution Effects of Digital Terrain Models on Landslide Susceptibility Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. T.; Dou, J.; Chang, Y.; Kuo, C. P.; Xu, K. M.; Liu, J. K.

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to identify the maximum number of correlated factors for landslide susceptibility mapping and to evaluate landslide susceptibility at Sihjhong river catchment in the southern Taiwan, integrating two techniques, namely certainty factor (CF) and artificial neural network (ANN). The landslide inventory data of the Central Geological Survey (CGS, MOEA) in 2004-2014 and two digital elevation model (DEM) datasets including a 5-meter LiDAR DEM and a 30-meter Aster DEM were prepared. We collected thirteen possible landslide-conditioning factors. Considering the multi-collinearity and factor redundancy, we applied the CF approach to optimize these thirteen conditioning factors. We hypothesize that if the CF values of the thematic factor layers are positive, it implies that these conditioning factors have a positive relationship with the landslide occurrence. Therefore, based on this assumption and positive CF values, seven conditioning factors including slope angle, slope aspect, elevation, terrain roughness index (TRI), terrain position index (TPI), total curvature, and lithology have been selected for further analysis. The results showed that the optimized-factors model provides a better accuracy for predicting landslide susceptibility in the study area. In conclusion, the optimized-factors model is suggested for selecting relative factors of landslide occurrence.

  11. A survey for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in endangered and highly susceptible Vietnamese salamanders (Tylototriton spp.).

    PubMed

    Thien, Tao Nguyen; Martel, An; Brutyn, Melanie; Bogaerts, Sergé; Sparreboom, Max; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Fisher, Matthew C; Beukema, Wouter; Van, Tang Duong; Chiers, Koen; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Until now, Asian amphibians appear to have largely escaped declines driven by chytridiomycosis. Vietnamese salamanders that belong to the genus Tylototriton are rare and have a patchy distribution in mountainous areas, falling within the proposed environmental envelope of chytrid infections, surrounded by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infected regions. If these salamanders are susceptible to chytridiomycosis, then their populations could be highly vulnerable after the introduction of B. dendrobatidis. Examination for the presence of the chytrid fungus in skin swabs from 19 Tylototriton asperrimus and 104 Tylototriton vietnamensis by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed. Susceptibility of T. asperrimus to experimental infection by using the global panzootic lineage (BdGPL) strain of B. dendrobatidis was examined. The fungus was absent in all samples from all wild salamanders examined. Inoculation with the BdGPL strain resulted in mortality of all five inoculated salamanders within 3 weeks after inoculation with infected animals that manifested severe orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, epidermal hyperplasia, and spongiosis. Although infection by B. dendrobatidis currently appears absent in Vietnamese Tylototriton populations, the rarity of these animals, their pronounced susceptibility to chytridiomycosis, an apparently suitable environmental context and increasing likelihood of the pathogen being introduced, together suggest the need of urgent measures to avoid future scenarios of extinction as witnessed in Central America and Australia.

  12. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion in Cerebral Cavernous Angiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Tan, Huan; Shenkar, Robert; Li, Luying; Zhang, Lingjiao; Guo, Xiaodong; Shi, Changbin; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Shah, Akash; Edelman, Robert; Christoforidis, Gregory; Awad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperpermeability and iron deposition are two central pathophysiological phenomena in human cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease. Here we used two novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to establish a relationship between these phenomena. Methods Subjects with CCM disease (4 sporadic and 18 familial) underwent MRI imaging using the Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion (DCEQP) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) techniques that measure hemodynamic factors of vessel leak and iron deposition respectively, previously demonstrated in CCM disease. Regions of interest encompassing the CCM lesions were analyzed using these techniques Results Susceptibility measured by QSM was positively correlated with permeability of lesions measured using DCEQP (r=0.49, p=<0.0001). The correlation was not affected by factors including familial predisposition, lesion volume, the contrast agent and the use of statin medication. Susceptibility was correlated with lesional blood volume (r=0.4, p=0.0001), but not with lesional blood flow. Conclusion The correlation between QSM and DCEQP suggests that the phenomena of permeability and iron deposition are related in CCM; hence “more leaky lesions” also manifest a more cumulative iron burden. These techniques might be used as biomarkers to monitor the course of this disease and the effect of therapy. PMID:24302484

  13. Classroom Seating and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackeim, Harold A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether people who differ in behavioral and self-report measures of lateralized seating preferences also differ in hypnotic susceptibility. Only right-handed subjects were used, and the associations between hypnotic susceptibility and seating preference were examined separately for males and females.…

  14. An Antimicrobial Susceptibility Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.; O'Donnell, Edward D.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized system is described which is used to store, manipulate and retrieve antimicrobial susceptibility data in the clinical microbiology lab. Features include facilitated input of susceptibility data, rapid generation of reports, realtime access to data, and enhanced retrieval of information for Infection Control.

  15. The multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes TAGAP and IL2RA are regulated by vitamin D in CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Berge, T; Leikfoss, I S; Brorson, I S; Bos, S D; Page, C M; Gustavsen, M W; Bjølgerud, A; Holmøy, T; Celius, E G; Damoiseaux, J; Smolders, J; Harbo, H F; Spurkland, A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. The majority of the MS-associated gene variants are located in genetic regions with importance for T-cell differentiation. Vitamin D is a potent immunomodulator, and vitamin D deficiency has been suggested to be associated with increased MS disease susceptibility and activity. In CD4+ T cells, we have analyzed in vitro vitamin D responsiveness of genes that contain an MS-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and with one or more vitamin D response elements in their regulatory regions. We identify IL2RA and TAGAP as novel vitamin D target genes. The vitamin D response is observed in samples from both MS patients and controls, and is not dependent on the genotype of MS-associated SNPs in the respective genes. PMID:26765264

  16. Susceptibility to aflatoxin contamination among maize landraces from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Beltran, Alejandro; Guerrero-Herrera, Manuel D J; Ortega-Corona, Alejandro; Vidal-Martinez, Victor A; Cotty, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    Maize, the critical staple food for billions of people, was domesticated in Mexico about 9,000 YBP. Today, a great array of maize landraces (MLRs) across rural Mexico is harbored in a living library that has been passed among generations since before the establishment of the modern state. MLRs have been selected over hundreds of generations by ethnic groups for adaptation to diverse environmental settings. The genetic diversity of MLRs in Mexico is an outstanding resource for development of maize cultivars with beneficial traits. Maize is frequently contaminated with aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus, and resistance to accumulation of these potent carcinogens has been sought for over three decades. However, MLRs from Mexico have not been evaluated as potential sources of resistance. Variation in susceptibility to both A. flavus reproduction and aflatoxin contamination was evaluated on viable maize kernels in laboratory experiments that included 74 MLR accessions collected from 2006 to 2008 in the central west and northwest regions of Mexico. Resistant and susceptible MLR accessions were detected in both regions. The most resistant accessions accumulated over 99 % less aflatoxin B1 than did the commercial hybrid control Pioneer P33B50. Accessions supporting lower aflatoxin accumulation also supported reduced A. flavus sporulation. Sporulation on the MLRs was positively correlated with aflatoxin accumulation (R = 0.5336, P < 0.0001), suggesting that resistance to fungal reproduction is associated with MLR aflatoxin resistance. Results of the current study indicate that MLRs from Mexico are potentially important sources of aflatoxin resistance that may contribute to the breeding of commercially acceptable and safe maize hybrids and/or open pollinated cultivars for human and animal consumption.

  17. Variations in concepts of "susceptibility" in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Parkin, R T; Balbus, J M

    2000-10-01

    The Food Quality Protection Act and the 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act are two of the most recent examples of legislation calling for protection of susceptible subpopulations. As regulatory deadlines draw nearer, controversies in scientific and policy arenas increase about incorporating susceptibility in risk assessment. The previously accepted working definition of "susceptibility" has already been called into question. Part of the controversy results from different disciplines conceiving of susceptibility in different ways. Understanding the conceptual differences embodied within definitions can provide a basis on which a revised working definition may be developed across disciplines. The purposes of this article are to describe the varying definitions of susceptibility, discuss the differing concepts incorporated in the definitions, and recommend ways in which susceptibility may be defined and framed to meet current risk assessment needs. The present analysis of definitions from the fields of ecology, biology, engineering, medicine, epidemiology, and toxicology revealed different emphases that relate to the underlying perspectives and methods of each field. It is likely that susceptibility will need to be formally defined for public policy purposes, but until that time, the use of more informal communication and decision-making processes is suggested to develop and utilize a new working consensus on the definition of susceptibility.

  18. An investigation into the association between HLA-G 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and multiple sclerosis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Nabiallah; Adib, Minoo; Alsahebfosoul, Fereshteh; Kazemi, Mohammad; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2016-01-15

    Human Leukocyte Antigen G (HLA-G) gene polymorphism and expression rate have recently been suggested to have a potential role in susceptibility to Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system with unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the frequency of HLA-G gene 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and its plasma level with MS susceptibility. In this study, the HLA-G gene from 212 patients and 210 healthy individuals was amplified using real time PCR and screened for the 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism. In addition, HLA-G plasma levels of the patients were measured and compared to normal controls by ELISA method. Our results revealed that 14 bp insertion in HLA-G could result in lower plasma HLA-G level of the subjects, regardless of their health status and vice versa. Additionally, significant correlation of HLA-G genotype and its plasma level with MS susceptibility was observed. In conclusion, not only HLA-G 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism could be associated with expression rate of the HLA-G gene and its plasma level, but also could be considered as a risk factor for susceptibility to MS in our study population.

  19. Anisotropy of the Magnetic Susceptibility of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite igneous complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M.; Almqvist, B.; Malehmir, A.; Troll, V. R.; Snowball, I.; Lougheed, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Alnö igneous complex in central Sweden is one of the largest (radius ~2.5 km) of the few well-known alkaline and carbonatite ring-intrusions in the world. The lithologies span from alkaline silicate rocks (nepheline syenite, ijolite, and pyroxenite) to a range of carbonatite dykes (e.g. sövite) with variable composition. The depth extent, dip, and dip direction of the alkaline and carbonatite rocks have been inferred from surface geological mapping, and a dome-shaped magma chamber with the roof at ~2 km below the palaeosurface was inferred to have supplied steeply dipping radial dykes and (shallowly dipping) cone sheets. Recent high-resolution reflection seismic profiles and gravity and ground magnetic measurements suggest, in turn, a saucer-shaped magma chamber at ~3 km depth below present day land surface. To provide further insight into the internal flow mechanics of these dykes and into their emplacement mechanisms, we have measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). About 250 samples from 119 oriented cores were collected with a handheld drilling machine from 26 localities within the Alnö complex. Prior to preparation of discrete samples for AMS, the cores were measured for their density and for ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities. Most of the sampling locations lie on a transect through the intrusion. Three locations have been sampled in detail, to determine the variation of AMS within individual carbonatite dykes. The AMS of samples were measured in low-field, using a KLY-2 Kappabridge. Bulk magnetic susceptibility ranges from 3.01e-5 to 2.50e-1 SI, and correlates with lithology. The sövites have the widest range of susceptibility (average 4.32e-2, with a range from 3.01e-5 to 2.50e-1 SI), whereas fenites have the lowest average susceptibility (average 2.06e-3, with a range from 9.86e-5 to 1.47e-2 SI); nepheline-syenite, ijolite and pyroxenite have susceptibilities between these two end member lithologies. Sövite consists mainly of

  20. Magnetic susceptibility of petroleum reservoir fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Oleksandr P.; Potter, David K.

    A knowledge of the magnetic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids may provide new techniques for improved reservoir characterisation, petroleum exploration and production. However, magnetic information is currently scarce for the vast majority of reservoir fluids. For instance, there is little in the literature concerning basic magnetic susceptibility values of crude oils or formation waters. We have therefore measured the mass magnetic susceptibility ( χm) of several crude oils, refined oil fractions, and formation waters from local and world-wide sites. All the fluids measured were diamagnetic, however there were distinct differences in magnitude between the different fluid types. In particular, χm for the crude oils was more negative than for the formation waters of the same locality. The magnetic susceptibility of the oils appears to be related to their main physical and chemical properties. The results correlated with the density, residue content, API (American Petroleum Institute) gravity, viscosity, sulphur content and metal concentration of the fluids. Light fractions of crude oil were the most diamagnetic. The magnetic measurements potentially allow physical and chemical differences between the fluids to be rapidly characterised. The results suggest other possible applications, such as passive in situ magnetic susceptibility sensors for fluid monitoring (for example, the onset of water breakthrough, or the detection of migrating fines) in reservoirs, which would provide an environmentally friendly alternative to radioactive tracers. The mass magnetic susceptibilities of the fluids in relation to typical reservoir minerals may also play a role in fluid-rock interactions, such as studies of wettability. The χm of crude oil from the various world-wide oil provinces that were tested also showed some differences, possibly reflecting broad physical and chemical features of the geological history of each province.

  1. Overview of quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Deistung, Andreas; Schweser, Ferdinand; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility describes the magnetizability of a material to an applied magnetic field and represents an important parameter in the field of MRI. With the recently introduced method of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and its conceptual extension to susceptibility tensor imaging (STI), the non-invasive assessment of this important physical quantity has become possible with MRI. Both methods solve the ill-posed inverse problem to determine the magnetic susceptibility from local magnetic fields. Whilst QSM allows the extraction of the spatial distribution of the bulk magnetic susceptibility from a single measurement, STI enables the quantification of magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, but requires multiple measurements with different orientations of the object relative to the main static magnetic field. In this review, we briefly recapitulate the fundamental theoretical foundation of QSM and STI, as well as computational strategies for the characterization of magnetic susceptibility with MRI phase data. In the second part, we provide an overview of current methodological and clinical applications of QSM with a focus on brain imaging. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Genetic susceptibility to occupational exposures

    PubMed Central

    Christiani, D C; Mehta, A J; Yu, C-L

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence in the general population, genetic variants that determine susceptibility to environmental exposures may contribute greatly to the development of occupational diseases in the setting of specific exposures occurring in the workplace. Studies investigating genetic susceptibilities in the workplace may: (1) provide mechanistic insight into the aetiology of disease, in particular the determination of environmentally responsive genes; (2) identify susceptible subpopulations with respect to exposure; and (3) provide valuable input in setting occupational exposure limits by taking genetic susceptibility into account. Polymorphisms in the NAT2 and the HLA-DPB1Glu69 genes provide classic examples of how genetic susceptibility markers have a clear role in identifying disease risk in bladder cancer and chronic beryllium disease, respectively. For diseases with more complex and multifactorial aetiology such as occupational asthma and chronic airways disease, susceptibility studies for selected genetic polymorphisms provide additional insight into the biological mechanisms of disease. Even when polymorphisms for genetic susceptibility have a clear role in identifying disease risk, the value of wide scale genetic screening in occupational settings remains limited due to primarily ethical and social concerns. Thus, large scale genetic screening in the workplace is not currently recommended. PMID:18487431

  3. Genetic susceptibility in ecosystems: the challenge for ecotoxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Evenden, A J; Depledge, M H

    1997-01-01

    Environmental management is inevitably complicated by the large variation in susceptibility to chemical toxicity exhibited by the living components of ecosystems, a significant proportion of which is determined by genetic factors. This paper examines the concept of genetic susceptibility in ecosystems and suggests the existence of two distinct forms reflecting genetic changes at the level of the individual and at the level of population and community. The influence of genetic susceptibility on exposure-response curves is discussed and the consequent accuracy of data used for toxicity test-based risk assessments examined. The paper concludes by describing a possible biomarker-based approach to future studies of susceptibility in ecosystems, suggesting the use of modern molecular genetic methods. PMID:9255571

  4. Belief in the paranormal and suggestion in the seance room.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Richard; Greening, Emma; Smith, Matthew

    2003-08-01

    In Experiment 1, participants took part in a fake seance. An actor suggested that a table was levitating when, in fact, it remained stationary. After the seance, approximately one third of participants incorrectly reported that the table had moved. Results also showed a significant relationship between the reported movement of the table and belief in the paranormal, with a greater percentage of believers than disbelievers, reporting that the table had moved. Experiment 2 varied whether the suggestion was consistent, or inconsistent, with participants' belief in the paranormal. Results again showed that believers were more susceptible to suggestion than disbelievers, but only when the suggestion was consistent with their belief in the paranormal. Approximately one fifth of participants believed that the fake seances contained genuine paranormal phenomena.

  5. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  6. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  7. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Ascomycetous Yeasts Isolated from Animals

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E.; Peláez, Teresa; Martínez-Nevado, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that antifungal resistance in yeast isolates of veterinary origin may be an underdiagnosed threat. We tested a collection of 92 ascomycetous yeast isolates that were obtained in Spain from birds, mammals and insects for antifungal susceptibility. MICs to amphotericin B and azoles were low, and no resistant isolates were detected. Despite these results, and given the potential role of animals as reservoirs of resistant strains, continuous monitoring of antifungal susceptibility in the veterinary setting is recommended. PMID:27216048

  8. Genome-wide Loci linked to non-obstructive azoospermia susceptibility may be independent of reduced sperm production in males with normozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenling; Liu, Yunqiang; Shen, Ying; Yan, Yuanlong; Wang, Xianding; Yang, Dong; Li, Lei; Ma, Yongxin; Tao, Dachang; Zhang, Sizhong; Yang, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is a complex, multifactorial disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified eight NOA susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance of P < 5.0 × 10(-8) in Han Chinese from southeastern, northern, and central China. To better understand the role of the variants in conferring NOA risk, we selected four GWAS loci (HLA-DRA rs3129878, PRMT6 rs12097821, SOX5 rs10842262, and PEX10 rs2477686) that were reported before 2014 to investigate their association with NOA and their potential effects on sperm production in 1177 Han males from southwest China, including 545 patients with idiopathic NOA and 632 controls with normozoospermia. The results confirmed that the HLA-DRA rs3129878 was an NOA susceptibility locus in the present population. Along with our data, meta-analyses supported the association of the four GWAS-linked loci with NOA, whereas an additive effect of the four loci on NOA susceptibility was not found. Interestingly, the normozoospermic males with the risk genotypes of rs12097821 and rs3129878 + rs10842262 + rs12097821 were observed to have higher total sperm counts relative to non-risk genotypes, suggesting that the risk alleles of the genetic loci may not be via impairing spermatogenic ability to express susceptibility to NOA. These findings may advance our understanding of the role of the NOA susceptibility loci, although the results need to be confirmed in larger samples.

  9. Cognitive Factors in Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert D.; Field, Peter B.

    1971-01-01

    This research explored the influence of cognitive variables on susceptibility to hypnosis. The three variables of concern in the present study are automatization, attention, and body experience. The results are summarized. (Author)

  10. Perceptual Load Affects Eyewitness Accuracy and Susceptibility to Leading Questions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Gillian; Greene, Ciara M.

    2016-01-01

    Load Theory (Lavie, 1995, 2005) states that the level of perceptual load in a task (i.e., the amount of information involved in processing task-relevant stimuli) determines the efficiency of selective attention. There is evidence that perceptual load affects distractor processing, with increased inattentional blindness under high load. Given that high load can result in individuals failing to report seeing obvious objects, it is conceivable that load may also impair memory for the scene. The current study is the first to assess the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory. Across three experiments (two video-based and one in a driving simulator), the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory was assessed. The results showed that eyewitnesses were less accurate under high load, in particular for peripheral details. For example, memory for the central character in the video was not affected by load but memory for a witness who passed by the window at the edge of the scene was significantly worse under high load. High load memories were also more open to suggestion, showing increased susceptibility to leading questions. High visual perceptual load also affected recall for auditory information, illustrating a possible cross-modal perceptual load effect on memory accuracy. These results have implications for eyewitness memory researchers and forensic professionals. PMID:27625628

  11. Perceptual Load Affects Eyewitness Accuracy and Susceptibility to Leading Questions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gillian; Greene, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Load Theory (Lavie, 1995, 2005) states that the level of perceptual load in a task (i.e., the amount of information involved in processing task-relevant stimuli) determines the efficiency of selective attention. There is evidence that perceptual load affects distractor processing, with increased inattentional blindness under high load. Given that high load can result in individuals failing to report seeing obvious objects, it is conceivable that load may also impair memory for the scene. The current study is the first to assess the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory. Across three experiments (two video-based and one in a driving simulator), the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory was assessed. The results showed that eyewitnesses were less accurate under high load, in particular for peripheral details. For example, memory for the central character in the video was not affected by load but memory for a witness who passed by the window at the edge of the scene was significantly worse under high load. High load memories were also more open to suggestion, showing increased susceptibility to leading questions. High visual perceptual load also affected recall for auditory information, illustrating a possible cross-modal perceptual load effect on memory accuracy. These results have implications for eyewitness memory researchers and forensic professionals.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility and susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma hominis: a review.

    PubMed

    Bygdeman, S M; Mårdh, P A

    1983-01-01

    The determination of the minimal growth-inhibiting concentration (MIC), the minimal metabolism-inhibiting concentration (MMC), and the minimal mycoplasmacidal concentration (MCC) of various antimicrobial compounds for Mycoplasma hominis is influenced by the pH of the test media, the inoculum size, and the incubation time, although each of these factors generally do not affect the minimal concentration more than fourfold. M. hominis is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. There are great differences in the susceptibility of M. hominis to various macrolide antibiotics. Thus the organism is resistant to erythromycin and oleandomycin, moderately resistant to tylosin and spiramycin, susceptible to josamycin as well as to another macrolide drug, labelled M-4365G. M. hominis is also highly susceptible to the macrolide-like compound rosaramicin and to the tetracyclines (although resistant strains occur). It is susceptible to lincomycin and clindamycin, and moderately susceptible to chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The aminoglycosides have limited activity against M. hominis.

  13. Genetic susceptibility to radiogenic cancer in humans.

    PubMed

    Allan, James M

    2008-11-01

    The clinical benefits associated with the use of ionizing radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes are well established, particularly in cancer medicine. Unfortunately, it is now clear that prior exposure to radiation is associated with an excess risk of developing malignancy in the exposure field. Indeed, the development of a second primary malignancy is a devastating side effect that can often be attributed to radiotherapy for a first cancer. Research has focused on elucidating the relationship between therapeutic radiation dose and site-specific cancer risk, and how this relationship is affected by host factors such as age, sex, and exposure to other potential carcinogens. By contrast, there is a relative paucity of data on host genetic susceptibility to cancer following cytotoxic and mutagenic radiation exposure. Animal model systems suggest a strong genetic basis underlying susceptibility to radiogenic cancer. In humans, research has focused on investigating loci with relatively rare putative high penetrance risk alleles. However, genetic susceptibility to radiogenic cancer and other late effects of radiation exposure may be determined predominantly by co-inheritance of low penetrance risk alleles, and how these interact with each other (gene-gene interactions), with radiation dose (gene-exposure interactions) and other risk factors.

  14. Locating influential nodes via dynamics-sensitive centrality

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    With great theoretical and practical significance, locating influential nodes of complex networks is a promising issue. In this paper, we present a dynamics-sensitive (DS) centrality by integrating topological features and dynamical properties. The DS centrality can be directly applied in locating influential spreaders. According to the empirical results on four real networks for both susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) and susceptible-infected (SI) spreading models, the DS centrality is more accurate than degree, k-shell index and eigenvector centrality. PMID:26905891

  15. Magnetic susceptibility, petrofabrics and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1988-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is a non-destructive technique for quantifying the average fabric of a small sample of rock. The interpretation of the magnetic fabric is not always straightforward. However, the principal directions of the magnitude ellipsoid of susceptibility commonly show orientations consistent with the kinematic interpretations of folds, shear zones and other structural features. The directions may correspond with the orientations of strained objects or with the planar-linear mineral orientations. There will usually be multiple mineralogical sources of susceptibility, often involving silicates. If the sources are known, or if the susceptibility can be attributed to a single mineral species, it may be possible to establish a correlation between the strain ellipsoid and the susceptibility ellipsoid. This correlation will be of principal directions in many instances and occasionally there may be a weak correlation of strain magnitudes as well. In other circumstances it may be possible to establish a correlation between changes in susceptibility and the strain. Nevertheless magnetic fabric studies are not routine substitutes for strain analysis. Even where information on strain is not provided, the magnetic fabrics (and subfabrics) yield a measure of the preferred crystallographic orientation or preferred dimensional orientation of the minerals that may be integrated profitably with other petrofabric data. Experimental deformation of certain synthetic aggregates indicates that directions of magnetic susceptibility spin rapidly with advancing strain, especially where the matrix grains undergo crystal-plastic deformation. In certain experiments, simple shear appears to change the intensity of magnetic fabric more effectively than pure shear. Experiments indicate also that the initial anisotropy of a rock-like material is not easily overprinted by deformation whereas field studies are equivocal.

  16. Rationale for revised penicillin susceptibility breakpoints versus Streptococcus pneumoniae: coping with antimicrobial susceptibility in an era of resistance.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Melvin P; Klugman, Keith P; Jones, Ronald N

    2009-06-01

    In January 2008, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute published revised susceptibility breakpoints for penicillin and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and shortly thereafter, the United States Food and Drug Administration similarly revised its breakpoints via changes in the package insert for penicillin. The revised susceptibility breakpoint is < or =2 microg/mL for nonmeningeal infections treated with parenteral penicillin at a dosage of 12 million units-24 million units per day. The susceptibility breakpoint of < or =0.06 microg/mL remains unchanged for pneumococcal meningitis treated with parenteral penicillin at a dosage of > or =18 million units per day. Herein, we review the scientific basis for the revisions to the breakpoints, which were supported by microbiologic, pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic, and clinical data. Clinicians, once again, should feel comfortable prescribing penicillin for pneumococcal pneumonia and other pneumococcal infections outside the central nervous system.

  17. Xylazine emesis, yohimbine and motion sickness susceptibility in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.

    1986-01-01

    The possible role of the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in xylazine-induced vomiting and in motion sickness was investigated. Cats were divided into two groups according to motion sickness susceptibility and were observed after s.c. injections of xylazine. The incidence of vomiting increased with the dose, and at each dose the high susceptibility group had a greater emetic incidence than the low susceptibility group. In another experiment with cats divided into two groups according to motion sickness susceptibility, s.c. administration of yohimbine effectively antagonized the xylazine-induced emesis in both susceptibility groups. The cats in the latter experiment were then challenged with a motion sickness stimulus after s.c. pretreatment with yohimbine. Yohimbine failed to prevent motion sickness but did occasion an unexplained variability in the incidence of vomiting. These findings suggest that the emetic effect of xylazine results from stimulation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors but that these receptors are not fundamental to feline motion sickness. The fact that susceptibilities to xylazine-induced emesis and to motion sickness are correlated suggests a point of interaction other than the area postrema, which is known to be essential for xylazine-induced vomiting but not for motion sickness in the cat.

  18. In Vivo Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Williams, Guy B.; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Arnold, Robert J.; Lupson, Victoria; Nestor, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explores the magnetostatic properties of the Alzheimer's disease brain using a recently proposed, magnetic resonance imaging, postprocessed contrast mechanism. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has the potential to monitor in vivo iron levels by reconstructing magnetic susceptibility sources from field perturbations. However, with phase data acquired at a single head orientation, the technique relies on several theoretical approximations and requires fast-evolving regularisation strategies. Methods In this context, the present study describes a complete methodological framework for magnetic susceptibility measurements with a review of its theoretical foundations. Findings and Significance The regional and whole-brain cross-sectional comparisons between Alzheimer's disease subjects and matched controls indicate that there may be significant magnetic susceptibility differences for deep brain nuclei – particularly the putamen – as well as for posterior grey and white matter regions. The methodology and findings described suggest that the QSM method is ready for larger-scale clinical studies. PMID:24278382

  19. 2-Thiazolylethylamine, a selective histamine H1 agonist, decreases seizure susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, H; Onodera, K; Iinuma, K; Watanabe, T

    1994-03-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histamine and its selective agonists on electrically and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice were studied. The ICV administration of histamine decreased seizure susceptibility on electrically and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions significantly and dose-dependently. The inhibitory effects of histamine were well antagonized by centrally acting histamine H1 antagonists such as pyrilamine (or mepyramine) and ketotifen, but not by a peripherally acting histamine H1 antagonist, astemizole, or a centrally acting H2 antagonist, zolantidine. The ICV administration of 2-thiazolylethylamine, a selective histamine H1 agonist, also decreased seizure susceptibility, which could be antagonized by centrally acting histamine H1 antagonists, whereas dimaprit, a selective histamine H2 agonist, did not affect seizure susceptibility. These findings strengthened the idea that the central histaminergic neuron system plays an inhibitory role in convulsions.

  20. Landslide Susceptibility Assessment Through Fuzzy Logic Inference System (flis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, T.; Gul, Y.; Rahman, A. Abdul; Riaz, M.

    2016-09-01

    Landslide is among one of the most important natural hazards that lead to modification of the environment. It is a regular feature of a rapidly growing district Mansehra, Pakistan. This caused extensive loss of life and property in the district located at the foothills of Himalaya. Keeping in view the situation it is concluded that besides structural approaches the non-structural approaches such as hazard and risk assessment maps are effective tools to reduce the intensity of damage. A landslide susceptibility map is base for engineering geologists and geomorphologists. However, it is not easy to produce a reliable susceptibility map due to complex nature of landslides. Since 1980s, several mathematical models have been developed to map landslide susceptibility and hazard. Among various models this paper is discussing the effectiveness of fuzzy logic approach for landslide susceptibility mapping in District Mansehra, Pakistan. The factor maps were modified as landslide susceptibility and fuzzy membership functions were assessed for each class. Likelihood ratios are obtained for each class of contributing factors by considering the expert opinion. The fuzzy operators are applied to generate landslide susceptibility maps. According to this map, 17% of the study area is classified as high susceptibility, 32% as moderate susceptibility, 51% as low susceptibility and areas. From the results it is found that the fuzzy model can integrate effectively with various spatial data for landslide hazard mapping, suggestions in this study are hope to be helpful to improve the applications including interpretation, and integration phases in order to obtain an accurate decision supporting layer.

  1. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  2. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J; Evans, R T; Lobbins, P M; Genco, R J

    1980-01-01

    The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. PMID:6903116

  3. Transgenerational epigenetic effects of the Apobec1 cytidine deaminase deficiency on testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility and embryonic viability.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Vicki R; Heaney, Jason D; Tesar, Paul J; Davidson, Nicholas O; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-10-09

    Environmental agents and genetic variants can induce heritable epigenetic changes that affect phenotypic variation and disease risk in many species. These transgenerational effects challenge conventional understanding about the modes and mechanisms of inheritance, but their molecular basis is poorly understood. The Deadend1 (Dnd1) gene enhances susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) in mice, in part by interacting epigenetically with other TGCT modifier genes in previous generations. Sequence homology to A1cf, the RNA-binding subunit of the ApoB editing complex, raises the possibility that the function of Dnd1 is related to Apobec1 activity as a cytidine deaminase. We conducted a series of experiments with a genetically engineered deficiency of Apobec1 on the TGCT-susceptible 129/Sv inbred background to determine whether dosage of Apobec1 modifies susceptibility, either alone or in combination with Dnd1, and either in a conventional or a transgenerational manner. In the paternal germ-lineage, Apobec1 deficiency significantly increased susceptibility among heterozygous but not wild-type male offspring, without subsequent transgenerational effects, showing that increased TGCT risk resulting from partial loss of Apobec1 function is inherited in a conventional manner. By contrast, partial deficiency in the maternal germ-lineage led to suppression of TGCTs in both partially and fully deficient males and significantly reduced TGCT risk in a transgenerational manner among wild-type offspring. These heritable epigenetic changes persisted for multiple generations and were fully reversed after consecutive crosses through the alternative germ-lineage. These results suggest that Apobec1 plays a central role in controlling TGCT susceptibility in both a conventional and a transgenerational manner.

  4. Genetic susceptibility to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. J.; Brenner, D. J.; Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.

    In the context of space radiation, it is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. One possibility is that haploinsufficiency for ATM confers radiosensitivity, and this defect involves 1-3% of the population. Using knock-out mice we chose to study cataractogenesis in the lens and oncogenic transformation in mouse embryo fibroblasts to assay for effects of ATM deficiency. Radiation induced cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals following exposure to either gamma rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. In addition, it was found that embryo fibroblasts of Atm heterozygotes showed an increased incidence of oncogenic transformation compared with their normal litter-matched counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive subpopulation.

  5. Limits to Cloud Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, James A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    1-kilometer AVHRR observations of ship tracks in low-level clouds off the west coast of the U S. were used to determine limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases in anthropogenic aerosols. Hundreds of tracks were analyzed to determine whether the changes in droplet radii, visible optical depths, and cloud top altitudes that result from the influx of particles from underlying ships were consistent with expectations based on simple models for the indirect effect of aerosols. The models predict substantial increases in sunlight reflected by polluted clouds due to the increases in droplet numbers and cloud liquid water that result from the elevated particle concentrations. Contrary to the model predictions, the analysis of ship tracks revealed a 15-20% reduction in liquid water for the polluted clouds. Studies performed with a large-eddy cloud simulation model suggested that the shortfall in cloud liquid water found in the satellite observations might be attributed to the restriction that the 1-kilometer pixels be completely covered by either polluted or unpolluted cloud. The simulation model revealed that a substantial fraction of the indirect effect is caused by a horizontal redistribution of cloud water in the polluted clouds. Cloud-free gaps in polluted clouds fill in with cloud water while the cloud-free gaps in the surrounding unpolluted clouds remain cloud-free. By limiting the analysis to only overcast pixels, the current study failed to account for the gap-filling predicted by the simulation model. This finding and an analysis of the spatial variability of marine stratus suggest new ways to analyze ship tracks to determine the limit to which particle pollution will alter the amount of sunlight reflected by clouds.

  6. Linking landslide susceptibility to sediment yield in the Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeckx, Jente; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Bǎlteanu, Dan; Chendeş, Viorel; Sima, Mihaela; Enciu, Petru; Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies revealed the importance of seismic activity in explaining regional patterns of catchment sediment yield (SY). This relation is often explained by the fact that seismic activity induces landslides that contribute to SY. Nevertheless, only a few studies focused on the effects of landslides on SY and even fewer studies have explored the potential of landslide susceptibility as a predictor for SY. The objective of this study is therefore to explore the potential of landslide susceptibility maps to explain the spatial variation of SY in the Romanian Carpathians, a region with moderate to high seismicity. 133 catchments, covering 63% of Romania, for which SY was measured during a period of at least 10 years and for which SY was not significantly affected by upstream reservoirs, were compiled and selected. 78 of these catchments were 'less disturbed', being covered for at least 50% by forest and semi-natural areas and confined to the Carpathian mountains. Landslide susceptibility in each catchment was assessed, using an earlier published state of the art landslide susceptibility map of Romania. Mean landslide susceptibility for each catchment shows a highly significant correlation with SY (r² = 0.44). This indicates that landslides are an important contributor to SY in Romania and suggests that regional and national landslide susceptibility maps can indeed be a useful tool to predict SY. Nevertheless, the susceptibility map did not explain much more of the observed variance in SY than some other individual catchment characteristics such as seismicity (r² = 0.40) and lithology (r² = 0.33). Also taking into account the spatial patterns of landslide susceptibility within the catchment did not significantly improve the observed correlations. Surprisingly, topography showed a nonsignificant correlation with SY, which can be attributed to the overwhelming effect of seismicity and lithology. Overall, our results suggest that seismicity is indeed a highly

  7. Factors influencing susceptibility to metals.

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, M

    1997-01-01

    Although the long-neglected field of human susceptibility to environmental toxicants is currently receiving renewed attention, there is only scant literature on factors influencing susceptibility to heavy metals. Genetic factors may influence the availability of sulfhydryl-containing compounds such as glutathione and metallothionein, which modify the distribution and toxicity of certain metals. Age and gender play a role in modifying uptake and distribution, although the mechanisms are often obscure. Concurrent exposure to divalent cations may enhance or reduce the toxicity of certain metals through competition for receptor-mediated transport or targets. Increasing use of biomarkers of exposure should greatly increase our understanding of the underlying distribution of susceptibility to various environmental agents. PMID:9255566

  8. Genetic susceptibility to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. J.; Brenner, D. J.; Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.

    In the context of space radiation, it is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. One possibility is that haploinsufficiency for ATM confers radiosensitivity, and this defect involves 1 3% of the population. Using knock-out mice we chose to study cataractogenesis in the lens and oncogenic transformation in mouse embryo fibroblasts to assay for effects of ATM deficiency. Radiation induced cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals following exposure to either gamma rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. In addition, it was found that embryo fibroblasts of Atm heterozygotes showed an increased incidence of oncogenic transformation compared with their normal litter-matched counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally significant radiosensitive subpopulation. Knock-out mice are now available for other genes including BRCA1 and 2, and Mrad9. An exciting possibility is the creation of double heterozygotes for pairs of mutated genes that function in the same signal transduction pathway, and consequently confer even greater radiosensitivity.

  9. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents.

  10. Lipoprotein metabolism differs between Marek's disease susceptible and resistant chickens.

    PubMed

    Yuan, P; Yu, Y; Luo, J; Tian, F; Zhang, H; Chang, S; Ramachandran, R; Zhang, L; Song, J

    2012-10-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by MD virus and has an important impact on the poultry industry worldwide. There have been reports showing different physiological characteristics between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. However, little is known about whether there are differences in lipid metabolism between MD susceptible and resistant lines of chickens. In this study, we examined the BW and the weight of tissues (abdominal fat, breast muscle with bone, leg muscle with bone, liver, and heart), the lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations and distributions, and the plasma and tissue levels of adiponectin and its receptors in the highly resistant and susceptible lines during chicken growth. Our data showed that the increase in total cholesterol during growth was mainly due to the elevation of cholesterol in the low-density/very low-density lipoprotein fraction in MD susceptible chickens, whereas the increase of total cholesterol was mainly attributable to the increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in MD resistant chickens. Meanwhile, the MD resistant line appeared to have increased plasma adiponectin levels compared with MD susceptible chickens during growth. Taken together, our data suggested that lipoprotein-cholesterol and adiponectin metabolism are different between MD susceptible and resistant chickens.

