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Sample records for sulfur compounds sulfur

  1. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Sulfur compounds in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Ahearn, M.

    1989-01-01

    Cometary atmospheres exhibit abundant sulfur and sulfur compounds, which are absent in planetary atmospheres. Sulfur compounds were also detected in interstellar media, including SO, SO2, CS, etc., but excluding S2 which was identified only in IRAS-Araki-Alcock 1983d. Fluorescence calculations are used to analyze the B-X system of S2 which appeared in IUE and ground-based spectra of IRAS-Araki-Alcock 1983d. Single- and multiple-cycle fluorescence calculations indicate that fluorescent equilibrium accounts for the observed spectra despite the fact that the S2 lifetime against solar ultraviolet radiation is relatively short. This analysis confirms unambiguously that emission peaks in the 3000 to 4000 A spectral range of the ground-based data are due to the B-X bands of S2. New evidence is presented of at least one S2 outburst before it was detected by A'Hearn, Feldman, and Schleicher. The time variation of S2 outgassing rates and discussion on the correlation between solar wind flux and the S2 outbursts will be presented.

  3. Sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, elemental sulfur and the byproduct sulfuric acid were produced at 109 operations in 29 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Total shipments were valued at about $1.6 billion. Elemental sulfur production was 8.2 Mt (9 million st); Louisiana and Texas accounted for about 53 percent of domestic production.

  4. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  5. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  6. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  7. Ambient Air Monitoring for Sulfur Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Joseph; Newman, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    A literature review of analytical techniques available for the study of compounds at low concentrations points up some of the areas where further research is needed. Compounds reviewed are sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate and bisulfate, metal sulfates, hydrogen sulfide, and organic sulfides. (BL)

  8. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2011-11-18

    Sulfur aromatic compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraalkyl-substituted thiophene, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, are the molecular components of many fossils (petroleum, oil shale, tar sands, bitumen). Structural units of natural, cross-linked heteroaromatic polymers present in brown coals, turf, and soil are similar to those of sulfur aromatic compounds. Many sulfur aromatic compounds are found in the streams of petroleum refining and upgrading (naphthas, gas oils) and in the consumer products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuels, heating fuels). Besides fossils, the structural fragments of sulfur aromatic compounds are present in molecules of certain organic semiconductors, pesticides, small molecule drugs, and in certain biomolecules present in human body (pheomelanin pigments). Photocatalysis is the frontier area of physical chemistry that studies chemical reactions initiated by absorption of photons by photocatalysts, that is, upon electronic rather than thermal activation, under "green" ambient conditions. This review provides systematization and critical review of the fundamental chemical and physicochemical information on heterogeneous photocatalysis of sulfur aromatic compounds accumulated in the last 20-30 years. Specifically, the following topics are covered: physicochemical properties of sulfur aromatic compounds, major classes of heterogeneous photocatalysts, mechanisms and reactive intermediates of photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds, and the selectivity of these reactions. Quantum chemical calculations of properties and structures of sulfur aromatic compounds, their reactive intermediates, and the structure of adsorption complexes formed on the surface of the photocatalysts are also discussed.

  9. Process for removing sulfur and sulfur compounds from the effluent of industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1981-03-10

    Sulfur dioxide in the stack gas from an industrial process is converted to elemental sulfur in a claus reactor at low temperature to produce sulfur fume. The sulfur is condensed by direct heat transfer with a continuously flowing countercurrent recirculating catalyst and a substantially sulfur dioxide-free gas is discharged. Catalyst and condensed sulfur are fed into the top of a sulfur recovery column and heated in the top of the column by direct heat transfer with a countercurrent stream of recycle gas. The sulfur and catalyst descend into a vaporization zone of the column where sulfur is vaporized. The vaporized sulfur is carried by the recycle gas back towards the top of the column and condensed to a fume by incoming sulfur bearing catalyst. The sulfur fume is carried from the top of the column in cold recycle gas. Hot catalyst from the vaporization section of the column is cooled by recycle gas entering the bottom of the column. Sulfur fume is recovered conventionally. Regenerated catalyst from the column is returned to the sulfur dioxide reactor. Claus plant tail gas with air passes into the base of an incinerator and passes countercurrent to recycled heat transfer solids and is oxidized to convert sulfur and sulfur bearing compounds to sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide is then converted to sulfur in the process just described.

  10. Anticancer Mechanism of Sulfur-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    De Gianni, Elena; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and vegetables have traditionally represented a main source for the discovery of many biologically active substances with therapeutic values. Among the many bioactive compounds identified over the years, sulfur-containing compounds, which are present especially in the genera Allium and Brassica, have been showing a protective effect against different types of cancer. Many in vitro and in vivo studies reported that apoptosis is crucial for the anticancer effects of sulfur-containing compounds. Garlic and onion compounds and isothiocyanates contained in Brassica vegetables are able to modulate apoptosis by a wide range of mechanisms. This chapter will give an overview on the induction of apoptosis by sulfur-containing compounds in cancer cells and their different molecular mechanisms. Finally, the potential clinical implications of their proapoptotic effects will be discussed. PMID:26298460

  11. Metabolic Reactions among Organic Sulfur Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, M.; Rogers, K.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur is central to the metabolisms of many organisms that inhabit extreme environments. Numerous authors have addressed the energy available from a variety of inorganic sulfur redox pairs. Less attention has been paid, however, to the energy required or gained from metabolic reactions among organic sulfur compounds. Work in this area has focused on the oxidation of alkyl sulfide or disulfide to thiol and formaldehyde, e.g. (CH3)2S + H2O yields CH3SH + HCHO + H2, eventually resulting in the formation of CO2 and SO4(-2). It is also found that reactions among thiols and disulfides may help control redox disequilibria between the cytoplasm and the periplasm. Building on our earlier efforts for thiols, we have compiled and estimated thermodynamic properties for alkyl sulfides. We are investigating metabolic reactions among various sulfur compounds in a variety of extreme environments, ranging from sea floor hydrothermal systems to organic-rich sludge. Using thermodynamic data and the revised HKF equation of state, along with constraints imposed by the geochemical environments sulfur-metabolizing organisms inhabit, we are able to calculate the amount of energy available to these organisms.

  12. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, H.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.

    2007-02-02

    In this 'feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of 'standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  13. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized 10 and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  14. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    DOEpatents

    Moore, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  15. Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; van der Drift, C; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

    2002-04-01

    Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), especially dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methanethiol (MT), is intensively studied because these compounds play an important role in the processes of global warming, acid precipitation, and the global sulfur cycle. VOSC concentrations in freshwater sediments are low due to the balance between the formation and degradation of these compounds. These reactions occur for the greater part at the oxic/anoxic interphase of sediment and water column. In contrast to marine ecosystems, where dimethylsulfoniopropionate is the main precursor of MT and DMS, in freshwater ecosystems, VOSCs are formed mainly by methylation of sulfide and to a lesser extent from the degradation of S-containing amino acids. One of the major routes for DMS and MT formation through sulfide methylation is anaerobic O-demethylation of methoxylated aromatic compounds. Inhibition studies have revealed that the major part of the endogenously produced MT and DMS is degraded anaerobically by methanogens. The major bacterial groups involved in formation and consumption of VOSCs are described. PMID:12022467

  16. Sulfur compound concentrations at swine and poultry facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced sulfur compounds are emitted from waste handling at animal agriculture operations. These sulfur compounds are responsible for odor production as well as participating in atmospheric chemistry. We have adapted a chromatographic method for providing 10 minute online monitoring capability of re...

  17. Microbial desulfurization of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, T; Izumi, Y

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur removal from petroleum is important from the standpoint of the global environment because the combustion of sulfur compounds leads to the production of sulfur oxides, which are the source of acid rain. As the regulations for sulfur in fuels become more stringent, the existing chemical desulfurizations are coming inadequate for the "deeper desulfurization" to produce lower-sulfur fuels without new and innovative processes. Biodesulfurization is rising as one of the candidates. Several microorganisms were found to desulfurize dibenzothiophene (DBT), a representative of the organic sulfur compounds in petroleum, forming a sulfur-free compound, 2-hydroxybiphenyl. They are promising as biocatalysts in the microbial desulfurization of petroleum because without assimilation of the carbon content, they remove only sulfur from the heterocyclic compounds which is refractory to conventional chemical desulfurization. Both enzymological and molecular genetic studies are now in progress for the purpose of obtaining improved desulfurization activity of organisms. The genes involved in the sulfur-specific DBT desulfurization were identified and the corresponding enzymes have been investigated. From the practical point of view, it has been proved that the microbial desulfurization proceeds in the presence of high concentrations of hydrocarbons, and more complicated DBT analogs are also desulfurized by the microorganisms. This review outlines the progress in the studies of the microbial desulfurization from the basic and practical point of view.

  18. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  19. Analysis for sulfur compound types in heavy crudes

    SciTech Connect

    Saetre, R.; Somogyvari, A. )

    1989-04-01

    It has been well established that the sulfur containing components of crude oil are corrosive, decrease catalyst efficiency, and release noxious vapors during their chemical reactions. Consequently, the processing of high sulfur feeds reduces refining capacity and increases the cost of the final products. Furthermore, the polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) may pose mutagenic and/or carcinogenic hazards. Specific classes of sulfur compounds have been found to be more objectionable than others, while some are considered beneficial in limited applications. Thus, it is important to identify the organosulfur classes which are undesirable for the specific application and to ascertain the concentration limits which are deleterious. The sulfur compounds in crude oils may be expected to undergo two types of reactions-addition (usually to heavy metal sales) and oxidation. The former was the basis for the sulfur class analyses performed by Ball under the auspices of API project 48. The method has found application recently; however, it requires large samples, is time and manpower intensive, and has been proved only for the lightest fractions of petroleum. The latter method, that of oxidation, has been the basis for several sulfur compound type analyses in crude oil and its fractions. They have used both the of these techniques for the analyses of sulfur compound types in heavy crudes and their fractions. They wish to report on the applicability of, and their modification to, some of these techniques and present their findings.

  20. Biodesulfurization of refractory organic sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mehran; Bassi, Amarjeet; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2007-01-01

    The stringent new regulations to lower sulfur content in fossil fuels require new economic and efficient methods for desulfurization of recalcitrant organic sulfur. Hydrodesulfurization of such compounds is very costly and requires high operating temperature and pressure. Biodesulfurization is a non-invasive approach that can specifically remove sulfur from refractory hydrocarbons under mild conditions and it can be potentially used in industrial desulfurization. Intensive research has been conducted in microbiology and molecular biology of the competent strains to increase their desulfurization activity; however, even the highest activity obtained is still insufficient to fulfill the industrial requirements. To improve the biodesulfurization efficiency, more work is needed in areas such as increasing specific desulfurization activity, hydrocarbon phase tolerance, sulfur removal at higher temperature, and isolating new strains for desulfurizing a broader range of sulfur compounds. This article comprehensively reviews and discusses key issues, advances and challenges for a competitive biodesulfurization process.

  1. The sulfur fixing characteristics on calcium-compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Dongyao, X.; Qiaowen, Y.; Jinghua, C.; Qiwen, F.; Peiling, X.

    1999-07-01

    On the basis of a three factor and four level orthogonal experiment, the sulfur fixing characteristic on calcium-compounds has been studied. Three factors include burning temperature, the ratio of calcium versus sulfur and calcium-compounds. The sulfur fixing efficiency of sample was calculated through measuring the sulfur content of slag by means of X-ray fluorescent analysis, and it was found that influence of calcium-compounds on the efficiency is more important than the burning temperature or the ratio, and that Ca(OH){sub 2} has a better efficiency than CaO or CaCO{sub 3}. As the burning temperature is increased, the efficiency is decreased; when the ratio is increased, the efficiency will increase. Sulfur fixing agent and coal powder were mixed, then the mixture obtained was burned, the best efficiency of fixing sulfur was only 33%. As a result, some measures must be adopted to increase the efficiency to a extent that the sulfur fixing agent on the basis of calcium-compounds can be used practically.

  2. Ultrasound assisted regioselective sulfonation of aromatic compounds with sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin S; Deshmukh, Krishna M; Jagtap, Sachin R; Nandurkar, Nitin S; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2009-03-01

    A simple and convenient methodology for selective sulfonation of aromatic compounds using sulfuric acid under sonication is described. The present methodology shows a considerable enhancement in the reaction rate along with improved selectivity compared with the reactions performed under silent conditions. The effect of various parameters such as agitation speed, sulfuric acid concentration, and temperature on reaction system have been investigated and are explained on the basis of ultrasonically generated cavitational effects. PMID:19014895

  3. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly. PMID:19710121

  4. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  5. A Systematic Presentation of Organic Phosphorus and Sulfur Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, James B.

    1985-01-01

    Because the names, interrelations, and oxidation levels of the organic compounds of phosphorus and sulfur tend to confuse students, a simple way to organize these compounds has been developed. The system consists of grouping them by oxidation state and extent of carbon substitution. (JN)

  6. Sulfur-binding in recent environments: II. Speciation of sulfur and iron and implications for the occurrence of organo-sulfur compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartgers, Walter A.; Lòpez, Jordi F.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Reiss, Christine; Maxwell, James R.; Grimalt, Joan O.

    1997-11-01

    Speciation of iron and sulfur species was determined for two recent sediments (La Trinitat and Lake Cisó) which were deposited in environments with a high biological productivity and sulfate-reducing activity. In sediments from calcite ponds of La Trinitat an excess of reactive iron species (iron monosulfides, iron hydroxides) results in a depletion of reactive sulfur which is accompanied by a virtual absence of organo-sulfur compounds, both in low (LMW) and high molecular-weight (HMW) fractions. Small amounts of phytanyl and highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) thiophenes in the extract demonstrate that these molecules exhibit a higher reactivity towards reduced sulfur species as compared to detrital iron. Euxinic sediments from Lake Cisó are characterised by an excess of reduced sulfur species which can rapidly trap reactive iron. High concentrations of H 2S results in the formation of organo-sulfur compounds which were encountered in both LMW and HMW fractions. The major part of the organic sulfur is bound to the carbohydrate portion of woody tissues, whose presence was revealed by a specific alkylthiophene distribution in the flash pyrolysate and by Li/EtNH 2 desulfurisation of the kerogen which resulted in the solubilisation of the sulfur-enriched hemicellulose fraction. Relatively high amounts of sulfurised C 25 HBI compounds in the sediment extract of Lake Cisó reflect the incorporation of sulfur into algal derived organic matter upon early diagenesis. The combined approach of the speciation of iron and sulfur species and the molecular analysis of sedimentary fractions demonstrates that abiotic sulfur binding to organic matter occurs at the earliest stages of diagenesis under specific depositional conditions (anoxic, stratified water column) in which an excess of reduced sulfur species relative to the amount of reactive iron is a controlling factor.

  7. Antioxidant combinations of molybdenum complexes and organic sulfur compounds for lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    deVries, L.; King, J.M.

    1983-09-06

    An antioxidant additive combination for lubricating oils is prepared by combining (a) a sulfur containing molybdenum compound prepared by reacting an ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and a basic nitrogen compound, with (b) an organic sulfur compound.

  8. Process for removal of sulfur compounds from fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.; Stegen, Gary E.

    1978-01-01

    Fuel gases such as those produced in the gasification of coal are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate matter by contact with molten metal salt. The fuel gas and salt are intimately mixed by passage through a venturi or other constriction in which the fuel gas entrains the molten salt as dispersed droplets to a gas-liquid separator. The separated molten salt is divided into a major and a minor flow portion with the minor flow portion passing on to a regenerator in which it is contacted with steam and carbon dioxide as strip gas to remove sulfur compounds. The strip gas is further processed to recover sulfur. The depleted, minor flow portion of salt is passed again into contact with the fuel gas for further sulfur removal from the gas. The sulfur depleted, fuel gas then flows through a solid absorbent for removal of salt droplets. The minor flow portion of the molten salt is then recombined with the major flow portion for feed to the venturi.

  9. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  10. Gas-chromatographic retention indexes of organic sulfur (II) compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Garbuzov, V.G.; Aerov, A.F.; Golovnya, R.V.; Misharina, T.A.

    1985-10-01

    Despite the large number of papers on the gas chromatographyof sulfur-containing compounds, according to the authors no systematic study has been carried out of their behavior, showing the dependences of the sorptional characteristics on the structure of the molecule and on the polarity of the stationary phase. The present article systematizes the results of many years of work on the determination on four columns with different polarity of retention indexes of sulfurcontaining compounds: mercaptans, dimercaptans, di-n-alkyl sulfides, n-alkyl isoalkyl sulfides, diisoalkyl sulfides, unsaturated sulfides, di-n-alkyl disulfides, and many others, in all more than 400 compounds. The data obtained and the regularities in their change, depending on the structure and polarity of the stationary phases, were successfully used to identify sulfur-containing compounds in the study of the odor composition of salmon flesh, boiled beef, boiled-corned pork and an aromatizer with a meat aroma.

  11. Sulfur Mustard

    MedlinePlus

    ... the environment. Sulfur mustard was introduced in World War I as a chemical warfare agent. Historically it ... fatal. When sulfur mustard was used during World War I, it killed fewer than 5% of the ...

  12. Microbial extraction of sulfur from model coal organosulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, R.F.; Ward, B.; Lepo, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Several hundred bacterial cultures isolated from a variety of natural sites were screened for their ability to desulfurize the model coal organosulfur compounds, dibenzothiophene (DBT) and DBT-sulfone. A sulfur-stress assay, in which DBT-sulfone was the only bioavailable source of sulfur, was used to screen and select for organisms that selectively desulfurized the organic-sulfur substrate. Only two new isolates, UMX9 and UMX3, and strain IGTS-8, a Rhodococcus rhodochrous provided by the Institute for Gas Technology (Chicago, USA.) as a reference culture, would grow on DBT or DBT-sulfone as a sole source of sulfur. Under sulfur-stress conditions, a desulfurized product identified as 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-phenylphenol) was detected only for UMX9 and IGTS-8. Biodesulfurization activity for all three organisms occurred only for growing cultures, and was depressed by free sulfate, although more so for UMX3 and IGTS-8 than for UMX9. None of the three cultures exhibited good growth on DBT, DBT-sulfone, or 2-phenylphenol as sole sources of carbon. Taxonomic studies revealed UMX3 to be similar to IGTS-8, whereas UMX9 only exhibited Rhodococcus-like features. Comparative tests for carbohydrate utilization revealed that only UMX9 would grow on glucose, and that only IGTS-8 would grow on L-arabinose. Assays of biodesulfurization activity as a function of temperature or pH revealed further differences between UMX9 and UMX3/IGTS-8. Under optimized assay conditions for each organism, UMX9 exhibited up to 30% greater biodesulfurization activity than did IGTS-8 and UMX3, which were similar in activity.

  13. Hydrodesulfurization reactivities of various sulfur compounds in vacuum gas oil

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I.

    1996-08-01

    The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of a vacuum gas oil (VGO) was performed at 360 C (6.9 MPa) over a commercial NiMo catalyst to examine the HDS reactivities of various sulfur compounds which exist in the VGO by means of quantitative pseudo-first-order kinetic analysis. Four representative types of aromatic-skeleton sulfur compounds were observed in the VGO: alkylbenzothiophenes (BTs), alkyldibenzothiophenes (DBTs), alkylphenanthro[4,5-b,c,d]thiophenes (PTs), and alkylbenzonaphthothiophenes (BNTs). Among these, alkyl-BTs exhibited the highest HDS reactivity, whereas alkyl-DBTs with alkyl substituents at the 4 and/or 6 positions appeared to have the least reactivity even though their aromatic-skeleton is smaller than those of both alkyl-PTs and -BNTs. Steric hindrance of alkyl groups at specific positions appears to be a major reason for the low reactivity. Quantum chemical calculations on representative sulfur compounds were carried out to compare molecular parameters with their different HDS reactivities.

  14. Quadruple sulfur isotope constraints on the origin and cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified sulfidic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Kamyshny, Alexey; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Li, Yue; Farquhar, James

    2013-11-01

    We have quantified the major forms of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) distributed in the water column of stratified freshwater Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), to evaluate the biogeochemical pathways involved in their production. The lake's anoxic deep waters contain high concentrations of sulfate (12-16 mmol L-1) and sulfide (0.12 μmol L-1 to 1.5 mmol L-1) with relatively low VOSC concentrations, ranging from 0.1 nmol L-1 to 2.8 μmol L-1. Sulfur isotope measurements of combined volatile organic sulfur compounds demonstrate that VOSC species are formed primarily from reduced sulfur (H2S/HS-) and zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), with little input from sulfate. Thedata support a role of a combination of biological and abiotic processes in formation of carbon-sulfur bonds between reactive sulfur species and methyl groups of lignin components. These processes are responsible for very fast turnover of VOSC species, maintaining their low levels in FGL. No dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was detected by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the lake water column or in planktonic extracts. These observations indicate a pathway distinct from oceanic and coastal marine environments, where dimethylsulfide (DMS) and other VOSC species are principally produced via the breakdown of DMSP by plankton species.

  15. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds from spruce trees

    SciTech Connect

    Rennenberg, H.; Huber, B.; Schroeder, P.; Stahl, K.; Haunold, W.; Georgil, H.W.; Slovik, S.; Pfanz, H. )

    1990-03-01

    Spruce (Picea abies L.) trees from the same clone were supplied with different, but low, amounts of plant available sulfate in the soil (9.7-18.1 milligrams per 100 grams of soil). Branches attached to the trees were enclosed in a dynamic gas exchange cuvette and analyzed for the emission of volatile sulfur compounds. Independent of the sulfate supply in the soil, H{sub 2}S was the predominant reduced sulfur compound continuously emitted from the branches with high rates during the day and low rates in the night. In the light, as well as in the dark, the rates of H{sub 2}S emission increased exponentially with increasing water vapor flux from the needles. Approximately 1 nanomole of H{sub 2}S was found to be emitted per mole of water. When stomata were closed completely, only minute emission of H{sub 2}S was observed. Apparently, H{sub 2}S emission from the needles is highly dependent on stromatal aperture, and permeation through the cuticle is negligible. In several experiments, small amounts of dimethylsulfide and carbonylsulfide were also detected in a portion of the samples. However, SO{sub 2} was the only sulfur compound consistently emitted from branches of spruce trees in addition to H{sub 2}S. Emission of SO{sub 2} mainly proceeded via an outburst starting before the beginning of the light period. The total amount of SO{sub 2} emitted from the needles during this outburst was correlated with the plant available sulfate in the soil. The diurnal changes in sulfur metabolism that may result in an outburst of SO{sub 2} are discussed.

  16. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  17. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S??, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 ??C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (???6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (???0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  18. Tandem sulfur chemiluminescence and flame ionization detection with planar microfluidic devices for the characterization of sulfur compounds in hydrocarbon matrices.

    PubMed

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Shellie, R A; Cortes, H J

    2013-07-01

    The detection of sulfur compounds in different hydrocarbon matrices, from light hydrocarbon feedstocks to medium synthetic crude oil feeds provides meaningful information for optimization of refining processes as well as demonstration of compliance with petroleum product specifications. With the incorporation of planar microfluidic devices in a novel chromatographic configuration, sulfur compounds from hydrogen sulfide to alkyl dibenzothiophenes and heavier distributions of sulfur compounds over a wide range of matrices spanning across a boiling point range of more than 650°C can be characterized, using one single analytical configuration in less than 25min. In tandem with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector for sulfur analysis is a flame ionization detector. The flame ionization detector can be used to establish the boiling point range of the sulfur compounds in various hydrocarbon fractions for elemental specific simulated distillation analysis as well as profiling the hydrocarbon matrices for process optimization. Repeatability of less than 3% RSD (n=20) over a range of 0.5-1000 parts per million (v/v) was obtained with a limit of detection of 50 parts per billion and a linear range of 0.5-1000 parts per million with a correlation co-efficient of 0.998.

  19. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  20. Removal of sulfur compounds from combustion product exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Dah Y.

    1982-01-01

    A method and device are disclosed for removing sulfur containing contaminents from a combustion product exhaust. The removal process is carried out in two stages wherein the combustion product exhaust is dissolved in water, the water being then heated to drive off the sulfur containing contaminents. The sulfur containing gases are then resolublized in a cold water trap to form a concentrated solution which can then be used as a commercial product.

  1. Effects of inorganic sulfur addition on fluxes of volatile sulfur compounds in Sphagnum peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Short and long-term impacts of increased S deposition on fluxes of volatile S compounds (VSC's) from Sphagnum peatlands were investigated in an artificially acidified (sulfuric and nitric acids) poor fen (Mire 239) at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Ontario, Canada. Additional experiments were conducted in a poor fen (Sallie's Fen) in Barrington, NH, USA. At Mire 239, emissions of VSC's were monitored, before and after acidification, at control (unacidified) and experimental sections within two major physiographic zones of the mire (oligotrophic and minerotrophic). The experimental segments of the mire received S amendments since 1983, in amounts equivalent to the annual S deposition in the highest polluted areas of Canada and U.S. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was the predominant VSC released from the mire and varied largely with time and space (i.e., from 2.5 to 127 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1)). Sulfur addition did not affect DMS emissions in a period of hours to a few days, although it stimulated production of DMS and MSH in the anoxic surficial regions of the peat. DMS emissions in the experimental oligotrophic segment of the mire was approximately 3-fold greater than in the control oligotrophic segment, and approximately 10-fold greater than in the minerotrophic zones. These differences could be due to a combination of differences in types of vegetation, nutritional status, and S input. At Sallie's Fen, DMS fluxes were approximately 8 times higher from a Sphagnum site than from a bare peat site. Fluxes of VSC's were not significantly affected by sulfate amendments at both sites, while DMS and MSH concentrations increases greatly with time in the top 10 cm of the peat column. Our data indicated that although Sphagnum is not the direct source of DMS released from Sphagnum peatlands, it might play a role in regulating DMS emissions to the atmosphere.

  2. Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in anoxic environments.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

    2002-01-01

    Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) is investigated due to the impact these compounds are thought to have on environmental processes like global temperature control, acid precipitation and the global sulfur cycle. Moreover, in several kinds of industries like composting plants and the paper industry VOSC are released causing odor problems. Waste streams containing these compounds must be treated in order to avoid the release of these compounds to the atmosphere. This paper describes the general mechanisms for the production and degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), two ubiquitous VOSC in anaerobic environments. Slurry incubations indicated that methylation of sulfide and MT resulting in MT and DMS, respectively, is one of the major mechanisms for VOSC in sulfide-rich anaerobic environments. An anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for the formation of MT and DMS through the anaerobic methylation of H2S and MT was isolated from a freshwater pond after enrichment with syringate as a methyl group donating compound and sole carbon source. In spite of the continuous formation of MT and DMS, steady state concentrations are generally very low. This is due to the microbial degradation of these compounds. Experiments with sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended sediment slurries demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria can also degrade MT and DMS, provided that sulfate is available. A methanogen was isolated that is able to grow on DMS as the sole carbon source. A large survey of sediments slurries of various origin demonstrated that both isolates are commonly occurring inhabitants of anaerobic environments.

  3. Portable instrument and method for detecting reduced sulfur compounds in a gas

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, J.S.; Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.

    1983-06-01

    A portable real time instrument for detecting concentrations in the part per billion range of reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas. Ozonized air or oxygen and reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas stream react to produce chemiluminescence in a reaction chamber and the emitted light is filtered and observed by a photomultiplier to detect reduced sulfur compounds. Selective response to individual sulfur compounds is achieved by varying reaction chamber temperature and ozone and sample gas flows, and by the use of either air or oxygen as the ozone source gas.

  4. [Utilization and transformation of sulfur-containing compounds by hens].

    PubMed

    Lagodiuk, P Z; Ratych, I B; Skvaruk, V I; Strazhnyk, Z Ia; Nazarevich, L E

    1984-01-01

    In the experiments with 35S-labelled sodium sulfate, sulfate sulfur was found to be used for cysteine synthesis in hens. The 35S label was detected in hen's eggs as well, the subshell membranes possessing the highest specific radioactivity. A dependence of 35S incorporation on the ovule developmental stage was revealed. It was established that a shortage of sulfur-containing amino acids in hens' diet can be partially compensated by sodium sulfate sulfur, which influences the concentration of some metabolites. PMID:6718330

  5. Measurement of total reduced sulfur compounds in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    McQuaker, N.R.; Rajala, G.E.; Pengilly, D.

    1986-05-01

    Methods for the determination of total reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds in the ambient air based on coulometric detection (Philips Model PW 9700 analyzer) and thermal oxidation followed by detection using pulsed fluorescence (Teco Model 43 analyzer) have been evaluated. Analytical response factors, relative to H/sub 2/S, were determined for both the individual TRS compounds and compounds such as terpenes and carbonyl sulfide that may be a potential source of interference. The results for COS and terpenes indicate that in a typical monitoring situation normally encountered concentrations of these compounds are not expected to cause significant measurement bias. The results for the individual TRS compounds indicate that while variations in TRS composition are not a factor in assessing measurement bias for the thermal oxidation/pulsed fluorescence method, they are a factor for the Philips coulometric method; i.e., increasing positive measurement bias maybe introduced as the TRS composition shifts toward relatively less H/sub 2/S. Philips-Teco comparison data collected at a single site in the vicinity of three operating kraft pupil mills are compatible with these expectations. 8 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  6. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  7. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  8. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  9. Sulfuric odorous compounds emitted from pig-feeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Youn; Ko, Han Jong; Kim, Hyeon Tae; Kim, Yoon Shin; Roh, Young Man; Lee, Cheol Min; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Chi Nyon

    The objective of the study was to quantify the concentration and emission levels of sulfuric odorous compounds emitted from pig-feeding operations. Five types of pig-housing rooms were studied: gestation, farrowing, nursery, growing and fattening rooms. The concentration range of sulfuric odorous compounds in these pig-housing rooms were 30-200 ppb for hydrogen sulfide (H 2S), 2.5-20 ppb for methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH), 1.5-12 ppb for dimethyl sulfide (DMS; CH 3SCH 3) and 0.5-7 ppb for dimethyl disulfide (DMDS; CH 3S 2CH 3), respectively. The emission rates of H 2S, CH 3SH, DMS and DMDS were estimated by multiplying the average concentration (mg m -3) measured near the air outlet by the mean ventilation rate (m 3 h -1) and expressed either per area (mg m -2 h -1) or animal unit (AU; liveweight of the pig, 500 kg) (mg pig -1 h -1). As a result, the emission rates of H 2S, CH 3SH, DMS and DMDS in the pig-housing rooms were 14-64, 0.8-7.3, 0.4-3.4 and 0.2-1.9 mg m -2 h -1, respectively, based on pig's activity space and 310-723, 18-80, 9-39 and 5-22 mg AU -1 h -1, respectively, based on pig's liveweight, which indicates that their emission rates were similar, whether based upon the pig's activity space or liveweight. In conclusion, the concentrations and emission rates of H 2S were highest in the fattening room followed by the growing, nursery, farrowing and gestation rooms whereas those of CH 3SH, DMS and DMDS concentrations were largest in the growing room followed by the nursery, gestation and farrowing rooms.

  10. Investigating secondary aerosol formation from agricultural amines and reduced sulfur compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas phase amines and reduced sulfur compounds are often co-emitted from agricultural processes. Amines have been recently recognized as potentially major sources of agricultural aerosol formation, while the reduced sulfur compounds are largely ignored. There is a severe lack of knowledge and under...

  11. Utilisation of aromatic organosulfur compounds as sulfur sources by Lipomyces starkeyi CBS 1807.

    PubMed

    Linder, Tomas

    2016-10-01

    Aromatic organosulfur compounds that contain aryl carbon-sulfur bonds are rare in nature but occur frequently in industrial processes and products. The utilisation of aryl sulfur compounds as a sulfur source has not been described previously among the budding yeasts (phylum Ascomycota, sub-phylum Saccharomycotina). A total of 31 strains representing 30 species and 28 genera of the budding yeasts were assayed for utilisation of benzene sulfonate as source of sulfur. Lipomyces starkeyi CBS 1807 was the only strain in this screen that was able to utilise benzene sulfonate as a sulfur source. Further study of L. starkeyi demonstrated that it could also utilise methyl phenyl sulfoxide, 1-naphthalene sulfonate, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, 1-anthraquinone sulfonate and 2-anthraquinone sulfonate as sulfur sources but not diphenylsulfone. This study represents the first reported case of the utilisation of sulfonated naphthalenes and anthraquinones as sulfur sources by a fungus. However, it should be stressed that the remaining 30 strains in this study were not assayed for the utilisation of these additional aryl sulfur compounds as sulfur sources. The present study highlights the potential of L. starkeyi and related species as a source of novel enzyme activities with possible applications in chemical manufacturing, disposal of xenobiotics and bioremediation.

  12. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naser A.; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO42-), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO42--activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S2-) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  13. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO4 (2-)), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO4 (2-)-activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5(')-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S(2-)) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  14. Measurements of sulfur compounds in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, J.; Stancu, D. G.; Niemax, K.

    2003-07-01

    Two simple methods for the analysis of the total concentration of sulfur in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry of excited, metastable sulfur atoms in a direct current discharge are presented. In the first method, the CO 2 sample gas is mixed with the plasma gas (Ar or He) while the second is based on reproducible measurements of the sulfur released from the walls in a helium discharge after being deposited as a result of operating the discharge in pure CO 2 sample gas. The detection limits obtained satisfy the requirements for the control of sulfur compounds in CO 2 used in the food and beverage industry.

  15. Microwave spectra of some sulfur and nitrogen compounds. [for chemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. The apparatus, software, and experimental procedures are described. Tables of absorption frequencies, peak absorption coefficients, and integrated intensities are included for 13 sulfur compounds, 14 nitrogen compounds, and 1 compound containing both sulfur and nitrogen. The frequency range covered was 26,500 to 40,000 MHz for most compounds and 18,000 to 40,000 MHz for some.

  16. Transformations of sulfur compounds in marsh-flat sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swider, K.T.; Mackin, J.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Measurements were made in mud-flat sediments from Flax Pond salt marsh to characterize the rates and mechanisms of sulfur cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine environment. Approximately 13 mmoles/m{sup 2} of reduced sulfur are generated annually in the mud flat and the dominant solid-phase product is pyrite. Ion activity products involving dissolved iron and sulfide species indicate approximate saturation with respect to metastable iron sulfide phases, showing that pyrite is not likely to be the first-formed Fe-bearing sulfide. Comparison of {Sigma}H{sub 2}S vs. SO{sup =}{sub 4} relationships in anoxic incubation experiments with those occurring in the undisturbed sediment permits evaluation of possible mechanisms involved in the transformation of metastable iron monosulfides to pyrite. Oxidants (e.g. MnO{sub 2}) that are introduced into the surface sediment, either by animal activity or physical events, are apparently necessary to cause major oxidation of FeS and {Sigma}H{sub 2}S to pyrite and sulfate. Solid-phase sulfur analyses and net {Sigma}H{sub 2}S accumulation in sediment pore waters are consistent with major sulfide oxidation, indicating that approximately 95% of the sulfide generated in the mud flat is reoxidized to sulfate and roughly half of this oxidation involves dissolved sulfide. The major factors limiting reduced sulfur burial are physical and biological disturbances and a low abundance of reactive solid-phase iron (2 wt%).

  17. Determination of sulfur compounds in hydrotreated transformer base oil by potentiometric titration.

    PubMed

    Chao, Qiu; Sheng, Han; Cheng, Xingguo; Ren, Tianhui

    2005-06-01

    A method was developed to analyze the distribution of sulfur compounds in model sulfur compounds by potentiometric titration, and applied to analyze hydrotreated transformer base oil. Model thioethers were oxidized to corresponding sulfoxides by tetrabutylammonium periodate and sodium metaperiodate, respectively, and the sulfoxides were titrated by perchloric acid titrant in acetic anhydride. The contents of aliphatic thioethers and total thioethers were then determined from that of sulfoxides in solution. The method was applied to determine the organic sulfur compounds in hydrotreated transformer base oil.

  18. Evolution of Volatile Sulfur Compounds during Wine Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kinzurik, Matias I; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Gardner, Richard C; Fedrizzi, Bruno

    2015-09-16

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) play a significant role in the aroma of foods and beverages. With very low sensory thresholds and strong unpleasant aromas, most VSCs are considered to have a negative impact on wine quality. In this study, headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) was used to analyze the time course of the biosynthesis of 12 VSCs formed during wine fermentation. Two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the laboratory strain BY4743 and a commercial strain, F15, were assessed using two media: synthetic grape media and Sauvignon Blanc juice. Seven VSCs were detected above background, with three rising above their sensory thresholds. The data revealed remarkable differences in the timing and evolution of production during fermentation, with a transient spike in methanethiol production early during anaerobic growth. Heavier VSCs such as benzothiazole and S-ethyl thioacetate were produced at a steady rate throughout grape juice fermentation, whereas others, such as diethyl sulfide, appear toward the very end of the winemaking process. The results also demonstrate significant differences between yeast strains and fermentation media.

  19. Lithium Polysulfidophosphates: A Family of Lithium-Conducting Sulfur-Rich Compounds for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wujun; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-01-01

    Given the great potential for improving the energy density of state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries by a factor of 5, a breakthrough in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries will have a dramatic impact in a broad scope of energy related fields. Conventional Li-S batteries that use liquid electrolytes are intrinsically short-lived with low energy efficiency. The challenges stem from the poor electronic and ionic conductivities of elemental sulfur and its discharge products. We report herein lithium polysulfidophosphates (LPSP), a family of sulfur-rich compounds, as the enabler of long-lasting and energy-efficient Li-S batteries. LPSP have ionic conductivities of 3.0 10-5 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 8 orders of magnitude higher than that of Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high Li-ion conductivity of LPSP is the salient characteristic of these compounds that impart the excellent cycling performance to Li-S batteries. In addition, the batteries are configured in an all-solid state that promises the safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  20. DSRP, Direct Sulfur Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization processes for IGCC and other advanced power applications utilize regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from raw coal gas. Regeneration of these sorbents produces an off-gas typically containing I to 3 percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Production of elemental sulfur is a highly desirable option for the ultimate disposal of the SO{sub 2} content of this off-gas. Elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity, is easily stored and transported. As shown in Figure 1, the DSRP consists of two catalytic reactors, each followed by a sulfur condenser. Hot regenerator off-gas is mixed with a hot coal-gas slip stream and fed to the first DSRP reactor. Approximately 95 percent of the sulfur gas in the inlet stream of the first reactor is converted to elemental sulfur. The outlet gas of the first DSRP reactor is cooled, condensing out sulfur. The gas could be recycled after the Stage I condenser. Alteratively, by adjusting the proportion of coal gas to regenerator off-gas, the effluent composition of the first reactor can be controlled to produce an H{sub 2}S-to-SO{sub 2} ratio of 2 to 1 at 95 percent sulfur conversion. The cooled gas stream is then passed to the second DSRP reactor where 80 to 90 percent of the remaining sulfur compounds are converted to elemental sulfur via the modified Claus reaction at high pressure. The total efficiency of the two reactors for the conversion of sulfur compounds to elemental sulfur is projected to be about 99.5 percent.

  1. Approach for selective separation of thiophenic and sulfidic sulfur compounds from petroleum by methylation/demethylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Suoqi; Chung, Keng H; Xu, Chunming; Shi, Quan

    2015-01-20

    Detailed characterization of petroleum derived sulfur compounds has been challenging, due to the complex composition of the hydrocarbon matrix. A novel method was developed for selective separation of thiophenic and sulfidic compounds from petroleum. Sulfur compounds were methylated to sulfonium salts by AgBF4 and CH3I, then the polar salts were separated by precipitation from petroleum matrix. The thiophenic and sulfidic sulfonium salts were sequentially demethylated with 7-azaindole and 4-dimethylaminopyridine, obtaining original thiophenic and sulfidic compounds, respectively. The method was validated by model compounds, and applied to a diesel and a vacuum distillation petroleum fraction. Sulfur fractions were characterized by gas chromatography (GC) coupled with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS), and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). The technique was effective to selectively obtain high-purity thiophenic and sulfidic compounds and showed rare discrimination among sulfur compounds with ranging molecular weights and degrees of unsaturation. The method would facilitate multifaceted detailed characterization of sulfur compounds in an organic complex matrix. PMID:25519193

  2. Kinase regulation by sulfur and selenium containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Carmen; Plano, Daniel; Font, María; Palop, Juan Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Kinases are enzymes that are involved in a wide-range of cellular targets such as cell proliferation, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. Aberrations in the activity of the kinases have been linked to many human diseases such as diabetes, inflammation and cancer. The discovery of more than 518 kinases encoded by the human genome has spurred the development of rapid screening techniques for potential drugs against these enzymes and these have been identified as interesting targets for medicinal chemistry programs, especially in cancer therapy. On the other hand, sulfur and selenium have been increasingly recognized as essential elements in biology and medicine. Converging data from epidemiological and clinical studies have highlighted these elements as effective chemopreventive agents, particularly against various types of cancer (prostate, lung, breast, leukemia, colon, skin, lymphome, thyroid, pancreas, liver). These elements act through a wide range of potential mechanisms where one identified signal pathway event is kinase modulation, which is common for the two elements and emerges as a valid target. The kinases modulated by sulfur and selenium derivatives include MAP, ERK, JNK, Akt, Cdc2, Cyclin B1 and Cdc25c amongst others. Although both of the elements in question are in the same group in the periodic table and have similar biochemistries, there are relevant differences related to redox potentials, stabilities, oxidation states and anticancer activity. Literature data suggest that the replacement of sulfur by selenium in established cancer chemopreventive agents results in more effective chemopreventive analogs. In view of the multi-target kinase mechanisms in preventing cellular transformation, as well as the differences and similarities between them, in this review we focus on the development of new structures that contain selenium and/or sulfur and discuss our understanding of the regulation of antitumoral effects with emphasis on kinase modulation

  3. Surface status and size influences of nickel nanoparticles on sulfur compound adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Chang Hyun; Park, Jung Geun; Park, Ji Chan; Song, Hyunjoon; Han, Sang-Sup; Kim, Jong-Nam

    2007-04-01

    Metallic nickel nanoparticles were incorporated on mesoporous silica to remove sulfur compounds in diesel selectively. In the first method, nickel nanoparticles were formed on mesoporous silica SBA-15 by impregnation and subsequent reduction of nickel nitrate. The sulfur adsorption capacity was strongly dependent on the nickel loading and the average nickel particle size. In the second method, nickel nanoparticles were synthesized in solution in the presence of a capping agent and then incorporated in mesoporous silica MCF by sonication. Although these particles maintain their sizes on the MCF surface after heat treatment, capping agent remaining on the Ni particle surface might interfere the adsorption of sulfur compounds.