  11. Strong ties promote the epidemic prevalence in susceptible-infected-susceptible spreading dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Tao

    2016-03-01

    We propose a weighted susceptible-infected-susceptible model on complex networks, where the weight of an edge is defined by the topological proximity of the two associated nodes. Each infected individual is allowed to select a limited number of neighbors to contact, and a tunable parameter is introduced to control the preference to contact through high-weight or low-weight edges. Simulation results on six real networks show that the epidemic prevalence can be largely promoted when strong ties are favored. By comparing with two statistical null models, we show that the distribution pattern of weights, rather than the topological structure, mainly contributes to the observations. Further analysis suggests that the weight-weight correlation strongly affects the results: high-weight edges are more significant in keeping high epidemic prevalence when the weight-weight correlation is positive.

  12. Central Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Clouds and haze cover most of the Italian peninsula in this view of central Italy (41.5N, 14.0E) but the Bay of Naples region with Mt. Vesuvius and the island of Capri are clear. The Adriatic Sea in the background separates Italy from the cloud covered Balkans of eastern Europe and the Tyrrhenian Sea in the foreground lies between the Italian mainland and the off scene islands of Corsica and Sardinia. Several aircraft contrails can also be seen.

  13. 29 CFR 785.45 - Suggestion systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suggestion systems. 785.45 Section 785.45 Labor Regulations..., Medical Attention, Civic and Charitable Work, and Suggestion Systems § 785.45 Suggestion systems. Generally, time spent by employees outside of their regular working hours in developing suggestions under...

  14. 29 CFR 785.45 - Suggestion systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suggestion systems. 785.45 Section 785.45 Labor Regulations..., Medical Attention, Civic and Charitable Work, and Suggestion Systems § 785.45 Suggestion systems. Generally, time spent by employees outside of their regular working hours in developing suggestions under...

  15. Variants in the inflammatory IL6 and MPO genes modulate stroke susceptibility through main effects and gene–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Helena; Krug, Tiago; Sobral, João; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Ferro, José M; Oliveira, Sofia A; Vicente, Astrid M

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that inflammation within the central nervous system contributes to stroke risk and recovery. Inflammatory conditions increase stroke risk, and the inflammatory response is of major importance in recovery and healing processes after stroke. We investigated the role of inflammatory genes IL1B, IL6, MPO, and TNF in stroke susceptibility and recovery in a population sample of 672 patients and 530 controls, adjusting for demographic, clinical and lifestyle risk factors, and stroke severity parameters. We also considered the likely complexity of inflammatory mechanisms in stroke, by assessing the combined effects of multiple genes. Two interleukin 6 (IL6) and one myeloperoxidase (MPO) single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with stroke risk (0.022susceptibility (P=0.031 after 1,000 permutations). In a subset of 546 patients, one IL6 haplotype was associated with stroke outcome at 3 months (correctedP=0.024), an intriguing finding warranting further validation. Our findings support the association of the IL6 gene and present novel evidence for the involvement of MPO in stroke susceptibility, suggesting a modulation of stroke risk by main gene effects, clinical and lifestyle factors, and gene–gene interactions. PMID:21407237

  16. Hypnosis, hypnotic suggestibility, memory, and involvement in films.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed; Lynn, Steven Jay; Condon, Liam

    2015-05-01

    Our research extends studies that have examined the relation between hypnotic suggestibility and experiential involvement and the role of an hypnotic induction in enhancing experiential involvement (e.g., absorption) in engaging tasks. Researchers have reported increased involvement in reading (Baum & Lynn, 1981) and music-listening (Snodgrass & Lynn, 1989) tasks during hypnosis. We predicted a similar effect for film viewing: greater experiential involvement in an emotional (The Champ) versus a non-emotional (Scenes of Toronto) film. We tested 121 participants who completed measures of absorption and trait dissociation and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and then viewed the two films after either an hypnotic induction or a non-hypnotic task (i.e., anagrams). Experiential involvement varied as a function of hypnotic suggestibility and film clip. Highly suggestible participants reported more state depersonalization than less suggestible participants, and depersonalization was associated with negative affect; however, we observed no significant correlation between hypnotic suggestibility and trait dissociation. Although hypnosis had no effect on memory commission or omission errors, contrary to the hypothesis that hypnosis facilitates absorption in emotionally engaging tasks, the emotional film was associated with more commission and omission errors compared with the non-emotional film.

  17. Indianapolis Plan Suggests Blueprint for Other Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2012-01-01

    An Indianapolis-based nonprofit organization has crafted a sweeping plan for reworking the 33,000-student Indianapolis school system that would place the district under the control of the city's mayor, pare down the money spent in central administration, and give principals broad authority to hire and fire teachers. The reform plan created by the…

  18. The genetic basis of multiple sclerosis: a model for MS susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstact Background MS-pathogenesis is known to involve both multiple environmental events, and several independent genetic risk-factors. Methods A model of susceptibility is developed and a mathematical analysis undertaken to elucidate the nature of genetic susceptibility to MS and to understand the constraints that are placed on the genetic basis of MS, both by the known epidemiological facts of this disease and by the known frequency of the HLA DRB1*1501 allele in the general populations of northern Europe and North America. Results For the large majority of cases (possibly all), MS develops, in part, because an individual is genetically susceptible. Nevertheless, 2.2% or less of the general population is genetically susceptible. Moreover, from the model, the number of susceptibility-loci that need to be in a "susceptible allelic state" to produce MS-susceptibility is small (11-18), whereas the total number of such susceptibility-loci is large (50-200), and their "frequency of susceptibility" is low (i.e., ≤ 0.12). The optimal solution to the model equations (which occurs when 80% of the loci are recessive) predicts the epidemiological data quite closely. Conclusions The model suggests that combinations of only a small number of genetic loci in a "susceptible allelic state" produce MS-susceptibility. Nevertheless, genome-wide associations studies with hundreds of thousands of SNPs, are plagued by both false-positive and false-negative identifications and, consequently, emphasis has been rightly placed on the replicability of findings. Nevertheless, because genome-wide screens don't distinguish between true susceptibility-loci and disease-modifying-loci, and because only true susceptibility-loci are constrained by the model, unraveling the two will not be possible using this approach. The model also suggests that HLA DRB1 may not be as uniquely important for MS-susceptibility as currently believed. Thus, this allele is only one among a hundred or more loci

  19. Differential susceptibility of equine and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells to equine herpesvirus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, R; Kimura, T; Nakamura, K; Ochiai, K; Okazaki, K; Wada, R; Umemura, T

    2006-04-01

    Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) shows endotheliotropism in the central nervous system (CNS) of infected horses. However, infection of endothelial cells has not been observed in the CNS of infected mice. To explore the basis for this difference in endotheliotropism, we compared the susceptibility of equine brain microvascular endothelial cells (EBMECs) and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) to EHV-1 infection. The kinetics of viral growth in EBMECs was typical of a fully productive infection whereas viral infection in MBMECs seemed to be nonproductive. Immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-EHV-1 polyclonal antibody demonstrated viral antigen in infected EBMECs, but not infected MBMECs. EHV-1 immediate early (IE), early (ICP0), and late (gB, gD and gK) transcripts were expressed in infected EBMECs. However, none of these genes was detected in infected MBMECs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Electron microscopic examination at the stage of viral entry showed that viral particles were present within uncoated vesicles in the cytoplasm of EBMECs, but absent from those of MBMECs. These results suggest that viral entry is an important determinant of the susceptibility of EBMECs and MBMECs to EHV-1 infection.

  20. Influence of tectonic folding on rockfall susceptibility, American Fork Canyon, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Harp, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    We examine rockfall susceptibility of folded strata in the Sevier fold-thrust belt exposed in American Fork Canyon in north-central Utah. Large-scale geologic mapping, talus production data, rock-mass-quality measurements, and historical rockfall data indicate that rockfall susceptibility is correlated with limb dip and curvature of the folded, cliff-forming Mississippian limestones. On fold limbs, rockfall susceptibility increases as dip increases. This relation is controlled by several factors, including an increase in adverse dip conditions and apertures of discontinuities, and shearing by flexural slip during folding that has reduced the friction angles of discontinuities by smoothing surface asperities. Susceptibility is greater in fold hinge zones than on adjacent limbs primarily because there are greater numbers of discontinuities in hinge zones. We speculate that susceptibility increases in hinge zones as fold curvature becomes tighter.

  1. Epidemic extinction in a generalized susceptible-infected-susceptible model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanshuang; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Guofeng

    2017-01-01

    We study the extinction of epidemics in a generalized susceptible-infected-susceptible model, where a susceptible individual becomes infected at the rate λ when contacting m infective individual(s) simultaneously, and an infected individual spontaneously recovers at the rate μ. By employing the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for the master equation, the problem is reduced to finding the zero-energy trajectories in an effective Hamiltonian system, and the mean extinction time < T> depends exponentially on the associated action S and the size of the population N, < T> ˜ \\exp ≤ft(NS\\right) . Because of qualitatively different bifurcation features for m  =  1 and m≥slant 2 , we derive independently the expressions of S as a function of the rescaled infection rate λ /μ . For the weak infection, S scales to the distance to the bifurcation with an exponent 2 for m  =  1 and 3/2 for m≥slant 2 . Finally, a rare-event simulation method is used to validate the theory.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility as a biosignature in stromatolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryshyn, Victoria A.; Corsetti, Frank A.; Frantz, Carie M.; Lund, Steve P.; Berelson, William M.

    2016-03-01

    results. The results of these experiments suggest that magnetic susceptibility shows promise as a new biosignature in the study of putative microbialites.

  3. Heterogeneity of pulmonary perfusion as a mechanistic image-based phenotype in emphysema susceptible smokers

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Sara K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that endothelial dysfunction and pathology of pulmonary vascular responses may serve as a precursor to smoking-associated emphysema. Although it is known that emphysematous destruction leads to vasculature changes, less is known about early regional vascular dysfunction which may contribute to and precede emphysematous changes. We sought to test the hypothesis, via multidetector row CT (MDCT) perfusion imaging, that smokers showing early signs of emphysema susceptibility have a greater heterogeneity in regional perfusion parameters than emphysema-free smokers and persons who had never smoked (NS). Assuming that all smokers have a consistent inflammatory response, increased perfusion heterogeneity in emphysema-susceptible smokers would be consistent with the notion that these subjects may have the inability to block hypoxic vasoconstriction in patchy, small regions of inflammation. Dynamic ECG-gated MDCT perfusion scans with a central bolus injection of contrast were acquired in 17 NS, 12 smokers with normal CT imaging studies (SNI), and 12 smokers with subtle CT findings of centrilobular emphysema (SCE). All subjects had normal spirometry. Quantitative image analysis determined regional perfusion parameters, pulmonary blood flow (PBF), and mean transit time (MTT). Mean and coefficient of variation were calculated, and statistical differences were assessed with one-way ANOVA. MDCT-based MTT and PBF measurements demonstrate globally increased heterogeneity in SCE subjects compared with NS and SNI subjects but demonstrate similarity between NS and SNI subjects. These findings demonstrate a functional lung-imaging measure that provides a more mechanistically oriented phenotype that differentiates smokers with and without evidence of emphysema susceptibility. PMID:20368443

  4. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  5. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  6. Parenting and Preschoolers' Executive Functioning: A Case of Differential Susceptibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochette, Émilie; Bernier, Annie

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of theoretical and empirical work has been attempting to answer the questions of how and how much of the effects of children's early experience may depend on their inner characteristics. Theory and evidence suggest that some children, notably those with difficult temperaments, are more susceptible to both negative and positive…

  7. Beyond Diathesis Stress: Differential Susceptibility to Environmental Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Jay; Pluess, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary-biological reasoning suggests that individuals should be differentially susceptible to environmental influences, with some people being not just more vulnerable than others to the negative effects of adversity, as the prevailing diathesis-stress view of psychopathology (and of many environmental influences) maintains, but also…

  8. Differential Susceptibility to Parenting and Quality Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Research on differential susceptibility to rearing suggests that infants with difficult temperaments are disproportionately affected by parenting and child care quality, but a major U.S. child care study raises questions as to whether quality of care influences social adjustment. One thousand three hundred sixty-four American children from…

  9. Are Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders Susceptible to Contour Illusions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Elizabeth; Scope, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism have been shown to be less susceptible to Kanisza type contour illusions than children without autism (Happe, 1996). Other authors have suggested that this finding could be explained by the fact that participants with autism were required to make a potentially ambiguous verbal response which may have masked whether or not they…

  10. Susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on the complete graph and the star graph: Exact analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cator, E.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2013-01-01

    Since mean-field approximations for susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemics do not always predict the correct scaling of the epidemic threshold of the SIS metastable regime, we propose two novel approaches: (a) an ɛ-SIS generalized model and (b) a modified SIS model that prevents the epidemic from dying out (i.e., without the complicating absorbing SIS state). Both adaptations of the SIS model feature a precisely defined steady state (that corresponds to the SIS metastable state) and allow an exact analysis in the complete and star graph consisting of a central node and N leaves. The N-intertwined mean-field approximation (NIMFA) is shown to be nearly exact for the complete graph but less accurate to predict the correct scaling of the epidemic threshold τc in the star graph, which is found as τc=ατc(1), where α=(1)/(2)logN+(3)/(2)loglogN and where τc(1)=(1)/(N)<τc is the first-order epidemic threshold for the star in NIMFA and equal to the inverse of the spectral radius of the star's adjacency matrix.

  11. Susceptibility of Primary Sensory Cortex to Spreading Depolarizations

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Volodymyr B.; Middleton, Natalie A.; Theriot, Jeremy J.; Parker, Patrick D.; Abdullah, Osama M.; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are recognized as actors in neurological disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Migraine aura involves sensory percepts, suggesting that sensory cortices might be intrinsically susceptible to SDs. We used optical imaging, MRI, and field potential and potassium electrode recordings in mice and electrocorticographic recordings in humans to determine the susceptibility of different brain regions to SDs. Optical imaging experiments in mice under isoflurane anesthesia showed that both cortical spreading depression and terminal anoxic depolarization arose preferentially in the whisker barrel region of parietal sensory cortex. MRI recordings under isoflurane, ketamine/xylazine, ketamine/isoflurane, and urethane anesthesia demonstrated that the depolarizations did not propagate from a subcortical source. Potassium concentrations showed larger increases in sensory cortex, suggesting a mechanism of susceptibility. Sensory stimulation biased the timing but not the location of depolarization onset. In humans with TBI, there was a trend toward increased incidence of SDs in parietal/temporal sensory cortex compared with other regions. In conclusion, SDs are inducible preferentially in primary sensory cortex in mice and most likely in humans. This tropism can explain the predominant sensory phenomenology of migraine aura. It also demonstrates that sensory cortices are vulnerable in brain injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are involved in neurologic disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury. In migraine, the nature of aura symptoms suggests that sensory cortex may be preferentially susceptible. In brain injury, SDs occur at a vulnerable time, during which the issue of sensory stimulation is much debated. We show, in mouse and human, that sensory cortex is more susceptible to SDs. We find that sensory stimulation biases the timing but not the location of the depolarizations

  12. Suggestive techniques connected to medical interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces a series of articles where several detailed clinical examples will be presented on the effectiveness of using suggestive techniques in various fields of interventional medicine. The aim of this series is to raise the attention to the patients heightened openness to suggestions. By recognizing the unavoidable nature of suggestive effects on one hand we can eliminate unfavourable, negative suggestions and on the other hand go on and consciously apply positive, helpful variations. Research materials, reviews and case study will describe the way suggestions can reduce anxiety and stress connected to medical intervention, improve subjective well-being and cooperation, and increase efficiency by reducing treatment costs. PMID:24265898

  13. Electromagnetic Radiation System (EMRS) for Susceptibility Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, *ELECTROMAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT, ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ANTENNAS, ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE, RADAR SIGNALS, RADIO SIGNALS, FIELD INTENSITY.

  14. Neuropsychological Test Performance and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Query, William T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between brain-behavior and hypnotic susceptibility in 70 alcoholic patients, using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale and its Fromm-Weingarten modification. Results showed the two scales were interchangeable insofar as they measured the same ability, and indicated that hypnotic susceptibility is related to…

  15. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) of the brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q; van Zijl, Peter C M; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging, STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of the susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of the susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in the myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Family Process Effects on Adolescent Males' Susceptibility to Antisocial Peer Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtner-Smith, Mary E.; MacKinnon-Lewis, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation examining relationship between adolescents' susceptibility to antisocial peer pressure and parenting style and frequency of behavior monitoring. Suggests adolescents most susceptible to antisocial peer pressure perceived infrequent monitoring by fathers, inappropriate discipline practice by fathers, and had mothers who…

  17. Unusual hysteresis in the magnetic susceptibility of cubic hexaboride KB6.

    PubMed

    Etourneau, J; Ammar, A; Villesuzanne, A; Villeneuve, G; Chevalier, B; Whangbo, M-H

    2003-07-14

    Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were carried out for cubic hexaboride KB(6), which is one electron short of completely filling its conduction band. It is found that KB(6) is not metallic and has localized spins. KB(6) exhibits a highly unusual hysteresis in the magnetic susceptibility below 100 K, which suggests that it undergoes a slow relaxation process.

  18. Nonequilibrium charge susceptibility and dynamical conductance: identification of scattering processes in quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Ness, H; Dash, L K

    2012-03-23

    We calculate the nonequilibrium charge transport properties of nanoscale junctions in the steady state and extend the concept of charge susceptibility to the nonequilibrium conditions. We show that the nonequilibrium charge susceptibility is related to the nonlinear dynamical conductance. In spectroscopic terms, both contain the same features versus applied bias when charge fluctuation occurs in the corresponding electronic resonances. However, we show that, while the conductance exhibits features at biases corresponding to inelastic scattering with no charge fluctuations, the nonequilibrium charge susceptibility does not. We suggest that measuring both the nonequilibrium conductance and charge susceptibility in the same experiment will permit us to differentiate between different scattering processes in quantum transport.

  19. Life style factors and acquired susceptibility to environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Au, W W

    2001-10-01

    Multifactorial risk factors are responsible for many diseases. They can be broadly categorized as environmental, genetic and life style factors. Much attention has been focused on the first two categories, e.g. the identification of environmental toxicants/carcinogens and the elucidation of genetic susceptibility to disease. Life style risk factors such as aging, poor nutrition, infection and exposure to toxicants can also increase susceptibility to illnesses. These life style factors can therefore be considered to cause acquired susceptibility for increased risk for environmental disease. Among Egyptians, infection with the parasite, Schistosoma, is the primary risk factor for bladder cancer and the risk is enhanced by exposure to mutagenic chemicals. We have shown that inheritance of susceptible metabolizing genes that can increase body burden of mutagenic chemicals enhances the risk. We have also hypothesized that chronic exposure to mutagenic chemicals causes cellular abnormalities that can reduce the capacity of cells to repair DNA damage and thus increase the risk for environmental disease. We have used a challenge assay to show that cells from cigarette smokers and from populations exposed to uranium, butadiene and pesticides have abnormal DNA repair responses compared to matched controls. On the other hand, the response is normal in workers exposed to very low concentrations of butadiene and benzene, and in mothers who had children with birth defects. This suggests that exposure to high enough concentrations of certain mutagens can cause acquired susceptibility in human populations. The acquired susceptibility is expected to interact with environmental factors and with genetic susceptibility to increase risk for environmental disease.

  20. Cognitive Susceptibility to Smoking: Two Paths to Experimenting among Mexican Origin Youth

    PubMed Central

    Spelman, Amy R.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Kelder, Steven H.; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Wilkinson, Anna V.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive susceptibility to smoking, defined as the lack of a firm commitment not to smoke in the future or if offered a cigarette by a friend, begins in childhood and is an early phase in the transition from never to ever smoking. Our objectives were to examine susceptibility to smoking and other psychosocial risk factors for experimentation with cigarettes among Mexican origin adolescents and to determine whether susceptibility status moderates the relationship between established risk factors for experimentation with cigarettes and future experimentation. We examined susceptibility and several psychosocial factors associated with susceptibility as baseline predictors of experimentation after 3 years of follow-up among 964 Mexican origin girls and boys between 11 and 13 years of age from the Houston metropolitan area. Participants were recruited between May 2005 and October 2006 and reported that they had never experimented with cigarettes at baseline. Baseline susceptibility and experimentation rates were 23% and 9%, respectively, whereas the follow-up experimentation rate, among those who had not experimented at baseline, was 22%. Susceptible adolescents at baseline were 2.6 times more likely to have experimented with cigarettes by follow-up. Baseline susceptibility moderated the relationship between experimentation at follow-up and the psychosocial risk factors assessed at baseline. Susceptibility is a valid and strong marker for the transition to experimentation for Mexican origin adolescents. Our results suggest that tailoring primary prevention programs by a youth’s susceptibility status may increase the efficacy of prevention efforts among Mexican origin youth. PMID:19959696

  1. Interrogative suggestibility in patients with conversion disorders.

    PubMed

    Foong, J; Lucas, P A; Ron, M A

    1997-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased interrogative suggestibility may contribute to the shaping and maintaining of conversions symptoms. Interrogative suggestibility was measured in 12 patients with conversion disorder and 10 control patients with confirmed neurological disease matched for age, premorbid intelligence, and as closely as possible in terms of their neurological symptoms to the patients with conversion disorder. Our observations do not support the contention that individual differences in interrogative suggestibility are of importance in the etiology of conversion disorders.

  2. Reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin of oral streptococci following amoxicillin exposure.

    PubMed

    Chardin, H; Yasukawa, K; Nouacer, N; Plainvert, C; Aucouturier, P; Ergani, A; Descroix, V; Toledo-Arenas, R; Azerad, J; Bouvet, A

    2009-08-01

    As antibiotic pressure often triggers bacterial resistance, the use of short-duration therapies is increasingly recommended. The objective of the present study was to evaluate both the clinical efficiency and the impact on oral streptococci of a 3 day versus a 7 day amoxicillin therapy for odontogenic infection requiring tooth extraction. On day 0, patients were randomly assigned to a 3 day or 7 day amoxicillin treatment. The tooth was extracted on day 2 and the post-operative follow-up was carried out on day 9. Oral flora was collected on days 0, 9 and 30, and the susceptibility of the streptococci to amoxicillin was determined. The results showed that treatment with amoxicillin for 3 or 7 days had a similar clinical efficiency, and also induced similar selection of oral streptococci with reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin, suggesting that the selection of strains with reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin is a rapid phenomenon, appearing even with short-duration therapies.

  3. Mitochondrial Genetics & Obesity: Evolutionary Adaptation & Contemporary Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a leading risk factor for a variety of metabolic diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Although in its simplest terms, obesity may be thought of as a consequence of excessive caloric intake and sedentary lifestyle, it is also evident that individual propensity for weight gain can vary. The etiology of individual susceptibility to obesity appears to be complex – involving a combination of environmental – genetic interactions. Herein, we suggest that the mitochondrion plays a major role in influencing individual susceptibility to this disease via mitochondrial – nuclear interaction processes, and that environmentally influenced selection events for mitochondrial function that conveyed increased reproductive and survival success during the global establishment of human populations during prehistoric times can influence individual susceptibility to weight gain and obesity. PMID:24075923

  4. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  5. Anticipation skill and susceptibility to deceptive movement.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robin C; Warren, Simon; Abernethy, Bruce

    2006-11-01

    The ability to detect deceptive movement was examined in skilled and novice rugby players. Participants (14 per group) attempted to predict direction change from video of expert and recreational rugby players changing direction with and without deceptive movement. Confidence associated with judgments was recorded on each trial to seek evidence regarding use of inferential (heuristic-based) and direct-perceptual (invariant-based) judgments. Novices were found to be susceptible to deceptive movement whereas skilled participants were not; however, both skilled and novice participants were more confident on trials containing deceptive movement. The data suggest that the skill-level difference in sensitivity to advance visual information extends to deceptive information. The implications of this finding, and the importance of considering the underlying process of anticipation skill, are discussed.

  6. Antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Luciana A; Cafarchia, Claudia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-11-01

    Antifungal resistance has been associated with biofilm formation in many microorganisms, but not yet in Malassezia pachydermatis. This saprophytic yeast can cause otitis and dermatitis in dogs and has emerged as an important human pathogen, responsible for systemic infections in neonates in intensive care units. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis strains, in both their planktonic and sessile forms, to fluconazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, terbinafine and voriconazole using the XTT assay and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values recorded for each drug were significantly higher for sessile cells relative to planktonic cells to the extent that ≥ 90% of M. pachydermatis strains in their sessile form were classified as resistant to all antifungal agents tested. Data suggest that M. pachydermatis biofilm formation is associated with antifungal resistance, paving the way towards investigating drug resistance mechanisms in Malassezia spp.

  7. Positive Suggestion: It Helps LD Students Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldridge, O. A. "Buff"

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews his experiences in remediating reading problems of learning disabled students through hypnotic and nonhypnotic suggestion. Research on the use of hypnosis is briefly summarized and recommendations on the use of nonhypnotic suggestion in the classroom are given. (CL)

  8. Maltreated Children's Memory: Accuracy, Suggestibility, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisen, Mitchell L.; Goodman, Gail S.; Qin, Jianjian; Davis, Suzanne; Crayton, John

    2007-01-01

    Memory, suggestibility, stress arousal, and trauma-related psychopathology were examined in 328 3- to 16-year-olds involved in forensic investigations of abuse and neglect. Children's memory and suggestibility were assessed for a medical examination and venipuncture. Being older and scoring higher in cognitive functioning were related to fewer…

  9. Interrogative suggestibility and perceptual motor performance.

    PubMed

    Gudjonsson, G H

    1984-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between interrogative suggestibility, as measured by the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale, and Arrow-Dot scores. The tendency of subjects (25 men and 25 women, mean age 30.2 yr.) to alter their answers once interpersonal pressure had been applied correlated significantly with poor Arrow-Dot Ego functioning.

  10. Susceptibility to chronic inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Nasef, Noha Ahmed; Mehta, Sunali; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is defined by the persistence of inflammatory processes beyond their physiological function, resulting in tissue destruction. Chronic inflammation is implicated in the progression of many chronic diseases and plays a central role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease. As such, this review aims to collate some of the latest research in relation to genetic and environmental susceptibilities to chronic inflammation. In the genetic section, we discuss some of the updates in cytokine research and current treatments that are being developed. We also discuss newly identified canonical and non-canonical genes associated with chronic inflammation. In the environmental section, we highlight some of the latest updates and evidence in relation to the role that infection, diet and stress play in promoting inflammation. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the latest research to build on our current understanding of chronic inflammation. It highlights the complexity associated with chronic inflammation, as well as provides insights into potential new targets for therapies that could be used to treat chronic inflammation and consequently prevent disease progression.

  11. Daptomycin Antibiotic Lock Therapy in a Rat Model of Staphylococcal Central Venous Catheter Biofilm Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Van Praagh, Andrew D. G.; Li, Tongchuan; Zhang, Shuxin; Arya, Anu; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Bertolami, Shellie; Mortin, Lawrence I.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) is an adjunctive procedure to prevent or treat central venous catheter infections, ensuing catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is rapidly bactericidal against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The efficacies of daptomycin against central venous catheter biofilms, catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections were evaluated by adapting a previously reported central venous catheter biofilm model in rats. Combined daptomycin ALT and systemic dosing resulted in the clearance of an established in vivo S. aureus central venous catheter biofilm after just two daily ALT treatments (30 min with daptomycin at 5 mg/ml) with concurrent systemic daptomycin dosing (40 mg/kg of body weight/day subcutaneously [s.c.]; equivalent exposure of 6 mg/kg/day in people). Daptomycin ALT solutions formulated in either saline or lactated Ringer's solution were equally fast in eradicating established in vivo methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) central venous catheter biofilms. However, the lactated Ringer's formulation was superior to that of saline in sustaining the bacterial clearance of treated central venous catheters (83% versus 50%). In MRSE-infected central venous catheter studies, 3 days of daptomycin or vancomycin ALT (18 h at 5 mg/ml) with systemic s.c. dosing (40 mg/kg/day daptomycin or 100 mg/kg/day vancomycin) was equally effective 1 week posttherapy in maintaining cleared central venous catheters (90% [n = 10] versus 100% [n = 8]). These results suggest that daptomycin ALT, along with systemic dosing, could be an effective treatment option for the prevention or eradication of staphylococcal central venous catheter biofilm infections, thereby reducing the occurrence of catheter-related bacteremia or catheter-related metastatic infections. PMID:21709082

  12. Diffusion Disk Susceptibility Testing with Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Shadomy, Smith; Carver, Melinda

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of the standardized 30-μg cephalothin disk and that of an experimental 30-μg cefaclor disk in predicting probable clinical susceptibility to cefaclor were compared. Quantitative determinations of cefaclor susceptibility were measured by the World Health Organization International Collaborative Study agar dilution procedure; diffusion disk tests were performed by the standardized U.S. Food and Drug Administration disk test. The cephalothin disk erred in predicting probable susceptibility in 52% of isolates of Enterococcus spp. resistant to 16 μg or less of cefaclor per ml; the cefaclor disk did not. The cephalothin disk erred in correctly predicting susceptibility in only 20% of cefaclor-susceptible isolates of Enterobacter spp.; the cefaclor disk correctly predicted susceptibility for 70%. These results indicate the need for further evaluation of a separate cefaclor disk for use in susceptibility testing with this new cephalosporin. PMID:646345

  13. [On suggestion and its related problems].

    PubMed

    Oka, Kazutaro

    2013-01-01

    Recently, intensive discussions about dissociative disorders have led to the rediscovery of the psychology of P. Janet, that has been under the shadow of Freud's psychoanalysis. Nevertheless, psychiatry, "Schulpsychiatrie" in German, has still paid little attention to the suggestion with which Janet has occupied himself throughout his long career. In this paper, the author examined suggestion from another point of view other than psychodynamic. It is presented that Freud reduced suggestion to a specific relation between an active subject and a passive object, as his precursors, F.A. Mesmer and R. de Puységur did the same. In contrast, Janet's early studies influenced by the philosophy of M. de Biran seem to focus on another aspect of suggestion. From this aspect, suggestion is based on a spontaneous intersubjective process that should be expressed by the middle voice. Referring to H. Bergson, with whom Janet corresponded, the author pointed out that one is not always one's own self that reflects one's whole life history, regardless of the presence/absence of mental abnormality, as is the case with a person under suggestion. Taking into account these factors of suggestion, i. e., the middle voice and fragile selfhood that is not firmly rooted in one's own life history, the author investigated hysteria as a distinct phenomenon that has a particularly close relation with suggestion. Furthermore, depersonalization and schizophrenia were discussed concerning their relation with hysteria. In this approach, the author suggested that the unconscious could be topographically localized not only in a deep portion of the mental apparatus, but also in its most superficial portion, unlike in the case of Freud's psychoanalysis.

  14. A suggested method for reporting a landslide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fell, Robin; Lacerda, W.; Cruden, D.M.; Evans, S.G.; LaRochelle, P.; Martinez, Fernando; Beltran, Lisandro; Jesenak, J.; Novograd, S.; Krauter, E.; Slunga, E.; Pilot, G.A.; Brand, E.W.; Farkas, J.; Bhandari, R.K.; Cotecchia, V.; Esu, Franco; Fujita, H.; Nakamura, H.; Sassa, K.; Ting, W.H.; Salt, Graham; Janbu, Nilmar; Nespak, A.M.; Gongxian, Wang; Zhuoyuan , Zhang; Michelena, R.; Popescu, Mihai; Viberg, Leif; Bonnard, C.; Hutchinson, J.N.; Einstein , H.H.; Schuster, R.L.; Varnes, D.J.; Ter-Martiros­ian, Z.G.; Ter-Stepanian, G.I.; Anagnosti, P.; Hashizume, M.; Watanabe, Masayuki

    1990-01-01

    The Landslide Report is a Suggested Method developed by the International Geotechnical Societies' UNESCO Working Party on World Landslide Inventory for reporting the position, date, type, geometry, volume and damage of significant landslides.

  15. Suggested Format for Acute Toxicity Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document suggests the format for final reports on pesticide studies (right column of the tables in the document) and provides instructions for the creation of PDF Version 1.3 electronic submission documents (left column of the tables).

  16. FDA Suggests Limits on Lead in Cosmetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162726.html FDA Suggests Limits on Lead in Cosmetics Agency notes most products already below recommended level ... limit on how much lead can be in cosmetics ranging from lipstick and eye shadow to blush ...

  17. Comparison of satellite and air photo based landslide susceptibility maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Frank; Blesius, Leonhard

    2007-07-01

    methods of obtaining input data provide similar results and successfully identified landslide prone areas. These results suggest that satellite imagery, in this instance, SPOT images, could potentially be used in lieu of conventional air photos, to evaluate landslide susceptibility. In many situations, especially in the case of remote locations and/or developing countries, this capability should result in substantial savings in terms of time, financial resources, and overall viability.

  18. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses.

  19. Toxicity and transcriptomic analysis in Hyalella azteca suggests increased exposure and susceptibility of epibenthic organisms to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are expected to make their way into the aquatic environment where sedimentation of particles will likely occur, putting benthic organisms at particular risk. Therefore, organisms such as Hyalella azteca, an epibenthic crustacean which forages at the sediment ...

  20. Atrazine increases ranavirus susceptibility in the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum.

    PubMed

    Forson, Diane Denise; Storfer, Andrew

    2006-12-01

    Pathogenic diseases and environmental contaminants are two of the leading hypotheses for global amphibian declines, yet few studies have examined the influence of contaminants on disease susceptibility. In this study, we examined effects of ecologically relevant doses of atrazine (0, 1.6, 16, and 160 microg/L), sodium nitrate (0, 6.8, 68 mg/L), and their interactions on susceptibility of four laboratory-bred tiger salamander families to Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV), a pathogen implicated in global amphibian die-offs. Salamanders were from Arizona populations where a coevolutionary history with ATV is supported, and thus cofactors rather than recent introduction may contribute to disease epizootics. Use of atrazine and nitrogenous fertilizers are ubiquitous; therefore, the impact of these cofactors on disease susceptibility is an important consideration. Atrazine and sodium nitrate significantly decreased peripheral leukocyte levels, suggesting an impact of these contaminants on the immune system. As expected from this result, atrazine significantly increased susceptibility of larvae to ATV infection. In contrast, nitrate had a marginally significant main effect and significantly decreased infection rate at the highest level. However, neither atrazine nor sodium nitrate had significant effects on viral copy number per individual. These results suggest that ecologically relevant concentrations of atrazine and nitrates have immunosuppressive effects, and atrazine may contribute to ATV epizootics, raising concerns about the influence of contaminants on diseases in general.

  1. Optimal control in a model of malaria with differential susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2014-06-01

    A malaria model with differential susceptibility is analyzed using the optimal control technique. In the model the human population is classified as susceptible, infected and recovered. Susceptibility is assumed dependent on genetic, physiological, or social characteristics that vary between individuals. The model is described by a system of differential equations that relate the human and vector populations, so that the infection is transmitted to humans by vectors, and the infection is transmitted to vectors by humans. The model considered is analyzed using the optimal control method when the control consists in using of insecticide-treated nets and educational campaigns; and the optimality criterion is to minimize the number of infected humans, while keeping the cost as low as is possible. One first goal is to determine the effects of differential susceptibility in the proposed control mechanism; and the second goal is to determine the algebraic form of the basic reproductive number of the model. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is claimed that the analytical results obtained are important for the design and implementation of control measures for malaria. It is suggested some future investigations such as the application of the method to other vector-borne diseases such as dengue or yellow fever; and also it is suggested the possible application of free software of computer algebra like Maxima.

  2. Phenotypic dissection of a Plasmodium-refractory strain of malaria vector Anopheles stephensi: the reduced susceptibility to P. berghei and P. yoelii.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa, Naoaki; Ishino, Tomoko; Tachibana, Mayumi; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Torii, Motomi

    2013-01-01

    Anopheline mosquitoes are the major vectors of human malaria. Parasite-mosquito interactions are a critical aspect of disease transmission and a potential target for malaria control. Current investigations into parasite-mosquito interactions frequently assume that genetically resistant and susceptible mosquitoes exist in nature. Therefore, comparisons between the Plasmodium susceptibility profiles of different mosquito species may contribute to a better understanding of vectorial capacity. Anopheles stephensi is an important malaria vector in central and southern Asia and is widely used as a laboratory model of parasite transmission due to its high susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. In the present study, we identified a rodent malaria-refractory strain of A. stephensi mysorensis (Ehime) by comparative study of infection susceptibility. A very low number of oocysts develop in Ehime mosquitoes infected with P. berghei and P. yoelii, as determined by evaluation of developed oocysts on the basal lamina. A stage-specific study revealed that this reduced susceptibility was due to the impaired formation of ookinetes of both Plasmodium species in the midgut lumen and incomplete crossing of the midgut epithelium. There were no apparent abnormalities in the exflagellation of male parasites in the ingested blood or the maturation of oocysts after the rounding up of the ookinetes. Overall, these results suggest that invasive-stage parasites are eliminated in both the midgut lumen and epithelium in Ehime mosquitoes by strain-specific factors that remain unknown. The refractory strain newly identified in this report would be an excellent study system for investigations into novel parasite-mosquito interactions in the mosquito midgut.

  3. Polymorphic Variation in Susceptibility and Metabolism of Triclosan-Resistant Mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains Obtained after Exposure to Biocides and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R.; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRIr) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRIhs) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRIr mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRIr mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRIr mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRIr mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRIr mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive traits. PMID

  4. COMPARATIVE MICROARRAY EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CANCER RELEVANT GENES IN HYPERTENSIVE RESISTANT VERSUS SUSCEPTIBLE RODENT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypertension and cancer are prevalent diseases. Epidemiological studies suggest that hypertension may increase the long term risk of cancer. Identification of resistance and/or susceptibility genes using rodent models could provide important insights into the management and treat...

  5. Homogeneous magnetic susceptibilities of tektites: Implications for extreme homogenization of source material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Tomasz; Borradaile, Graham John

    Low field magnetic susceptibility of 151 tektites from the Australasian strewn field is dominated by paramagnetism of the silicate glass. Ferromagnetic contributions are negligible because the formation of oxides was suppressed during rapid quenching. A few samples from the Central European strewn field show similar properties. Also, susceptibilities calculated from the large number of published geochemical analyses yield similar low susceptibilities. To produce low mass susceptibilities in such a narrow range of 50-100×10 -9 m 3 kg -1, paramagnetic behaviour and negligible remanence, a target source that is both appropriate and widespread over the Earth's surface is required. Modern marine sediments would appear to fill these requirements. The uniformity of the material, and hence its magnetic properties would be enhanced by the thorough mixing of molten terrestrial sedimentary during vaporization and ejection and its subsequent rapid quenching.

  6. Methodology for determining susceptibility of rough rice to Rhyzopertha dominica (L.) and Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varieties of rough rice, Oryzae sativa (L)., were obtained from different sources in the south-central United States and evaluated for susceptibility to the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fab.), and the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier), in laboratory studies. Adult R. ...

  7. Paleoclimatic forcing of magnetic susceptibility variations in Alaskan loess during the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Beget, J.E.; Stone, D.B.; Hawkins, D.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Visual matches and statistical tests suggest correlations between marine isotope curves, retrodictive solar insolation at lat 65{degree}N, and magnetic susceptibility profiles through late Quaternary age Alaskan loess sections. The susceptibility changes largely appear to reflect variability in magnetite content due to climatically controlled changes in wind intensity and competence. Magnetic susceptibility profiles through massive loess can provide stratigraphic context for intercalated paleosols and tephras. A prominent paleosol correlated with marine isotope stage 5 occurs several metres above the Old Crow ash in loess sections, indicating that this important tephra is older than suggested by thermoluminescence dates, and may have been deposited ca. 215 {plus minus}25 ka.

  8. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  9. Technology Is Power: Suggestions for Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanklin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Shanklin knows it can be hard for new teachers to incorporate all they know about technology with the realities of a classroom. She suggests setting incremental, monthly technology goals; investing in equipment; assessing students' grasp of the technology at their disposal and their use of it in classroom projects; searching purposefully for…

  10. Accounting: Suggested Content for Postsecondary Tax Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Patricia H.; Morgan, Samuel D.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys of community college graduates and of certified public accountants were made to determine employment relevance of the accounting curriculum. The article suggests topics from the study data which should be included in taxation courses, e.g., income tax accounting, corporate taxation accounting, and tax law. (MF)

  11. Integrating Composition and Literature: Some Practical Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiker, Donald A.

    This paper suggests that it is possible to construct a course that integrates the teaching of composition with the teaching of literature without allowing the secondary goal of heightened literary understanding to overwhelm the primary goal of improved expository writing. It presents a syllabus for a four-week unit on Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun…

  12. Studies and Suggestions on Prewriting Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Shigao; Dai, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies and suggests the need for writing instruction by which students can experience writing as a creative process in exploring and communicating meaning. The prewriting activities generate ideas which can encourage a free flow of thoughts and help students discover both what they want to say and how to say it on paper. Through the…

  13. Family Living: Suggestions for Effective Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.; And Others

    Suggestions for effective parenting of preschool children are provided in 33 brief articles on children's feelings concerning self-esteem; fear; adopted children; the birth of a sibling; death; depression; and coping with stress, trauma, and divorce. Children's behavior is discussed in articles on toddlers' eating habits, punishment and…

  14. Reading Aloud--Suggestions for Classroom Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rews, Alun L. W.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an introductory summary in defense of "reading aloud" in the English as a foreign language classroom and a more substantial section offering practical suggestions for handling it. The defense centers on a clarification of the purpose of reading aloud. Descriptions of different reading activities are included along with methods of…

  15. Suggestions for Structuring a Research Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, James D.; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often experience difficulty as they attempt to prepare journal articles that describe their work. The purpose of this article is to provide researchers in the field of education with a series of suggestions as to how to clearly structure each section of a research manuscript that they intend to submit for publication in a scholarly…

  16. Suggestions for Teaching the Migratory Pupil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Dolly; And Others

    Suggestions for teachers of migrant children are offered in seven individual teaching guides which were developed as part of a research and curriculum development project to improve the teaching of migratory pupils. Levels of study include grades four, five, six, and seven, and one general unit deals with providing an effective learning…

  17. Current Research: 2013 Summer Reading Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2013

    2013-01-01

    To supplement the summer reading of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, the NSTA Committee on Research in Science Education suggested a list of science education research articles that were published in the journals of NSTA's affiliates in 2012. These articles covered a variety of topics that include learning about…

  18. Childhood Asthma May Encourage Obesity, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163160.html Childhood Asthma May Encourage Obesity, Study Suggests Fear of flare-ups might spur ... elementary school students in California, researchers found that childhood asthma ... increased risk of obesity over the next 10 years. "I was surprised ...

  19. Applications and suggested directions of transition research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes many of the applications of transition research having significant technological importance and suggests critical general areas for further research. Critical research requirements include identification and quantification of initial disturbance fields, disturbance internalization by inviscid and viscous flow fields and amplification in nonboundary-layer flows, along with elucidation of the roughness-induced destabilization physics.

  20. Suggested Outline for Auditory Perception Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Clare A.

    Presented are suggestions for speech therapists to use in auditory perception training and screening of language handicapped children in kindergarten through grade 3. Directions are given for using the program, which is based on games. Each component is presented in terms of purpose, materials, a description of the game, and directions for…

  1. Exploring Genetic Susceptibility to Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects 1% to 5% of the population, and approximately 90% of the affected individuals are women. FM patients experience impaired quality of life and the disorder places a considerable economic burden on the medical care system. With the recognition of FM as a major health problem, many recent studies have evaluated the pathophysiology of FM. Although the etiology of FM remains unknown, it is thought to involve some combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure that triggers further alterations in gene expression. Because FM shows marked familial aggregation, most previous research has focused on genetic predisposition to FM and has revealed associations between genetic factors and the development of FM, including specific gene polymorphisms involved in the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic pathways. The aim of this review was to discuss the current evidence regarding genetic factors that may play a role in the development and symptom severity of FM. PMID:26306300

  2. Personalized and not general suggestion produces false autobiographical memories and suggestion-consistent behavior.

    PubMed

    Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Jarry, Josée L; Bernstein, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Suggesting false childhood events produces false autobiographical beliefs, memories and suggestion-consistent behavior. The mechanisms by which suggestion affects behavior are not understood, and whether false beliefs and memories are necessary for suggestions to impact behavior remains unexplored. We examined the relative effects of providing a personalized suggestion (suggesting that an event occurred to the person in the past), and/or a general suggestion (suggesting that an event happened to others in the past). Participants (N=122) received a personalized suggestion, a general suggestion, both or neither, about childhood illness due to spoiled peach yogurt. The personalized suggestion resulted in false beliefs, false memories, and suggestion-consistent behavioral intentions immediately after the suggestion. One week or one month later participants completed a taste test that involved eating varieties of crackers and yogurts. The personalized suggestion led to reduced consumption of only peach yogurt, and those who reported a false memory showed the most eating suppression. This effect on behavior was equally strong after one week and one month, showing a long lived influence of the personalized suggestion. The general suggestion showed no effects. Suggestions that convey personal information about a past event produce false autobiographical memories, which in turn impact behavior.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility of topological nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitik, G. P.; Sharlai, Yu. V.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of the topological Weyl, type-II Weyl, Dirac, and line node semimetals is theoretically investigated. Dependences of this susceptibility on the chemical potential, temperature, direction, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found. The obtained results show that magnetic measurements can be very useful in investigating these semimetals. As an example, we calculate magnetic susceptibility of Cd3As2 ,Na3Bi , and Ca3P2 .

  4. Simple nonlinear models suggest variable star universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2016-02-01

    Dramatically improved data from observatories like the CoRoT and Kepler spacecraft have recently facilitated nonlinear time series analysis and phenomenological modeling of variable stars, including the search for strange (aka fractal) or chaotic dynamics. We recently argued [Lindner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 (2015) 054101] that the Kepler data includes "golden" stars, whose luminosities vary quasiperiodically with two frequencies nearly in the golden ratio, and whose secondary frequencies exhibit power-law scaling with exponent near -1.5, suggesting strange nonchaotic dynamics and singular spectra. Here we use a series of phenomenological models to make plausible the connection between golden stars and fractal spectra. We thereby suggest that at least some features of variable star dynamics reflect universal nonlinear phenomena common to even simple systems.

  5. Mentoring in biostatistics: some suggestions for reform

    PubMed Central

    Odueyungbo, Adefowope; Thabane, Lehana

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring is routinely used as a tool to facilitate acquisition of skills by new professionals in fields like medicine, nursing, surgery, and business. While mentoring has been proposed as an effective strategy for knowledge and skills transfer in biostatistics and related fields, there is still much to be done to facilitate adoption by stakeholders, including academia and employers of biostatisticians. This is especially troubling given that biostatisticians play a key role in the success or otherwise of clinical research conducted for evidence-based decisions. In this paper, we offer suggestions on how mentoring can be applied in practice to advance the statistical training of future biostatisticians. In particular, we propose steps that academic statistics departments, professional statistical societies, and statistics organizations can take to advance the mentoring of young biostatisticians. Our suggestions also cover what mentors and mentees can do to facilitate a successful mentoring relationship. PMID:23093907

  6. Seasonal fluctuation in susceptibility to insecticides within natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. II. Features of genetic variation in susceptibility to organophosphate insecticides within natural populations of D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miyo, Takahiro; Oguma, Yuzuru; Charlesworth, Brian

    2006-08-01

    To elucidate genetic variation in susceptibility to organophosphate insecticides within natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster, we conducted an analysis of variance for mortality data sets of isofemale lines (10-286 lines) used in the previous studies. Susceptibility of isofemale lines to the three organophosphate insecticides was continuously distributed within each natural population, ranging from susceptible to resistant. Analysis of variance showed highly significant variation among isofemale lines in susceptibility to each insecticide for each natural population. Significant genetic variances in susceptibility to the three chemicals were estimated for the Katsunuma population; 0.0529-0.2722 for malathion, 0.0492-0.1603 for prothiophos, and 0.0469-0.1696 for fenitrothion. Contrary to the consistent seasonal tendency towards an increase in mean susceptibility in the fall, reported in the previous study, genetic variances in susceptibility to the three organophosphates did not change significantly in 1997 but tended to increase by 2- to 5-times in 1998. We tested whether both the observed situations, maintenance and increase in genetic variance in organophosphate resistance, can be generated under circumstances in which the levels of resistance to the three organophosphates tended to decrease, by conducting a simulation analysis, based on the hypothesis that resistant genotypes have lower fitnesses than susceptible ones under the density-independent condition. The simulation analysis generally explained the pattern in the mean susceptibility and genetic variances in susceptibility to the three organophosphates, observed in the Katsunuma population of D. melanogaster. It was suggested that the differences in the frequencies of resistance genes in the summer population could affect the patterns in genetic variance in organophosphate resistance in the fall population.

  7. BJUT at TREC 2015 Contextual Suggestion Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-20

    Exploiting homophily effect for trust prediction. In Proceedings of the sixth ACM international conference on Web search and data mining , pages 53–62. ACM...experiments to evaluate the proposed framework on TREC 2015 Contextual Suggestion data set, and, as would be expected, the results demonstrate its generality...time, recommending according to user’s personalized needs the data describes the user’s interest accurately. The data about spots crawled from open-web

  8. [Suggestions to improve dentist-endodontist collaboration].

    PubMed

    Zabalegui, B; Zabalegui, I; Flores, L

    1989-01-01

    Referrals from the general dentist to the endodontist are in some occasions complicated with lack of proper communication among dentist-patient-specialist, resulting in the loss of confidence or even the patient. Suggestions to improve this communication are discussed, which will provide the patient a higher confidence in the indicated endodontic treatment and a better dental service. It will also enhance the prestige of the general dentists' and specialists' practice.

  9. Candida and candidaemia. Susceptibility and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2013-11-01

    specific incidence rate was comparable in children and the younger adults with that in the other Nordic countries it was notably higher in the elderly population. This in combination with the fact that it is increasing specifically in the elderly men and that the incidence rates in the Nordic countries were comparable two decades back suggest that host specific factors including antifungal consumption rather than genetic differences in susceptibility to fungaemia account for the differences, and hence that it is possibly modifiable by implementing relevant measures. Hence, it was important to investigate the underlying clinical conditions and diagnostic factors and the outcome in Danish patients with fungaemia. In this study we demonstrated that two thirds of the patients had received abdominal surgery or intensive care treatment prior to the development of the fungaemia, a proportion that is higher than in most other studies. We also demonstrated that unless surveillance cultures are handled with careful attention the detection of non-C. albicans may go unnoticed which imply a risk of inappropriate treatment in cases involving intrinsically resistant species. Finally, we demonstrated the necessity of using a fungal blood culture flask in addition to the conventional aerobic and anaerobic ones if all C. glabrata infections (BACTEC) and all polymicrobial infections (BacT/ALERT) are to be diagnosed. Hence close monitoring with the use of improved diagnostic options (such as frequent BC including a mycosis bottle, surveillance cultures and mannan antigen and antibody screening) of particularly ICU and abdominal surgery patients may help better identify patients with fungaemia and allow early treatment. With respect to treatment and outcome we found that the fluconazole resistant species C. glabrata, C. krusei and S. cerevisiae were significantly more common in patients exposed to at least 7 days of antifungal prophylaxis (mainly fluconazole). We also demonstrated that a

  10. Anisotropy in the Orbital Susceptibilities of HCP Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Carol M.

    Calculations of the magnetic susceptibility of the hcp transition metals Sc and Zr are carried out. The major contributions to the susceptibility are found to be the Van Vleck orbital and Pauli spin terms. Other smaller yet significant contributions are the Landau-Peierls and core diamagnetic terms. Particular attention is given the Van Vleck contribution in order to advance the understanding of orbital paramagnetism in transition metals. The required energy bands and wavefunctions are determined. from the augmented plane wave (APW) method, and the Kubo-. Obata formula (1) is used to obtain a value for the Van Vleck orbital. susceptibility. Estimates of the spin and diamagnetic terms are made. and the sum of the various contributions is computed to obtain the. bulk susceptibility. Our calculations yielded the values (chi)(,(PARLL)) = 362 x. 10('-6) emu/mole and (chi)(,(PERP)) = 384 x 10(' -6) emu/mole for the susceptibility. of Sc and the values (chi)(,(PARLL)) = 159 x 10(' -6) emu/mole and (chi)(,(PERP)) = 164 x. 10('-6) emu/mole for the susceptibility of Zr. These calculated results. for Sc and Zr are then compared to the measurements of Spedding. and Croat (2) and Collings and Ho (3), respectively. The calculated. and measured values of the susceptibility in Sc are found to agree. quite well with one another. On the other hand, for Zr we find a. marked disagreement between the calculated and measured. susceptibilities. Attempts are made to understand this disagreement. and suggestions are made for additional calculations to expedite the solution of this and related problems. *DOE Report IS-T-1050. This work was performed under Contract No. W-7405-eng-82 with the U.S. Department of Energy. (1) R. Kubo and Y. Obata, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 11, 547 (1956). (2) F. H. Spedding and J. J. Croat, J. Chem. Phys. 58, 5514 (1973). (3) E. W. Collings and J. C. Ho, Phys. Rev. B 4, 349 (1971).

  11. Susceptibility of SCADA systems and the energy sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goike, Lindsay

    The research in this paper focused on analyzing SCADA systems in the energy sector for susceptibility to cyber attacks, in furtherance of providing suggestions to mitigate current and future cyber attacks. The research will be addressing the questions: how are SCADA systems susceptible to cyber attacks, and what are the suggested ways to mitigate both current and future cyber attacks. The five main categories of security vulnerabilities facing current SCADA systems were found to be: connectivity to the Internet, failure to plan, interdependency of sectors, numerous different types of threats, and outdated software. Some of the recommendations mentioned to mitigate current and future risks were: virtual private networks, risk assessments, increased physical security, updating of software, and firewalls.

  12. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W; Baker, Annette L; Shulman, Stanford T; Rowley, Anne H; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5' untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 x 10(-8) in the Japanese and P = 3.7 x 10(-3) in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD.

  13. Autoimmune disorders affecting both the central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kamm, Christoph; Zettl, Uwe K

    2012-01-01

    Various case series of patients with autoimmune demyelinating disease affecting both the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS), either sequentially or simultaneously, have been reported for decades, but their frequency is considerably lower than that of the "classical" neurological autoimmune diseases affecting only either CNS or PNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or Guillain-Barré-Syndrome (GBS), and attempts to define or even recognize the former as a clinical entity have remained elusive. Frequently, demyelination started with CNS involvement with subsequent PNS pathology, in some cases with a relapsing-remitting course. Three potential mechanisms for the autoimmune etiology of these conditions can be discussed: (I) They could be caused by a common autoimmunological reactivity against myelin antigens or epitopes present in both the central and peripheral nervous system; (II) They could be due to a higher general susceptibility to autoimmune disease, which in some cases may have been caused or exacerbated by immunomodulatory treatment, e.g. b-interferon; (III) Their co-occurrence might be coincidental. Another example of an autoimmune disease variably involving the central or peripheral nervous system or both is the overlapping and continuous clinical spectrum of Fisher syndrome (FS), as a variant of GBS, and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis (BBE). Recent data from larger patient cohorts with demonstration of common autoantibodies, antecedent infections, and results of detailed clinical, neuroimaging and neurophysiological investigations suggest that these three conditions are not separate disorders, but rather form a continuous spectrum with variable central and peripheral nervous system involvement. We herein review clinical and paraclinical data and therapeutic options of these disorders and discuss potential underlying common vs. divergent immunopathogenic mechanisms.

  14. Griffiths effects of the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model on random power-law networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Wesley; Ferreira, Silvio C.; Ódor, Géza

    2016-03-01

    We provide numerical evidence for slow dynamics of the susceptible-infected-susceptible model evolving on finite-size random networks with power-law degree distributions. Extensive simulations were done by averaging the activity density over many realizations of networks. We investigated the effects of outliers in both highly fluctuating (natural cutoff) and nonfluctuating (hard cutoff) most connected vertices. Logarithmic and power-law decays in time were found for natural and hard cutoffs, respectively. This happens in extended regions of the control parameter space λ1<λ <λ2 , suggesting Griffiths effects, induced by the topological inhomogeneities. Optimal fluctuation theory considering sample-to-sample fluctuations of the pseudothresholds is presented to explain the observed slow dynamics. A quasistationary analysis shows that response functions remain bounded at λ2. We argue these to be signals of a smeared transition. However, in the thermodynamic limit the Griffiths effects loose their relevancy and have a conventional critical point at λc=0 . Since many real networks are composed by heterogeneous and weakly connected modules, the slow dynamics found in our analysis of independent and finite networks can play an important role for the deeper understanding of such systems.

  15. Temporal interactions facilitate endemicity in the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Leo; Klemm, Konstantin; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Masuda, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Data of physical contacts and face-to-face communications suggest temporally varying networks as the media on which infections take place among humans and animals. Epidemic processes on temporal networks are complicated by complexity of both network structure and temporal dimensions. Theoretical approaches are much needed for identifying key factors that affect dynamics of epidemics. In particular, what factors make some temporal networks stronger media of infection than other temporal networks is under debate. We develop a theory to understand the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model on arbitrary temporal networks, where each contact is used for a finite duration. We show that temporality of networks lessens the epidemic threshold such that infections persist more easily in temporal networks than in their static counterparts. We further show that the Lie commutator bracket of the adjacency matrices at different times is a key determinant of the epidemic threshold in temporal networks. The effect of temporality on the epidemic threshold, which depends on a data set, is approximately predicted by the magnitude of a commutator norm.

  16. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  17. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) Susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%): only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down) and KD90 (90% Knock-Down) times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar. PMID:25369291

  18. Susceptibility profile of vaginal yeast isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M A; Dietze, R; Paula, C R; Da Matta, D A; Colombo, A L

    2001-01-01

    Vaginal specimens for culture were obtained from two hundred and five immunocompetent, non-hospitalized patients selected among all women attending the Gynecology and Obstetric Ambulatory Clinic of the University of Espírito Santo, Brazil, during a 2-year period (From 1998 to 1999). Patients were checked for signs and symptoms of vulvovaginitis and previous use of topical and systemic antifungal drugs. Yeast isolates were identified by classical methods and the antifungal susceptibility profile was determined according to NCCLS microbroth assay. The prevalence of vaginal yeast isolates from asymptomatic women was 25% (30/121) and 60% (50/84) among patients with symptoms of vulvovaginitis. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species in both groups (46% and 90%, respectively), followed by C. glabrata (13% and 6%, respectively). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B. Only ten isolates had dose dependent susceptibility (DDS) or resistance to azoles; and seven of these were non-albicans species. Based on our results we suggest that species identification and antifungal susceptibility testing need not be routinely performed in immunocompetent women, and may be reasonable only for the minority of patients with complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis that fail to respond to therapy.

  19. Van Vleck from Spectroscopy to Susceptibilities: Kuhn Losses Regained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Michel

    2011-03-01

    As a young assistant professor in Minneapolis, John H. Van Vleck spent much of his time between 1923 and 1926 writing a book-length Bulletin for the National Research Council. As its title, Quantum Principles and Line Spectra, suggests, the book focuses almost exclusively on spectroscopy, the core pursuit of the old quantum theory. By the time it finally appeared in 1926, the old quantum theory had given way to the new quantum mechanics. Van Vleck soon realized that matrix mechanics reinstated some well-confirmed results of the classical theory of susceptibilities that had been lost in the old quantum theory. In the history and philosophy of science literature, such losses are called 'Kuhn losses'. Using mathematical techniques similar to those presented in his NRC Bulletin, Van Vleck started to work on the theory of susceptibilities. In 1929, now a full professor in Madison, he began writing another book, which appeared in 1932 and has become a classic: The Theory of Electric and Magnetic Susceptibilities. In this talk I follow Van Vleck's trajectory from spectroscopy to susceptibilities and examine how his two books reflect and helped shape research traditions.The talk is based on joint work with Charles Midwinter.

  20. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Sebastien; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%): only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down) and KD90 (90% Knock-Down) times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar.

  1. Guidelines and Suggestions for Balloon Gondola Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility is responsible for ensuring that science payloads meet the appropriate design requirements. The ultimate goal is to ensure that payloads stay within the allowable launch limits as well as survive the termination event. The purpose of this presentation is to provide some general guidelines for Gondola Design. These include rules and reasons on why CSBF has a certain preference and location for certain components within the gondola as well as other suggestions. Additionally, some recommendations are given on how to avoid common pitfalls.

  2. Planktonic foraminiferal oxygen isotope analysis by ion microprobe technique suggests warm tropical sea surface temperatures during the Early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, Reinhard; Kelly, D. Clay; Kita, Noriko T.; Fournelle, John H.; Valley, John W.

    2011-09-01

    Cool tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are reported for warm Paleogene greenhouse climates based on the δ18O of planktonic foraminiferal tests. These results are difficult to reconcile with models of greenhouse gas-forced climate. It has been suggested that this "cool tropics paradox" arises from postdepositional alteration of foraminiferal calcite, yielding erroneously high δ18O values. Recrystallization of foraminiferal tests is cryptic and difficult to quantify, and the compilation of robust δ18O records from moderately altered material remains challenging. Scanning electron microscopy of planktonic foraminiferal chamber-wall cross sections reveals that the basal area of muricae, pustular outgrowths on the chamber walls of species belonging to the genus Morozovella, contain no mural pores and may be less susceptible to postdepositional alteration. We analyzed the δ18O in muricae bases of morozovellids from the central Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 865) by ion microprobe using 10 μm pits with an analytical reproducibility of ±0.34‰ (2 standard deviations). In situ measurements of δ18O in these domains yield consistently lower values than those published for conventional multispecimen analyses. Assuming that the original δ18O is largely preserved in the basal areas of muricae, this new δ18O record indicates Early Paleogene (˜49-56 Ma) tropical SSTs in the central Pacific were 4°-8°C higher than inferred from the previously published δ18O record and that SSTs reached at least ˜33°C during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. This study demonstrates the utility of ion microprobe analysis for generating more reliable paleoclimate records from moderately altered foraminiferal tests preserved in deep-sea sediments.

  3. Landslide susceptibility mapping using a neuro-fuzzy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Choi, J.; Oh, H.

    2009-12-01

    This paper develops and applied an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) based on a geographic information system (GIS) environment using landslide-related factors and location for landslide susceptibility mapping. A neuro-fuzzy system is based on a fuzzy system that is trained by a learning algorithm derived from the neural network theory. The learning procedure operates on local information, and causes only local modifications in the underlying fuzzy system. The study area, Boun, suffered much damage following heavy rain in 1998 and was selected as a suitable site for the evaluation of the frequency and distribution of landslides. Boun is located in the central part of Korea. Landslide-related factors such as slope, soil texture, wood type, lithology, and density of lineament were extracted from topographic, soil, forest, and lineament maps. Landslide locations were identified from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys. Landslide-susceptible areas were analyzed by the ANFIS method and mapped using occurrence factors. In particular, we applied various membership functions (MFs) and analysis results were verified using the landslide location data. The predictive maps using triangular, trapezoidal, and polynomial MFs were the best individual MFs for modeling landslide susceptibility maps (84.96% accuracy), proving that ANFIS could be very effective in modeling landslide susceptibility mapping. Various MFs were used in this study, and after verification, the difference in accuracy according to the MFs was small, between 84.81% and 84.96%. The difference was just 0.15% and therefore the choice of MFs was not important in the study. Also, compared with the likelihood ratio model, which showed 84.94%, the accuracy was similar. Thus, the ANFIS could be applied to other study areas with different data and other study methods such as cross-validation. The developed ANFIS learns the if-then rules between landslide-related factors and landslide

  4. Genomewide suggestive linkage of opioid dependence to chromosome 14q.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Herbert M; Fann, Cathy S J; Bartzis, Michael; Evgrafov, Oleg V; Rosenthal, Richard N; Nunes, Edward V; Miner, Christian; Santana, Maria; Gaffney, Jebediah; Riddick, Amy; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Knowles, James A

    2007-06-01

    The genetic predisposition to addiction to opioids and other substances is transmitted as a complex genetic trait, which investigators are attempting to characterize using genetic linkage and association. We now report a high-density genome-wide linkage study of opioid dependence. We ascertained 305 DSM-IV opioid dependent affected sibling pairs from an ethnically mixed population of methadone maintained subjects and genotyped their DNA using Affymetrix 10K v2 arrays. Analysis with MERLIN identified a region on chromosome 14q with a non-parametric lod (NPL) of 3.30. Secondary analyses indicated that this locus was relatively specific to the self-identified Puerto Rican subset, as the NPL increased from 3.30 to 5.00 (NPL(Caucasian) = 0.05 and NPL(African Amer.) = 0.15). The 14q peak encompasses the NRXN3 gene (neurexin 3), which was previously identified as a potential candidate gene for addiction. Secondary analyses also identified several regions with gender-specific NPL scores greater than 2.00. The most significant was a peak on (10q) that increased from 0.90 to 3.22 when only males were considered (NPL(female) = 0.05). Our linkage data suggest specific chromosomal loci for future fine-mapping genetic analysis and support the hypothesis that ethnic and gender specific genes underlie addiction susceptibility.

  5. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  6. Evidence for Glass and Spin-Glass Phase Transitions From the Dynamic Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Bitko, D.; Coppersmith, S. N.; Leheny, R. L.; Menon, N.; Nagel, S. R.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence that there is a phase transition, with a diverging static susceptibility, underlying the transformation of a liquid into a glass. The dielectric susceptibility, at frequencies above its characteristic value, shows a power-law tail extending over many decades to higher frequencies. An extrapolation of this behavior to the temperature where the dynamics becomes arrested indicates a diverging susceptibility. We present evidence for analogous behavior in the magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnet approaching the spin-glass transition. The similarity of the response in these two glassy systems suggests that some conventional lore, such as that the spin glass shows evidence for a diverging correlation length only in a nonlinear but not in the linear susceptibility, may be invalid. PMID:27805138

  7. An Evolutionary Perspective on Family Studies: Differential Susceptibility to Environmental Influences.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Sarah; Belsky, Jay

    2016-12-01

    An evolutionary perspective of human development provides the basis for the differential-susceptibility hypothesis which stipulates that individuals should differ in their susceptibility to environmental influences, with some being more affected than others by both positive and negative developmental experiences and environmental exposures. This paper reviews evidence consistent with this claim while revealing that temperamental and genetic characteristics play a role in distinguishing more and less susceptible individuals. The differential-susceptibility framework under consideration is contrasted to the traditional diathesis-stress view that "vulnerability" traits predispose some to being disproportionately affected by (only) adverse experiences. We raise several issues stimulated by the literature that need to be clarified in further research. Lastly, we suggest that therapy may differ in its effects depending on an individual's susceptibility.

  8. Some factors affecting an increase in magnetic susceptibility of cement dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuchowska, Beata J.

    2001-09-01

    The aim of the research was to explain reasons of fluctuation in magnetic susceptibility of cement dusts and the consequences for the environment. The research comprised measurements of magnetic susceptibility and Fe content in dusts, and also in raw materials, additives, fuels, mixtures and clinkers used for cement production. The samples were taken in four cement plants located in Opole Province (southern Poland). In addition to this, the influence of two production methods (dry and wet) on magnetic susceptibility of dusts and some aspects of ferrimagnetic minerals formation in the process of clinker burning were considered. It was proven that magnetic susceptibility of dusts depends on raw materials and fuels but especially on additives used for cement production, method of production and the carbon monoxide content in gases from clinker rotary kilns. Statistically important linear correlations between magnetic susceptibility and Fe suggest that during clinker burning, ferrimagnetic minerals may be formed.

  9. NMR Spectroscopy Identifies Metabolites Translocated from Powdery Mildew Resistant Rootstocks to Susceptible Watermelon Scions.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Iqbal; Kousik, Chandrasekar; Hassell, Richard; Chowdhury, Kamal; Boroujerdi, Arezue F

    2015-09-16

    Powdery mildew (PM) disease causes significant loss in watermelon. Due to the unavailability of a commercial watermelon variety that is resistant to PM, grafting susceptible cultivars on wild resistant rootstocks is being explored as a short-term management strategy to combat this disease. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiles of susceptible and resistant rootstocks of watermelon and their corresponding susceptible scions (Mickey Lee) were compared to screen for potential metabolites related to PM resistance using multivariate principal component analysis. Significant score plot differences between the susceptible and resistant groups were revealed through Mahalanobis distance analysis. Significantly different spectral buckets and their corresponding metabolites (including choline, fumarate, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetate, and melatonin) have been identified quantitatively using multivariate loading plots and verified by volcano plot analyses. The data suggest that these metabolites were translocated from the powdery mildew resistant rootstocks to their corresponding powdery mildew susceptible scions and can be related to PM disease resistance.

  10. Spin susceptibility of disordered gapped graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, I.; Biter, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the spin susceptibility for the case of gapped graphene systems in the presence of disorder. The average single-particle density of states in gapped graphene with disorder was calculated, using the Born and the T-matrix approximations. The temperature dependence of the static spin susceptibility was analyzed. The influence of the chemical potential position and disorder is also discussed.

  11. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Using the Multiple Dipole-Inversion Combination with k-space Segmentation Method.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ryota; Shirai, Toru; Taniguchi, Yo; Murase, Takenori; Bito, Yoshitaka; Ochi, Hisaaki

    2017-03-27

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for noninvasively estimating the magnetic susceptibility of biological tissue. Several methods for QSM have been proposed. One of these methods can estimate susceptibility with high accuracy in tissues whose contrast is consistent between magnitude images and susceptibility maps, such as deep gray-matter nuclei. However, the susceptibility of small veins is underestimated and not well depicted by using the above approach, because the contrast of small veins is inconsistent between a magnitude image and a susceptibility map. In order to improve the estimation accuracy and visibility of small veins without streaking artifacts, a method with multiple dipole-inversion combination with k-space segmentation (MUDICK) has been proposed. In the proposed method, k-space was divided into three domains (low-frequency, magic-angle, and high-frequency). The k-space data in low-frequency and magic-angle domains were obtained by L1-norm regularization using structural information of a pre-estimated susceptibility map. The k-space data in high-frequency domain were obtained from the pre-estimated susceptibility map in order to preserve small-vein contrasts. Using numerical simulation and human brain study at 3 Tesla, streaking artifacts and small-vein susceptibility were compared between MUDICK and conventional methods (MEDI and TKD). The numerical simulation and human brain study showed that MUDICK and MEDI had no severe streaking artifacts and MUDICK showed higher contrast and accuracy of susceptibility in small-veins compared to MEDI. These results suggest that MUDICK can improve the accuracy and visibility of susceptibility in small-veins without severe streaking artifacts.

  12. Suggested noise criteria for plumbing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Jerry

    2005-09-01

    The issue of noise that is generated by plumbing systems has been addressed in several articles and texts in the acoustic literature, but most of this information deals with a description of the various noise generation mechanisms and recommended methods of controlling noise from plumbing fixtures and piping. As with any noise source that has the potential for generating annoyance, the question of how much noise is too much noise eventually arises. Chapter 47 of the 2003 ASHRAE Applications Handbook contains newly published guidelines for plumbing noise criteria as it impacts building occupants. This paper discusses the ASHRAE guidelines, and it also suggests additional noise criteria for other plumbing-related sources of noise in multitenant buildings.

  13. Instrumentation in antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Felmingham, D; Brown, D F

    2001-07-01

    Studies in the 1960s demonstrated the problems of variability in susceptibility testing methods, especially those affecting the performance of disc diffusion procedures. These studies made apparent the need for standardization and resulted in more clearly defined performance limits for growth medium, incubation conditions, inoculum concentration, disc content for diffusion methods, the setting of interpretative MIC breakpoints and the establishment of quality control parameters. More recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of instrumentation for reading disc diffusion tests and the endpoints of agar or broth dilution MIC determinations. Instrumentation ranges in complexity from the simple optical reading of zones of inhibition or growth endpoints, requiring operator interpretation, to more sophisticated devices for reading, recording and 'expert system' analysis of results with interfacing of instruments to laboratory information management systems. Some of the more developed systems are fully automated and can also identify the organisms tested. The pressure to reduce labour costs and provide results earlier favours the use of more automated systems whilst the requirement for resistance surveillance provides impetus for the use of systems that provide quantitative results and electronic data handling.

  14. Sources of magnetic susceptibility in a slate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham; Mothersill, John; Tarling, Don; Alford, Craig

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility and its anisotropy in the Borrowdale Volcanic slates at Kentmere in the English Lake District are attributed largely to preferred orientation of a paramagnetic chlorite of diabantite-ripidolite composition. In units of 10 -6 cgs/g, the principal susceptibilities for the slates are 9.61; 9.42; 8.69 and for the chlorite grains the minimum anisotropy is represented by principal susceptibilities of 11.57; 11.22 and 9.15. Because the magnetic susceptibility is carried by a tightly packed, matrix-forming mineral that has recrystallised during the deformation it is not possible to imagine simple grain rotation as being responsible for the anisotropy of susceptibility.

  15. THE ENVIRONMENT AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present article the putative role of environmental factors in schizophrenia is reviewed and synthesized. Accumulating evidence from recent studies suggests that environmental exposures may play a more significant role in the etiopathogenesis of this disorder than previously thought. This expanding knowledge base is largely a consequence of refinements in the methodology of epidemiologic studies, including birth cohort investigations, and in preclinical research that has been inspired by the evolving literature on animal models of environmental exposures. The bulk of evidence supports a contribution of environmental factors acting during fetal and perinatal life; these include infections, nutritional deficiencies, paternal age, fetal/neonatal hypoxic insults, maternal stress and other exposures. A considerable amount of data supports cannabis use in adolescence, migration, unfavorable neighborhood environments, and possibly infections at different points in the lifespan as risk factors for schizophrenia. Animal models have yielded evidence suggesting that these exposures cause brain and behavioral phenotypes that are analogous to findings observed in patients with schizophrenia. It is suggested that future studies attempt to replicate these findings, identify new risk factors, explore the gestational specificity of environmental insults, elaborate developmental trajectories, and examine relationships between environmental exposures and structural and functional brain anomalies in schizophrenia patients. Future research on gene-environment interactions and epigenetic effects of environmental exposures should shed further light on genes and exposures that may not be identified in the absence of these integrated approaches. Moreover, translational studies should further facilitate the discovery of neurodevelopmental mechanisms that increase susceptibility to schizophrenia. The study of environmental factors in schizophrenia may have important implications for

  16. Satellite estimates of precipitation susceptibility in low-level marine stratiform clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.; Kubar, T. L.

    2015-09-05

    Quantifying the sensitivity of warm rain to aerosols is important for constraining climate model estimates of aerosol indirect effects. In this study, the precipitation sensitivity to cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) in satellite retrievals is quantified by applying the precipitation susceptibility metric to a combined CloudSat/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data set of stratus and stratocumulus clouds that cover the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. We note that consistent with previous observational studies of marine stratocumulus, precipitation susceptibility decreases with increasing liquid water path (LWP), and the susceptibility of the mean precipitation rate R is nearly equalmore » to the sum of the susceptibilities of precipitation intensity and of probability of precipitation. Consistent with previous modeling studies, the satellite retrievals reveal that precipitation susceptibility varies not only with LWP but also with Nd. Puzzlingly, negative values of precipitation susceptibility are found at low LWP and high Nd. There is marked regional variation in precipitation susceptibility values that cannot simply be explained by regional variations in LWP and Nd. This suggests other controls on precipitation apart from LWP and Nd and that precipitation susceptibility will need to be quantified and understood at the regional scale when relating to its role in controlling possible aerosol-induced cloud lifetime effects.« less

  17. Satellite estimates of precipitation susceptibility in low-level marine stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.; Kubar, T. L.

    2015-09-05

    Quantifying the sensitivity of warm rain to aerosols is important for constraining climate model estimates of aerosol indirect effects. In this study, the precipitation sensitivity to cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) in satellite retrievals is quantified by applying the precipitation susceptibility metric to a combined CloudSat/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data set of stratus and stratocumulus clouds that cover the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. We note that consistent with previous observational studies of marine stratocumulus, precipitation susceptibility decreases with increasing liquid water path (LWP), and the susceptibility of the mean precipitation rate R is nearly equal to the sum of the susceptibilities of precipitation intensity and of probability of precipitation. Consistent with previous modeling studies, the satellite retrievals reveal that precipitation susceptibility varies not only with LWP but also with Nd. Puzzlingly, negative values of precipitation susceptibility are found at low LWP and high Nd. There is marked regional variation in precipitation susceptibility values that cannot simply be explained by regional variations in LWP and Nd. This suggests other controls on precipitation apart from LWP and Nd and that precipitation susceptibility will need to be quantified and understood at the regional scale when relating to its role in controlling possible aerosol-induced cloud lifetime effects.