  4. [Distribution and sources of oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in surface soil of Beijing, China].

    PubMed

    He, Guang-Xiu; Zhang, Zhi-Huan; Peng, Xu-Yang; Zhu, Lei; Lu, Ling

    2011-11-01

    62 surface soil samples were collected from different environmental function zones in Beijing. Sulfur and oxygen heterocyclic aromatic compounds were detected by GC/MS. The objectives of this study were to identify the composition and distribution of these compounds, and discuss their sources. The results showed that the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soils mainly contained dibenzofuran, methyl- and C2-dibenzofuran series, dibenzothiophene, methyl-, C2- and C3-dibenzothiophene series and benzonaphthothiophene series. The composition and distribution of the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil samples varied in the different environmental function zones, of which some factories and the urban area received oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds most seriously. In Beijing, the degree of contamination by oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the north surface soil was higher than that in the south. There were preferable linear correlations between the concentration of dibenzofuran series and fluorene series, as well as the concentration of dibenzothiophene series and dibenzofuran series. The oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil were mainly derived from combustion products of oil and coal and direct input of mineral oil, etc. There were some variations in pollution sources of different environmental function zones.

  5. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  6. Compounds with mixed and intermediate sulfur valences in pyrite from the Amelia Mine, Southwest Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucha, H.; Barnes, H. L.

    1995-02-01

    Compounds with mixed and intermediate sulfur valences form cloudy small inclusions in banded pyrite and 2 4 mm large rounded aggregates in pyrite stalactites. Such areas under high magnification of SEM appear to be a mixture of FeS2 with FeS2O3. Some of the microareas of 40 50 μm are homogeneous and can be identified by reflected light microscopy, microprobe and soft X-ray spectroscopy as Fe-thiosulphate, FeS2O3 or (Fe, Pb)2S3O7 with this compound having one sulfur -2 and two sulfurs +6. The intermediate sulfur compounds are enriched in Pb, Ni, Co and As.

  7. Determination of total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole in asphalt fume samples by gas chromatography with sulfur chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Jaycox, L B; Olsen, L D

    2000-09-01

    As part of a collaborative project between the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Federal Highway Administration to evaluate asphalt pavers' exposures to asphalt fume and their potential health effects, a method was developed for the determination of total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole in asphalt fume samples. Asphalt fume samples were collected from asphalt mixtures with and without the addition of ground-up rubber tires. The asphalt fume samples were collected with sampling trains that consisted of a Teflon membrane filter and an XAD-2 adsorbent tube. Filter and sampling tube media were extracted with hexane and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector. Separation was achieved with a 100 percent dimethyl polysiloxane fused silica column. Typical calibration curves had linear correlation coefficients of 0.99 or better with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5 percent. Benzothiazole desorption efficiency (DE) determined using spiked sampling tubes ranged from 96.5 percent at 5.0 micrograms to 89.4 percent at 40 micrograms with RSD values from 0.9 to 4.0 percent. Benzothiazole storage recovery determined using sampling tubes spiked at 20 micrograms and refrigerated for 30 days at 4 degrees C was 89.8 percent when corrected for the DE with an RSD of 1.1 percent. The limit of detection for the method determined using spiked sampling tubes was 0.30 microgram. Quantitation for total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole was against benzothiazole standards in hexane. Because of detector selectivity, sample preparation consisted of a simple hexane extraction even when samples had a high background due to hydrocarbon overload. Detector sensitivity provided quantitation in the sub-microgram region. Because of the sample preparation step and because benzothiazole was determined during the same analysis run, this method is straightforward and analytically efficient. The method has been used to

  8. Effects of inhibitors and NaCl on the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds by a marine acidophilic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kazuo; Higashino, Emi; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Sugio, Tsuyoshi

    2005-02-01

    The effect of NaCl and the pathways of the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds were studied using resting cells and cell-free extracts of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH. This isolate specifically requires NaCl for growth. The oxidation of sulfur and sulfite by resting cells was strongly inhibited by 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. Carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone and monensin were also relatively strong inhibitors. Thiosulfate-oxidizing activity was not inhibited by these uncouplers. Valinomycin did not inhibit the oxidation of sulfur compounds. NaCl stimulated the sulfur- and sulfite-oxidizing activities in resting cells but not in cell-free extracts. The tetrathionate-oxidizing activity in resting cells was slightly stimulated by NaCl, whereas it did not influence the thiosulfate-oxidizing activity. Sulfide oxidation was biphasic, suggesting the formation of intermediate sulfur. The initial phase of sulfide oxidation was not affected by NaCl, whereas the subsequent oxidation of sulfur in the second phase was Na+-dependent. A model is proposed for the role of NaCl in the metabolism of reduced sulfur compounds in A. thiooxidans strain SH.

  9. Ab initio study of hypervalent sulfur hydrides as model intermediates in the interconversion reactions of compounds containing sulfur-sulfur bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, R.S.; Pakkanen, T.A.; Steudel, R.

    1987-02-04

    Ab initio MO calculations involving the 4-31G* basis set have been used to predict the equilibrium geometries of the hypervalent sulfur hydrides H/sub 2/SS, (HS)/sub 2/SS, H/sub 2/S(SH)/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S(SSH)/sub 2/, and the cyclic H/sub 4/S/sub 4/. The energy changes in their formation from appropriate sulfanes H/sub 2/S/sub n/ (n = 1-4) have been studied with the 6-31G* basis set including the correction for the electron correlation by the second- and third-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory. The results are used to discuss the possible pathways in the interconversion reactions between various sulfur compounds containing cumulated SS bonds, for example, the formation of S/sub 7/ from S/sub 8/ for which hypervalent intermediates have been proposed recently. Comparison with experimental evidence is made whenever possible.

  10. Flash pyrolysis of coal, coal maceral, and coal-derived pyrite with on-line characterization of volatile sulfur compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Lake, M.A.; Griffin, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A Pyroprobe flash pyrolysis-gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector was used to study volatile sulfur compounds produced during the thermal decomposition of Illinois coal, coal macerals and coal-derived pyrite. Maximum evolution of volatile organic sulfur compounds from all coal samples occurred at a temperature of approximately 700??C. At this temperature, the evolution of thiophene, its alkyl isomers, and short-chain dialkyl sulfide compounds relative to the evolution of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene compounds was greater from coal high in organic sulfur than from coal low in organic sulfur. The variation in the evolution of sulfur compounds observed for three separate coal macerals (exinite, vitrinite, and inertinite) was similar to that observed for whole coal samples. However, the variation trend for the macerals was much more pronounced. Decomposition of coal-derived pyrite with the evolution of elemental sulfur was detected at a temperature greater than 700??C. The results of this study indicated that the gas chromotographic profile of the volatile sulfur compounds produced during flash pyrolysis of coals and coal macerals varied as a function of the amount of organic sulfur that occurred in the samples. Characterization of these volatile sulfur compounds provides a better understanding of the behavior of sulfur in coal during the thermolysis process, which could be incorporated in the design for coal cleaning using flash pyrolysis techniques. ?? 1988.

  11. Use of reduced sulfur compounds by Beggiatoa sp.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D C; Castenholz, R W

    1981-01-01

    A strain of Beggiatoa cf. leptomitiformis (OH-75-B, clone 2a) was isolated which is unique among reported strains in its ability to deposit internal sulfur granules from thiosulfate. It also deposited these characteristic granules (as all BEggiatoa species do) from sulfide. In cultures where growth was limited by exhaustion of organic substrates, these granules generally comprised about 20% of the total cell weight. With medium containing acetate and thiosulfate, no measurable utilization of thiosulfate or deposition of elemental sulfur (S0) took place until after the exponential growth phase. Neither sulfide nor thiosulfate added an increment to heterotrophic growth yield except for the weight of the deposited S0. The deposition of S0 from thiosulfate was probably a disproportionation in which S0 and sulfate were produced in a 1:1 ratio. Some of the S0 was further oxidized to sulfate. No autotrophic or mixotrophic growth was demonstrated for this strain. When inoculated in small, well-dispersed quantities into yeast extract medium, this strain grew only after long lags. Addition of the enzyme catalase eliminated initial lags and increased growth rates slightly. In contrast, catalase had no influence on growth rate when added to mineral medium containing acetate. In yeast extract medium, the inhibition of growth rate was presumably because of peroxides. Addition of thiosulfate was almost as effective as catalase in eliminating this inhibition. The S0 granules which, in this case, were deposited during the exponential growth phase, appeared to be partly responsible for this relief. This strain of Beggiatoa sp. remained active for at least 5 days under strictly anaerobic conditions, and under those conditions, it increased its dry weight by about 2.5-fold. Anaerobic "growth" and maintenance required the presence of an energy source, such as acetate. When cells containing much internal S0 were transferred to an organic anaerobic medium, a substantial portion of the

  12. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  13. NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange of Sulfur-Heterocyclic Compounds Found In Petroleum

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Goodson, Boyd M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2016-01-01

    NMR hyperpolarization via Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) was employed to investigate the feasibility of enhancing the NMR detection sensitivity of sulfur-heterocycles (specifically 2-methylthiophene and dibenzothiophenes), a family of compounds typically found in petroleum and refined petroleum products. SABRE hyperpolarization of sulfur-heterocycles (conducted in seconds) offers potential advantages of providing structural information about sulfur-containing contaminants in petroleum, thereby informing petroleum purification and refining to minimize sulfur content in refined products such as gasoline. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy sensitivity gains endowed by hyperpolarization potentially allows for performing structural assays using inexpensive, low-magnetic-field (ca. 1 T) high-resolution NMR spectrometers ideally suited for industrial applications in the field. PMID:27500206

  14. Spectral reflectance (0.4 - 5.0 microns) of sulfur related compounds and mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, Jonathan C.

    1987-01-01

    Studied and quantified were: (1) the spectral properties of sulfur related compounds and materials; (2) the effects of thermal history, temperature and mixing ratios on the spectral properties of these materials; and (3) the application of these results to the Jovian system, in particular, the surfaces of Io, Europa, and Amalthea, and the chromophores in the Jovian atmosphere. Major results of the study include: (1) a study of how sulfur deposition affects the band strengths in various silicates; (2) a study of how the ultraviolet absorption band of sulfur is affected by dilution in ice; (3) the application of these two sets of experimental studies to Io, in the case of silicate band strengths, and Europa, as in the case of sulfur dilution in ices.

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of sulfur-containing compounds from garlic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Yeon; Li, Hua; Lim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Hwa Jin; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2012-11-01

    We identified four anti-inflammatory sulfur-containing compounds from garlic, and their chemical structures were identified as Z- and E-ajoene and oxidized sulfonyl derivatives of ajoene. The sulfur compounds inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that these sulfur compounds attenuated the LPS-induced expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and mRNA. Moreover, these sulfur-containing compounds suppressed the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity and the degradation of inhibitory-κBα in LPS-activated macrophages. Furthermore, we observed that they markedly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) at 20 μM. These data demonstrate that the sulfur compounds from garlic, (Z, E)-ajoene and their sulfonyl analogs, can suppress the LPS-induced production of NO/PGE(2) and the expression of iNOS/COX-2 genes by inhibiting the NF-κB activation and the phosphorylations of p38 and ERK. Taken together, these data show that Z- and E-ajoene and their sulfonyl analogs from garlic might have anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential.

  16. Air/water oxidative desulfurization of coal and sulfur-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzinski, R. P.; Freidman, S.; LaCount, R. B.

    1981-02-01

    Air/water Oxydesulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major U. S. coal basins. The applicability at present of this treatment for producing an environmentally acceptable coal has been restricted by recently proposed SO2 emission standards for utility boilers. The product would, however, be attractive to the many smaller industrial coal users who cannot afford to operate and maintain flue gas desulfurization systems. It is also possible that the utility industry could realize a benefit by using chemically cleaned coal with partial flue gas scrubbing. The higher cost of the cleaned coal would be offset by the reduction in capital and operating costs resulting from decreased FGD requirements. The susceptibility of sulfur in coal to oxidative removal varies with the nature of the sulfur-containing species. The inorganic sulfur compounds, primarily pyrite, marcasite, and iron sulfate, are more amenable to treatment than the organically bound sulfur which exhibits varying degrees of resistance depending on its chemical environment. Air/water Oxydesulfurization consistently removes in excess of 90 percent of the pyritic sulfur; the extent and efficiency of organic sulfur removal however, depends on the type of coal and severity of treatment used. In general, the organic sulfur of the higher rank coals exhibits more resistance to treatment than that of the lower rank coals; however, the accompanying heating value is greater for the latter. Similar treatment of sulfur-containing model compounds further illustrates the relative susceptibilities of different chemical species to oxidation. Application of these data to the understanding of the complex chemistry involved in the treatment of coal is a preliminary step toward improving the efficiency of Oxydesulfurization.

  17. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must

    PubMed Central

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  18. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  19. Sulfur/lithium-insertion compound composite cathodes for Li-S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Sheng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-12-01

    A part of carbon additives in sulfur cathodes is replaced by lithium-insertion compounds as they can contribute extra capacity and increase the overall energy density. Accordingly, VO2(B) and TiS2 were incorporated into sulfur cathodes as they can work within the same voltage window as that of sulfur. However, VO2(B) was found to be incompatible with the glyme-based electrolytes that are usually used in Li-S cells, but TiS2 performs well while coupled with sulfur. The S/C/TiS2 composite cathode delivers 252 mAh g-1 more than that of pristine sulfur cathode (1334 mAh g-1 vs. 1082 mAh g-1). The increased capacity is not only due to the contribution by TiS2 itself but also due to a better active-material dispersion and utilization. Serving as active reaction sites during cycling, TiS2 suppresses agglomeration of sulfur and facilitates better ionic/electronic transport within the cathode structure. This composite cathode design provides another direction for Li-S batteries to improve the overall energy density.

  20. Stoichiometric modeling of oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (Riscs) in Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla Fazzini, Roberto A; Cortés, Maria Paz; Padilla, Leandro; Maturana, Daniel; Budinich, Marko; Maass, Alejandro; Parada, Pilar

    2013-08-01

    The prokaryotic oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) is a topic of utmost importance from a biogeochemical and industrial perspective. Despite sulfur oxidizing bacterial activity is largely known, no quantitative approaches to biological RISCs oxidation have been made, gathering all the complex abiotic and enzymatic stoichiometry involved. Even though in the case of neutrophilic bacteria such as Paracoccus and Beggiatoa species the RISCs oxidation systems are well described, there is a lack of knowledge for acidophilic microorganisms. Here, we present the first experimentally validated stoichiometric model able to assess RISCs oxidation quantitatively in Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (strain DSM 17318), the archetype of the sulfur oxidizing acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs. This model was built based on literature and genomic analysis, considering a widespread mix of formerly proposed RISCs oxidation models combined and evaluated experimentally. Thiosulfate partial oxidation by the Sox system (SoxABXYZ) was placed as central step of sulfur oxidation model, along with abiotic reactions. This model was coupled with a detailed stoichiometry of biomass production, providing accurate bacterial growth predictions. In silico deletion/inactivation highlights the role of sulfur dioxygenase as the main catalyzer and a moderate function of tetrathionate hydrolase in elemental sulfur catabolism, demonstrating that this model constitutes an advanced instrument for the optimization of At. thiooxidans biomass production with potential use in biohydrometallurgical and environmental applications.

  1. Genomic Analysis Unravels Reduced Inorganic Sulfur Compound Oxidation of Heterotrophic Acidophilic Acidicaldus sp. Strain DX-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Hongying; Zhang, Xian; Xiao, Yunhua; Guo, Xue; Liu, Xueduan

    2016-01-01

    Although reduced inorganic sulfur compound (RISC) oxidation in many chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers has been investigated in recent years, there is little information about RISC oxidation in heterotrophic acidophiles. In this study, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, a heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophile, was isolated. Its genome was sequenced and then used for comparative genomics. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR was performed to identify the expression of genes involved in the RISC oxidation. Gene encoding thiosulfate: quinone oxidoreductase was present in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, while no candidate genes with significant similarity to tetrathionate hydrolase were found. Additionally, there were genes encoding heterodisulfide reductase complex, which was proposed to play a crucial role in oxidizing cytoplasmic sulfur. Like many heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1 had no genes encoding enzymes essential for the direct oxidation of sulfite. An indirect oxidation of sulfite via adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate was proposed in Acidicaldus strain DX-1. However, compared to other closely related bacteria Acidiphilium cryptum and Acidiphilium multivorum, which harbored the genes encoding Sox system, almost all of these genes were not detected in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1. This study might provide some references for the future study of RISC oxidation in heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles. PMID:27239474

  2. Genomic Analysis Unravels Reduced Inorganic Sulfur Compound Oxidation of Heterotrophic Acidophilic Acidicaldus sp. Strain DX-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Hongying; Zhang, Xian; Xiao, Yunhua; Guo, Xue; Liu, Xueduan

    2016-01-01

    Although reduced inorganic sulfur compound (RISC) oxidation in many chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers has been investigated in recent years, there is little information about RISC oxidation in heterotrophic acidophiles. In this study, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, a heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophile, was isolated. Its genome was sequenced and then used for comparative genomics. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR was performed to identify the expression of genes involved in the RISC oxidation. Gene encoding thiosulfate: quinone oxidoreductase was present in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1, while no candidate genes with significant similarity to tetrathionate hydrolase were found. Additionally, there were genes encoding heterodisulfide reductase complex, which was proposed to play a crucial role in oxidizing cytoplasmic sulfur. Like many heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers, Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1 had no genes encoding enzymes essential for the direct oxidation of sulfite. An indirect oxidation of sulfite via adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate was proposed in Acidicaldus strain DX-1. However, compared to other closely related bacteria Acidiphilium cryptum and Acidiphilium multivorum, which harbored the genes encoding Sox system, almost all of these genes were not detected in Acidicaldus sp. strain DX-1. This study might provide some references for the future study of RISC oxidation in heterotrophic sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles. PMID:27239474

  3. Mechanism of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds by thiosulfate-grown Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Masau, R J; Oh, J K; Suzuki, I

    2001-04-01

    Thiobacillus thiooxidans was grown at pH 5 on thiosulfate as an energy source, and the mechanism of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds was studied by the effect of inhibitors, stoichiometries of oxygen consumption and sulfur, sulfite, or tetrathionate accumulation, and cytochrome reduction by substrates. Both intact cells and cell-free extracts were used in the study. The results are consistent with the pathway with sulfur and sulfite as the key intermediates. Thiosulfate was oxidized after cleavage to sulfur and sulfite as intermediates at pH 5, the optimal growth pH on thiosulfate, but after initial condensation to tetrathionate at pH 2.3 where the organism failed to grow. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibited sulfur oxidation directly and the oxidation of thiosulfate or tetrathionate indirectly. It did not inhibit the sulfite oxidation by cells, but inhibited any reduction of cell cytochromes by sulfur, thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and sulfite. NEM probably binds sulfhydryl groups, which are possibly essential in supplying electrons to initiate sulfur oxidation. 2-Heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline N-oxide (HQNO) inhibited the oxidation of sulfite directly and that of sulfur, thiosulfate, and tetrathionate indirectly. Uncouplers, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), inhibited sulfite oxidation by cells, but not the oxidation by extracts, while HQNO inhibited both. It is proposed that HQNO inhibits the oxidation of sulfite at the cytochrome b site both in cells and extracts, but uncouplers inhibit the oxidation in cells only by collapsing the energized state of cells, delta muH+, required either for electron transfer from cytochrome c to b or for sulfite binding.

  4. [Research on determination of total volatile organic sulfur compounds in the atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Ling; He, Ying; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Bao-Dong

    2011-12-01

    A detection technology was established comprising trap, desorption, oxidation and UV fluorescence determination process, and used for the test of total concentration of trace volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the atmosphere. A cryogenic trap-thermal desorption device was developed, integrating the advantages of solid retention method and cryogenic condensation method, which was applied to capture and enrich trace volatile organic sulfur compounds. Under high temperature and combustion-supporting gas, the VSCs were completely oxidized into sulfur dioxide. By analyzing the content of sulfur dioxide through ultraviolet fluorescence method indirectly calculated to gain the total concentration of volatile organic sulfur compounds. The trapping temperature, desorption temperature and the oxidation temperature were 5 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 1 000 degrees C, and the precision and recovery of the method were 5.46% and 99.6%-109.2%, respectively. The content of trace amounts of atmospheric VSCs determined from February to April at Qingdao was 42-195 ng x m(-3).

  5. Low Temperature Sorbents for removal of Sulfur Compounds from fluid feed Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjan

    1999-09-30

    A sorbent material is provided comprising a material reactive with sulfur, a binder unreactive with sulfur and an inert material, wherein the sorbent absorbs the sulfur at temperatures between 30 and 200 C. Sulfur absorption capacity as high as 22 weight percent has been observed with these materials.

  6. Low Temperature Sorbents for Removal of Sulfur Compounds from Fluid Feed Streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani

    2004-06-01

    A sorbent material is provided comprising a material reactive with sulfur, a binder unreactive with sulfur and an inert material, wherein the sorbent absorbs the sulfur at temperatures between 30 and 200 C. Sulfur absorption capacity as high as 22 weight percent has been observed with these materials.

  7. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  8. Stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines by volatile sulfur compounds in endodontically treated teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Johann; von Baehr, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Persistent microorganisms in endodontically treated teeth produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) such as methyl mercaptan, hydrogen sulfide, and thioether. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the ex vivo immune response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to sulfur compounds in 354 patients with systemic diseases. These systemic findings are correlated with semiquantitative values of a VSC indicator applied directly on endodontically treated teeth. Data elucidate the role of VSC in patients with immunologic diseases and the role of a semiquantitative chairside test, like the VSC indicator presented here, in correlation to IFNg and IL-10 sensitization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The association between ex vivo-stimulated cytokines and endodontically derived sulfur components is supported by the fact that the number of interferon gamma- and/or interleukin-10-positive sensitized patients declined significantly 3–8 months after extraction of the corresponding teeth. PMID:25792853

  9. Uptake of Small Organic Compounds by Sulfuric Acid Aerosols: Dissolution and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the role of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the interactions of a series of small organic compounds with low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid will be evaluated. The total amount of organic material which may be taken up from the gas phase by dissolution, surface layer formation, and reaction during the particle lifetime will be quantified. Our current results for acetaldehyde uptake on 40 - 80 wt% sulfuric acid solutions will be compared to those of methanol, formaldehyde, and acetone to investigate the relationships between chemical functionality and heterogeneous activity. Where possible, equilibrium uptake will be ascribed to component pathways (hydration, protonation, etc.) to facilitate evaluation of other species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  10. Reduction of sulfur compounds in the sediments of a eutrophic lake basin.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Klug, M J

    1981-05-01

    Concentrations of various sulfur compounds (SO(4), H(2)S, S, acid-volatile sulfide, and total sulfur) were determined in the profundal sediments and overlying water column of a shallow eutrophic lake. Low concentrations of sulfate relative to those of acid-volatile sulfide and total sulfur and a decrease in total sulfur with sediment depth implied that the contribution of dissimilatory sulfur reduction to H(2)S production was relatively minor. Addition of 1.0 mM Na(2)SO(4) to upper sediments in laboratory experiments resulted in the production of H(2)S with no apparent lag. Kinetic experiments with S demonstrated an apparent K(m) of 0.068 mmol of SO(4) reduced per liter of sediment per day, whereas tracer experiments with S indicated an average turnover time of the sediment sulfate pool of 1.5 h. Total sulfate reduction in a sediment depth profile to 15 cm was 15.3 mmol of sulfate reduced per m per day, which corresponds to a mineralization of 30% of the particulate organic matter entering the sediment. Reduction of S occurred at a slower rate. These results demonstrated that high rates of sulfate reduction occur in these sediments despite low concentrations of oxidized inorganic compounds and that this reduction can be important in the anaerobic mineralization of organic carbon.

  11. Sulfur compounds in therapy: Radiation-protective agents, amphetamines, and mucopolysaccharide sulfation

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, W.O. )

    1992-09-01

    Sulfur-containing compounds have been used in the search for whole-body radiation-protective compounds, in the design of amphetamine derivatives that retain appetite-suppressive effects but lack most behavioral effects characteristic of amphetamines, and in the search for the cause of kidney stone formation in recurrently stoneforming patients. Organic synthetic procedures were used to prepare radiation-protective compounds having a variety of sulfur-containing functional groups, and to prepare amphetamine derivatives having electron-attracting sulfur functions. In the case of the kidney stone causation research, isolation of urinary mucopolysaccharides (MPS) from recurrently stoneforming patients was carried out and the extent of sulfation of the MPS was determined by electrophoresis. Whole-body radiation-protective agents with a high degree of protection against lethal doses of gamma-radiation in mice were found in a series of quinolinium and pyridinium bis(methylthio) and methylthio amino derivatives. Mechanism studies showed that the copper complexes of these agents mimicked the beneficial action of superoxide dismutase. Electron-attracting sulfur-containing functions on amphetamine nitrogen, as well as 4'-amino nitrogen provided amphetamine derivatives with good appetite-suppressant effects and few or no adverse behavioral effects. Higher than normal levels of sulfation of the urinary MPS of stone formers suggested a cause for recurrent kidney stone formation. A sulfation inhibitor was found to prevent recurrence of stone formation and inhibit growth of existing stones. The inclusion of various sulfur-containing functions in organic molecules yielded compounds having whole-body radiation protection from lethal doses of gamma-radiation in animals. The presence of electron-attracting sulfur functions in amphetamine gave derivatives that retained appetite-suppressant effects and eliminated most adverse behavioral effects.

  12. Gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry for the identification of organic sulfur compounds in shellfish and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Miyake, Y.

    1980-11-01

    The authors determined that the organic sulfur compounds usually contained in crude oil can be used as a marker of oil pollution in shellfish and fish. Short-necked clams and eels were maintained in a controlled laboratory environment in water with suspension of crude oil. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms of short-necked clam extract showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Capillary column gas chromatography-mass chromatograms of crude oil and extract from the soft body of a short-necked clam showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Besides sulfur components, various other compounds were contained in crude oil and short-necked clam. Mass chromatograms of crude oil and the extract from eel flesh showed the presence of alkyl benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, naphthalene, and alkyl naphthalene. Data indicated that the organic sulfur compounds and polyaromatic compounds could serve as markers of oil pollution in shellfish and fish.

  13. Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds of Environmental Interest: Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Thomas G.; Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) have been assigned environmental roles in global warming, acid precipitation, and cloud formation where two important members dimethyl sulfide (CH3)2 S, DMS, and methanethiol, CH3SH, MT, of VOSC group are involved.

  14. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  15. RNA transcript sequencing reveals inorganic sulfur compound oxidation pathways in the acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans.

    PubMed

    Christel, Stephan; Fridlund, Jimmy; Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Buck, Moritz; Watkin, Elizabeth L; Dopson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans is an acidophile implicated in low-temperature biomining for the recovery of metals from sulfide minerals. Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans obtains its energy from the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds, and genes encoding several alternative pathways have been identified. Next-generation sequencing of At. ferrivorans RNA transcripts identified the genes coding for metabolic and electron transport proteins for energy conservation from tetrathionate as electron donor. RNA transcripts suggested that tetrathionate was hydrolyzed by the tetH1 gene product to form thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and sulfate. Despite two of the genes being truncated, RNA transcripts for the SoxXYZAB complex had higher levels than for thiosulfate quinone oxidoreductase (doxDAgenes). However, a lack of heme-binding sites in soxX suggested that DoxDA was responsible for thiosulfate metabolism. Higher RNA transcript counts also suggested that elemental sulfur was metabolized by heterodisulfide reductase (hdrgenes) rather than sulfur oxygenase reductase (sor). The sulfite produced as a product of heterodisulfide reductase was suggested to be oxidized by a pathway involving the sat gene product or abiotically react with elemental sulfur to form thiosulfate. Finally, several electron transport complexes were involved in energy conservation. This study has elucidated the previously unknown At. ferrivorans tetrathionate metabolic pathway that is important in biomining.

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Sulfur-Containing Compounds from Garlic

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Da Yeon; Li, Hua; Lim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Hwa Jin; Jeon, Raok

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We identified four anti-inflammatory sulfur-containing compounds from garlic, and their chemical structures were identified as Z- and E-ajoene and oxidized sulfonyl derivatives of ajoene. The sulfur compounds inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Western blotting and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that these sulfur compounds attenuated the LPS-induced expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and mRNA. Moreover, these sulfur-containing compounds suppressed the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity and the degradation of inhibitory-κBα in LPS-activated macrophages. Furthermore, we observed that they markedly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) at 20 μM. These data demonstrate that the sulfur compounds from garlic, (Z, E)-ajoene and their sulfonyl analogs, can suppress the LPS-induced production of NO/PGE2 and the expression of iNOS/COX-2 genes by inhibiting the NF-κB activation and the phosphorylations of p38 and ERK. Taken together, these data show that Z- and E-ajoene and their sulfonyl analogs from garlic might have anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential. PMID:23057778

  17. Biological technologies for the removal of sulfur containing compounds from waste streams: bioreactors and microbial characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Jingying; Lin, Jian; Liu, Junxin

    2015-10-01

    Waste gases containing sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, thioethers, and mercaptan, produced and emitted from industrial processes, wastewater treatment, and landfill waste may cause undesirable issues in adjacent areas and contribute to atmospheric pollution. Their control has been an area of concern and research for many years. As alternative to conventional physicochemical air pollution control technologies, biological treatment processes which can transform sulfur compounds to harmless products by microbial activity, have gained in popularity due to their efficiency, cost-effectiveness and environmental acceptability. This paper provides an overview of the current biological techniques used for the treatment of air streams contaminated with sulfur compounds as well as the advances made in the past year. The discussion focuses on bioreactor configuration and design, mechanism of operation, insights into the overall biological treatment process, and the characterization of the microbial species present in bioreactors, their populations and their interactions with the environment. Some bioreactor case studies are also introduced. Finally, the perspectives on future research and development needs in this research area were also highlighted.

  18. Chalcogen bonding interactions between reducible sulfur and selenium compounds and models of zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Patricia B; Bayse, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Reducible sulfur and selenium (r-S/Se) compounds, defined as sulfur and selenium compounds not in the lowest -2 oxidation state (e.g., -1 to +6), release Zn(2+) from zinc-sulfur proteins such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and metallothionein. A series of density functional theory calculations was performed on donor-acceptor complexes between r-S/Se compounds and models of the Cys2His2, Cys3His and Cys4 ZF sites. These S⋯S/Se chalcogen bonding interactions consist of the donation of electron density from a S lone pair on the ZF model to a S/Se-X antibonding molecular orbital of the r-S/Se compound. The strength of the interaction was shown to be dependent upon the Lewis basicity of the ZF model (Cys4>Cys3His>Cys2His2) and the Lewis acidity of the r-S/Se compound as measured by the energy of the S/Se-X antibonding orbital. Interactions with the softer r-Se compounds were stronger than the r-S compounds, consistent with the greater reactivity of the former with ZF proteins.

  19. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of sulfur-rich compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzer, J.G.; Dlott, D.D.; Iwaki, L.K.; Kirkpatrick, S.M.; Rauchfuss, T.B.

    1999-09-02

    The molecular third-order optical nonlinearity {gamma}{sub R} (second hyperpolarizability or nonlinear refractive index) was measured for a series of sulfur-rich molecules: sulfur (S{sub 8}), carbon-sulfur compounds, and metal thiolate clusters. Z-scan techniques (pulse width 27 ps, wavelength 527 nm) were used to measure these properties in solution by comparing the solution to the pure solvent. The authors approach is an efficient way to evaluate a number of different compounds and to quickly direct synthetic strategies for improved nonlinear and linear optical properties. The optical nonlinearities were evaluated in terms of figures of merit {vert{underscore}bar}W{vert{underscore}bar}/I{sub 0} and [T]{sup {minus}1}, where {vert{underscore}bar}W{vert{underscore}bar}/I{sub 0} is the ratio of nonlinear refraction to linear absorption and [T]{sup {minus}1} is the ratio of nonlinear refraction to nonlinear absorption. Among the carbon-sulfur compounds, C{sub 6}S{sub 8}O{sub 2} had the largest figures of merit: {vert{underscore}bar}W{vert{underscore}bar}/I{sub 0} = 4.3 x 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2} W{sup {minus}1} and [T]{sup {minus}1} > 5. The metal thiolate cluster with the largest second hyperpolarizability was [Zn{sub 10}S{sub 4}(SPh){sub 16}]{sup 4{minus}} ({gamma}{sub R} = {minus}7.8 x 10{sup {minus}56} C m{sup 4} V{sup {minus}3}, {minus}6.3 x 10{sup {minus}31} esu). This cluster exhibited no measurable linear or nonlinear absorption, so the figures of merit were effectively infinite. Previous work on the second hyperpolarizability of sulfur-rich compounds examined species that were hampered by substantial linear absorption coefficients. The present work shows that high figures of merit can be achieved without significant linear or nonlinear absorption.

  20. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  1. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Organic Compounds from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G. W.; Thiemens, M. H.; Jackson, T.; Chang, Sherwood

    1996-01-01

    Isotopic measurements have been made on organic sulfur and phosphorus compounds recently discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Carbon, hydrogen and sulfur measurements were performed on individual members of the organic sulfur compounds, alkyl sulfonates; and carbon and hydrogen measurements were made on bulk alkyl phosphonates. Cooper and Chang reported the first carbon isotopic measurements of Murchison organic sulfonates, providing insight into the potential synthetic mechanisms of these and, possibly, other organic species. Hydrogen isotopic measurements of the sulforiates now reveal deuterium excesses ranging from +660 to +2730 %. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low temperature astrophysical environment consistent with that of dense molecular clouds. Measurements of the sulfur isotopes provide further constraints on the origin and mechanism of formation of these organic molecules. Recently, there has been growing documentation of sulfur isotopic anomalies in meteoritic material. Thiemens and Jackson have shown that some bulk ureilites possess excess S-33 and Thiemens et al. have reported excess S-33 in an oldhamite separate from the Norton County meteorite. Rees and Thode reported a large S-33 excess in an Allende acid residue, however, attempts to verify this measurements have been unsuccessful, possibly due to the heterogeneous nature of the carrier phase. With the recognition that sulfur isotopes may reflect chemistry in the protosolar nebula or the precursor molecular cloud, identification of potential carriers is of considerable interest. In the present study, the stable isotopes of sulfur were measured in methane sulfonic acid extracted from the Murchison meteorite. The isotopic composition was found to be: (delta)S-33 = 2.48 %, (delta)S-34 = 2.49 % and (delta)S-36 = 6.76 %. Based upon analysis of more than 60 meteoritic and numerous terrestrial samples, the mass fractionation lines are

  2. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  3. Room temperature rechargeable magnesium batteries with sulfur-containing composite cathodes prepared from elemental sulfur and bis(alkenyl) compound having a cyclic or linear ether unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaoka, Kanae; Kim, In-Tae; Yamabuki, Kazuhiro; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Tsutsumi, Hiromori

    2015-11-01

    Room temperature rechargeable magnesium (Mg) batteries are constructed from Mg as a negative material, sulfur (S)-containing composite prepared from elemental sulfur and the bis(alkenyl) compound having a crown ether unit (BUMB18C6) or linear ether unit (UOEE) as a positive material and the simple electrolyte (0.7 mol dm-3 Mg[N(SO2CF3)2]2-triglyme (G3) solution). The reaction between molten S and the bis(alkenyl) compound (BUMB18C6 or UOEE) provides the sulfur-containing composite, S-BUMB18C6 or S-UOEE. Both of the sulfur-containing composites are electrochemically active in the Mg salt-based electrolyte, acetonitrile- or G3- Mg[N(SO2CF3)2]2 electrolyte. The first discharge capacity of the test cells with the sulfur-containing composite is 460 Ah kg-1 (per the weight of sulfur in the composite) with the S-BUMB18C6 electrode and 495 Ah kg-1 with the S-UOEE electrode. According to the continuous charge-discharge cycle tests (at 10th cycle), the discharge capacity of the test cell with the S-BUMB18C6 electrode (68.1 Ah kg-1) is higher than that with the S-UOEE electrode (0.18 Ah kg-1). The crown ether units in the S-BUMB18C6 composite may create ion-conducting paths in the cathode, prevent rise in the internal resistance of the cathode, and provide better cycle performance of the test cells with the S-BUMB18C6 composite electrode than that with the S-UOEE electrode.

  4. Defluorination of organofluorine sulfur compounds by Pseudomonas sp. strain D2

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B.D.; Criddle, C.S.; Howell, R.D.

    1998-08-01

    Little is known of the potential for biodegradation of fluorinated sulfonates. Because of the apparent stability of fluorinated organics, their bioactivity, and their potential for accumulation in the environment, it is important to understand their environmental fate and the mechanisms by which they might be degraded. To evaluate this potential, the following model compounds were selected: difluoromethane sulfonate (DFMS), trifluoromethane sulfonate (TFMS), 2,2,2-trifluoroethane sulfonate (TES), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctane sulfonate (H-PFOS). A laboratory isolate designated Pseudomonas sp. strain D2 completely defluorinated DFMS under aerobic sulfur-limiting conditions in a defined mineral medium. Strain D2 utilized DFMS as the sole source of sulfur, but not as a source of carbon or energy. DFMS utilization was inhibited by other forms of sulfur, and noncompetitive inhibition kinetics were observed, with K{sub i}-values of 3--4 {micro}M for sulfate, sulfite, methane sulfonate, and cystine. Strain D2 was subsequently used to evaluate degradation of other fluorinated sulfonates. Growth and defluorination were only observed for those compounds containing hydrogen (TES and H-PFOS). TFMS and PFOS were not degraded. TES was completely defluorinated, and H-PFOS was partially defluorinated. No volatile transformation products were detected for TES or DFMS, but six volatile products were detected for H-PFOS. All of the volatile products contained oxygen and fluorine, but not sulfur. This is the first report of defluorination of fluorinated sulfonates, a linkage between sulfur assimilation and defluorination, and generation of volatile fluorinated biotransformation products.

  5. Removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater through adsorption on modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ben Hariz, Ichrak; Al Ayni, Foued; Monser, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater on a chemically modified activated carbon (MAC) was investigated. The modification technique (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and thermal modification) enhanced the removal capacity of carbon and therefore decreases cost-effective removal of sulfide from refinery wastewater. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data were determined for sulfur removal from real refinery wastewater. The data were evaluated according to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models. The Freundlich isotherm fitted well with the equilibrium data of sulfur on different adsorbents, whereas the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second-order model. Insights of sulfide removal mechanisms indicated that the sorption was controlled through the intraparticle diffusion mechanism with a significant contribution of film diffusion. The MAC adsorbent was found to have an effective removal capacity of approximately 2.5 times that of non-modified carbon. Using different MAC, sulfides were eliminated with a removal capacity of 52 mg g(-1). Therefore, MAC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of sulfur in refinery wastewater.

  6. Thermodynamics of Aqueous Organic Sulfur Compounds: A Key to the Organic Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Systems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, Karyn L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hydrothermal environments are locations of varied geochemistry due to the disequilibrium between vent fluids and seawater. The disequilibrium geochemistry has been hypothesized to include reactions to synthesize organic compounds. Observations of the organic geochemistry of hydrothermal vent sites has received little attention. Experimental simulations of these environments, however, indicate that organic compounds may have difficulty forming in a purely aqueous environment. On the other hand, thiols. thioesters and disulfides have been implicated as reaction intermediates between CO or CO2 in experiments of carbon reduction in hydrothermal environments as well as in a variety of biological processes and other abiotic reactions (Wachtershauser, 1990, OLEB 20, 173; Heinen and Lauwers, 1996, OLEB 26, 13 1, Huber and Wachtershauser, 1997, Science 276, 245; Russell et al., 1998, in Thermophiles: The keys to molecular evolution and the origin of life?). The reduction of CO2 to thiols, for example, is observed using the FeS-H2S/FeS2 couple to provide the reducing power (see Schoonen et al., 1999, OLEB 29, 5). In addition, the enzyme involved in final stage of methanogenesis, coenzyme-M, is itself a thiol. Thus, organic sulfur compounds may hold the key to the organic chemistry leading to the origin of life at high temperatures. Understanding the biochemical processes of microorganisms that can live to temperatures at least as high as 113 C (Blochl et al., 1996, Extremophiles 1, 14) requires knowledge of the properties of the chemical reactions involved. In order to assess the role of aqueous organic sulfur compounds in hydrothermal organic geochemistry, we have been attempting to determine their thermodynamic properties. We have culled the literature to obtain the properties of organic sulfur compounds. We are able to calculate a number of essential properties, such as free energies of formation, from solubility data available in the literature together with standard

  7. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2008-07-02

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  8. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Organic Compounds from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G. W.; Thiemens, M. H.; Jackson, T.; Chang, S.

    1995-09-01

    Carbon, hydrogen and sulfur isotopic measurements have been made on individual members of a recently discovered class of organic sulfur compounds, alkyl sulfonates, in the Murchison meteorite. Cooper and Chang (1) reported the first carbon isotopic measurements of Murchison organic sulfonates, providing insight into potential synthetic mechanisms of these, and possibly other, organic species. Hydrogen isotopic measurements of the sulfonates now reveal deuterium excesses ranging from +660 to +2730 per mil. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low temperature astrophysical environment consistent with that of dense molecular clouds. Measurement of the sulfur isotopes provide further constraints on the origin and mechanism of formation of these organic molecules. Recently, there has been growing documentation of sulfur isotopic anomalies in meteoritic material. Thiemens and Jackson (2) have shown that some bulk ureilites possess excess 33S and Thiemens et al. (3) have reported excess 33S in an oldhamite separate from Norton County. Rees and Thode (4) reported a large 33S excess in an Allende acid residue, however, attempts to verify this measurement have been unsuccessful, possibly due to the heterogeneous nature of the carrier phase. With the recognition that sulfur isotopes may reflect nebular chemistry, identification of potential carriers is of considerable interest. In the present study the three stable isotopes of sulfur were measured in methane sulfonate extracted from the Murchison meteorite. The isotopic composition was found to be delta 33S=2.48, delta 34S=2.49 and delta 36S = 6.76 per mil. Based upon analysis of more than 60 meteoritic, and numerous terrestrial samples, the mass fractionation lines are defined by 33Delta = delta 33S-0.50 delta 34S and 36Delta = delta 36S -1.97 delta 34S. From these relations a 33Delta = 1.24 per mil and 36Delta = 0.89 per mil is observed. These anomalies

  9. The Epoxidation of Carbonyl Compounds with a Benzyne-Triggered Sulfur Ylide.

    PubMed

    Lou, Mei-Mei; Wang, Han; Song, Li; Liu, Hong-Yi; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Guo, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Fu-Geng; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-15

    An efficient method for the synthesis of epoxides from carbonyl compounds, sulfoxides, and benzyne is presented. The strategy involved an epoxidation by a sulfur ylide which is formed in situ from sulfoxide and benzyne through the S-O bond insertion and deprotonation. This one-pot reaction proceeds under mild and base-free conditions, providing a convenient way to introduce the substituted methylene groups onto the carbonyl carbon.

  10. PCDD/Fs' suppression by sulfur-amine/ammonium compounds.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Tong; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Buekens, Alfons; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2015-03-01

    Three distinct -S and -NH2 or NH4(+) containing compounds, including ammonium thiosulfate, aminosulfonic acid and thiourea, were studied as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) inhibitors. All these three -S and -N containing compounds tested show strong suppression of PCDD/Fs formation, especially for thiourea which has not been studied before. With a (S+N)/Cl molar ratio of only 0.47, thiourea could inhibit 97.3% of PCDD/Fs and even 99.8% of I-TEQ. At an unusually high de novo test temperature (650 °C), the PCDD/Fs' formation was still very low but also the inhibition capacity of thiourea was weak, with an efficiency of 59% for PCDD/Fs when with a (S+N)/Cl molar ratio of 1.40. The results also revealed that the inhibition capability of the combined -S/-NH2 or -S/NH4(+) suppressant was strongly influenced by both the nature of the functional group of nitrogen and the value of the molar ratio (S+N)/Cl. The amine functional group -NH2 tends to be more efficient than ammonium NH4(+) and within a certain range a higher (S+N)/Cl value leads to a higher inhibition efficiency. Moreover, the emission of gases was continuously monitored: the Gasmet results revealed that SO2, HCN and NH3 were the most important decomposition products of thiourea. Thiourea is non-toxic, environment-friendly and can be sprayed into the post-combustion zone in form of powder or aqueous solution. The cost of thiourea at least can be partially compensated by its high inhibition efficiency. Therefore, the application of thiourea in a full-scale incinerator system is promising and encouraging. PMID:25481352

  11. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  12. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  13. Biochemistry of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Huxtable, R.J.; LaFranconi, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the chemistry of sulfur; the oxidation states of sulfur; the reduction of sulfate and the oxidation of sulfide; the sulfur cycle; oxidation of inorganic sulfide; the metabolism and functions of methionine; taurine and the oxidative metabolism of cysteine; thiols, disulfides, and thioesters; thioethers; thiamine; biotin; sulfates; inherited disorders of sulfur metabolism; cystinuria; sulfur and the metabolism of xenobiotics; general aspects of xenobiotic metabolism; glutathione and sulfation of xenobiotics; and metabolic activation as a result of sulfate conjugation.

  14. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  15. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  16. [Effects of sulfur compounds on Pb partitioning in a simulated MSW incinerator].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Guo; Li, Qing-Hai; Zhuo, Yu-Qun; Chen, Chang-He

    2008-03-01

    The effect of sulfur compounds (including sulfur, sulfide, sulfite and sulfate), initial concentration of heavy metal and operating conditions on Pb emission in MSW incineration were investigated using a simulated tubular furnace with the simulated MSW. Operating conditions of the experiment included combustion chamber temperature and MSW residence time. The concentration of Pb was measured by ICP-AES after the digesting of samples including bottom ash, fly ash and flue gas according to related USEPA methods. The results indicated that all 4 sulfur compounds tended to increase Pb partitioning in fly ash and decrease Pb partitioning in bottom ash. The increasing of S and Na2S content tended to decrease Pb partitioning in bottom ash, meanwhile, the content of Na2SO3 and Na2SO4 have no significant effects on Pb partitioning. Incineration temperature showed a significant effect on Pb volatilization, and thus the Pb partitioning in fly ash increasing along with temperature went upwards. Pb did not partition in flue gas during the whole experimental temperature range. Furthermore, the effect of initial concentration of heavy metal had a significant influence on Pb partitioning. The more initial concentration of Pb was, the more Pb partitioned in bottom ash. MSW residence time was also investigated. The longer MSW residence time was, the less Pb partitioned in bottom ash. PMID:18649551

  17. Adsorption of sulfur compound utilizing rice husk ash modified with niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Rodrigo M.; Pessoa Júnior, Wanison A. G.; Braga, Valdeilson S.; Barros, Ivoneide de C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Adsorbents based in rice husk ash (RHA) modified with niobium pentoxide were prepared for impregnation methods and applied in sulfur removal in liquid fuels. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen physisorption and thermal analysis; they show that there was no qualitative change in the amorphous structure of the RHA; however, the method of impregnation could modify the particle size and topology of RHA particles. The larger sulfur removal (>50%) was achieved using RHA with 5 wt.% Nb2O5 at a dosage of 10 g L-1, after 4 h of contact with the model fuel. The kinetic study of adsorption of thiophene showed that the models of pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion best fit the experimental data. The adsorption experiments with the thiophenic derivatives compounds show a large selectivity of the adsorbent.

  18. Complete genome sequence of the sulfur compounds oxidizing chemolithoautotroph Sulfuricurvum kujiense type strain (YK-1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Sulfuricurvum kujiense Kodama and Watanabe 2004 is the type species of the monotypic genus Sulfuricurvum, which belongs to the family Helicobacteriaceae in the class Epsilonproteobacteria. The species is of interest because it is frequently found in crude oil and oil sands where it utilizes various reduced sulfur compounds such as elemental sulfur, sulfide and thiosulfate as electron donors. Members of the species do not utilize sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons as carbon and energy sources. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Sulfuricurvum. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 2,574,824 bp length and four plasmids of 118,585 bp, 71,513 bp, 51,014 bp, and 3,421 bp length, respectively, harboring a total of 2,879 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Assessment of the risk of pollution by sulfur compounds and heavy metals in soils located in the proximity of a disused for 20 years sulfur mine (SE Poland).

    PubMed

    Sołek-Podwika, Katarzyna; Ciarkowska, Krystyna; Kaleta, Dorota

    2016-09-15

    The study assessed the long-term effects of anthropogenic pressure of the sulfur industry on turf-covered soils located in the vicinity of the sulfur mine Grzybów. The study assumes that 20 years which elapsed since the end of the exploitation of sulfur is a period sufficiently long for the content of sulfur compounds in soils not to exceed the permissible level and that soil of the region can be classified as not contaminated. A part of the study involved identification of changes in the contents Stot. and SSO4(2-) in soils collected in the 1970s and early twenty-first century. It was also traced the relationship between the content of sulfur compounds and selected soil properties and estimated risk of soil environment pollution by heavy metals. Mean contents of trace elements studied amounted to 10.2-10.8 mg kg(-1) for Pb, 14.3-39.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn, 0.2-0.4 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 3.8-32.2 mg kg(-1) for Cr, 2.7-15.1 mg kg(-1) for Cu and 2.9-18.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni. Based on the results of SSO4(2-) content in soils collected at a distance of 1 km from the mine, it was found out that despite the passage of years, the amount of this type of sulfur still is increased and exceeds 0.14 g kg(-1). As the distance from the mine grew lower (from 0.017 to 0.03 g kg(-1)) average content of the sulfur form was observed. In the studied soil material we found generally positive, strong correlation between the Stot. and SSO4(2-) content and analyzed trace elements. The degree of contamination of examined soils with heavy metals was estimated on the basis of the integrated pollution index, which pointed to a moderate and low level of antropogenization of this area. In addition, the relationship between the determined characteristics of soils (Corg. contents, the fraction <0.002 mm and pH) and heavy metals confirms that the trace elements present in soils do not occur in mobile forms in the soil solution. PMID:27266650

  20. Sulfur rate control system

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.A.; Mullendore, M.G.; Kleinfeldt, T.E.; Walker, H.G. Jr.

    1993-07-20

    A sulfur rate control system is described for substantially optimizing particulate removal performance of an electrostatic precipitator in fluid communication with a flue carrying combustion products of a fossil fuel, comprising: an electrostatic precipitator having an inlet for receiving a flue gas: means for injecting sulfur trioxide into a flue for mixing with said flue gas at a location preceding entry of said flue gas into said electrostatic precipitator, said injection of sulfur trioxide being varied responsive to a proportional control signal; and, control means coupled to both said flue and said sulfur trioxide injection means for generating said proportional control signal, said control means including (1) means for measuring a sulfur dioxide concentration quantity in said flue gas at a location preceding said sulfur trioxide injection means, (2) means for measuring a flow rate of particulates in said flue gas at a location preceding said sulfur trioxide injection means, and (3) a controller for calculating a ratio between said sulfur dioxide concentration quantity and said flow rate of particulates, said ratio calculating controller having a first input coupled to said sulfur dioxide measuring means and a second input coupled to said particulate flow rate measuring means for generating said proportional control signal in proportion to a difference between a predetermined value and said ratio between said sulfur dioxide concentration quantity and said flow rate of particulates, said ratio controller having an output coupled to said sulfur trioxide injection means for maximizing particulate removal efficiency of said electrostatic precipitator.

  1. Sulfonates: A novel class of organic sulfur compounds in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairavamurthy, Appathurai; Zhou, Weiqing; Eglinton, Timothy; Manowitz, Bernard

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) used to measure sulfur speciation in a variety of organic-rich marine sediments has established sulfonates as a novel and major component of sedimentary organic sulfur. The origins of sulfonates in sediments are not clear, although both biological and geochemical mechanisms are possible. The accumulation of oxidized sulfonate sulfur in reducing marine sediments was not known previously; hence, a new perspective in sulfur geochemistry is established. The biogeochemical implications of the presence of sulfonates in marine sediments are discussed.

  2. Sulfur 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of thiophenic and aromatic thioether compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behyan, Shirin; Hu, Yongfeng; Urquhart, Stephen G.

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic compounds are major constituents of fossil fuels and pose problems for fuel refinement. The quantification and speciation of these compounds is of great interest in different areas such as biology, fossil fuels studies, geology, and archaeology. Sulfur 1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has emerged as a qualitative and quantitative method for sulfur speciation. A firm understanding of the sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of organosulfur species is required for these analytical studies. To support this development, the sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of simple thiols and thioethers were previously examined, and are now extended to studies of thiophenic and aromatic thioether compounds, in the gas and condensed phases. High-resolution spectra have been further analyzed with the aid of Improved Virtual Orbital (IVO) and Δ(self-consistent field) ab initio calculations. Experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve the assignment of spectroscopic features important for the speciation and quantification of sulfur compounds. Systematic differences between gas and condensed phases are also explored; these differences suggest a significant role for conformational effects in the NEXAFS spectra of condensed species.

  3. Genetic Basis for Metabolism of Methylated Sulfur Compounds in Methanosarcina Species

    PubMed Central

    Fu, He

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methanosarcina acetivorans uses a variety of methylated sulfur compounds as carbon and energy sources. Previous studies implicated the mtsD, mtsF, and mtsH genes in catabolism of dimethylsulfide, but the genes required for use of other methylsulfides have yet to be established. Here, we show that a four-gene locus, designated mtpCAP-msrH, is specifically required for growth on methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The mtpC, mtpA, and mtpP genes encode a putative corrinoid protein, a coenzyme M (CoM) methyltransferase, and a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter, respectively, while msrH encodes a putative transcriptional regulator. Mutants lacking mtpC or mtpA display a severe growth defect in MMPA medium but are unimpaired during growth on other substrates. The mtpCAP genes comprise a transcriptional unit that is highly and specifically upregulated during growth on MMPA, whereas msrH is monocistronic and constitutively expressed. Mutants lacking msrH fail to transcribe mtpCAP and grow poorly in MMPA medium, consistent with the assignment of its product as a transcriptional activator. The mtpCAP-msrH locus is conserved in numerous marine methanogens, including eight Methanosarcina species that we showed are capable of growth on MMPA. Mutants lacking the mtsD, mtsF, and mtsH genes display a 30% reduction in growth yield when grown on MMPA, suggesting that these genes play an auxiliary role in MMPA catabolism. A quadruple ΔmtpCAP ΔmtsD ΔmtsF ΔmtsH mutant strain was incapable of growth on MMPA. Reanalysis of mtsD, mtsF, and mtsH mutants suggests that the preferred substrate for MtsD is dimethylsulfide, while the preferred substrate for MtsF is methanethiol. IMPORTANCE Methylated sulfur compounds play pivotal roles in the global sulfur and carbon cycles and contribute to global temperature homeostasis. Although the degradation of these molecules by aerobic bacteria has been well studied, relatively little is known regarding their fate in anaerobic

  4. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  5. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  6. Direct night-time ejection of particle-phase reduced biogenic sulfur compounds from the ocean to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Cassandra J; Furutani, Hiroshi; Guazzotti, Sergio A; Coffee, Keith R; Jung, Jinyoung; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Prather, Kimberly A

    2015-04-21

    The influence of oceanic biological activity on sea spray aerosol composition, clouds, and climate remains poorly understood. The emission of organic material and gaseous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) from the ocean represents well-documented biogenic processes that influence particle chemistry in marine environments. However, the direct emission of particle-phase biogenic sulfur from the ocean remains largely unexplored. Here we present measurements of ocean-derived particles containing reduced sulfur, detected as elemental sulfur ions (e.g., (32)S(+), (64)S2(+)), in seven different marine environments using real-time, single particle mass spectrometry; these particles have not been detected outside of the marine environment. These reduced sulfur compounds were associated with primary marine particle types and wind speeds typically between 5 and 10 m/s suggesting that these particles themselves are a primary emission. In studies with measurements of seawater properties, chlorophyll-a and atmospheric DMS concentrations were typically elevated in these same locations suggesting a biogenic source for these sulfur-containing particles. Interestingly, these sulfur-containing particles only appeared at night, likely due to rapid photochemical destruction during the daytime, and comprised up to ∼67% of the aerosol number fraction, particularly in the supermicrometer size range. These sulfur-containing particles were detected along the California coast, across the Pacific Ocean, and in the southern Indian Ocean suggesting that these particles represent a globally significant biogenic contribution to the marine aerosol burden.

  7. Fly ash sulfur concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Head, W.J.; Liao, M.

    1981-05-01

    Two waste products, flyash and elemental sulfur, can be combined with a modifying agent to produce a potentially useful construction material, flyash sulfur concrete. Manufacturing processes and characteristics of this concrete are described. Compared with a conventional crushed stone aggregate, flyash sulfur concrete is a viable highway pavement base course material. The material's strength characteristics are analyzed. (1 diagram, 4 graphs, 2 photos, 9 references, 5 tables)

  8. Inhibition of enzymatic browning of chlorogenic acid by sulfur-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Tomas F M; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Verloop, Annewieke J W; van Berkel, Willem J H; Gruppen, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The antibrowning activity of sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO(3)) was compared to that of other sulfur-containing compounds. Inhibition of enzymatic browning was investigated using a model browning system consisting of mushroom tyrosinase and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA). Development of brown color (spectral analysis), oxygen consumption, and reaction product formation (RP-UHPLC-PDA-MS) were monitored in time. It was found that the compounds showing antibrowning activity either prevented browning by forming colorless addition products with o-quinones of 5-CQA (NaHSO(3), cysteine, and glutathione) or inhibiting the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase (NaHSO(3) and dithiothreitol). NaHSO(3) was different from the other sulfur-containing compounds investigated, because it showed a dual inhibitory effect on browning. Initial browning was prevented by trapping the o-quinones formed in colorless addition products (sulfochlorogenic acid), while at the same time, tyrosinase activity was inhibited in a time-dependent way, as shown by pre-incubation experiments of tyrosinase with NaHSO(3). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that sulfochlorogenic and cysteinylchlorogenic acids were not inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase.

  9. Inorganic sulfur-nitrogen compounds: from gunpowder chemistry to the forefront of biological signaling.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Butler, Anthony R; Woollins, J Derek; Feelisch, Martin

    2016-04-14

    The reactions between inorganic sulfur and nitrogen-bearing compounds to form S-N containing species have a long history and, besides assuming importance in industrial synthetic processes, are of relevance to microbial metabolism; waste water treatment; aquatic, soil and atmospheric chemistry; and combustion processes. The recent discovery that hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide exert often similar, sometimes mutually dependent effects in a variety of biological systems, and that the chemical interaction of these two species leads to formation of S-N compounds brought this chemistry to the attention of physiologists, biochemists and physicians. We here provide a perspective about the potential role of S-N compounds in biological signaling and briefly review their chemical properties and bioactivities in the context of the chronology of their discovery. Studies of the biological role of NO revealed why its chemistry is ideally suited for the tasks Nature has chosen for it; realising how the distinctive properties of sulfur can enrich this bioactivity does much to revive 'die Freude am experimentellen Spiel' of the pioneers in this field.

  10. Olfactometry Profiles and Quantitation of Volatile Sulfur Compounds of Swiss Tilsit Cheeses.

    PubMed

    Fuchsmann, Pascal; Stern, Mireille Tena; Brügger, Yves-Alain; Breme, Katharina

    2015-09-01

    To establish the odor profiles of three differently fabricated commercial Swiss Tilsit cheeses, analyses were conducted using headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/pulsed flame photometric detection and gas chromatography-olfactometry to identify and quantitate volatile compounds. In addition, odor quality and the impact of target sulfur compounds on the overall odor of the cheeses were investigated. The odor profile was found to be mainly influenced by buttery-cheesy and sulfury odor notes in all cheeses. Buttery-cheesy odor notes were attributed to three main molecules: butanoic acid, 3-methylbutanoic acid, and butane-2,3-dione. Over a dozen volatile sulfur compounds were detected at parts per billion levels, but only a few influenced the odor profile of the cheeses: methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide, bis(methylthio)methane, dimethyl trisulfide, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and 2-methyltetrahydrothiophen-3-one (tentative). In conclusion, the conducted analyses allowed differentiation of the cheeses, and gas chromatography-olfactometry results confirmed that partially thermized milk cheese has a more intense and more multifaceted overall flavor. PMID:26230142

  11. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180T during growth on different reduced sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Dobler, Nadine; Polen, Tino; Latus, Jeanette; Stockdreher, Yvonne; Dahl, Christiane

    2013-09-01

    The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180(T) is one of the best-studied sulfur-oxidizing anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, and it has been developed into a model organism for laboratory-based studies of oxidative sulfur metabolism. Here, we took advantage of the organism's high metabolic versatility and performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to investigate the response of A. vinosum cells upon exposure to sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, or sulfite compared to photoorganoheterotrophic growth on malate. Differential expression of 1,178 genes was observed, corresponding to 30% of the A. vinosum genome. Relative transcription of 551 genes increased significantly during growth on one of the different sulfur sources, while the relative transcript abundance of 627 genes decreased. A significant number of genes that revealed strongly enhanced relative transcription levels have documented sulfur metabolism-related functions. Among these are the dsr genes, including dsrAB for dissimilatory sulfite reductase, and the sgp genes for the proteins of the sulfur globule envelope, thus confirming former results. In addition, we identified new genes encoding proteins with appropriate subcellular localization and properties to participate in oxidative dissimilatory sulfur metabolism. Those four genes for hypothetical proteins that exhibited the strongest increases of mRNA levels on sulfide and elemental sulfur, respectively, were chosen for inactivation and phenotypic analyses of the respective mutant strains. This approach verified the importance of the encoded proteins for sulfur globule formation during the oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate and thereby also documented the suitability of comparative transcriptomics for the identification of new sulfur-related genes in anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria. PMID:23873913

  12. Compound-specific sulfur isotope analysis of thiadiamondoids of oils from the Smackover Formation, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zvi Gvirtzman,; Ward Said-Ahmad,; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ronald J. Hill,; J. Michael Moldowan,; Zhibin Wei,; Alon Amrani,

    2015-01-01

    Thiadiamondoids (TDs) are diamond-like compounds with a sulfide bond located within the cage structure. These compounds were suggested as a molecular proxy for the occurrence and extent of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). Compound-specific sulfur-isotope analysis of TDs may create a multi-parameter system, based on molecular and δ34S values that may be sensitive over a wider range of TSR and thermal maturation stages. In this study, we analyzed a suite of 12 Upper Jurassic oil and condensate samples generated from source rocks in the Smackover Formation to perform a systematic study of the sulfur isotope distribution in thiadiamondoids (one and two cages). For comparison we measured the δ34S composition of benzothiophenes (BTs) and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs). We also conducted pyrolysis experiments with petroleum and model compounds to have an insight into the formation mechanisms of TDs. The δ34S of the TDs varied significantly (ca 30‰) between the different oils depending on the degree of TSR alteration. The results showed that within the same oil, the one-cage TDs were relatively uniform, with 34S enriched values similar to those of the coexisting BTs. The two-cage TDs had more variable δ34S values that range from the δ34S values of BTs to those of the DBTs, but with general 34S depletion relative to one cage TDs. Hydrous pyrolysis experiments (360 °C, 40 h) with either CaSO4 or elemental S (equivalent S molar concentrations) and adamantane as a model compound demonstrate the formation of one cage TDs in relatively low yields (<0.2%). Higher concentrations of TDs were observed in the elemental sulfur experiments, most likely because of the higher rates of reaction with adamantane under these experimental conditions. These results show that the formation of TDs is not exclusive to TSR reactions, and that they can also form by reaction with reduced S species apart from sulfate reduction, though at low yields. Oxygenated compounds, most notably 2

  13. Compound-specific sulfur isotope analysis of thiadiamondoids of oils from the Smackover Formation, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvirtzman, Zvi; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Hill, Ronald J.; Moldowan, J. Michael; Wei, Zhibin; Amrani, Alon

    2015-10-01

    Thiadiamondoids (TDs) are diamond-like compounds with a sulfide bond located within the cage structure. These compounds were suggested as a molecular proxy for the occurrence and extent of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). Compound-specific sulfur-isotope analysis of TDs may create a multi-parameter system, based on molecular and δ34S values that may be sensitive over a wider range of TSR and thermal maturation stages. In this study, we analyzed a suite of 12 Upper Jurassic oil and condensate samples generated from source rocks in the Smackover Formation to perform a systematic study of the sulfur isotope distribution in thiadiamondoids (one and two cages). For comparison we measured the δ34S composition of benzothiophenes (BTs) and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs). We also conducted pyrolysis experiments with petroleum and model compounds to have an insight into the formation mechanisms of TDs. The δ34S of the TDs varied significantly (ca 30‰) between the different oils depending on the degree of TSR alteration. The results showed that within the same oil, the one-cage TDs were relatively uniform, with 34S enriched values similar to those of the coexisting BTs. The two-cage TDs had more variable δ34S values that range from the δ34S values of BTs to those of the DBTs, but with general 34S depletion relative to one cage TDs. Hydrous pyrolysis experiments (360 °C, 40 h) with either CaSO4 or elemental S (equivalent S molar concentrations) and adamantane as a model compound demonstrate the formation of one cage TDs in relatively low yields (<0.2%). Higher concentrations of TDs were observed in the elemental sulfur experiments, most likely because of the higher rates of reaction with adamantane under these experimental conditions. These results show that the formation of TDs is not exclusive to TSR reactions, and that they can also form by reaction with reduced S species apart from sulfate reduction, though at low yields. Oxygenated compounds, most notably 2

  14. Observation of dipropenyldisulfide and other organic sulfur compounds in the atmosphere of a beech forest with Allium ursinum ground cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puxbaum, H.; König, G.

    Dipropenyldisulfide, methylpropenyldisulfide, cis-propenylpropyldisulfide, diallylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide and 3-methylthiopropene were detected in the atmosphere of a beech forest with Allium ursinum (broad-leaved garlic) ground cover plants. Furthermore, it was shown that the Allium plants were the source of the organic sulfur compounds. The atmospheric concentrations of the organic sulfur observed on one day in May 1994 in a suburban forest in Vienna ranged from 0.3 to 7.8 ppb S with an average level of 2.9 ppb S. The atmospheric emission rate of organic sulfur species from A. ursinum determined with an enclosure box was the highest ever reported for terrestrial continental plants. The total organic sulfur flux on the average was at least 1 jug g-1h-1 (plant dry weight) or 60 gmgm-2 h-1 (per unit of ground area).

  15. Detection and classification of gaseous sulfur compounds by solid electrolyte cyclic voltammetry of cermet sensor array.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Kirsten E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L; Hammond, Mark H; Tillett, Duane; Streckert, Holger H

    2007-02-12

    Electrochemical sensors composed of a ceramic-metallic (cermet) solid electrolyte are used for the detection of gaseous sulfur compounds SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2) in a study involving 11 toxic industrial chemical (TIC) compounds. The study examines a sensor array containing four cermet sensors varying in electrode-electrolyte composition, designed to offer selectivity for multiple compounds. The sensors are driven by cyclic voltammetry to produce a current-voltage profile for each analyte. Raw voltammograms are processed by background subtraction of clean air, and the four sensor signals are concatenated to form one vector of points. The high-resolution signal is compressed by wavelet transformation and a probabilistic neural network is used for classification. In this study, training data from one sensor array was used to formulate models which were validated with data from a second sensor array. Of the 11 gases studied, 3 that contained sulfur produced the strongest responses and were successfully analyzed when the remaining compounds were treated as interferents. Analytes were measured from 10 to 200% of their threshold-limited value (TLV) according to the 8-h time weighted average (TWA) exposure limits defined by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). True positive classification rates of 93.3, 96.7, and 76.7% for SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2), respectively, were achieved for prediction of one sensor unit when a second sensor was used for modeling. True positive rates of 83.3, 90.0, and 90.0% for SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2), respectively, were achieved for the second sensor unit when the first sensor unit was used for modeling. Most of the misclassifications were for low concentration levels (such 10-25% TLV) in which case the compound was classified as clean air. Between the two sensors, the false positive rates were 2.2% or lower for the three sulfur compounds, 0.9% or lower for the interferents (eight remaining analytes), and 5.8% or lower for

  16. Sulfur: its clinical and toxicologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Komarnisky, Lioudmila A; Christopherson, Robert J; Basu, Tapan K

    2003-01-01

    Although there is no known dietary requirement for inorganic sulfur, it is an essential element for all animal species in as much as they all require the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine. There are three predominate forms of organic sulfur in animals and humans: 1). the thiomethyl of methionine residues in protein; 2). the sulfhydryl disulfides of protein; and 3). the compounds containing ester or amide bound sulfates of glycosaminoglycans, steroids, and many xenobiotic metabolites. Thus, sulfur becomes an important constituent of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and other biomolecules. Unlike mammalian species, plants can use inorganic sulfur and synthesize methionine from which are synthesized all the other important sulfur compounds. Hence, sulfur deficiency occurs mainly when plants are grown in sulfur-depleted soils and when humans and animals consume low-protein diets. In recent times, however, the increasing prevalence of refining petroleum and smelting sulfur compounds of metallic minerals into free metals are having a large impact on the balance of sulfur in the environment. Sulfur toxicity is associated mainly with high levels of the element and its toxic volatile substances in the environment. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), a major air pollutant, may adversely affect animal and human health by causing bronchitis, bronchoconstriction, and increased pulmonary resistance.

  17. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  18. Process for reducing sulfur in coal char

    DOEpatents

    Gasior, Stanley J.; Forney, Albert J.; Haynes, William P.; Kenny, Richard F.

    1976-07-20

    Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

  19. Electricity generation from an inorganic sulfur compound containing mining wastewater by acidophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Gaofeng; Christel, Stephan; Roman, Pawel; Wong, Zhen Lim; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Dopson, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Sulfide mineral processing often produces large quantities of wastewaters containing acid-generating inorganic sulfur compounds. If released untreated, these wastewaters can cause catastrophic environmental damage. In this study, microbial fuel cells were inoculated with acidophilic microorganisms to investigate whether inorganic sulfur compound oxidation can generate an electrical current. Cyclic voltammetry suggested that acidophilic microorganisms mediated electron transfer to the anode, and that electricity generation was catalyzed by microorganisms. A cation exchange membrane microbial fuel cell, fed with artificial wastewater containing tetrathionate as electron donor, reached a maximum whole cell voltage of 72 ± 9 mV. Stepwise replacement of the artificial anolyte with real mining process wastewater had no adverse effect on bioelectrochemical performance and generated a maximum voltage of 105 ± 42 mV. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the microbial consortia resulted in sequences that aligned within the genera Thermoplasma, Ferroplasma, Leptospirillum, Sulfobacillus and Acidithiobacillus. This study opens up possibilities to bioremediate mining wastewater using microbial fuel cell technology.

  20. A kinetic and thermochemical database for organic sulfur and oxygen compounds.

    PubMed

    Class, Caleb A; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Green, William H

    2015-05-28

    Potential energy surfaces and reaction kinetics were calculated for 40 reactions involving sulfur and oxygen. This includes 11 H2O addition, 8 H2S addition, 11 hydrogen abstraction, 7 beta scission, and 3 elementary tautomerization reactions, which are potentially relevant in the combustion and desulfurization of sulfur compounds found in various fuel sources. Geometry optimizations and frequencies were calculated for reactants and transition states using B3LYP/CBSB7, and potential energies were calculated using CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)-F12a/VTZ-F12. Rate coefficients were calculated using conventional transition state theory, with corrections for internal rotations and tunneling. Additionally, thermochemical parameters were calculated for each of the compounds involved in these reactions. With few exceptions, rate parameters calculated using the two potential energy methods agreed reasonably, with calculated activation energies differing by less than 5 kJ mol(-1). The computed rate coefficients and thermochemical parameters are expected to be useful for kinetic modeling. PMID:25941683

  1. Electricity generation from an inorganic sulfur compound containing mining wastewater by acidophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Gaofeng; Christel, Stephan; Roman, Pawel; Wong, Zhen Lim; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Dopson, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Sulfide mineral processing often produces large quantities of wastewaters containing acid-generating inorganic sulfur compounds. If released untreated, these wastewaters can cause catastrophic environmental damage. In this study, microbial fuel cells were inoculated with acidophilic microorganisms to investigate whether inorganic sulfur compound oxidation can generate an electrical current. Cyclic voltammetry suggested that acidophilic microorganisms mediated electron transfer to the anode, and that electricity generation was catalyzed by microorganisms. A cation exchange membrane microbial fuel cell, fed with artificial wastewater containing tetrathionate as electron donor, reached a maximum whole cell voltage of 72 ± 9 mV. Stepwise replacement of the artificial anolyte with real mining process wastewater had no adverse effect on bioelectrochemical performance and generated a maximum voltage of 105 ± 42 mV. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the microbial consortia resulted in sequences that aligned within the genera Thermoplasma, Ferroplasma, Leptospirillum, Sulfobacillus and Acidithiobacillus. This study opens up possibilities to bioremediate mining wastewater using microbial fuel cell technology. PMID:27155452

  2. Enhanced elemental mercury removal from coal-fired flue gas by sulfur-chlorine compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nai-Qiang Yan; Zan Qu; Yao Chi; Shao-Hua Qiao; Ray L. Dod; Shih-Ger Chang; Charles Miller

    2009-07-15

    Oxidation of Hg{sup 0} with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl{sub 2}) and sulfur monochloride (S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), were investigated as oxidants for Hg{sup 0} by gas-phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas-phase reaction between Hg{sup 0} and SCl{sub 2} is shown to be more rapid than the gas-phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1({+-}0.5) x 10{sup -18} mL-molecules{sup -1}.s{sup -1} at 373 K. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg{sup 0} removal is about 90% with 5 ppm SCl {sub 2} or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and 40 g/m{sup 3} of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl{sub 2} (or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90% of Hg{sup 0} can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3% of SCl{sub 2} or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} is used. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg{sup 0}/SCl{sub 2} or Hg{sup 0}/S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} reactions. Additionally, about 8% of SCl{sub 2} or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  4. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-11-01

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur without coal gas or with limited use. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) regeneration, (2) substoichiometric (partial) oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Preliminary assessment of these approaches indicated that developing SO{sub 2} regeneration faced the fewest technical and economic problems among the four process options. Elemental sulfur is the only likely product of SO{sub 2} regeneration and the SO{sub 2} required for the regeneration can be obtained by burning a portion of the sulfur produced. Experimental efforts have thus been concentrated on SO{sub 2}-based regeneration processes. Results from laboratory investigations are presented and discussed.

  5. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  6. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  7. Polarizable empirical force field for sulfur-containing compounds based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2010-09-01

    Condensed-phase computational studies of molecules using molecular mechanics approaches require the use of force fields to describe the energetics of the systems as a function of structure. The advantage of polarizable force fields over nonpolarizable (or additive) models lies in their ability to vary their electronic distribution as a function of the environment. Toward development of a polarizable force field for biological molecules, parameters for a series of sulfur-containing molecules are presented. Parameter optimization was performed to reproduce quantum mechanical and experimental data for gas phase properties including geometries, conformational energies, vibrational spectra, and dipole moments as well as for condensed phase properties such as heats of vaporization, molecular volumes, and free energies of hydration. Compounds in the training set include methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, ethyl methyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide. The molecular volumes and heats of vaporization are in good accordance with experimental values, with the polarizable model performing better than the CHARMM22 nonpolarizable force field. Improvements with the polarizable model were also obtained for molecular dipole moments and in the treatment of intermolecular interactions as a function of orientation, in part due to the presence of lone pairs and anisotropic atomic polarizability on the sulfur atoms. Significant advantage of the polarizable model was reflected in calculation of the dielectric constants, a property that CHARMM22 systematically underestimates. The ability of this polarizable model to accurately describe a range of gas and condensed phase properties paves the way for more accurate simulation studies of sulfur-containing molecules including cysteine and methionine residues in proteins. PMID:20575015

  8. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  9. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  10. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  11. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  12. Studies on the Low-Temp Oxidation of Coal Containing Organic Sulfur and the Corresponding Model Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanjun; Li, Zenghua; Li, Jinhu; Zhou, Yinbo; Yang, Yongliang; Tang, Yibo

    2015-12-11

    This paper selects two typical compounds containing organic sulfur as model compounds. Then, by analyzing the chromatograms of gaseous low-temp oxidation products and GC/MS of the extractable matter of the oxidation residue, we summarizing the mechanism of low-temp sulfur model compound oxidation. The results show that between 30°C to 80°C, the interaction between diphenyl sulfide and oxygen is mainly one of physical adsorption. After 80°C, chemical adsorption and chemical reactions begin. The main reaction mechanism in the low-temp oxidation of the model compound diphenyl sulfide is diphenyl sulfide generates diphenyl sulfoxide, and then this sulfoxide is further oxidized to diphenyl sulphone. A small amount of free radicals is generated in the process. The model compound cysteine behaves differently from diphenyl sulfide. The main reaction low-temp oxidation mechanism involves the thiol being oxidized into a disulphide and finally evolving to sulfonic acid, along with SO₂ being released at 130°C and also a small amount of free radicals. We also conducted an experiment on coal from Xingcheng using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the major forms of organic sulfur in the original coal sample are thiophene and sulfone. Therefore, it can be inferred that there is none or little mercaptan and thiophenol in the original coal. After low-temp oxidation, the form of organic sulfur changes. The sulfide sulfur is oxidized to the sulfoxide, and then the sulfoxide is further oxidized to a sulfone, and these steps can be easily carried out under experimental conditions. What's more, the results illustrate that oxidation promotes sulfur element enrichment on the surface of coal.

  13. Studies on the Low-Temp Oxidation of Coal Containing Organic Sulfur and the Corresponding Model Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanjun; Li, Zenghua; Li, Jinhu; Zhou, Yinbo; Yang, Yongliang; Tang, Yibo

    2015-01-01

    This paper selects two typical compounds containing organic sulfur as model compounds. Then, by analyzing the chromatograms of gaseous low-temp oxidation products and GC/MS of the extractable matter of the oxidation residue, we summarizing the mechanism of low-temp sulfur model compound oxidation. The results show that between 30°C to 80°C, the interaction between diphenyl sulfide and oxygen is mainly one of physical adsorption. After 80°C, chemical adsorption and chemical reactions begin. The main reaction mechanism in the low-temp oxidation of the model compound diphenyl sulfide is diphenyl sulfide generates diphenyl sulfoxide, and then this sulfoxide is further oxidized to diphenyl sulphone. A small amount of free radicals is generated in the process. The model compound cysteine behaves differently from diphenyl sulfide. The main reaction low-temp oxidation mechanism involves the thiol being oxidized into a disulphide and finally evolving to sulfonic acid, along with SO₂ being released at 130°C and also a small amount of free radicals. We also conducted an experiment on coal from Xingcheng using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the major forms of organic sulfur in the original coal sample are thiophene and sulfone. Therefore, it can be inferred that there is none or little mercaptan and thiophenol in the original coal. After low-temp oxidation, the form of organic sulfur changes. The sulfide sulfur is oxidized to the sulfoxide, and then the sulfoxide is further oxidized to a sulfone, and these steps can be easily carried out under experimental conditions. What's more, the results illustrate that oxidation promotes sulfur element enrichment on the surface of coal. PMID:26690405

  14. The influence of hydroxyl volatile organic compounds on the oxidation of aqueous sulfur dioxide by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Yogpal; Chandel, C P S; Gupta, K S

    2014-01-01

    Although the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the oxidation of dissolved sulfur dioxide by oxygen has been the subject of many investigations, this is the first study which examines the effect of a large number of precisely 16 hydroxy compounds. The kinetics both in the absence and the presence of VOCs was defined by rate laws (A and B): -d[S(IV)]dt = R₀ = k₀[S(IV)] (A) -d[S(IV)]dt = R(i) = k(i)[S(IV)] (B) where R₀ and k₀ are the initial rate and first-order rate constant, respectively, in the absence of VOCs, R(i), and k(i) are the initial rate and the first-order rate constant, respectively, in the presence of VOCs, and [S(IV)] is the concentration of dissolved sulfur dioxide, sulfur(IV). The nature of the dependence of k(i) on the concentration of inhibitor, [Inh], was defined by Eq. (C). [k(i) = k₀/(1 + B[Inh]) (C) where B is an empirical inhibition parameter. The values of B have been determined from the plots of 1/k(i) versus [Inh]. Among aliphatic and aromatic hydroxy compounds studied, t-butyl alcohol and pinacol were without any inhibition effect due to the absence of secondary or tertiary hydrogen. The values of inhibition parameter, B, were related to k(inh), the rate constant for the reaction of SO₄(-) radical with the inhibitor, by Eq. (D). B = (9 ± 2) x 10⁻⁴ x k(inh) (D) Equation (D) may be used to calculate the values of either of B or k(inh) provided that the other is known. The extent of inhibition depends on the value of the composite term, B[Inh]. However, in accordance with Eq. (C), the extent of inhibition would be sizeable and measurable when B[Inh] > 0.1 and oxidation of S(IV) would be almost completely stopped when B[Inh] ≥ 10. B[Inh] value can be used as a guide whether the reaction step: SO4 (-) + organics → SO₄(2-) + non-chain products: should be included in the multiphase models or not.

  15. The influence of hydroxyl volatile organic compounds on the oxidation of aqueous sulfur dioxide by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Yogpal; Chandel, C P S; Gupta, K S

    2014-01-01

    Although the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the oxidation of dissolved sulfur dioxide by oxygen has been the subject of many investigations, this is the first study which examines the effect of a large number of precisely 16 hydroxy compounds. The kinetics both in the absence and the presence of VOCs was defined by rate laws (A and B): -d[S(IV)]dt = R₀ = k₀[S(IV)] (A) -d[S(IV)]dt = R(i) = k(i)[S(IV)] (B) where R₀ and k₀ are the initial rate and first-order rate constant, respectively, in the absence of VOCs, R(i), and k(i) are the initial rate and the first-order rate constant, respectively, in the presence of VOCs, and [S(IV)] is the concentration of dissolved sulfur dioxide, sulfur(IV). The nature of the dependence of k(i) on the concentration of inhibitor, [Inh], was defined by Eq. (C). [k(i) = k₀/(1 + B[Inh]) (C) where B is an empirical inhibition parameter. The values of B have been determined from the plots of 1/k(i) versus [Inh]. Among aliphatic and aromatic hydroxy compounds studied, t-butyl alcohol and pinacol were without any inhibition effect due to the absence of secondary or tertiary hydrogen. The values of inhibition parameter, B, were related to k(inh), the rate constant for the reaction of SO₄(-) radical with the inhibitor, by Eq. (D). B = (9 ± 2) x 10⁻⁴ x k(inh) (D) Equation (D) may be used to calculate the values of either of B or k(inh) provided that the other is known. The extent of inhibition depends on the value of the composite term, B[Inh]. However, in accordance with Eq. (C), the extent of inhibition would be sizeable and measurable when B[Inh] > 0.1 and oxidation of S(IV) would be almost completely stopped when B[Inh] ≥ 10. B[Inh] value can be used as a guide whether the reaction step: SO4 (-) + organics → SO₄(2-) + non-chain products: should be included in the multiphase models or not. PMID:24638831

  16. Identification of a New Antibacterial Sulfur Compound from Raphanus sativus Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Yazbak, Ahmad; Rushrush, Salwa; Rudy, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Raphanus sativus L. (radish), a member of Brassicaceae, is widely used in traditional medicine in various cultures for treatment of several diseases and disorders associated with microbial infections. The antibacterial activity of the different plant parts has been mainly attributed to several isothiocyanate (ITC) compounds. However, the low correlation between the ITC content and antibacterial activity suggests the involvement of other unknown compounds. The objective of this study was to investigate the antibacterial potential of red radish seeds and identify the active compounds. A crude ethanol seed extract was prepared and its antibacterial activity was tested against five medically important bacteria. The ethanol extract significantly inhibited the growth of all tested strains. However, the inhibitory effect was more pronounced against Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the ethanol extract followed by HPLC, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 15N-NMR, and HMBC analysis revealed that the active fraction consisted of a single new compound identified as [5-methylsulfinyl-1-(4-methylsulfinyl-but-3-enyl)-pent-4-enylidene]-sulfamic acid, which consisted of two identical sulfur side chains similar to those found in ITCs. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of the isolated compound were in the range of 0.5–1 mg/mL. These results further highlight the role of radish as a rich source of antibacterial compounds. PMID:27781070

  17. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  18. Sulfur volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

  19. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  20. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  1. Molecular detection and isolation from antarctica of methylotrophic bacteria able to grow with methylated sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Moosvi, S Azra; McDonald, Ian R; Pearce, David A; Kelly, Donovan P; Wood, Ann P

    2005-08-01

    This study is the first demonstration that a diverse facultatively methylotrophic microbiota exists in some Antarctic locations. PCR amplification of genes diagnostic for methylotrophs was carried out with bacterial DNA isolated from 14 soil and sediment samples from ten locations on Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, Antarctica. Genes encoding the mxaF of methanol dehydrogenase, the fdxA for Afipia ferredoxin, the msmA of methanesulfonate monooxygenase, and the 16S rRNA gene of Methylobacterium were detected in all samples tested. The mxaF gene sequences corresponded to those of Hyphomicrobium, Methylobacterium, and Methylomonas. Over 30 pure cultures of methylotrophs were isolated on methanesulfonate, dimethylsulfone, or dimethylsulfide from ten Signy Island lakes. Some were identified from 16S rRNA gene sequences (and morphology) as Hyphomicrobium species, strains of Afipia felis, and a methylotrophic Flavobacterium strain. Antarctic environments thus contain diverse methylotrophic bacteria, growing on various C1-substrates, including C1-sulfur compounds. PMID:16104352

  2. The relative importance of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in the acidification of freshwater

    SciTech Connect

    Van Miegroet, H.