  18. Satellite estimates of precipitation susceptibility in low-level marine stratiform clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.; Kubar, T. L.

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying the sensitivity of warm rain to aerosols is important for constraining climate model estimates of aerosol indirect effects. In this study, the precipitation sensitivity to cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) in satellite retrievals is quantified by applying the precipitation susceptibility metric to a combined CloudSat/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data set of stratus and stratocumulus clouds that cover the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Consistent with previous observational studies of marine stratocumulus, precipitation susceptibility decreases with increasing liquid water path (LWP), and the susceptibility of the mean precipitation rate R is nearly equal to the sum of the susceptibilities of precipitation intensity and of probability of precipitation. Consistent with previous modeling studies, the satellite retrievals reveal that precipitation susceptibility varies not only with LWP but also with Nd. Puzzlingly, negative values of precipitation susceptibility are found at low LWP and high Nd. There is marked regional variation in precipitation susceptibility values that cannot simply be explained by regional variations in LWP and Nd. This suggests other controls on precipitation apart from LWP and Nd and that precipitation susceptibility will need to be quantified and understood at the regional scale when relating to its role in controlling possible aerosol-induced cloud lifetime effects.

  19. California foreshock sequences suggest aseismic triggering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Shearer, Peter M.

    2013-06-01

    Foreshocks are one of the few well-documented precursors to large earthquakes; therefore, understanding their nature is very important for earthquake prediction and hazard mitigation. However, the triggering role of foreshocks is not yet clear. It is possible that foreshocks are a self-triggering cascade of events that simply happen to trigger an unusually large aftershock; alternatively, foreshocks might originate from an external aseismic process that ultimately triggers the mainshock. In the former case, the foreshocks will have limited utility for forecasting. The latter case has been observed for several individual large earthquakes; however, it remains unclear how common it is and how to distinguish foreshock sequences from other seismicity clusters that do not lead to large earthquakes. Here we analyze foreshocks of three M>7 mainshocks in southern California. These foreshock sequences appear similar to earthquake swarms, in that they do not start with their largest events and they exhibit spatial migration of seismicity. Analysis of source spectra shows that all three foreshock sequences feature lower average stress drops and depletion of high-frequency energy compared with the aftershocks of their corresponding mainshocks. Using a longer-term stress-drop catalog, we find that the average stress drop of the Landers and Hector Mine foreshock sequences is comparable to nearby swarms. Our observations suggest that these foreshock sequences are manifestations of aseismic transients occurring close to the mainshock hypocenters, possibly related to localized fault zone complexity, which have promoted the occurrence of both the foreshocks and the eventual mainshock.

  20. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-26

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose &gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  1. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  2. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  3. [Evidence that suggest the reality of reincarnation].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, children can be found who reported that they have memories of a previous life. More than 2,500 cases have been studied and their specifications have been published and preserved in the archives of the Division of Perceptual Studies at the University of Virginia (United States). Many of those children come from countries where the majority of the inhabitants believe in reincarnation, but others come from countries with different cultures and religions that reject it. In many cases, the revelations of the children have been verified and have corresponded to a particular individual, already dead. A good number of these children have marks and birth defects corresponding to wounds on the body of his previous personality. Many have behaviors related to their claims to their former life: phobias, philias, and attachments. Others seem to recognize people and places of his supposed previous life, and some of their assertions have been made under controlled conditions. The hypothesis of reincarnation is controversial. We can never say that it does not occur, or will obtain conclusive evidence that it happens. The cases that have been described so far, isolated or combined, do not provide irrefutable proof of reincarnation, but they supply evidence that suggest its reality.

  4. Functional polymorphism in the 5′-UTR of CR2 is associated with susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    FAN, QIN; HE, JUN-FANG; WANG, QI-RUI; CAI, HONG-BING; SUN, XUE-GANG; ZHOU, XIN-XI; QIN, HAI-DE; SHUGART, YIN YAO; JIA, WEI-HUA

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a squamous cell cancer endemic in Southern China and Southeast Asia. It has been shown that inflammatory and immune responses during EBV infection contribute to the development of NPC. The complement receptor 2 (CR2) gene plays central roles during inflammatory and immune responses and, therefore, is a good candidate susceptibility gene for NPC. We performed PCR-based sequencing to identify multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the exon regions of the CR2 gene in a Cantonese population. Two SNPs were screened in 528 NPC patients and 408 normal individuals to perform a case-control study matched according to age, gender and residence. Furthermore, we cloned the entire 5′-UTR and entire CR2 promoter into a luciferase report system and compared the luciferase activities between the different allelic constructs. A SNP in the 5′-UTR of CR2 (24 T/C, rs3813946) showed a significant association (P<0.01) with NPC in the Cantonese population studied. The subjects were categorized into 2 age groups: group 1, age ≤45 years and group 2, age >45 years. In group 1, the allelic frequencies of 24 T/C in the patients were significantly different from those of the controls (P=0.0034). The odds ratio (OR=1.81) also indicated a higher risk of NPC in individuals who carried the minor allele C. All constructs exerted allelic differences on luciferase activities, but only the susceptible allele +24C construct showed increased activity. Our findings implicate CR2 as a susceptibility gene for NPC and suggest that enhanced CR2 expression may be involved in the oncogenesis and development of NPC. PMID:23612877

  5. Alternate ventricular asymmetry could suggest a psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Egan, P J; Mitrovics, T C; Tomandl, B F

    2017-01-01

    Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the skull and brain for diagnostic purposes sometimes reveals a wider tip of the frontal ventricular horn on one side and a wider tip of the temporal horn on the other. A search for 'alternate ventricular asymmetry' in Google Scholar, Medline and PubMed Central yielded no results, so the digital archive of the hospital was searched for such cases. A total of 5908 examinations were reviewed and 508 cases were found, comprising 6% of the neurological inpatients and 20% of the psychiatric inpatients (P = 0.001 by χ(2) ). The >3-fold difference in the incidence of this particular ventricular asymmetry implies that it could suggest a psychiatric diagnosis. Clin. Anat. 30:50-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  7. Tracking changes in the susceptibility of forest land infested with gypsy moth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Gansner, D.A.; Quimby, J.W.; King, S.L.; Arner, S.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The report questions the forest land subject to intensive outbreaks of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) which become less susceptible to defoliation. A model for estimating the lifelihood of gypsy moth defoliation has been developed and validated. It was applied to forest-inventory plot data to quantity trends in the susceptibility of forest land in south-central Pennsylvania during a period of intensive infestation. Results show that even though susceptibility of the region's forest apparently has declined, the potential for future infestations remains relatively high.

  8. Cryptosporidiosis susceptibility and risk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Makri, Anna; Modarres, Reza; Parkin, Rebecca

    2004-02-01

    Regional estimates of cryptosporidiosis risks from drinking water exposure were developed and validated, accounting for AIDS status and age. We constructed a model with probability distributions and point estimates representing Cryptosporidium in tap water, tap water consumed per day (exposure characterization); dose response, illness given infection, prolonged illness given illness; and three conditional probabilities describing the likelihood of case detection by active surveillance (health effects characterization). The model predictions were combined with population data to derive expected case numbers and incidence rates per 100,000 population, by age and AIDS status, borough specific and for New York City overall in 2000 (risk characterization). They were compared with same-year surveillance data to evaluate predictive ability, assumed to represent true incidence of waterborne cryptosporidiosis. The predicted mean risks, similar to previously published estimates for this region, overpredicted observed incidence-most extensively when accounting for AIDS status. The results suggest that overprediction may be due to conservative parameters applied to both non-AIDS and AIDS populations, and that biological differences for children need to be incorporated. Interpretations are limited by the unknown accuracy of available surveillance data, in addition to variability and uncertainty of model predictions. The model appears sensitive to geographical differences in AIDS prevalence. The use of surveillance data for validation and model parameters pertinent to susceptibility are discussed.

  9. P values: from suggestion to superstition

    PubMed Central

    Concato, John; Hartigan, John A

    2016-01-01

    A threshold probability value of ‘p≤0.05’ is commonly used in clinical investigations to indicate statistical significance. To allow clinicians to better understand evidence generated by research studies, this review defines the p value, summarizes the historical origins of the p value approach to hypothesis testing, describes various applications of p≤0.05 in the context of clinical research and discusses the emergence of p≤5×10−8 and other values as thresholds for genomic statistical analyses. Corresponding issues include a conceptual approach of evaluating whether data do not conform to a null hypothesis (ie, no exposure–outcome association). Importantly, and in the historical context of when p≤0.05 was first proposed, the 1-in-20 chance of a false-positive inference (ie, falsely concluding the existence of an exposure–outcome association) was offered only as a suggestion. In current usage, however, p≤0.05 is often misunderstood as a rigid threshold, sometimes with a misguided ‘win’ (p≤0.05) or ‘lose’ (p>0.05) approach. Also, in contemporary genomic studies, a threshold of p≤10−8 has been endorsed as a boundary for statistical significance when analyzing numerous genetic comparisons for each participant. A value of p≤0.05, or other thresholds, should not be employed reflexively to determine whether a clinical research investigation is trustworthy from a scientific perspective. Rather, and in parallel with conceptual issues of validity and generalizability, quantitative results should be interpreted using a combined assessment of strength of association, p values, CIs, and sample size. PMID:27489256

  10. Employee suggestion programs: the rewards of involvement.

    PubMed

    Mishra, J M; McKendall, M

    1993-09-01

    Successful ESPs are the products of a great deal of effort by managers, administrators, teams, individuals, and reviewers, who are all striving to achieve the goals of increased profitability and enhanced employee involvement. A review of the literature indicates that there are several prescriptions that will increase the likelihood of a successful ESP (see the box). Today's American business prophets sound ceaseless calls to arms in the name of "world class performance," "global competitiveness," "total quality management," and a variety of other buzz terms. A burgeoning industry has evolved that promises, through speeches, teleconferences, seminars, and consulting contracts, to teach American organizations how to achieve excellence. In the face of a sputtering economy and unrelenting competitive pressure, today's managers must translate these laudatory ideals into hands-on reality without sacrificing the firm's profit margin to experimentation. If any idea can help an organization achieve improvement through a workable program, then that idea and that program deserve real consideration. An ESP represents an opportunity to tap the intelligence and resourcefulness of an organization's employees, and by doing so, reap significant cost savings. Those companies and managers that have an ESP program uniformly list economic advantages first when describing the benefits of their employee suggestion programs. But there is another deeper and longer term benefit inherent in an ESP. These programs allow employees to become involved in their organization; they drive deaccession to lower levels, they give employees more responsibility, they foster creative approaches to work, and they encourage creativity in pursuit of company goals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Core loss and magnetic susceptibility of superparamagnetic Fe nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kin, Masane; Kura, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-12-01

    Toroidal-shaped high-density Fe nanoparticle assemblies (FNAs) were fabricated by molding different sized Fe nanoparticles (NPs), and the effect of the magnetic behavior of the FNAs on the core loss and the magnetic susceptibility was investigated. An FNA with 4.3 nm diameter Fe NPs exhibits superparamagnetism at room temperature while an FNA with 6.4 nm diameter Fe NPs doesn't exhibit superparamagnetism at room temperature. AC magnetization curves at 1, 10 and 100 kHz were measured to evaluate the core loss of the toroidal-shaped FNAs. Both FNAs exhibited no significant eddy current loss, which suggests that surfactants on the NP surface effectively act to electrically insulate the NPs, and the NPs are not sintered together when the FNAs are molded. The AC magnetization curves had no hysteresis for the FNA with 4.3 nm diameter Fe NPs, i.e., the core loss was minimal for the superparamagnetic FNA. The magnetic susceptibility of the superparamagnetic FNA with 4.3 nm Fe NPs was 12 times higher than that estimated from Langevin theory due to the effect of strong magnetic dipole interaction. These results suggest that the superparamagnetic FNA has potential as a magnetic core material that exhibits low core loss and high magnetic susceptibility, even at high frequency.

  13. In Vitro Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Isolates of Human and Animal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Max T.; Westblade, Lars F.; Robertson, Amy E.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Burd, Eileen M.; Hindler, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    MIC results for 115 Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates are presented. Of these, 33% were methicillin resistant, among which 51.4% were susceptible to doxycycline, 29.7% to clindamycin, and 21.6% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. All of the isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline, daptomycin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, rifampin, tigecycline, and vancomycin. Of all the isolates, 82.6%, 67.8%, and 23.5% were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and penicillin, respectively. No isolates harbored mupA or qacA/B genes, which suggested a lack of resistance to mupirocin or chlorhexidine. PMID:26962087

  14. Susceptibility to Eating Disorders Among Collegiate Female Student–Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McLester, Cherilyn N.; Hardin, Robin; Hoppe, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research has suggested that the prevalence of young women with eating disorders (EDs) is increasing, but determining the exact prevalence of EDs within the female student–athlete (FS-A) population is difficult. Looking at certain traits may help us to identify their level of susceptibility to developing an ED. Objective: To determine the susceptibility of FS-As to EDs in relation to self-concept, including self-esteem and body image. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic training and health centers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I, II, and III institutions via e-mail questionnaire correspondence. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 439 FS-As from 17 participating institutions completed the questionnaires. The sample was primarily white (83.1%) and underclass (61.8%). Main Outcome Measure(s): The questionnaire consisted of 4 parts: 3 subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Body Cathexis Scale, and demographic items. Results: A total of 6.8% of FS-As were susceptible to anorexia and 1.8% were susceptible to bulimia. The majority of FS-As (61%) reported normal self-esteem levels, whereas 29.4% had high self-esteem. Overall, 64.5% were satisfied and 23% were very satisfied with their body image. Conclusions: These results are generally positive in that they suggest FS-As have high levels of self-concept and are at low risk to develop EDs. However, these findings do not mean that all concerns should be dismissed. Although more than 90% of the respondents were not susceptible to an ED, there are still FS-As who may be. Athletic departments should evaluate their FS-As' levels of self-concept so that their susceptibility to EDs can be addressed. The emotional aspect of health care should be included in providing holistic care for student–athletes. Athletic trainers often are the primary health care providers for FS-As, so they should be made aware of this concern. PMID:24762233

  15. Magnetic susceptibility of tetragonal titanium dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Pankey, T.; Grant, F.A.

    1960-01-01

    Careful measurements have been made of the magnetic susceptibility of the rutile and anatase crystalline forms of titanium dioxide. The magnetic susceptibility of a single crystal of high-purity rutile was found to be (0.067??0.0015)??10-6 emu per gram, and was temperature-independent from 55??to 372??K. Difficulty was encountered in obtaining a good value of the magnetic susceptibility of anatase because of impurities. However, a value of 0.02??10-6 emu per gram was obtained as a maximum value for anatase powder. A discussion is given for the different values obtained for anatase and rutile. ?? 1960 The American Physical Society.

  16. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  17. The erosive susceptibility of cervical versus occlusal enamel.

    PubMed

    Hammadeh, M; Rees, J S

    2001-03-01

    Clinical studies have strongly suggested a multifactorial aetiology for abfraction lesions or non-carious cervical tooth loss, with a contribution from erosive agents. Structural studies have shown that cervical enamel is more porous with a poorly developed crystal structure that may be more prone to erosion. The aim of this study was to examine the susceptibility to erosion of cervical and occlusal enamel from human premolar and molar teeth. Small blocks of cervical and cuspal enamel were immersed in either orange juice or Coca-Cola and the surface enamel loss was measured using profilometry. The enamel loss was essentially linear at a rate of 2.2-8.8 microns/hr. It was concluded that there was little difference in the susceptibility to erosion between cervical and cuspal enamel, even when the surface hypermineralised layer was removed.

  18. Italian norms for the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, V; Bellusci, A; Russo, P M

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents norms for an Italian translation of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C; Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962). Archival data on hypnosis research subjects recruited over a 10-year period of research on hypnosis were pooled, resulting in an aggregate sample of 356 participants (263 female and 93 male). Score distribution, item difficulty levels, and reliability of the SHSS:C were computed. Of this group, 218 subjects were administered the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility approximately 3 weeks prior to administration of the SHSS:C. The remaining 138 subjects received only the SHSS:C. Results suggest that the Italian version of the SHSS:C is a reliable and valid measure.

  19. Genetic Susceptibility to Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tochimoto, Akiko; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that is characterized by tissue fibrosis, microvasculopathy, and autoimmunity. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of SSc and is one of the frequent causes of mortality in SSc. Although the exact etiology of SSc remains unknown, clinical and experimental investigations have suggested that genetic and environmental factors are relevant to the pathogenesis of SSc and SSc-ILD. More than 30 genes have been identified as susceptibility loci for SSc, most of which are involved in immune regulation and inflammation. It is thought that the key pathogenesis of SSc-ILD is caused by the release of profibrotic mediators such as transforming growth factor β1 and connective tissue growth factor from lung cells induced by a persistent damage. This review presents the genetic susceptibility to SSc-ILD, including human leukocyte antigen and non-human leukocyte antigen genes, especially focusing on connective tissue growth factor. PMID:26997879

  20. A strabismus susceptibility locus on chromosome 7p

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vaishali; Shugart, Yin Yao; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Zhang, Jie; Li, Lan; Williams, John; Hayden, David; Craig, Brian; Capo, Hilda; Chamblee, Denise; Chen, Cathy; Collins, Mary; Dankner, Stuart; Fiergang, Dean; Guyton, David; Hunter, David; Hutcheon, Marcia; Keys, Marshall; Morrison, Nancy; Munoz, Michelle; Parks, Marshall; Plotsky, David; Protzko, Eugene; Repka, Michael X.; Sarubbi, Maria; Schnall, Bruce; Siatkowski, R. Michael; Traboulsi, Elias; Waeltermann, Joanne; Nathans, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    Strabismus has been known to have a significant genetic component, but the mode of inheritance and the identity of the relevant genes have been enigmatic. This paper reports linkage analysis of nonsyndromic strabismus. The principal results of this study are: (i) the demonstrated feasibility of identifying and recruiting large families in which multiple members have (or had) strabismus; (ii) the linkage in one large family of a presumptive strabismus susceptibility locus to 7p22.1 with a multipoint logarithm of odds score of 4.51 under a model of recessive inheritance; and (iii) the failure to observe significant linkage to 7p in six other multiplex families, consistent with genetic heterogeneity among families. These findings suggest that it will be possible to localize and ultimately identify strabismus susceptibility genes by linkage analysis and mutation screening of candidate genes. PMID:14519848

  1. Perceptual susceptibility to acoustic manipulations in speaker discrimination.

    PubMed

    Sell, Gregory; Suied, Clara; Elhilali, Mounya; Shamma, Shihab

    2015-02-01

    Listeners' ability to discriminate unfamiliar voices is often susceptible to the effects of manipulations of acoustic characteristics of the utterances. This vulnerability was quantified within a task in which participants determined if two utterances were spoken by the same or different speakers. Results of this task were analyzed in relation to a set of historical and novel parameters in order to hypothesize the role of those parameters in the decision process. Listener performance was first measured in a baseline task with unmodified stimuli, and then compared to responses with resynthesized stimuli under three conditions: (1) normalized mean-pitch; (2) normalized duration; and (3) normalized linear predictive coefficients (LPCs). The results of these experiments suggest that perceptual speaker discrimination is robust to acoustic changes, though mean-pitch and LPC modifications are more detrimental to a listener's ability to successfully identify same or different speaker pairings. However, this susceptibility was also found to be partially dependent on the specific speaker and utterances.

  2. Extended biofilm susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus bovine mastitis isolates: evidence for association between genetic makeup and biofilm susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Melchior, M B; van Osch, M H J; Lam, T J G M; Vernooij, J C M; Gaastra, W; Fink-Gremmels, J

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent causes of bovine mastitis. The antimicrobial treatment of this disease is currently based on antimicrobial susceptibility tests according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standards. However, various authors have shown a discrepancy between the results of this standard susceptibility test and the actual cure rate of the applied antimicrobial treatment. Increasing evidence suggests that in vivo biofilm formation by Staph. aureus, which is not assessed in the antimicrobial susceptibility tests, is associated with this problem, resulting in disappointing cure rates, especially for infections of longer duration. Previous data obtained with a limited number of strains showed that the extended biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility (EBS) assay reveals differences between strains, which cannot be derived from a standard susceptibility test or from a 24-h biofilm susceptibility test. The objective of this study was to test a collection of Staph. aureus bovine mastitis strains in the EBS assay and to model the effect of antimicrobial exposure, duration of antimicrobial exposure, and genotype profile of the strains on antimicrobial susceptibility. With the results from a previous study with the same collection of strains, the effect of genotype represented by accessory gene regulator gene (agr-type), the presence of insertional sequence 257 (IS257), intercellular adhesion (ica), and the β-lactamase (blaZ) gene were entered as explanatory factors in a logistic regression model. The agr locus of Staph. aureus controls the expression of most of the virulence factors, represses the transcription of several cell wall-associated proteins, and activates several exoproteins during the post-exponential phase. The IS257 gene has been related to biofilm formation in vitro and was found earlier in 50% of the agr-type 2 strains. The ica gene cluster encodes for the production of an extracellular polysaccharide adhesin, termed

  3. Suggestibility under Pressure: Theory of Mind, Executive Function, and Suggestibility in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpinski, Aryn C.; Scullin, Matthew H.

    2009-01-01

    Eighty preschoolers, ages 3 to 5 years old, completed a 4-phase study in which they experienced a live event and received a pressured, suggestive interview about the event a week later. Children were also administered batteries of theory of mind and executive function tasks, as well as the Video Suggestibility Scale for Children (VSSC), which…

  4. Physically-based landslide susceptibility modelling: geotechnical testing and model evaluation issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, Ivan; Mergili, Martin; Schneider-Muntau, Barbara; Alvioli, Massimiliano; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2015-04-01

    We used the software r.slope.stability for physically-based landslide susceptibility modelling in the 90 km² Collazzone area, Central Italy, exploiting a comprehensive set of lithological, geotechnical, and landslide inventory data. The model results were evaluated against the inventory. r.slope.stability is a GIS-supported tool for modelling shallow and deep-seated slope stability and slope failure probability at comparatively broad scales. Developed as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software, r.slope.stability evaluates the slope stability for a large number of randomly selected ellipsoidal potential sliding surfaces. The bottom of the soil (for shallow slope stability) or the bedding planes of lithological layers (for deep-seated slope stability) are taken as potential sliding surfaces by truncating the ellipsoids, allowing for the analysis of relatively complex geological structures. To take account for the uncertain geotechnical and geometric parameters, r.slope.stability computes the slope failure probability by testing multiple parameter combinations sampled deterministically or stochastically, and evaluating the ratio between the number of parameter combinations yielding a factor of safety below 1 and the total number of tested combinations. Any single raster cell may be intersected by multiple sliding surfaces, each associated with a slope failure probability. The most critical sliding surface is relevant for each pixel. Intensive use of r.slope.stability in the Collazzone Area has opened up two questions elaborated in the present work: (i) To what extent does a larger number of geotechnical tests help to better constrain the geotechnical characteristics of the study area and, consequently, to improve the model results? The ranges of values of cohesion and angle of internal friction obtained through 13 direct shear tests corresponds remarkably well to the range of values suggested by a geotechnical textbook. We elaborate how far an increased number of

  5. Parasitic Central Nervous System Infections in Immunocompromised Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melanie; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Immunosuppression due to therapy after transplantation or associated with HIV infection increases susceptibility to various central nervous system (CNS) infections. This article discusses how immunosuppression modifies the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of selected parasitic CNS infections, with a focus on toxoplasmosis, Chagas disease, neurocysticercosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. PMID:15824993

  6. Isolation of moderately penicillin-susceptible strains of Neisseria meningitidis in Argentina.

    PubMed Central

    Lopardo, H A; Santander, C; Ceinos, M C; Rubeglio, E A

    1993-01-01

    Four strains that were moderately susceptible to penicillin and/or ampicillin were found among 54 consecutive isolates of meningococci recovered from patients in one pediatric hospital in Argentina from October 1991 to December 1992. Disk diffusion tests performed with 2 U of penicillin failed to detect one strain. These findings suggest that attention should be paid to changes in the susceptibility patterns of meningococci in order to anticipate therapeutic failures in the future. PMID:8215295

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin in Spain: Clonal Diversity and Appearance of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Epidemic Clones

    PubMed Central

    Alou, Luis; Ramirez, Mario; García-Rey, César; Prieto, José; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the pulsed-field gel electrophoretic profiles of 82 pneumococcal isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (RSC) and of 90 co-occurring susceptible isolates indicates a considerable genetic diversity among isolates with RCS and points to a close relation between the two groups. This finding suggests that pneumococci with RCS emerge through independent mutational events. PMID:11557501

  8. Lesion heterogeneity on high-field susceptibility MRI is associated with multiple sclerosis severity

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Daniel M.; Li, Xu; Liu, Hongjun; Jones, Craig K.; Caffo, Brian; Calabresi, Peter A.; van Zijl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Susceptibility MRI contrast variations reflect alterations in brain iron and myelin content- making this imaging tool relevant to studies of multiple sclerosis lesion heterogeneity. In this study we aimed to characterize the relationship of high-field, susceptibility contrasts in multiple sclerosis lesions to clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods Twenty-four subjects with multiple sclerosis underwent 7-tesla MRI of the brain, disability exams, and a fatigue inventory. R2*, frequency, and relative susceptibility (from quantitative susceptibility mapping) were analyzed in 306 white matter lesions. Results Most lesions were hypointense on R2* (88% without a rim, 5% with). Lesions that were hyperintense on quantitative susceptibility mapping were more frequent in relapsing-remitting than progressive multiple sclerosis (54% vs. 35%, p = 0.018). Hyperintense lesion rims on quantitative susceptibility maps were more common in progressive multiple sclerosis and higher levels of disability and fatigue. Mean lesion R2* was inversely related to disability and fatigue and significantly reduced in progressive multiple sclerosis. Relative susceptibility was lower lesions in progressive multiple sclerosis (median -0.018 ppm, range -0.070 – 0.022) than relapsing-remitting (median -0.010 ppm, range -0.062 – 0.052, p = 0.003). Conclusion A progressive clinical phenotype, greater disability, and fatigue were associated with lower R2* and relative susceptibility values (suggestive of low iron due to oligodendrocyte loss) and rimmed lesions (suggestive of chronic inflammation) in this multiple sclerosis cohort. Lesion heterogeneity on susceptibility MRI may help explain disability in multiple sclerosis and provide a window into the processes of demyelination, oligodendrocyte loss, and chronic lesion inflammation. PMID:26939635

  9. Eicosanoids influence insect susceptibility to nucleopolyhedroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine pharmaceutical inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis (e.g., bromophenacyl bromide, clotrimazole, diclofenamic acid, esculetin, flufenamic acid, domethacin, nimesulide, sulindac, tolfenamic acid) that increased the susceptibility of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), to the nucleopolyhedrovi...

  10. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-06-14

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility and MIC distribution of 41 drugs against clinical isolates from China and reference strains of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilian; Pang, Hui; Guo, Qian; Huang, Mingxiang; Tan, Yanhong; Li, Chao; Wei, Jianhao; Xia, Yuanzhi; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Xiuqin; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhiguang; Xu, Donglei; Wan, Kanglin

    2017-03-01

    To treat nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections more optimally, further research pertaining to mycobacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents is required. A total of 82 species of NTM reference strains and 23 species of NTM clinical isolates were included. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 41 drugs were determined using the microdilution method in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth. The results showed that most of the NTM were susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, three macrolides (clarithromycin, azithromycin and roxithromycin), cefmetazole, linezolid and capreomycin. Rapidly growing mycobacterium strains were additionally susceptible to cefoxitin, clofazimine, rifapentine, doxycycline, minocycline, tigecycline, meropenem and sulfamethoxazole, whereas slowly growing mycobacterium strains were additionally susceptible to rifabutin. This study on the susceptibility of NTM includes the largest sample size of Chinese clinical isolates and reference strains. NTM species-specific drug susceptibility patterns suggested that it is urgent to identify the species of NTM, to normalise the treatment of NTM infectious disease and to clarify the resistance mechanisms of NTM.

  12. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  13. Central diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Hiroshi; Azuma, Yoshinori; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Hagiwara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Central diabetes insipidus (CDI), characterized by polyuria and polydipsia, is caused by deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP), an antidiuretic hormone which acts on V2 receptors in kidney to promote reabsorption of free water. CDI is classified into three subtypes; idiopathic, secondary and familial. A previous study suggests that infundibulo-neurohypophysitis might be an underlying cause of idiopathic CDI. Among secondary CDI, the tumors in the central nervous system such as craniopharyngioma and germ cell tumors are the most frequent causes. Familial CDI is inherited mostly in an autosomal dominant mode, and the number of causal mutations in the AVP gene locus reported so far exceeds 80. CDI is treated with desmopressin, an analogue of vasopressin, and the tablet is preferred to the nasal form because it is easier to administer. It is also shown that the oral disintegrating tablet formula increases QOL and decreases the incidence of hyponatremia in CDI patients. In some CDI patients, the osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus do not function and patients do not sense thirst. These adipsic CDI patients are treated with desmopressin and adjusting the amount of daily water intake based on body weight measurement; but controlling the water balance is extremely difficult, and morbidity and mortality are shown to be high in these patients. PMID:28008190

  14. [Measles and chickenpox susceptibility among immigrants].

    PubMed

    Gétaz, Laurent; Casillas, Alejandra; Wolff, Hans

    2016-05-04

    Exposure of immigrants to infectious diseases in their country of origin influences their susceptibility to infections later in life. Susceptibility to certain infections may significantly differs between immigrants depending on their regions of origin. Both measles and chickenpox (varicella) are conditions for which the level of exposure in the country of origin influences the preventive measures that immigrant health providers should propose. Through these two illustrative examples, this article summarizes the practical implications for clinicians who care for immigrants originating from southern countries.

  15. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility: Measurement schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John; Stupavsky, Mike

    The precision of AMS determination is enhanced by measuring susceptibility in directions with a uniform orientation distribution that include the four body diagonals. Some standard 10.5 cm³ samples with mean susceptibility < 100µSI possess too few “magnetic” grains for reliable petrofabric interpretation whatever the measurement strategy. We should only interpret their AMS if they pass fabric homogeneity tests.

  16. Interleukin-10 Promoter Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Tuberculosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuan; Chen, Junjun; Tong, Zhongkai; Yang, Guangdie; Yao, Yinan; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Jianying

    2015-01-01

    Objective As an update to other recent meta-analyses, the purpose of this study was to explore whether interleukin-10 (IL-10) polymorphisms and their haplotypes contribute to tuberculosis (TB) susceptibility. Methods We searched for published case-control studies examining IL-10 polymorphisms and TB in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Wanfang databases and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the strengths of the associations. Results A total of 28 studies comprising 8,242 TB patients and 9,666 controls were included in the present study. There were no significant associations between the -1082G/A, -819C/T, and -592A/C polymorphisms and TB in the pooled samples. Subgroup analyses revealed that the -819T allele was associated with an increased TB risk in Asians in all genetic models (T vs. C: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.05-1.29, P=0.003; TT vs. CC: OR=1.37, 95% CI=1.09-1.72, P=0.006; CT+TT vs. CC: OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.09-1.63, P=0.006; TT vs. CT+CC: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.02-1.35, P=0.03) and that the -592A/C polymorphism was significantly associated with TB in Europeans under two genetic models (A vs. C: OR=0.77, 95% CI=0.60-0.98, P=0.03; AA vs. CC: OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.30-0.95, P=0.03). Furthermore, the GCC IL-10 promoter haplotype was associated with an increased risk of TB (GCC vs. others: P=1.42, 95% CI=1.02-1.97, P=0.04). Subgroup analyses based on ethnicity revealed that the GCC haplotype was associated with a higher risk of TB in Europeans, whereas the ACC haplotype was associated with a lower TB risk in both Asians and Europeans. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the IL-10-819T/C polymorphism is associated with the risk of TB in Asians and that the IL-10-592A/C polymorphism may be a risk factor for TB in Europeans. Furthermore, these data indicate that IL-10 promoter haplotypes play a vital role in the susceptibility to or protection

  17. University of Waterloo at TREC 2014 Contextual Suggestion: Experiments with Suggestion Clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    task. As part of TREC 2014 the contextual suggestion track is running for the third time. The goal of this task is to tailor point -of-interest...suggestions to users according to this preferences. Here we present how we gathered candidate points -of-interest, grouped them according to similarity using...clustering, and picked points -of-interest that each user would find especially appealing. The organizers of this track distributed users’ personal

  18. Gene polymorphism in transforming growth factor-beta codon 10 is associated with susceptibility to Giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, H; Hajilooi, M; Fallah, M; Khyabanchi, O; Haidari, M

    2009-12-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies have a central role in anti-Giardial defence. It has been demonstrated that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) stimulates B lymphocytes to produce and secrete S-IgA. We sought to determine the association between TGF-beta1 polymorphism (T+869C) with susceptibility to Giardiasis. The TGF-beta1 genotypes and levels of salivary (S-IgA) were analysed in individuals with Giardiasis (97 symptomatic and 57 asymptomatic) and controls (n = 92). Individuals with symptomatic Giardiasis had the lowest levels of S-IgA compared to individuals in asymptomatic Giardiasis and control groups (97%, 73% and 43%, <1 g L(-1), respectively, P = 0.002). The frequency of allele C and CC genotypes of TGF-beta1 polymorphism was significantly higher among symptomatic patients than asymptomatic and control groups. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the individuals homozygous for allele C of TGF-beta1 had a significantly higher risk for symptomatic Giardiasis with odds ratio of 2.76 (95% CI: 3.88, 1.71, P = 0.007). Among the participants with TT genotype per cent of individuals with S-IgA level of more than 1 g L(-1) was almost twice the percentage in CC genotype individuals (14% versus 7% respectively P = 0.01). Our data suggest that CC genotype of TGF-beta1 polymorphism at codon 10 is associated with occurrence of Giardiasis.

  19. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  20. MR Measurement of Alloy Magnetic Susceptibility: Towards Developing Tissue-Susceptibility Matched Metals

    PubMed Central

    Astary, Garrett W.; Peprah, Marcus K.; Fisher, Charles R.; Stewart, Rachel L.; Carney, Paul R.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Meisel, Mark W.; Manuel, Michele V.; Mareci, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to relate structure to function mapped with high-temporal resolution electrophysiological recordings using metal electrodes. Additionally, MRI may be used to guide the placement of electrodes or conductive cannula in the brain. However, the magnetic susceptibility mismatch between implanted metals and surrounding brain tissue can severely distort MR images and spectra, particularly in high magnetic fields. In this study, we present a modified MR method of characterizing the magnetic susceptibility of materials that can be used to develop biocompatible, metal alloys that match the susceptibility of host tissue in order to eliminate MR distortions proximal to the implant. This method was applied at 4.7 T and 11.1 T to measure the susceptibility of a model solid-solution alloy of Cu and Sn, which is inexpensive but not biocompatible. MR-derived relative susceptibility values of four different compositions of Cu-Sn alloy deviated by less than 3.1% from SQUID magnetometry absolute susceptibility measurements performed up to 7 T. These results demonstrate that the magnetic susceptibility varies linearly with atomic percentage in these solid-solution alloys, but are not simply the weighted average of Cu and Sn magnetic susceptibilities. Therefore susceptibility measurements are necessary when developing susceptibility-matched, solid-solution alloys for the elimination of susceptibility artifacts in MR. This MR method does not require any specialized equipment and is free of geometrical constraints, such as sample shape requirements associated with SQUID magnetometry, so the method can be used at all stages of fabrication to guide the development of a susceptibility matched, biocompatible device. PMID:23727587

  1. MR measurement of alloy magnetic susceptibility: towards developing tissue-susceptibility matched metals.

    PubMed

    Astary, Garrett W; Peprah, Marcus K; Fisher, Charles R; Stewart, Rachel L; Carney, Paul R; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Meisel, Mark W; Manuel, Michele V; Mareci, Thomas H

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to relate structure to function mapped with high-temporal resolution electrophysiological recordings using metal electrodes. Additionally, MRI may be used to guide the placement of electrodes or conductive cannula in the brain. However, the magnetic susceptibility mismatch between implanted metals and surrounding brain tissue can severely distort MR images and spectra, particularly in high magnetic fields. In this study, we present a modified MR method of characterizing the magnetic susceptibility of materials that can be used to develop biocompatible, metal alloys that match the susceptibility of host tissue in order to eliminate MR distortions proximal to the implant. This method was applied at 4.7T and 11.1T to measure the susceptibility of a model solid-solution alloy of Cu and Sn, which is inexpensive but not biocompatible. MR-derived relative susceptibility values of four different compositions of Cu-Sn alloy deviated by less than 3.1% from SQUID magnetometry absolute susceptibility measurements performed up to 7T. These results demonstrate that the magnetic susceptibility varies linearly with atomic percentage in these solid-solution alloys, but are not simply the weighted average of Cu and Sn magnetic susceptibilities. Therefore susceptibility measurements are necessary when developing susceptibility-matched, solid-solution alloys for the elimination of susceptibility artifacts in MR. This MR method does not require any specialized equipment and is free of geometrical constraints, such as sample shape requirements associated with SQUID magnetometry, so the method can be used at all stages of fabrication to guide the development of a susceptibility matched, biocompatible device.

  2. Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeJarnette, S.S.; Crownover, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This report delineates and describes the geohyrology and susceptibility of the major aquifers to contamination in Area 6, Greene, Marengo, Pickens, Sumter, and Tuscaloosa Counties in west-central Alabama. The major aquifers in the study area are the Nanafalia, Eutaw, Gordo, and Coker aquifers of Tertiary and Cretaceous age. The recharge areas for one or more of these aquifers are in each of the five counties. East aquifer is a source of public water supply in one or more of the five counties. All recharge areas for the major aquifers are susceptible to contamination from the surface. However, large parts of the recharge areas are in rural settings that are used for timberlands, farms, and pastures, and are several miles from pumping centers; therefore, these areas are not highly susceptible to contamination. (USGS)

  3. Changes in Tetracycline Susceptibility of Enteric Bacteria following Switching to Nonmedicated Milk Replacer for Dairy Calves▿

    PubMed Central

    Kaneene, John B.; Warnick, Lorin D.; Bolin, Carole A.; Erskine, Ronald J.; May, Katherine; Miller, RoseAnn

    2008-01-01

    A randomized intervention study was conducted to determine if discontinuing use of calf milk replacer medicated with oxytetracycline results in increased tetracycline susceptibility in Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli in dairy calves over a 12-month period. Dairy herds with enteric bacteria with known low tetracycline susceptibility were enrolled for the study. Fecal samples from preweaned calves and environmental samples were collected from eight dairy herds in Michigan and New York State. Samples were collected monthly for 3 months prior to and 12 months after four of the eight herds discontinued medicated milk replacer feeding. Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. and E. coli were isolated, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using automated broth microdilution. A total of 804 intervention and 1,026 control calf fecal samples and 122 intervention and 136 control environmental samples were collected for testing. No differences in owner-reported morbidity and mortality between treatment groups were seen. The intervention was significantly associated with increasing tetracycline susceptibility in E. coli and Salmonella. Tetracycline susceptibility increased in intervention herds for the first 3 months after switching to nonmedicated milk replacer but declined in subsequent months. Discontinuing the practice of feeding medicated milk replacers to calves increased tetracycline susceptibility in E. coli and Salmonella on dairy farms, without increasing cattle disease, but declines in effectiveness after 3 months suggest that other factors contribute to decreasing susceptibility on the farm. PMID:18417664

  4. Susceptibilities of Helicoverpa zea and Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations to Cry1Ac insecticidal protein.

    PubMed

    Ali, M I; Luttrell, R G; Young, S Y

    2006-02-01

    Susceptibilities of bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.) to Cry1Ac were measured via a diet-incorporated assay with MPV II at the University of Arkansas during 2002-2004. Lethal concentration-mortality (LC50) estimates of five laboratory, seven laboratory-cross, and 10 field populations of H. virescens varied 12-fold. Pooled susceptibilities of H. virescens across all laboratory and field populations varied five-fold. The LC50 estimates for H. virescens were higher than those reported by previous research before the introduction of transgenic crops. However, the ratio of susceptibility of laboratory and field populations was similar, suggesting no change in overall species susceptibility. Individual LC50 estimates of five laboratory, nine laboratory-cross, and 57 field populations of H. zea varied over 130-fold. Pooled susceptibilities across laboratory and field populations varied widely. Among the field populations, colonies from non-Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops were generally more susceptible than those from Bt crops. Across the Bt crops expressing Cry protein, colonies from Bollgard (Monsanto Company) cotton had lower susceptibility to CrylAc than those from Bt corn and those from non-Bt crops.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Haemophilus parasuis from pigs in the United Kingdom and Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, A J Martín; Tucker, A W; Navas, J; Blanco, M; Morris, S J; Gutiérrez-Martín, C B

    2007-02-25

    A total of 30 British and 30 Spanish Haemophilus parasuis isolates were tested for their susceptibility to 19 of the antimicrobials currently used in swine practice with a broth microdilution method in order to know the emergence of resistance against these compounds in this porcine pathogen. All the British isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ceftiofur, erythromycin, tilmicosin, enrofloxacin, and florfenicol, and most of them were susceptible to the remaining antimicrobials (the highest resistance rate found was of 20% to neomycin). In contrast, all the Spanish isolates were susceptible exclusively to florfenicol, and high proportions of resistance were encountered for penicillin, ampicillin, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tiamulin and trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole; in addition, a bimodal or multimodal distribution, or tailing of Spanish isolates over the MIC range was observed for clindamycin, sulphonamides and tylosine tartrate, suggesting the development of acquired resistance. In addition, several multiresistance patterns were found among the Spanish isolates, 23.3% of them being resistant to at least eight antimicrobials, the same rate as that encountered for those being susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. This study showed that in general British H. parasuis isolates are susceptible to antimicrobial agents routinely used for treatment of porcine respiratory diseases; however, the Spanish isolates need a more continuous surveillance of their susceptibility patterns.

  6. Stages of smoking acquisition versus susceptibility as predictors of smoking initiation in adolescents in primary care.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minnie; Hollis, Jack; Polen, Michael; Lapidus, Jodi; Austin, Donald

    2005-07-01

    We evaluated whether susceptibility, the stages of smoking acquisition, and socio-environmental factors can identify adolescents who will become smokers. Our data came from a randomized controlled trial of an intervention to prevent adolescent smoking. Subjects were adolescents (n=1955) ages 14-17 being seen for routine medical care. The dependent variable was 30-day smoking status at 2-year follow-up (89.6% response rate). Independent variables included susceptibility, the stages of acquisition, and socio-environmental factors. Susceptible adolescents were two to three times more likely to be smokers than non-susceptible adolescents. Compared to acquisition precontemplators, acquisition contemplators were three to five times more likely, and acquisition preparers were five to eight times more likely, to be smokers. When combined into a single measure, susceptible precontemplators were two times, contemplators were six times, and preparers were nine times more likely to be smokers than non-susceptible precontemplators. Our findings suggest that acquisition stage and susceptibility can independently predict smoking onset. They may be used together to target teens for smoking prevention efforts in the clinical setting.

  7. Quantitative susceptibility mapping for investigating subtle susceptibility variations in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schweser, Ferdinand; Sommer, Karsten; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Jürgen Rainer

    2012-09-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel magnetic resonance-based technique that determines tissue magnetic susceptibility from measurements of the magnetic field perturbation. Due to the ill-posed nature of this problem, regularization strategies are generally required to reduce streaking artifacts on the computed maps. The present study introduces a new algorithm for calculating the susceptibility distribution utilizing a priori information on its regional homogeneity derived from gradient echo phase images and analyzes the impact of erroneous a priori information on susceptibility map fidelity. The algorithm, Homogeneity Enabled Incremental Dipole Inversion (HEIDI), was investigated with a special focus on the reconstruction of subtle susceptibility variations in a numerical model and in volunteer data and was compared with two recently published approaches, Thresholded K-space Division (TKD) and Morphology Enabled Dipole Inversion (MEDI). HEIDI resulted in susceptibility maps without streaking artifacts and excellent depiction of subtle susceptibility variations in most regions. By investigating HEIDI susceptibility maps acquired with the volunteers' heads in different orientations, it was demonstrated that the apparent magnetic susceptibility distribution of human brain tissue considerably depends on the direction of the main magnetic field.

  8. Differential susceptibility experiments: going beyond correlational evidence: comment on beyond mental health, differential susceptibility articles.

    PubMed

    van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2012-05-01

    Reviewing the studies on differential susceptibility presented in this section, we argue that the time is ripe to go beyond correlational designs to differential susceptibility experiments. In such experiments, randomization prevents hidden moderator effects on the environment and guarantees the independence of moderator and outcome, while the environment is manipulated and assessed in standard ways. Correlational studies generate a priori expectations about crucial moderators (e.g., temperament, biological sensitivity, and genetics). We discuss the differential susceptibility experiments available up until now and conclude that these experiments are feasible and contribute in unique ways to our conceptions of differential susceptibility.

  9. Deformation regime variations in an arcuate transpressional orogen (Ribeira belt, SE Brazil) imaged by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in granulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egydio-Silva, Marcos; Vauchez, Alain; Raposo, Maria Irene B.; Bascou, Jérôme; Uhlein, Alexandre

    2005-10-01

    The Ribeira belt of southeastern Brazil displays an arcuate shape, with a structural trend that varies from ˜NS in the northern domain to ENE-WSW in the southern domain. This curvature is accompanied by a transition from contraction-dominated to transcurrent-dominated tectonics. The transition in deformation regime is accommodated in the central domain of the belt where granulitic rocks dominate and mineral-stretching lineations are commonly concealed by metamorphic recrystallization. We present anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data from 664 samples from 62 sites in high-temperature gneisses, granulites and migmatites of the transitional, central domain of the belt, with the aim of investigating: (1) how well AMS allows one to map the mineral-stretching lineation and foliations in domains displaying a complex kinematic framework and (2) to investigate the kinematic pattern at the transition between the thrusting dominated and a wrench-faulting dominated orogenic segments. The mean magnetic susceptibility is 7.54×10 -3 SI. The degree of anisotropy varies from 1.32 up to 4.31, with an average value of 1.53. The shape parameter T is generally >0 meaning that the AMS ellipsoid is dominantly oblate. Magnetic lineations and foliations form a consistent pattern correlated with the modification of the structural characteristics observed along the Ribeira belt. In the southern wrench-fault-dominated domain, the magnetic lineation is subhorizontal, parallel to the trend of the steeply dipping magnetic foliation. This correlation with the fabric observed in mylonites suggests that the magnetic fabric is a valid proxy of the tectonic fabric in granulites. Results from the northern domain show that it comprises two sub-domains both displaying a ˜NS-trending magnetic foliation. Eastward, over a broad area, the magnetic foliation is consistently steeply dipping and bears a shallowly to moderately plunging magnetic lineation. Westward, the dip of the foliation

  10. Liquefaction susceptibility evaluation for the city of Evansville, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Kayabali, K. . Dept. of Geological Engineering); West, T.R. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1994-06-01

    A series of Standard Penetration Tests (SPT) were performed to delineate potentially liquefiable deposits in Evansville, Indiana. Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) were performed in areas where SPT soundings indicated liquefaction-prone material. Two SPT-based and two CPT-based liquefaction evaluation procedures were evaluated. A fifth method, called the Liquefaction Potential Index, is utilized to provide more quantitative assessment regarding liquefaction risk resulting from the postulated earthquakes. At 27 different locations, over 100 soil layers were investigated for liquefaction susceptibility. Concern exists for two postulated earthquakes: one a major earthquake generated in the Wabash Valley fault zone and the other a catastrophic earthquake with an epicenter in the central New Madrid seismic zone.

  11. Genetic Aspects of Susceptibility to Mercury Toxicity: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Virginia; Sprovieri, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Human exposure to mercury is still a major public health concern. In this context, children have a higher susceptibility to adverse neurological mercury effects, compared to adults with similar exposures. Moreover, there exists a marked variability of personal response to detrimental mercury action, in particular among population groups with significant mercury exposure. New scientific evidence on genetic backgrounds has raised the issue of whether candidate susceptibility genes can make certain individuals more or less vulnerable to mercury toxicity. In this review, the aim is to evaluate a new genetic dimension and its involvement in mercury risk assessment, focusing on the important role played by relevant polymorphisms, located in attractive gene targets for mercury toxicity. Existing original articles on epidemiologic research which report a direct link between the genetic basis of personal vulnerability and different mercury repercussions on human health will be reviewed. Based on this evidence, a careful evaluation of the significant markers of susceptibility will be suggested, in order to obtain a powerful positive “feedback” to improve the quality of life. Large consortia of studies with clear phenotypic assessments will help clarify the “window of susceptibility” in the human health risks due to mercury exposure. PMID:28106810

  12. Susceptibility of irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.H.; Dong, Q.; Ts'ao, C.

    1988-11-01

    Using cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), the authors attempted to determine whether prior irradiation would alter the susceptibility of these cells to three known injurious stimuli and, if so, whether the alteration would be related to radiation dose. BAEC were irradiated with 0, 5, or 10 Gy of gamma rays and, on the third postirradiation day, exposed to fibrin, nicotine, or bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Release of prelabeled 51Cr, representing cell lysis, cell detachment, or a combination of the two, was determined. Significant differences between irradiated and control cells were determined by using paired Student's t-tests. Irradiation did not appear to have altered the sensitivity of BAEC to fibrin-induced injury. Cells irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays, but generally not those irradiated with half this dose, showed a heightened susceptibility to nicotine. Contrary to the nicotine results, irradiated cells showed less cell detachment and lysis after exposure to LPS. These results suggest that the susceptibility of irradiated BAEC to harmful stimuli depends largely on the nature of the stimulus as well as the radiation dose.

  13. Human genetic susceptibility and infection with Leishmania peruviana

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, M.A.; Davis, C.R.; Collins, A.

    1995-11-01

    Racial differences, familial clustering, and murine studies are suggestive of host genetic control of Leishmania infections. Complex segregation analysis has been carried out by use of the programs POINTER and COMDS and data from a total population survey, comprising 636 nuclear families, from an L. perurviana endemic area. The data support genetic components controlling susceptibility to clinical leishmaniasis, influencing severity of disease and resistance to disease among healthy individuals. A multifactorial model is favored over a sporadic model. Two-locus models provided the best fit to the data, the optimal model being a recessive gene (frequency .57) plus a modifier locus. Individuals infected at an early age and with recurrent lesions are genetically more susceptible than those infected with a single episode of disease at a later age. Among people with no lesions, those with a positive skin-test response are genetically less susceptible than those with a negative response. The possibility of the involvement of more than one gene together with environmental effects has implications for the design of future linkage studies. 31 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Awareness of Cancer Susceptibility Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Phuong L.; Vadaparampil, Susan Thomas; Breen, Nancy; McNeel, Timothy S.; Wideroff, Louise; Graubard, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic testing for several cancer susceptibility syndromes is clinically available; however, existing data suggest limited population awareness of such tests. Purpose To examine awareness regarding cancer genetic testing in the U.S. population aged ≥25 years in the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys. Methods The weighted percentages of respondents aware of cancer genetic tests, and percent changes from 2000–2005 and 2005–2010, overall and by demographic, family history, and healthcare factors were calculated. Interactions were used to evaluate the patterns of change in awareness between 2005 and 2010 among subgroups within each factor. To evaluate associations with awareness in 2005 and 2010, percentages were adjusted for covariates using multiple logistic regression. The analysis was performed in 2012. Results Awareness decreased from 44.4% to 41.5% (p<0.001) between 2000 and 2005, and increased to 47.0% (p<0.001) in 2010. Awareness increased between 2005 and 2010 in most subgroups, particularly among individuals in the South (p-interaction=0.03) or with a usual place of care (p-interaction=0.01). In 2005 and 2010, awareness was positively associated with personal or family cancer history and high perceived cancer risk, and inversely associated with racial/ethnic minorities, age 25–39 or ≥60 years, male gender, lower education and income levels, public or no health insurance, and no provider contact in 12 months. Conclusions Despite improvement from 2005 to 2010, ≤50% of the U.S. adult population was aware of cancer genetic testing in 2010. Notably, disparities persist for racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with limited health care access or income. PMID:24745633

  15. Biocide susceptibility of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Helen; Baldwin, Adam; Dowson, Christopher G.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species are important opportunistic pathogens with intrinsic antibiotic resistance. They are also well known as contaminants of disinfectants, yet their biocide susceptibility has not been studied in detail. We investigated Bcc biocide susceptibility and correlated it to their taxonomy, antibiotic susceptibility and ability to form biofilms. Methods Genetically distinct Bcc strains belonging to 12 of the defined species were examined. Biocide susceptibility was assessed by (i) broth dilution MIC assays, (ii) agar growth-based MBC screens and (iii) suspension tests. Antibiotic MIC was determined by Etest® strips, and the ability to form biofilms was examined in a 96-well plate assay. Results Biocide susceptibility varied across the Bcc complex with high MIC recorded for chlorhexidine (>100 mg/L), cetylpyridinium chloride (>200 mg/L), triclosan (>500 mg/L), benzalkonium chloride (>400 mg/L) and povidone (>50 000 mg/L). Species-dependent differences were apparent only for cetylpyridinium chloride. There was no correlation between biocide susceptibility and (i) antibiotic susceptibility or (ii) the ability to form biofilms. Biocide MBC was considerably higher than the MIC (chlorhexidine, 6-fold greater; cetylpyridinium chloride, 20-fold greater). Cystic fibrosis outbreak strains (Burkholderia multivorans Glasgow strain and Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12) possessed elevated chlorhexidine resistance, and Bcc bacteria were also shown to remain viable in current commercial biocide formulations. Conclusions Bcc bacteria are resistant to a wide range of biocides and further representatives of this group should be included as reference strains in the development of new anti-infectives and commercial formulations. PMID:19153076

  16. Spatially explicit shallow landslide susceptibility mapping over large areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.; Stock, Jonathan D.; McKean, Jim; Kazian, Brian; Hargrove, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in downscaling climate model precipitation predictions now yield spatially explicit patterns of rainfall that could be used to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility over large areas. In California, the United States Geological Survey is exploring community emergency response to the possible effects of a very large simulated storm event and to do so it has generated downscaled precipitation maps for the storm. To predict the corresponding pattern of shallow landslide susceptibility across the state, we have used the model Shalstab (a coupled steady state runoff and infinite slope stability model) which susceptibility spatially explicit estimates of relative potential instability. Such slope stability models that include the effects of subsurface runoff on potentially destabilizing pore pressure evolution require water routing and hence the definition of upslope drainage area to each potential cell. To calculate drainage area efficiently over a large area we developed a parallel framework to scale-up Shalstab and specifically introduce a new efficient parallel drainage area algorithm which produces seamless results. The single seamless shallow landslide susceptibility map for all of California was accomplished in a short run time, and indicates that much larger areas can be efficiently modelled. As landslide maps generally over predict the extent of instability for any given storm. Local empirical data on the fraction of predicted unstable cells that failed for observed rainfall intensity can be used to specify the likely extent of hazard for a given storm. This suggests that campaigns to collect local precipitation data and detailed shallow landslide location maps after major storms could be used to calibrate models and improve their use in hazard assessment for individual storms.

  17. Transition in magnetic fabric types in progressively deformed, fine-grained sedimentary rocks of Central Armorica (Brittany, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerinck, Tom; Hirt, Ann M.; Debacker, Timothy N.; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of progressively deformed, fine-grained sedimentary rocks is determined for different tectonometamorphic settings in Central Armorica (Brittany, France). Low-temperature AMS and high-field torque magnetometry on a representative selection of samples indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominantly paramagnetic and the ferromagnetic (s.l.) contribution can be neglected. The AMS documents a progressive transition of intermediate fabrics to tectonic fabrics and increasingly stronger developed tectonic fabrics. An integrated magnetic-mineralogical approach is performed in order to assess whether we can use this evolution as a quantitative indicator for the intensity of cleavage development in Central Armorica. During the magnetic fabric transition, the maximum susceptibility axis (K1) remains stationary oriented parallel to the bedding - cleavage intersection, whereas the minimum susceptibility axis (K3) orientation distribution changes from a moderate girdle distribution in the intermediate fabric types, to a strongly clustered distribution parallel to the cleavage pole for the tectonic fabric types. A Woodcock two-axis ratio plot is used to evaluate this change in K3 distribution. This shows a regional pattern with intermediate fabrics in the southern part of Central Armorica and tectonic fabrics in the northern part of Central Armorica. Quantitative analysis of the observed magnetic fabrics shows that the fabric transition described above is accompanied by an evolution from prolate susceptibility ellipsoids with a relatively low degree of anisotropy to oblate ellipsoid with an increasingly higher degree of anisotropy. In a graph of the shape parameter T against the corrected degree of anisotropy PJ, this evolution has a hockey-stick shaped pattern with the vertical branch reflecting the actual transition from intermediate to tectonic fabric type and the horizontal branch reflecting progressively stronger developed

  18. Sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Retschnig, Gina; Williams, Geoffrey R; Mehmann, Marion M; Yañez, Orlando; de Miranda, Joachim R; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related differences in susceptibility to pathogens are a common phenomenon in animals. In the eusocial Hymenoptera the two female castes, workers and queens, are diploid and males are haploid. The haploid susceptibility hypothesis predicts that haploid males are more susceptible to pathogen infections compared to females. Here we test this hypothesis using adult male (drone) and female (worker) honey bees (Apis mellifera), inoculated with the gut endoparasite Nosema ceranae and/or black queen cell virus (BQCV). These pathogens were chosen due to previously reported synergistic interactions between Nosema apis and BQCV. Our data do not support synergistic interactions between N. ceranae and BQCV and also suggest that BQCV has limited effect on both drone and worker health, regardless of the infection level. However, the data clearly show that, despite lower levels of N. ceranae spores in drones than in workers, Nosema-infected drones had both a higher mortality and a lower body mass than non-infected drones, across all treatment groups, while the mortality and body mass of worker bees were largely unaffected by N. ceranae infection, suggesting that drones are more susceptible to this pathogen than workers. In conclusion, the data reveal considerable sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees and highlight the importance of ultimate measures for determining susceptibility, such as mortality and body quality, rather than mere infection levels.

  19. Replication of Early B-cell Factor 1 (EBF1) Gene-by-psychosocial Stress Interaction Effects on Central Adiposity in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Central obesity plays a major role in the development of many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Chronic stress may be involved in the pathophysiology of central obesity. Although several large-scale genome-wide association studies have reported susceptibility genes for central adiposity, the effects of interactions between genes and psychosocial stress on central adiposity have rarely been examined. A recent study focusing on Caucasians discovered the novel gene early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), which was associated with central obesity-related traits via interactions with stress levels. We aimed to evaluate EBF1 gene-by-stress interaction effects on central adiposity traits, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT), in Korean adults. Methods A total of 1467 Korean adults were included in this study. We selected 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the EBF1 gene and analyzed their interactions with stress on central adiposity using additive, dominant, and recessive genetic modeling. Results The four SNPs that had strong linkage disequilibrium relationships (rs10061900, rs10070743, rs4704967, and rs10056564) demonstrated significant interactions with the waist-hip ratio in the dominant model (pint<0.007). In addition, two other SNPs (rs6556377 and rs13180086) were associated with VAT by interactions with stress levels, especially in the recessive genetic model (pint<0.007). As stress levels increased, the mean values of central adiposity traits according to SNP genotypes exhibited gradual but significant changes (p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that the common genetic variants for EBF1 are associated with central adiposity through interactions with stress levels, emphasizing the importance of managing stress in the prevention of central obesity. PMID:27744667

  20. Individual Differences in the Rubber Hand Illusion Are Related to Sensory Suggestibility

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Angela; Tinazzi, Michele; Cavedini, Clelia; Zampini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    In the rubber hand illusion (RHI), watching a rubber hand being stroked in synchrony with one’s own hidden hand may induce a sense of ownership over the rubber hand. The illusion relies on bottom-up multisensory integration of visual, tactile, and proprioceptive information, and on top-down processes through which the rubber hand is incorporated into pre-existing representations of the body. Although the degree of illusory experience varies largely across individuals, the factors influencing individual differences are unknown. We investigated whether sensory suggestibility might modulate susceptibility to the RHI. Sensory suggestibility is a personality trait related to how individuals react to sensory information. Because of its sensory nature, this trait could be relevant for studies using the RHI paradigm. Seventy healthy volunteers were classified by Sensory Suggestibility Scale (SSS) scores as having high or low suggestibility and assigned to either a high- (High-SSS) or a low-suggestibility (Low-SSS) group. Two components of the RHI were evaluated in synchronous and asynchronous stroking conditions: subjective experience of sense of ownership over the rubber hand via a 9-statement questionnaire, and proprioceptive drift as measured with a ruler. The High-SSS group was generally more susceptible to the subjective component; in the synchronous condition, they rated the statement assessing the sense of ownership higher than the Low-SSS group. The scores for this statement significantly correlated with the total SSS score, indicating that the higher the sensory suggestibility, the stronger the sense of ownership. No effect of sensory suggestibility on proprioceptive drift was observed, suggesting that the effect is specific for the subjective feeling of ownership. This study demonstrates that sensory suggestibility may contribute to participants’ experience of the illusion and should be considered when using the RHI paradigm. PMID:27977783

  1. Retrieval Can Increase or Decrease Suggestibility Depending on How Memory Is Tested: The Importance of Source Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jason C. K.; Wilford, Miko M.; Hughes, Katharine L.

    2012-01-01

    Taking an intervening test between learning episodes can enhance later source recollection. Paradoxically, testing can also increase people's susceptibility to the misinformation effect--a finding termed retrieval-enhanced suggestibility (RES, Chan, Thomas, & Bulevich, 2009). We conducted three experiments to examine this apparent contradiction.…

  2. Only skin deep: shared genetic response to the deadly chytrid fungus in susceptible frog species.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Poorten, Thomas J; Settles, Matthew; Murdoch, Gordon K

    2012-07-01

    Amphibian populations around the world are threatened by an emerging infectious pathogen, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). How can a fungal skin infection kill such a broad range of amphibian hosts? And do different host species have a similar response to Bd infection? Here, we use a genomics approach to understand the genetic response of multiple susceptible frog species to Bd infection. We characterize the transcriptomes of two closely related endangered frog species (Rana muscosa and Rana sierrae) and analyse whole genome expression profiles from frogs in controlled Bd infection experiments. We integrate the Rana results with a comparable data set from a more distantly related susceptible species (Silurana tropicalis). We demonstrate that Bd-infected frogs show massive disruption of skin function and show no evidence of a robust immune response. The genetic response to infection is shared across the focal susceptible species, suggesting a common effect of Bd on susceptible frogs.

  3. Calcium handling by platelets from normal and malignant hyperthermia-susceptible pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.E.; Brooks, R.R.; Bonk, K.R.; Carpenter, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Platelets from normal and malignant hyperthermia (MH)-susceptible pigs were evaluated for differences in {sup 45}calcium uptake in the absence or presence of caffeine, halothane, or halothane and caffeine together. There were no statistically significant differences in basal or halothane-inhibited calcium uptake by platelets from either source. There was a small statistically significant difference in calcium uptake between platelets from normal and MH-susceptible pigs in the presence of 16 mM caffeine and 0.5% halothane. Calcium uptake by platelets from one pedigree of MH-susceptible pigs were stimulated in a concentration-dependent manner by caffeine. These data suggest that exposure of platelets to caffeine may have potential for identifying MH-susceptibility.

  4. Centralize Printing, and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1984-01-01

    Describes the operations of a centralized printing office in a California school district. Centralization greatly increased the efficiency and lowered the cost of generating publications, information services, newsletters, and press releases throughout the school year. (TE)

  5. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    suggested that during first days in anaerobic conditions the susceptibility changes with time. The results demonstrate that assessing effects of antimicrobial treatments on resistance in the host’s enteric bacteria that are Gram negative facultative Anaerobe Bacilli requires data on the bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility in the conditions resembling those in the intestine. PMID:27191612

  7. Geostatistical Microscale Study of Magnetic Susceptibility in Soil Profile and Magnetic Indicators of Potential Soil Pollution.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Fabijańczyk, Piotr; Magiera, Tadeusz; Rachwał, Marzena

    Directional variograms, along the soil profile, can be useful and precise tool that can be used to increase the precision of the assessment of soil pollution. The detail analysis of spatial variability in the soil profile can be also an important part of the standardization of soil magnetometry as a screening method for an assessment of soil pollution related to the dust deposition. The goal of this study was to investigate the correlation between basic parameters of spatial correlations of magnetic susceptibility in the soil profile, such as a range of correlation and a sill, and selected magnetometric indicators of soil pollution. Magnetic indicators were an area under the curve of magnetic susceptibility versus a depth in the soil profile, values of magnetic susceptibility at depths ranging from 1 to 10 cm, and maximum and background values of magnetic susceptibility in the soil profile. These indicators were previously analyzed in the literature. The results showed that a range of correlation of magnetic susceptibility was significantly correlated with magnetic susceptibility measured at depths 1, 2, and 3 cm. It suggests that a range of correlation is a good measure of pollutants' dispersion in the soil profile. The sill of the variogram of magnetic susceptibility was found to be significantly correlated with the area under the curve of plot of magnetic susceptibility that is related to the soil pollution. In consequence, the parameters of microscale spatial variability of magnetic susceptibility in s soil profile are important measures that take into consideration the spatial aspect of s soil pollution.

  8. Central and peripheral demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Gulati, Natasha Singh

    2014-01-01

    Several conditions cause damage to the inherently normal myelin of central nervous system, perepheral nervous system or both central and perepheral nervous system and hence termed as central demyelinating diseases, perepheral demyelinating diseases and combined central and perepheral demyelinating diseases respectively. Here we analysed and foccused on the etiology, prevalance, incidence and age of these demyelinating disorders. Clinical attention and various diagnostic tests are needed to adequately assess all these possibilities. PMID:24741263

  9. Whole Brain Susceptibility Mapping Using Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Li, Wei; Guidon, Arnaud; Liu, Chunlei

    2011-01-01

    The derivation of susceptibility from image phase is hampered by the ill-conditioned filter inversion in certain k-space regions. In this paper, compressed sensing (CS) is used to compensate for the k-space regions where direct filter inversion is unstable. A significantly lower level of streaking artifacts is produced in the resulting susceptibility maps for both simulated and in vivo data sets compared to outcomes obtained using the direct threshold method. It is also demonstrated that the CS based method outperforms regularization based methods. The key difference between the regularized inversions and CS compensated inversions is that, in the former case, the entire k-space spectrum estimation is affected by the ill-conditioned filter inversion in certain k-space regions, whereas in the CS based method only the ill-conditioned k-space regions are estimated. In the susceptibility map calculated from the phase measurement obtained using a 3T scanner, not only are the iron-rich regions well depicted, but good contrast between white and gray matter interfaces that feature a low level of susceptibility variations are also obtained. The correlation between the iron content and the susceptibility levels in iron-rich deep nucleus regions is studied, and strong linear relationships are observed which agree with previous findings. PMID:21671269

  10. Role of reversible susceptibility in ferromagnetic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Carl S.

    2002-05-01

    An equation of state based upon saturation magnetization, Ms, coercive field, Hc, and the reversible susceptibility function of magnetization is proposed for ferromagnetic hysteresis. Reversible susceptibility divided by the initial susceptibility is the anisotropy function of magnetization, χr, ranging from one in the demagnetized state to zero at saturation, and varying with magnetic history. Its dependence on scaled magnetization, m=M/Ms on the interval (-1,1) varies with material, allowing characterization of anisotropy classes. Precise measurements have been made of reversible susceptibility, initial and saturate magnetization curves, and loops for Orthonol™, annealed 3% nickel steel and as-received 1018 steel, representing crystals, isotropic polycrystals and composite ferromagnets, respectively. Magnetization change is the product of the reversible susceptibility, change in the applied field and the cooperative function due to domain interactions. This function is 1+βm for the virgin curve with half this slope from any reversal, where β=Ms/XiHc is the hysteresis coefficient. Variation of β for 1018 steel is due to distributed coercivities, and causes sigmoid B(H) curves. In the scaled field representation, where h=H/Hc, the cooperative function is 1/(1-hχr), a hyperbolic field dependence smeared by the anisotropy function. Constant anisotropy causes closed hysteresis loops, while variable anisotropy causes creeping of cycled asymmetric loops. In ferromagnetism, 1/χ=1/χr-h, normal scaled reluctivity is reduced from its reversible value by the scaled field.

  11. Whole brain susceptibility mapping using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Li, Wei; Guidon, Arnaud; Liu, Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    The derivation of susceptibility from image phase is hampered by the ill-conditioned filter inversion in certain k-space regions. In this article, compressed sensing is used to compensate for the k-space regions where direct filter inversion is unstable. A significantly lower level of streaking artifacts is produced in the resulting susceptibility maps for both simulated and in vivo data sets compared to outcomes obtained using the direct threshold method. It is also demonstrated that the compressed sensing based method outperforms regularization based methods. The key difference between the regularized inversions and compressed sensing compensated inversions is that, in the former case, the entire k-space spectrum estimation is affected by the ill-conditioned filter inversion in certain k-space regions, whereas in the compressed sensing based method only the ill-conditioned k-space regions are estimated. In the susceptibility map calculated from the phase measurement obtained using a 3T scanner, not only are the iron-rich regions well depicted, but good contrast between white and gray matter interfaces that feature a low level of susceptibility variations are also obtained. The correlation between the iron content and the susceptibility levels in iron-rich deep nucleus regions is studied, and strong linear relationships are observed which agree with previous findings.

  12. Antianaerobic Antimicrobials: Spectrum and Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Hannah M.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria recovered from selected cases can influence the choice of antimicrobial therapy. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has standardized many laboratory procedures, including anaerobic susceptibility testing (AST), and has published documents for AST. The standardization of testing methods by the CLSI allows comparisons of resistance trends among various laboratories. Susceptibility testing should be performed on organisms recovered from sterile body sites, those that are isolated in pure culture, or those that are clinically important and have variable or unique susceptibility patterns. Organisms that should be considered for individual isolate testing include highly virulent pathogens for which susceptibility cannot be predicted, such as Bacteroides, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, and Clostridium spp.; Bilophila wadsworthia; and Sutterella wadsworthensis. This review describes the current methods for AST in research and reference laboratories. These methods include the use of agar dilution, broth microdilution, Etest, and the spiral gradient endpoint system. The antimicrobials potentially effective against anaerobic bacteria include beta-lactams, combinations of beta-lactams and beta-lactamase inhibitors, metronidazole, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, macrolides, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones. The spectrum of efficacy, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and resistance patterns against these agents are described. PMID:23824372

  13. Chinese hyper-susceptibility to vection-induced motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Leblanc, Ree; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that control individual differences in susceptible to motion sickness. A serendipitous observation in our laboratory that most Chinese subjects become motion sick prompted this study. We used a rotating optokinetic drum to provoke motion sickness and compared gastric responses and symptom reports of Chinese, European-American, and African-American subjects. There was no difference in the responses of European-American and African-American subjects; however, Chinese subjects showed significantly greater disturbances in gastric activity and reported significantly more severe symptoms. We suggest that this hypersusceptibility presents a natural model for the study of physiological mechanisms of nausea and other symptoms of motion sickness.

  14. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  15. Bayesian multinomial probit modeling of daily windows of susceptibility for maternal PM2.5 exposure and congenital heart defects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past epidemiologic studies suggest maternal ambient air pollution exposure during critical periods of the pregnancy is associated with fetal development. We introduce a multinomial probit model that allows for the joint identification of susceptible daily periods during the pregn...

  16. Enhancement by Nalidixic Acid of the Thermal Susceptibility of the Ts-7 Mutant of Escherichia Coli TAU-Bar

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Mikio; Mishima, Yukio; Kawada, Jun; Yielding, K. Lemone

    1975-01-01

    Nadilidixic acid at 5 × 10−6 M produced a substantial increase in thermal susceptibility of Ts-7, suggesting either that the thermal and nalidixic acid targets are identical or closely interdependent. PMID:1101825

  17. Differential Susceptibility Experiments: Going beyond Correlational Evidence--Comment on beyond Mental Health, Differential Susceptibility Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2012-01-01

    Reviewing the studies on differential susceptibility presented in this section, we argue that the time is ripe to go beyond correlational designs to differential susceptibility experiments. In such experiments, randomization prevents hidden moderator effects on the environment and guarantees the independence of moderator and outcome, while the…

  18. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A; Yeom, Kristen W; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging.

  19. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  20. Bipolar disorder: idioms of susceptibility and disease and the role of 'genes' in illness explanations.

    PubMed

    Baart, Ingrid; Widdershoven, Guy

    2013-11-01

    This qualitative study explores (1) how members of the Dutch Association for People with Bipolar Disorder explain the affliction of bipolar disorder; (2) the relationship between genetic, environmental and personal factors in these explanations and (3) the relationship between illness explanations, self-management and identity. A total of 40 participants took part in seven different focus group discussions. The results demonstrate that there are two different explanatory idioms, each one centred around an opposing concept, that is, susceptibility and disease. Individuals who construct explanations around the concept of 'disease' attach more importance to 'genes and chemicals' than to environmental components in the onset of the disorder, whereas individuals adhering to the central concept of 'susceptibility' tend to do this much less. Compared with individuals using the 'susceptibility' idiom, those who use a 'disease' idiom tend to observe fewer possibilities for self-management and are less inclined to construct normalcy through a quest for personal growth. Stories of suffering seem more integral to the 'disease' idiom than to the 'susceptibility' idiom. The 'disease' idiom seems less integrated in a contemporary surveillance psychiatric discourse than the 'susceptibility' idiom; however, both vocabularies can offer normative constraints.

  1. ORCHIDS: an Observational Randomized Controlled Trial on Childhood Differential Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes). However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-)environment interactions to obtain more insight into a) moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b) behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-)environment interactions in an experimental design. Methods/Design The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training). In a screening, families with children aged 4–8 who show mild to (sub)clinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest), after 6 months (i.e., posttest), and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up). Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-)environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s) received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and will manifest

  2. The comparison between a ground based and a space based probabilistic landslide susceptibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, P.; Mondini, A.; Guzzetti, F.; Rossi, M.; Ardizzone, F.; Cardinali, M.

    2009-04-01

    Probabilistic landslide susceptibility assessments attempt to predict the location and threat posed by known landslides. Under the assumption that landslides will occur in the future because of the same conditions that produced them in the past, geomorphologists use susceptibility assessments to predict the location of future landslides. We present an attempt to exploit satellite data to prepare a landslide susceptibility zonation for a the Collazzone area that extends for 79 sq km in the Umbria region, Central Italy. For the study area we have prepared a map of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) obtained by processing raw NIR and RED channels (b2 and b3 bands) at 15 m x 15 m resolution of an image acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), on board the TERRA satellite, and a map of Land Surface Temperature (LST) obtained by processing raw TIR channels (b11 to b15 bands) at 90 m × 90 m resolution from the same image. Both maps, in general proxy for soil moisture maps, were obtained through standard algorithms. As expected, there is a strong correspondence between NDVI and LST, but, when the NDVI does not change, elevation effects and others are predominant in LST. For the Collazzone area we prepared two different susceptibility models. The first was prepared through multivariate analysis of thematic data (including morphometry, lithology, structure and land use) obtained through traditional methods, primarily the interpretation of aerial photographs and field work. The second susceptibility model was prepared using terrain morphology and information obtained processing satellite data. The two models were compared in term of model fit and model performance and were validated exploiting landslide inventories not used to build the models. The two susceptibility models are very similar from a geographic and a classification point of view. This is good news, as it tells us that for landslide susceptibility

  3. How interviewers' nonverbal behaviors can affect children's perceptions and suggestibility.

    PubMed

    Almerigogna, Jehanne; Ost, James; Akehurst, Lucy; Fluck, Mike

    2008-05-01

    We conducted two studies to examine how interviewers' nonverbal behaviors affect children's perceptions and suggestibility. In the first study, 42 8- to 10-year-olds watched video clips showing an interviewer displaying combinations of supportive and nonsupportive nonverbal behaviors and were asked to rate the interviewer on six attributes (e.g., friendliness, strictness). Smiling received high ratings on the positive attributes (i.e., friendly, helpful, and sincere), and fidgeting received high ratings on the negative attributes (i.e., strict, bored, and stressed). For the second study, 86 8- to 10-year-olds participated in a learning activity about the vocal chords. One week later, they were interviewed individually about the activity by an interviewer adopting either the supportive (i.e., smiling) or nonsupportive (i.e., fidgeting) behavior. Children questioned by the nonsupportive interviewer were less accurate and more likely to falsely report having been touched than were those questioned by the supportive interviewer. Children questioned by the supportive interviewer were also more likely to say that they did not know an answer than were children questioned by the nonsupportive interviewer. Participants in both conditions gave more correct answers to questions about central, as opposed to peripheral, details of the activity. Implications of these findings for the appropriate interviewing of child witnesses are discussed.