    1992-01-01

    The acid-base chemistry of streams and lakes is regulated by the amount and composition of atmospheric deposition and by biogeochemical processes in the catchment and within streams and lakes. In this paper the influence of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds will be discussed (a) because they are major constituents of atmospheric deposition that have recently become the focus of critical loads assessments in Europe and North America, and (b) because they are essential nutrients for most biota and cycle naturally through terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In order to evaluate the relative impact of atmospheric inputs on freshwater acidity, it is necessary to clearly define acidification'' and to understand; the mechanisms of change caused or mediated by natural and anthropogenic processes.

  3. Determination of sulfur and nitrogen compounds during the processing of dry fermented sausages and their relation to amino acid generation.

    PubMed

    Corral, Sara; Leitner, Erich; Siegmund, Barbara; Flores, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of odor-active sulfur and nitrogen compounds formed during the processing of dry fermented sausages was the objective of this study. In order to elucidate their possible origin, free amino acids (FAAs) were also determined. The volatile compounds present in the dry sausages were extracted using solvent assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) and monitored by one and two-dimensional gas chromatography with different detectors: mass spectrometry (MS), nitrogen phosphorous (NPD), flame photometric (FPD) detectors, as well as gas chromatography-olfactometry. A total of seventeen sulfur and nitrogen compounds were identified and quantified. Among them, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline was the most potent odor active compound, followed by methional, ethylpyrazine and 2,3-dihydrothiophene characterized by toasted, cooked potato, and nutty notes. The degradation of FAAs, generated during processing, was related to the production of aroma compounds, such as methionine forming methional and benzothiazole while ornithine was the precursor compound for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline and glycine for ethylpyrazine.

  4. PTR-MS measurement of partition coefficients of reduced volatile sulfur compounds in liquids from biotrickling filters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dezhao; Feilberg, Anders; Nielsen, Anders Michael; Adamsen, Anders Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Biological air filtration for reduction of emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (e.g., hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide) from livestock production facilities is challenged by poor partitioning of these compounds into the aqueous biofilm or filter trickling water. In this study, Henry's law constants of reduced volatile sulfur compounds were measured for deionized water, biotrickling filter liquids (from the first and second stages of a two-stage biotrickling filter), and NaCl solutions by a dynamic method using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) at a temperature range of 3-45°C. NaCl solutions were used to estimate salting-out constants up to an ionic strength of 0.7 M in order to evaluate the effect of ionic strength on partitioning between air and biofilter liquids. Thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy of phase exchange) were obtained from the measured partition coefficients as a function of temperature. The results show that the partition coefficients of organic sulfur compounds in the biotrickling filter liquids were generally very close to the corresponding partition coefficients in deionized water. Based on the estimated ionic strength of biofilter liquids, it is assessed that salting-out effects are of no importance for these compounds. For H(2)S, a higher enthalpy of air-liquid partitioning was observed for 2nd stage filter liquid, but not for 1st stage filter liquid. In general, the results show that co-solute effects for sulfur compounds can be neglected in numerical biofilter models and that the uptake of volatile sulfur compounds in biotrickling filter liquids cannot be increased by decreasing ionic strength.

  5. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF TOTAL REDUCED SULFUR COMPOUNDS FROM PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRIES WITH OZONE AS AN OXIDANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulp and paper industry generates more than 144 million lb of VOCs per year including a range of reduced sulfur compounds (TRS) such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methane thiol (MT) and H2S that are odorous, toxic and contribute to smog formation. Thermal ...

  6. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  7. Kinetics of oxidation of odorous sulfur compounds in aqueous alkaline solution with H2O2.

    PubMed

    Feliers, C; Patria, L; Morvan, J; Laplanche, A

    2001-10-01

    Sulfur species oxidation is a crucial issue wastewater treatment. The production of sulfur compounds like H2S,CH3SH, C2H5SH, disulfides and dimethyle sulfide generates odorous nuisances for the neighborhood. The oxidation of these species by H2O2 in alkaline solution has been investigated. The results showed that thiols CH3SH and C2H5SH react with H202 only in their dissociated form RS- with rate constants respectively k = 8.81 +/- 0.48 M-1s-1 and 8.37 +/- 0.63 M-1.s-1. Mercaptans oxidation produces 100 % of dimethyldisulfide or diethyldisulfide. The oxidation of disulfides shows a difference of reactivity between H2O2 and HO2- towards sulfur species. Increasing the pH accelerates significantly the reactions in the case of CH3SSCH3. The oxidation rate can be described as: r = k[RSSR][H2O2][RSSR][H2O2] + k[RSSR][HO2-] [RSSR][HO2-] with k[RSSR][H2O2] = 1.2 x 10(-4) +/- 0.2 x 10(-4) M-1s-1 and k[RSSR][HO2-] = 3.4 x 10(-4) +/- 0.6 x 10(-4) M-1.s-1 for CH3SSCH3. Dimethyl sulfide presents a reactivity different from disulfides. The oxidation rate can also be described as: r = k[CH3SCH3][H2O21][CH3SCH3][H2O2] + k[CH3SCH3][HO-] [CH3SCH3][HO2-], however, oxidation rate decreases with pH increase. k[CH3SCH3][H2O2] = 12.8 x 10(-3) +/- 0.96 x 10(-3) M-1.s-1 and k[CH3SCH3][HO2-] = 4 x 10(-3) +/- 0.3 x 10(-3) M-1.s-1.

  8. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongyu; Schuchardt, Frank; Li, Guoxue; Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ► The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ► Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ► Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS{sub 2}) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O{sub 2} concentration (p < 0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg{sup −1} (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%.

  9. Bacterial ethane formation from reduced, ethylated sulfur compounds in anoxic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Strohmaier, F.E.; Kiene, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Trace levels of ethane were produced biologically in anoxic sediment slurries from five chemically different aquatic environments. Gases from these locations displayed biogenic characteristics, having 12C-enriched values of ??13CH4 (-62 to -86%.), ??13C2H6 (-35 to -55%.) and high ratios (720 to 140,000) of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8]. Endogenous production of ethane by slurries was inhibited by autoclaving or by addition of the inhibitor of methanogenic bacteria, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES). Ethane formation was stimulated markedly by ethanethiol (ESH), and, to a lesser extent, by diethylsulfide (DES). Formation of methane and ethane in ESH- or DES-amended slurries was blocked by BES. Experiments showed that ethionine (or an analogous compound) could be a precursor of ESH. Ethylamine or ethanol additions to slurries caused only a minor stimulation of ethane formation. Similarly, propanethiol additions resulted in only a minor enhancement of propane formation. Cell suspensions of a methyltrophic methanogen produced traces of ethane when incubated in the presence of DES, although the organism did not grow on this compound. These results indicate that methanogenic bacteria produce ethane from the traces of ethylated sulfur compounds present in recent sediments. Preliminary estimates of stable carbon isotope fractionation associated with sediment methane formation from dimethylsulfide was about 40%., while ethane formation from DES and ESH was only 4. 6 and 6.5%., respectively. ?? 1988.

  10. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  11. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: ? Concentrations and fluxes above a grass field

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this s...

  12. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: Assessment and control of data quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this ...

  13. Sulfur monochloride in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, L. S.; Rakitin, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    The data on the reactivity of sulfur monochloride published in the past 15 years have been reviewed and systematized. The review focuses on the synthesis of acyclic and heterocyclic compounds with the use of S2Cl2. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  14. Bis(4-hydroxybenzyl)sulfide: a sulfur compound inhibitor of histone deacetylase isolated from root extract of Pleuropterus ciliinervis.

    PubMed

    Son, Il Hong; Lee, Sung Ik; Yang, Hyun Duk; Moon, Hyung-In

    2007-01-01

    A sulfur compound, bis(4-hydroxybenzyl)sulfide (1) was isolated from the root extract of Pleuropterus ciliinervis. Its structure was elucidated using NMR spectroscopic techniques and mass spectrometric analysis. Compound 1 showed potent inhibitory activity in a histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme assay. It also exhibited growth inhibitory activity on five human tumor cell lines and more sensitive inhibitory activity on the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cell line. PMID:17851433

  15. Inhibitory Effect of Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on Volatile Sulfur Compound Production by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takuya; Nakajima, Masato; Fujimoto, Akie; Hanioka, Takashi; Hirofuji, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral anaerobes are the major compounds responsible for oral malodor. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 is recognized as an antiplaque probiotic bacterium. In this study, the effect of E. faecium WB2000 on VSC production by Porphyromonas gingivalis was evaluated, and the mechanism of inhibition of oral malodor was investigated. P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 was cultured in the presence of four lactic acid bacteria, including E. faecium WB2000. Subsequently, P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, W50, W83, and two clinical isolates were cultured in the presence or absence of E. faecium WB2000, and the emission of VSCs from spent culture medium was measured by gas chromatography. The number of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in mixed culture with E. faecium WB2000 decreased at 6 h, and the rate of decrease was higher than that in mixed cultures with the other lactic acid bacteria. The numbers of five P. gingivalis strains decreased at similar rates in mixed culture with E. faecium WB2000. The concentration of methyl mercaptan was lower in spent culture medium from P. gingivalis and E. faecium WB2000 cultures compared with that from P. gingivalis alone. Therefore, E. faecium WB2000 may reduce oral malodor by inhibiting the growth of P. gingivalis and neutralizing methyl mercaptan. PMID:27799940

  16. Sulfur Volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of molten sulfur, in which viscosity decreases approximately four orders of magnitude as it cools from 170 to 120 C, may result in distinctive volcanic flow morphologies that allow sulfur flows and volcanoes to be identified on Io. Search of high resolution Voyager images reveals three features--Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera--considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes based on their morphology. All three average 250 km in diameter and are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular, widespread flows. Geometric relations indicate that the flows were emplaced after the central zone and appear to have emanated from their margins. The central zones are interpreted to be domes representing the high temperature stage of sulfur formed initially upon eruption. Rapid quenching formed a crust which preserved this phase of the emplacement. Upon cooling to 170 C, the sulfur reached a low viscosity runny stage and was released as the thin, widespread flows.

  17. The south Karelia air pollution study: Effects of low-level expsoure to malodorous sulfur compounds on symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Partti-Pellinen, K.; Marttila, O.; Vilkka, V.; Jaakkola, J.J. |

    1996-07-01

    Exposure to very low levels of ambient-air malodorous sulfur compounds and their effect on eye irritation, respiratory-tract symptoms, and central nervous system symptoms in adults were assessed. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire (response rate = 77%) was distributed during March and April 1992 to adults (n = 336) who lived in a neighborhood that contained a pulp mill and in a nonpolluted reference community (n = 380). In the exposed community, the measured annual mean concentrations of total reduced sulfur compounds and sulfur dioxide measured in two stations were 2 to 3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. In the reference community, the annual mean concentration of sulfur dioxide was 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The residents of the community near the pulp mill reported an excess of cough, respiratory infections, and headache during the previous 4 wk, as well as during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for headache was increased significantly in the exposed community, compared with the reference area: the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.83 (95% confidence interval [95% Cl] = 1.06-3.15) during the previous 4 wk and 1.70 (95% Cl = 1.05-2.73) during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for cough was also increased during the preceding 12 mo (aOR = 1.64, 95% Cl = 1.01-2.64). These results indicated that adverse health effects of malodorous sulfur compounds occur at lower concentrations than reported previously. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of the process of formation of sulfur compounds in oxygen gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    G.Ya. Gerasimov; T.M. Bogacheva

    2001-05-15

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of the behavior of the system fuel-oxidizer in oxygen gasification of coal is used to reveal the main mechanisms of the process of capture of sulfur by the mineral part of the coal and to determine the fundamental possibility of the process for coals from different coal fields.

  19. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  20. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  1. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  2. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  3. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, Tetsuo; Squires, Thomas G.; Venier, Clifford G.

    1985-02-05

    A process for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  4. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  5. Assessment of reduced sulfur compounds in ambient air as malodor components in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susaya, Janice; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Phan, Nhu-Thuc; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2011-07-01

    Long-term monitoring of reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs: hydrogen sulfide (H 2S), methanethiol (CH 3SH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS)) in ambient air was made using an on-line GC system at an odor monitoring station in the city of Ansan, South Korea (August 2005-December 2007). The results were examined to assess the status of RSC pollution, its relative contribution to malodor, and the controlling factors of its occurrence. H 2S (mean of 0.27 ppb) was eminent in terms of both magnitude and occurrence frequency, while others were not with mean values of 0.11 (DMDS), 0.10 (DMS), and 0.07 ppb (CH 3SH). Unlike others, the temporal trends of H 2S were best represented by the combined effects of its source processes and meteorological conditions. The results of correlation analysis indicate strong correlations between RSCs and water-related parameters (e.g., rainfall, dew point, and relative humidity). The role of RSCs as malodor component appears to be pronounced during nighttime, especially in summer. If the relative contribution of RSCs to malodor is assessed by means of the sum of odor intensity (SOI), its impact is relatively low, with an SOI value of 1.22 (weak odor strength). Consequently, a more deliberate approach may be needed to effectively assess odor occurrence patterns in ambient air.

  6. Origins of sulfur compounds in the atmosphere of a zone of high productivity (Gulf of Guinea)

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, R.; Servant, J.

    1982-12-20

    Recent observations have suggested substantial emission of sulfur compounds by oceanic water which could explain the presence of SO/sub 2/ and SO/sup +//sub 4/ in the air above these waters. The emission is thought to increase with the productivity of the oceanic zones. This point is discussed in relation to the Gulf of Guinea, a zone of high productivity. During the first two campaigns between Dakar, Abidjan, and the Gulf of Guinea SO/sup +//sub 4/ concentrations were measured in the air. Between Abidjan and the Gulf of Guinea the atmospheric SO= /sub 4/ concentrations decreased from 800 to 400 ng m/sup -3/. During the third campaign, between Abidjan and the South Equatorial Current (latitude 1/sup 0/S), the H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ concentrations were measured. The mean H/sub 2/S concentration was 20 ng m/sup -3/, and that of SO/sub 2/ varied between 120 and under 50 ng m/sup -3/. The origins of SO/sub 2/ and SO/sup +//sub 4/ in the air of this area are discussed through the daily variations of the H/sub 2/S content of the air and a contribution from the forested zones of West Africa.

  7. Inhibition of microbial growth by ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound derived from garlic.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, R; Iwata, N; Ishikawa, K; Fukuda, H; Fujino, T; Suzuki, A

    1996-11-01

    Ajoene, a garlic-derived sulfur-containing compound that prevents platelet aggregation, exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Growth of gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Streptomyces griseus, was inhibited at 5 micrograms of ajoene per ml. Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus plantarum also were inhibited below 20 micrograms of ajoene per ml. For gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Xanthomonas maltophilia, MICs were between 100 and 160 micrograms/ml. Ajoene also inhibited yeast growth at concentrations below 20 micrograms/ml. The microbicidal effect of ajoene on growing cells was observed at slightly higher concentrations than the corresponding MICs. B. cereus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were killed at 30 micrograms of ajoene per ml after 24 h of cultivation when cultivation was started at 10(5) cells per ml. However, the minimal microbicidal concentrations for resting cells were at 10 to 100 times higher concentrations than the corresponding MICs. The disulfide bond in ajoene appears to be necessary for the antimicrobial activity of ajoene, since reduction by cysteine, which reacts with disulfide bonds, abolished its antimicrobial activity.

  8. Emission of volatile organic sulfur compounds from a heavily polluted river in Guangzhou, South China.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yanqing; Chen, Fanzhong; Yu, Ying; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2008-08-01

    Emissions of five volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), including methanethiol, carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and dimethyl disulfide, from a heavily polluted river, Shijing River in Guangzhou of South China, was studied. The results showed that the amounts of all VOSCs emitted from the river increased from downstream to upstream along the river with increasing magnitude of water pollution. The emission of carbonyl sulfide was the highest among the target analytes, ranging from 23.8 microg m(-2) h(-1) to 42.6 microg m(-2) h(-1) at the water surface of Shijin River. The concentration levels of VOSCs on the riverbank were lower than those at the water surface either in Shijing River or in Liuxi River. However, the contribution of dimethyl disulfide to the total VOSCs on the riverbank was higher than that at the water surface in most sampling sites, indicating that there might be a point source of dimethyl disulfide on the riverbank besides diffusion from water surface. The 24-h semi-continuous monitoring data revealed that the emissions of VOSCs at the water surface peaked at 9:00 and 21:00, which was consistent with the water quality variability in Shijin River caused by daily tidal variation.

  9. Preparation of Macro-Porous Tin Oxide for Sensing of Sulfur Compound.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Hoon; Sung, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Lee, Tae Jin

    2016-03-01

    Macro-porous tin oxide was prepared as an enhanced sensing material for sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide. Poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) was used as a template for the formation of macro-pores. Tin chloride was used as a precursor for the synthesis of tin oxide, and was impregnated over PMMA beads using a rotary vacuum evaporator. The solid Sn/PMMA material was treated thermally for 4 h at 600 degrees C. The porous morphology of tin oxide prepared in this study was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of this material measured by the nitrogen adsorption method was approximately 56 m2/g. The crystal structure of the porous material analyzed by XRD was a typical structure of tin oxide. The response of macro-porous tin oxide as a chemical gas sensor was measured using an I-V source meter and the change in signal was observed with the repeated injection of hydrogen sulfide and air. The sensing tests for macro-porous tin oxide were carried out at 200 degrees C and the fast response of macro-porous sensing material was also confirmed.

  10. Preparation of Macro-Porous Tin Oxide for Sensing of Sulfur Compound.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Hoon; Sung, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Lee, Tae Jin

    2016-03-01

    Macro-porous tin oxide was prepared as an enhanced sensing material for sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide. Poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) was used as a template for the formation of macro-pores. Tin chloride was used as a precursor for the synthesis of tin oxide, and was impregnated over PMMA beads using a rotary vacuum evaporator. The solid Sn/PMMA material was treated thermally for 4 h at 600 degrees C. The porous morphology of tin oxide prepared in this study was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of this material measured by the nitrogen adsorption method was approximately 56 m2/g. The crystal structure of the porous material analyzed by XRD was a typical structure of tin oxide. The response of macro-porous tin oxide as a chemical gas sensor was measured using an I-V source meter and the change in signal was observed with the repeated injection of hydrogen sulfide and air. The sensing tests for macro-porous tin oxide were carried out at 200 degrees C and the fast response of macro-porous sensing material was also confirmed. PMID:27455761

  11. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-10-15

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH) group and appear in the free gaseous form, in the acid-labile form and in the dithiothreitol-labile form. Dimethyl sulfide is a neutral molecule and exists only in the free form. The foul odor of these sulfur volatiles is a striking characteristic and plays a major role in bad breath, feces and flatus. Because sulfur is a biologically active element, the biological significance of the sulfur volatiles are also highlighted. Despite its highly toxic properties, hydrogen sulfide has been lately recommended to become the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, based on high concentration found in healthy tissues, such as blood and brain. However, there is much doubt about the reliability of the assay methods used. Many artifacts in the sulfide assays exist. The methods to detect the various forms of hydrogen sulfide are critically reviewed and compared with findings of our group. Recent findings that free gaseous hydrogen sulfide is absent in whole blood urged the need to revisit its role as a blood-borne signaling molecule.

  12. Multi-functional sorbents for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and lead compounds from hot flue gases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Lin, Wen-Chiang

    2003-10-01

    A multi-functional sorbent is developed for the simultaneous removal of PbCl(2) vapor and sulfur dioxide from the combustion gases. The sorbent is tested in a bench-scale reactor at the temperature of 700 degrees C, using simulated flue gas (SFG) containing controlled amounts of PbCl(2) and SO(2) compounds. The removal characteristics of PbCl(2) and SO(2), individually and in combination, are investigated. The results show that the mechanism of capture by the sorbent is not a simple physical adsorption process but seems to involve a chemical reaction between the Ca-based sorbent and the contaminants from the simulated flue gas. The porous product layer in the case of individual SO(2) sorption is in a molten state at the reaction temperature. In contrast, the combined sorption of lead and sulfur compounds generates a flower-shaped polycrystalline product layer.

  13. Methods for removing malodorous sulfur compounds from pulp mill flue gases and the like by using green liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Farin, W.G.

    1984-02-14

    This is an improved method for removing malodorous sulfur compounds from flue gases generated in kraft or sodium sulfite pulping operations and the like by the absorption process using green liquor, an aqueous solution containing sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate. The malodorous gas compounds, including hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulfide are preferentially absorbed by the sodium sulfide forming sodium hydrosulfide and methanol. Any sulfur dioxide in the gas is absorbed and neutralized by sodium carbonate. In this method carbon dioxide absorption is minimized and the formation of sodium bicarbonate is limited. Sodium bicarbonate formation is minimized in order to avoid its reaction with sodium hydrosulfide which would then release undesirable hydrogen sulfide during absorption, as well as to forestall the need to increase chemical and lime kiln capacity requirements when the green liquor returned to the kraft recovery process contains excess amounts of sodium bicarbonate.

  14. Cryogenic trapping of reduced sulfur compounds using a nafion drier and cotton wadding as an oxidant scavenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Hofmann, R.; Kesselmeier, J.

    A commercially available Nafion drier (Perma-Pure) was tested under laboratory and field conditions and shown to be suitable for measurements of reduced sulfur compounds such as H 2S, COS, CH 3SH, CH 3SCH 3 (DMS) and CS 2 in dry and humid air in the pptv-range. For the scavenging of oxidants we combined the Nafion drier technique with a cotton oxidant scrubber. Results obtained under laboratory conditions with humidified samples and in the course of a small field experiment confirm the oxidant scrubber qualities of cotton and indicate that the cotton oxidant scrubber in combination with a Nafion drier is suitable for measurements of nearly all reduced sulfur compounds except CH 3SH.

  15. Sulfur dioxide removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Sliger, A.G.; O'Donnell, J.J.; Northup, A.H. Jr.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream with a buffered, aqueous thiosulfate/polythionate solution which comprises: (a) introducing sulfur dioxide-containing gas, recovered hydrogen sulfide, and a buffered, aqueous, lean thiosulfate/polythionate solution to an SO/sub 2/-gas/liquid contacting zone; (b) recovering cleaned gas and a buffered, aqueous, enriched thiosulfate/polythionate solution from the SO/sub 2/-gas/liquid contacting zone; (c) introducing the recovered, enriched solution to a regeneration zone; (d) introducing externally supplied hydrogen sulfide to the regeneration zone to react a portion of the recovered, enriched solution therein to form a slurry of elemental sulfur in a buffered, aqueous, lean thiosulfate/polythionate solution; (e) recovering unreacted excess hydrogen sulfide from the regeneration zone for use in step (a); and (f) withdrawing the slurry from the regeneration zone, separating elemental sulfur from the slurry, and recovering the buffered, aqueous, lean thiosulfate/polythionate solution for use in step (a).

  16. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  17. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  18. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2003-01-01

    Since domestic sulfur production peaked at nearly 11 million metric tons in 1974, the sulfur industry has undergone dramatic change. In 1974, mined sulfur produced using the Frasch hot water method provided 8 million tons of sulfur, representing 75 percent of total elemental sulfur production. (In the Frasch process, hot water is injected directly into the sulfur-containing mineral strata, melting the crystalline sulfur, which then lifts to the surface with air.) The remaining 25 percent was produced as byproduct sulfur.

  20. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  1. The cycle of biogenic sulfur compounds over the Amazon Basin. I - Dry season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of SO2, methylmercaptan, dimethylsulfide, H2S, aerosol sulfate, and methanesulfonate over the Amazon Basin during the July/August dry season were determined from samples collected by the NASA research aircraft. The results indicate that biogenic emissions represent an important, if not the dominant, source of sulfur to the atmosphere over Amazonia. Per unit area, the wet continental tropics appear to have about the same reduced sulfur emission flux as the oceanic area average (about 6 nmol/sq m per min), consistent with the fact that the aerosol sulfate concentration over the Amazon Basin is similar to the excess sulfate levels over the remote oceans. However, since the wet tropical continents represent only about 3 percent of the earth's surface, their global contribution is modest; it is also small relative to the anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel burning.

  2. Activity of vanadium catalysts for sulfuric acid production, promoted with Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Mg compounds, at various pressures of sulfur oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanenko, S.V.; Dzhoraev, R.R.

    1995-12-10

    The activities of vanadium catalysts promoted with Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Mg sulfates (ratio Me:V = 4) were studied in conditions of low (up to 1 kPa) and high (up to 70 kPa) partial pressures of sulfur oxides at 693 and 758 K. The authors report results of reaction kinetic studies.

  3. Control of the chemical state change of sulfur in solid compound targets during high-resolution PIXE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyung-Joo; Choi, Han-Woo; Kim, Gi-Dong; Kim, Joon-Kon

    2012-07-01

    A high-energy-resolution wavelength-dispersive (WD) X-ray spectrometer in the Johansson geometry, which allowed energy resolution below the natural linewidth of the K α lines was employed in measurements of the proton-induced K α X-ray emission spectra for six typical sulfur compounds (CdS, Na2SO3, Na2 S2O5, NaHSO3, (NH4)2SO4, and Na2SO4) to investigate the chemical state change during 2.4-MeV proton irradiation with a current density of 7.5 nA/mm2. We found that the chemical state change of each compound depended on the various factors affecting the surface temperature increase, such as target thickness, mounting method, and existence of active cooling during the measurement. The chemical state of sulfur on the target surface of S4+ compounds was gradually changed into S6+ without exception through irradiation under poor cooling conditions. Sulfur compounds of the S0 and S6+ states with closed shell structures were proven to be chemically stable against proton bombardment, as expected. However, (NH4)2SO4 was found to be most sensitive to proton irradiation among the sulfur compounds, and S0, one of the reaction products, became a major element at doses higher than 3 × 108 Gy. If thick targets were mounted by using a carbon adhesive tape, chemical state change could be observed in some cases even with lowtemperature cooling down to -80 °C, however, the chemical state change seemed to be remarkably suppressed by using very thin targets mounted with a silver paste even without active cooling. In conclusion, the chemical states of sulfur compounds could be preserved without significant change for an accumulated dose of about 3 × 107 Gy, equivalent to a typical high-resolution PIXE scanning period, by adopting a proper target preparation scheme to discharge proton-induced thermal energy effectively from the irradiated target surface.

  4. Sulfur chemistry in bacterial leaching of pyrite.

    PubMed

    Schippers, A; Jozsa, P; Sand, W

    1996-09-01

    In the case of pyrite bioleaching by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, an organism without sulfur-oxidizing capacity, besides the production of tetra- and pentathionate, a considerable accumulation of elemental sulfur occurred. A similar result was obtained for chemical oxidation assays with acidic, sterile iron(III) ion-containing solutions. In the case of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, only slight amounts of elemental sulfur were detectable because of the organism's capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. In the course of oxidative, chemical pyrite degradation under alkaline conditions, the accumulation of tetrathionate, trithionate, and thiosulfate occurred. The data indicate that thiosulfate, trithionate, tetrathionate, and disulfane-monosulfonic acid are key intermediate sulfur compounds in oxidative pyrite degradation. A novel (cyclic) leaching mechanism is proposed which basically is indirect.

  5. Sulfur Chemistry in Bacterial Leaching of Pyrite

    PubMed Central

    Schippers, A.; Jozsa, P.; Sand, W.

    1996-01-01

    In the case of pyrite bioleaching by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, an organism without sulfur-oxidizing capacity, besides the production of tetra- and pentathionate, a considerable accumulation of elemental sulfur occurred. A similar result was obtained for chemical oxidation assays with acidic, sterile iron(III) ion-containing solutions. In the case of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, only slight amounts of elemental sulfur were detectable because of the organism's capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. In the course of oxidative, chemical pyrite degradation under alkaline conditions, the accumulation of tetrathionate, trithionate, and thiosulfate occurred. The data indicate that thiosulfate, trithionate, tetrathionate, and disulfane-monosulfonic acid are key intermediate sulfur compounds in oxidative pyrite degradation. A novel (cyclic) leaching mechanism is proposed which basically is indirect. PMID:16535406

  6. Combined chemical and microbiological removal of organic sulfur from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaelian, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate techniques for chemically converting the sulfur containing organic compounds in coal to compounds that can be treated microbiologically to remove the organically bound sulfur. The goal is to achieve an economically feasible mild chemical oxidation of the organic sulfur in a representative Illinois Basin coal by converting the sulfur to sulfoxides and sulfones; the carbon sulfur bond in the sulfoxides and sulfones would then be broken microbiologically and the sulfur removed from the coal as sulfate.

  7. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds. PMID:26143035

  8. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds.

  9. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gigolashvili, Tamara; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage, and final utilization of sulfur (S) containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops. PMID:25250037

  10. Allyl isothiocyanate from mustard seed is effective in reducing the levels of volatile sulfur compounds responsible for intrinsic oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Minmin; Hanley, A Bryan; Dodds, Michael W J

    2013-06-01

    Oral malodor is a major social and psychological issue that affects general populations. Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), particularly hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) and methyl mercaptan (CH₃SH), are responsible for most oral malodor. The objectives for this study were to determine whether allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) at an organoleptically acceptable level can eliminate VSCs containing a free thiol moiety and further to elucidate the mechanism of action and reaction kinetics. The study revealed that gas chromatograph with a sulfur detector demonstrated a good linearity, high accuracy and sensitivity on analysis of VSCs. Zinc salts eliminate the headspace level of H₂S but not CH₃SH. AITC eliminates both H₂S and CH₃SH via a nucleophilic addition reaction. In addition, a chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that the presence of unsaturated group on the side chain of the isothiocyanate accelerates the elimination of VSCs. PMID:23470258

  11. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  12. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Process for producing benzene by hydrodealkylation of a hydrocarbon fraction comprising alkylaromatic hydrocarbons, olefinic hydrocarbons and sulfur compound

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, M.; Cosyns, J.

    1984-07-31

    A stabilized hydrocarbon fraction comprising toluene, xylene, sulfur and olefinic hydrocarbons is converted to benzene by catalytic hydrodesulfurization, hydrodealkylation and catalytic hydrogenation.

  14. Macroporous chitosan hydrogels: Effects of sulfur on the loading and release behaviour of amino acid-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Elviri, Lisa; Asadzadeh, Maliheh; Cucinelli, Roberta; Bianchera, Annalisa; Bettini, Ruggero

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan is a biodegradable, biocompatible polymer of natural origin widely applied to the preparation of functional hydrogels suitable for controlled release of drugs, peptides and proteins. Non-covalent interactions, expecially ionic interactions, are the main driver of the loading and release behaviour of amino acids or peptides from chitosan hydrogels. With the aim to improve the understanding of the mechanisms governing the behaviour of chitosan hydrogels on peptide uptake and delivery, in this paper the attention was focused on the role played by sulfur on the interactions of chitosan hydrogels with sulfur-containing amino acids (AA) and peptides. Hence, loading and release experiments on cysteine, cystine and glutathione (SH containing amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide, respectively) as well as on glycine and valine as apolar amino acids were carried out. For these puroses, chitosan hydrogels were prepared in an easy and reproducible manner by a freeze-gelation process on a poly-L-lysine coated support. The hydrogel surface pore size, uniformity and distribution were tested. Optimal results (D50 = 26 ± 4 μm) were obtained by using the poly-L-lysine positively-charged surface. The loading results gathered evidenced that the sulfur-containing molecules presented an increased absorption both in terms of rate and extent by chitosan hydrogels with respect to nonpolar amino acids, mainly due to ionic and hydrogen bond interactions. ATR-FTIR analysis carried out on chitosan hydrogels, with and without the AA related compounds to study putative interactions, supported these apparent sulfur-dependent results. Finally, chitosan hydrogels displayed excellent retention capabilities (AA release <5%) for all AA, strongly supporting the use of chitosan hydrogels as matrix for controlled drug release.

  15. Application of a quantitative structure retention relationship approach for the prediction of the two-dimensional gas chromatography retention times of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycle compounds.

    PubMed

    Gieleciak, Rafal; Hager, Darcy; Heshka, Nicole E

    2016-03-11

    Information on the sulfur classes present in petroleum is a key factor in determining the value of refined products and processing behavior in the refinery. A large part of the sulfur present is included in polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs), which in turn are difficult to desulfurize. Furthermore, some PASHs are potentially more mutagenic and carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs. All of this calls for improved methods for the identification and quantification of individual sulfur species. Recent advances in analytical techniques such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) have enabled the identification of many individual sulfur species. However, full identification of individual components, particularly in virgin oil fractions, is still out of reach as standards for numerous compounds are unavailable. In this work, a method for accurately predicting retention times in GC×GC using a QSRR (quantitative structure retention relationship) method was very helpful for the identification of individual sulfur compounds. Retention times for 89 saturated, aromatic, and polyaromatic sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds were determined using two-dimensional gas chromatography. These retention data were correlated with molecular descriptors generated with CODESSA software. Two independent QSRR relationships were derived for the primary as well as the secondary retention characteristics. The predictive ability of the relationships was tested by using both independent sets of compounds and a cross-validation technique. When the corresponding chemical standards are unavailable, the equations developed for predicting retention times can be used to identify unknown chromatographic peaks by matching their retention times with those of sulfur compounds of known molecular structure.

  16. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer. PMID:26936016

  17. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer.

  18. Aboveground and Belowground Herbivores Synergistically Induce Volatile Organic Sulfur Compound Emissions from Shoots but Not from Roots.

    PubMed

    Danner, Holger; Brown, Phil; Cator, Eric A; Harren, Frans J M; van Dam, Nicole M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2015-07-01

    Studies on aboveground (AG) plant organs have shown that volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions differ between simultaneous attack by herbivores and single herbivore attack. There is growing evidence that interactive effects of simultaneous herbivory also occur across the root-shoot interface. In our study, Brassica rapa roots were infested with root fly larvae (Delia radicum) and the shoots infested with Pieris brassicae, either singly or simultaneously, to study these root-shoot interactions. As an analytical platform, we used Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) to investigate VOCs over a 3 day time period. Our set-up allowed us to monitor root and shoot emissions concurrently on the same plant. Focus was placed on the sulfur-containing compounds; methanethiol, dimethylsulfide (DMS), and dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), because these compounds previously have been shown to be biologically active in the interactions of Brassica plants, herbivores, parasitoids, and predators, yet have received relatively little attention. The shoots of plants simultaneously infested with AG and belowground (BG) herbivores emitted higher levels of sulfur-containing compounds than plants with a single herbivore species present. In contrast, the emission of sulfur VOCs from the plant roots increased as a consequence of root herbivory, independent of the presence of an AG herbivore. The onset of root emissions was more rapid after damage than the onset of shoot emissions. The shoots of double infested plants also emitted higher levels of methanol. Thus, interactive effects of root and shoot herbivores exhibit more strongly in the VOC emissions from the shoots than from the roots, implying the involvement of specific signaling interactions.

  19. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  20. Factors controlling fluxes of volatile sulfur compounds in Sphagnum peatlands. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni

    1992-01-01

    Exchange of DMS and OCS between the surface of Sphagnum peatlands and the atmosphere were measured with dynamic (S-free sweep air) and static enclosures. DMS emission rates determined by both methods were comparable. The dynamic method provided positive OCS flux rates (emission) for measurements performed at sites containing Sphagnum. Conversely, data from the static method indicated that OCS was consumed from the atmosphere. Short and long-term impacts of increased S deposition on fluxes of volatile S compounds (VSC's) from Sphagnum peatlands were investigated in a poor fen (Mire 239) at the Experimental Lakes Area, Ontario, Canada. Additional experiments were conducted in a poor fen (Sallie's Fen in Barrington, NH, USA). At Mire 239, emissions of VSC's were monitored, before and after acidification, at control and experimental sections within two major physiographic areas of the mire (oligotrophic and minerotrophic). DMS was the predominant VSC released from Mire 239 and varied largely with time and space. Sulfur addition did not affect DMS emissions in a period of hours to a few days. DMS emissions in the experimental oligotrophic area of the mire was approximately 3-fold greater than in the control oligotrophic area, and approximately 10-fold greater than in the minerotrophic zones. These differences could be due to a combination of differences in types of vegetation, nutritional status, and S input. At Sallie's Fen, DMS fluxes were not significantly affected by sulfate amendments, while DMS and MSH concentrations increased greatly with time in the top 10 cm of the peat column. The major environmental factors controlling fluxes of DMS in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland were investigated in Sallie's Fen, NH. DMS emissions from the surface of the peatland varied greatly over 24 hours and seasonally. Temperature seemed to be the major environmental factor controlling these variabilities. Concentrations of dissolved VSC's varied with time and space throughout the fen

  1. Influence of Sulfur for Oxygen Substitution in the Solvolytic Reactions of Chloroformate Esters and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Malcolm J.; Kevill, Dennis N.

    2014-01-01

    The replacement of oxygen within a chloroformate ester (ROCOCl) by sulfur can lead to a chlorothioformate (RSCOCl), a chlorothionoformate (ROCSCl), or a chlorodithioformate (RSCSCl). Phenyl chloroformate (PhOCOCl) reacts over the full range of solvents usually included in Grunwald-Winstein equation studies of solvolysis by an addition-elimination (A-E) pathway. At the other extreme, phenyl chlorodithioformate (PhSCSCl) reacts across the range by an ionization pathway. The phenyl chlorothioformate (PhSCOCl) and phenyl chlorothionoformate (PhOCSCl) react at remarkably similar rates in a given solvent and there is a dichotomy of behavior with the A-E pathway favored in solvents such as ethanol-water and the ionization mechanism favored in aqueous solvents rich in fluoroalcohol. Alkyl esters behave similarly but with increased tendency to ionization as the alkyl group goes from 1° to 2° to 3°. N,N-Disubstituted carbamoyl halides favor the ionization pathway as do also the considerably faster reacting thiocarbamoyl chlorides. The tendency towards ionization increases as, within the three contributing structures of the resonance hybrid for the formed cation, the atoms carrying positive charge (other than the central carbon) change from oxygen to sulfur to nitrogen, consistent with the relative stabilities of species with positive charge on these atoms. PMID:25310653

  2. Sulfurized limonite as material for fast decomposition of organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Tanaka, Toshinori; Tsuda, Yutaka; Ban, Masahiro; Koveke, Edwin P; Koinuma, Michio; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2014-08-15

    Rapid decomposition of wastewater contaminants using sulfurized limonite (S-limonite) was investigated. Limonite is used for desulfurization of biogases, and S-limonite is obtained from desulfurization plants as solid waste. In this work, the profitable use of S-limonite in water treatment was examined. The divalent Fe in S-limonite was expected to produce OH radicals, as Fe(2+) ions and limonite thermally treated with H2 do. Methylene blue was used for batch-wise monitoring of the decomposition performance. The decomposition rate was fast and the methylene blue solution color disappeared in only 10s when a small amount of H2O2 was added (1mM in the sample solution) in the presence of S-limonite. The OH radicals were formed by a heterogeneous reaction on the S-limonite surface and Fenton reaction with dissolved Fe(2+). The decomposition of pentachlorophenol was also examined; it was successfully decomposed in batch-wise tests. The surfaces of limonite before sulfurization, S-limonite, and S-limonite after use for water treatment were performed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that S-limonite reverted to limonite after being used for water treatment.

  3. Oxidation of sulfur compounds in petroleum residues: reactivity-structural relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.C.; Dorrence, S.M.; Nazir, M.; Plancher, H.; Barbour, F.A.

    1981-09-01

    Studies have been made on the reactivity of sulfur entities in oxidized asphalts and oxidized petroleum distillation residues during air oxidation. Asphalts are referred to as residues. The oxidation of these materials includes the rapid formation of an unsymmetrical ir band at ca 1030/cm. Sulfoxides are not normally found in unoxidized petroleum residues, but develop rapidly during air aging. Their presence in these residues has been inferred from their specific bands in ir spectra. Confirmation of sulfoxides was obtained from deoxygenation with chlorocarbenes and decomposition with bromine and peracetic acid. Hydroperoxides in amounts that might interfere with sulfoxide determination were not found in oxidated residues. The concentration of sulfoxides formed during air oxidation was found to rapidly reach a maximum value and to remain constant on further oxidation of the residue. Model studies indicate that hydroperoxides play a role in sulfoxide formation. The data show that both alkyl and aryl sulfides were present in aliphatic residues, that predominantly alkyl types were oxidized during oxidative aging in air and that concentrations of the alkyl and aryl types vary with crude source. Peracetic acid oxidation of the residues indicated that most of the sulfur present was in the form of sulfides. 2 figures, 6 tables.

  4. Method for reducing the sulfur content of a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2004-12-28

    The sulfur content of a liquid hydrocarbon stream is reduced under mild conditions by contracting a sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon stream with transition metal particles containing the transition metal in a zero oxidation state under conditions sufficient to provide a hydrocarbon product having a reduced sulfur content and metal sulfide particles. The transition metal particles can be produced in situ by adding a transition metal precursor, e.g., a transition metal carbonyl compound, to the sulfur-containing liquid feed stream and sonicating the feed steam/transition metal precursor combination under conditions sufficient to produce the transition metal particles.

  5. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Garrels, Robert M.; Lerman, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO2 to SO4 from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere. PMID:16593066

  6. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur.

    PubMed

    Garrels, R M; Lerman, A

    1981-08-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO(2) to SO(4) from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere.

  7. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur.

    PubMed

    Garrels, R M; Lerman, A

    1981-08-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO(2) to SO(4) from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere. PMID:16593066

  8. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  9. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  10. Reduced and Oxidized Sulfur Compounds Detected by Evolved Gas Analyses of Materials from Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Brunner, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Steele, A.; Wray, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate minerals have been directly detected or strongly inferred from several Mars datasets and indicate that aqueous alteration of martian surface materials has occurred. Indications of reduced sulfur phases (e.g., sulfides) from orbital and in situ investigations of martian materials have been fewer in number, but these phases are observed in martian meteorites and are likely because they are common minor phases in basaltic rocks. Here we discuss potential sources for the S-bearing compounds detected by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument’s evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments.

  11. Finding of thiosulfate pathway for synthesis of organic sulfur compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and improvement of ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Eri; Saiki, Kyohei; Honda, Kurara; Sugiura, Yuki; Kawano, Yusuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Watanabe, Daisuke; Wakabayashi, Yukari; Abe, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Suematsu, Makoto; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes thiosulfate as a sole sulfur source. The energetically-favored thiosulfate rather than sulfate as sulfur sources is also more effective for improving growth and ethanol-production rate in S. cerevisiae due to high levels of intracellular NADPH during thiosulfate utilization.

  12. Finding of thiosulfate pathway for synthesis of organic sulfur compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and improvement of ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Eri; Saiki, Kyohei; Honda, Kurara; Sugiura, Yuki; Kawano, Yusuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Watanabe, Daisuke; Wakabayashi, Yukari; Abe, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Suematsu, Makoto; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes thiosulfate as a sole sulfur source. The energetically-favored thiosulfate rather than sulfate as sulfur sources is also more effective for improving growth and ethanol-production rate in S. cerevisiae due to high levels of intracellular NADPH during thiosulfate utilization. PMID:26188417

  13. Relationship between corrosion and the biological sulfur cycle: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.J.; Ray, R.I.; Pope, R.K.

    2000-04-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused by microbiologically mediated oxidation and reduction of sulfur and sulfur compounds is complicated by the variety of potential metabolic-energy sources and by-products; the coexistence of reduced and oxidized sulfur species; competing reactions with inorganic and organic compounds; and the versatility and adaptability of microorganisms in biofilms. The microbial ecology of sulfur-rich environments is poorly understood because of the association of aerobes and anaerobes and the mutualism or succession of heterotrophs to autotrophs. The physical scale over which the sulfur cycle influences corrosion varies with the environment. The complete sulfur cycle of oxidation and reduction reactions can take place in macroenvironments, including sewers and polluted harbors, or within the microenvironment of biofilms. In this review, reactions of sulfur and sulfur compounds resulting in corrosion were discussed in the context of environmental processes important to corrosion.

  14. Stabilized sulfur dissolving compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, M.J.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a storage-stable composition for the dissolution of sulfur. It comprises a major proportion of a sulfide of the formula R{sup 1}SS{sub A}SR{sup 2} where R{sup 1} and R{sup 2} are independently alkyl, aryl, alkaryl, alkoxyalkyl or hydroxyalkyl radicals wherein the alkyl moiety has from 1 to 24 carbon atoms and A is an average number ranging from 0 to 3, a catalytic amount of a mixture of an amine and a mercaptan, and a stabilizing component effective for an in an amount sufficient to inhibit loss of catalyst activity on storage.

  15. Methionine metabolism: major pathways and enzymes involved and strategies for control and diversification of volatile sulfur compounds in cheese.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuesta, María Del Carmen; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    For economical reasons and to accommodate current market trends, cheese manufacturers and product developers are increasingly interested in controlling cheese flavor formation and developing new flavors. Due to their low detection threshold and diversity, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are of prime importance in the overall flavor of cheese and make a significant contribution to their typical flavors. Thus, the control of VSCs formation offers considerable potential for industrial applications. This paper gives an overview of the main VSCs found in cheese, along with the major pathways and key enzymes leading to the formation of methanethiol from methionine, which is subsequently converted into other sulfur-bearing compounds. As these compounds arise primarily from methionine, the metabolism of this amino acid and its regulation is presented. Attention is focused in the enzymatic potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that are widely used as starter and adjunct cultures in cheese-making. In view of industrial applications, different strategies such as the enhancement of the abilities of LAB to produce high amounts and diversity of VSCs are highlighted as the principal future research trend.

  16. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  17. FTIR-ATR evaluation of topical skin protectants useful for sulfur mustard and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braue, Ernest H., Jr.; Litchfield, Marty R.; Bangledorf, Catherine R.; Rieder, Robert G.

    1992-03-01

    The US Army has a need to develop topical protectants that can decrease the effects of cutaneous exposure to chemical warfare (CW) agents. Such materials would enhance a soldier's ability to carry out the mission in a chemically hostile environment, would lessen the burden on medical personnel, and may allow the casualties to return to duty in a shorter period of time than might otherwise be possible. In a preliminary report (E. H. Braue, Jr. and M. G. Pannella, Applied Spectrosc., 44, 1061 (1990)), we described a unique analytical method using FT-IR spectroscopy and the horizontal attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory for evaluating the effectiveness of topical skin protectants (TSPs) against penetration by chemical agents. We now describe the application of this method to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD).

  18. Characterization of sulfur compounds in whisky by full evaporation dynamic headspace and selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous element-specific detection.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; MacNamara, Kevin

    2012-12-28

    A method is described for characterization of sulfur compounds in unaged and aged whisky. The method is based on full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) of 100 μL of whisky samples followed by selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) retention-time-locked (RTL) gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) with simultaneous element-specific detection using a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). Sequential heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to identify each individual sulfur compound in the unaged whisky. Twenty sulfur compounds were positively identified by a MS library search, linear retention indices (LRI), and formula identification using MS calibration software. Additionally eight formulas were also identified for unknown sulfur compounds. Simultaneous heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to produce the (2)D RTL GC-SCD chromatograms for principal component analysis. PCA of the (2)D RTL GC-SCD data clearly demonstrated the difference between unaged and aged whisky, as well as two different whisky samples. Fourteen sulfur compounds could be characterized as key sulfur compounds responsible for the changes in the aging step and/or the difference between two kinds of whisky samples. The determined values of the key sulfur compounds were in the range of 0.3-210 ng mL(-1) (RSD: 0.37-12%, n=3).

  19. The South Karelia Air Pollution Study. The effects of malodorous sulfur compounds from pulp mills on respiratory and other symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Jaakkola, J.J.; Vilkka, V.; Marttila, O.; Jaeppinen, P.H.; Haahtela, T. )

    1990-12-01

    The paper mills in South Karelia, the southeast part of Finland, are responsible for releasing a substantial amount of malodorous sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and methyl sulfides ((CH3)2S and (CH3)2S2), into ambient air. In the most polluted residential area the annual mean concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan are estimated to be 8 and 2 to 5 micrograms/m3 and the highest daily average concentration 100 and 50 micrograms/m3. The annual mean and highest daily concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are very low. We studied the effects of malodorous sulfur compounds on eye, nasal and respiratory symptoms, and headache in adults. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire was distributed in February 1987 and responded to by 488 adults living in a severely (n = 198), a moderately (n = 204), and a nonpolluted community (n = 86). This included questions about occurrence of the symptoms of interest during the previous 4 wk and 12 months and individual, behavioral, and other environmental determinants of the symptoms. The response rate was 83%. The odds ratios (OR) for symptoms experienced often or constantly in severely versus nonpolluted and moderately versus nonpolluted communities were estimated in logistic regression analysis controlling potential confounders. The odds ratios for eye (moderate exposure OR 11.70, Cl95% 2.33 to 58.65; severe exposure OR 11.78, Cl95% 2.35 to 59.09) and nasal symptoms (OR 2.01, Cl95% 0.97 to 4.15; OR 2.19, Cl95% 1.06 to 4.55) and cough (OR 1.89, Cl95% 0.61 to 5.86; OR 3.06, Cl95% 1.02 to 9.29) during the previous 12 months were increased, with a dose-response pattern.

  20. Sulfuric acid as autocatalyst in the formation of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2012-12-26

    Sulfuric acid can act as a catalyst of its own formation. We have carried out a computational investigation on the gas-phase formation of H(2)SO(4) by hydrolysis of SO(3) involving one and two water molecules, and also in the presence of sulfuric acid and its complexes with one and two water molecules. The hydrolysis of SO(3) requires the concurrence of two water molecules, one of them acting as a catalyzer, and our results predict an important catalytic effect, ranging between 3 and 11 kcal·mol(-1) when the catalytic water molecule is substituted by a sulfuric acid molecule or one of its hydrates. In these cases, the reaction products are either bare sulfuric acid dimer or sulfuric acid dimer complexed with a water molecule. There are broad implications from these new findings. The results of the present investigation show that the catalytic effect of sulfuric acid in the SO(3) hydrolysis can be important in the Earth's stratosphere, in the heterogeneous formation of sulfuric acid and in the formation of aerosols, in H(2)SO(4) formation by aircraft engines, and also in understanding the formation of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere of Venus.

  1. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  2. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  3. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  4. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  5. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  6. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations on nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  7. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations of nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  8. Evolution of Volatile Sulfur Compounds during Laboratory-Scale Incubations and Indoor Preparation of Compost Used as a Substrate in Mushroom Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Derikx, P J; Simons, F H; Op den Camp, H J; van der Drift, C; Van Griensven, L J; Vogels, G D

    1991-02-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds are known to be produced during the preparation of compost used as a substrate in mushroom cultivation. Because they cause odor problems, attempts have been made to reduce the production of these compounds. The influences of temperature and various additions on the production of volatile sulfur compounds from composting material were tested on laboratory-scale preparations. The production of H(2)S, COS, CH(3)SH, and (CH(3))(2)S was proven to be a biological process with an optimal temperature that coincides with the optimal temperature for biological activity. The formation of CS(2) and (CH(3))(2)S(2) was shown to be a nonbiological process. The emission of volatile sulfur compounds during the indoor preparation of mushroom compost appeared to be remarkably reduced (about 90%) as compared with the emission during the conventional outdoor process. Introduction of this indoor composting process would result in a significant reduction in environmental pollution. PMID:16348421

  9. Evolution of Volatile Sulfur Compounds during Laboratory-Scale Incubations and Indoor Preparation of Compost Used as a Substrate in Mushroom Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Derikx, P. J. L.; Simons, F. H. M.; Op den Camp, H. J. M.; van der Drift, C.; Van Griensven, L. J. L. D.; Vogels, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds are known to be produced during the preparation of compost used as a substrate in mushroom cultivation. Because they cause odor problems, attempts have been made to reduce the production of these compounds. The influences of temperature and various additions on the production of volatile sulfur compounds from composting material were tested on laboratory-scale preparations. The production of H2S, COS, CH3SH, and (CH3)2S was proven to be a biological process with an optimal temperature that coincides with the optimal temperature for biological activity. The formation of CS2 and (CH3)2S2 was shown to be a nonbiological process. The emission of volatile sulfur compounds during the indoor preparation of mushroom compost appeared to be remarkably reduced (about 90%) as compared with the emission during the conventional outdoor process. Introduction of this indoor composting process would result in a significant reduction in environmental pollution. PMID:16348421

  10. Clinical comparison of a new manual toothbrush on breath volatile sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Williams, Malcolm I; Vazquez, Joe; Cummins, Diane

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this randomized, crossover study was to compare the effectiveness of a newly designed manual toothbrush (Colgate 360 degrees) to two commercially available manual toothbrushes (Oral-B Indicator and Oral-B CrossAction) and a battery-powered toothbrush (Crest SpinBrush PRO) for their ability to reduce overnight volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) associated with oral malodor. The study followed a four-period crossover design. Following a washout period, prospective subjects arrived at the testing facility without eating, drinking, or performing oral hygiene for baseline evaluation of breath VSC levels. For each phase of the study, subjects were given one of the test tooth-brushes and a tube of regular toothpaste to take home, and they were instructed to brush their teeth in their customary manner for 1 minute. When using the Colgate 360 degrees toothbrush, subjects were instructed to clean their tongue with the implement on the back of the brush head for 10 seconds. The following morning, subjects reported to the testing facility, again without performing oral hygiene, eating, or drinking, for the overnight evaluation. After a minimum 2-day washout period, subjects repeated the same regimen using the other toothbrushes. The levels of breath VSC were evaluated instrumentally using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Measurements were taken in duplicate and then averaged. The levels of VSC were expressed as parts per billion (ppb) in mouth air. Sixteen men and women completed the study. At baseline, the mean levels of VSC in mouth air for the 4 toothbrushes were 719.8 ppb+/-318.4 ppb, 592.8 ppb+/-264.6 ppb, 673.8 ppb+/-405.9 ppb, and 656.2 ppb+/-310.2 ppb for the Colgate 360 degrees, Oral-B Indicator, Crest SpinBrush PRO, and Oral-B CrossAction, respectively. Overnight, the mean breath VSC levels after using the four toothbrushes were lower than those observed at baseline. The respective mean levels of breath VSC were 266.5 ppb

  11. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    2014-09-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern, as a result of changes in livestock production methods. RSC emissions were determined from a swine CAFO in North Carolina. RSC measurements were made over a period of ≈1 week from both the barn and lagoon during each of the four seasonal periods from June 2007 to April 2008. During sampling, meteorological and other environmental parameters were measured continuously. Seasonal hydrogen sulfide (H2S) barn concentrations ranged from 72 to 631 ppb. Seasonal dimethyl sulfide (DMS; CH3SCH3) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS; CH3S2CH3) concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower, ranging from 0.18 to 0.89 ppb and 0.47 to 1.02 ppb, respectively. The overall average barn emission rate was 3.3 g day-1 AU-1 (AU (animal unit) = 500 kg of live animal weight) for H2S, which was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the DMS and DMDS overall average emissions rates, determined as 0.017 g day-1 AU-1 and 0.036 g day-1 AU-1, respectively. The overall average lagoon flux was 1.33 μg m-2 min-1 for H2S, which was approximately an order of magnitude higher than the overall average DMS (0.12 μg m-2 min-1) and DMDS (0.09 μg m-2 min-1) lagoon fluxes. The overall average lagoon emission for H2S (0.038 g day-1 AU-1) was also approximately an order of magnitude higher than the overall average DMS (0.0034 g day-1 AU-1) and DMDS (0.0028 g day-1 AU-1) emissions. H2S, DMS and DMDS have offensive odors and low odor thresholds. Over all four sampling seasons, 77% of 15 min averaged H2S barn concentrations were an order of magnitude above the average odor threshold. During these sampling periods, however, DMS and DMDS concentrations did not exceed their odor thresholds. The overall average barn and lagoon emissions from this study were used to help estimate barn, lagoon and total (barn + lagoon) RSC emissions from swine CAFOs

  12. Clinical comparison of a new manual toothbrush on breath volatile sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Williams, Malcolm I; Vazquez, Joe; Cummins, Diane

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this randomized, crossover study was to compare the effectiveness of a newly designed manual toothbrush (Colgate 360 degrees) to two commercially available manual toothbrushes (Oral-B Indicator and Oral-B CrossAction) and a battery-powered toothbrush (Crest SpinBrush PRO) for their ability to reduce overnight volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) associated with oral malodor. The study followed a four-period crossover design. Following a washout period, prospective subjects arrived at the testing facility without eating, drinking, or performing oral hygiene for baseline evaluation of breath VSC levels. For each phase of the study, subjects were given one of the test tooth-brushes and a tube of regular toothpaste to take home, and they were instructed to brush their teeth in their customary manner for 1 minute. When using the Colgate 360 degrees toothbrush, subjects were instructed to clean their tongue with the implement on the back of the brush head for 10 seconds. The following morning, subjects reported to the testing facility, again without performing oral hygiene, eating, or drinking, for the overnight evaluation. After a minimum 2-day washout period, subjects repeated the same regimen using the other toothbrushes. The levels of breath VSC were evaluated instrumentally using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Measurements were taken in duplicate and then averaged. The levels of VSC were expressed as parts per billion (ppb) in mouth air. Sixteen men and women completed the study. At baseline, the mean levels of VSC in mouth air for the 4 toothbrushes were 719.8 ppb+/-318.4 ppb, 592.8 ppb+/-264.6 ppb, 673.8 ppb+/-405.9 ppb, and 656.2 ppb+/-310.2 ppb for the Colgate 360 degrees, Oral-B Indicator, Crest SpinBrush PRO, and Oral-B CrossAction, respectively. Overnight, the mean breath VSC levels after using the four toothbrushes were lower than those observed at baseline. The respective mean levels of breath VSC were 266.5 ppb

  13. Organic Matter Sulfurization in the Cariaco Water Column Revealed by High-Sensitivity and Compound-Specific d34S Analyses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, M. R.; Sessions, A. L.; Adkins, J. F.; Thunell, R.

    2015-12-01

    Organic matter burial in marine sediments is a major process in the global carbon cycle, and enhanced organic matter burial is often associated with periods of global climatic and ecological change. Still, we have only a limited understanding of the processes that drive enhanced OM burial during oxygen-deficient conditions. Abiotic OM sulfurization has the potential to enhance the preservation of OM, but for this process to be significant it must compete with heterotrophic remineralization, most of which occurs before sinking particles reach the sea floor. We investigate the sources of sulfur to sinking particles in a modern marine basin using samples from the CARIACO fixed sediment trap time-series, applying recently developed methods for d34S analysis of small (≥20 nmol) sulfur pools and individual volatile organosulfur compounds. Relative to expectations for planktonic biomass, we find that sinking particles are both sulfur-rich and 34S-depleted. Higher apparent fluxes of 34S-depleted organic sulfur are associated with high OM export from the surface ocean, low terrestrial inputs, and high concentrations of both elemental S and the dominant non-polar organosulfur compound, C20 thiophene. We conclude that OM sulfurization is occurring in particles sinking through the Cariaco water column on timescales of days or less. Depending on the frequency of high OM export events, we estimate that this rapid sulfurization delivers roughly half of the total organic S present at 5 cm depth in underlying sediments. Accordingly, many OM-rich deposits in the geologic record may represent the products of water column sulfurization. This process provides a strong mechanistic feedback between oxygen deficiency and OM preservation.

  14. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  15. The Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, K. L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. Understanding how sulfur became prevalent in biochemical processes and many biomolecules requires knowledge of the reaction properties of sulfur-bearing compounds. We have previously estimated thermodynamic data for thiols, the simplest organic sulfur compounds, at elevated temperatures and pressures. If life began in hydrothermal environments, it is especially important to understand reactions at elevated temperatures among sulfur-bearing compounds and other organic molecules essential for the origin and persistence of life. Here we examine reactions that may have formed amino acids with thiols as reaction intermediates in hypothetical early Earth hydrothermal environments. (There are two amino acids, cysteine and methionine, that contain sulfur.) Our calculations suggest that significant amounts of some amino acids were produced in early Earth hydrothermal fluids, given reasonable concentrations H2, NH3, H2S and CO. For example, preliminary results indicate that glycine activities as high as 1 mmol can be reached in these systems at 100 C. Alanine formation from propanethiol is also a favorable reaction. On the other hand, the calculated equilibrium log activities of cysteine and serine from propanethiol are -21 and -19, respectively, at 100 C. These results

  16. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  17. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  18. A case study involving allergic reactions to sulfur-containing compounds including, sulfite, taurine, acesulfame potassium and sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Stohs, Sidney J; Miller, Mark J S

    2014-01-01

    A case study is reported whereby an individual with known sulfite and sulfonamide allergies develops hypersensitivity to taurine above a threshold level as well as to the non-nutritive sweetener acesulfame potassium, compounds that are not normally associated with allergic reactions. Sulfites, sulfonamides, taurine and acesulfame potassium all contain a SO3 moiety. Challenge tests provide evidence for the hypersensitivities to taurine and acesulfame potassium. The subject is also allergic to thiuram mix and thimerosal, sulfur containing compounds, as well as to various food products. This may be the first case where hypersensitivities to taurine and acesulfame potassium have been documented and reported. Several mechanistic explanations are provided for the untoward reactions to taurine and acesulfame potassium.

  19. Theoretical studies of the marine sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James B.; Liu, May S.

    1985-01-01

    Several reduced sulfur compounds are produced by marine organisms and then enter the atmosphere, where they are oxidized and ultimately returned to the ocean or the land. The oceanic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) flux, in particular, represents a significant fraction of the annual global sulfur input to the atmosphere. In the atmosphere, this gas is converted to sulfur dioxide (SO2), methane sulfonic acid, and other organic acids which are relatively stable and about which little is known. SO2 is a short lived gas which, in turn, is converted to sulfuric acid and other sulfate compounds which contribute significantly to acid rain. Because of the complexity of the sulfur system, it is not well understood even in the unperturbed atmosphere. However, a number of new observations and experiments have led to a significant increase in the understanding of this system. A number of one dimensional model experiments were conducted on the gas phase part of the marine sulfur cycle. The results indicate the measured concentration of DMS and the amplitude of its diurnal cycle are in agreement with estimates of its global flux. It was also found that DMS can make a large contribution to the background SO2 concentration in the free troposphere. Estimates of CS2 concentrations in the atmosphere are inconsistent with estimated fluxes; however, measured reaction rates are consistent with the observed steep tropospheric gradient in CS2. Observations of CS2 are extremely sparse. Further study is planned.

  20. Reactions of SIV species with organic compounds: formation mechanisms of organo-sulfur derivatives in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passananti, Monica; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have an important impact on climate, air quality and human health. However the chemical reactions involved in their formation and growth are not fully understood or well-constrained in climate models. It is well known that inorganic sulfur (mainly in oxidation states (+IV) and (+VI)) plays a key role in aerosol formation, for instance sulfuric acid is known to be a good nucleating gas. In addition, acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds has shown to produce new particles, with a clear enhancement in the presence of ozone (Iinuma 2013). Organosulfates have been detected in tropospheric particles and aqueous phases, which suggests they are products of secondary organic aerosol formation process (Tolocka 2012). Originally, the production of organosulfates was explained by the esterification reaction of alcohols, but this reaction in atmosphere is kinetically negligible. Other formation pathways have been suggested such as hydrolysis of peroxides and reaction of organic matter with sulfite and sulfate radical anions (SO3-, SO4-) (Nozière 2010), but it remains unclear if these can completely explain atmospheric organo-sulfur aerosol loading. To better understand the formation of organo-sulfur compounds, we started to investigate the reactivity of SIV species (SO2 and SO32-) with respect to specific functional groups (organic acids and double bonds) on atmospherically relevant carboxylic acids and alkenes. The experiments were carried out in the homogeneous aqueous phase and at the solid-gas interface. A custom built coated-wall flow tube reactor was developed to control relativity humidity, SO2 concentration, temperature and gas flow rate. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics were measured and resulting products were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). The experiments were performed with and without the presence of ozone in order to evaluate any

  1. Inhibition of Ammonia Oxidation in Nitrosomonas europaea by Sulfur Compounds: Thioethers Are Oxidized to Sulfoxides by Ammonia Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Juliette, Lisa Y.; Hyman, Michael R.; Arp, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Organic sulfur compounds are well-known nitrification inhibitors. The inhibitory effects of dimethylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide, and ethanethiol on ammonia oxidation by Nitrosomonas europaea were examined. Both dimethylsulfide and dimethyldisulfide were weak inhibitors of ammonia oxidation and exhibited inhibitory characteristics typical of substrates for ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). Depletion of dimethylsulfide required O2 and was prevented with either acetylene or allylthiourea, two inhibitors of AMO. The inhibition of ammonia oxidation by dimethylsulfide was examined in detail. Cell suspensions incubated in the presence of ammonia oxidized dimethylsulfide to dimethyl sulfoxide. Depletion of six other thioethers was also prevented by treating cell suspensions with either allylthiourea or acetylene. The oxidative products of three thioethers were identified as the corresponding sulfoxides. The amount of sulfoxide formed accounted for a majority of the amount of sulfide depleted. By using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, allylmethylsulfide was shown to be oxidized to allylmethylsulfoxide by N. europaea with the incorporation of a single atom of 18O derived from 18O2 into the sulfide. This result supported our conclusion that a monooxygenase was involved in the oxidation of allylmethylsulfide. The thioethers are concluded to be a new class of substrates for AMO. This is the first report of the oxidation of the sulfur atom by AMO in whole cells of N. europaea. The ability of N. europaea to oxidize dimethylsulfide is not unique among the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Nitrosococcus oceanus, a marine nitrifier, was also demonstrated to oxidize dimethylsulfide to dimethyl sulfoxide. PMID:16349086

  2. Vertical distributions of COS, CS 2, DMS and other sulfur compounds in a loblolly pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berresheim, H.; Vulcan, V. D.

    Measurements of atmospheric COS, CS 2, DMS, SO 2 and aerosol sulfate and methanesulfonate (MSA) concentrations were conducted in a loblolly pine forest in central Georgia between July and September 1990. The daytime profiles obtained for the reduced sulfur gases (COS, CS 2, DMS) often showed significantly higher concentrations at the canopy level than above the forest canopy, indicating a net emission of these gases from the tree tops. No evidence was found for a net uptake of COS by the canopy during daytime. With one exception, all COS concentrations measured during the day were significantly higher than corresponding nighttime values. These results appear to be in conflict with recent studies suggesting a net uptake of atmospheric COS by plants during photosynthetic activity. Possible explanations for these different findings are discussed. Nighttime profiles indicated no major biosphere-atmosphere exchange of COS, CS 2 or DMS. Nighttime DMS concentrations were significantly higher than corresponding daytime values. A clear inverse relationship between the diel variations of DMS and MSA was observed, consistent with rapid photochemical oxidation of DMS under the given conditions.

  3. Post-SL9 Sulfur Photochemistry on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Allen, Mark; Gladstone, G. Randall

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled the photochemical evolution of the sulfur containing species that were observed in Jupiter's stratosphere after the Shoemaker Levy 9 (SL9) impacts. We find that most of the sulfur is converted to S8 in the first few days. Other important sulfur reservoirs are CS, whose abundance increases markedly with time, and possibly H2CS, HNCS, and NS, whose abundances depend on kinetic reaction rates that are unknown at the present. We discuss the temporal variation of the major sulfur compounds, make abundance and compositional predictions useful for comparison with observations, and discuss the possible condensation of sulfur containing species.

  4. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds and non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian Cooper

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern. Both RSCs and NMVOCs contribute to odor. In addition, RSCs also have the potential to form fine particulate matter (PMfine) and NMVOCs the potential to form ozone. Measurements of RSCs and NMVOCs emissions were made from both an anaerobic lagoon and barn at a swine CAFO in North Carolina. Emission measurements were made over all four seasonal periods. In each seasonal period, measurements were made from both the anaerobic lagoon and barn for ˜1 week. RSC and NMVOCs samples were collected using passivated canisters. Nine to eleven canister samples were taken from both the lagoon and barn over each sampling period. The canisters were analyzed ex-situ using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) measurements were made in-situ using a pulsed fluorescence H2S/SO2 analyzer. During sampling, measurements of meteorological and physiochemical parameters were made. H2S had the largest RSC flux, with an overall average lagoon flux of 1.33 mug m-2 min-1. The two main RSCs identified by the GC-FID, dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), had overall average lagoon fluxes an order of magnitude lower, 0.12 and 0.09 mug m-2 min-1, respectively. Twelve significant NMVOCs were identified in lagoon samples (ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, decanal, heptanal, hexanal, nonanal, octanal, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and 4-methylphenol). The overall average fluxes for these NMVOCs, ranged from 0.08 mug m-2 min-1 (4-methylphenol) to 2.11 mug m-2 min-1 (acetone). Seasonal H2S barn concentrations ranged from 72-631 ppb. DMS and DMDS seasonal concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower. There were six significant NMVOCs identified in barn samples (methanol, ethanol, acetone 2-3 butanedione, acetaldehyde

  5. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  6. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  7. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  8. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur compounds by ozone and granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, B.; Ball, G.W.

    1996-11-01

    Most groundwater supplies in the western U.S. are relatively low in dissolved organic matter, are generally free of bacteria, and are platable to their consumers. In areas of western Nevada, certain groundwaters are near active geothermal areas, which can produce sulfurous types of tastes and odors (T&Os) in the water. Other water quality characteristics can consist of either relatively low or highly mineralized waters, variations in pH, and temperatures ranging from those slightly above normal groundwaters to pressurized steam. Watersource Consulting Engineers (WCE) and Shepherd Laboratories (SL) conducted an engineering study of a high-capacity well for a local northwestern Nevada utility. WCE`s original task had been to design pumping and storage facilities for the well, in addition to evaluating basic treatment. Originally, WCE anticipated designing facilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and reduce color, primarily with chlorination and aeration. SL was requested to evaluate existing water quality and eventually conduct bench-scale testing of several treatment processes. As the study proceeded, the original goals were modified when it became evident that water quality conditions required more extensive evaluation. The study was done in several stages, reflecting the information gained during each stage. The final recommended design criteria included treatment for improving water quality relative to T&O, color, total organic carbon (TOC), and, to a limited extent, fluoride. The water quality goals adopted by the utility encompassed primary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for regulatory compliance and secondary MCLs for aesthetically pleasing water. The treatment processes evaluated and recommended in this study were designed primarily to improve the aesthetic qualities of color, taste, and odor. Fluoride reduction was evaluated but was not included in the final design requirements, except for the overall reduction provided by the recommended process.

  9. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  10. The significance of glucosinolates for sulfur storage in Brassicaceae seedlings.

    PubMed

    Aghajanzadeh, Tahereh; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; De Kok, Luit J

    2014-01-01

    Brassica juncea seedlings contained a twofold higher glucosinolate content than B. rapa and these secondary sulfur compounds accounted for up to 30% of the organic sulfur fraction. The glucosinolate content was not affected by H2S and SO2 exposure, demonstrating that these sulfur compounds did not form a sink for excessive atmospheric supplied sulfur. Upon sulfate deprivation, the foliarly absorbed H2S and SO2 replaced sulfate as the sulfur source for growth of B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings. The glucosinolate content was decreased in sulfate-deprived plants, though its proportion of organic sulfur fraction was higher than that of sulfate-sufficient plants, both in absence and presence of H2S and SO2. The significance of myrosinase in the in situ turnover in these secondary sulfur compounds needs to be questioned, since there was no direct co-regulation between the content of glucosinolates and the transcript level and activity of myrosinase. Evidently, glucosinolates cannot be considered as sulfur storage compounds upon exposure to excessive atmospheric sulfur and are unlikely to be involved in the re-distribution of sulfur in B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings upon sulfate deprivation.

  11. The significance of glucosinolates for sulfur storage in Brassicaceae seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanzadeh, Tahereh; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; De Kok, Luit J.

    2014-01-01

    Brassica juncea seedlings contained a twofold higher glucosinolate content than B. rapa and these secondary sulfur compounds accounted for up to 30% of the organic sulfur fraction. The glucosinolate content was not affected by H2S and SO2 exposure, demonstrating that these sulfur compounds did not form a sink for excessive atmospheric supplied sulfur. Upon sulfate deprivation, the foliarly absorbed H2S and SO2 replaced sulfate as the sulfur source for growth of B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings. The glucosinolate content was decreased in sulfate-deprived plants, though its proportion of organic sulfur fraction was higher than that of sulfate-sufficient plants, both in absence and presence of H2S and SO2. The significance of myrosinase in the in situ turnover in these secondary sulfur compounds needs to be questioned, since there was no direct co-regulation between the content of glucosinolates and the transcript level and activity of myrosinase. Evidently, glucosinolates cannot be considered as sulfur storage compounds upon exposure to excessive atmospheric sulfur and are unlikely to be involved in the re-distribution of sulfur in B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings upon sulfate deprivation. PMID:25566279

  12. Sulfur dimers adsorbed on Au(111) as building blocks for sulfur octomers formation: A density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Tamargo, Carlos E.; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Pujals, Daniel Codorniu; Mikosch, Hans

    2014-07-28

    Experimental scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies have shown for more than two decades rectangular formations when sulfur atoms are deposited on Au(111) surfaces. The precursors have ranged from simple molecules or ions, such as SO{sub 2} gas or sulfide anions, to more complex organosulfur compounds. We investigated, within the framework of the Density Functional Theory, the structure of these rectangular patterns assuming them entirely composed of sulfur atoms as the experimental evidence suggests. The sulfur coverage at which the simulations were carried out (0.67 ML or higher) provoked that the sulfur-sulfur association had to be taken into account for achieving a good agreement between the sets of simulated and experimental STM images. A combination of four sulfur dimers per rectangular formation properly explained the trends obtained by the experimental STM analysis which were related with the rectangles' size and shape fluctuations together with sulfur-sulfur distances within these rectangles. Finally, a projected density of states analysis showed that the dimers were capable of altering the Au(5d) electronic states at the same level as atomic sulfur adsorbed at low coverage. Besides, sulfur dimers states were perfectly distinguished, whose presence near and above the Fermi level can explain both: sulfur-sulfur bond elongation and dimers stability when they stayed adsorbed on the surface at high coverage.

  13. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on sulfur. Sulfur is said to be among the few solid elements found in elemental form in nature and has industrial uses. Changes in the sulfur production process over the years are discussed as well as the mining process developed by German engineer Herman Frasch that involves melting the sulfur underground and pumping it to the surface.

  14. 46 CFR 148.04-20 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.04-20 Section 148.04-20 Shipping COAST GUARD... Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-20 Sulfur. (a) When sulfur is loaded in a deep hold with general cargo in the 'tween deck hold above the sulfur, a dust proof wooden...

  15. Metabolism of reduced methylated sulfur compounds in anaerobic sediments and by a pure culture of an estuarine methanogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiene, R.P.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Catena, Anthony; Miller, Laurence G.; Capone, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), or methane thiol (MSH) to a diversity of anoxic aquatic sediments (e.g., fresh water, estuarine, alkaline/hypersaline) stimulated methane production. The yield of methane recovered from DMS was often 52 to 63%, although high concentrations of DMS (as well as MSH and DMDS) inhibited methanogenesis in some types of sediments. Production of methane from these reduced methylated sulfur compounds was blocked by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Sulfate did not influence the metabolism of millimolar levels of DMS, DMDS, or MSH added to sediments. However, when DMS was added at ∼2-μM levels as [14C]DMS, metabolism by sediments resulted in a 14CH4/14CO2 ratio of only 0.06. Addition of molybdate increased the ratio to 1.8, while 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid decreased it to 0, but did not block 14CO2 production. These results indicate the methanogens and sulfate reducers compete for DMS when it is present at low concentrations; however, at high concentrations, DMS is a “noncompetitive” substrate for methanogens. Metabolism of DMS by sediments resulted in the appearance of MSH as a transient intermediate. A pure culture of an obligately methylotrophic estuarine methanogen was isolated which was capable of growth on DMS. Metabolism of DMS by the culture also resulted in the transient appearance of MSH, but the organism could grow on neither MSH nor DMDS. The culture metabolized [14C]-DMS to yield a 14CH4/14CO2 ratio of ∼2.8. Reduced methylated sulfur compounds represent a new class of substrates for methanogens and may be potential precursors of methane in a variety of aquatic habitats.

  16. The Science and Application of Critical Loads for Deposition of Nitrogen and Sulfur Compounds in National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, E.

    2008-12-01

    The National Parks of the U.S. contain resources of unsurpassed beauty and ecological significance. Park managers are directed to preserve the scenery and natural resources in these parks unimpaired for future generations. However, air pollution can damage the very resources that parks were created to preserve and, often, air pollution originates from outside park boundaries and therefore beyond the National Park Service's management jurisdiction. The Clean Air Act provides a framework and certain tools for protecting park resources from air pollution, but despite these programs, air pollution impacts to national park resources are widespread, including acidification or eutrophication from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Advances in ecosystem research and modeling have allowed national park managers to use critical loads to better evaluate ecosystem condition and set clear management goals for parks. Critical loads define the amount of deposition, usually nitrogen or sulfur compounds, below which harmful effects to a given resource are not expected. Resource protection goals based on critical loads, in turn, can be communicated to federal and State air regulatory agencies, and incorporated into air quality management planning for ecosystem protection. For example, the National Park Service, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and the Environmental Protection Agency have collaborated to use a critical load to set goals for a nitrogen deposition reduction plan to remedy ecosystem impacts in Rocky Mountain National Park. Elevated nitrogen deposition to the park has caused changes in the type and abundance of aquatic plant species, elevated levels of nitrate in surface waters, elevated levels of nitrogen in spruce needles, long-term accumulation of nitrogen in forest soils, and a shift in alpine tundra plant communities favoring sedges and grasses over the natural wildflower flora. The plan calls for nitrogen deposition to

  17. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  18. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  19. Adsorptive Removal of Organic Sulfur Compounds from Jet Fuel over K-exchanged NiY Zeolites Prepared by Impregnation and Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Subramani, Velu; Song, Chunshan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chin, Ya-Huei

    2005-07-20

    NiY zeolites with different Ni loadings were synthesized by incipient wetness impregnation and liquid phase ion-exchange methods using NH4Y and KY zeolites. These Ni-containing Y zeolites were tested as adsorbents for removing organic sulfur compounds from a model jet fuel containing 510 ppmw sulfur and a real JP-8 jet fuel containing 380 ppmw sulfur under ambient conditions either without reduction or after reduction around 600 C. At the adsorption temperature of 80 C, the NiY zeolite containing 30 wt % Ni synthesized by incipient wetness impregnation of NH4Y zeolite was able to clean only about 10 ml of a model jet fuel per g of the adsorbent to produce a desulfurized fuel containing below 1 ppmw sulfur. Under the same experimental conditions, the NiY zeolite prepared using KY zeolite cleaned about 30 ml of the fuel per g of the adsorbent. Better sulfur adsorption performance was observed when the NiY zeolites were synthesized by ion-exchange, and reduced before sulfur adsorption. The reducibility and surface properties of some of the selected NiY zeolites were investigated by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TPR studies indicated that the reducibility of NiY-zeolite was improved when K was present as a co-cation. The in-situ XPS studies of unreduced and reduced samples revealed that presence of K as co-cation in the zeolite matrix helps Ni dispersion at the surface. The promotional effect of K on the sulfur adsorption performance of NiY zeolites was therefore attributed to improved reducibility and surface dispersion of Ni when K was present as a co-cation.

  20. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  1. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  2. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  3. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  4. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  5. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  6. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  7. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  8. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  9. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  10. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to an... to or greater than 0.005 ppm shall be rounded up). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the...

  11. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  12. Sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction occurs in all marine sediments that contain organic matter. Aqueous sulfide (HS-, H2S), one of the initial products of bacterial sulfide reduction, is extremely reactive with iron bearing minerals: sulfur is fixed into sediments as iron sulfide (first FeS and then Fe2S2). A working definition is given of sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments. Controls and consequences of sulfate reduction rates in marine sediments are examined.

  13. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  14. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Corbeels, Roger J.; Kokturk, Uygur

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  15. Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

  16. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered. PMID:26706053

  17. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered.

  18. Production of ultra-low-sulfur gasoline: an equilibrium and kinetic analysis on adsorption of sulfur compounds over Ni/MMS sorbents.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazle; Liu, B S; Zhang, Q L; Wang, W S

    2012-11-15

    High performance nickel-based micro-mesoporous silica (Ni/MMS) sorbent was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with ultrasonic aid (IWI-u) for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) of commercial gasoline and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized with BET, XRD, TPR, SEM, HRTEM and TG/DTG. These results show that 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can still retain the framework of MMS and nickel particles were homogeneously distributed in the MMS channels without any aggregation, which improved significantly the ADS performance of the sorbents. The studies on the ADS kinetics indicate that the adsorption behavior of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can be described appropriately by pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion model verified that the steric hindrance and intraparticle diffusion were the rate controlling step of the adsorption process of DBT molecules. Langmuir model can be used to describe the adsorption isotherms for T, BT and DBT due to low coverage. The regeneration sorbent maintains the sulfur removal efficiency of 85.9% for 6 cycles.

  19. Production of ultra-low-sulfur gasoline: an equilibrium and kinetic analysis on adsorption of sulfur compounds over Ni/MMS sorbents.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazle; Liu, B S; Zhang, Q L; Wang, W S

    2012-11-15

    High performance nickel-based micro-mesoporous silica (Ni/MMS) sorbent was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with ultrasonic aid (IWI-u) for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) of commercial gasoline and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized with BET, XRD, TPR, SEM, HRTEM and TG/DTG. These results show that 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can still retain the framework of MMS and nickel particles were homogeneously distributed in the MMS channels without any aggregation, which improved significantly the ADS performance of the sorbents. The studies on the ADS kinetics indicate that the adsorption behavior of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can be described appropriately by pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion model verified that the steric hindrance and intraparticle diffusion were the rate controlling step of the adsorption process of DBT molecules. Langmuir model can be used to describe the adsorption isotherms for T, BT and DBT due to low coverage. The regeneration sorbent maintains the sulfur removal efficiency of 85.9% for 6 cycles. PMID:23022413

  20. Microwave Remote Sensing of the Temperature and Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in the Lower Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Kolodner, Marc A.; Butler, Bryan J.; Suleiman, Shady H.; Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-08-01

    A multi-wavelength radio frequency observation of Venus was performed on April 5, 1996, with the Very Large Array to investigate potential variations in the vertical and horizontal distribution of temperature and the sulfur compounds sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and sulfuric acid vapor (H 2SO 4(g)) in the atmosphere of the planet. Brightness temperature maps were produced which feature significantly darkened polar regions compared to the brighter low-latitude regions at both observed frequencies. This is the first time such polar features have been seen unambiguously in radio wavelength observations of Venus. The limb-darkening displayed in the maps helps to constrain the vertical profile of H 2SO 4(g), temperature, and to some degree SO 2. The maps were interpreted by applying a retrieval algorithm to produce vertical profiles of temperature and abundance of H 2SO 4(g) given an assumed sub-cloud abundance of SO 2. The results indicate a substantially higher abundance of H 2SO 4(g) at high latitudes (above 45°) than in the low-latitude regions. The retrieved temperature profiles are up to 25 K warmer than the profile obtained by the Pioneer Venus sounder probe at altitudes below 40 km (depending on location and assumed SO 2 abundance). For 150 ppm of SO 2, it is more consistent with the temperature profile obtained by Mariner 5, extrapolated to the surface via a dry adiabat. The profiles obtained for H 2SO 4(g) at high latitudes are consistent with those derived from the Magellan radio occultation experiments, peaking at around 8 ppm at an altitude of 46 km and decaying rapidly away from that altitude. At low latitudes, no significant H 2SO 4(g) is observed, regardless of the assumed SO 2 content. This is well below that measured by Mariner 10 (Lipa and Tyler 1979, Icarus39, 192-208), which peaked at ˜14 ppm near 47 km. Our results favor ≤100 ppm of SO 2 at low latitudes and ≤50 ppm in polar regions. The low-latitude value is statistically consistent with the

  1. Identification of the chemical form of sulfur compounds in the Japanese pink coral (Corallium elatius) skeleton using μ-XRF/XAS speciation mapping.