  4. Psychiatric vulnerability: suggestions from animal models and role of neurotrophins.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Enrico; Francia, Nadia

    2009-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well-studied neurotrophins involved in the neurogenesis, differentiation, growth and maintenance of selected peripheral and central populations of neuronal cells during development and at adulthood. Neurotrophins, in concert to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, play a key role in modulating brain plasticity and behavioral coping, especially during ontogenetic critical periods, when developing brain is particularly sensitive to external stimulations. Indeed, early life events, such psychophysical stress, affect NGF and BDNF levels, and induce dysregulation of the HPA axis. Thus, early life experiences can affect brain development, contributing to shape interindividual differences in vulnerability to stress or psychiatric disorders. At adulthood, intermale aggressive interactions in mice, representing a psychosocial stressful condition, has been shown to markedly alter NGF and BDNF levels both in plasma as well as in selected brain areas, including the hypothalamus and hippocampus. These results have been extended to humans, showing that blood NGF levels are enhanced in psychological contexts mainly associated to anxiety and fear, such as first skydiving experience. Recent studies indicate a role for neurotrophins also in vulnerability and resilience to stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. Overall, these findings suggest a role of neurotrophins as factors mediating both short- and long-term experience effects on brain structure and function.

  5. Basal Ganglia Calcification with Tetanic Seizure Suggest Mitochondrial Disorder.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Enzelsberger, Barbara; Bastowansky, Adam

    2017-04-09

    BACKGROUND Basal ganglia calcification (BGC) is a rare sporadic or hereditary central nervous system (CNS) abnormality, characterized by symmetric or asymmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 65-year-old Gypsy female who was admitted for a tetanic seizure, and who had a history of polyneuropathy, restless-leg syndrome, retinopathy, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, osteoporosis with consecutive hyperkyphosis, cervicalgia, lumbalgia, struma nodosa requiring thyroidectomy and consecutive hypothyroidism, adipositas, resection of a vocal chord polyp, arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease, atheromatosis of the aorta, peripheral artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steatosis hepatis, mild renal insufficiency, long-term hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, impingement syndrome, spondylarthrosis of the lumbar spine, and hysterectomy. History and clinical presentation suggested a mitochondrial defect which also manifested as hypoparathyroidism or Fanconi syndrome resulting in BGC. After substitution of calcium, no further tetanic seizures occurred. CONCLUSIONS Patients with BGC should be investigated for a mitochondrial disorder. A mitochondrial disorder may also manifest as tetanic seizure.

  6. Niche convergence suggests functionality of the nocturnal fovea

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Gillian L.; Melin, Amanda D.; Tuh Yit Yu, Fred; Bernard, Henry; Ong, Perry S.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The fovea is a declivity of the retinal surface associated with maximum visual acuity. Foveae are widespread across vertebrates, but among mammals they are restricted to haplorhine primates (tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans), which are primarily diurnal. Thus primates have long contributed to the view that foveae are functional adaptations to diurnality. The foveae of tarsiers, which are nocturnal, are widely interpreted as vestigial traits and therefore evidence of a diurnal ancestry. This enduring premise is central to adaptive hypotheses on the origins of anthropoid primates; however, the question of whether tarsier foveae are functionless anachronisms or nocturnal adaptations remains open. To explore this question, we compared the diets of tarsiers (Tarsius) and scops owls (Otus), taxa united by numerous anatomical homoplasies, including foveate vision. A functional interpretation of these homoplasies predicts dietary convergence. We tested this prediction by analyzing stable isotope ratios that integrate dietary information. In Borneo and the Philippines, the stable carbon isotope compositions of Tarsius and Otus were indistinguishable, whereas the stable nitrogen isotope composition of Otus was marginally higher than that of Tarsius. Our results indicate that species in both genera consumed mainly ground-dwelling prey. Taken together, our findings support a functional interpretation of the many homoplasies shared by tarsiers and scops owls, including a retinal fovea. We suggest that the fovea might function similarly in tarsiers and scops owls by calibrating the auditory localization pathway. The integration of auditory localization and visual fixation during prey detection and acquisition might be critical at low light levels. PMID:25120441

  7. Cross Fostering Experiments Suggest That Mice Songs Are Innate

    PubMed Central

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Nakanishi, Kaori; Nakagawa, Ryoko; Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Background Vocal learning is a central functional constituent of human speech, and recent studies showing that adult male mice emit ultrasonic sound sequences characterized as “songs” have suggested that the ultrasonic courtship sounds of mice provide a mammalian model of vocal learning. Objectives We tested whether mouse songs are learned, by examining the relative role of rearing environment in a cross-fostering experiment. Methods and Findings We found that C57BL/6 and BALB/c males emit a clearly different pattern of songs with different frequency and syllable compositions; C57BL/6 males showed a higher peak frequency of syllables, shorter intervals between syllables, and more upward frequency modulations with jumps, whereas BALB/c males produced more “chevron” and “harmonics” syllables. To establish the degree of environmental influences in mouse song development, sons of these two strains were cross-fostered to another strain of parents. Songs were recorded when these cross-fostered pups were fully developed and their songs were compared with those of male mice reared by the genetic parents. The cross-fostered animals sang songs with acoustic characteristics - including syllable interval, peak frequency, and modulation patterns - similar to those of their genetic parents. In addition their song elements retained sequential characteristics similar to those of their genetic parents' songs. Conclusion These results do not support the hypothesis that mouse “song” is learned; we found no evidence for vocal learning of any sort under the conditions of this experiment. Our observation that the strain-specific character of the song profile persisted even after changing the developmental auditory environment suggests that the structure of these courtship sound sequences is under strong genetic control. Thus, the usefulness of mouse “song” as a model of mammalian vocal learning is limited, but mouse song has the potential to be an indispensable model

  8. Endocrine correlates of susceptibility to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Motion sickness releases ACTH, epinerphrine, and norepinephrine. The endocrine responses to motion sickness, adaptive responses leading to the resolution of the syndrome, and the way in which antimotion-sickness drugs influence the endocrine responses were studied. Susceptible or insusceptible subjects were administered antimotion-sickness drugs prior to stressful stimulation. Insusceptible subjects displayed more pronounced elevations of ACTH, epinephrine, and norepinephrine after stressful motion. Predrug levels of ACTH were higher in insusceptible subjects (p less than 0.01). Acute blockade of hormone responses to stressful motion or alteration of levels of ACTH by drugs were not correlated with individual susceptibility. No correlation was apparent between epinephrine and ACTH release. These endocrine differences may represent neurochemical markers for susceptibility to motion, stress, or general adaptability, and it may be that the chronic modulation of their levels might be more effective in preventing motion sickness than the acute blockage or stimulation of specific receptors.

  9. Light scalar susceptibilities and isospin breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, R. Torres; Nicola, A. Gomez

    2010-12-28

    Making a thermal analysis in the context of NLO SU(3) Chiral Perturbation Theory we see that isospin breaking (IB) corrections (both electromagnetic and QCD ones) to quark condensates are of order O(e{sup 2}) and O({epsilon}), with {epsilon} the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing angle. However the combination {chi}{sub uu}-{chi}{sub ud} of flavour breaking susceptibilities, which vanishes in the isospin limit and can be identified essentially with the connected susceptibility, has an order O(1) contribution enhanced with T because of the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}) mixing. Finally we present a thermal sum rule that relates quark condensate ratios and the light scalar susceptibility without IB, {chi}(T)-{chi}(0).

  10. Introduction to cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes.

    PubMed

    McGee, Rose B; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-12-02

    The last 30 years have witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, including those that predispose to hematopoietic malignancies. The identification and characterization of families affected by these syndromes is enhancing our knowledge of the oncologic and nononcologic manifestations associated with predisposing germ line mutations and providing insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Here, we provide an overview of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, focusing on aspects relevant to the evaluation of patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Guidance is provided to facilitate recognition of these syndromes by hematologists/oncologists, including descriptions of the family history features, tumor genotype, and physical or developmental findings that should raise concern for an underlying cancer genetic syndrome. The clinical implications and management challenges associated with cancer susceptibility syndromes are also discussed.

  11. Magnetic Susceptibility in the Vertebral Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, F.; Nagele, T.; Lutz, O.; Pfeffer, K.; Giehl, J.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic resonance method is described which provides good-quality field-mapping images of the spine, although the in vivo signals from red bone marrow of the vertebral bodies exhibit similar fractions of lipid and water protons with their chemical-shift difference of 3.4 ppm. The susceptibilities of bone marrow and intervertebral disks were examined in 20 cadaveric human spines, 9 healthy volunteers, and 9 patients with degenerative disk alterations. The influence of geometrical properties was studied in cylindrical spine phantoms of different size and contents with different susceptibility. The measurements reveal interindividual differences of the susceptibility of the intervertebral disks in healthy subjects. Three out of nine degenerated disks with low signal in T2-weighted spin-echo images showed irregularities of the field distribution within the nucleus pulposus.

  12. Superficial scald susceptibility and a-farnesene metabolism in ‘Bartlett’ pears grown in California and Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Bartlett’ pears grown in northern California (CA) consistently show development of the physiological storage disorder superficial scald, particularly after prolonged storage of 4–5 months in air. In contrast, fruit of this cultivar grown in central Washington (WA) are typically less susceptible to ...

  13. National landslide susceptibility map for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glade, T.; Dikau, R.; Bell, R.

    2003-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility is generally based on historical data and field mapping, Resulting maps usually cover regions ranging between local and regional scales. However, also national scale analysis is important to delineate regions most prone to landsliding. Herein it is crucial to define the parameters, which are most important within this scale, and indeed, which can be derived from national data sets. This study aims to demonstrate a method on how to obtain national scale landslide susceptibility maps. In this study, German landslide literature was extensively reviewed. Due to the varying nature of the different sources and publications, only the information on lithology and slope angle was compiled. To include local knowledge, returned questionnaires send to experts in landslide research were evaluated and respective information summarized. For regions with no information, generalized geotechnical properties for existing lithology were applied. Additionally, a geological map at a scale of 1:1.000.000 and a nationwide digital terrain model with a resolution of 25 m x 25 m were available. The combination of slope angle and lithology was qualitatively classified in negligible, minor, moderate and high landslide susceptibility classes and applied to the data. Due to the resolution of the geology map, the 25 m resolution has been aggregated to 150 m, which seemed appropriate considering the extend of most of the landslides. Coastal landslide susceptibility has been derived from an existing data set. The map delineates areas of different landslide susceptibilities. The regions include cuestas, steep slopes in rolling midland topography and in the Alps, as well as slopes of deeply dissected rivers. Work in progress includes an evaluation of the calculated landslide susceptibility map using regional data sets. Although it is a preliminary result, this study presents the potential of such maps for planning and management purposes.

  14. Central obesity and health-related factors among middle-aged men: a comparison among native Japanese and Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil and Japan.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, Andiara; Nakata, Yoshio; Ito, Lucy S; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek J; Erb, Christopher T; Shigematsu, Ryosuke; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Shinjo, Samuel K; Uno, Miyuki; Marie, Suely K N; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of different cultural environments on the development of obesity by examining the association of central obesity, lifestyle, and selected coronary risk factors among people with identical Japanese genetic backgrounds living in Japan and Brazil. One hundred and four native Japanese and 286 Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil and Japan aged 35 years or over were studied. Obesity, metabolic risk factors for coronary disease, and history of regular sports activity, daily physical activity, and eating habits were assessed. The results showed Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil with significantly higher waist circumference values, and greater prevalence of central obesity compared to native Japanese and Japanese-Brazilians residing in Japan. The risk of developing central obesity was found to be 2.8 times higher among Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil. However, this association was no longer found to be significant after adjusting for lifestyle factors in the logistic model. Additionally, waist circumference was found to be significantly associated with metabolic risk factors for coronary disease. These findings suggest substantial variation in measures of central obesity among the three groups of Japanese ancestry, and underscore the heterogeneity of risk factors among communities of Japanese ancestry living in different cultural environments. The results also suggest that immigrant men exposed to the Brazilian cultural environment are more susceptible to the development of central obesity, and it seems to be associated with various lifestyle items and metabolic risk factors for coronary disease.

  15. Homeostasis, Inflammation, and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Kotas, Maya E.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    While modernization has dramatically increased lifespan, it has also witnessed the increasing prevalence of diseases such as obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Such chronic, acquired diseases result when normal physiologic control goes awry and may thus be viewed as failures of homeostasis. However, while nearly every process in human physiology relies on homeostatic mechanisms for stability, only some have demonstrated vulnerability to dysregulation. Additionally, chronic inflammation is a common accomplice of the diseases of homeostasis, yet the basis for this connection is not fully understood. Here we review the design of homeostatic systems and discuss universal features of control circuits that operate at the cellular, tissue and organismal levels. We suggest a framework for classification of homeostatic signals that is based on different classes of homeostatic variables they report on. Finally, we discuss how adaptability of homeostatic systems with adjustable set points creates vulnerability to dysregulation and disease. This framework highlights the fundamental parallels between homeostatic and inflammatory control mechanisms and provides a new perspective on the physiological origin of inflammation. PMID:25723161

  16. Central Gain Control in Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Benjamin D.; Rodrigues, Paulo V.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss induced by noise or ototoxic drug exposure reduces the neural activity transmitted from the cochlea to the central auditory system. Despite a reduced cochlear output, neural activity from more central auditory structures is paradoxically enhanced at suprathreshold intensities. This compensatory increase in the central auditory activity in response to the loss of sensory input is referred to as central gain enhancement. Enhanced central gain is hypothesized to be a potential mechanism that gives rise to hyperacusis and tinnitus, two debilitating auditory perceptual disorders that afflict millions of individuals. This review will examine the evidence for gain enhancement in the central auditory system in response to cochlear damage. Further, it will address the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this enhancement and discuss the contribution of central gain enhancement to tinnitus and hyperacusis. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms with distinct temporal and spectral profiles are likely to contribute to central gain enhancement. Dissecting the contributions of these different mechanisms at different levels of the central auditory system is essential for elucidating the role of central gain enhancement in tinnitus and hyperacusis and, most importantly, the development of novel treatments for these disorders. PMID:25386157

  17. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Wanke, Bodo; Guarro, Josep

    2004-10-01

    We have determined the in vitro susceptibilities of 57 strains of Cryptococcus gattii to nine antifungal agents and have compared the MICs for these strains with those for C. neoformans. MICs were determined by a microdilution reference method. Albaconazole and ravuconazole (MICs of 0.04 and 0.05 microg/ml, respectively) showed the best activities. Micafungin showed no activity (MIC of >128 microg/ml). In general, C. gattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans to all drugs tested, with the exception of amphotericin B and flucytosine.

  18. Magnetic Susceptibility of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsuneya

    2017-02-01

    The orbital magnetic susceptibility is calculated in collapsed carbon nanotubes within an effective-mass scheme for two magnetic-field configurations, perpendicular and parallel to the flattened plane. The response is diamagnetic in both directions and is much larger for the perpendicular configuration, with some rare exceptions. In chiral nanotubes, calculated results show small and almost negligible effects of collapsing except for some modification due to change in the effective magnetic field. In nonchiral zigzag and armchair nanotubes, the susceptibility is strongly modified, depending on relative displacement of two layers in the flattened region.

  19. Population screening for genetic susceptibility to disease.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A.

    1995-01-01

    Genetic screening for susceptibility to common diseases, such as the common cancers, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, may soon be technically feasible. Commercial interests should not be allowed to introduce such screening before proper evaluation or without adequate counselling and support. The evaluation of such testing should include psychosocial and medical outcomes and outcomes for those given low risks as well as high risks. These tests may distract attention away from environmental factors contributing to disease, for which social and political measures may be more appropriate than individualised susceptibility screening and lifestyle modification. PMID:7613325

  20. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Trilles, Luciana; Fernández-Torres, Belkys; dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Wanke, Bodo; Guarro, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the in vitro susceptibilities of 57 strains of Cryptococcus gattii to nine antifungal agents and have compared the MICs for these strains with those for C. neoformans. MICs were determined by a microdilution reference method. Albaconazole and ravuconazole (MICs of 0.04 and 0.05 μg/ml, respectively) showed the best activities. Micafungin showed no activity (MIC of >128 μg/ml). In general, C. gattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans to all drugs tested, with the exception of amphotericin B and flucytosine. PMID:15472349

  1. [Methods for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Dannaoui, Eric

    2006-01-01

    During the last years, a large amount of work has been completed to improve the methods used for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing. Reference techniques are currently available both for yeasts and filamentous fungi, but in some instances, technical improvement are needed. Etest is another well standardized method that can be used as an alternative on a routine basis in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Studies of in vitro-in vivo correlations have led to the definition of susceptibility breakpoints for yeasts for fluconazole, itraconazole, and flucytosine.

  2. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  3. Fidelity susceptibility as holographic PV-criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Davood; Faizal, Mir; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that entropy can be used to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. In this paper, we will use complexity to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. Thus, we will analyze the relation among holographic complexity, fidelity susceptibility, and thermodynamics in extended phase space. We will demonstrate that fidelity susceptibility (which is the informational complexity dual to a maximum volume in AdS) can be related to the thermodynamical volume (which is conjugate to the cosmological constant in the extended thermodynamic phase space). Thus, this letter establishes a relation among geometry, thermodynamics, and information theory, using complexity.

  4. The baryonic susceptibility near critical temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shu

    2010-08-05

    We discuss the role of quarks and baryons near the QCD phase transition. The former is modelled in the spirit of PNJL model, while the latter is splitted into two classes: 'stringy' and 'non-stringy' baryons. We represent the non-stringy baryons by a sum over the resonance on equal footing, and obtain the density of states of stringy baryons from string inspired model at finite-T. Our model produce a rise and fall of baryonic contribution to the susceptibility, which is in qualitative agreement with lattice results. We also discuss the chiral effect on the baryonic mass and susceptibility.

  5. Susceptibility of large populations of coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    It is an important and interesting problem to elucidate how the degree of phase order in a large population of coupled oscillators responds to a synchronizing periodic force from the outside. Here this problem is studied analytically as well as numerically by introducing the concept of susceptibility for globally coupled phase oscillators with either nonrandom or random interactions. It is shown that the susceptibility diverges at the critical point in the nonrandom case with Widom's equality satisfied, while it exhibits a cusp in the most random case.

  6. Hypnotic induction is followed by state-like changes in the organization of EEG functional connectivity in the theta and beta frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Graham A; Burgess, Adrian P

    2014-01-01

    Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information) between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs) and 11 low susceptible (lows) participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH) and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH), which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1-3.9 Hz), theta (4-7.9 Hz) alpha (8-12.9 Hz), beta1 (13-19.9 Hz), beta2 (20-29.9 Hz) and gamma (30-45 Hz). The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized "hypnotic-state."

  7. Hypnotic induction is followed by state-like changes in the organization of EEG functional connectivity in the theta and beta frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Graham A.; Burgess, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information) between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs) and 11 low susceptible (lows) participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH) and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH), which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1–3.9 Hz), theta (4–7.9 Hz) alpha (8–12.9 Hz), beta1 (13–19.9 Hz), beta2 (20–29.9 Hz) and gamma (30–45 Hz). The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized “hypnotic-state.” PMID:25104928

  8. Methodology for Elaborating Regional Susceptibility Maps of Slope Instability: the State of Guerrero (mexico) Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Huesca, A. E.; Ferrés, D.; Domínguez-M, L.

    2013-05-01

    Numerous cases of different types of slope instability occur every year in the mountain areas of México. Sometimes these instabilities severely affect the exposed communities, roads and infrastructure, causing deaths and serious material damage, mainly in the states of Puebla, Veracruz, Oaxaca, Guerrero and Chiapas, at the central and south sectors of the country. The occurrence of the slope instability is the result of the combination of climatic, geologic, hydrologic, geomorphologic and anthropogenic factors. The National Center for Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) is developing several projects in order to offer civil protection authorities of the Mexican states some methodologies to address the hazard assessment for different natural phenomena in a regional level. In this framework, during the past two years, a methodology was prepared to construct susceptibility maps for slope instability at regional (≤ 1:100 000) and national (≤ 1:1 000 000) levels. This research was addressed in accordance to the criteria established by the International Association of Engineering Geology, which is the highest international authority in this topic. The state of Guerrero has been taken as a pilot scheme to elaborate the susceptibility map for slope instability at a regional level. The major constraints considered in the methodology to calculate susceptibility are: a) the slope of the surface, b) the geology and c) the land use, which were integrated using a Geographic Information System (GIS). The arithmetic sum and weighting factors to obtain the final susceptibility map were based on the average values calculated in the individual study of several cases of slope instability occurred in the state in the past decade. For each case, the evaluation format proposed by CENAPRED in 2006 in the "Guía Básica para la elaboración de Atlas Estatales y Municipales de Peligros y Riesgos" to evaluate instabilities in a local level, was applied. The resulting susceptibility map shows

  9. Does Titan's Slightly Oblate Shape suggest a Capture Origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini radar observations show that Titan is slightly oblate (Zebker et al, 2009 Science 324 921). The average polar radius falls short of the expected value by 120 m. The synchronously rotating ellipsoid of uniform density that best matches Titan’s shape has a spin rate that is 1.12 times faster than the present rate. Next, a freely-spinning, uniform-density, oblate spheroid of Titan’s mass and mean size which best fits the satellite’s shape has a polar radius which equals the observed value exactly. The spin rate of this hydrostatic equilibrium object is 1.97 times the present value. These calculation are based on the theory of rotating fluid satellites developed by Dermott (1988, Icarus 37 575). The Titan shape data, along with the existence of the non-zero value of the eccentricity of Titan’s orbit, re-awaken the possibility that Titan did not originally condense in orbit about Saturn (Prentice, 1980 JPL Publication 80-80; 1984 Earth, Moon and Planets 30 209). Instead, it is suggested that Titan first condensed as a secondary solid embryo within the gas ring that was shed by protosolar cloud (hereafter PSC) at Saturn’s orbital distance from the Sun. By forming in a free orbit about the PSC, Titan’s shape would have initially been that of an oblate spheroid, like Ceres. Next, the condensate that forms in the PSC gas ring of temperature 94 K consists of anhydrous rock (mass fraction 0.4925), water ice (0.4739) and graphite (0.0336). Its mean density at 94 K is 1.5221 g/cm3 (Prentice, 2006 Publ. Astron. Soc. Australia 23 1; 2007 38th LPSC, 2402.pdf). The gravity measurements of Iess et al (2010 Science 327 1367) have revealed that the interior of Titan is in a state of incomplete separation between the rock and ice phases. The axial moment of inertia is C/MR2 = 0.342. The gravity data suggest that the interior of Titan is cold and that its structure consists of a central core of rock and ice that is surmounted by a mantle of pure ice. The non

  10. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF−/−) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF−/− mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection. PMID:28280495

  11. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF(-/-)) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF(-/-) mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection.

  12. Genetic Characterization of Optochin-Susceptible Viridans Group Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; Balsalobre, Luz; Fenoll, Asunción; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2003-01-01

    Two clinical isolates of viridans group streptococci (VS) with different degrees of susceptibility to optochin (OPT), i.e., fully OPT-susceptible (Opts) VS strain 1162/99 (for which the MIC was equal to that for Streptococcus pneumoniae, 0.75 μg/ml) and intermediate Opts VS strain 1174/97 (MIC, 6 μg/ml) were studied. Besides being OPT susceptible, they showed characteristics typical of VS, such as bile insolubility; lack of reaction with pneumococcal capsular antibodies; and lack of hybridization with rRNA (AccuProbe)-, lytA-, and pnl-specific pneumococcal probes. However, these VS Opts strains and VS type strains hybridized with ant, a gene not present in S. pneumoniae. A detailed characterization of the genes encoding the 16S rRNA and SodA classified isolates 1162/99 and 1174/97 as Streptococcus mitis. Analysis of the atpCAB region, which encodes the c, a, and b subunits of the F0F1 H+-ATPase, the target of optochin, revealed high degrees of similarity between S. mitis 1162/99 and S. pneumoniae in atpC, atpA, and the N terminus of atpB. Moreover, amino acid identity between S. mitis 1174/97 and S. pneumoniae was found in α helix 5 of the a subunit. The organization of the chromosomal region containing the atp operon of the two Opts VS and VS type strains was spr1284-atpC, with spr1284 being located 296 to 556 bp from atpC, whereas in S. pneumoniae this distance was longer than 68 kb. In addition, the gene order in S. pneumoniae was IS1239-74 bp-atpC. The results suggest that the full OPT susceptibility of S. mitis 1162/99 is due to the acquisition of atpC, atpA, and part of atpB from S. pneumoniae and that the intermediate OPT susceptibility of S. mitis 1174/97 correlates with the amino acid composition of its a subunit. PMID:14506029

  13. Global Association between Thermophilicity and Vancomycin Susceptibility in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chayan; Alam, Masrure; Mandal, Subhrangshu; Haldar, Prabir K.; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Roy, Rimi; Rameez, Moidu J.; Misra, Anup K.; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Nanda, Ashish K.; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra K.; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of the aquatic microbiota of several circum-neutral (6.0–8.5 pH) mid-temperature (55–85°C) springs revealed rich diversities of phylogenetic relatives of mesophilic bacteria, which surpassed the diversity of the truly-thermophilic taxa. To gain insight into the potentially-thermophilic adaptations of the phylogenetic relatives of Gram-negative mesophilic bacteria detected in culture-independent investigations we attempted pure-culture isolation by supplementing the enrichment media with 50 μg ml−1 vancomycin. Surprisingly, this Gram-positive-specific antibiotic eliminated the entire culturable-diversity of chemoorganotrophic and sulfur-chemolithotrophic bacteria present in the tested hot water inocula. Moreover, it also killed all the Gram-negative hot-spring isolates that were obtained in vancomycin-free media. Concurrent literature search for the description of Gram-negative thermophilic bacteria revealed that at least 16 of them were reportedly vancomycin-susceptible. While these data suggested that vancomycin-susceptibility could be a global trait of thermophilic bacteria (irrespective of their taxonomy, biogeography and Gram-character), MALDI Mass Spectroscopy of the peptidoglycans of a few Gram-negative thermophilic bacteria revealed that tandem alanines were present in the fourth and fifth positions of their muropeptide precursors (MPPs). Subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed a close affinity between the D-alanine-D-alanine ligases (Ddl) of taxonomically-diverse Gram-negative thermophiles and the thermostable Ddl protein of Thermotoga maritima, which is well-known for its high specificity for alanine over other amino acids. The Ddl tree further illustrated a divergence between the homologs of Gram-negative thermophiles and mesophiles, which broadly coincided with vancomycin-susceptibility and vancomycin-resistance respectively. It was thus hypothesized that thermophilic Ddls have been evolutionarily selected to favor a D

  14. Differential Susceptibilities of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus from the Americas to Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vazeille, Marie; Yebakima, André; Girod, Romain; Goindin, Daniella; Dupont-Rouzeyrol, Myrielle; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the major outbreak in 2007 in the Yap Island, Zika virus (ZIKV) causing dengue-like syndromes has affected multiple islands of the South Pacific region. In May 2015, the virus was detected in Brazil and then spread through South and Central America. In December 2015, ZIKV was detected in French Guiana and Martinique. The aim of the study was to evaluate the vector competence of the mosquito spp. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus from the Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe), North America (southern United States), South America (Brazil, French Guiana) for the currently circulating Asian genotype of ZIKV isolated from a patient in April 2014 in New Caledonia. Methodology/Principal Findings Mosquitoes were orally exposed to an Asian genotype of ZIKV (NC-2014-5132). Upon exposure, engorged mosquitoes were maintained at 28°±1°C, a 16h:8h light:dark cycle and 80% humidity. 25–30 mosquitoes were processed at 4, 7 and 14 days post-infection (dpi). Mosquito bodies (thorax and abdomen), heads and saliva were analyzed to measure infection, dissemination and transmission, respectively. High infection but lower disseminated infection and transmission rates were observed for both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Ae. aegypti populations from Guadeloupe and French Guiana exhibited a higher dissemination of ZIKV than the other Ae. aegypti populations examined. Transmission of ZIKV was observed in both mosquito species at 14 dpi but at a low level. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests that although susceptible to infection, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus were unexpectedly low competent vectors for ZIKV. This may suggest that other factors such as the large naïve population for ZIKV and the high densities of human-biting mosquitoes contribute to the rapid spread of ZIKV during the current outbreak. PMID:26938868

  15. Voltage-dependent switching of sensorimotor integration by a lobster central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Nargeot, Romuald

    2003-06-15

    Behavioral adaptations and the underlying neural plasticity may not simply result from peripheral information conveyed by sensory inputs. Central neuronal networks often spontaneously generate neuronal activity patterns that may also contribute to sensorimotor integration and behavioral adaptations. The present study explored a novel form of sensory-induced plasticity by which the resulting changes in motor output depend essentially on the preexisting functional state of an identified neuron of an endogenously active central network. In the isolated lobster stomatogastric nervous system, electrical stimulation of a mechanosensory nerve transiently inactivated rhythmic spike bursting in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron of the pyloric motor pattern-generating network. Repeated sensory nerve stimulation gradually and long-lastingly strengthened the bursting of the LP neuron to the detriment of sensory-elicited inactivation. This strengthening of pyloric-timed rhythmic activity was enhanced by experimental depolarization of the neuron. Conversely, when the LP neuron was hyperpolarized, the same sensory stimulation paradigm now gradually increased the susceptibility of the pyloric-timed bursting of the network neuron to sensory-elicited inactivation. Modulation of depolarization-activated and hyperpolarization-activated ionic conductances that underlie the intrinsic bursting properties of the LP neuron may contribute via differential voltage-dependent recruitment and effects to the respective adaptive processes. These data therefore suggest a novel state-dependent mechanism by which an endogenously active central network can decrease or increase its responsiveness to the same sensory input.

  16. Absence of IFN-γ increases brain pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-susceptible DRB1*0301.DQ8 HLA transgenic mice through secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 and induction of pathogenic monocytes/microglia into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Luo, Ningling; Luckey, David; Papke, Louisa; Hubbard, Alyssa; Wussow, Arika; Smart, Michele; Giri, Shailendra; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella

    2014-11-15

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS of presumed autoimmune origin. Of all the genetic factors linked with multiple sclerosis, MHC class II molecules have the strongest association. Generation of HLA class II transgenic (Tg) mice has helped to elucidate the role of HLA class II genes in chronic inflammatory and demyelinating diseases. We have shown that the human HLA-DRB1*0301 gene predisposes to proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), whereas HLA-DQβ1*0601 (DQ6) was resistant. We also showed that the DQ6 molecule protects from EAE in DRB1*0301.DQ6 double-Tg mice by producing anti-inflammatory IFN-γ. HLA-DQβ1*0302 (DQ8) Tg mice were also resistant to PLP(91-110)-induced EAE, but production of proinflammatory IL-17 exacerbated disease in DRB1*0301.DQ8 mice. To further confirm the role of IFN-γ in protection, we generated DRB1*0301.DQ8 mice lacking IFN-γ (DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-)). Immunization with PLP(91-110) peptide caused atypical EAE in DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-) mice characterized by ataxia, spasticity, and dystonia, hallmarks of brain-specific disease. Severe brain-specific inflammation and demyelination in DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-) mice with minimal spinal cord pathology further confirmed brain-specific pathology. Atypical EAE in DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-) mice was associated with increased encephalitogenicity of CD4 T cells and their ability to produce greater levels of IL-17 and GM-CSF compared with DRB1*0301.DQ8 mice. Further, areas with demyelination showed increased presence of CD68(+) inflammatory cells, suggesting an important role for monocytes/microglia in causing brain pathology. Thus, our study supports a protective role for IFN-γ in the demyelination of brain through downregulation of IL-17/GM-CSF and induction of neuroprotective factors in the brain by monocytes/microglial cells.

  17. Familial susceptibility to severe respiratory infection in early life.

    PubMed

    Goetghebuer, Tessa; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Thomson, Anne; Hull, Jeremy

    2004-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are common in the first year of life and are mostly caused by viruses. Severity of LRTI in infants is associated with early-life environmental factors. Genetic association studies also suggest a role of heredity in susceptibility to acute bronchiolitis. We designed a case control study to further investigate relative importance of familial influences in risk of LRTI in early childhood compared to environmental factors. From a hospital database, we selected 1,308 children (436 cases; 872 controls) living in Oxfordshire. Cases were children under age 5 years admitted to hospital with LRTI. Parental history and other exposures were recorded in cases and controls by postal questionnaire. Maternal history of asthma increased the risk of severe LRTI in the first year of life, independent of subsequent asthma in a child. History of maternal bronchiolitis also increased the risk of infant LRTI. These results further support the possibility that genetic factors play an important role in susceptibility to severe viral respiratory infections in early life, and suggest that this effect may be independent of subsequent childhood asthma.

  18. Improved medium for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Redding, J S; Maher, L A; Howell, A W

    1987-01-01

    The need for complex growth media has complicated routine susceptibility testing of Haemophilus influenzae because of antagonism of certain antimicrobial agents by the medium or because of difficulties in interpretation of growth endpoints. Haemophilus test medium (HTM) is a simple, transparent medium for broth- or agar-based tests with H. influenzae. HTM incorporates Mueller-Hinton medium with additions of 15 micrograms of hematin per ml, 15 micrograms of NAD per ml, and 5 mg of yeast extract per ml as growth-promoting additives. Agar or broth microdilution MICs of 10 antimicrobial agents for a collection of 179 H. influenzae isolates determined by using HTM compared favorably with MICs determined by the conventional agar or broth dilution methods recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Disk diffusion tests performed with HTM allowed accurate categorization of susceptible and resistant strains and were easier to interpret than tests performed with Mueller-Hinton chocolate agar. A particular advantage of HTM was the reliability of broth- or agar-based test results with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The results of the study suggest modification of current National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards MIC-interpretive criteria for H. influenzae with amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Error rate-bounded analysis of MICs and disk diffusion zone sizes also suggest modified zone-interpretive criteria for ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline with HTM or conventional media. Interpretive zone sizes are newly proposed for cefaclor and rifampin disk diffusion tests. PMID:3500965

  19. Iron Deprivation Affects Drug Susceptibilities of Mycobacteria Targeting Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rahul; Hameed, Saif; Fatima, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) acquired by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) through continuous deployment of antitubercular drugs warrants immediate search for novel targets and mechanisms. The ability of MTB to sense and become accustomed to changes in the host is essential for survival and confers the basis of infection. A crucial condition that MTB must surmount is iron limitation, during the establishment of infection, since iron is required by both bacteria and humans. This study focuses on how iron deprivation affects drug susceptibilities of known anti-TB drugs in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a “surrogate of MTB.” We showed that iron deprivation leads to enhanced potency of most commonly used first line anti-TB drugs that could be reverted upon iron supplementation. We explored that membrane homeostasis is disrupted upon iron deprivation as revealed by enhanced membrane permeability and hypersensitivity to membrane perturbing agent leading to increased passive diffusion of drug and TEM images showing detectable differences in cell envelope thickness. Furthermore, iron seems to be indispensable to sustain genotoxic stress suggesting its possible role in DNA repair machinery. Taken together, we for the first time established a link between cellular iron and drug susceptibility of mycobacteria suggesting iron as novel determinant to combat MDR. PMID:26779346

  20. The menstrual cycle and susceptibility to coriolis-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B; Heskin, R; Hofer, K; Gagnon, M

    2001-01-01

    Survey studies on motion sickness susceptibility suggest that females tend to report greater severity in illness and higher incidence of vomiting than males. Menstruation is said to be a contributing factor. A recent study suggested that females were least susceptible to seasickness during ovulation in a "round the world" yacht race. Sixteen subjects (18-36 years old) were exposed to Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation in the laboratory. They were tested once during permenstruation (Day 1-5), ovulation (Day 12-15) and premenstruation (Day 24-28), based on a normalized 28-day cycle, in a randomised design. Physiological measurements of motion sickness included forearm and calf cutaneous blood flow. Subjective evaluation of sickness symptoms was based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria and Golding's rating method. Our results indicated that under controlled laboratory conditions, different phases of the menstrual cycle appear to have no influence on subjective symptoms of motion sickness or on cutaneous blood flow increase in the forearm and calf. The lack of commonality between the types and levels of hormones that are released during motion sickness and those that are involved in different menstrual phases appears to support our findings.

  1. Fast measurement of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Schrock, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Method, based on photoanalysis of adenosine triphosphate using light-emitting reaction with luciferase-luciferin technique, saves time by eliminating isolation period required by conventional methods. Technique is also used to determine presence of infection as well as susceptibilities to several antibiotics.

  2. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  3. Parasitism enhances tilapia susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of columnaris disease. Many commercially important freshwater fish worldwide are susceptible to columnaris disease that can result in high fish mortality. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a protozoan parasite in many ...

  4. Individual Differences in Susceptibility to Inattentional Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seegmiller, Janelle K.; Watson, Jason M.; Strayer, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Inattentional blindness refers to the finding that people do not always see what appears in their gaze. Though inattentional blindness affects large percentages of people, it is unclear if there are individual differences in susceptibility. The present study addressed whether individual differences in attentional control, as reflected by…

  5. Antimicrobic susceptibility testing. A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Sherris, J C

    1989-06-01

    The development of antimicrobic susceptibility testing is outlined with particular reference to standardization of procedures and organizational developments that have led to substantially improved performance. Special problems continue to be posed by increased proportions of opportunistic pathogens and newly recognized mechanisms of resistance, and these require updating. The role of automated procedures and technical problems in MBC and serum bactericidal testing are considered.

  6. Climate change and corn susceptibility to mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is an essential part of the world’s grain supply, but climate change has the potential to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce food security and safety. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force of climate change, our understanding of how elevated ...

  7. Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conservation of a molecular target across species can be used as a line-of-evidence to predict the likelihood of chemical susceptibility. The web-based Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility (SeqAPASS) tool was developed to simplify, streamline, and quantitatively assess protein sequence/structural similarity across taxonomic groups as a means to predict relative intrinsic susceptibility. The intent of the tool is to allow for evaluation of any potential protein target, so it is amenable to variable degrees of protein characterization, depending on available information about the chemical/protein interaction and the molecular target itself. To allow for flexibility in the analysis, a layered strategy was adopted for the tool. The first level of the SeqAPASS analysis compares primary amino acid sequences to a query sequence, calculating a metric for sequence similarity (including detection of candidate orthologs), the second level evaluates sequence similarity within selected domains (e.g., ligand-binding domain, DNA binding domain), and the third level of analysis compares individual amino acid residue positions identified as being of importance for protein conformation and/or ligand binding upon chemical perturbation. Each level of the SeqAPASS analysis provides increasing evidence to apply toward rapid, screening-level assessments of probable cross species susceptibility. Such analyses can support prioritization of chemicals for further ev

  8. Estimation of bonding nature using diamagnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Tomiyasu, Keisuke; Sato, Toyoto; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-21

    A chemical bond includes both covalent and ionic characteristics. We develop an experimental method to estimate the degree of each contribution based on magnetic susceptibility measurements, in which Pascal's scheme for Larmor diamagnetism is combined with electronegativity. The applicability to metal hydrides is also shown.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  10. Integrating Susceptibility into Environmental Policy: An Analysis of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for Lead

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Ramya; Burke, Thomas A.; White, Ronald H.; Fox, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to chemical toxins has not been adequately addressed in risk assessment methodologies. As a result, environmental policies may fail to meet their fundamental goal of protecting the public from harm. This study examines how characterization of risk may change when susceptibility is explicitly considered in policy development; in particular we examine the process used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set a National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for lead. To determine a NAAQS, EPA estimated air lead-related decreases in child neurocognitive function through a combination of multiple data elements including concentration-response (CR) functions. In this article, we present alternative scenarios for determining a lead NAAQS using CR functions developed in populations more susceptible to lead toxicity due to socioeconomic disadvantage. The use of CR functions developed in susceptible groups resulted in cognitive decrements greater than original EPA estimates. EPA’s analysis suggested that a standard level of 0.15 µg/m3 would fulfill decision criteria, but by incorporating susceptibility we found that options for the standard could reasonably be extended to lower levels. The use of data developed in susceptible populations would result in the selection of a more protective NAAQS under the same decision framework applied by EPA. Results are used to frame discussion regarding why cumulative risk assessment methodologies are needed to help inform policy development. PMID:22690184

  11. Meta-analysis and genome-wide interpretation of genetic susceptibility to drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Classical genetic studies provide strong evidence for heritable contributions to susceptibility to developing dependence on addictive substances. Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have sought genes, chromosomal regions and allelic variants likely to contribute to susceptibility to drug addiction. Results Here, we performed a meta-analysis of addiction candidate gene association studies and GWAS to investigate possible functional mechanisms associated with addiction susceptibility. From meta-data retrieved from 212 publications on candidate gene association studies and 5 GWAS reports, we linked a total of 843 haplotypes to addiction susceptibility. We mapped the SNPs in these haplotypes to functional and regulatory elements in the genome and estimated the magnitude of the contributions of different molecular mechanisms to their effects on addiction susceptibility. In addition to SNPs in coding regions, these data suggest that haplotypes in gene regulatory regions may also contribute to addiction susceptibility. When we compared the lists of genes identified by association studies and those identified by molecular biological studies of drug-regulated genes, we observed significantly higher participation in the same gene interaction networks than expected by chance, despite little overlap between the two gene lists. Conclusions These results appear to offer new insights into the genetic factors underlying drug addiction. PMID:21999673

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bovine digital dermatitis treponemes identifies macrolides for in vivo efficacy testing.

    PubMed

    Evans, N J; Brown, J M; Hartley, C; Smith, R F; Carter, S D

    2012-12-07

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a major infectious lameness of dairy cattle and sheep considered to be caused by treponemes. The aim of this study was to identify antibiotics effective against DD treponemes that might be useful in the treatment of ruminant DD in the future or to identify antibiotics useful in isolation studies. Here, a microdilution method was used to identify in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of treponemes cultured from DD lesions to eight relevant antibiotics. DD treponemes exhibited highest susceptibility to amoxicillin, azithromycin and gamithromycin. Unfortunately, amoxicillin whilst having potential for DD treatment in other animals (e.g. sheep) would require milk withhold periods in dairy cattle. DD treponemes were not particularly susceptible to two cephalosporins: cefalexin and ceftiofur, which do not require milk withhold. The bacteria demonstrated low susceptibility to trimethoprim and especially colistin suggesting these antimicrobials may be particularly useful in isolation of DD treponemes. The most promising high susceptibility results for macrolides indicate a rationale to consider veterinary licensed macrolides as DD treatments. Furthermore, given the DD treponeme antibiotic susceptibility similarities to established treatments for human treponematoses, identification of treponemacidal, long acting β-lactam analogues not requiring milk withhold may allow for development of a successful treatment for dairy cattle DD.

  13. The association between polymorphism of P53 Codon72 Arg/Pro and hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility: evidence from a meta-analysis of 15 studies with 3,704 cases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Surong; Zhao, Lianying; Yang, Jingting; Hu, Miao

    2014-04-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that p53gene participates in human carcinogenesis as tumor suppressors. Polymorphism of p53 gene codon72 arginine (Arg)/proline (Pro) (rs1042522) may influence the function of p53 protein and then affect the processing of carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that p53 codon72 Arg/Pro polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, published results are inconsistent and inconclusive. To examine the validity of the association between the polymorphism and HCC risk, we performed this meta-analysis. We have conducted a search of case-control studies on the associations of p53 codon72 polymorphism with susceptibility to HCC in PubMed, ScienceDirect, BioMed central, Springer, EBSCO, Wanfang databases, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. A total of 15 studies were identified with 3,704 cases and 4,559 controls for codon72 Arg/Pro polymorphism. The result did support a significant genetic association between Pro allele and susceptibility to HCC in all the genetic models. Similarly, subgroup analysis showed significant associations between the Arg/Pro polymorphism and susceptibility to HCC when stratifying by race, gender, source of controls, and hepatitis virus infection status. This meta-analysis suggests that p53 codon72 Arg/Pro polymorphism may be associated with the risk of HCC, especially in subgroup analysis of Asian and Caucasian population, hospital-based population, the female, and the individuals infected with hepatitis virus. However, well-designed studies based on different ethnic groups with larger sample size and more detailed data are needed to confirm these conclusions.

  14. The association between polymorphism of P53 codon 72 Arg/Pro and hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility: evidence from a meta-analysis of 15 studies with 3704 cases☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Surong; Zhao, Lianying; Yang, Jingting; Hu, Miao

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence has shown that p53gene participates in human carcinogenesis as tumor suppressors. Polymorphism of p53 gene codon 72 Arg/Pro (rs1042522) may influence the function of p53 protein and then affect the processing of carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, published results are inconsistent and inconclusive. To examine the validity of the association between the polymorphism and HCC risk, we performed this meta-analysis. Methodology/principal findings We have conducted a search of case–control studies on the associations of p53 codon 72 polymorphism with susceptibility to HCC in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Bio-Med central, Springer-link, EBSCO, Wanfang databases and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. A total of 15 studies were identified with 3704 cases and 4559 controls for codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism. The result did support a significant genetic association between Pro allele and susceptibility to HCC in all the genetic models. Similarly, subgroup analysis showed significant associations between the Arg/Pro polymorphism and susceptibility to HCC when stratifying by race, gender, source of controls and hepatitis virus infection status. Conclusions/significance This meta-analysis suggests that p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism may be associated with the risk of HCC, especially in subgroup analysis of Asian and Caucasian population, hospital-based population, the female, and the individuals infected with hepatitis virus. However, well-designed studies based on different ethnic groups with larger sample size and more detailed data are needed to confirm these conclusions. PMID:25606382

  15. Hyperinducibility of Ia antigen on astrocytes correlates with strain-specific susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, P.T.; ter Meulen, V.; Fontana, A.

    1987-06-01

    In search of a phenotypic marker determining genetically controlled susceptibility to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in the brain-in particular, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)- the authors have compared the ..gamma..-interferon (IFN-..gamma..) induction of Ia molecules on astrocytes and macrophages from rat and mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to this disease. They focused on Ia expression because DTH reactions to self or foreign antigens are largely mediated by lymphocytes restricted by class II (Ia) antigens of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The data demonstrate that Lewis (fully susceptible) and Brown Norway (BN) (fully resistant) rats are very different in that Lewis astrocytes express much higher levels of Ia than BN astrocytes. Similar data were obtained from an analysis of EAE-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains (SJL and BALB/c, respectively), which suggest that this phenomenon may be universal and not limited to only one mammalian species. At least one gene responsible for Ia hyperinduction is located outside the rat RT-1 or the mouse MHC locus. Animals congenic at the RT-1 or MHC locus of the resistant strain but with background genes of the susceptible strain exhibit intermediate levels of Ia compared to fully resistant and susceptible rodents, which fits well with the reduced EAE susceptibility of these congenic animals. Furthermore, hyperinduction of Ia is astrocyte specific, since peritoneal macrophages of susceptible and resistant strains exhibit identical profiles of Ia induction. Thus, astrocyte Ia hyperinducibility may be a major strain- and tissue-specific factor that contributes to Ia-restricted DTH reactions in the brain.

  16. Friends' drinking norms and male adolescents' alcohol consumption: The moderating role of performance-based peer influence susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Hanneke A; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Scholte, Ron H J; Spijkerman, Renske; Prinstein, Mitchell J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2016-12-01

    This study examined whether the relationship between friends' drinking norms and male adolescents' alcohol use is moderated by performance-based peer influence susceptibility. Seventy-three male adolescents (M = 17 years) from three schools in the Netherlands were exposed to the drinking norms of "peers" (electronic confederates) in a chat room experiment. These peers were either popular or unpopular, and conveyed pro- or anti-alcohol norms. Peer influence susceptibility was defined as the change in adolescents' answers before and after exposure to the peer norms. Multilevel regression analyses indicated that the relationship between friends' drinking norms and adolescents' alcohol use (assessed during eight weekends) was moderated by susceptibility to the pro-alcohol norms of popular peers. This relationship was stronger for adolescents who were highly susceptible. These findings suggest that a behavioral measure of peer influence susceptibility could be useful in alcohol prevention programs to select adolescents at risk for negative peer socialization.

  17. Tylosin susceptibility of Staphylococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Entorf, Monika; Feßler, Andrea T; Kadlec, Kristina; Kaspar, Heike; Mankertz, Joachim; Peters, Thomas; Schwarz, Stefan

    2014-07-16

    Although the 16-membered macrolide tylosin is commonly used for the treatment of bovine mastitis, little information is currently available about the susceptibility of mastitis pathogens to tylosin. In the present study, 112 Staphylococcus aureus and 110 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) spp. isolates from cases of bovine mastitis were tested by broth microdilution and agar disk diffusion with 30 μg tylosin disks. Susceptibility to erythromycin was tested by broth microdilution and disk diffusion using 15 μg disks. Both test populations showed bimodal distributions of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters with eleven S. aureus and eight CoNS isolates showing tylosin MICs of ≥ 256 μg/ml and no zones of growth inhibition around the tylosin 30 μg disks. All 19 isolates with tylosin MICs of ≥ 256 μg/ml were also resistant to erythromycin. For six additional erythromycin-resistant isolates, tylosin MICs of 1-8 μg/ml were observed. One S. aureus and two CoNS isolates showed inducible macrolide resistance. PCR analysis of the 25 erythromycin-resistant staphylococcal isolates identified the resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(T), mph(C) and msr(A) alone or in different combinations. An excellent correlation between the results of the different tylosin susceptibility tests (broth microdilution versus disk diffusion) was seen for S. aureus and CoNS isolates. Since tylosin does not induce the expression of the aforementioned erm genes, isolates with an inducible resistance phenotype may - if only tylosin is tested - be falsely classified as tylosin-susceptible. Thus, erythromycin should be tested in parallel and tylosin should only be used for the treatment of infections caused by erythromycin-susceptible staphylococci.

  18. Assessing genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobue; Babazono, Tetsuya

    2005-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Studies indicate both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In particular, epidemiological evidence shows a familial clustering of nephropathy in siblings with diabetes, supporting an important role of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. A common approach in genetic research is assessment of candidate gene polymorphisms using case-control analysis; a number of studies have evaluated predictable candidate genes for diabetic nephropathy. In contrast, only a few studies have used a whole genome approach, such as scanning of micro-satellite markers, in the assessment of genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. A whole genome linkage analysis using families of Pima Indians showed susceptibility loci for diabetic nephropathy on chromosome 3, 7, and 20. Another linkage analysis using discordant sib-pairs of Caucasian families with type 1 diabetes identified a critical area on chromosome 3q. However, these results have been inconclusive and further investigation is required. Recently, a genome-wide, case-control analysis identifying susceptibility genes for diabetic nephropathy was performed. As a result, a single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 23 of the solute carrier family 12 (sodium-chloride cotransporter) member 3 gene was found to be strongly associated with diabetic nephropathy. Although further assessment of this polymorphism is needed, this strategy offers great promise in the identification of genetic factors predisposing patients to diabetic nephropathy. Identification of genetic susceptibility markers may offer new hope in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  20. Polymorphic variation in susceptibility and metabolism of triclosan-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains obtained after exposure to biocides and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRI(r)) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRI(hs)) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRI(r) mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRI(r) mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRI(r) mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRI(r) mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRI(r) mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive

  1. Conditions that may affect the results of susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Permar, Sallie; Sun, Zhonghe

    2002-01-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important front-line anti-tuberculosis drug that is active only at acid pH. However, acid pH causes significant difficulty for PZA susceptibility testing. A common problem in PZA testing is false resistance caused by large bacterial inocula. This study investigated the relationship of false resistance to numbers of bacilli, pH and other factors that potentially affect susceptibility to PZA. Large inocula (10(7-8) bacilli/ml) of M. tuberculosis H37Ra caused significant increase in medium pH from 5.5 towards neutrality, and thus produced false resistance results. The increase in medium pH was determined to be a function of live bacilli; heat-killed bacilli had little or no effect. Susceptibility to PZA and its active derivative pyrazinoic acid (POA) was comparable on 7H11 agar medium, but POA was less active than PZA in liquid medium containing bovine serum albumin (BSA), suggesting that susceptibility to PZA or POA was reduced in the presence of BSA, because of its neutralising effect on medium pH and significant POA binding. A 3-month-old H37Ra culture was shown to be more susceptible to PZA exposure than a 4-day log-phase culture, suggesting that PZA is more active for non-growing bacilli. Finally, reserpine, an inhibitor of POA efflux pump, increased susceptibility to PZA even near neutral pH 6.8, with an MIC of 400 mg/L compared with 1,000 mg/L without reserpine. These findings should have implications for understanding the mode of action of PZA and for PZA susceptibility testing.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization in human tissues: a study case.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ovaia, H; Marques, G; Santos, A; Gomes, C; Rocha, A

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the magnetic properties, magnetic susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) of tissue samples from the brain, liver, spleen, pancreas, heart and lungs, resected from human corpses, with the aim of identifying the magnetic mineral structures and understanding their possible connection to diseases, professional activity, age and gender of the individual, smoking habits and the environment. The heart was the organ with the highest values of magnetic susceptibility and the pancreas showed the lowest values. No relationship was found between magnetic susceptibility, IRM values and ages of the individuals. However the samples obtained in females showed lower values of magnetic susceptibility than those resected from males. The samples collected from the lungs of smokers have higher values of magnetic susceptibility and IRM indicating the presence of magnetic particles with an anthropic origin. Moreover, the complexity of the magnetic behaviour of these tissues may suggest a contribution of both biogenic and anthropogenic magnetic particles also due to some professional activities. In the brain a heterogeneous distribution of the magnetic susceptibility values was found, which might be related mainly to the diamagnetic behaviour of myelin-rich structures. This study suggests that although the diamagnetic and paramagnetic behaviour is common to all structures, magnetite-type structures are always present in the tissues and hematite-type structures may also contribute to the magnetic signal of the sample. IRM values are only dependent on the presence of magnetite or hematite-type magnetic structures and so this technique seems more suitable to achieve the characterization of biomagnetic structures than magnetic susceptibility.

  3. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY OF ADULTS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENT EXPOSURE TO NEUROTOXICANTS: ANOTHER SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is considerable public and regulatory interest in the adverse outcomes of developmental exposure to toxicants. The 1996 Food Quality Protection Act spurred research on understanding potential neurotoxic, immunotoxic, and endocrine outcomes in susceptible populations, parti...

  4. Genetic variations in the receptor-ligand pair CCR5 and CCL3L1 are important determinants of susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Gonzalez, Enrique; Kulkarni, Hemant; Patel, Sukeshi; Shike, Hiroko; Sundel, Robert S; Newburger, Jane W; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2005-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an enigmatic, self-limited vasculitis of childhood that is complicated by development of coronary-artery aneurysms. The high incidence of KD in Asian versus European populations prompted a search for genetic polymorphisms that are differentially distributed among these populations and that influence KD susceptibility. Here, we demonstrate a striking, inverse relationship between the worldwide distribution of CCR5- Delta 32 allele and the incidence of KD. In 164 KD patient-parent trios, 4 CCR5 haplotypes including the CCR5- Delta 32 allele were differentially transmitted from heterozygous parents to affected children. However, the magnitude of the reduced risk of KD associated with the CCR5- Delta 32 allele and certain CCR5 haplotypes was significantly greater in individuals who also possessed a high copy number of the gene encoding CCL3L1, the most potent CCR5 ligand. These findings, derived from the largest genetic study of any systemic vasculitis, suggest a central role of CCR5-CCL3L1 gene-gene interactions in KD susceptibility and the importance of gene modifiers in infectious diseases.

  5. Association of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms with oral cancer susceptibility: evidence from a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sui; Xu, Jin-Dong; Zhuo, Zhen-Jian; Hua, Zhu-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a central enzyme involved in folate metabolism and plays an important role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Several studies have been conducted to illustrate the associations between MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms with oral cancer susceptibility; however, the results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted an updated meta-analysis to obtain a more reliable estimation of the associations. We retrieved eligible studies from PubMed, EMBASE, and CBM databases through September 2016. Ultimately, pooled analyses involved 10 studies with 1443 cases and 1640 controls for the C677T polymorphism, as well as five studies with 973 cases and 1024 controls for the A1298C polymorphism. Risk estimates were presented as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Pooled results indicated that neither C677T nor A1298C polymorphism was associated with oral cancer susceptibility. However, a borderline significant association was detected between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and a decreased oral cancer risk (homozygous model: OR=0.71, 95% CI=0.50–1.00) in hospital-based studies. Our results suggested that MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms might not be associated with oral cancer risk. However, more evidence is needed to further confirm these findings in the future. PMID:28138253

  6. Magnetic Susceptibility of Wet vs. Dry Sediment and Mass Normalized vs. Volume Normalized Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Hruba, J.; Nabelek, L.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of magnetic susceptibility in sediments represents a fast and non-destructive technique that can be used to deduce the concentration of magnetic minerals [1, 2]. Magnetic minerals change their magnetic properties with temperature [3]. Heating (during a fire, laboratory, with the purpose of manufacturing a product, etc.) can modify a number of sediment properties [4, 5]. Heat-induced sediment mineralogical changes may cause irreversible changes in the sediment mineral structure and composition, and they occur at a wide range of temperature [6]. We provided measurements of magnetic susceptibility on samples from the Stara Jimka (SJ) paleo lacustrine site in the Bohemian Forest using magnetic susceptibility meter MS-30. Sediment samples of approximately 0.2 cm thickness were weighed and put into plastic containers. First, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were taken on wet samples. Then the containers were put into the oven and sediment was dried at temperature of 110°C. After drying and cooling to room temperature, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were repeated. Dry samples were also weighed. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility of dry versus wet samples showed higher values of magnetic susceptibility of dry samples. This enhancement was probably caused during oven-drying, when constituents of sediment (mainly clays) underwent heat-induced changes. We also compared volume normalized values of magnetic susceptibility with mass normalized values. Mass normalized magnetic susceptibility was burdened by greater noise. References: [1] QUIJANO, L. et al. 2001. Magnetic Susceptibilty in Topsoils and Bulk Cores of Cultivated Calcisols. [2] DEARING, J. A. 1994. Environmental Magnetic Susceptibility. [3] HANESCH, M. and SCHOLGER, R. 2005. The Influence of Soil Type on the Magnetic Susceptibility Measured throughout Soil Profiles. [4] FARWIG, V. J. et al. 2004. The Effects of Heating on Mineral Magnetic Enhancement of Soils. [5] KLETETSCHKA, G

  7. Host susceptibility of citrus cultivars to Queensland fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A C; Hamacek, E L; Smith, D; Kopittke, R A; Gu, H

    2013-04-01

    Citrus crops are considered to be relatively poor hosts for Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), as for other tephritid species. Australian citrus growers and crop consultants have reported observable differences in susceptibility of different citrus cultivars under commercial growing conditions. In this study we conducted laboratory tests and field surveys to determine susceptibility to B. tryoni of six citrus cultivars [(Eureka lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck); Navel and Valencia oranges (C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck); and Imperial, Ellendale, and Murcott mandarins (C. reticulata Blanco). The host susceptibility of these citrus cultivars was quantified by a Host Susceptibility Index, which is defined as the number of adult flies produced per gram of fruit infested at a calculated rate of one egg per gram of fruit. The HSI was ranked as Murcott (0.083) > Imperial (0.052) > Navel (0.026) - Ellendale (0.020) > Valencia (0.008) > Eureka (yellow) (0.002) > Eureka (green) (0). Results of the laboratory study were in agreement with the level of field infestation in the four citrus cultivars (Eureka lemon, Imperial, Ellendale, and Murcott mandarins) that were surveyed from commercial orchards under baiting treatments against fruit flies in the Central Burnett district of Queensland. Field surveys of citrus hosts from the habitats not subject to fruit fly management showed that the numbers of fruit flies produced per gram of fruit were much lower, compared with the more susceptible noncitrus hosts, such as guava (Psidium guajava L.), cherry guava (P. littorale Raddi), mulberry (Morus nigra L.), loquat (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.), and pear (Pyrus communis L.). Therefore, the major citrus crops commercially cultivated in Australia have a relatively low susceptibility to B. tryoni, with Eureka lemons being a particularly poor host for this tephritid fruit fly.

  8. Detection of Reduced Susceptibility to Chlorfenapyr- and Bifenthrin-Containing Products in Field Populations of the Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Aaron R; Scharf, Michael E; Bennett, Gary W; Gondhalekar, Ameya D

    2017-04-10

    Insecticide resistance is a major impediment for effective control of Cimex lectularius L. Previous resistance detection studies with bed bugs have focused on certain pyrethroid, neonicotinoid, organochlorine, organophosphate, and carbamate insecticides. Within the pyrethroid class, resistance studies have mostly been limited to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and alpha- and beta-cyfluthrin. The goal of this study was to develop diagnostic concentration bioassays for assessing bed bug susceptibility levels to chlorfenapyr- and bifenthrin-containing products. First, glass vial and filter paper bioassay methods were compared for their utility in susceptibility monitoring. Statistical comparison of toxicity data between bioassays indicated that the vial assay was less confounded by assay susbtrate effects, required less insecticide, and was faster, especially for chlorfenapyr. Next, using vial diagnostic concentrations (LC99) for each insecticide, 10 laboratory-adapted field strains and the Harlan lab-susceptible strain were screened for susceptibility to chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin. The results of this study reveal recent bed bug susceptibility levels to certain chlorfenapyr- and bifenthrin-containing products. Reduced susceptibility was detected in three and five field strains to chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin, respectively. Detection of reduced susceptibility suggests that certain strains may be segregating toward greater chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin resistance. These results merit continuous resistance monitoring efforts to detect chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin susceptibility shifts. Additionally, to reduce insecticide selection pressures and delay resistance development, adoption of integrated bed bug control strategies that combine chemical and nonchemical methods is recommended.

  9. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  10. Aphid-encoded variability in susceptibility to a parasitoid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many animals exhibit variation in resistance to specific natural enemies. Such variation may be encoded in their genomes or derived from infection with protective symbionts. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, for example, exhibits tremendous variation in susceptibility to a common natural enemy, the parasitic wasp Aphidius ervi. Pea aphids are often infected with the heritable bacterial symbiont, Hamiltonella defensa, which confers partial to complete resistance against this parasitoid depending on bacterial strain and associated bacteriophages. That previous studies found that pea aphids without H. defensa (or other symbionts) were generally susceptible to parasitism, together with observations of a limited encapsulation response, suggested that pea aphids largely rely on infection with H. defensa for protection against parasitoids. However, the limited number of uninfected clones previously examined, and our recent report of two symbiont-free resistant clones, led us to explicitly examine aphid-encoded variability in resistance to parasitoids. Results After rigorous screening for known and unknown symbionts, and microsatellite genotyping to confirm clonal identity, we conducted parasitism assays using fifteen clonal pea aphid lines. We recovered significant variability in aphid-encoded resistance, with variation levels comparable to that contributed by H. defensa. Because resistance can be costly, we also measured aphid longevity and cumulative fecundity of the most and least resistant aphid lines under permissive conditions, but found no trade-offs between higher resistance and these fitness parameters. Conclusions These results indicate that pea aphid resistance to A. ervi is more complex than previously appreciated, and that aphids employ multiple tactics to aid in their defense. While we did not detect a tradeoff, these may become apparent under stressful conditions or when resistant and susceptible aphids are in direct competition. Understanding

  11. Neuronal copper homeostasis susceptibility by genetic defects in dysbindin, a schizophrenia susceptibility factor

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Avanti; Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia; Larimore, Jennifer; Comstra, Heather S.; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Werner, Erica; Manvich, Daniel F.; Iuvone, P. Michael; Weinshenker, David; Faundez, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors and susceptible genomes interact to determine the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. Although few genes and environmental factors have been linked, the intervening cellular and molecular mechanisms connecting a disorder susceptibility gene with environmental factors remain mostly unexplored. Here we focus on the schizophrenia susceptibility gene DTNBP1 and its product dysbindin, a subunit of the BLOC-1 complex, and describe a neuronal pathway modulating copper metabolism via ATP7A. Mutations in ATP7A result in Menkes disease, a disorder of copper metabolism. Dysbindin/BLOC-1 and ATP7A genetically and biochemically interact. Furthermore, disruption of this pathway causes alteration in the transcriptional profile of copper-regulatory and dependent factors in the hippocampus of dysbindin/BLOC-1-null mice. Dysbindin/BLOC-1 loss-of-function alleles do not affect cell and tissue copper content, yet they alter the susceptibility to toxic copper challenges in both mammalian cells and Drosophila. Our results demonstrate that perturbations downstream of the schizophrenia susceptibility gene DTNBP1 confer susceptibility to copper, a metal that in excess is a neurotoxin and whose depletion constitutes a micronutrient deficiency. PMID:26199316

  12. Personality traits as potential susceptibility markers: differential susceptibility to support among parents.

    PubMed

    Slagt, Meike; Dubas, Judith Semon; Denissen, Jaap J A; Deković, Maja; van Aken, Marcel A G

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we examined whether parents are differentially susceptible to support from their spouse and adolescent child depending on their personality traits, and whether differences in susceptibility to support among parents, in turn, are linked to the quality of support parents give to their children. Participants in this three-wave longitudinal study were 288 two-parent Dutch families with an adolescent child. Fathers were on average 43.9 years old (SD = 3.7 years), mothers were 41.7 years old (SD = 3.3 years), and adolescents (50% girls) were 14.5 years old (SD = 0.8 years). We found that the association between support from children toward their parents and subsequent support from parents toward their children was more pronounced for parents high on Openness, for better and for worse. Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Emotional Stability did not emerge as markers of differences in susceptibility. Also, parents did not differ in their susceptibility to support from their spouse, nor were differences in susceptibility found a year later when using data from a third wave. We found very modest support for differential susceptibility, only for Openness, and depending on the source of perceived support and on the timing of measurement.

  13. Carbapenem Resistance among Enterobacter Species in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Atul; Praharaj, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Mahadevan; Grover, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To detect genes encoding carbapenem resistance among Enterobacter species in a tertiary care hospital in central India. Methods. Bacterial identification of Enterobacter spp. isolates from various clinical specimens in patients admitted to intensive care units was performed by routine conventional microbial culture and biochemical tests using standard recommended techniques. Antibiotic sensitivity test was performed by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion technique. PCR amplification and automated sequencing was carried out. Transfer of resistance genes was determined by conjugation. Results. A total of 70/130 (53.84%) isolates of Enterobacter spp. were found to exhibit reduced susceptibility to imipenem (diameter of zones of inhibition ≤13 mm) by disc diffusion method. Among 70 isolates tested, 48 (68.57%) isolates showed MIC values for imipenem and meropenem ranging from 32 to 64 mg/L as per CLSI breakpoints. All of these 70 isolates were found susceptible to colistin in vitro as per MIC breakpoints (<0.5 mg/L). PCR carried out on these 48 MBL (IP/IPI) E-test positive isolates (12 Enterobacter aerogenes, 31 Enterobacter cloacae, and 05 Enterobacter cloacae complex) was validated by sequencing for beta-lactam resistance genes and result was interpreted accordingly. Conclusion. The study showed MBL production as an important mechanism in carbapenem resistance in Enterobacter spp. and interspecies transfer of these genes through plasmids suggesting early detection by molecular methods. PMID:25180095

  14. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  15. Eliminating Age Differences in Children's and Adults' Suggestibility and Memory Conformity Effects.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Brackmann, Nathalie; van Helvoort, Daniël H J

    2017-03-30

    We examined whether typical developmental trends in suggestion-induced false memories (i.e., age-related decrease) could be changed. Using theoretical principles from the spontaneous false memory field, we adapted 2 often-used false memory procedures: misinformation (Experiment 1) and memory conformity (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, 7- to 9-year-old children (n = 33) and adults (n = 39) received stories containing associatively related details. They then listened to misinformation in the form of short narratives preserving the meaning of the story. Children and adults were equally susceptible to the misinformation effect. In Experiment 2, younger (7- to 8-year-olds, n = 30) and older (11- to 12-year-olds, n = 30) children and adults (n = 30) viewed pictures containing associatively related details. They viewed these pictures in pairs. Although the pictures differed, participants believed they had viewed the same pictures. Participants had to report what they could recollect during collaborative and individual recall tests. Children and adults were equally susceptible to memory conformity effects. When correcting for response bias, adults' false memory scores were even higher than children's. Our results show that age trends in suggestion-induced false memories are not developmentally invariant. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Differential susceptibilities to azithromycin treatment of chlamydial infection in the gastrointestinal tract and cervix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that chlamydiae may persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and be a reservoir for reinfection of the genital tract. We hypothesize that there may be a differential susceptibility of organisms in the GI and genital tracts. To determine the effect of azithromy...

  17. FACTORS AFFECTING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE CORAL MONTASTRAEA FAVEOLATE TO BLACK-BAND DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black-band disease affects many species of tropical reef-building corals, but it is unclear what factors contribute to the disease-susceptibility of individual corals or how the disease is transmitted between colonies. Studies have suggested that the ability of black-band disease...

  18. In vitro susceptibilities of Zygomycota to polyenes.

    PubMed

    Dannaoui, Eric; Meis, Jacques F G M; Mouton, Johan W; Verweij, Paul E

    2002-05-01

    The in vitro activity of polyenes was determined for 36 isolates of Zygomycota including Rhizopus spp. (15), Absidia corymbifera (10), Mucor spp. (6), Rhizomucor spp. (3), Cunninghamella bertholletiae (1) and Apophysomyces elegans (1). All isolates were tested with amphotericin B, heated amphotericin B and nystatin by a broth microdilution test. There were no significant differences between heated and unheated solutions of amphotericin B in terms of their antifungal activities. The MICs of amphotericin B for most of the strains were <2 mg/L. For all isolates, nystatin was significantly less active than amphotericin B (P < 0.001). The one C. bertholletiae and one A. elegans isolates were less susceptible to amphotericin B (MICs 2 mg/L) and were also less susceptible to nystatin.

  19. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  20. Bladder cancer epidemiology and genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiyan; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system. The incidence of bladder cancer of men is higher than that of women (approximately 4:1). Here, we summarize the bladder cancer-related risk factors, including environmental and genetic factors. In recent years, although the mortality rate induced by bladder cancer has been stable or decreased gradually, the public health effect may be pronounced. The well-established risk factors for bladder cancer are cigarette smoking and occupational exposure. Genetic factors also play important roles in the susceptibility to bladder cancer. A recent study demonstrated that hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. Since 2008, genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been used to identify the susceptibility loci for bladder cancer. Further gene-gene or gene-environment interaction studies need to be conducted to provide more information for the etiology of bladder cancer. PMID:23720672

  1. Excitonic susceptibility in near triangular quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, A.; Arulmozhi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Diamagnetic susceptibility and binding energy of an exciton in a near triangular quantum well, with potential profile proportional to |z|2/3 composed of GaAs/Ga1- x Al x As and ZnO/Zn1- x Mg x O are calculated as a function of the wellwidth and concentration of Al and Mg respectively varying the magnetic field applied along growth direction (i.e. z-axis). Diamagnetic susceptibility of light hole exciton and heavy hole exciton, shows inverse behaviors in the two materials below 20 nm wellwidth and the binding energy of both excitons increases, as the magnetic field increases. The results obtained, are compared with those of quantum wells with varied potential profiles and the experimental results reported in the literature.

  2. Effects of information type on children's interrogative suggestibility: is Theory-of-Mind involved?

    PubMed

    Hünefeldt, Thomas; Rossi-Arnaud, Clelia; Furia, Augusta

    2009-08-01

    This research was aimed at learning more about the different psychological mechanisms underlying children's suggestibility to leading questions, on the one hand, and children's suggestibility to negative feedback, on the other, by distinguishing between interview questions concerning different types of information. Results showed that, unlike the developmental pattern of children's suggestibility to leading questions, the developmental pattern of children's suggestibility to negative feedback differed depending on whether the interview questions concerned external facts (physical states and events) or internal facts (mental states and events). This difference was not manifested in response to questions concerning central versus peripheral facts. Results are interpreted in terms of the hypothesis that children's suggestibility to negative feedback is differently affected by "Theory-of-Mind" abilities than children's suggestibility to leading questions. Further research is needed in order to test this hypothesis.

  3. Temperature-dependent susceptibility in ALON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2001-02-01

    Herein, we propose a stochastic model of the complex susceptibility in aluminum nitride (ALON), a polycrystalline transparent ceramic. The proposed model yields an inverse power-law dependence of the dielectric loss tangent on frequency, in remarkably close agreement with data. In addition, the phenomenological parameters are found to be strongly temperature-dependent. This temperature dependence is determined, in the theoretical model, to be a consequence of the thermodynamic properties of the molecular dipoles in the material.

  4. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles with tunable susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wilson, Robert J.; Earhart, Christopher M.; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    High-moment monodisperse disk-shaped Co–Fe magnetic nanoparticles, stable in aqueous solution, were physically fabricated by using nanoimprinted templates and vacuum deposition techniques. These multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles exhibit nearly zero magnetic remanence and coercivity, and susceptibilities which can be tuned by exploiting interlayer magnetic interactions. In addition, a low cost method of scaling up the production of sub-100 nm synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. PMID:19529797

  5. Topological susceptibility with the improved Asqtad action

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bernard et al.

    2004-01-06

    As a test of the chiral properties of the improved Asqtad (staggered fermion) action, we have been measuring the topological susceptibility as a function of quark masses for 2 + 1 dynamical flavors. We report preliminary results, which show reasonable agreement with leading order chiral perturbation theory for lattice spacing less than 0.1 fm. The total topological charge, however, shows strong persistence over Monte Carlo time.

  6. CONSIDERATION OF CHILDREN'S DISTINCTIVE SUSCEPTIBILITY IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of children's distinctive susceptibility in environmental health studies.
    Pauline Mendola (US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711)

    Children are a particularly susceptible subpopulation with ...

  7. Diamagnetic bulk susceptibility data of C3F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.

    This document is part of Subvolume B `Diamagnetic Susceptibility of Organic Compounds, Oils, Paraffins and Polyethylenes' of Volume 27 `Diamagnetic Susceptibility and Anisotropy' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group II Molecules and Radicals.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms linked to susceptibility to malaria.

    PubMed

    Driss, Adel; Hibbert, Jacqueline M; Wilson, Nana O; Iqbal, Shareen A; Adamkiewicz, Thomas V; Stiles, Jonathan K

    2011-09-19

    The influence of host genetics on susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been extensively studied over the past twenty years. It is now clear that malaria parasites have imposed strong selective forces on the human genome in endemic regions. Different genes have been identified that are associated with different malaria related phenotypes. Factors that promote severity of malaria include parasitaemia, parasite induced inflammation, anaemia and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in brain microvasculature.Recent advances in human genome research technologies such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and fine genotyping tools have enabled the discovery of several genetic polymorphisms and biomarkers that warrant further study in host-parasite interactions. This review describes and discusses human gene polymorphisms identified thus far that have been shown to be associated with susceptibility or resistance to P. falciparum malaria. Although some polymorphisms play significant roles in susceptibility to malaria, several findings are inconclusive and contradictory and must be considered with caution. The discovery of genetic markers associated with different malaria phenotypes will help elucidate the pathophysiology of malaria and enable development of interventions or cures. Diversity in human populations as well as environmental effects can influence the clinical heterogeneity of malaria, thus warranting further investigations with a goal of developing new interventions, therapies and better management against malaria.