    PubMed

    Tamenori, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Luan, Nguyen Trong; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Iwasaki, Nozomu

    2014-05-01

    The distributions and chemical forms of sulfur compounds in the skeleton of Japanese pink coral (Corallium elatius) were investigated using X-ray spectroscopic techniques combined with micro-focused soft X-ray radiation. Microscopic X-ray fluorescence/soft X-ray photoabsorption (μ-XRF/XAS) speciation mapping clarified that sulfate is the primary species in the coral skeleton, with minor amounts of organic sulfur, whereas both sulfate and organic sulfur coexist in coenenchyme. Analysis of the post-edge region of the XAS spectra confirmed that sulfate ions in the coral skeleton are mainly in the form of gypsum-like inorganic sulfate substituting for the carbonate ions in the calcite skeleton. The sulfate concentration was negatively correlated with the magnesium concentration and positively correlated with that of phosphorus. Speciation mapping of sulfate in the coral skeleton showed clear fluctuations with sulfate concentrations being higher at dark bands, whereas the small amount of organic sulfur had unclear dark/bright bands. These results suggest that the little organic sulfur that is present is contained in the organic matter embedded in the biocrystal of coral skeleton.

  2. The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongyun; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Huan; Yu, Ren; Luo, Guangqian; Liu, Wenqiang; Li, Aijun; Yao, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires at temperatures from 673 to 1073K was investigated. Sulfur was predominant in the forms of thiophenic and inorganic sulfides in raw scrap tires. In the pyrolysis process, sulfur in organic forms was unstable and decomposed, leading to the sulfur release into tar and gases. At 673 and 773K, a considerable amount of sulfur was distributed in tar. Temperature increasing from 773 to 973K promoted tar decomposition and facilitated sulfur release into gases. At 1073K, the interactions between volatiles and char stimulated the formation of high-molecular-weight sulfur-containing compounds. After pyrolysis, almost half of the total content of sulfur in raw scrap tires still remained in the char and was mostly in the form of sulfides. Moreover, at temperatures higher than 873K, part of sulfur in the char was immobilized in the sulfates. In the pyrolysis gases, H2S was the main sulfur-containing gas. Increasing temperature stimulated the decomposition of organic polymers in scrap tires and more H2S was formed. Besides H2S, other sulfur-containing gases such as CH3SH, COS and SO2 were produced during the rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

  3. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  4. Inhibitory effect of sulfur-containing compounds in Scorodocarpus borneensis Becc. on the aggregation of rabbit platelets.

    PubMed

    Lim, H; Kubota, K; Kobayashi, A; Seki, T; Ariga, T

    1999-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of three pure compounds isolated from wood garlic, 2,4,5-trithiahexane (I), 2,4,5,7-tetrathiaoctane (II), and 2,4,5,7-tetrathiaoctane 2,2-dioxide (III), on rabbit platelet aggregation induced by collagen, arachidonic acid, U46619, ADP (adenosine 5'-diphosphate), PAF (platelet aggregating factor), and thrombin were studied in vitro. The anti-aggregating activity of 2,4,5,7-tetrathiaoctane 4,4-dioxide (IV) was also measured with collagen and arachidonic acid. I, II, III, and IV inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by all tested agonists. I, II, and III exhibited a stronger inhibitory effect against the thrombin-induced aggregation of GFP (gel-filtered platelets) than against the aggregation induced by the other agonists. Notably, the IC50 value for III was 4 microM, which is approximately 2.5 times stronger than MATS (methyl allyl trisulfide), a major anti-platelet compound isolated from garlic. In inhibiting collagen-induced aggregation, II was as potent as MATS and aspirin, with a marked disaggregation effect on the secondary aggregation by arachidonic acid, at the rate of 47.05%/min at a concentration of 10(-4) M. I, II, and III also suppressed U46619-induced aggregation. These results suggest that sulfur-containing compounds in wood garlic not only inhibit arachidonic acid metabolism but also suppress aggregation in association with the function of the platelet plasma membrane. PMID:10192909

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO[sub 2]-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO[sub 2] with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO[sub 2] with H[sub 2]S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO[sub 2] reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO[sub 2] reduction planned over various CeO[sub 2]-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought Claus-alternative'' for coal-fired power plant applications.

  6. Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, P.J.; Benedek, K.R.; Lunt, R.R.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-12-31

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. A small fraction of these systems produce a useable byproduct (gypsum): the remainder generate approximately 20 million tons per annum of disposable flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct, which are transported and disposed of in landfills. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate this solid waste production, transportation and disposal. All regenerable FGD systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a saleable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid SO{sub 2}. This off-gas has only a fraction of the flue gas volume, and contains no oxygen. Recovery of sulfur from this stream in a single-stage catalytic converter, avoiding a multi-stage Claus plant, could decrease the cost and accelerate the commercialization of many regenerable FGD processes. The paper describes the plan to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is based on a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide such as ceria and zirconia.

  7. Intermediate sulfur oxidation state compounds in the euxinic surface sediments of the Dvurechenskii mud volcano (Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, Anna; Kamyshny, Alexey; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; deBeer, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    The deep Black Sea is known to be depleted in electron-acceptors for sulfide oxidation. This study on depth distributions of sulfur species (S(II), S(0), Sn2-, SO32-, SO32-, SO42-) in the Dvurechenskii mud volcano, a cold seep situated in the permanently anoxic eastern Black Sea basin (Sorokin Trough, 2060 m water depth), showed remarkable concentrations of sulfide oxidation products. Sulfite concentrations of up to 11 μmol L-1, thiosulfate concentrations of up to 22 μmol L-1, zero-valent sulfur concentrations of up to 150 μmol L-1 and up to five polysulfide species were measured in the upper 20 cm of the sediment. Electron-acceptors found to be available in the Dvurechenskii mud volcano (DMV) for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfide oxidation intermediates are iron-minerals, and probably also reactive manganese phases. Up to 60 μmol g-1 of reactive iron-minerals and up to 170 μmol L-1 dissolved iron was present in the central summit with the highest fluid upflow and fresh mud outflow. Thus, the source for the oxidative power in the DMV are reactive iron phases extruded with the mud from an ancient source in the deeply buried sediments, leading to the formation of various sulfur intermediates in comparably high concentrations. Another possible source of sulfide oxidation intermediates in DMV sediments could be the formation of zero-valent sulfur by sulfate dependent anaerobic microbial oxidation of methane followed by disproportionation of zero-valent sulfur. Sulfide oxidation intermediates, which are produced by these processes, do not reach thermodynamic equilibrium with rhombic sulfur, especially close to the active center of the DMV due to a short equilibration time. Thus, mud volcano sediments, such as in the DMV, can provide oxidizing niches even in a highly reduced environment like the abyssal part of the Black Sea.

  8. Some Experiments in Sulfur-Nitrogen Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banister, Arthur J.; Smith, Nigel R. M.

    1982-01-01

    Briefly surveys the main structural types of sulfur-nitrogen compounds, and describes syntheses, suitable as undergraduate experiments, which illustrate four of the five types of cyclic species. Laboratory procedures, background information, and discussion of results for these experiments are provided. (Author/JN)

  9. Are we getting enough sulfur in our diet?

    PubMed Central

    Nimni, Marcel E; Han, Bo; Cordoba, Fabiola

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur, after calcium and phosphorus, is the most abundant mineral element found in our body. It is available to us in our diets, derived almost exclusively from proteins, and yet only 2 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins contains sulfur. One of these amino acids, methionine, cannot be synthesized by our bodies and therefore has to be supplied by the diet. Cysteine, another sulfur containing amino acid, and a large number of key metabolic intermediates essential for life, are synthesized by us, but the process requires a steady supply of sulfur. Proteins contain between 3 and 6% of sulfur amino acids. A very small percentage of sulfur comes in the form of inorganic sulfates and other forms of organic sulfur present in foods such as garlic, onion, broccoli, etc. The minimal requirements (RDA) for all the essential amino acids have always been estimated in terms of their ability to maintain a nitrogen balance. This method asses amino acid requirements for protein synthesis, only one of the pathways that methionine follows after ingestion. To adequately evaluate the RDA for methionine, one should perform, together with a nitrogen balance a sulfur balance, something never done, neither in humans nor animals. With this in mind we decided to evaluate the dietary intake of sulfur (as sulfur amino acids) in a random population and perform sulfur balance studies in a limited number of human volunteers. Initially this was done to try and gain some information on the possible mode of action of a variety of sulfur containing compounds (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine sulfate, and others, ) used as dietary supplements to treat diseases of the joints. Out of this study came information that suggested that a significant proportion of the population that included disproportionally the aged, may not be receiving sufficient sulfur and that these dietary supplements, were very likely exhibiting their pharmacological actions by supplying inorganic sulfur. PMID

  10. Measuring global sulfur dioxide emissions with satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide affects the weather by enhancing cloud formation, and long-term shifts in emissions can change the climate by increasing the amount of solar radiation scattered back into space. Sulfur dioxide emissions are the basis for acid rain, and the gas itself can cause respiratory problems. Despite the compound's importance to climate, the difficulties associated with accurately measuring sulfur dioxide mean that rates of emissions are generally not well understood.

  11. Sulfuric acid in the Venus clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The extremely dry nature of the Venus upper atmosphere appears to demand the presence of an efficient desiccating agent as the chief constituent of the clouds of Venus. On the basis of polarization measures it is to be expected that this substance is present as spherical droplets, 1 to 2 microns in diameter, with a refractive index n of 1.46 plus or minus 0.02 at 3500A in the observed region of the atmosphere, with T about equal to 235 K. This substance must have ultraviolet, visible, and infrared reflection properties not inconsistent with the observed spectrum of Venus. Sulfuric acid, of about 86% by weight composition, roughly fulfills the first of these properties. The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  12. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Beaudry, W.T.; Szafraniec, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    One technology recommended for consideration for the disposal of the U.S. Chemical Stockpile is chemical neutralization followed by biodegradation. In the case of sulfur mustard ({open_quotes}mustard gas{close_quotes}, 2,2{prime}-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), alkaline hydrolysis yields a detoxified and biodegradable product. The hydrolysis reaction was studied with respect to the effects of temperature and sulfur mustard concentration on the rate and products of the reaction. A 28-fold overall rate enhancement was observed at 70{degrees}C vs. 30{degrees}C corresponding to an enthalpy of activation value of 17.9 Kcal/mole. Material balance studies conducted by {sup 1}H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis showed that the products of the reaction consisted of thiodiglycol was relatively greater at lower sulfur mustard concentrations and higher temperatures. As temperatures were decreased or sulfur mustard concentrations was increased, the proportion of ether-type compounds increased accordingly. Conditions of 1% (vol//vol) sulfur mustard, 5% stoichiometric excess of NaOH and 90{degrees}C were selected for generation of the hydrolyzed bioreactor influent material. The bioreactor was seeded with activated sludge and was initially operated as 5 liter sequencing batch reactor with a hydraulic residence time of approximately days. Early results show total organic carbon removal of greater than 90%.

  13. Influence of Sulfur Species on Current Efficiency in the Aluminum Smelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirbekova, Rauan; Haarberg, Geir Martin; Thonstad, Jomar; Saevarsdottir, Gudrun

    2016-04-01

    Anode impurities are the major source of sulfur in aluminum electrolysis. Sulfur in anodes is mainly found as organic compounds. Alumina also introduces small quantities of sulfur, typically in the form of sulfates. The scarcity and cost of low-sulfur raw materials and the possibility of sulfur removal from the cell by means of flue gas may make high-sulfur content anodes a viable option. However, some anode impurities are known to affect current efficiency in aluminum production and caution must be exercised. The effect of increased sulfur content in the aluminum electrolysis electrolyte must be studied. This paper explores the effect of increased sulfur concentration in the electrolyte on current efficiency in a laboratory cell. Sodium sulfate was added to the electrolyte as a source of sulfur at regular time intervals to maintain a constant sulfur concentration. Current efficiency decreased by 1.1 pct per each 100 mg/kg (ppm) increase in sulfur concentration in the electrolyte.

  14. X-ray microspectroscopy of sulfur in basaltic glass inclusions. Inference on the volcanic sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métrich, N.; Susini, J.; Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Bonnin-Mosbah, M.; Menez, B.

    2003-03-01

    It is commonly accepted that sulfur is carried out as sulfide (S^{II-}) or/and sulfate (S^{VI}) by Earth mantlederived melts, before being released as SO2 and/or H2S in volcanic emissions. By analyzing reference compounds and a selection of minute glass inclusions in olivine crystals using μXANES (X-ray Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge, we demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of sulfite (S^{IV}) in addition to sulfate (S^{VI}) in these rare inclusions representative of oxidized and water rich-basaltic magmas, prior to loss of sulfur and water. The sulfide (S^{II-}) when exists is minor. We proposed that sulfite (S^{IV}) acts as an intermediate, metastable species which results in partitioning of sulfur into the volcanic gas emissions.

  15. Interactions between natural organic matter, sulfur, arsenic and iron oxides in re-oxidation compounds within riparian wetlands: nanoSIMS and X-ray adsorption spectroscopy evidences.

    PubMed

    Al-Sid-Cheikh, Maya; Pédrot, Mathieu; Dia, Aline; Guenet, Hélène; Vantelon, Delphine; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Delhaye, Thomas

    2015-05-15

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic and ubiquitous element which can be responsible for severe health problems. Recently, Nano-scale Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (nanoSIMS) analysis has been used to map organomineral assemblages. Here, we present a method adapted from Belzile et al. (1989) to collect freshly precipitated compounds of the re-oxidation period in a natural wetland environment using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet scavenger. This method provides information on the bulk samples and on the specific interactions between metals (i.e. As) and the natural organic matter (NOM). Our method allows producing nanoSIMS imaging on natural colloid precipitates, including (75)As(-), (56)Fe(16)O(-), sulfur ((32)S(-)) and organic matter ((12)C(14)N) and to measure X-ray adsorption of sulfur (S) K-edge. A first statistical treatment on the nanoSIMS images highlights two main colocalizations: (1) (12)C(14)N(-), (32)S(-), (56)Fe(16)O(-) and (75)As(-), and (2) (12)C(14)N(-), (32)S(-) and (75)As(-). Principal component analyses (PCAs) support the importance of sulfur in the two main colocalizations firstly evidenced. The first component explains 70% of the variance in the distribution of the elements and is highly correlated with the presence of (32)S(-). The second component explains 20% of the variance and is highly correlated with the presence of (12)C(14)N(-). The X-ray adsorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) on sulfur speciation provides a quantification of the organic (55%) and inorganic (45%) sulfur compositions. The co-existence of reduced and oxidized S forms might be attributed to a slow NOM kinetic oxidation process. Thus, a direct interaction between As and NOM through sulfur groups might be possible.

  16. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Sulfur in human nutrition and applications in medicine.

    PubMed

    Parcell, Stephen

    2002-02-01

    Because the role of elemental sulfur in human nutrition has not been studied extensively, it is the purpose of this article to emphasize the importance of this element in humans and discuss the therapeutic applications of sulfur compounds in medicine. Sulfur is the sixth most abundant macromineral in breast milk and the third most abundant mineral based on percentage of total body weight. The sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs) are methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, homocystine, and taurine. Dietary SAA analysis and protein supplementation may be indicated for vegan athletes, children, or patients with HIV, because of an increased risk for SAA deficiency in these groups. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), a volatile component in the sulfur cycle, is another source of sulfur found in the human diet. Increases in serum sulfate may explain some of the therapeutic effects of MSM, DMSO, and glucosamine sulfate. Organic sulfur, as SAAs, can be used to increase synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), glutathione (GSH), taurine, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). MSM may be effective for the treatment of allergy, pain syndromes, athletic injuries, and bladder disorders. Other sulfur compounds such as SAMe, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), taurine, glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate, and reduced glutathione may also have clinical applications in the treatment of a number of conditions such as depression, fibromyalgia, arthritis, interstitial cystitis, athletic injuries, congestive heart failure, diabetes, cancer, and AIDS. Dosages, mechanisms of action, and rationales for use are discussed. The low toxicological profiles of these sulfur compounds, combined with promising therapeutic effects, warrant continued human clinical trails. PMID:11896744

  18. Sulfur speciation and bioaccumulation in camphor tree leaves as atmospheric sulfur indicator analyzed by synchrotron radiation XRF and XANES.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianrong; Zhang, Guilin; Bao, Liangman; Long, Shilei; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan; Ma, Chenyan; Zhao, Yidong

    2013-03-01

    Analyzing and understanding the effects of ambient pollution on plants is getting more and more attention as a topic of environmental biology. A method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy was established to analyze the sulfur concentration and speciation in mature camphor tree leaves (CTLs), which were sampled from 5 local fields in Shanghai, China. Annual SO2 concentration, SO4(2-) concentration in atmospheric particulate, SO4(2-) and sulfur concentration in soil were also analyzed to explore the relationship between ambient sulfur sources and the sulfur nutrient cycling in CTLs. Total sulfur concentration in mature camphor tree leaves was 766-1704 mg/kg. The mainly detected sulfur states and their corresponding compounds were +6 (sulfate, include inorganic sulfate and organic sulfate), +5.2 (sulfonate), +2.2 (suloxides), +0.6 (thiols and thiothers), +0.2 (organic sulfides). Total sulfur concentration was strongly correlated with sulfate proportion with a linear correlation coefficient up to 0.977, which suggested that sulfur accumulated in CTLs as sulfate form. Reduced sulfur compounds (organic sulfides, thiols, thioethers, sulfoxide and sulfonate) assimilation was sufficed to meet the nutrient requirement for growth at a balanced level around 526 mg/kg. The sulfate accumulation mainly caused by atmospheric sulfur pollution such as SO2 and airborne sulfate particulate instead of soil contamination. From urban to suburb place, sulfate in mature CTLs decreased as the atmospheric sulfur pollution reduced, but a dramatic increase presented near the seashore, where the marine sulfate emission and maritime activity pollution were significant. The sulfur concentration and speciation in mature CTLs effectively represented the long-term biological accumulation of atmospheric sulfur pollution in local environment.

  19. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  20. Method for removing sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ermini, E.

    1980-12-16

    Sulfur dioxide is removed from waste gases generated in a thermoelectric plant by contacting the gases countercurrently with an aqueous alkaline solution having a ph of about 9-12 and containing both sodium hydroxide and manganic hydroxide, whereby the sulfur dioxide reacts with the sodium hydroxide to form sodium sulfite until the ph of the solution is about 6-7 and the sodium hydroxide is substantially exhausted and wherein the sulfur dioxide then reacts with the manganic hydroxide to form manganese sulfite. The resultant sodium sulfite and manganese sulfite are oxidized and transformed into sodium sulfate and manganese sulfate respectively, by the action of oxygen in the mixture, in the presence of the manganic ion and also by the direct oxidizing action of the manganic ion.

  1. Monoclinic sulfur cathode utilizing carbon for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Chul; Han, Young-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries have been designed to be combined with conductive carbon because the insulating nature of sulfur causes low active material utilization and poor rate capability. This paper is the first to report that carbon can induce a phase transition in a sulfur cathode. The stable form of a sulfur crystal at ambient temperature is orthorhombic sulfur. We found that monoclinic sulfur becomes more stable than orthorhombic sulfur if carbon atoms penetrate into the sulfur at elevated temperatures and the carbon density exceeds a threshold of C0.3S8. The high stability of the carbon-containing monoclinic sulfur persists during lithiation and is attributed to locally formed linear SC3S chains with marked stability. This study provides a novel perspective on the role of carbon in the sulfur cathode and suggests control of the crystal phase of electrodes by composite elements as a new way of designing efficient electrode materials.

  2. Identification, synthesis, and characterization of novel sulfur-containing volatile compounds from the in-depth analysis of Lisbon lemon peels (Citrus limon L. Burm. f. cv. Lisbon).

    PubMed

    Cannon, Robert J; Kazimierski, Arkadiusz; Curto, Nicole L; Li, Jing; Trinnaman, Laurence; Jańczuk, Adam J; Agyemang, David; Da Costa, Neil C; Chen, Michael Z

    2015-02-25

    Lemons (Citrus limon) are a desirable citrus fruit grown and used globally in a wide range of applications. The main constituents of this sour-tasting fruit have been well quantitated and characterized. However, additional research is still necessary to better understand the trace volatile compounds that may contribute to the overall aroma of the fruit. In this study, Lisbon lemons (C. limon L. Burm. f. cv. Lisbon) were purchased from a grove in California, USA, and extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. Fractionation and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were utilized to separate, focus, and enhance unidentified compounds. In addition, these methods were employed to more accurately assign flavor dilution factors by aroma extract dilution analysis. Numerous compounds were identified for the first time in lemons, including a series of branched aliphatic aldehydes and several novel sulfur-containing structures. Rarely reported in citrus peels, sulfur compounds are known to contribute significantly to the aroma profile of the fruit and were found to be aroma-active in this particular study on lemons. This paper discusses the identification, synthesis, and organoleptic properties of these novel volatile sulfur compounds.

  3. Sulfur isotopic compositions of individual organosulfur compounds and their genetic links in the Lower Paleozoic petroleum pools of the Tarim Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunfang; Amrani, Alon; Worden, Richard H.; Xiao, Qilin; Wang, Tiankai; Gvirtzman, Zvi; Li, Hongxia; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Jia, Lianqi

    2016-06-01

    During thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), H2S generated by reactions between hydrocarbons and aqueous sulfate back-reacts with remaining oil-phase compounds forming new organosulfur compounds (OSCs) that have similar δ34S values to the original sulfate. Using Compound Specific Sulfur Isotope Analysis (CSSIA) of alkylthiaadamantanes (TAs), alkyldibenzothiophenes (DBTs), alkylbenzothiophenes (BTs) and alkylthiolanes (TLs), we have here attempted to differentiate OSCs due to primary generation and those due to TSR in oils from the Tarim Basin, China. These oils were generated from Cambrian source rocks and accumulated in Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs. Based on compound specific sulfur isotope and carbon isotope data, TAs concentrations and DBT/phenanthrene ratios, the oils fall into four groups, reflecting different extents of source rock signal, alteration by TSR, mixing events, and secondary generation of H2S. Thermally stable TAs, that were produced following TSR, rapidly dominate kerogen-derived TAs at low to moderate degrees of TSR. Less thermally stable TLs and BTs were created as soon as TSR commenced, rapidly adopted TSR-δ34S values, but they do not survive at high concentrations unless TSR is advanced and ongoing. The presence of TLs and BTs shows that TSR is still active. Secondary DBTs were produced in significant amounts, sufficient to dominate kerogen-derived DBTs, only when TSR was at an advanced extent. The difference in sulfur isotopes between (i) TLs and DBTs and (ii) BTs and DBTs and (iii) TAs and DBTs, represents the extent of TSR while the presence of TAs at greater than 20 μg/g represents the occurrence of TSR. The output of this study shows that compound specific sulfur isotopes of different organosulfur compounds, with different thermal stabilities and formation pathways, not only differentiate between oils of TSR and non-TSR origin, but can also reveal information about relative timing of secondary charge events and migration

  4. Phototrophic bacteria and their role in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trueper, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    An essential step that cannot be bypassed in the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur today is dissimilatory sulfate reduction by anaerobic bacteria. The enormous amounts of sulfides produced by these are oxidized again either anaerobically by phototrophic bacteria or aerobically by thiobacilli and large chemotrophic bacteria (Beggiatoa, Thiovulum, etc.). Phototrophic bacteria use sulfide, sulfur, thiosulfate, and sulfite as electron donors for photosynthesis. The most obvious intermediate in their oxidative sulfur metabolism is a long chain polysulfide that appears as so called sulfur globules either inside (Chromatiaceae) or outside (Ectothiorhodospiraceae, Chlorobiaceae, and some of the Rhodospirillaceae) the cells. The assimilation of sulfur compounds in phototrophic bacteria is in principle identical with that of nonphototrophic bacteria. However, the Chlorobiaceae and some of the Chromatiaceae and Rhodospirillaceae, unable to reduce sulfate, rely upon reduced sulfur for biosynthetic purposes.

  5. Stable sulfur and carbon isotope investigations of pore-water and solid-phase compounds in sediments of the Chapopote Asphalt Volcano, southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, T.; Bruechert, V.; Pape, T.; Schubotz, F.; Kasten, S.

    2007-05-01

    During R/V Meteor cruise M67 2a/b (March-April 2006) to the Asphalt Volcanoes of the southern Gulf of Mexico two gravity cores were retrieved from the central depression of the Chapopote Knoll which contained viscous oil/asphalt a few meters below the sediment surface. Also several push cores were taken with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) QUEST at sites where oil/asphalt reached closely below the sediment surface. From these cores solid-phase and pore-water samples were taken for on-board and subsequent shore-based analyses. Together with a core taken from a background site which is not influenced by asphalt/oil seepage these sediment and pore water samples are currently subject to detailed analyses of (1) the stable sulfur isotopic composition of both dissolved (sulfate and sulfide) and solid-phase (iron monosulfides, pyrite) sulfur compounds, and (2) the composition and stable carbon isotopic signatures of hydrocarbon gases. The major aims of these investigations are to identify whether and to which extent the upward migration of oil, asphalt and gas (1) stimulates biogeochemical processes and turn-over rates, and (2) influences the stable sulfur isotopic signatures of both dissolved and solid phase sulfur compounds. Furthermore, we seek to determine the potential of these - possibly unusual - stable sulfur isotopic signals of solid-phase sulfides to reconstruct hydrocarbon seepage in older geological records and to elucidate how the composition and the stable carbon isotopic signatures of the hydrocarbon gases are altered by the action of typical chemosynthetic communities thriving at these sites.

  6. Formation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing light-absorbing compounds accelerated by evaporation of water from secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (<2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>105 L mol-1 cm-1 at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 103 cm2 g-1 - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH ˜ 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

  7. Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds Accelerated by Evaporation of Water from Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-01-14

    Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of dlimonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (< 2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>10{sup 5} L mol{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH {approx} 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

  8. Effect of nitrogen supplementation and Saccharomyces species on hydrogen sulfide and other volatile sulfur compounds in shiraz fermentation and wine.

    PubMed

    Ugliano, Maurizio; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Siebert, Tracey; Travis, Brooke; Magno, Franco; Versini, Giuseppe; Henschke, Paul A

    2009-06-10

    A Shiraz must with low yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) was supplemented with two increasing concentrations of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and fermented with one Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one Saccharomyces bayanus strain, with maceration on grape skins. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) was monitored throughout fermentation, and a total of 16 volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) were quantified in the finished wines. For the S. cerevisiae yeast strain, addition of DAP to a final YAN of 250 or 400 mg/L resulted in an increased formation of H(2)S compared to nonsupplemented fermentations (100 mg/L YAN). For this yeast, DAP-supplemented fermentations also showed prolonged formation of H(2)S into the later stage of fermentation, which was associated with increased H(2)S in the final wines. The S. bayanus strain showed a different H(2)S production profile, in which production was inversely correlated to initial YAN. No correlation was found between total H(2)S produced by either yeast during fermentation and H(2)S concentration in the final wines. For both yeasts, DAP supplementation yielded higher concentrations of organic VSCs in the finished wines, including sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, and mercaptoesters. PCA analysis indicated that nitrogen supplementation before fermentation determined a much clearer distinction between the VSC profiles of the two yeasts compared to nonsupplemented fermentations. These results raise questions concerning the widespread use of DAP in the management of low YAN fermentations with respect to the formation of reductive characters in wine. PMID:19391591

  9. Kinetics of reaction of peroxynitrite with selenium- and sulfur-containing compounds: Absolute rate constants and assessment of biological significance.

    PubMed

    Storkey, Corin; Pattison, David I; Ignasiak, Marta T; Schiesser, Carl H; Davies, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitrite (the physiological mixture of ONOOH and its anion, ONOO(-)) is a powerful biologically-relevant oxidant capable of oxidizing and damaging a range of important targets including sulfides, thiols, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Excessive production of peroxynitrite is associated with several human pathologies including cardiovascular disease, ischemic-reperfusion injury, circulatory shock, inflammation and neurodegeneration. This study demonstrates that low-molecular-mass selenols (RSeH), selenides (RSeR') and to a lesser extent diselenides (RSeSeR') react with peroxynitrite with high rate constants. Low molecular mass selenols react particularly rapidly with peroxynitrite, with second order rate constants k2 in the range 5.1 × 10(5)-1.9 × 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), and 250-830 fold faster than the corresponding thiols (RSH) and many other endogenous biological targets. Reactions of peroxynitrite with selenides, including selenosugars are approximately 15-fold faster than their sulfur homologs with k2 approximately 2.5 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1). The rate constants for diselenides and sulfides were slower with k2 0.72-1.3 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1) and approximately 2.1 × 10(2)M(-1)s(-1) respectively. These studies demonstrate that both endogenous and exogenous selenium-containing compounds may modulate peroxynitrite-mediated damage at sites of acute and chronic inflammation, with this being of particular relevance at extracellular sites where the thiol pool is limited.

  10. The Oxidation of Sulfur-Containing Compounds Using Heterogeneous Catalysts of Transition Metal Oxides Deposited on the Polymeric Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh Vu, Ngo; Dinh Bui, Nhi; Thi Minh, Thao; Thi Thanh Dam, Huong; Thi Tran, Hang

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the activity of heterogeneous catalysts of transition metal oxides deposited on the polymeric matrix in the oxidation of sulfur-containing compounds. It is shown that MnO2-10/CuO-10 has the highest catalytic activity. The physicomechanical properties of polymeric heterogeneous catalysts of transition-metal oxides, including the specific surface area, elongation at break and breaking strength, specific electrical resistance, and volume resistivity were studied by using an Inspekt mini 3 kN universal tensile machine in accordance with TCVN 4509:2006 at a temperature of 20 ± 2°C. Results show that heterogeneous polymeric catalysts were stable under severe reaction conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive analysis are used to study the surfaces of the catalysts. Microstructural characterization of the catalysts is performed by using x-ray computed tomography. We demonstrate the potential application of polymeric heterogeneous catalysts of transition-metal oxides in industrial wastewater treatment.

  11. Catabolism of volatile sulfur compounds precursors by Brevibacterium linens and Geotrichum candidum, two microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Arfi, Kenza; Amárita, Felix; Spinnler, Henry-Eric; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2003-11-01

    Two Brevibacterium linens strains and the cheese-ripening yeast Geotrichum candidum were compared with regard to their ability to produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) from three different precursors namely L-methionine, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (KMBA) and 4-methylthio-2-hydroxybutyric acid (HMBA). All microorganisms were able to convert these precursors to VSCs. However, although all were able to produce VSCs from L-methionine, only G. candidum accumulated KMBA when cultivated on this amino acid, contrary to B. linens suggesting that the transamination pathway is not active in this microorganism. Conversely, a L-methionine gamma-lyase activity--which catalyses the one step L-methionine to methanethiol (MTL) degradation route--was only found in B. linens strains. Several other enzymatic activities involved in the catabolism of the precursors tested were investigated. KMBA transiently accumulated in G. candidum cultures, and was then reduced to HMBA by a KMBA dehydrogenase (KDH) activity. This activity was not detected in B. linens. Despite no HMBA dehydrogenase (HDH) was found in G. candidum, a strong HMBA oxidase (HOX) activity was measured in this microorganism. This latter activity was weakly active in B. linens. KMBA and HMBA demethiolating activities were found in all the microorganisms. Our results illustrate the metabolic diversity between cheese-ripening microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

  12. Sulfur speciation of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, K.R.; Sum, S.T.; Johnston, M.V.; Wexler, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sulfur enters the atmosphere as gaseous species emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. These species can undergo a variety of oxidation reactions that ultimately yield hexavalent sulfur aerosols. Since the final products play an important role in acid rain production and the earth`s energy balance, it is important to distinguish tetravalent and hexavalent sulfur aerosols, as well as differentiate those arising from natural and anthropogenic sources. To attain these goals the authors chose to examine five target compounds that are present in the atmosphere: sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium sulfite, methanesulfonic acid (MSA), and the sodium salt of hydroxymethanesulfonic acid (NaHMSA). Sodium sulfate is observed in oceanic aerosols, while both ammonium salts are observed over land. MSA is found only in the marine environment and originates solely from natural emissions, while HMSA is formed in urban hazes and primarily arises from anthropogenic sources. Thus, MSA and HMSA serve as tracers for distinguishing natural and anthropogenic sulfur emissions. To differentiate these compounds, the authors used Rapid Single-Particle Mass Spectrometry (RSMS), a method that allows single particles to be analyzed on-line and in real time. With RSMS, particles are drawn directly into the source region of a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer where they are detected by light scattering of a continuous laser beam and then ablated by an excimer laser pulse. With this sequence of events, each mass spectrum results from a single laser pulse ablating a single particle.

  13. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Xuran; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiaoqing; Qu, Deyang

    2016-01-01

    The polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li-S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S4 2 - and S5 2 - species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S8 2 - and S6 2 - for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  14. The Speciation of Sulfur in an Ocean on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu.; Shock, E. L.

    2002-01-01

    Stability of native sulfur, iron sulfides, and aqueous sulfur compounds is evaluated at assumed P-T conditions of the Europa's ocean floor. Pyrite, gypsum, and ferric hydroxides can coexist in contact with sulfate-rich oceanic water. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. (Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coal)

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, B.B.

    1990-06-20

    Research continues on methods for desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this term include: coal procurement and preparation, microbial removal of pyrite and sulfate, analytical procedures for characterization of total organic sulfur, organic sulfur removal, microbial activity on model coal organosulfur compounds, screening/detection assays, and monitoring of desulfurization activity. (VC)

  16. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of sulfur-containing compounds from Petiveria alliacea L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seokwon; Kubec, Roman; Musah, Rabi A

    2006-03-01

    A total of 18 organosulfur compounds originating from Petiveria alliacea L. roots have been tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. These represent compounds occurring in fresh homogenates as well as those present in various macerates, extracts and other preparations made from Petiveria alliacea. Of the compounds assayed, the thiosulfinates, trisulfides and benzylsulfinic acid were observed to be the most active, with the benzyl-containing thiosulfinates exhibiting the broadest spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The effect of plant sample preparation conditions on the antimicrobial activity of the extract is discussed.

  17. Apparatus and process for producing particulate sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Harbolt, B.A.; Howell, D.W.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes apparatus for producing relatively large, high bulk density sulfur particles from molten sulfur. The apparatus including a means disposed beneath the porous belt for receiving both quenching liquid drained from sulfur particles on the belt and sulfur particles falling from the porous belt which are not discharged onto the second conveyor belt, and including means for recycling the received fallen particles back onto a particle receiving end region of the porous belt.

  18. The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James F.; Turco, Richard P.; Liu, May S.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere using a one-dimensional photochemical model is described and evaluated. Theoretical uncertainties concerning the operation of the marine sulfur cycle are examined, and measurements of sulfur gases in the marine atmosphere necessary for developing the model are derived. Previous modeling studies are reviewed, and the data from these studies are compared to the model simulations. Recommendations for improving the simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere are discussed.

  19. Behavior of sulfur during coal pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Heidbrink, J.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by thermogravimetry/ Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR) techniques. SO2, COS, and H2S were major gaseous sulfur-containing products observed during coal pyrolysis. The release rates of the gaseous sulfur species showed several peaks within the temperature ranges, which were due to the emission of different forms of sulfur in coal. ?? 1994.

  20. Parameters Influencing Sulfur Speciation in Environmental Samples Using Sulfur K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Thumanu, Kanjana; Kositanont, Charnwit; Schwarzer, Klaus; Prietzel, Jörg; Hirunyatrakul, Phoosak; Kittikoon, Itthipon

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to enhance the credibility of applying the sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy as an innovative “fingerprint” for characterizing environmental samples. The sensitivities of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra of ten sulfur compound standards detected by two different detectors, namely, Lytle detector (LyD) and Germanium detector (GeD), were studied and compared. Further investigation on “self-absorption” effect revealed that the maximum sensitivities of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra were achieved when diluting sulfur compound standards with boron nitride (BN) at the mixing ratio of 0.1%. The “particle-size” effect on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum sensitivities was examined by comparing signal-to-noise ratios of total suspended particles (TSP) and particulate matter of less than 10 millionths of a meter (PM10) collected at three major cities of Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratios of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra were positively correlated with sulfate content in aerosols and negatively connected with particle sizes. The combination of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) has proved that sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum can be used to characterize German terrestrial soils and Andaman coastal sediments. In addition, this study highlighted the capability of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra as an innovative “fingerprint” to distinguish tsunami backwash deposits (TBD) from typical marine sediments (TMS). PMID:23193498

  1. Formation of insoluble, nonhydrolyzable, sulfur-rich macromolecules via incorporation of inorganic sulfur species into algal carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Marika D.; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2000-08-01

    The process of sulfur incorporation into organic matter was simulated in the laboratory by sulfurization of cell material of the prymnesiophyte alga Phaeocystis in sea water with inorganic polysulfides at 50°C. Flash pyrolysis of the residue, obtained after extraction and several hydrolysis steps, yielded mainly C 1-C 4 alkylbenzenes and C 1-C 4 alkylphenols and, in contrast to control and blank experiments, relatively high amounts of C 0-C 4 alkylthiophenes. The distribution of the thiophenes is very similar to that in pyrolysates of type II-S kerogens. The formation of high-molecular-weight sulfur-rich macromolecules co-occurs with a marked drop in the content of hydrolyzable carbohydrates. This indicates that sulfurization results in the preservation of algal carbohydrate carbon in a macromolecular structure composed of (poly)sulfidic cross-linked carbohydrate skeletons, which upon pyrolysis yields alkylthiophenes. Sulfurization of glucose under similar conditions resulted in the formation of a nonhydrolyzable, solid material, which yielded high amounts of organic sulfur compounds upon pyrolysis, mainly short-chain alkylthiophenes, although with a different distribution than that in the pyrolysate of the sulfurized algal material. The carbon numbers of these organic sulfur compounds extend beyond six, indicating that the length of the carbon skeleton of the pyrolysis products is not limited by the length of the carbon skeleton of the substrate. These results suggest that the sulfurization of carbohydrates may be an important pathway in the preservation of organic matter in euxinic depositional environments.

  2. Recovering sulfur from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Linde AG (Hoellriegeiskreuth, Germany) has developed ClinSulf-SDP process, a two-reactor system that offers better than 99.5% sulfur recovery at low capital and operating costs. In a traditional Claus plant, sulfur-recovery rates of 99.3% can be achieved by combining a two- or three-stage Claus plant with a separate tail-gas cleanup unit (TGCU). Common TGCU methods include H{sub 2}S scrubbing, subdewpoint condensation and direct oxidation. Such combined units are not only costly and complicated to build and maintain, but many of today`s operators require higher sulfur-recovery rates--on the order of 99.3%--99.8%. The Clin-Sulf-SDP combines several catalytic stages of a Claus plant with a subdewpoint, tailgas-treatment system, and the process uses only two reactors. At the heart of the process are two identical, internally cooled reactors. Two four-way valves periodically reverse the sequence of the matching reactors, allowing them to alternate between sulfur-adsorption and catalyst-regeneration modes.

  3. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  4. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  5. TRENDS IN RURAL SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of regional trends in atmospheric concentrations in sulfur dioxide (502) and particulate sulfate (50~- ) at rural monitoring sites in the Clean Air Act Status and Trends Monitoring Network (CAsTNet) from 1990 to 1999. A two-stage approach is used t...

  6. Eagle-Picher Industries Sodium Sulfur Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silvey, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the sodium sulfur program are presented. Sodium sulfur low earth orbit (LEO) cells are described. Topics covered include cell sizes, areas of improvement, and NaS cell testing. Sodium sulfur cell and battery designs continue to evolve with significant improvement demonstrated in resistance, rechargeability, cycle life, energy density, and electrolyte characterization.

  7. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  8. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  10. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  11. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur...

  12. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  13. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  14. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  15. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  16. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  17. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also known as oil of vitriol,...

  11. Swept Away: Resuspension of Bacterial Mats Regulates Benthic-Pelagic Exchange of Sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Jonathan; Bathmann, Ulrich V.

    1987-06-01

    Filaments and extracellular material from colorless sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa spp.) form extensive white sulfur mats on surface sediments of coastal, oceanic, and even deep-sea environments. These chemoautotrophic bacteria oxidize soluble reduced sulfur compounds and deposit elemental sulfur, enriching the sulfur content of surface sediment fivefold over that of deeper sediments. Laboratory flume experiments with Beggiatoa mats from an intertidal sandflat (Nova Scotia) demonstrated that even slight erosion of sediment causes a flux of 160 millimoles of sulfur per square meter per hour, two orders of magnitude greater than the flux produced by sulfur transformations involving either sulfate reduction or sulfide oxidation by benthic bacteria. These experiments indicate that resuspension of sulfur bacterial mats by waves and currents is a rapid mechanism by which sediment sulfur is recycled to the water column. Benthic communities thus lose an important storage intermediate for reduced sulfur as well as a high-quality bacterial food source for benthic grazers.

  12. Thorium Compounds with Bonds to Sulfur or Selenium: Synthesis, Structure, and Thermolysis.

    PubMed

    Rehe, David; Kornienko, Anna Y; Emge, Thomas J; Brennan, John G

    2016-07-18

    Thorium chalcogenolates Th(ER)4 (E = S, Se; R = Ph, C6F5) form pyridine complexes with a variety of coordination numbers. Four compounds, (py)4Th(SPh)4, (py)3Th(SePh)4, (py)3Th(SC6F5)4, and (py)4Th(SeC6F5)4, have been isolated and characterized by spectroscopic methods and low-temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Two of the products, (py)4Th(SPh)4 and (py)4Th(SeC6F5)4, have classic eight coordinate A4B4 square-antiprism geometries. The SePh compound is the only seven coordinate (4Se, 3N) product, and the fluorinated thiolate is distinctive in that the structure contains two dative interactions between Th and fluoride, to give a nine coordinate (3N, 4S, 2F) structure. The EPh compounds decompose thermally to give ThE2 and EPh2, while the fluorinated compounds give primarily ThF4, E2(C6F5)2, and E(C6F5)2. PMID:27376981

  13. Theoretical investigation of the interaction between aromatic sulfur compounds and [BMIM](+)[FeCl4](-) ionic liquid in desulfurization: A novel charge transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongping; Zhu, Wenshuai; Chang, Yonghui; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Ming; Yin, Sheng; Xia, Jiexiang; Li, Huaming

    2015-06-01

    In this work, interaction nature between a group of aromatic sulfur compounds and [BMIM](+)[FeCl4](-) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). A coordination structure is found to be critical to the mechanism of extractive desulfurization. Interaction energy and extractive selectivity follow the order: thiophene (TH)sulfur compounds transfer into the Lewis part of ionic liquid, namely, [FeCl4](-). Furthermore, it is better to consider the Lewis acidity of Fe-containing ionic liquid by the whole unit (such as [FeCl4](-) and aromatic sulfur compounds (X)) rather than only Fe or S atom.

  14. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part B--Nitrogen-, Sulfur-, and Oxygen-Containing Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-07-01

    Present study focused on the biodegradation of various heterocyclic nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (NSO) compounds using naphthalene-enriched culture. Target compounds in the study were pyridine, quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran. Screening studies were carried out using different microbial consortia enriched with specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and NSO compounds. Among different microbial consortia, naphthalene-enriched culture was the most efficient consortium based on high substrate degradation rate. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order pyridine > quinoline > benzofuran > benzothiophene. Benzothiophene and benzofuran were found to be highly recalcitrant pollutants. Benzothiophene could not be biodegraded when concentration was above 50 mg/l. It was observed that 2-(1H)-quinolinone, benzothiophene-2-one, and benzofuran-2,3-dione were formed as metabolic intermediates during biodegradation of quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran, respectively. Quinoline-N and pyridine-N were transformed into free ammonium ions during the biodegradation process. Biodegradation pathways for various NSO compounds are proposed. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate single substrate biodegradation kinetics satisfactorily. Benzothiophene and benzofuran biodegradation kinetics, in presence of acetone, was simulated using a generalized multi-substrate model.

  15. Sulfur isotope distribution in solfatares, Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoen, R.; Rye, R.O.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur isotope data on hydrogen sulfide, native sulfur, and sulfates from acid hot-spring areas at Yellowstone National Park suggest that hydrogen sulfide oxidizes to sulfur analogically, whereas sulfur undergoes biological oxidation to sulfuric acid. An exception occurs at Mammoth Hot Springs where hydrogen sulfide apparently undergoes biochemical oxidation to sulfur.

  16. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries. PMID:26378622

  17. Volatile sulfur compounds from a redox-controlled-cattle-manure slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, W.E.; Guenzi, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    Volatile S compounds have been implicated as contributors to the odor problem from cattle-feedlots. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of oxidation-reduction potentials (E/sub h/) on the type and amount of volatile S compounds released from cattle manure. The laboratory experiment utilized a manure slurry controlled at pH 7, 30/sup 0/C, and a preselected E/sub h/ levels. The E/sub h/ of the slurry was initially controlled at +300 mV, and subsequently decreased in increments of 100 mV/week through -200 mV. Effluent gases from the incubation flask were trapped, and the S gases analyzed by gas chromatography. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS/sub 2/) production was low (less than or equal to 0.07 ..mu..g/g manure/d) at all redox levels. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) were highest at 0 mV, while hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) and methanethiol (MeSH) were greatest at -100 mV. The total amount of S volatilized from the manure slurry as each compound was: H/sub 2/O, 155 ..mu..g; MeSH, 135 ..mu..g; DMS, 83..mu..g; DMDS, 27 ..mu..g; COS, 8 ..mu..g; and CS/sub 2/, 3 ..mu..g; representing about 1.7% of the total manure S.

  18. Determination of sulfur trioxide in engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Arnold, D R

    1975-04-01

    Sulfur trioxide in the exhaust gas of an internal combustion engine is removed and concentrated by absorption in a solution of 80% isopropyl alcohol, which quantitatively absorbs it and inhibits the oxidation of any sulfur dioxide which may be absorbed. The absorbed sulfur trioxide (sulfuric acid) is determined by an absorption titration by using barium chloride as the titrant and thorin as the indicator. The sulfur dioxide content of the exhaust is measured continuously by means of a DuPont Model 411 ultraviolet photoanalyzer.

  19. Determination of sulfur trioxide in engine exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, D R

    1975-01-01

    Sulfur trioxide in the exhaust gas of an internal combustion engine is removed and concentrated by absorption in a solution of 80% isopropyl alcohol, which quantitatively absorbs it and inhibits the oxidation of any sulfur dioxide which may be absorbed. The absorbed sulfur trioxide (sulfuric acid) is determined by an absorption titration by using barium chloride as the titrant and thorin as the indicator. The sulfur dioxide content of the exhaust is measured continuously by means of a DuPont Model 411 ultraviolet photoanalyzer. PMID:50930

  20. Petroleum and diesel sulfur degradation under gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos; Calvo, Wilson Aparecido Parejo; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Duarte, Celina Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is currently the most common method used by refineries to remove sulfur compounds from petroleum fractions. However, it is not highly effective for removing thiophene compounds such as benzothiophene. Additionally, this process generates high costs for the oil industry. In the present work, ionizing radiation was used in order to study the effect on the degradation of petroleum and diesel sulfur compounds. Crude oil and diesel fuel samples were studied, without any pretreatment, and irradiated using a cobalt-60 gamma cell in a batch system at absorbed doses of 30 kGy and 50 kGy. The sulfur compounds were extracted and then analyzed by gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry (GCMS). A high efficiency of ionizing radiation was observed regarding the degradation of sulfur compounds such as benzothiophene and benzenethiol and the formation of fragments, for example 1.2-dimethylbenzene and toluene.

  1. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  2. New cysteine-S-conjugate precursors of volatile sulfur compounds in bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L. cultivar).

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Niclass, Yvan

    2011-04-13

    The objective of this study was to verify whether the volatile organic sulfur compounds recently discovered in bell pepper (Capsicum annuum, L. cultivars), such as the mercapto-ketones: 4-sulfanyl-2-heptanone and 2-sulfanyl-4-heptanone, the mercapto-alcohols: 4-sulfanyl-2-heptanol and 2-sulfanyl-4-heptanol, and heptane-2,4-dithiol, originate from their corresponding cysteine-S-conjugates. Analysis of aqueous extracts of red and green bell pepper by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode (UPLC-MS ESI(+)) displayed masses corresponding to the expected cysteine-S-conjugates. To confirm this observation, four cysteine-S-conjugates were prepared as authentic samples: S-(3-hydroxy-1-methylhexyl)-L-cysteine, S-(3-hydroxy-1-propylbutyl)-L-cysteine, S-(3-oxo-1-propylbutyl)-L-cysteine, and (2R,2'R)-3,3'-(4-hydroxyheptane-2,6-diyl)bis(sulfanediyl) bis(2-aminopropanoic acid). By comparison with the fragmentation patterns and retention times of synthetic mixtures of cysteine-S-conjugate diastereoisomers, the natural occurrence of cysteine conjugates was confirmed in bell peppers. In addition, the cysteine-S-conjugates from red and green bell pepper extracts were concentrated by ion exchange chromatography and the fractions incubated with a β-lyase (apotryptophanase). The liberated thiols were concentrated by affinity chromatography, and their occurrence, detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, confirmed our predictions. Moreover, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol was also detected and the occurrence of S-(1(2-hydroxyethyl)butyl)-L-cysteine confirmed. A quantitative estimation based on external calibration curves, established by UPLC-MS ESI(+) in selected reaction monitoring mode, showed that cysteine-S-conjugates were present at concentrations in the range of 1 to 100 μg/kg (±20%).

  3. Sulfur diagenesis in everglades peat and origin of pyrite in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Altschuler, Z.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.; Silber, C.C.; Simon, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    The pattern of sulfur transformation in peat across the Everglades basin indicates that pyrite formation in organic-rich swamps depends on the use of organic oxysulfur compounds in dissimilatory respiration by sulfur-reducing bacteria. This paragenesis explains the primary distribution of sulfur compounds in low-sulfur coals and possibly in most coals and many organic-rich soils and sediments. It also accounts for the occurrence of framboidal pyrite bound in fossil tissue in coal and sediments.

  4. Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

  5. ROLE OF SULFUR IN REDUCING PCDD AND PCDF FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past research has suggested that the presence of sulfur (S) in municipal waste combustors (MWCs) can decrease downstream formation of chlorinated organic compounds, particularly polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Thus, co-firing a...

  6. [Sulfur isotopic ratios indicating sulfur cycling in slope soils of karst areas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Cong-qiang; Li, Xiao-dong; Liu, Tao-ze; Zhang, Li-li

    2010-02-01

    Sequential extraction methods for soil sulfur were used to determine delta34 S ratios and sulfur contents of total sulfur, organic sulfur, SO4(21) and FeS2 in slope soils of karst areas. In general, FeS2 has the lowest delta34 S ratios, ranging from -6.86% per hundred to -4.229% per hundred, followed in ascending order by SO4(2-) (-2.64% per hundred - -1.34% per hundred), total sulfur (-3.25% per hundred - -1.03% per hundred) and organic sulfur (-1.63% per hundred -0.50% per hundred) in surface soils of profiles, and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms all show increasing trend with profiles deepening. Covariations of delta34 S ratios of SO4(2-) and FeS2 with increasing depth are related to SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction, while the increase in parallel of delta34 S ratios of total sulfur and organic sulfur could be resulted from organic sulfur cycling. delta34 S ratios have been extensively used to indicate sulfur sources, moreover, SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction and organic sulfur mineralization result in significant sulfur isotopic fractionation, and sulfides oxidation and SO4(2-) assimilation have no isotopic fractionation occurred, the vertical variations of delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms can therefore be good records for depth-dependant sulfur cycling processes. Furthermore, by comparing depth distributions of sulfur contents and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms, it is easily to discuss the migration of SO4(-1) and organic sulfur fractions in soil profiles.

  7. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    DOEpatents

    Dejonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; Armand, Michel B.

    1989-01-01

    An novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200.degree. C. or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S).sub.y).sub.n wherein y=1 to 6; n=2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprisises one of more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associtated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

  8. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    DOEpatents

    DeJonghe, L.C.; Visco, S.J.; Mailhe, C.C.; Armand, M.B.

    1988-03-31

    A novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200/degree/C or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S)/sub y/)n wherein y = 1 to 6; n = 2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprises one or more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon. 4 figs.

  9. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; Armand, Michel B.

    1988-03-01

    A novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200 C or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S) sub y) n wherein y = 1 to 6; n = 2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprises one or more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

  10. Comparative aspects of sulfur mineralization in sediments of a eutrophic lake basin.

    PubMed

    King, G M; Klug, M J

    1982-06-01

    The net mineralization of organic sulfur compounds in surface sediments of Wintergreen Lake was estimated from a mass-balance budget of sulfur inputs and sediment sulfur concentrations. The net mineralization of organic sulfur inputs is <50% complete, which is consistent with the dominance of organic sulfur (>80% of total sulfur) in sediment. Although sediment sulfur is predominantly organic, sulfate reduction is the most significant process in terms of the quantities of sulfur transformed in surface sediments. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/m per day. On an annual basis, this rate is 19-fold greater than net rates of organic sulfur mineralization and 65-fold greater than sulfate ester hydrolysis.

  11. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfurmore » were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.« less

  12. Metal specificity in DNA damage prevention by sulfur antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Battin, Erin E; Brumaghim, Julia L

    2008-12-01

    Metals such as CuI and FeII generate hydroxyl radical (.OH) by reducing endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Because antioxidants can ameliorate metal-mediated oxidative damage, we have quantified the ability of glutathione, a primary intracellular antioxidant, and other biological sulfur-containing compounds to inhibit metal-mediated DNA damage caused hydroxyl radical. In the CuI/H2O2 system, six sulfur compounds, including both reduced and oxidized glutathione, inhibited DNA damage with IC50 values ranging from 3.4 to 12.4 microM. Glutathione and 3-carboxypropyl disulfide also demonstrated significant antioxidant activity with FeII and H2O2. Additional gel electrophoresis and UV-vis spectroscopy studies confirm that antioxidant activity for sulfur compounds in the CuI system is attributed to metal coordination, a previously unexplored mechanism. The antioxidant mechanism for sulfur compounds in the FeII system, however, is unlike that of CuI. Our results demonstrate that glutathione and other sulfur compounds are potent antioxidants capable of preventing metal-mediated oxidative DNA damage at well below their biological concentrations. This novel metal-binding antioxidant mechanism may play a significant role in the antioxidant behavior of these sulfur compounds and help refine understanding of glutathione function in vivo. PMID:18675460

  13. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  14. Analytical method for the evaluation of sulfur functionalities in American coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, A.

    1983-05-01

    This investigation consisted of the following 6 tasks: (1) improve the instrumentation for the sulfur functional groups analysis and make it more reliable. (2) create a set of reference standards of sulfur-containing compounds. (3) examine the sulfur groups distribution in untreated and desulfurized coals. (4) examine the sulfur functionalities in raw and processed coals, i.e., liquefied coals. (5) determine the distribution of sulfur functionalities in modified coals. (6) prepare computer programs for calculations related to the distribution of sulfur functional groups in coal. Each task is discussed and results are presented. Appendix A contains the computer program used to interpret the data. 31 references, 56 figures, 17 tables.

  15. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  16. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Frost, J.K.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.

    1993-12-31

    The Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC) has reported a precombustion coal desulfurization process using perchloroethylene (PCE) at 120 C to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur. The purposes of this research were to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization and to verify the ASTM forms-of-sulfur determination for evaluation of the process. An additional goal was to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. A laboratory scale operation of the MWOPC PCE desulfurization process was demonstrated, and a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal was developed. The authors have determined that PCE desulfurization removed mainly elemental sulfur from coal. The higher the level of coal oxidization, the larger the amount of elemental sulfur that is removed by PCE extraction. The increased elemental sulfur during short-term preoxidation is found to be pH dependent and is attributed to coal pyrite oxidation under acidic (pH < 2) conditions. The non-ASTM sulfur analyses confirmed the hypothesis that the elemental sulfur produced by oxidation of pyrite complicates the interpretation of analytical data for PCE process evaluations when only the ASTM forms-of-sulfur is used. When the ASTM method is used alone, the elemental sulfur removed during PCE desulfurization is counted as organic sulfur. A study using model compounds suggests that mild preoxidation treatment of coal described by MWOPC for removal of organic sulfur does not produce enough oxidized organic sulfur to account for the amounts of sulfur removal reported. Furthermore, when oxidation of coal-like organosulfur compounds does occur, the products are inconsistent with production of elemental sulfur, the product reported by MWOPC. Overall, it is demonstrated that the PCE process is not suitable for organic sulfur removal.

  17. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  18. Some thoughts on GAIA and the sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelock, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data hypothesis states that the composition, oxidation reduction state, and temperature of the troposphere are actively regulated by the biota for the biota. One of the early predictions of the Gaia hypothesis was that there should be a sulfur compound made by the biota in the oceans. It would need to be stable enough against oxidation in water to allow its transfer to the air. Either the sulfur compound itself or its atmospheric oxidation product would have to return sulfur from the sea to the land surfaces. The most likely candidate for this role was dimethyl sulfide. Another sulfur compound of interest from a Gaian viewpoint CS2 (carbon disulfide) is discussed. Theories on the production of dimethyl sulfide and carbon disulfide related to the Gaian hypothesis are examined.

  19. World petroleum-derived sulfur production

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, A.

    1982-08-02

    Research efforts in new uses for sulfur, among them those of the Sulfur Development Institute of Canada, have resulted in the development of several new product markets. Petroleum and natural gas derived sulfurs are finding use as asphalt extenders in road construction throughout North America and as concrete extenders and substitutes for Portland cement in the construction industries of Mexico and the Middle East. Their use in masonry blocks is now being commercialized. Canada is the world's largest producer of commercial sulfur; 80% of it is used as a processing chemical in the form of sulfuric acid. Saudi Arabia, recently having begun to commercialize its vast resources, is constructing plants for the extraction of sulfur from natural gas and plans to export between 6 and 7 x 10/sup 5/ tons annually, much of it for fertilizer manufacture to India, Tunisia, Italy, Pakistan, Greece, Morocco, and Thailand.

  20. Prebiotic Synthesis of Methionine and Other Sulfur-Containing Organic Compounds on the Primitive Earth: A Contemporary Reassessment Based on an Unpublished 1958 Stanley Miller Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Eric T.; Cleaves, H. James; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Original extracts from an unpublished 1958 experiment conducted by the late Stanley L. Miller were recently found and analyzed using modern state-of-the-art analytical methods. The extracts were produced by the action of an electric discharge on a mixture of methane (CH4), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Racemic methionine was farmed in significant yields, together with other sulfur-bearing organic compounds. The formation of methionine and other compounds from a model prebiotic atmosphere that contained H2S suggests that this type of synthesis is robust under reducing conditions, which may have existed either in the global primitive atmosphere or in localized volcanic environments on the early Earth. The presence of a wide array of sulfur-containing organic compounds produced by the decomposition of methionine and cysteine indicates that in addition to abiotic synthetic processes, degradation of organic compounds on the primordial Earth could have been important in diversifying the inventory of molecules of biochemical significance not readily formed from other abiotic reactions, or derived from extraterrestrial delivery.

  1. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  2. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  3. Monitoring of sulfuric acid episodes in St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Cobourn, W.G.; Djukic-Husar, J.; Husar, R.B.

    1980-08-20

    During July 1977 and again in February 1978 in St. Louis, Missouri, episodes of about 3-day duration occurred in which sulfuric acid persisted as part of the regional haze aerosol. These sulfuric acid episodes were monitored with 15-min time resolution by a thermal analysis--flame photometric detection particulate sulfur monitor. The measurement technique detects the concentration of total particulate sulfur as well as the fraction as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. However, it cannot distinguish between (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/; thus it is not specific for the detection of total hydrogen ion concentration associated with particulate sulfur. In the summer, July--August 1977, total particulate sulfur average was 3.8 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/, and the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (measured as sulfur) average was below 0.5 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/, while in the winter, February--March 1978, it was 3.2 and 0.8 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/, respectively. During the summer episode the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (as sulfur) peaked at about 10 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/, compared to a total particulate sulfur peak concentration of 20 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/. During the winter episode the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentration peaked at about 4 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/, compared to a particulate sulfur peak concentration of 6 ..mu..gS/m/sup 3/. Daily average particulate sulfur and light scattering from July--August 1977 and February--March 1978 show a strong correlation (r>0.8). There were several general differences between the summer and winter data which suggest chemical and physical changes in the atmospheric aerosol. Analysis of the summer data revealed overall diurnal patterns in particulate sulfur and acidity, but these patterns did not show up with the winter data. The strong correlation between light scattering and particulate sulfur indicates that sulfur compounds play a prominent role in visibility degradation by fine particles.

  4. Iron sulfur and iron molybdenum sulfur compounds: Comparison of molecular orbital calculations and spin-Hamiltonian analysis of Mössbauer spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautwein, A. X.; Bill, E.; Bläs, R.; Lauer, S.; Winkler, H.; Kostikas, A.

    1985-04-01

    The electronic structures of mononuclear Fe-S complexes with a FeIIS4 core and of binuclear Fe-Mo-S complexes containing the FeS2Mo core have been calculated by a semiempirical molecular orbital method (iterative extended Hückel theory), followed by a spin-orbit coupling calculation on the five highest occupied iron-like molecular orbitals. Fine structure and hyperfine structure tensors and parameters (g, D, E, A, and electric field gradient) have been calculated and compared with data from spin-Hamiltonian analysis of Mössbauer measurements. For the mononuclear complex anions [Fe(SPh)4]2- and [Fe(dts)2]2- it was found that Vẑẑ is negative, D positive, and that the magnetic anisotropy places the preferred direction of the hyperfine magnetic field perpendicular to the Vẑẑ direction in agreement with spin-Hamiltonian results. The similarity of parameters of [Fe(SPh)4]2- and reduced rubredoxin (Rdred) confirms the suggestion that this anion has a ground electronic state practically identical to Rdred. The complex anion [Fe(dts)2]2- shows smaller anisotropy, and due to the fact that the orbital ground state is energetically not well separated from higher states in this case a strong temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting is observed. For the binuclear complex anions [(SPh)2FeS2MoS2]2-, [S5FeS2MoS2]2-, and [Cl2FeS2MoS2]2- it was found that d is negative and Vẑẑ is positive. A specific feature of these binuclear Fe-Mo-S complexes is that Vẑẑ is directed perpendicular to the Fe-Mo line. (This theoretical result is confirmed by single crystal Mössbauer studies on [Cl2FeS2MoS2]2-; see the following paper in this journal.) The preferred direction of the magnetic hyperfine field is close to the Vẑẑ axis. The correlation of calculated values of ρ(0) and isomer shifts for mononuclear and binuclear compounds confirms the role of MoS2-4 as a charge withdrawing ligand.

  5. Doped carbon-sulfur species nanocomposite cathode for Li--S batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Donghai; Xu, Tianren; Song, Jiangxuan

    2015-12-29

    We report a heteroatom-doped carbon framework that acts both as conductive network and polysulfide immobilizer for lithium-sulfur cathodes. The doped carbon forms chemical bonding with elemental sulfur and/or sulfur compound. This can significantly inhibit the diffusion of lithium polysulfides in the electrolyte, leading to high capacity retention and high coulombic efficiency.

  6. Are the clouds of Venus sulfuric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that strong aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have the right refractive index and freeze at Venusian cloud temperature, explain the dryness of the Venusian stratosphere, are consistent with some features of the Venusian IR spectrum, and do not absorb in highly reflecting areas of Venus. It is also indicated that such solutions should be produced by reactions between known atmospheric constituents and most sulfur-bearing rock at the Venusian surface temperature, and require only small amounts of sulfur consistent with its cosmic abundance and with the amounts of other volatile elements present in the atmosphere. It is believed therefore that the clouds of Venus consist of sulfuric acid solutions.

  7. Elemental sulfur in Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinds, Jim S.; Cunningham, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur has been reported in Eddy County, N. Mex., in rocks ranging from Silurian to Holocene in age at depths of 0-15,020 feet. Targets of present exploration are Permian formations in the Delaware Basin and northwest shelf areas at depths of less than 4,000 feet. Most of the reported sulfur occurrences in the shelf area are in the 'Abo' (as used by some subsurface geologists), Yeso, and San Andres Formations and the Artesia Group. Sulfur deposition in the dense dolomites of the 'Abo,' Yeso, and San Andres Formations is attributed to the reduction of ionic sulfate by hydrogen sulfide in formation waters in zones of preexisting porosity and permeability. A similar origin accounts for most of the sulfur deposits in the formations of the Artesia Group, but some of the sulfur in these formations may have originated in place through the alteration of anhydrite to carbonate and sulfur by the metabolic processes of bacteria in the presence of hydrocarbons. Exploration in the Delaware Basin area is directed primarily toward the Castile Formation. Sulfur deposits in the Castile Formation are found in irregular masses of cavernous brecciated secondary carbonate rock enveloped by impermeable anhydrite. The carbonate masses, or 'castiles,' probably originated as collapse features resulting from subsurface solution and upward stopping. Formation of carbonate rock and sulfur in the castiles is attributed to the reduction of brecciated anhydrite by bacteria and hydrocarbons in the same process ascribed to the formation of carbonate and sulfur in the caprocks of salt domes.

  8. Sulfur and hydrogen isotope anomalies in meteorite sulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Thiemens, M H; Jackson, T L; Chang, S

    1997-08-22

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  9. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  10. Development of the Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, William A.; Steimke, John L

    2005-09-23

    The production of hydrogen via the thermochemical splitting of water is being considered as a primary means for utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors to provide fuel for a hydrogen economy. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is one of the baseline candidates identified by the U.S. Department of Energy [1] for this purpose. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that only involves sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen compounds. Recent work has resulted in an improved process design with a calculated overall thermal efficiency (nuclear heat to hydrogen, higher heating value basis) approaching 50%. Economic analyses indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant employing the HyS Process in conjunction with an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor system can produce hydrogen at competitive prices. Experimental work has begun on the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer, the major developmental component in the cycle. Proof-of-concept tests have established proton-exchange-membrane cells (a state-of-the-art technology) as a viable approach for conducting this reaction. This is expected to lead to more efficient and economical cell designs than were previously available. Considerable development and scale-up issues remain to be resolved, but the development of a viable commercial-scale HyS Process should be feasible in time to meet the commercialization schedule for Generation IV gas-cooled nuclear reactors.

  11. Sulfur recovery process including removal of residual sulfur from Claus catalyst after regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cabanaw, B.E.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur. It comprises: passing an acid gas feedstream having as a sulfur species essentially only hydrogen sulfide therein to a Claus plant comprising a thermal conversion zone and at least one Claus catalytic reaction zone operated under adsorption conditions including temperature for forming and depositing a preponderance of sulfur formed on catalyst therein.

  12. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen sulfide... gas containing a total sulfur content expressed as hydrogen sulfide in excess of 350 grains...

  13. Binding mechanism of sulfur and dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile in sulfur/polymer composite cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, The Nam Long; Ghaznavi, Mahmoudreza; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Konarov, Aishuak; Sadhu, Mikhail; Tangirala, Ravichandra; Chen, P.

    2013-11-01

    A composite consisting of sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile is one of the most promising cathode materials for use in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries. However, the reported sulfur contents have been low, less than 50 wt%, which compromise the intrinsic high specific capacity and energy of elemental sulfur and hence decrease significantly the specific energy of the composite. To identify the potential to further increase the sulfur content, we elucidate the binding mechanism of sulfur and polyacrylonitrile in their composite. The heat treatment experiments at varying timespans with excess sulfur showed a constancy of sulfur content after a critical length of timespan, indicating the saturation of sulfur in the structure of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. Based on molecular structure and size consideration, it is proposed that the binding involves the formation of an 8 membered ring of sulfur embedded between 4 heterocyclic rings of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. From this model and experimental results, we show that there exists an upper limit of sulfur content in the sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile composite at 56 wt%.

  14. Inhibition by polyphenolic phytochemicals and sulfurous compounds of the formation of 8-chloroguanosine mediated by hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Toshinori; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) of activated neutrophils can react with nucleic acid bases to form chlorinated nucleosides such as 8-chloroguanosine (Cl-Guo). Chlorination is enhanced by nicotine. We investigated the effects of various natural antioxidants including polyphenolic phytochemicals on the formation of Cl-Guo by HOCl in the presence and the absence of nicotine. Polyphenols, including catechins, curcumin, resveratrol, silibinin, and sulfurous compound α-lipoic acid, were found to inhibit both HOCl- and human MPO-induced Cl-Guo formation dose-dependently. Among the test compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Cl-Guo formation, mediated by activated human neutrophils in the presence of nicotine, was inhibited by EGCG, silibinin, and α-lipoic acid. These results suggest that polyphenols and sulfurous compounds have the potential to inhibit the induction of nucleobase damage mediated by chlorination, with possible application to reducing DNA damage associated with inflammation and cigarette-smoke inhalation. PMID:23221717

  15. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  16. Sulfur-bridged BODIPY DYEmers.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Johannes; Böker, Birte; Brandhorst, Kai; Funk, Markus; Bröring, Martin

    2013-08-19

    Reactions of BODIPY monomers with sulfur nucleophiles and electrophiles result in the formation of new BODIPY dimers. Mono- and disulfur bridges are established, and the new dyestuff molecules were studied with respect to their structural, optical, and electrochemical properties. X-ray diffraction analyses reveal individual angulated orientations of the BODIPY subunits in all cases. DFT calculations provide solution conformers of the DYEmers which deviate in a specific manner from the crystallographic results. Clear exciton-like splittings are observed in the absorption spectra, with maxima at up to 628 nm, in combination with the expected weak fluorescence in polar solvents. A strong communication between the BODIPY subunits was detected by cyclic voltammetry, where two separated one-electron oxidation and reduction waves with peak-to-peak potential differences of 120-400 mV are observed. The qualitative applicability of the exciton model by Kasha for the interpretation of the absorption spectral shape with respect to the conformational state, subunit orientation and distance, and conjugation through the different sulfur bridges, is discussed in detail for the new BODIPY derivatives. This work is part of our concept of DYEmers, where the covalent oligomerisation of BODIPY-type dye molecules with close distances is leading to new functional dyes with predictable properties. PMID:23843344

  17. Contribution of Gulf Area natural sulfur to the North American sulfur budget

    SciTech Connect

    Luria, M.; Van Valin, C.C.; Wellman, D.L.; Pueschel, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of natural sulfur compounds from the Gulf of Mexico to the overall North American sulfur budget two series of air sampling flights were performed over the gulf area. Total aerosol mass load and sulfate concentration data indicate, in agreement with our previous findings on gas-phase products, that these observations can be divided into two categories. One group of measurements was taken under offshore airflow and the other under onshore flow conditions. From the measurements performed under clean (onshore) flow, average inside boundary layer SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ concentrations were evaluated. Using these data, together with our previously reported dimethyl sulfide levels, a simple model was developed to estimate the sulfur flux transported northward from the gulf area. Upper and lower limits of this contribution are estimated at 0.25 and 0.04 Tg (S) year/sup -1/, respectively. Although this quantity is relatively low compared with the national US anthropogenic emission, it has significance for the global sulfur cycle, and it can cause a significant acidification of cloud water. 24 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Using remotely sensed information to interpret the distribution of some volatile organic sulfur compounds in the upper ocean along an Atlantic meridional transect (AMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.; Rhee, T. S.; von Hobe, Marc; Andreae, M. O.

    2000-12-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds from an Atlantic Meridional Transect of the RRS James Clark Ros are presented together with optical data and upper ocean chlorophyl data. The latitudinal distribution of DMS and CH3SH is consistent with a biological source with low values in oligotrophic areas and high values in coastal regions. The DMS/CH3SH ratio shows systematic variation between oligotrophic and coastal areas and seems to correlate inversely with absorbance and fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter. The latitudinal distribution of COS and CS2 conform with existing models based on known sources and sinks of these compounds. A system of photochemical provinces is developed for these compounds based on a previously published scheme. An estimate of the global distribution of these provinces is made based on data archives and remotely sensed data.

  19. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y

    2015-05-05

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  20. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences sulfur starvation responses of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniela; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Devers, Emanuel A; Brueckner, Franziska; Hoefgen, Rainer; Krajinski, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is a mutualistic interaction that occurs between the large majority of vascular plants and fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. In addition to other nutrients, sulfur compounds are symbiotically transferred from AM fungus to host plants; however, the physiological importance of mycorrhizal-mediated sulfur for plant metabolism has not yet been determined. We applied different sulfur and phosphate fertilization treatments to Medicago truncatula and investigated whether mycorrhizal colonization influences leaf metabolite composition and the expression of sulfur starvation-related genes. The expression pattern of sulfur starvation-related genes indicated reduced sulfur starvation responses in mycorrhizal plants grown at 1 mM phosphate nutrition. Leaf metabolite concentrations clearly showed that phosphate stress has a greater impact than sulfur stress on plant metabolism, with no demand for sulfur at strong phosphate starvation. However, when phosphate nutrition is high enough, mycorrhizal colonization reduces sulfur stress responses, probably as a result of symbiotic sulfur uptake. Mycorrhizal colonization is able to reduce sulfur starvation responses in M. truncatula when the plant's phosphate status is high enough that sulfur starvation is of physiological importance. This clearly shows the impact of mycorrhizal sulfur transfer on plant metabolism.

  1. Density functional theory study of sulfur tolerance of copper: New copper-sulfur phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Bai, Kewu; Kulish, Vadym V.; Wu, Ping; Chen, Zhong

    2012-04-01

    We study two possible mechanisms of sulfur (S) poisoning of copper (Cu) surfaces: S adsorption and formation of Cu-S compounds. Based on the performed calculations, we predict new Cu-S phase diagram that not only describes the formation of Cu-S compounds but also predicts a dependence of the transition temperature between clean and contaminated Cu surfaces on partial pressure ratio of H2 and H2S (PH2/PH2S). Since conditions under which sulfur sorbs and desorbs at Cu surfaces cannot be predicted directly from the classical thermodynamic database, our study enhances current understanding of Cu-S interaction and mechanisms of S poisoning of Cu-based catalysts.

  2. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  3. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  4. Stability of sulfur slopes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clow, G. D.; Carr, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical properties of elemental sulfur are such that the upper crust of Io cannot be primarily sulfur. For heat flows in the range 100-1000 ergs/sq cm sec sulfur becomes ductile within several hundred meters of the surface and would prevent the formation of calderas with depths greater than this. However, the one caldera for which precise depth data are available is 2 km deep, and this value may be typical. A study of the mechanical equilibrium of simple slopes shows that the depth to the zone of rapid ductile flow strongly controls the maximum heights for sulfur slopes. Sulfur scarps with heights greater than 1 km will fail for all heat flows greater than 180 ergs/sq cm sec and slope angles greater than 22.5 deg. The observed relief on Io is inconsistent with that anticipated for a predominantly sulfur crust. However, a silicate crust with several percent sulfur included satisfies both the mechanical constraints and the observed presence of sulfur on Io.

  5. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  6. Sulfur extended asphalt pavement evaluation: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    This summary report overviews two previously issued study reports. One report assesses The availability and pricing of sulfur with respect to sulfur extended asphalt (SEA) paving mixture is assessed. A laboratory oriented testing program which was principally used to examine the durability and aging characteristics of SEA paving mixtures is reported.

  7. Sulfur in Distillers Grains for Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential element needed by animals for many functions. About 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur. It is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine; in chondroitin sulfate of cartilage; and in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. Methionine, thiam...

  8. Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2006-12-26

    High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

  9. Fate of excess sulfur in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rennenberg, H.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms which have evolved in higher plants to cope with excess sulfur in their environments are reviewed. Survival in a sulfur-rich environment is seldom achieved through avoidance of the intake of sulfur. The presence of excess sulfur in the soil or in the air usually results in an intake of excess sulfur into plants. An immediate injury by the excess sulfur taken up is, however, prevented by a series of metabolic processes. Storage of excess sulfur in a metabolically inactive compartment, i.e. the vacuole, appears to occur in most plants. The finding of a storage of glutathione is several investigations suggests that with increasing accumulation of sulfate its reduction also increases. Under these conditions the cysteine concentration in different compartments of the cell may still be maintained at a low level by the incorporation of the excess cysteine synthesized into glutathione. This peptide appears to be the storage form of reduced sulfur in higher plants. 167 references, 2 figures.

  10. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  11. Temperature anisotropy of the Jovian sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.; Mekler, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The apparent paradox between the reported observation of a 3-eV gyration energy of Jupiter's ionized sulfur nebula and its observed thickness is discussed. An observation of the thickness of the cloud taken nearly edge-on is presented and shown to imply a large bounce-averaged anisotropy of the sulfur in temperature. These observations are used to construct a self-consistent model of the sulfur nebula in which the sulfur ions are injected by Io as ions and remain sufficiently collisionless in the magnetosphere to maintain the anisotropy for a time longer than a characteristic diffusion time. It is also shown that the proton-electron plasma is collisionally thermalized and provides an adequate means of tapping the rotational energy of the planet to provide the power radiated in the sulfur lines.

  12. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  13. Seawater sulfur isotope fluctuations in the Cretaceous.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Kastner, Miriam; Campbell, Douglas; Thiemens, Mark H

    2004-06-11

    The exogenic sulfur cycle is tightly coupled with the carbon and oxygen cycles, and therefore a central component of Earth's biogeochemistry. Here we present a high-resolution record of the sulfur isotopic composition of seawater sulfate for the Cretaceous. The general enrichment of isotopically light sulfur that prevailed during the Cretaceous may have been due to increased volcanic and hydrothermal activity. Two excursions toward isotopically lighter sulfur represent periods of lower rates of pyrite burial, implying a shift in the location of organic carbon burial to terrestrial or open-ocean settings. The concurrent changes in seawater sulfur and inorganic carbon isotopic compositions imply short-term variability in atmospheric oxygen partial pressure.

  14. Process and apparatus for recovery of sulfur from ammonia containing acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a Claus process for the recovery of sulfur, the steps comprising: passing a first stream containing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, and ammonia through a low temperature Claus catalytic conversion zone and depositing elemental sulfur and ammonium compounds on catalyst therein; deriving a regeneration stream from the Claus process and regenerating the resulting laden catalyst therewith vaporizing sulfur and ammonia therefrom and producing a regeneration effluent stream comprising elemental sulfur and ammonia; cooling the regeneration effluent stream and condensing elemental sulfur therefrom and producing a sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream; introducing at least a portion of the sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream into a hydrogenation zone and converting substantially all sulfur compounds therein to hydrogen sulfide. The resulting hydrogen sulfide containing stream is introduced into an ammonia removal zone. The resulting stream is contacted with a first aqueous stream and produces a second aqueous stream enriched in ammonia and a sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream reduced in ammonia content; removing ammonia from the second aqueous stream and producing an ammonia enriched stream; returning the sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream reduced in ammonia content to the Claus process adjacent and downstream of the point of derivation of the regeneration stream for the further recovery of sulfur therefrom; and introducing the ammonia enriched stream into an ammonia conversion zone and reducing the concentration of ammonia therein.

  15. Metabolism of L-methionine linked to the biosynthesis of volatile organic sulfur-containing compounds during the submerged fermentation of Tuber melanosporum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Sang; Zhou, Huan; Li, Hong-Mei; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2013-12-01

    Tuber melanosporum, known as the black diamond of cuisine, is highly appreciated for its unique and characteristic aroma, which is mainly due to its volatile organic sulfur-containing compounds (VOSCs). In this work, by adding 5 g/L L-methionine to the fermentation medium, the activities of aminotransferase and α-ketoacid decarboxylase were significantly enhanced by 103 and 250%, respectively, while the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and demethiolase were decreased by 277 and 39%. Then, the six VOSCs, i.e., methanethiol (MTL), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), 3-(methylthio)propanal (methional), and 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol (methionol), were first detected in the submerged fermentation of T. melanosporum. These results indicated that the biosynthesis of VOSCs was triggered by aminotransferase and α-ketoacid decarboxylase. The production of methional and methionol increased with the increased concentrations of L-methionine (i.e., 5, 10, 15, and 20 g/L) before day 4 of the culture protocol, and methionol was the major product in the Ehrlich pathway. The production of MTL was significantly decreased after day 4 with a significantly increased DMDS, and DMDS was the major product of the demethiolation pathway. Compared with the demethiolation pathway with a total flux of sulfur of 11.33-24.32 μM, the Ehrlich pathway with a total flux of sulfur of 6,149-10,330 μM was considered the major pathway for the biosynthesis of VOSCs. This is the first report linking the metabolism of L-methionine to the biosynthesis of VOSCs by the Ehrlich and demethiolation pathways during the submerged fermentation of T. melanosporum.

  16. Isotopic composition and concentration of sulfur in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Thiemens, M. H.

    1993-07-01

    New sulfur isotopic ratio measurements are reported for seven carbonaceous chondrites. Newly developed procedures permit measurement of delta S-33, delta S-34, and delta S-36 at precisions significantly greater than previously reported. A search for S-36 nucleosynthetic anomalies coproduced with anomalies in, for example, Ti-50 and Ca-48 was negative. The high endemic sulfur concentration probably dilutes any S-36 anomaly, and separation of individual sulfur phases may be needed to identify S-36 carrier phases. Large internal isotopic variations are observed, deriving from parent body and possibly nebular processes. Chondrule separates from Allende demonstrate isotopic compositions which vary as a function of diameter. High-temperature gas-solid exchange and a two-component mixing model may account for the observations. High-resolution isotopic data and structural information are reported for organic sulfur compounds separated by chemical extractions. The insoluble organics appear to be of either aliphatic or alicyclic structure and are dominant phases.

  17. Development of instrumental methods of analysis of sulfur compounds in coal process streams. Quarterly technical progress report for October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.; Stutts, J. D.; Ankabrandt, S. J.; Stahl, J.; Yakupkovic, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Work is in progress on the preparation of a user-oriented computer software manual, for estimating sulfur speciation in aqueous coal process streams form a thermodynamic data base. Capabilities and limitations of sulfide and polysulfide analysis by differential pulse polarography at a dropping mercury anode are assessed critically. Thallous nitrate used as the titrant reagent in a thermometric enthalpy titration yields the molar sum of monosulfide and polysulfide. Inorganic sulfur has been successfully speciated in coal conversion by-product water samples. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, thermometric enthalpy titrations and classical methods was used. One hundred percent of the total sulfur present was quantitatively accounted for.

  18. Enhancement of the fungicidal activity of amphotericin B by allicin, an allyl-sulfur compound from garlic, against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Akira; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-10-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a representative antibiotic for the control of serious fungal infections, and its fungicidal activity was greatly enhanced by allicin, an allyl-sulfur compound from garlic. In addition to the plasma membrane permeability change, AmB induced vacuole membrane damage so that the organelles were visible as small discrete particles. Although allicin was ineffective in promoting AmB-induced plasma membrane disability, this compound enhanced AmB-induced structural damage to the vacuolar membrane even at a non-lethal dose of the antibiotic. Allicin could also enhance the antifungal activity of AmB against the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and against Aspergillus fumigatus. In contrast, allicin did not enhance the cytotoxic activity of AmB against cells of human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60), a vacuole-less organism.

  19. Process for preparing a sulfurized molybdenum-containing composition and lubricating oil containing said composition

    SciTech Connect

    Devries, L.; King, J.M.

    1981-08-11

    Antioxidant additives for lubricating oil are prepared by combining a polar promoter, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and a basic nitrogen compound complex to form a sulfur- and molybdenumcontaining composition.