  9. Human variability and susceptibility to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Pastino, G M; Yap, W Y; Carroquino, M

    2000-01-01

    Although humans vary in their response to chemicals, comprehensive measures of susceptibility have generally not been incorporated into human risk assessment. The U.S. EPA dose-response-based risk assessments for cancer and the RfD/RfC (reference dose-reference concentration) approach for noncancer risk assessments are assumed to protect vulnerable human subgroups. However, these approaches generally rely on default assumptions and do not consider the specific biological basis for potential susceptibility to a given toxicant. In an effort to focus more explicitly on this issue, this article addresses biological factors that may affect human variability and susceptibility to trichloroethylene (TCE), a widely used halogenated industrial solvent. In response to Executive Order 13045, which requires federal agencies to make protection of children a high priority in implementing their policies and to take special risks to children into account when developing standards, this article examines factors that may affect risk of exposure to TCE in children. The influence of genetics, sex, altered health state, coexposure to alcohol, and enzyme induction on TCE toxicity are also examined. PMID:10807552

  10. Correlation between virulence of various strains of mycobacteria and their susceptibility to ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP).

    PubMed

    Scheller, S; Kawalski, H; Oklek, K; Dworniczak, S; Matsuno, T; Waldemar-Klimmek, K; Rajca, M; Shani, J

    1998-01-01

    Ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) has antibacterial, antiviral, antiprotozoal and antifungal properties, in addition to many biological effects. Our laboratory has demonstrated a synergistic effect of EEP and antibiotics on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and suggested that the bactericidal effect of EEP was expressed mainly on virulent mycobacteria rather than on non-virulent (attenuated) ones. The present study was designed to reconfirm the latter finding, by subjecting 17 different mycobacteria strains to EEP, and evaluating whether there is a correlation between the virulence of the mycobacteria strains studied and their susceptibility to EEP. Our findings demonstrate that while the four non-virulent strains studied are not susceptible to EEP, out of the 13 virulent strains studied seven are susceptible and six are resistant to it. These results suggest that while there is no full correlation between virulence of the mycobacteria tested and their susceptibility to EEP, the few strains that were resistant to EEP were non-virulent.

  11. Genetic susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Concepción M; Olza, Josune; Gil, Angel

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It is a chronic, complex, and multifactorial origin disease characterised by body fat excess mainly due to an imbalance between dietary intake and energy expenditure. One of the major complications of obesity is metabolic syndrome, which comprises anthropometrical, clinical, and metabolic dysfunctions that predispose the affected individual to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. It is hypothesised that the variability in the susceptibility to obesity-mediated metabolic complications involves both environmental and genetic factors. Whereas advances in the knowledge of the variations in the human genome have led to the identification of susceptibility genes that contribute to obesity and related disorders, relatively few studies have specifically focused on the interactions between obesity and genetic polymorphisms and the development of metabolic complications. Despite these limited efforts, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that the effects of some gene variants on metabolic traits are modified by or present only in the setting of obesity. Furthermore, some of these loci may have larger effects on metabolic phenotypes in the presence of certain dietary or lifestyle factors. In the present manuscript, we reviewed the genes and their variants that have been evidenced to play a role in obesity-associated metabolic complications through genetic association studies, including candidate gene and genome-wide association approaches in adults and children.

  12. Empirical prediction of genomic susceptibilities for multiple cancer classes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseung; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2014-01-01

    An empirical approach is presented for predicting the genomic susceptibility of an individual to the most likely one among nine traits, consisting of eight major cancer classes plus a healthy trait. We use four prediction methods by applying two supervised learning algorithms to two different descriptors of common genomic variations (the profiles of genotypes of SNPs and SNP syntaxes with low P values or low frequencies) of each individual genome from normal cells. All four methods made correct predictions substantially better than random predictions for most cancer classes, but not for some others. A combination of the four results using Bayesian inference better predicted overall than any individual method. The multiclass accuracy of the combined prediction ranges from 33% to 56% depending on cancer classes of testing sets, compared with 11% for a random prediction among nine traits. Despite limited SNP data available and the absence of rare SNPs in public databases, at present, the results suggest that the framework of this approach or its improvement can predict cancer susceptibility with probability estimates useful for making health decisions for individuals or for a population. PMID:24449885

  13. Genetic Association Between PER3 Genetic Polymorphisms and Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Peiliang; Ou, Juanjuan; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Ning; Xie, Ganfeng; Sa, Rina; Liu, Chen; Xiang, Lisha; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The genes along the circadian pathways control and modulate circadian rhythms essential for the maintenance of physiological homeostasis through self-sustained transcription-translation feedback loops. PER3 (period 3) is a circadian pathway gene and its variants (rs1012477, 4/5-repeat) have frequently been associated with human cancer. The mixed findings, however, make the role of the 2 variants in cancer susceptibility elusive. We aimed in this article to clarify the association of PER3 variants with cancer. We collected genetic data from 8 studies, providing 6149 individuals for rs1012477 and 5241 individuals for 4/5-repeat. Based on the genotype and allele frequency, we chose the fixed-effects model to estimate risk of cancer. Overall analysis did not suggest a global role of rs1012477 in cancer susceptibility. For PER3 4/5-repeat variant, we found a moderate increase in risk of cancer among individuals with the 5-allele compared to individuals with the 4-allele, although this association was not statistically significant (homozygous model: odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81–1.67; recessive model: OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.82–1.67). No substantial heterogeneity was revealed in this analysis. Our meta-analysis provides no evidence supporting a global association of PER3 genetic variants with the incidence of cancer. PMID:25837749

  14. Susceptibility of monkeypox virus aerosol suspensions in a rotating chamber.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Killeen, Stephanie Z; Redmann, Rachel K; Roy, Chad J

    2013-02-01

    Viral aerosols can have a major impact on public health and on the dynamics of infection. Once aerosolized, viruses are subjected to various stress factors and their integrity and potential of infectivity can be altered. Empirical characterization is needed in order to predict more accurately the fate of these bioaerosols both for short term and long term suspension in the air. Here the susceptibility to aerosolization of the monkeypox virus (MPXV), associated with emerging zoonotic diseases, was studied using a 10.7 L rotating chamber. This chamber was built to fit inside a Class three biological safety cabinet, specifically for studying airborne biosafety level three (BSL3) microorganisms. Airborne viruses were detected by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) after up to 90 h of aging. Viral concentrations detected dropped by two logs for culture analysis and by one log for qPCR analysis within the first 18 h of aging; viral concentrations were stable between 18 and 90 h, suggesting a potential for the MPXV to retain infectivity in aerosols for more than 90 h. The rotating chamber used in this study maintained viral particles airborne successfully for prolonged periods and could be used to study the susceptibility of other BSL3 microorganisms.

  15. Susceptibility of Monkeypox virus aerosol suspensions in a rotating chamber

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Redmann, Rachel K.; Roy, Chad. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Viral aerosols can have a major impact on public health and on the dynamics of infection. Once aerosolized, viruses are subjected to various stress factors and their integrity and potential of infectivity can be altered. Empirical characterization is needed in order to predict more accurately the fate of these bioaerosols both for short term and long term suspension in the air. Here the susceptibility to aerosolization of the monkeypox virus (MPXV), associated with emerging zoonotic diseases, was studied using a 10.7 liter rotating chamber. This chamber was built to fit inside a Class three biological safety cabinet, specifically for studying airborne biosafety level three (BSL3) microorganisms. Airborne viruses were detected by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) after up to 90 hours of aging. Viral concentrations detected dropped by two logs for culture analysis and by one log for qPCR analysis within the first 18 hours of aging; viral concentrations were stable between 18 and 90 hours, suggesting a potential for the MPXV to retain infectivity in aerosols for more than 90 hours. The rotating chamber used in this study maintained viral particles airborne successfully for prolonged periods and could be used to study the susceptibility of other BSL3 microorganisms. PMID:23142251

  16. Susceptibility to febrile seizures: more than just a faulty thermostat!

    PubMed

    Prasad, Asuri N; Seshia, Shashi S

    2009-05-01

    Febrile seizures, always a hot topic, continue to fire up the interest of a wide spectrum of clinical and basic neuroscientists. Several clinical investigators, amongst them the Halifax group (spearheaded by the Camfields to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude for their contributions in this field), have provided us with a sound foundation for clinical management. We now need to explore febrile seizures in new ways to clarify factors and identify mechanisms that contribute to the intriguing age-dependent susceptibility. The complex processes involved in thermoregulation and the febrile response are important pieces of the puzzle. The contributory factors are likely different for isolated simple febrile, recurrent febrile and complex febrile seizures. A 'systems biology approach' is needed to investigate the intricate genome-proteome-metabolome interaction in determining susceptibility. Population studies that incorporate current clinical, experimental, infectious and molecular genetic knowledge in their concept and design will help to 'conquer' the final frontiers of febrile seizures. In 2006, Engel suggested that febrile seizures could 'encompass many different entities', an increasingly plausible opinion. A higher profile for febrile seizures and related syndromes in the ILAE classification scheme will further catalyze progress in the field. The resultant knowledge can only improve management.

  17. Motion sickness susceptibility in parabolic flight and velocity storage activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    1991-01-01

    In parabolic flight experiments, postrotary nystagmus is as found to be differentially suppressed in free fall (G) and in a high gravitoinertial force (1.8 G) background relative to 1 G. In addition, the influence of postrotary head movements on nystagmus suppression was found to be contingent on G-dependency of the velocity storage and dumping mechanisms. Here, susceptibility to motion sickness during head movements in 0 G and 1.8 G was rank-correlated with the following: (1) the decay time constant of the slow phase velocity of postrotary nystagmus under 1 G, no head movement, baseline conditions, (2) the extent of time constant reduction elicited in 0 G and 1.8 G; (3) the extent of time constant reduction elicited by head tilts in 1 G; and (4) changes in the extent of time constants reduction in 0 G and 1.8 G over repeated tests. Susceptibility was significantly correlated with the extent to which a head movement reduced the time constant in 1 G, was weakly correlated with the baseline time constant, but was not correlated with the extent of reduction in 0 G or 1.8 G. This pattern suggests a link between mechanisms evoking symptoms of space motion sickness and the mechanisms of velocity storage and dumping. Experimental means of evaluating this link are described.

  18. Breed susceptibility for developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Elizabeth; Breur, Gert J; Austin, Connie C

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale epidemiological study was conducted to determine breeds at risk for 12 developmental orthopedic diseases (DODs). Developmental orthopedic diseases investigated included canine hip dysplasia (CHD); craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); fragmented coronoid process; hypertrophic osteodystrophy; Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease; osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, caudal humeral head, femoral condyles, and talar trochlear ridges; panosteitis; patella luxation; and ununited anconeal process. Dogs that were diagnosed with any one of the diseases of interest at any of 10 veterinary teaching hospitals participating in the Veterinary Medical Database from 1986 to 1995 were included as cases. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine risk. Frequency of diagnosis during the 10-year period ranged from 35 cases (CMO) to 10,637 cases (CHD). The number of breeds at increased risk for a disease ranged from one (CMO) to 35 (CHD). Breed susceptibility for a DOD may suggest a genetic component in the disease etiology. The results of this study serve to increase veterinarians' awareness of breeds susceptible to DODs and may facilitate the control of such diseases by identifying breeds that might benefit from breeding programs or environmental intervention such as dietary modification.

  19. In vitro prion protein conversion suggests risk of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Morawski, A.R.; Carlson, C.M.; Chang, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) affect both domestic sheep (scrapie) and captive and free-ranging cervids (chronic wasting disease; CWD). The geographical range of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis; BHS) overlaps with states or provinces that have contained scrapie-positive sheep or goats and areas with present epizootics of CWD in cervids. No TSEs have been documented in BHS, but the susceptibility of this species to TSEs remains unknown. Results: We acquired a library of BHS tissues and found no evidence of preexisting TSEs in these animals. The prion protein gene (Prnp) in all BHS in our library was identical to scrapie-susceptible domestic sheep (A136R 154Q171). Using an in vitro prion protein conversion assay, which has been previously used to assess TSE species barriers and, in our study appears to recollect known species barriers in mice, we assessed the potential transmissibility of TSEs to BHS. As expected based upon Prnp genotype, we observed BHS prion protein conversion by classical scrapie agent and evidence for a species barrier between transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and BHS. Interestingly, our data suggest that the species barrier of BHS to white-tailed deer or wapiti CWD agents is likely low. We also used protein misfolding cyclic amplification to confirm that CWD, but not TME, can template prion protein misfolding in A136R 154Q171genotype sheep. Conclusions: Our results indicate the in vitro conversion assay used in our study does mimic the species barrier of mice to the TSE agents that we tested. Based on Prnp genotype and results from conversion assays, BHS are likely to be susceptible to infection by classical scrapie. Despite mismatches in amino acids thought to modulate prion protein conversion, our data indicate that A136R154Q171 genotype sheep prion protein is misfolded by CWD agent, suggesting that these animals could be susceptible to CWD. Further investigation of TSE transmissibility to BHS, including

  20. Behavioral connectivity among bighorn sheep suggests potential for disease spread

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borg, Nathan J.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mack, Curt M.; Waits, Lisette P.; Krausman, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Connectivity is important for population persistence and can reduce the potential for inbreeding depression. Connectivity between populations can also facilitate disease transmission; respiratory diseases are one of the most important factors affecting populations of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). The mechanisms of connectivity in populations of bighorn sheep likely have implications for spread of disease, but the behaviors leading to connectivity between bighorn sheep groups are not well understood. From 2007–2012, we radio-collared and monitored 56 bighorn sheep in the Salmon River canyon in central Idaho. We used cluster analysis to define social groups of bighorn sheep and then estimated connectivity between these groups using a multi-state mark-recapture model. Social groups of bighorn sheep were spatially segregated and linearly distributed along the Salmon River canyon. Monthly probabilities of movement between adjacent male and female groups ranged from 0.08 (±0.004 SE) to 0.76 (±0.068) for males and 0.05 (±0.132) to 0.24 (±0.034) for females. Movements of males were extensive and probabilities of movement were considerably higher during the rut. Probabilities of movement for females were typically smaller than those of males and did not change seasonally. Whereas adjacent groups of bighorn sheep along the Salmon River canyon were well connected, connectivity between groups north and south of the Salmon River was limited. The novel application of a multi-state model to a population of bighorn sheep allowed us to estimate the probability of movement between adjacent social groups and approximate the level of connectivity across the population. Our results suggest high movement rates of males during the rut are the most likely to result in transmission of pathogens among both male and female groups. Potential for disease spread among female groups was smaller but non-trivial. Land managers can plan grazing of domestic sheep for spring and summer

  1. Wide variability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa aminoglycoside results among seven susceptibility testing procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Staneck, J L; Glenn, S; DiPersio, J R; Leist, P A

    1989-01-01

    microdilution method, despite monitoring of the agar for cation content through performance disk diffusion testing with P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853. Tobramycin activity was greater than gentamicin activity, and susceptibility to tobramycin ranged from 89 to 97%, with few statistically significant differences noted among the seven methods studied. Differences in MIC distribution and geometric mean MIC between agar dilution and CSMHB microdilution testing were minimal and suggested less of a cation influence on tobramycin than gentamicin results. Although amikacin was also more active than gentamicin (83 to 99% of isolates were susceptible), differences in the amikacin results among methods tended to reflect the same trends in reporting as seen with gentamicin testing, with the exception that results of Avantage testing were similar to those of disk diffusion, CSMHB microdilution, Sensititre, and Vitek. A difference in geometric mean MIC of 5 micrograms/ml between CSMHB testing and agar dilution testing suggested the influence of divalent cations on amikacin results. Few highly significant differences were noted among methods when isolates were tested against carbenicillin and piperacillin, except that Avantage piperacillin results (66% susceptible) and Autobac piperacillin results (98% susceptible) were noticeably different from the percent piperacillin susceptibility (range, 85 to 92%) measured by the other methods. Method-dependent variability among aminoglycoside susceptibility results, particularly when testing gentamicin, prevents meaningful comparison of Pseudomonas susceptibility trends among hospitals when different methods are used and promotes confusion and frustration among clinical microbiologists and clinicians owing to the uncertainties of clinical meaning of these data. PMID:2511223

  2. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of solid oxygen at pressures up to 3.3 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, M.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuruda, H.; Deguchi, H.; Ishizuka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of solid oxygen had long been observed only in the restricted pressure region below 0.8 GPa. We succeeded in extending the pressure region up to 3.3 GPa by clamping condensed oxygen in the sample chamber of a miniature diamond anvil cell and measuring the dc magnetic susceptibility using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. In this experiment, the well-known α-β and β-γ transitions are observed in the phase diagram, suggesting consistency with the previous results of X-ray and Raman studies. In addition, a new magnetic anomaly is observed in the β phase.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of solid oxygen at pressures up to 3.3 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Mito, M. Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuruda, H.; Deguchi, H.; Ishizuka, M.

    2014-01-07

    The magnetic susceptibility of solid oxygen had long been observed only in the restricted pressure region below 0.8 GPa. We succeeded in extending the pressure region up to 3.3 GPa by clamping condensed oxygen in the sample chamber of a miniature diamond anvil cell and measuring the dc magnetic susceptibility using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. In this experiment, the well-known α–β and β–γ transitions are observed in the phase diagram, suggesting consistency with the previous results of X-ray and Raman studies. In addition, a new magnetic anomaly is observed in the β phase.

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Drug Resistance Mechanisms, and Therapy of Infections with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin A.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Within the past 10 years, treatment and diagnostic guidelines for nontuberculous mycobacteria have been recommended by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Moreover, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has published and recently (in 2011) updated recommendations including suggested antimicrobial and susceptibility breakpoints. The CLSI has also recommended the broth microdilution method as the gold standard for laboratories performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria. This article reviews the laboratory, diagnostic, and treatment guidelines together with established and probable drug resistance mechanisms of the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:22763637

  5. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Helicobacter felis, H. bizzozeronii, and H. salomonis.

    PubMed

    Van den Bulck, K; Decostere, A; Gruntar, I; Baele, M; Krt, B; Ducatelle, R; Haesebrouck, F

    2005-07-01

    The susceptibilities of Helicobacter felis (15 strains), H. bizzozeronii (7 strains), and H. salomonis (3 strains) to 10 antimicrobial agents were investigated by determination of the MIC using the agar dilution method. No consistent differences were noticed between the different Helicobacter species, which were all highly susceptible to ampicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, tylosin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and neomycin, as demonstrated by low MICs. Higher MICs were obtained for lincomycin (up to 8 microg/ml) and spectinomycin (up to 4 microg/ml). Two H. felis strains showed a MIC of 16 microg/ml for metronidazole, suggesting acquired resistance to this antimicrobial agent.

  6. Susceptibility of Skeletal Muscle to Coxsackie A2 Virus Infection: Effects of Botulinum Toxin and Denervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, Clifford G.; Drachman, Daniel B.; Pestronk, Alan; Narayan, Opendra

    1984-02-01

    Coxsackie A viruses can infect denervated but not innervated mature skeletal muscles. The role of synaptic transmission in preventing susceptibility to Coxsackievirus infection was studied by surgically denervating leg muscles of mice or injecting the muscles with botulinum toxin to block quantal release of acetylcholine. Control muscles were injected with heat-inactivated toxin. Subsequent injection of Coxsackie A2 virus resulted in extensive virus replication and tissue destruction in the denervated and botulinum toxin-treated muscles, while the control muscles showed only minimal changes. This suggests that the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to Coxsackievirus infection is regulated by synaptic transmission.

  7. Very virulent plus strains of MDV induce an acute form of transient paralysis in both susceptible and resistant chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Zhang, Huanmin; Karcher, Darrin M; Heidari, Mohammad

    2012-08-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include depression, crippling, weight loss, and transient paralysis (TP). TP is a disease of the central nervous system that affects MD-susceptible chickens 8-11 days post-infection (dpi), normally resulting in recovery 1-3 d after the onset of clinical signs. In this study we inoculated chickens from lines 7(2) (MD-susceptible) and 6(3) (MD-resistant) with a very virulent plus strain of MDV at 2 wk of age, and collected brain samples from birds with and without TP at 5, 11, and 21 dpi for gene expression profiling and histological analysis. Data revealed that chickens inoculated with MDV had higher levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-18, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, MHC I, and CD18 in their brains at 11 dpi compared to the uninfected control birds. In addition, the expression levels of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ were significantly higher in the brains of the birds showing clinical signs of TP than in asymptomatic chickens. Comparative analysis between the two chicken lines showed that the expression levels of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-18, CD18, and MHC I were significantly higher in the brains of the birds from line 6(3) with TP than those of line 7(2) exhibiting neurological disorders. A differential expression pattern was observed for some of the tested genes at different time points post-inoculation. Histological analysis showed lymphocytic meningitis, perivascular cuffing, and neuronal degeneration within the brains of birds from both susceptible and resistant lines exhibiting TP at 11 dpi. Vaccination prevented development of TP and other MD-associated clinical symptoms. These observations are suggestive of an underlying immunological mechanism for viral-induced neurological dysfunction, and the differential responses of the two chicken lines to MDV infection.

  8. Susceptibility breakpoint for enrofloxacin against swine Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Pan, Huafang; Ahmad, Ijaz; Cheng, Guyue; Wang, Yulian; Dai, Menghong; Tao, Yanfei; Chen, Dongmei; Peng, Dapeng; Liu, Zhenli; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-09-01

    Susceptibility breakpoints are crucial for prudent use of antimicrobials. This study has developed the first susceptibility breakpoint (MIC ≤ 0.25 μg/ml) for enrofloxacin against swine Salmonella spp. based on wild-type cutoff (COWT) and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) cutoff (COPD) values, consequently providing a criterion for susceptibility testing and clinical usage of enrofloxacin.

  9. Aquifer susceptibility in Virginia, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelms, David L.; Harlow,, George E.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Health, sampled water from 171 wells and springs across the Commonwealth of Virginia between 1998 and 2000 as part of the Virginia Aquifer Susceptibility study. Most of the sites sampled are public water supplies that are part of the comprehensive Source Water Assessment Program for the Commonwealth. The fundamental premise of the study was that the identification of young waters (less than 50 years) by multiple environmental tracers could be used as a guide for classifying aquifers in terms of susceptibility to contamination from near-surface sources. Environmental tracers, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), and carbon isotopes (14C and d13C) were used to determine the age of water discharging from wells and springs. Concentrations of CFCs greater than 5 picograms per kilogram and 3H concentrations greater than 0.6 tritium unit were used as thresholds to indicate that parts of the aquifer sampled have a component of young water and are, therefore, susceptible to near-surface contamination. Concentrations of CFCs exceeded the susceptibility threshold in 22 percent of the wells and in one spring sampled in the Coastal Plain regional aquifer systems. About 74 percent of the samples from wells with the top of the first water zone less than 100 feet below land surface exceeded the threshold values, and water supplies developed in the upper 100 feet of the Coastal Plain are considered to be susceptible to contamination from near-surface sources. The maximum depth to the top of the screened interval for wells that contained CFCs was less than 150 feet. Wells completed in the deep confined aquifers in the Coastal Plain generally contain water older than 1,000 years, as indicated by carbon-14 dating, and are not considered to be susceptible to contamination under natural conditions. All of the water samples from wells

  10. The sedimentary records of Holocene environmental changes from the Central High of the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikci, Betul; Çağatay, Namık; Kadir Eriş, Kürşad; Akyol, Mustafa; Yalamaz, Burak; Uçarkuş, Gülsen; Henry, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara (SoM) is located between the Aegean Sea and the Black Sea, to which it is connected via the Istanbul (Bosphorus) and Canakkale (Dardanelles) straits having sill depths of 65 and 35 m, respectively. It has a two-way water mass exchange with a permanent pycnocline located at 20-25 m water depth. With the objective of determining Holocene paleoenvironmental changes, we studied a 8.36 m-long piston core recovered from the Central High of the SoM at a water depth of 835 m, using multiproxy analyses such as total organic and inorganic carbon, high resolution µ-XRF core scanner analysis, grain size, magnetic susceptibility and density. A 2 cm-thick tephra layer with high K and Zr and relatively low magnetic susceptibility occurs at 2.1 meter below sea floor (mbsf), which is correlated with the Avellino (Somma-Vesuvius, Italy) eruption dated at 3.9 ka BP, according to the previous studies. Using this age and assuming a uniform sedimentation rate, the base of the core dates back to ca 8 ka BP. The core includes organic-rich (sapropelic) sediments with 1.5 % to 2.2%) in its top 3.5 m and bottom 1 m. Sapropelic layers are olive green and in part laminated, and contain occasional reddish brown spots and laminae formed by oxidation of iron monosulphides. The core also contains some few mm- to cm-thick sandy-silty mass-flow units below 2.4 mbsf, some of which could have been triggered by the earthquake activity on the Central High segment of the North Anatolian Fault, just a few km away from the core location. Variations in Ca-Ti ratio suggest millennial-scale climatic changes during the Holocene. Keywords: Sea of Marmara, Holocene paleoenvironmental records, tephra, turbidites, TOC analysis, XRF analysis, physical properties.

  11. A multidisciplinary approach for analysing landslide susceptibility in Abruzzo piedmont (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Marco; Urbano, Tullio; Coco, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility is the probability or likelihood that a landslide phenomenon happens in a specific area and in a not determined date, based on the correlation of controlling factors with distribution of past events. The present work presents a landslide susceptibility analysis assessment in the Feltrino Stream basin and minor surrounding coastal basins in south-eastern Abruzzo Region (Central Italy). The work was based on a multidisciplinary approach involving GIS (Geographic Information System) processing and geomorphological field survey. The study area, as well as the whole Italian Adriatic hills, is characterized by moderate to high landslide susceptibility, because of the complex geological, geomorphological and climatic features. Geologically, the bedrock is mainly characterised by marine deposits composed by clay-sandstone-conglomerate lithology belonging to Upper Pliocene - Lower Pleistocene, and locally by marine to continental transitional deposits belonging to Middle Pleistocene. The bedrock is largely covered by near-surface continental deposits composed by clay-silt-sand-gravel lithology ranging in age from Upper Pleistocene to Holocene. From the geomorphological viewpoint, the area is involved in different landslides phenomena (rock falls, rotational, translational and complex landslides, earth flows) which affect ~15% of the overall surface area. The landslide susceptibility study was carried out through a geostatistical analysis of landslides driver factors. Air-photos analysis was conducted for larger landslides and hillslope areas. The identified landslides were corroborated through a detailed geomorphological field survey. The methodology involved three main steps. Firstly, the main driver factors, directly or indirectly linked to slope instability, were defined and mapped by DTM processing, air-photos analysis and detailed geomorphological field survey. Morphological, geological and geomorphological factors were considered: slope

  12. Expert opinion on landslide susceptibility elicted by probabilistic inversion from scenario rankings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Katy; Dashwood, Claire; Lark, Murray

    2016-04-01

    For many natural hazards the opinion of experts, with experience in assessing susceptibility under different circumstances, is a valuable source of information on which to base risk assessments. This is particularly important where incomplete process understanding, and limited data, limit the scope to predict susceptibility by mechanistic or statistical modelling. The expert has a tacit model of a system, based on their understanding of processes and their field experience. This model may vary in quality, depending on the experience of the expert. There is considerable interest in how one may elicit expert understanding by a process which is transparent and robust, to provide a basis for decision support. One approach is to provide experts with a set of scenarios, and then to ask them to rank small overlapping subsets of these with respect to susceptibility. Methods of probabilistic inversion have been used to compute susceptibility scores for each scenario, implicit in the expert ranking. It is also possible to model these scores as functions of measurable properties of the scenarios. This approach has been used to assess susceptibility of animal populations to invasive diseases, to assess risk to vulnerable marine environments and to assess the risk in hypothetical novel technologies for food production. We will present the results of a study in which a group of geologists with varying degrees of expertise in assessing landslide hazards were asked to rank sets of hypothetical simplified scenarios with respect to land slide susceptibility. We examine the consistency of their rankings and the importance of different properties of the scenarios in the tacit susceptibility model that their rankings implied. Our results suggest that this is a promising approach to the problem of how experts can communicate their tacit model of uncertain systems to those who want to make use of their expertise.

  13. [Genetic factors in susceptibility to age- and noise-related hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Sliwińiska-Kowalska, Mariola; Pawelczyk, Małgorzata; Kowalski, Tomasz Jarema

    2006-10-01

    Individual susceptibility to age-related hearing loss (AHL) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) varies greatly, and this inter-individual variation is due to an interaction of environmental factors, individual factors, and susceptibility genes. Majority of studies on susceptibility genes for AHL and NIHL have been performed in mice model. These findings suggest the role of the same genes in the development of AHL and NIHL, the more so as the pathogenesis of both diseases is similar with a crucial role of oxidative stress. The alleles responsible for AHL have been localized to the chromosome 10 (Ahl gene). Ahl-/- mice develop hearing impairment at early age and are also oversensitive to noise. Ahl gene is a recessive gene and it is probably responsible for the synthesis of cell junction proteins. In mice ahl codes for cadherin (CDH) proteins. The cadherin of interest is named otocadherin or CDH23, and it is localized to the links between stereocilia of hair cells. A hypomorphic 753G>A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Cdh 23 is associated with AHL, and the 753A variant is also correlated with susceptibility to NIHL. An increased susceptibility to AHL and NIHL may rely on the SNPs of several other genes, including the groups of oxidative stress genes, K+ ions recycling genes, monogenic deafness genes (including Connexin 26 gene, which mutation is responsible for the most frequent hereditary deafness in Caucasians), as well as mitochondrial genes. Several oxidative stress enzyme (sod1-/-, gpx -/-) knock-out mice have been shown to be more susceptible to NIHL than wild strains. Current large-scale cohort studies on AHL and NIHL performed under the European projects in between-lab collaboration along with a dynamic progress in the field of genetics of deafness open up new opportunities to find human AHL and NIHL susceptibility genes and develop methods for AHUNIHL treatment.

  14. Susceptibility Contrast in High Field MRI of Human Brain as a Function of Tissue Iron Content

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bing; Li, Tie-Qiang; van Gelderen, Peter; Shmueli, Karin; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility provides an important contrast mechanism for MRI. Increasingly, susceptibility-based contrast is being exploited to investigate brain tissue microstructure and to detect abnormal levels of brain iron as these have been implicated in a variety of neuro-degenerative diseases. However, it remains unclear to what extent magnetic susceptibility-related contrast at high field relates to actual brain iron concentrations. In this study, we performed susceptibility weighted imaging as a function of field strength on healthy brains in vivo and post-mortem brain tissues at 1.5T, 3T and 7T. Iron histology was performed on the tissue samples for comparison. The calculated susceptibility-related parameters R2* and signal frequency shift in four iron-rich regions (putamen, globus pallidus, caudate, and thalamus) showed an almost linear dependence (r=0.90 for R2*; r=0.83 for phase, p<0.01) on field strength, suggesting that potential ferritin saturation effects are not relevant to susceptibility-weighted contrast for field strengths up to 7T. The R2* dependence on the putative (literature-based) iron concentration was 0.048 Hz/Tesla/ppm. The histological data from brain samples confirmed the linear dependence of R2* on field strength and showed a slope against iron concentration of 0.0099 Hz/Tesla/ppm dry-weight, which is equivalent to 0.05 Hz/Tesla/ppm wet-weight and closely matched the calculated value in vivo. These results confirm the validity of using susceptibility-weighted contrast as an indicator of iron content in iron-rich brain regions. The absence of saturation effects opens the way to exploit the benefits of MRI at high field strengths for the detection of iron distributions with high sensitivity and resolution. PMID:19027861

  15. Gene polymorphisms in pattern recognition receptors and susceptibility to idiopathic recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosentul, Diana C.; Delsing, Corine E.; Jaeger, Martin; Plantinga, Theo S.; Oosting, Marije; Costantini, Irene; Venselaar, Hanka; Joosten, Leo A. B.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Dupont, Bertrand; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Sobel, Jack D.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Approximately 5% of women suffer from recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). It has been hypothesized that genetic factors play an important role in the susceptibility to RVVC. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of genetic variants of genes encoding for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on susceptibility to RVVC. Study design: For the study, 119 RVVC patients and 263 healthy controls were recruited. Prevalence of polymorphisms in five PRRs involved in recognition of Candida were investigated in patients and controls. In silico and functional studies were performed to assess their functional effects. Results: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR1, TLR4, CLEC7A, and CARD9 did not affect the susceptibility to RVVC. In contrast, a non-synonymous polymorphism in TLR2 (rs5743704, Pro631His) increased the susceptibility to RVVC almost 3-fold. Furthermore, the TLR2 rs5743704 SNP had deleterious effects on protein function as assessed by in silico analysis, and in vitro functional assays suggested that it reduces production of IL-17 and IFNγ upon stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with Candida albicans. No effects were observed on serum mannose-binding lectin concentrations. Condensation: This study demonstrates the association of susceptibility to RVVC with genetic variation in TLR2, most likely caused by decreased induction of mucosal antifungal host defense. Conclusion: Genetic variation in TLR2 may significantly enhance susceptibility to RVVC by modulating host defense mechanisms against Candida. Additional studies are warranted to assess systematically the role of host genetic variation for susceptibility to RVVC. PMID:25295030

  16. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher F; Elbe, Laura A; Neal, Tyler D; Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic misuse and overuse in both the healthcare and agricultural fields have dramatically increased the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. Two strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (ATCC 43330 and a wild-type) and 1 strain of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (ATCC 25923) were challenged (9 runs in triplicate) in a preliminary study with ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) doses ranging from 0.25 to 3.00 mJ/cm(2). The mean percent kill was calculated for each strain when compared with the control plates (no exposure to UVGI). Then, each strain was challenged (22 runs in triplicate) with UVGI doses of 2.00, 2.50, and 3.00 mJ/cm(2). The results suggest a difference between the doses required to disinfect surfaces with each strain. Assuming a standard error rate of α = 0.05, there was a significant difference in variance between the MRSA (ATCC 43330 and wild type) strains and the S. aureus (ATCC 25923) methicillin-susceptible strain.

  17. Towards a Remote Sensing Based Assessment of Land Susceptibility to Degradation: Examining Seasonal Variation in Land Use-Land Cover for Modelling Land Degradation in a Semi-Arid Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashame, Gofamodimo; Akinyemi, Felicia

    2016-06-01

    Land degradation (LD) is among the major environmental and anthropogenic problems driven by land use-land cover (LULC) and climate change worldwide. For example, poor LULC practises such as deforestation, livestock overstocking, overgrazing and arable land use intensification on steep slopes disturbs the soil structure leaving the land susceptible to water erosion, a type of physical land degradation. Land degradation related problems exist in Sub-Saharan African countries such as Botswana which is semi-arid in nature. LULC and LD linkage information is still missing in many semi-arid regions worldwide.Mapping seasonal LULC is therefore very important in understanding LULC and LD linkages. This study assesses the impact of seasonal LULC variation on LD utilizing Remote Sensing (RS) techniques for Palapye region in Central District, Botswana. LULC classes for the dry and rainy seasons were classified using LANDSAT 8 images at Level I according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) International Organization of Standardization (ISO) code 19144. Level I consists of 10 LULC classes. The seasonal variations in LULC are further related to LD susceptibility in the semi-arid context. The results suggest that about 985 km² (22%) of the study area is susceptible to LD by water, major LULC types affected include: cropland, paved/rocky material, bare land, built-up area, mining area, and water body. Land degradation by water susceptibility due to seasonal land use-land cover variations is highest in the east of the study area where there is high cropland to bare land conversion.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced.

  19. Enhanced brain susceptibility to negative stimuli in adolescents: ERP evidences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiajin; Ju, Enxia; Meng, Xianxin; Chen, Xuhai; Zhu, Siyu; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigated neural substrates of emotional face processing in adolescents and its comparison with adults. As emotional faces elicit more of emotional expression recognition rather than direct emotional responding, it remains undetermined how adolescents are different from adults in brain susceptibility to emotionally stressful stimuli. Methods: Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults while subjects performed a standard/deviant distinction task by pressing different keys, irrespective of the emotionality of deviant stimuli. Results: Adolescents exhibited more negative amplitudes for HN vs. neutral pictures in N1 (100–150 ms), P2 (130–190 ms), N2 (210–290 ms), and P3 (360–440 ms) components. In addition, adolescents showed more negative amplitudes for MN compared to neutral pictures in N1, P2, and N2 components. By contrast, adults exhibited significant emotion effects for HN stimuli in N2 and P3 amplitudes but not in N1 and P2 amplitudes, and they did not exhibit a significant emotion effect for MN stimuli at all these components. In the 210–290 ms time interval, the emotion effect for HN stimuli was significant across frontal and central regions in adolescents, while this emotion effect was noticeable only in the central region for adults. Conclusions: Adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of the emotional intensity of the stimuli, possibly due to the immature prefrontal control system over the limbic emotional inputs during adolescence. PMID:25972790

  20. Does reactivating a witnessed memory increase its susceptibility to impairment by subsequent misinformation?

    PubMed

    Rindal, Eric J; DeFranco, Rachel M; Rich, Patrick R; Zaragoza, Maria S

    2016-10-01

    In a recent PNAS article, Chan and LaPaglia (2013) provided arguments and evidence to support the claim that reactivating a witnessed memory (by taking a test) renders the memory labile and susceptible to impairment by subsequent misinformation. In the current article, we argue that Chan and LaPaglia’s (2013) findings are open to alternative interpretations, and further test the hypothesis that reactivation increases a witnessed memory’s susceptibility to impairment. To this end, the current studies used a different set of materials and a different measure of memory impairment, the Modified Recognition Test (McCloskey & Zaragoza, 1985). In Experiment 1a, we established that our reactivation manipulation was effective by showing that we could replicate the well-established retrieval enhanced suggestibility effect with our materials. However, when we assessed potential impairment of the witnessed memory with the Modified Recognition Test (Experiments 1a and 1b), we failed to find evidence that reactivating the witnessed memory prior to misinformation impaired memory for the originally witnessed event. In Experiment 2, we replicated Chan and LaPaglia’s (2013) findings when we used their memory impairment measure (misinformation-free True/False Recognition Test) and showed why that test does not permit clear inferences about memory impairment. Collectively, the results showed that, although the reactivation manipulation increased susceptibility to suggestion (i.e., as evidenced by increased reporting of suggested misinformation), there was no evidence that reactivation through testing increased the original memory’s susceptibility to impairment.