  20. Magnetic effects in sulfur-decorated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Choongyu; Cybart, Shane A.; Shin, S. J.; Kim, Sooran; Kim, Kyoo; Rappoport, T. G.; Wu, S. M.; Jozwiak, C.; Fedorov, A. V.; Mo, S.-K.; Lee, D.-H.; Min, B. I.; Haller, E. E.; Dynes, R. C.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between two different materials can present novel phenomena that are quite different from the physical properties observed when each material stands alone. Strong electronic correlations, such as magnetism and superconductivity, can be produced as the result of enhanced Coulomb interactions between electrons. Two-dimensional materials are powerful candidates to search for the novel phenomena because of the easiness of arranging them and modifying their properties accordingly. In this work, we report magnetic effects in graphene, a prototypical non-magnetic two-dimensional semi-metal, in the proximity with sulfur, a diamagnetic insulator. In contrast to the well-defined metallic behaviour of clean graphene, an energy gap develops at the Fermi energy for the graphene/sulfur compound with decreasing temperature. This is accompanied by a steep increase of the resistance, a sign change of the slope in the magneto-resistance between high and low fields, and magnetic hysteresis. A possible origin of the observed electronic and magnetic responses is discussed in terms of the onset of low-temperature magnetic ordering. These results provide intriguing insights on the search for novel quantum phases in graphene-based compounds. PMID:26888720

  1. Magnetic effects in sulfur-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Choongyu; Cybart, Shane A.; Shin, S. J.; Kim, Sooran; Kim, Kyoo; Rappoport, T. G.; Wu, S. M.; Jozwiak, C.; Fedorov, A. V.; Mo, S.-K.; Lee, D.-H.; Min, B. I.; Haller, E. E.; Dynes, R. C.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between two different materials can present novel phenomena that are quite different from the physical properties observed when each material stands alone. Strong electronic correlations, such as magnetism and superconductivity, can be produced as the result of enhanced Coulomb interactions between electrons. Two-dimensional materials are powerful candidates to search for the novel phenomena because of the easiness of arranging them and modifying their properties accordingly. In this work, we report magnetic effects in graphene, a prototypical non-magnetic two-dimensional semi-metal, in the proximity with sulfur, a diamagnetic insulator. In contrast to the well-defined metallic behaviour of clean graphene, an energy gap develops at the Fermi energy for the graphene/sulfur compound with decreasing temperature. This is accompanied by a steep increase of the resistance, a sign change of the slope in the magneto-resistance between high and low fields, and magnetic hysteresis. A possible origin of the observed electronic and magnetic responses is discussed in terms of the onset of low-temperature magnetic ordering. These results provide intriguing insights on the search for novel quantum phases in graphene-based compounds.

  2. Sulfur nanocrystals anchored graphene composite with highly improved electrochemical performance for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Zimin; Wang, Xiuli; Zhao, Xuyang; Tu, Jiangping; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of graphene-sulfur composites with 50 wt% of sulfur are prepared using hydrothermal method and thermal mixing, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectra mapping show that sulfur nanocrystals with size of ∼5 nm dispersed on graphene sheets homogeneously for the sample prepared by hydrothermal method (NanoS@G). While for the thermal mixed graphene-sulfur composite (S-G mixture), sulfur shows larger and uneven size (50-200 nm). X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) reveals the strong chemical bonding between the sulfur nanocrystals and graphene. Comparing with the S-G mixture, the NanoS@G composite shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The NanoS@G composite delivers an initial capacity of 1400 mAh g-1 with the sulfur utilization of 83.7% at a current density of 335 mA g-1. The capacity keeps above 720 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles. The strong adherence of the sulfur nanocrystals on graphene immobilizes sulfur and polysulfides species and suppressed the "shuttle effect", resulting higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention. Electrochemical impedance also suggests that the strong bonding enabled rapid electronic/ionic transport and improved electrochemical kinetics, therefore good rate capability is obtained. These results demonstrate that the NanoS@G composite is a very promising candidate for high-performance Li-S batteries.

  3. A mesoporous carbon–sulfur composite as cathode material for high rate lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunji; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • CMK-3 mesoporous carbon was synthesized as conducting reservoir for housing sulfur. • Sulfur/CMK-3 composites were prepared by two-stage thermal treatment. • The composite at 300 °C for 20 h shows improved electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Sulfur composite was prepared by encapsulating sulfur into CMK-3 mesoporous carbon with different heating times and then used as the cathode material for lithium sulfur batteries. Thermal treatment at 300 °C plays an important role in the sulfur encapsulation process. With 20 h of heating time, a portion of sulfur remained on the surface of carbon, whereas with 60 h of heating time, sulfur is confined deeply in the small pores of carbon that cannot be fully exploited in the redox reaction, thus causing low capacity. The S/CMK-3 composite with thermal treatment for 40 h at 300 °C contained 51.3 wt.% sulfur and delivered a high initial capacity of 1375 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C. Moreover, it showed good capacity retention of 704 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 578 mA h g{sup −1} at 2 C even after 100 cycles, which proves its potential as a cathode material for high capability lithium sulfur batteries.

  4. Sodium sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca R.; Minck, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries were identified as the most likely successor to nickel-hydrogen batteries for space applications. One advantage of the Na/S battery system is that the usable specific energy is two to three times that of nickel-hydrogen batteries. This represents a significant launch cost savings or increased payload mass capabilities. Sodium-sulfur batteries support NASA OAST's proposed Civil Space Technology Initiative goal of a factor of two improvement in spacecraft power system performance, as well as the proposed Spacecraft 2000 initiative. The sodium-sulfur battery operates at between 300 and 400 C, using liquid sodium and sulfur/polysulfide electrodes and solid ceramic electrolyte. The transport of the electrode materials to the surface of the electrolyte is through wicking/capillary forces. These critical transport functions must be demonstrated under actual microgravity conditions before sodium-sulfur batteries can be confidently utilized in space. Ford Aerospace Corporation, under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center, is currently working on the sodium-sulfur battery space flight experiment definition study. The objective is to design the experiment that will demonstrate operation of the sodium-sulfur battery/cell in the space environment with particular emphasis on evaluation of microgravity effects. Experimental payload definitions were completed and preliminary designs of the experiment were defined.

  5. Combined chemical and microbiological removal of organic sulfur from coal. Technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaelian, L.A.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this work is to investigate techniques for chemically converting the sulfur containing organic compounds in coal to compounds that can be treated microbiologically to remove the organically bound sulfur. The goal is to achieve an economically feasible mild chemical oxidation of the organic sulfur in a representative Illinois Basin coal by converting the sulfur to sulfoxides and sulfones; the carbon sulfur bond in the sulfoxides and sulfones would then be broken microbiologically and the sulfur removed from the coal as sulfate.

  6. Modeling total reduced sulfur and sulfur dioxide emissions from a kraft recovery boiler using an artificial neural network, and, Investigating volatile organic compounds in an urban intermountain valley using a TD/GC/MS methodology and intrinsic tracer molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Christopher Louis

    2000-11-01

    Back-propagation neural networks were trained to predict total reduced sulfur (TRS) and SO2 emissions from kraft recovery boiler operational data. A 0.721 coefficient of correlation was achieved between actual and predicted sulfur emissions on test data withheld from network training. The artificial neural network (ANN) models found an inverse, linear relationship between TRS/SO2 emissions and percent opacity. A number of relationships among operating parameters and sulfur emissions were identified by the ANN models. These relationships were used to formulate strategies for reducing sulfur emissions. Disagreement between ANN model predictions on a subsequent data set revealed an additional scenario for sulfur release not present in the training data. ANN modeling was demonstrated to be an effective tool for analyzing process variables when balancing productivity and environmental concerns. Five receptor sites distributed in the Missoula Valley, Montana, were employed to investigate possible VOC (benzene, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-xylene, o-xylene, naphthalene, acetone, chloroform, α-pinene, β-pinene, p-cymene and limonene) sources. The most dominant source of VOCs was found to be vehicle emissions. Furthermore, anthropogenic sources of terpenoids overwhelmed biogenic emissions, on a local scale. Difficulties correlating wind direction and pollutant levels could be explained by wind direction variability, low wind speed and seasonally dependent meteorological factors. Significant evidence was compiled to support the use of p-cymene as a tracer molecule for pulp mill VOC emissions. Apportionment techniques using o-xylene and p-cymene as tracers for automobile and pulp mill emissions, respectively, were employed to estimate each source's VOC contribution. Motor vehicles were estimated to contribute between 56 and 100 percent of the aromatic pollutants in the Missoula Valley airshed, depending upon the sampling location. Pulp mill emissions

  7. New Proteins Involved in Sulfur Trafficking in the Cytoplasm of Allochromatium vinosum*

    PubMed Central

    Stockdreher, Yvonne; Sturm, Marga; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dobler, Nadine; Zigann, Renate; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The formation of periplasmic sulfur globules is an intermediate step during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in various sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. The mechanism of how this sulfur is activated and crosses the cytoplasmic membrane for further oxidation to sulfite by the dissimilatory reductase DsrAB is incompletely understood, but it has been well documented that the pathway involves sulfur trafficking mediated by sulfur-carrying proteins. So far sulfur transfer from DsrEFH to DsrC has been established. Persulfurated DsrC very probably serves as a direct substrate for DsrAB. Here, we introduce further important players in oxidative sulfur metabolism; the proteins Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 are strictly conserved in the Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, and Acidithiobacillaceae families of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and are linked to genes encoding complexes involved in sulfur oxidation (Dsr or Hdr) in the latter two. Here we show via relative quantitative real-time PCR and microarray analysis an increase of mRNA levels under sulfur-oxidizing conditions for rhd_2599, tusA, and dsrE2 in Allochromatium vinosum. Transcriptomic patterns for the three genes match those of major genes for the sulfur-oxidizing machinery rather than those involved in biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. TusA appears to be one of the major proteins in A. vinosum. A rhd_2599-tusA-dsrE2-deficient mutant strain, although not viable in liquid culture, was clearly sulfur oxidation negative upon growth on solid media containing sulfide. Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 bind sulfur atoms via conserved cysteine residues, and experimental evidence is provided for the transfer of sulfur between these proteins as well as to DsrEFH and DsrC. PMID:24648525

  8. Simple and Excellent Selective Chemiluminescence-Based CS2 On-Line Detection System for Rapid Analysis of Sulfur-Containing Compounds in Complex Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runkun; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yufei

    2015-06-01

    To study the interesting chemical reaction phenomenon can greatly contribute to the development of an innovative analytical method. In this paper, a simple CL reaction cell was constructed to study the chemiluminescence (CL) emission from the thermal oxidation of carbon disulfide (CS2). We found that the CL detection of CS2 exhibits unique characteristics of excellent selectivity and rapid response capacity. Experimental investigations together with theoretical calculation were performed to study the mechanism behind the CL reaction. The results revealed that the main luminous intermediates generated during the thermal degradation of CS2 are SO2* and CO2*. Significantly, this CL emission phenomenon has a wide application due to many sulfur-containing compounds that can convert to CS2 under special conditions. On the basis of this scheme, a CS2-generating and detection system was developed for rapid measurement of CS2 or other compounds that can convert to CS2. The usefulness of the system was demonstrated by measuring dithiocarbamate (DTC) pesticides (selected mancozeb as a representative analyte) based on the evolution of CS2 in spiked agricultural products. Results showed that the system allows online and large volume detection of CS2 under nonequilibrium condition, which greatly reduces the analytical time. The concentrations of mancozeb in the spiked samples were well-quantified with satisfied recoveries of 76.9-97.3%. The system not only addresses the urgent need for rapid in-field screening of DTC residues in foodstuffs but also opens a new opportunity for the fast, convenient, and cost-effective detection of CS2 and some other sulfur-containing compounds in complex samples. PMID:25913203

  9. Process for removing sulfur dioxide from gas

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, W.R.

    1980-06-03

    There is disclosed a process for obtaining purer sodium sulfate from a mixture of solids containing sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite. The process involves contacting an aqueous slurry of the sulfate-sulfite mixture with a sulfur dioxide-containing gas under conditions which solubilize a significant amount of the sulfite as sodium bisulfite dissolved in the liquid aqueous phase. The remaining solid phase contains sodium sulfate of greater purity than in the mixture treated with sulfur dioxide. The mixture of sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite which is purified by the process may be obtained advantageously as a purge material from a process for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream.

  10. Equity, efficiency, and sulfur emission reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Pechman, C.

    1985-05-16

    The author describes how historic legislation and regulations have led to the current sulfur emission patterns. He evaluates possible sulfur emission policy options from the perspective of equity and efficiency, the latter in terms of its allocative and productive aspects, and concludes that relying upon direct controls of emissions to meet air quality objectives is an inefficient use of resources. Regulations to protect public health create an incentive to disperse rather than reduce sulfur emissions. Reliance on market forces, including emission taxes or auctions, is efficient at a minimum cost. 23 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  12. A Carbon-Sulfur Hybrid with Pomegranate-like Structure for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanting; Lv, Wei; Niu, Shuzhang; He, Yanbing; Zhou, Guangmin; Chen, Guohua; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2016-05-01

    A carbon-sulfur hybrid with pomegranate-like core-shell structure, which demonstrates a high rate performance and relatively high cyclic stability, is obtained through carbonization of a carbon precursor in the presence of a sulfur precursor (FeS2 ) and a following oxidation of FeS2 to sulfur by HNO3 . Such a structure effectively protects the sulfur and leaves enough buffer space after Fe(3+) removal and, at the same time, has an interconnected conductive network. The capacity of the obtained hybrid is 450 mA h g(-1) under the current density of 5 C. This work provides a simple strategy to design and prepare various high-performance carbon-sulfur hybrids for lithium-sulfur batteries.

  13. Amylopectin wrapped graphene oxide/sulfur for improved cyclability of lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weidong; Chen, Hao; Yu, Yingchao; Wang, Deli; Cui, Zhiming; Disalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-10-22

    An amylopectin wrapped graphene oxide-sulfur composite was prepared to construct a 3-dimensionally cross-linked structure through the interaction between amylopectin and graphene oxide, for stabilizing lithium sulfur batteries. With the help of this cross-linked structure, the sulfur particles could be confined much better among the layers of graphene oxide and exhibited significantly improved cyclability, compared with the unwrapped graphene oxide-sulfur composite. The effect of the electrode mass loading on electrochemical performance was investigated as well. In the lower sulfur mass loading cells, such as 2 mg cm(-2), both the capacity and the efficiency were obviously better than those of the higher sulfur mass loading cells, such as 6 mg cm(-2).

  14. Effects of high salinity and constituent organic compounds on treatment of photo-processing waste by a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria/granular activated carbon sludge system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin-Le; Hosomi, Masaaki; Murakami, Akihiko

    2002-02-01

    To achieve practical treatment of photo-processing waste (PW) using our previously proposed sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB)/granular activated carbon (GAC) sludge system, this paper elucidates why 3- to 5-X dilution of PW was required. That is, a series of experiments were carried out to show the effects of high salinity and constituent organic compounds in PW, respectively. Both an inorganic salts system and calcination PW system showed that SOB completely oxidizes S2O(3)2- -S to SO(4)2- -S even at 12.3 or 13.6% salinity, respectively; hence the dilution requirement is not attributable to high salinity. In experiments employing SOB and SOB/GAC systems to investigate the effects of 23 constituent compounds in PW, compounds were classified into Groups I, II, IIIa, and IIIb. Even with 10 g/l GAC, the nine compounds in Group IIIb still exhibited a toxic effect on SOB activity at 1- and 3-X dilutions; thus it is these compounds that are responsible for requiring dilution of PW. Accordingly, a reduction in their use within the photodeveloping and fix-stabilizing industry, and/or use of > 10g/l GAC, are new considerations for establishing a more practical PW treatment process.

  15. Cyclic process for the removal of sulfur dioxide and the recovery of sulfur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.L.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a gas containing sulfur dioxide. It comprises contacting a gas containing sulfur dioxide with an aqueous solution comprising water, ferric chloride and a salt selected from the group consisting of barium chloride and calcium chloride to form ferrous chloride, hydrochloric acid and a precipitate selected from the group consisting of barium sulfate and calcium sulfate; and treating the aqueous solution with an oxidizing agent to convert ferrous chloride to ferric chloride.

  16. Mass-independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early Earth.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, J; Wing, B A; McKeegan, K D; Harris, J W; Cartigny, P; Thiemens, M H

    2002-12-20

    Populations of sulfide inclusions in diamonds from the Orapa kimberlite pipe in the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton, Botswana, preserve mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations. The data indicate that material was transferred from the atmosphere to the mantle in the Archean. The data also imply that sulfur is not well mixed in the diamond source regions, allowing for reconstruction of the Archean sulfur cycle and possibly offering insight into the nature of mantle convection through time.

  17. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  18. Mass-independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early Earth.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, J; Wing, B A; McKeegan, K D; Harris, J W; Cartigny, P; Thiemens, M H

    2002-12-20

    Populations of sulfide inclusions in diamonds from the Orapa kimberlite pipe in the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton, Botswana, preserve mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations. The data indicate that material was transferred from the atmosphere to the mantle in the Archean. The data also imply that sulfur is not well mixed in the diamond source regions, allowing for reconstruction of the Archean sulfur cycle and possibly offering insight into the nature of mantle convection through time. PMID:12493909

  19. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted.

  20. Sulfur isotopic composition of cenozoic seawater sulfate

    PubMed

    Paytan; Kastner; Campbell; Thiemens

    1998-11-20

    A continuous seawater sulfate sulfur isotope curve for the Cenozoic with a resolution of approximately 1 million years was generated using marine barite. The sulfur isotopic composition decreased from 19 to 17 per mil between 65 and 55 million years ago, increased abruptly from 17 to 22 per mil between 55 and 45 million years ago, remained nearly constant from 35 to approximately 2 million years ago, and has decreased by 0.8 per mil during the past 2 million years. A comparison between seawater sulfate and marine carbonate carbon isotope records reveals no clear systematic coupling between the sulfur and carbon cycles over one to several millions of years, indicating that changes in the burial rate of pyrite sulfur and organic carbon did not singularly control the atmospheric oxygen content over short time intervals in the Cenozoic. This finding has implications for the modeling of controls on atmospheric oxygen concentration.

  1. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted. PMID:26108794

  2. Sulfur Dioxide variability in the Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; Korablev, O.; Mahieux, A.; Wilquet, V.; Chamberlain, S.; Belayev, D.; Encrenaz, Th.; Esposito, L.; Jessup, K. L.; Lefèvre, F.; Limaye, S.; Marcq, E.; Mils, F.; Parkinson, C.; Sandor, B.; Stolzenbach, A.; Wilson, C.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of sulfur oxides (SO2, SO, OCS, and H2 SO4) in Venus' mesosphere have generated controversy and great interest in the scientific community. These observations revealed u nexpected spatial patterns and spatial/temporal variability that have not been satisfactorily explained by models. Particularly intriguing are the layer of enhanced gas-phase SO2 and SO in the upper mesosphere, and variability in the maximum observed SO2 a bundance and the equator -to-pole SO2 abundance gradient, seemingly on multi-year cycles, that is not uniquely linked to local time variations. Sulfur oxide chemistry on Venus is closely linked to the global-scale cloud and haze layers, which are composed primarily of concentrated sulfuric acid. Consequently, sulfur oxide observations provide important insight into the ongoing chemical evolution of Venus' atmosphere, atmospheric dynamics, and possible volcanism.

  3. Cathodic polarization of sulfur in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, A.I.; Dukhanin, G.P.; Morachevskii, A.G.; Simikov, I.A.

    1985-12-01

    As a continuation of studies on the electrochemical behavior of sulfur in molten salts, this paper reports work on the determination of lithium and potassium ion discharge potentials at a sulfur electrode during cathodic polarization in molten LiNO/sub 3/-LiNO/sub 2/-LiOH and LiNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ at 423/sup 0/K as well as in molten LiF-LiCl-LiI and LiC1-KC1 ay 650/sup 0/K. The studies were carried out by taking polarization curves in a pulsed galvanostatic mode using a three-electrode electrochemical cell. The sulfur electrode floating on the molten salt electrolyte contacted a 5-mm-diameter graphite rod that also touched the molten salt. The same patterns were observed for the cathodic polarization of sulfur in both halide and nitrate melts.

  4. Atmospheric influence of Earth's earliest sulfur cycle

    PubMed

    Farquhar; Bao; Thiemens

    2000-08-01

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures for delta(33)S, delta(34)S, and delta(36)S from sulfide and sulfate in Precambrian rocks indicate that a change occurred in the sulfur cycle between 2090 and 2450 million years ago (Ma). Before 2450 Ma, the cycle was influenced by gas-phase atmospheric reactions. These atmospheric reactions also played a role in determining the oxidation state of sulfur, implying that atmospheric oxygen partial pressures were low and that the roles of oxidative weathering and of microbial oxidation and reduction of sulfur were minimal. Atmospheric fractionation processes should be considered in the use of sulfur isotopes to study the onset and consequences of microbial fractionation processes in Earth's early history.

  5. Ceres: Sulfur deposits and graphitized carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Vilas, Faith; Li, Jian-Yang

    2016-09-01

    We report new results from observations of the dwarf planet Ceres using the Hubble Space Telescope in the spectral range 1160-5700 Å. Comparisons between Ceres' UV-visible spectra and laboratory measurements indicate that both sulfur species and graphitized carbon are important on Ceres' surface. We find a latitudinal gradient in UV absorption, with northern latitudes being more UV absorbing than southern latitudes, a trend that can be explained by increasing abundances of sulfur and SO2 toward northern latitudes. The presence of graphitized carbon is consistent with the surface of this airless body being carbonized in response to processes such as charged particle bombardment. The presence of volatile sulfur species is consistent with the idea that Ceres exhibits geothermal activity. Spectral differences with previous UV observations are likely due to the changing sulfurous and carbonaceous surface of Ceres.

  6. A Comparative Quantitative Proteomic Study Identifies New Proteins Relevant for Sulfur Oxidation in the Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    PubMed Central

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Sylvester, Marc; Kröninger, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the proteome response of Allochromatium vinosum when growing photoautotrophically in the presence of sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur with the proteome response when the organism was growing photoheterotrophically on malate. Applying tandem mass tag analysis as well as two-dimensional (2D) PAGE, we detected 1,955 of the 3,302 predicted proteins by identification of at least two peptides (59.2%) and quantified 1,848 of the identified proteins. Altered relative protein amounts (≥1.5-fold) were observed for 385 proteins, corresponding to 20.8% of the quantified A. vinosum proteome. A significant number of the proteins exhibiting strongly enhanced relative protein levels in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds are well documented essential players during oxidative sulfur metabolism, e.g., the dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrAB. Changes in protein levels generally matched those observed for the respective relative mRNA levels in a previous study and allowed identification of new genes/proteins participating in oxidative sulfur metabolism. One gene cluster (hyd; Alvin_2036-Alvin_2040) and one hypothetical protein (Alvin_2107) exhibiting strong responses on both the transcriptome and proteome levels were chosen for gene inactivation and phenotypic analyses of the respective mutant strains, which verified the importance of the so-called Isp hydrogenase supercomplex for efficient oxidation of sulfide and a crucial role of Alvin_2107 for the oxidation of sulfur stored in sulfur globules to sulfite. In addition, we analyzed the sulfur globule proteome and identified a new sulfur globule protein (SgpD; Alvin_2515). PMID:24487535

  7. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  8. Definition of Non-Conventional Sulfur Utilization in Western Kazakhstan for Sulfur Concrete (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, Paul

    2007-05-31

    Battelle received a contract from Agip-KCO, on behalf a consortium of international oil and gas companies with exploration rights in the North Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan. The objective of the work was to identify and help develop new techniques for sulfur concrete products from waste, by-product sulfur that will be generated in large quantitites as drilling operations begin in the near future. BNL has significant expertise in the development and use of sulfur concrete products and has direct experience collaborating with the Russian and Kazakh partners that participated. Feasibility testing was successfully conducted for a new process to produce cost-effective sulfur polymer cement that has broad commerical applications.

  9. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  10. Effects of variation of dietary sulfur on movement of sulfur in sheep rumen

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.; Bray, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of variations in dietary sulfur on rumen sulfur dynamics were studied under steady state conditions. In the first experimental period, three sheep were given 33.3 g of a pelleted diet hourly containing 1.59 g sulfur/kg (low) and in the second period the sulfur content was increased to 3.21 g/kg (high) by the addition of sodium sulfate. The daily sulfur intake was 1.158 g on the low sulfur diet and .545 g of this passed from the rumen in protein, .614 g was calculated to be absorbed from the rumen as sulfide, and .052 g was estimated to be recycled to the rumen. For sheep with daily intakes of 2.317 g sulfur, 1.212 g passed from the rumen in protein, 1.078 g was absorbed from the rumen, and .093 g was estimated to be recycled. It was estimated that 127 and 165 g microbial protein were synthesized/kg organic matter truly digested in the rumen for low and high sulfur diets, respectively. A simple model using simultaneous equations was proposed to describe rumen sulfur metabolism.

  11. Large fractions of CO2-fixing microorganisms in pristine limestone aquifers appear to be involved in the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrmann, Martina; Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Schulze, Isabel; Opitz, Sebastian; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The traditional view of the dependency of subsurface environments on surface-derived allochthonous carbon inputs is challenged by increasing evidence for the role of lithoautotrophy in aquifer carbon flow. We linked information on autotrophy (Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle) with that from total microbial community analysis in groundwater at two superimposed—upper and lower—limestone groundwater reservoirs (aquifers). Quantitative PCR revealed that up to 17% of the microbial population had the genetic potential to fix CO2 via the Calvin cycle, with abundances of cbbM and cbbL genes, encoding RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) forms I and II, ranging from 1.14 × 103 to 6 × 106 genes liter−1 over a 2-year period. The structure of the active microbial communities based on 16S rRNA transcripts differed between the two aquifers, with a larger fraction of heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic, soil-related groups in the oxygen-deficient upper aquifer. Most identified CO2-assimilating phylogenetic groups appeared to be involved in the oxidation of sulfur or nitrogen compounds and harbored both RubisCO forms I and II, allowing efficient CO2 fixation in environments with strong oxygen and CO2 fluctuations. The genera Sulfuricellaand Nitrosomonas were represented by read fractions of up to 78 and 33%, respectively, within the cbbM and cbbL transcript pool and accounted for 5.6 and 3.8% of 16S rRNA sequence reads, respectively, in the lower aquifer. Our results indicate that a large fraction of bacteria in pristine limestone aquifers has the genetic potential for autotrophic CO2 fixation, with energy most likely provided by the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

  12. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Concentration of Volatile Sulfur Compound in Mouth Air of a Group of Nigerian Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehizele, AO; Akhionbare, O

    2013-01-01

    Background: The major goal of non-surgical periodontal therapy is to reduce or eliminate the subgingival pathogenic microbial flora that is known to be associated with volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Aim: The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the concentration of VSC in mouth air of young adults. Subjects and Methods: Four hundred subjects, grouped into two based on the absence or presence of periodontal diseases, were involved in this study. Basic periodontal examination was used for the grouping. The measurement of the concentration of the VSC in the mouth air of the subjects was done objectively, using the Halimeter, before and after the therapy, and at recall visits 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Chi-square and Paired t-test were used to find statistical significance. Results: The results revealed that at baseline, 78.7% (48/61) of the subjects who had VSC concentration more than 250 parts per billion (ppb) were from the group with periodontal disease. Immediately after non-surgical periodontal therapy, only 8.5% (17/200) of the subjects with periodontal disease had VSC concentration of more than 250 ppb while all the subjects with no periodontal disease had VSC concentration less than 181 ppb. The same pattern of reduction in the concentration of the VSC and improvement in oral hygiene was also obtained 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Conclusion: It can be concluded that non-surgical periodontal therapy brought about reduction in the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air of young adults. PMID:24116328

  13. Large fractions of CO2-fixing microorganisms in pristine limestone aquifers appear to be involved in the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martina; Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Schulze, Isabel; Opitz, Sebastian; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-04-01

    The traditional view of the dependency of subsurface environments on surface-derived allochthonous carbon inputs is challenged by increasing evidence for the role of lithoautotrophy in aquifer carbon flow. We linked information on autotrophy (Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle) with that from total microbial community analysis in groundwater at two superimposed-upper and lower-limestone groundwater reservoirs (aquifers). Quantitative PCR revealed that up to 17% of the microbial population had the genetic potential to fix CO2 via the Calvin cycle, with abundances of cbbM and cbbL genes, encoding RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) forms I and II, ranging from 1.14 × 10(3) to 6 × 10(6) genes liter(-1) over a 2-year period. The structure of the active microbial communities based on 16S rRNA transcripts differed between the two aquifers, with a larger fraction of heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic, soil-related groups in the oxygen-deficient upper aquifer. Most identified CO2-assimilating phylogenetic groups appeared to be involved in the oxidation of sulfur or nitrogen compounds and harbored both RubisCO forms I and II, allowing efficient CO2 fixation in environments with strong oxygen and CO2 fluctuations. The genera Sulfuricella and Nitrosomonas were represented by read fractions of up to 78 and 33%, respectively, within the cbbM and cbbL transcript pool and accounted for 5.6 and 3.8% of 16S rRNA sequence reads, respectively, in the lower aquifer. Our results indicate that a large fraction of bacteria in pristine limestone aquifers has the genetic potential for autotrophic CO2 fixation, with energy most likely provided by the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

  14. Antioxidants countermeasures against sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, M

    2012-07-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent that persists as a serious menace from the viewpoint of acute and chronic toxicity, simple synthesis and no effective treatment currently being available. The two most deleterious basic molecular mechanisms in SM poisoning are: inflammation and over-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and the resulting DNA alkylation. Oxidative stress is the common consequence of these pathway activations. In the present review, the significance of oxidative stress in SM poisoning is discussed along with research on antioxidant therapy as a suitable antidote. The temporal dynamics of the redox imbalance, the antioxidant depletion and impact this has on tissues are described as the pathologies induced by SM. Special attention is paid to ameliorating the damage using low molecular weight antioxidants. Melatonin, epigallocatechin gallate and flavone derivatives, in particular, have been studied in recent experiments. The suitability of these antioxidants for therapy purposes is considered in a separate chapter. The review concludes with a view to the future and the studies needed on antioxidant therapy as a countermeasure to SM poisoning.

  15. Recovery of elemental sulfur from sour gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.

    1984-07-31

    Excess heat generated in a thermal reaction zone of a Claus sulfur recovery plant is used, by means of a high boiling point heat transfer medium, to reheat the Claus plant process stream prior to high temperature Claus catalytic conversion, and/or to regenerate Claus catalyst on which sulfur is deposited, or for other functions. In another aspect, low temperature Claus catalytic converters are operated at equivalent pressures during a cycle comprising an adsorption phase, a regeneration phase, and a cooling phase.

  16. Attachment of Thiobacillus thiooxidans to sulfur crystals.

    PubMed

    SCHAEFFER, W I; HOLBERT, P E; UMBREIT, W W

    1963-01-01

    Schaeffer, W. I. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), P. E. Holbert, and W. W. Umbreit. Attachment of Thiobacillus thiooxidans to sulfur crystals. J. Bacteriol. 85:137-140. 1963.-Electron micrographs of replicas of sulfur crystals before and after attack by Thiobacillus thiooxidans show that the microorganisms erode the crystal in the area immediately adjacent to the cell. When there are many cells, the entire crystal surface appears eroded.

  17. A Cable-Shaped Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-01-20

    A carbon nanostructured hybrid fiber is developed by integrating mesoporous carbon and graphene oxide into aligned carbon nanotubes. This hybrid fiber is used as a 1D cathode to fabricate a new cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery. The fiber cathode exhibits a decent specific capacity and lifespan, which makes the cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery rank far ahead of other fiber-shaped batteries.

  18. Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators

    DOEpatents

    Eller, Phillip G.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    1979-01-01

    Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

  19. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  20. World copper smelter sulfur balance-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, S.W. )

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the US Bureau of Mines initiated a contract to gather engineering, operating, and environmental cost data for 1988 for 30 major foreign primary copper smelters in market economy countries. Data were collected for 29 of the designated smelters together with information on applicable environmental regulations. Materials balance data obtained were used with available data for the eight US smelters to determine the approximate extent of copper smelter sulfur emission control in 1988. A broad characterization of the status of sulfur emission control regulation was made. The 37 US and foreign smelters represented roughly 73.2% of world and 89.3% of market economy primary copper production in 1988. The 29 non-US smelters attained 55.3% control of their input sulfur in 1988. Combined with the 90.4% control of US smelters, an aggregate 63.4% sulfur control existed. Roughly 1,951,100 mt of sulfur was emitted from the 37 market economy smelters in 1988. Identifiable SO[sub 2] control regulations covered 72.4% of the 29 foreign smelters, representing 65.5% of smelting capacity. Including US smelters, 78.4% of the major market economy smelters were regulated, representing 73.1% of smelting capacity. Significant changes since 1988 that may increase sulfur emission control are noted.

  1. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  2. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  3. Generation of Sulfur-rich, Sulfur-undersaturated Basaltic Melts in Oxidized Arc Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, P. J.; Luth, R. W.; Richards, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Although sulfur is a minor element in the Earth, it has a disproportionate impact because it commonly occurs as sulfide. Sulfides largely control the behavior of chalcophile (e.g., Cu, Ni) and highly siderophile elements (Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) that are of interest because either they are economically important or because they provide valuable information about geochemical processes. Island arc basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings and therefore, in these settings, sulfur maybe present not as sulfide but as sulfate. In addition to the impact on the behavior of chalcophile and siderophile elements, sulfur speciation as sulfate may have a role on the occurrence of sulfur-rich explosive volcanism, which has been linked to significant short-term variations in global climate. However, little is known about the range in oxygen fugacity for the transition from solubility as sulfide to solubility as sulfate. We used experimental data on the solubility of sulfur in basaltic melts saturated with either sulfide or sulfate at different oxygen fugacities to model this transition. Our model shows that the ten-fold increase in the solubility of sulfur (from 0.14 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%) observed experimentally occurs at oxygen fugacities between ˜FMQ+1 and ˜FMQ+2, conditions under which many arc magmas are thought to be generated. The increase in the solubility of sulfur with increasing oxygen fugacity implies that in oxidized arc sources very low degrees of partial melting are sufficient to generate basaltic melts that are simultaneously sulfur-rich and sulfur-undersaturated. In the absence of sulfides, oxides and metallic alloys may influence the behavior of some (but not all) the highly siderophile elements whereas the chalcophile and some siderophile elements become incompatible. As a consequence, melting of oxidized sources in which sulfides are not stable would favor incorporation of metals such as Cu, Ni, Au and Pd in the melts and

  4. Volcanogenic Sulfur on Earth and Io: Composition and Spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, J.S.; Delmelle, P.; Nash, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    The causes of Io's variegated surface, especially the roles of sulfur, and the geochemical history of sulfur compounds on Io are not well understood. Suspecting that minor impurities in sulfur might be important, we have investigated the major and trace element chemistry and spectroscopic reflectance of natural sulfur from a variety of terrestrial volcanic-hydrothermal environments. Evidence suggests that Io may be substantially coated with impure sulfur. On Earth, a few tenths of a percent to a few percent of chalcophile trace elements (e.g., As and Se) comonly occur in sulfur and appear to stabilize material of yellow, brown, orange, and red hues, which may persist even at low temperatures. Percentage levels of chalcophile impurities are reasonably expected to occur on Io in vapor sublimate deposits and flows derived from such deposits. Such impurities join a host of other mechanisms that might explain Io's reds and yellows. Two-tenths to two percent opaque crystalline impurities, particularly pyrite (FeS2), commonly produces green, gray, and black volcanic sulfur on Earth and might explain areas of Io having deposits of these colors. Pyrite produces a broad absorption near 1 ??m that gradually diminishes out to 1.6 ??m - similar but not identical to the spectrum of Io seen in Galileo NIMS data. Percentage amounts of carbonaceous impurities and tens of percent SiO2 (as silicates) also strongly affect the spectral properties of Earth's sulfur. Io's broad absorption between 0.52 and 0.64 ??m remains unexplained by these data but could be due to sodium sulfides, as suggested previously by others, or to As, Se, or other impurities. These impurities and others, such as P and Cl (which could exist on Io's surface in amounts over 1% that of sulfur), greatly alter the molecular structure of molten and solid sulfur. Minor impurities could impact Io's geology, such as the morphology of sulfur lava flows and the ability of sulfur to sustain high relief. We have not found

  5. Identification of control parameters for the sulfur gas storability with bag sampling methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air samples containing sulfur compounds are often collected and stored in sample bags prior to analyses. The storage stability of six gaseous sulfur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, DMS, CS2, DMDS and SO2) was compared between two different bag materials (polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and polyester aluminum (PEA))...

  6. Process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal sulfide sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.; Gal, Eli

    1995-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal-sulfur compound. Spent metal-sulfur compound is regenerated to re-usable metal oxide by moving a bed of spent metal-sulfur compound progressively through a single regeneration vessel having a first and second regeneration stage and a third cooling and purging stage. The regeneration is carried out and elemental sulfur is generated in the first stage by introducing a first gas of sulfur dioxide which contains oxygen at a concentration less than the stoichiometric amount required for complete oxidation of the spent metal-sulfur compound. A second gas containing sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen at a concentration sufficient for complete oxidation of the partially spent metal-sulfur compound, is introduced into the second regeneration stage. Gaseous sulfur formed in the first regeneration stage is removed prior to introducing the second gas into the second regeneration stage. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the third cooling and purging stage. Except for the gaseous sulfur removed from the first stage, the combined gases derived from the regeneration stages which are generally rich in sulfur dioxide and lean in oxygen, are removed from the regenerator as an off-gas and recycled as the first and second gas into the regenerator. Oxygen concentration is controlled by adding air, oxygen-enriched air or pure oxygen to the recycled off-gas.

  7. Metal-Sulfur Battery Cathodes Based on PAN-Sulfur Composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hendrickson, Kenville E; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-09-23

    Sulfur/polyacrylonitrile composites provide a promising route toward cathode materials that overcome multiple, stubborn technical barriers to high-energy, rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. Using a facile thermal synthesis procedure in which sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are the only reactants, we create a family of sulfur/PAN (SPAN) nanocomposites in which sulfur is maintained as S3/S2 during all stages of the redox process. By entrapping these smaller molecular sulfur species in the cathode through covalent bonding to and physical confinement in a conductive host, these materials are shown to completely eliminate polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium anode and sulfur cathode. We also show that, in the absence of any of the usual salt additives required to stabilize the anode in traditional Li-S cells, Li-SPAN cells cycle trouble free and at high Coulombic efficiencies in simple carbonate electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the SPAN cathodes at various stages of charge and discharge further show a full and reversible reduction and oxidation between elemental sulfur and Li-ions in the electrolyte to produce Li2S as the only discharge product over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge at fixed current densities. PMID:26325146

  8. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  9. COULOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TOTAL SULFUR AND REDUCED INORGANIC SULFUR FRACTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the solid-phase partitioning of sulfur is frequently an important analytical component of risk assessments at hazardous waste sites because minerals containing reduced-sulfur can significantly affect the transport and fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in na...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  14. Metal-Sulfur Battery Cathodes Based on PAN-Sulfur Composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hendrickson, Kenville E; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-09-23

    Sulfur/polyacrylonitrile composites provide a promising route toward cathode materials that overcome multiple, stubborn technical barriers to high-energy, rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. Using a facile thermal synthesis procedure in which sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are the only reactants, we create a family of sulfur/PAN (SPAN) nanocomposites in which sulfur is maintained as S3/S2 during all stages of the redox process. By entrapping these smaller molecular sulfur species in the cathode through covalent bonding to and physical confinement in a conductive host, these materials are shown to completely eliminate polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium anode and sulfur cathode. We also show that, in the absence of any of the usual salt additives required to stabilize the anode in traditional Li-S cells, Li-SPAN cells cycle trouble free and at high Coulombic efficiencies in simple carbonate electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the SPAN cathodes at various stages of charge and discharge further show a full and reversible reduction and oxidation between elemental sulfur and Li-ions in the electrolyte to produce Li2S as the only discharge product over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge at fixed current densities.

  15. Infiltrating sulfur into a highly porous carbon sphere as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A highly porous carbon (HPC) with regular spherical morphology was synthesized. • Sulfur/HPC composites were prepared by melt–diffusion method. • Sulfur/HPC composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life. - Abstract: Sulfur composite material with a highly porous carbon sphere as the conducting container was prepared. The highly porous carbon sphere was easily synthesized with resorcinol–formaldehyde precursor as the carbon source. The morphology of the carbon was observed with field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, which showed a well-defined spherical shape. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis indicated that it possesses a high specific surface area of 1563 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume of 2.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} with a bimodal pore size distribution, which allow high sulfur loading and easy transportation of lithium ions. Sulfur carbon composites with varied sulfur contents were prepared by melt–diffusion method and lithium sulfur cells with the sulfur composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life.

  16. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the reduction of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Dethiosulfovibrio spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, A. V.; Böttcher, M. E.; Kuever, J.

    2009-04-01

    Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur are typical by-products of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide and important sulfur intermediates in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of natural sediments where they can be further transformed by microbial or chemical oxidation, reduction, or disproportionation. Due to the often superimposing reaction pathways of the sulfur intermediates in natural environments specific tracers are needed to better resolve the complex microbial and biogeochemical reactions. An important fingerprint for sulfur cycling is provided by the microbial fractionation of the stable sulfur isotopes S-34 and S-32. Proper interpretation of isotope signals in nature, however, is only possible by the calibration with results obtained with pure cultures under defined experimental conditions. In addition, sulfur isotope discrimination may provide informations about specific encymatic biochemical pathways within the bacterial cells. In this study, we report the results for the discrimination of stable sulfur isotopes S-32 and S-34 during reduction of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur by non-sulfate, but sulfur- and thiosulfate-reducing bacteria which are phylogenetically not related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Experiments with were conducted at known cell-specific thiosulfate reduction rates. Stable sulfur isotope fractionation was investigated during reduction of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur at 28°C by growing batch cultures of Dethiosulfovibrio marinus WS100 (type strain DSM 12537) and Dethiosulfovibrio russensis (type strain DSM 12538) using citrate as carbon and energy source. The cell-specific reduction rates were 0.3 to 2.4 fmol cell-1 d-1 (thiosulfate) and 31 to 38 fmol cell-1 d-1 (elemental sulphur), respectively. The sulfide produced was depleted in S-34 by 12 per mil compared to total thiosulfate sulfur, close to previous results observed for sulfate-reducing bacteria, indicating that the thiosulfate-reducing mechanism of sulfate reducers is similar to

  17. Workshop on sulfur chemistry in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.E. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The Flue Gas Desulfurization Workshop was held at Morgantown, West Virginia, June 7-8, 1979. The presentations dealt with the chemistry of sulfur and calcium compounds in scrubbers. DOE and EPRI programs in this area are described. Ten papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  18. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  19. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  20. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.